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Keyword dermatologists in glasgow
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TitleDermatology in Glasgow | Dermatologist Near Me
Urlhttps://www.sknclinics.co.uk/dermatologist-in-glasgow
DescriptionImprove the health & appearance of your skin with our range of dermatological procedures at your local sk:n clinic in Glasgow
Date
Organic Position2
H1Dermatology in Glasgow
H2Your Trusted Dermatology Clinic in Glasgow
Frequently Asked Questions
See all our clinics in Glasgow
H3The sk:n Glasgow Medical Team
Arrange your consultation
H2WithAnchorsYour Trusted Dermatology Clinic in Glasgow
Frequently Asked Questions
See all our clinics in Glasgow
BodyDermatology in Glasgow Visit our state of the art facility in Glasgow Dermatology Medical Director in your local clinic Located between Glasgow Central and Queen Street Station Arrange a Consultation Your Trusted Dermatology Clinic in Glasgow . We employ some of the UK’s most skilled dermatology experts. Book a consultation at our dedicated expert skin clinic in Glasgow. The sk:n Glasgow Medical Team . sk:n is home to more consultant dermatologists, doctors, plastic surgeons, nurses and therapists, than any other UK dermatology service provider. The sk:n team in Glasgow will ensure that your visit to the clinic is truly worthwhile: at sk:n we are passionate about helping you discover better skin. So, whether you suffer from acne, unwanted facial hair, regret an old tattoo, or simply just want to freshen up your complexion – we have the most effective treatments on the market to help you achieve the results you long for. Kahlil Al-Nakib Kahlil Al-Nakib . Doctor David McGill David McGill . Doctor Julia Einwachter-Thompson Julia Einwachter-Thompson . Dermatologist Cormac Convery Cormac Convery . Doctor Jim McCaul Jim McCaul . Professor Adam Gilmour Adam Gilmour . Consultant Plastic Surgeon Daron Seukeran Daron Seukeran . Group Medical Director Range of Dermatology treatments available Medical Director  in every clinic Consultations from £100 25 year long partnership with the NHS UK’s leading Doctors and Dermatologists  Frequently Asked Questions . Will The Conditions Return? . Close Icon Downtime is minimal and the benefits of your treatment will be noticed instantly. Are Verrucas Contagious? . Close Icon Yes, verrucae are contagious and can easily be spread in areas where people often have bare feet, such as at public swimming pools. Are Minor Skin Procedures Safe? . Close Icon All of our procedures are carried out in highly clinical, sterilised operating rooms by doctors with many years’ experience following strict medical protocols. This means you can rest assured the procedure are very safe. Does Wart and Verruca Treatment Hurt? . Close Icon The level of comfort depends on the removal technique recommended. Laser Removal is virtually pain free. In more sensitive areas, it is described as feeling like the flick of an elastic band. For Excision Removal and Cryotherapy, the area will be numbed with a local anaesthetic so you won’t feel anything. After treatment the skin left behind may be tender for a few days and will need to be covered. It’s also best to use a strong sunscreen on the area for six months, as it will be more sensitive to sunlight. Are Moles Dangerous? . Close Icon Most moles are harmless. However, sometimes they can develop into a form of skin cancer called malignant melanoma. If you notice new moles or existing moles that have changed shape, colour, size, height, or if they become irritated or start bleeding, then it’s important you go to your GP immediately to get them checked and removed if necessary.  How Do You Catch Verruca? . Close Icon Verrucas are easily contracted through direct contact from a verruca to healthy skin. It is also possible to develop a verruca through contact with objects that have been touched by the infected skin, such as towels, shoes and socks. As verrucae are contagious, the best prevention is to treat them as soon as possible to avoid them spreading. Is birthmark removal painful?   . Close Icon Some patients with sensitive skin worry that this will be a problem, but with the use of anaesthetic cream, almost anyone can comfortably undergo laser therapy to remove unwanted birthmarks. In more sensitive areas, birthmark removal is described as feeling like the flick of an elastic band. You may experience some redness and bruising in the area following treatment, but once this subsides you will see a permanent fading of your birthmark. Is birthmark removal safe? . Close Icon Birthmark removal at sk:n is completely safe and is only carried out by medical doctors in clinical environments. We work to strict protocols and have access to some of the UK’s leading doctors and dermatologists. The laser energy is selectively targeted to the faulty blood vessels or built-up pigment cells only, meaning that surrounding tissues are not affected and there is no lasting damage to the skin. Lasers have been used to remove birthmarks for years, and we will ensure that the laser settings are safe and effective for your skin. What Is A Mole? . Close Icon A common mole is a coloured spot on the skin that develops when pigment cells (melanocytes) grow in clusters. The medical term for moles is melanocytic naevi and most adults usually have between 10 and 40 on their body. Although common moles may be present at birth, they usually appear later in childhood and increase during teenage years. During pregnancy moles often get darker and they can fade away completely from around the age of 50. How can I remove my acne scars? . Close Icon Acne scars can be stubborn and seemingly permanent, but there are proven effective treatments available to diminish the appearance of acne scarring (see ‘Treatments for acne scarring’ above). The best treatment for your skin will depend on the type of acne scarring you have. Before you undergo any treatment, a dermatologist or skin expert should assess your acne scars and select the most appropriate treatment for you. What Happens After Skin Tag Removal? . Close Icon There will be a small white scar where the skin tag has been removed. Other than that, complications are rare and you can go home as soon as your anaesthetic wears off. What Results Will I See From Skin Tag Removal? . Close Icon The treatment will completely remove your skin tag; however there will be a small white scar where the removal took place. Arrange your consultation . One of our friendly sk:n advisors will contact you to answer your questions, and get you started on your journey to better skin. Qualified and regulated medical experts An NHS Partner organisation Rated excellent by our clients on Trustpilot Strict safety measures in place Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. You need Javascript enabled to view this form. Please enable/update Javascript, or alternatively get in touch with our friendly team on 03301624460 See all our clinics in Glasgow . Glasgow Gordon Street Opening Times Monday 10:00 - 20:00 Tuesday 10:00 - 20:00 Wednesday 10:00 - 21:00 Thursday 10:00 - 21:00 Friday 09:00 - 18:00 Saturday 09:00 - 18:00 Sunday 10:00 - 17:00 Clinic Address 48/50 Gordon Street, Glasgow, G1 3PU Telephone 0141 406 7756 Finding Us You’ll find us at 50 Gordon Street in the heart of the city centre, a one minute walk from Grand Central Station or a 7 minute walk from Queen Street Station. With excellent transport links: the closest bus stops are Drury Street and Central Station, and the nearest car parking is available at NCP Glasgow Mitchell Street or Buchanan Galleries Car Park. We look forward to seeing you soon! View Clinic View More Clinics Conditions Acne Age Spots Blackheads Face Problems Moles Pigmentation All Conditions Treatments Acne Treatments Dermatology Hydrafacial Laser Hair Removal Laser Tattoo Removal Microneedling Rejuvenation Skin Cancer Services All Treatments Find a Clinic London The Midlands & Wales The North & Scotland The South Pricing Special Offers Pricing Interest Free Credit Refer a Friend Shop Shop By Brand Sk:n Medik8 R-Retinoate® by Medik8 SkinCeuticals Heliocare PRIORI RevitaLash The Organic Pharmacy Vitage Epionce Brush On Block Kelo-Cote Shop By Condition Acne/Problem Prone Keratosis Pilaris Pigmentation Rosacea Stretch Marks Shop By Product Type Hydrators Moisturisers/Cream Serums And Gels Enhancement Face Masks Hand And Body Creams Exfoliators Hair Care Make Up And Tanning Sets / Gift Ideas Sunscreen Post Procedure Cleansers Shop By Skin Type Dry Normal Combination Oily Anti-Ageing / Mature Sensitive About Expert Medical Team Contact Us Reviews Aftercare & Support Covid-19 Blog Manage My Bookings Book Online Close Icon My Bag, 0 Items Close Icon No products in the basket. We use cookies to improve your browsing experience. By continuing, you agree to receive cookies on our website. Find out more.
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Result 3
TitlePrivate Dermatology Services in Glasgow | Ross Hall Hospital
Urlhttps://www.bmihealthcare.co.uk/hospitals/bmi-ross-hall-hospital/dermatology
DescriptionOur expert consultant dermatologists in Glasgow have access to cutting-edge technology and advanced facilities to diagnose and treat a wide range of skin ...
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Title5 Best Dermatologists in Glasgow
Urlhttps://kevsbest.co.uk/best-dermatologists-glasgow/
DescriptionGlasgow's top rated Dermatologists. List of the best Dermatologists in Glasgow: Professor David Burden, Dr Girish Gupta, Dr Robert Herd, Dr Robert Herd, Dr Nicholas Wainwright
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H15 Best Dermatologists in Glasgow
H2Glasgow’s Best Dermatologists:
H3Professor David Burden
Dr Girish Gupta
Dr Robert Herd
Dr Nicholas Wainwright
Sk:n
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ABOUT US
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H2WithAnchorsGlasgow’s Best Dermatologists:
Body5 Best Dermatologists in Glasgow Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Below is a list of the top and leading Dermatologists in Glasgow. To help you find the best Dermatologists located near you in Glasgow, we put together our own list based on this rating points list. Contents hide Glasgow’s Best Dermatologists: Professor David Burden Dr Girish Gupta Dr Robert Herd Dr Nicholas Wainwright Sk:n Glasgow’s Best Dermatologists:. The top rated Dermatologists in Glasgow are: Professor David Burden – has published over 150 scientific papers in major medical journals and international dermatology textbooks over the past 25 years Dr Girish Gupta – has been an invited speaker at international dermatology meetings in Europe, North America and Asia Dr Robert Herd – leading specialists in the practice of Mohs micrographic surgery Dr Nicholas Wainwright – a member of the British Photodermatology Group Sk:n – has a 25-year long partnership with the NHS Professor David Burden. Professor David Burden is a consultant dermatologist that specialises in adult dermatology and provides treatment on different skin conditions like cancer, acne, psoriasis and eczema. Fully involved in all research and studies concerning inflammatory skin diseases, he works in finding the latest treatment technology to address the different skin diseases and conditions that a patient has. He is currently affiliated with Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital and Spire Murrayfield Hospital in Edinburgh and is currently accepting new and existing patients. He is open for both personal and phone and video consultation for the convenience and comfort of his patients. Personable and thorough, you will be worry-less with his guidance and care. Products/Services: Malignant Skin Cancer Excision, Acne, Psoriasis LOCATION: Address: Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital 25 Beaconsfield Road GLASGOW G12 0PJ Phone: 141 530 5946 Website: www.finder.bupa.co.uk/professor_david_burden REVIEWS: “Really impressed.” – Alexa Laney Dr Girish Gupta. Dr Girish Gupta specialises in the management of skin cancer and currently providing a full and comprehensive programme that focuses on both surgical and medical dermatology. With his wealth of experience in the field, he has been extending assistance in helping manage skin cancer, offer mole screening and provides topical therapy pre-cancerous skin conditions. He has been continuously studying the different aspect of dermatology to find the latest treatment and medical method that can help manage and treat different skin conditions and diseases. He is holding private clinics in both Glasgow and Edinburgh and is connected with Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital, BMI Ross Hall Hospital and The Edinburgh Clinic. A reliable and efficient doctor, he takes time to check the condition of his patients, discuss possible treatment and help them fully manage their conditions, putting their minds at ease. For expert assistance on any skin condition concerns, do not hesitate to contact his clinic to schedule an appointment and let him provide you with the best service that you can ever imagine. Products/Services: Skin Cancer Management, Mole and Lesion Assessment LOCATION: Address: Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital, 25 Beaconsfield Road GLASGOW G12 0PJ Phone: 080 061 6267 Website: www.skinhealthscotland.com/dr-girish-gupta REVIEWS: “In my experience, I found Dr Girish to be very professional and was able to put your mind at ease. Would highly recommend.” – Review from www.doctify.com Dr Robert Herd. Dr Robert Herd offers comprehensive treatment and dermatological services on the different spectrum of dermatology including general dermatology and skin cancer. From general rashes, acne, rosacea, eczema, psoriasis, urticaria and skin infections to complex issues like melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma, he can definitely diagnose well your condition and offer the most appropriate treatment to help manage the skin conditions that you have. A pioneering doctor when it comes to Mohs micrographic surgery, he set-up the West of Scotland Mohs micrographic surgery service in Glasgow. Some of the treatment that he offers also includes excision biopsy, shave biopsy, curettage and cautery, laser surgery, hedgehog pathway inhibitors and botox for hyperhidrosis to name a few. A well-established doctor in the field, you can certainly entrust your condition to him for the best treatment that he can deliver. For any dermatological issues, do not hesitate to tap in his service and get the best help and management that only he can give. Products/Services: General Dermatology, Skin Cancer, Practical Procedures LOCATION: Address: BMI Ross Hall Hospital, 221 Crookston Road GLASGOW G52 3NQ Phone: 141 810 3151 Website: www.drrobertherd.co.uk REVIEWS: “I had just been told after attending the Mole Clinic at my local pharmacy that I could potentially have a melanoma on my right leg. Obviously, I was very worried and upset by this and when I met Dr Herd he did his best to try and reassure me. The mole was removed and after a few anxious weeks, my results came back fine. I have since seen Dr Herd on a regular basis over the years for annual skin check-ups and I find that his calming and friendly manner gives me peace of mind.” – SB, Inverkip Dr Nicholas Wainwright. Dr Nicholas Wainwright is an expert clinician that is currently holding a private clinic in BMI Ross Hall Hospital in Glasgow. He provides dermatology consultation to check the condition of the patients, analyse their skin issue and provide the best help and treatment that will suit the needs of his patients. He works on various dermatological concerns like moles, acne, rosacea, warts, dermatoses, eczema, skin allergy and skin cancer. He has a special interest in Photodermatology and Phototherapy and is continuously seeking advancement to possibly using UV and visible lights in treating different skin conditions. For any concerns regarding any skin conditions, do not hesitate to seek assistance from his clinic to get the best assessment and treatment that would effectively manage the condition that you have. Patient-centred, he is dedicated to providing the best cure for your ultimate wellness and wellbeing. Products/Services: Skin Cancer, Moles, Photodermatology, Sun Damage, Eczema, Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Skin Allergy, Urticaria, Dermatoses, Acne, Rosacea, Warts LOCATION: Address: Glasgow Nuffield Hospital 25 Beaconsfield Road Glasgow G12 0PJ Phone: 141 334 9441 Website: www.finder.bupa.co.uk/dr_nicholas_wainwright REVIEWS: “Good doctor listened to my issue and provide the best solution.” – Kianne Marsh Sk:n. Sk:n is a premier skin clinic that offers different dermatological services to all its clients. They specialise in the diagnosis and treatment of all skin conditions including acne, acne scarring, age spots, blackheads, crow’s feet, dull skin, forehead lines, excess sweating, ingrowing hair and many others. They provide services and treatments that include removal and rejuvenation of your skin. One of the leading skin care clinic in the UK, they have more than 50 clinics across the country so you can always find one that is near your place. Their consultation fee starts at £100 and the rate may vary depending on the treatment that you will have. They are open from 10 AM to 8 PM on Mondays and Tuesdays, from 10 AM to 9 PM on Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 9 AM to 6 PM on Friday and Saturday and from 10 Am to 5 PM on Sundays so do not hesitate to schedule a visit and get the treatment that you will need. Products/Services: Acne Treatments, Dermatology, Facial Thread Veins, Milia Removal, Mole Removal, Laser Tattoo Removal, Wart & Verruca Removal LOCATION: Address: 48/50 Gordon Street, Glasgow, G1 3PU Phone: 141 406 7756 Website: www.sknclinics.co.uk REVIEWS: “Friendly service, professional approach from all members of staff. The Doctor made me feel at ease by explaining the procedure and aftercare well. The laser mole removal procedure was quick and painless. Overall, very good experience!” – Atanaska Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLES. Glasgow 5 Best Furniture in Glasgow. Glasgow 5 Best Nightclubs in Glasgow. Glasgow 5 Best Wedding Photographer in Glasgow. - Advertisment - Most Popular. Get Back on the Road with Driver Medicals from Vital Medicals. London Travel Guide – Fahim Imam-Sadeque Shares What You Should Know Before You Go. 6 Best Emergency Electricians in London. 3 Best Gift Shops in the UK. Load more ABOUT US. Kev's Best is an international rating business, we always put trust and quality at the first place. We review businesses, products and services in the United Kingdom. FOLLOW US. FacebookLinkedinPinterestTwitter © Kev's Best Privacy Policy Terms & Condition Disclaimer Conatct Us Posting.... We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it.Ok
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Result 6
TitleProfessor David Burden, Dermatology | Nuffield Health
Urlhttps://www.nuffieldhealth.com/consultants/professor-david-burden
DescriptionProfessor David Burden is a Consultant Dermatologist at Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital
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H1Professor David Burden
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BodyProfessor David Burden Qualifications . BSc (Hons), MB ChB, DTMH, MD (Gold medal), FRCP GMC number: 3174755 Practicing since: 1987 Specialties . Dermatology Consultation times . Tuesday First Friday of the month Overview Overview Enquire now 0800 616 267 Back to top Enquire now Or call us on 0800 616 267 About. Professor David Burden graduated from the University of Manchester Medical School in 1987 and then trained in Glasgow, Manchester, Birmingham and Toronto. In 1999 he was appointed Consultant Dermatologist to the Western Infirmary in Glasgow and also the Royal Hospital for Sick Children at Yorkhill. He specialises in many areas of dermatology including skin cancer, mole mapping and inflammatory skin disease. Treatments and tests offered by Professor David Burden at Nuffield Health. Skin surgery Mole removal Dermatological surgery Mole mapping Mole assessment Excision of skin lesion Locations Professor David Burden works with. List view Map view Glasgow   25 Beaconsfield Road, Glasgow, G12 0PJ 0141 334 9441 CQC Overall rating Scottish hospitals not rated by the CQC   View details View more Related experience. Memberships. Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Ireland International Psoriasis Council International Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians British Association of Dermatologists Scottish Dermatological Society Other posts held. Consultant Dermatologist, Western Infirmary Glasgow Honorary Professor, University of Glasgow Insurers Professor David Burden works with. Professor David Burden works with the following private medical insurance providers: Aviva Health AXA PPP Healthcare AXA PPP International Benenden Health Bupa Bupa On Demand Cigna CS Healthcare Simplyhealth Vitality Health (Pru Health) WPA Declaration. Professor David Burden does not hold a share or financial interest in this hospital, another Nuffield Health hospital or the company. Professor David Burden does not have a share or financial interest in equipment used at this hospital or another Nuffield Health hospital. Professor David Burden does not hold any paid advisory role(s) at this hospital or on behalf of Nuffield Health. About us Media centre Contact us Careers Terms and conditions Privacy policy © 2022 Nuffield Health
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  • david burden
  • 9
  • 6
  • david
  • 9
  • 6
  • burden
  • 9
  • 6
  • health
  • 9
  • 6
  • hospital
  • 7
  • 6
  • glasgow
  • 6
  • 6
  • nuffield health
  • 5
  • 6
  • nuffield
  • 5
  • 6
  • skin
  • 4
  • 6
  • mole
  • 4
  • 6
  • view
  • 4
  • 6
  • david burden work
  • 3
  • 6
  • burden work
  • 3
  • 6
  • dermatology
  • 3
  • 6
  • dermatologist
  • 3
  • 6
  • work
  • 3
  • 6
  • international
  • 3
  • 6
Result 7
TitleGlasgow Skin Cancer Specialist | Dr Robert Herd Dermatology
Urlhttp://www.drrobertherd.co.uk/
DescriptionDr Robert Herd is Scotland's leading consultant dermatologist based at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow specialising in general dermatology and skin cancer
Date
Organic Position7
H1Scotland's leading consultant dermatologist and skin cancer specialist
H2
H3Dr Robert Herd is a Consultant Dermatologist based at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow. He has expertise in general dermatology and skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma is the commonest cancer and can be removed by the gold standard method, Mohs’ Micrographic surgery. Simple procedures such as excision biopsy, cryotherapy and laser therapy are also offered. Mole screening can be performed. You can keep up to date with the talking points section.
H2WithAnchors
BodyScotland's leading consultant dermatologist and skin cancer specialist. Find the treatment for you Scotland's leading consultant dermatologist and skin cancer specialist. Keeping you safe and in the know Dr Robert Herd is a Consultant Dermatologist based at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow. He has expertise in general dermatology and skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma is the commonest cancer and can be removed by the gold standard method, Mohs’ Micrographic surgery. Simple procedures such as excision biopsy, cryotherapy and laser therapy are also offered. Mole screening can be performed. You can keep up to date with the talking points section. . General Dermatology. Skin Cancer. Procedures Offered. Book Your Appointment. Over 10,000 cases of skin cancer per year in Scotland. Don't become a number. Call now on 0141 810 3151 or email I had just been told after attending the Mole Clinic at my local pharmacy that I could potentially have a melanoma on my right leg. Obviously I was very worried and upset by this and when I met Dr. Herd he did his best to try and reassure me. The mole was removed and after a few anxious weeks my results came back fine. I have since seen Dr. Herd on a regular basis over the years for annual skin check ups and I find that his calming and friendly manner gives me peace of mind. Dr Robert Herd MSc, MD, FRCP(Edin) 221 Crookston Road, GlasgowScotland G52 3NQ 0141 810 3151 Email Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy | Website by BBD Creative
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • skin
  • 6
  • 7
  • cancer
  • 6
  • 7
  • skin cancer
  • 5
  • 7
  • dr
  • 4
  • 7
  • herd
  • 4
  • 7
  • consultant dermatologist
  • 3
  • 7
  • scotland
  • 3
  • 7
  • consultant
  • 3
  • 7
  • dermatologist
  • 3
  • 7
  • mole
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
TitleNHSGGC : Dermatology
Urlhttps://www.nhsggc.org.uk/services/dermatology/
Description
Date17 Apr 2019
Organic Position8
H1NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyNHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Home Patients & Visitors Where to go to find out about visiting hospital as a patient or a visitor, or find your local services, transportation and all NHSGGC services. Hospitals Our main hospital sites. Search all our facilities Search/View all of our locations and facilities. Information for Patients What to expect, treatment, care, travel, rights and responsibilities. Hospital visiting - Updated 09/09 Latest visiting information. Know who to turn to For everyday ailments, minor injuries or serious emergencies. Patient Feedback What's your experience of using our hospitals and services? About Us NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde is the largest health board in the UK. We provide healthcare to over 1.2 million people and employ around 38,000 staff. Get In Touch / Get Involved Tell us your experience of our services, have your say, and more. Inform, Engage and Consult Help shape your hospital and community services. Health News Health News - Rounding up all the latest news within NHSGGC. NHS Board Board Members, meetings and reports and finances. Freedom Of Information (FOI) Advice and guidance on Freedom of Information. Media Centre Press Office, latest news and media resources. Publications Library Browse all our publications. Professional Support Sites Services for staff and professionals Our performance Our quality commitment is to ensure that you receive the best health care possible today and that you are fully involved in the future of your health service. Celebrating Success Showcasing staff and achievements. Quality  Our Quality Commitment. Working With Our Patients Working with our patients. Your Health Find out about latest health advice and campaigns, how to look after your own health and your family's wellbeing. Know who to turn to For everyday ailments, minor injuries or serious emergencies. Health Services Our featured health services. Public Health Health protection, screening, services, improvement and more. Infection Prevention and Control Latest guidance, policies and reports. Equalities in Health Information for patients and service users, and support for staff. Healthy Living For everyday healthy living advice and services information. Working With Us Whether you're seeking career advice, looking for a job, or already work with us, you'll find everything you need right here. HR Connect All your HR needs under one umbrella. The Recruitment Service Vacancies, career advice, job packs, Modern Apprenticeships and more. Staff Communications Already working with us? Find out all you need to know! Work Experience Work experience and study placements. Staff Health Making NHSGGC a healthier place to work. For NHSGGC Staff Latest COVID-19 guidance and vaccination info. COVID-19 (Coronavirus info) Information and guidance for public, NHSGGC staff, and community-based services.  Hospital visiting restrictions now in place. Home > Services > Dermatology Previous Next Dermatology Dermatology Service This service is available at the following locations Port Glasgow Health Centre Glasgow Royal Infirmary Inverclyde Royal Hospital Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Glasgow Stobhill Hospital (New) West Glasgow Ambulatory Care Hospital Coronavirus (COVID-19) Guidance Last Updated: 17 April 2019 Get in touch / Get Involved Help / FAQs Sitemap Copyright 2022 NHSGGC Hospitals & Community Hospitals All Locations Know who to turn to Services Directory Contacts & Resources Get In Touch Press Team FOI Requests Twitter Facebook YouTube Flickr About this website About this website Accessibility Cookie information Privacy, Terms & Conditions Sitemap Partners Health and Social Care Partnerships Health Scotland NHS 24 NHS Inform Organ Donation Scotland Scotblood Yes PleaseNo thanks / already do
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • service
  • 18
  • 8
  • health
  • 17
  • 8
  • hospital
  • 13
  • 8
  • information
  • 8
  • 8
  • staff
  • 8
  • 8
  • patient
  • 7
  • 8
  • glasgow
  • 6
  • 8
  • nhsggc
  • 6
  • 8
  • latest
  • 6
  • 8
  • nh
  • 5
  • 8
  • find
  • 5
  • 8
  • advice
  • 5
  • 8
  • guidance
  • 5
  • 8
  • visiting
  • 4
  • 8
  • care
  • 4
  • 8
  • experience
  • 4
  • 8
  • news
  • 4
  • 8
  • working
  • 4
  • 8
  • work
  • 4
  • 8
  • health service
  • 3
  • 8
  • covid 19
  • 3
  • 8
  • location
  • 3
  • 8
  • turn
  • 3
  • 8
  • everyday
  • 3
  • 8
  • board
  • 3
  • 8
  • touch
  • 3
  • 8
  • involved
  • 3
  • 8
  • community
  • 3
  • 8
  • quality
  • 3
  • 8
  • covid
  • 3
  • 8
  • 19
  • 3
  • 8
  • dermatology
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleBest Dermatologists in Glasgow 2022 | Doctify
Urlhttps://www.doctify.com/uk/find/dermatology/glasgow/specialists
DescriptionFind the best Dermatologists in Glasgow, UK. Read verified patient reviews, and book an in-person appointment or a video consultation online instantly
Date
Organic Position9
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Bodyttps://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-K73CL79" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden">Javascript is required to run this pages. Please turn it on or ask help from tech support if you dont know how to enable itAbout DoctifyTrust at DoctifyInternational SitesUnited Kingdom United Arab Emirates Austria Germany Australia The Doctify BlogFor ProvidersFor dentistsFor medical specialistsLog InClinics & SpecialistsLog InPatientsSign Up Log InFor ProvidersFor dentistsFor medical specialistsLog InClinics & SpecialistsLog InPatientsSign Up Log In
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • specialistslog
  • 4
  • 9
Result 10
TitlePrivate Consultant Dermatologists | Skin Specialists in Glasgow | Private Healthcare UK
Urlhttps://www.privatehealth.co.uk/doctors-and-health-professionals/dermatologist/scotland/lanarkshire/glasgow/
DescriptionList of top private consultant dermatologists and skin specialists in Glasgow, from Private Healthcare UK: Your independent guide to UK private healthcare
Date
Organic Position10
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyHomeAbout usAdvertisersSite map Get a quote Conditions &treatmentsGuide togoing privateCostsHealthinsuranceDoctors &specialistsHospital &clinicsCosmeticsurgery Compare list fancybox Compare list fancybox
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 11
TitleSkin Clinic Glasgow, Private Skin Specialist - Skin Health Scotland
Urlhttps://www.skinhealthscotland.com/
DescriptionSkin Health Scotland is a private skin clinic in Glasgow run by Dr Girish Gupta. We specialize in the diagnosis and management of skin conditions likes Moles,
Date
Organic Position11
H1
H2Specialist expertise
Moles
Skin Cancers
Lumps and Bumps
Other Skin Conditions
H3
H2WithAnchorsSpecialist expertise
Moles
Skin Cancers
Lumps and Bumps
Other Skin Conditions
BodyHome Dr Girish Gupta Info & FAQs About Us Patient reviews Contact us What we do Prices & Payment Specialist expertise. Skin Health Scotland is owned an operated by Girish Gupta, a leading Consultant Dermatologist in Edinburgh and Glasgow. We have specialist expertise in the diagnosis and management of skin conditions, which may be potentially serious, cause discomfort or be embarrassing. Treatment may simply be with appropriate medication, minimally invasive treatments, laser therapy or minor surgery. Moles. For many people moles are more of a cosmetic issue as they can be unsightly and can be removed simply and safely. However our team will also analyse all moles removed to give you peace of mind. Read More Skin Cancers. With our changing lifestyles skin cancer is an increasing risk, especially for those with active outdoor pursuits or those with fair complexions who burn easily in the sun. Read More Lumps and Bumps. Lumps and bumps covers a whole range of lesions such as warts, skin tags, cysts and other blemishes which are visible on the surface of the skin. These can be surgically removed and analysed or treated by other means as appropriate, usually at one-stop clinics. Read More Other Skin Conditions. Inflammatory skin disorders cover a broad category that includes many conditions ranging in severity, from mild itching to those with significant medical health consequences. Read More Email : [email protected]© 2013 Skin Health Scotland
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • skin
  • 9
  • 11
  • read
  • 4
  • 11
  • health
  • 3
  • 11
  • condition
  • 3
  • 11
  • mole
  • 3
  • 11
  • removed
  • 3
  • 11
Result 12
TitleDr Catherine Jury: Dermatology
Urlhttps://finder.bupa.co.uk/Consultant/view/188220/dr_catherine_jury
Description
Date
Organic Position12
H1Finder
H2Dr Catherine Jury 04114118
H3Dermatology
Practice
Day
Hours
Appt Bookings
H2WithAnchorsDr Catherine Jury 04114118
BodyFinder Our comprehensive online directory of Bupa recognisedconsultants, therapists, hospitals and healthcare services Search Search for Bupa recognised healthcare professionals and services. OK: Error! Note:. Home Dr Catherine Jury Dr Catherine Jury 04114118. Dermatology .   Fee assured Verified this account Overview About me. I qualified in 1994 from Glasgow University Medical School and have been a Consultant Dermatologist here in Glasgow since 2006. My practice is split between adult and paediatric dermatology working between Glasgow Royal Infirmary and the Royal Hospital for Children. I also have a particular interest in inherited blistering disorders of the skin. Areas of interest. Paediatric Dermatology; Inflammmatory skin disease; acne; eczema; psoriasis; sun damage and mole evaluation; skin cancer; blistering skin disorders. Medical secretaries. Medical Secretary - for appointments Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital 25 Beaconsfield Road GLASGOW G12 0PJ 0141 530 3719 [email protected] Medserv - for billing/payments Ground Floor Rockwood House 9-17 Perrymount Road Haywards Heath RH16 3TW 020 3384 1952 [email protected] About me Current NHS consultant posts held. Glasgow Royal Infirmary Royal Hospital for Children (Yorkhill) Research interests. Inherited blistering disorders of the skin Genodermatoses Personal interests. Art Knitting and crochet Cooking (and eating) Skiing and kayaking Publications. British Journal of Dermatology Clinical and Experimental Dermatology Journal of Dermatological Treatment Courses offered to GPs. Involved in local GP led training sessions and seminars My qualifications & training Qualifications . MBChB Glasgow University 1994 MRCP Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Glasgow 1997 GMC registration. Reference number 4114118 Details of entry to specialist register. Dermatology, 2006 Affiliations / memberships. British Association of Dermatologists Scottish dermatology Society British Society for Paediatric Dermatology Medical Dermatology Society My private practice Practice hours. Practice. Day. Hours. Appt Bookings. Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital, G12 0PJ Wednesday 09:30 - 11:30 0141 334 9441 Post treatment communication. Following treatment of a Bupa member, I will communicate with GPs in line with Department of Health, GMC and appropriate professional bodies guidelines. In the event of an urgent query following treatment, Bupa members should use the following contact details. Dr Catherine S Jury 0141 334 9441 Consultant's practices Information for healthcare professionals Information for healthcare professionals (Bupa patients only, last 12 months). Procedures completed S1500 Biopsy of skin or subcutaneous tissue - (1-5) Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital (1-5) S1420 Shave biopsy of lesion of skin - (1-5) Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital (1-5) S0633 Excision of lesion of skin or subcutaneous tissue - up to three, Trunk & Limbs (excluding lipoma) - (1-5) Nuffield Health Glasgow Hospital (1-5) Report this page Edit details Print page Thank you for your feedback Error! The information contained on Finder is submitted by consultants, therapists and healthcare services, and is declared by these third parties to be correct and compliant with the standards and codes of conduct specified by their relevant regulatory body. Bupa cannot guarantee the accuracy of all of the information provided. You can find out more about the information on Finder and our website terms of use.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • hospital
  • 14
  • 12
  • glasgow
  • 12
  • 12
  • nuffield
  • 11
  • 12
  • skin
  • 10
  • 12
  • dermatology
  • 9
  • 12
  • nuffield health
  • 8
  • 12
  • glasgow hospital
  • 8
  • 12
  • bupa
  • 6
  • 12
  • health
  • 6
  • 12
  • nuffield health glasgow
  • 5
  • 12
  • health glasgow hospital
  • 5
  • 12
  • health glasgow
  • 5
  • 12
  • healthcare
  • 5
  • 12
  • practice
  • 5
  • 12
  • royal
  • 5
  • 12
  • information
  • 5
  • 12
  • dr catherine
  • 4
  • 12
  • catherine
  • 4
  • 12
  • jury
  • 4
  • 12
  • professional
  • 4
  • 12
  • medical
  • 4
  • 12
  • consultant
  • 4
  • 12
  • interest
  • 4
  • 12
  • treatment
  • 4
  • 12
  • healthcare professional
  • 3
  • 12
  • paediatric dermatology
  • 3
  • 12
  • finder
  • 3
  • 12
  • service
  • 3
  • 12
  • dr
  • 3
  • 12
  • paediatric
  • 3
  • 12
  • blistering
  • 3
  • 12
  • disorder
  • 3
  • 12
  • 0141
  • 3
  • 12
  • british
  • 3
  • 12
  • gp
  • 3
  • 12
  • detail
  • 3
  • 12
  • society
  • 3
  • 12
Result 13
TitleDermatology Clinics in West End, Glasgow • Check Prices & Reviews
Urlhttps://www.whatclinic.com/dermatology/uk/lanarkshire/glasgow/west-end
DescriptionPrices from £110 - Enquire for a fast quote ★ Choose from 5 Dermatology Clinics in West End, Glasgow
Date2 Jul 2021
Organic Position13
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyWhatClinic, you agree to our Cookie Policy. Toggle navigation Find a clinic you'll love About Clinic Login Add your clinic Country:
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • clinic
  • 3
  • 13
Result 14
TitleSkin Analysis - FTT Skin Clinics - Glasgow, Hamilton, Inverness
Urlhttps://www.francesturnertraill.co.uk/treatments/consultant-dermatologist-expert-skin-analysis/
DescriptionFTT Skin Clinics offers a complementary advanced skin analysis at all our clinics. Our medical staff will discuss a range of possible skin care treatments
Date
Organic Position14
H1Skin Analysis
H2Skin Analysis Consultations – FTT Skin Clinics
API 100 for Skin Analysis
H3
H2WithAnchorsSkin Analysis Consultations – FTT Skin Clinics
API 100 for Skin Analysis
BodySkin Analysis Skin Analysis Consultations – FTT Skin Clinics. Skin conditions can cause concern, discomfort or embarrassment or sometimes all three.  FTT Skin Clinics team offer a complimentary, no obligation skin analysis at consultation for patients with skin concerns about their skin. We totally understand that no two of us are the same. That is why we like to spend time with you at your skin analysis consultation to discover what bothers you and to listen to your concerns.  Our staff will chat through all the options that are available to you, to help achieve your desired results. All our treatments, from skin care products you use at home every day to in clinic treatments are always bespoke to you, your skin needs and lifestyle.  We have many cutting edge energy based platforms and technologies, treatments at our disposal to choose from when designing your treatment package mixed in with good old fashioned expert knowledge to deliver research backed, evidence based care with minimum downtime. We have helped many people, men, women, young and old with their skin concerns from acne, acne scarring, rosacea, pigmentation, diffuse redness, lines and wrinkles, thread veins, lumps, lesions and bumps to just simply wanting fresh glowing skin every day or for a special event such as a wedding. At consultation we will measure your skins moisture, sebum, pore size, melanin, acne and sensitivity to provide an automated report on your skins condition. Your report is stored so that we can compare results against future visits to monitor improvements at your review appointments. All FTT Skin Clinics staff are accredited with Acne and Rosacea Association UK. It is a charity teaching cutting edge techniques for treating acne and rosacea under the guidance of Professor of Dermatology Tony Chu. THE FTT SCAR CLINIC FTT SKIN CLINICS works in partnership with MEDICS AGAINST VIOLENCE in Glasgow.  We provide victims of violence with pro bono scar repair treatment in our main clinic near Glasgow. Book Complimentary Skin AnalysisAPI 100 for Skin Analysis. Moisture / Sebum / Pore / Melanin / Clearness of Pore / Wrinkle / Sensitivity
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • skin
  • 19
  • 14
  • clinic
  • 7
  • 14
  • ftt
  • 6
  • 14
  • ftt skin
  • 5
  • 14
  • skin analysi
  • 5
  • 14
  • analysi
  • 5
  • 14
  • treatment
  • 5
  • 14
  • acne
  • 5
  • 14
  • ftt skin clinic
  • 4
  • 14
  • skin clinic
  • 4
  • 14
  • consultation
  • 4
  • 14
  • concern
  • 4
  • 14
  • skin analysi consultation
  • 3
  • 14
  • analysi consultation
  • 3
  • 14
  • rosacea
  • 3
  • 14
  • pore
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
TitleDermatology in Glasgow ▷ Ask for free quotes
Urlhttps://glasgow.cylex-uk.co.uk/dermatology.html
DescriptionLa Belle Forme cosmetic surgery clinic in Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland. Our prices for cosmetic treatments or plastic surgery are ...
DateResults 1 - 20 of 25
Organic Position15
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
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Result 16
TitleTHE BEST 10 Dermatologists in Glasgow, DE - Last Updated January 2022 - Yelp
Urlhttps://www.yelp.com/search?cflt=dermatology&find_loc=Glasgow
DescriptionBest Dermatologists in Glasgow, DE - SunWise Family Dermatology & Surgery, Elkton Dermatology, Burke Dermatology, Dermatology Care, Richard H Bonder, MD, Angela Coleman - Dermatology Care, Premier Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery, Jaffe David F, MD, ChristianaCare Dermatology HealthCare Center at Christiana, Panzer Dermatology Associates PA
Date
Organic Position16
H1The Best 10 Dermatologists in Glasgow, DE
H2
H3Can't find the business?
H2WithAnchors
BodyThe Best 10 Dermatologists in Glasgow, DESort:RecommendedAllPrice Open Now1. SunWise Family Dermatology & Surgery. 4DermatologistsSurgeonsThis is a placeholder“I began treatment Dr. Gerald Stroup for adult acne. My experience with the staff (as a whole) has been nothing short of phenomenal. My first impression of Dr. G was a very…” more2. Elkton Dermatology. 2DermatologistsThis is a placeholder“I have been seeing a dermatologist local to where I live and wasn't 100% confident on a diagnosis related to some scalp/hair issues I've been having. I decided to take a chance and…” more3. Burke Dermatology. 13DermatologistsThis is a placeholder“What a terrific doctor and staff! So done to earth, excellent bedside manner. Thank you.” more4. Dermatology Care. 1DermatologistsTattoo RemovalHair Loss CentersThis is a placeholder“I highly recommended Dermatology Care & Wellness Center for any condition you have in the scope of the treatments and services provided by Dermatology Care & Wellness Center, Angela…” more5. Richard H Bonder, MD. 2DermatologistsThis is a placeholder“Trying to find a good dermatologist in the area. Went to Dr. Bonder with my 16 month daughter who was having a skin condition. The staff were very friendly and Dr. Bonder was…” more6. Angela Coleman - Dermatology Care. 2DermatologistsCosmetic SurgeonsLaser Hair RemovalThis is a placeholder“Went here today for the first time. Angela and her assistant were super friendly, down to earth, and extremely accommodating! She made sure my procedure went smooth, painless, and…” more7. Premier Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery. 20Day SpasDermatologists$$$This is a placeholder“Always highly satisfied with my care here. I tend to see Dr. Mashek and she seems to always know the best treatments. I have started going to their spa center as well which has great…” more8. Jaffe David F, MD. 3DermatologistsThis is a placeholder“I have grown to like this doctor. Although at first I felt they were disrespectful of my time. The office and staff are competent and even pleasant. I would give it five stars but…” more9. ChristianaCare Dermatology HealthCare Center at Christiana. DermatologistsThis is a placeholder10. Panzer Dermatology Associates PA. 5DermatologistsThis is a placeholder“Pros: nice office, nice staff, quick refilling meds Cons: I have been going to Panzer for 8 YEARS, EIGHT!! And my acne still has not cleared up. I feel like they keep giving me…” more12345671 of 7Can't find the business?Adding a business to Yelp is always free.Add businessGot search feedback? Help us improve.AboutAbout YelpCareersPressInvestor RelationsTrust & SafetyContent GuidelinesAccessibility StatementTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicyAd ChoicesDiscoverYelp Project Cost GuidesCollectionsTalkEventsThe Local YelpYelp BlogSupportYelp MobileDevelopersRSSYelp for BusinessClaim your Business PageAdvertise on YelpYelp for Restaurant OwnersTable ManagementBusiness Success StoriesBusiness SupportYelp Blog for BusinessLanguagesEnglishCountriesUnited StatesAboutBlogSupportTermsPrivacy PolicyCopyright © 2004–2022 Yelp Inc. Yelp, , and related marks are registered trademarks of Yelp.Some Data By Acxiom
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • placeholder
  • 13
  • 16
  • dermatology
  • 10
  • 16
  • dr
  • 7
  • 16
  • bonder
  • 5
  • 16
  • staff
  • 5
  • 16
  • care
  • 5
  • 16
  • dermatology care
  • 4
  • 16
  • dermatologist
  • 4
  • 16
  • center
  • 4
  • 16
  • treatment
  • 3
  • 16
  • angela
  • 3
  • 16
  • yelp
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
TitleReal-life story - Dr Donna Torley | Health Careers
Urlhttps://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/doctors/roles-doctors/medicine/dermatology/training-and-development/real-life-story-dr-donna-torley
Description
Date
Organic Position17
H1Real-life story - Dr Donna Torley
H2Dr Donna Torley
Help us improve
H3Consultant dermatologist
How I got into the role Expand / collapse
What I do Expand / collapse
The best bits and challenges Expand / collapse
Life outside work Expand / collapse
Career plans and top tips for others Expand / collapse
H2WithAnchorsDr Donna Torley
Help us improve
BodyReal-life story - Dr Donna Torley Dr Donna Torley is a Consultant Dermatologist at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow, one of the largest acute hospitals in the UK. Dr Donna Torley. Consultant dermatologist. Employer or university Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow I love the immense variety of the work in dermatology and I feel incredibly privileged to work in this great specialty, which I find very fulfilling. How I got into the role Expand / collapse . I decided I wanted to be a doctor at around the age of 12. Medicine seemed the ideal choice as I enjoyed sciences and the idea of working with people really appealed to me. I was the first person in my family to become a doctor. After taking Scottish Highers I went to medical school at the University of Glasgow, where I loved every minute of the undergraduate training. We had some exposure to dermatology during a four-week placement with an excellent motivational teacher. This specialty appealed with its combination of surgery and medicine and lots of contact with patients. I trained before the introduction of Foundation Training, and so after medical school I completed a one-year junior house officer job which included medicine and surgery. After this I worked as a senior house officer for two more years, where I gained experience in obstetrics and gynaecology, paediatrics and dermatology. However it was dermatology that I fell in love with, even though by this stage I had been accepted onto a GP training scheme. Dermatology is so varied and there is a great mix of inpatient and outpatient work, as well as the opportunity to perform surgical procedures. I found the learning about inflammatory skin diseases fascinating and also enjoyed the medical overlap with the other medical specialities. I completed one year of GP training before switching to higher specialist training in dermatology later on. I don’t regret choosing GP training first, as it provided lots of useful experience. Prior to starting my higher training I had a couple of jobs, I went to Australia for a year on an academic post, conducting research into cardiovascular risk and I also worked in a staff grade post in a dermatology department for two years. The staff in the department were wonderfully supportive, and they really encouraged me to apply for higher training. The higher specialist training normally takes four years, but I trained on a less than full time basis and my training took longer. I had two of my children during my training and had to juggle family life with my job and also study for the Diploma of Dermatology exam. The training here in Glasgow was excellent and involved working in different hospital sites in Glasgow, Lanarkshire and Clyde. I gained experience in all aspects of acute dermatology and also worked in various special interest clinics. We learnt about common skin conditions such as eczema, acne and psoriasis and more unusual conditions such as toxic epidermal necrolysis, a life-threatening dermatological emergency where patients shed their skin due to the effects of medication. During training I developed a special interest in urticaria (a raised itchy rash also known as hives). At the end of my training I was awarded my CCT and applied for consultant posts. There was lots of competition then, although there are more vacancies nowadays. What I do Expand / collapse . Once I became a consultant I continued to work part-time and I currently work three days a week. One of the main aspects of my work is running general dermatology half-day clinics here at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital three times a week. As well as more common skin conditions I also see patients with disorders which are more unusual such as lichen planus (an itchy rash with small, shiny, flat-topped areas) and morphoea (painless discoloured thickened patches on the skin). I also run a specialist urticaria clinic. In the outpatient clinics I also undertake surgical procedures, such as the removal of skin lesions. Larger scale dermatological surgery is undertaken by my colleagues who have developed a special interest in this area. I see a mixture of new and follow-up patients in the outpatients’ clinics and generally see around 15 patients per clinic. The appointment times are usually ten minutes. We work very closely with other doctors and healthcare specialists such as the plastic surgery team and nurses in multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). I also see patients with skin cancer. Being aware of the psychological effects of skin conditions is an important aspect of my work. Skin conditions that affect the hands and face can be particularly distressing. I offer our patients a range of treatments including topical treatment in the form of a cream or lotion, treatment using light or ultraviolet radiation (UVB) and systemic treatments such as immunosuppressants (drugs that reduce the strength of the body’s immune system) for inflammatory skin conditions. We have a dermatology ward at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital and I lead a ward round once a week. Patients with chronic skin conditions may be admitted to hospital for treatment with oral medications and I monitor these patients along with the nurses and junior doctors. Teaching is another important aspect of my job and I teach medical students, junior doctors at all levels, nurses and pharmacists. I usually lead one or two teaching sessions every month. The best bits and challenges Expand / collapse . I love the immense variety of the work in dermatology and I feel incredibly privileged to work in this great specialty, which I find very fulfilling. I particularly enjoy the outpatients’ clinics and working with patients with inflammatory diseases and the more unusual conditions. The surgical aspect of the job is very enjoyable and there’s also lots of interaction with other specialties. Most of all I like our patients who are so interesting! The main challenge is the shortage of dermatologists which adds to the pressure of the job. Life outside work Expand / collapse . Dermatology is a specialty that enables you to have a good work-life balance as the work is not as acute as other medical jobs. As I work in a large department I only have to be on call 24 hours a day for one week about four or five times a year. My job fits around my family nicely – I have three children and working three days a week means that I have plenty of time to spend with them. I also have a good network of friends and time for a social life Career plans and top tips for others Expand / collapse . My aim is to ensure that our services are always improving and evolving. I also want to build a good team with excellent training, not only for other dermatologists but for the wider clinical team including nurses. I’d also like to promote dermatology as a career. Top tips if you are unable to get onto a training scheme in dermatology, apply for stand-alone jobs in the specialty to give you more experience become involved in research via the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network gain experience of delivering presentations locally and nationally Printer-friendly version PDF version Login to Bookmark Make a comment or report a problem with this page Help us improve.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • dermatology
  • 17
  • 17
  • training
  • 16
  • 17
  • work
  • 14
  • 17
  • patient
  • 12
  • 17
  • skin
  • 11
  • 17
  • job
  • 10
  • 17
  • year
  • 8
  • 17
  • condition
  • 8
  • 17
  • week
  • 7
  • 17
  • hospital
  • 7
  • 17
  • time
  • 7
  • 17
  • clinic
  • 7
  • 17
  • skin condition
  • 6
  • 17
  • life
  • 6
  • 17
  • university
  • 6
  • 17
  • specialty
  • 6
  • 17
  • medical
  • 6
  • 17
  • expand collapse
  • 5
  • 17
  • glasgow
  • 5
  • 17
  • expand
  • 5
  • 17
  • collapse
  • 5
  • 17
  • doctor
  • 5
  • 17
  • higher
  • 5
  • 17
  • experience
  • 5
  • 17
  • aspect
  • 5
  • 17
  • treatment
  • 5
  • 17
  • queen elizabeth university
  • 4
  • 17
  • elizabeth university hospital
  • 4
  • 17
  • queen elizabeth
  • 4
  • 17
  • elizabeth university
  • 4
  • 17
  • university hospital
  • 4
  • 17
  • lot
  • 4
  • 17
  • outpatient
  • 4
  • 17
  • specialist
  • 4
  • 17
  • day
  • 4
  • 17
  • team
  • 4
  • 17
  • nurs
  • 4
  • 17
  • dr donna torley
  • 3
  • 17
  • dr donna
  • 3
  • 17
  • donna torley
  • 3
  • 17
  • gp training
  • 3
  • 17
  • special interest
  • 3
  • 17
  • day week
  • 3
  • 17
  • outpatient clinic
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleInnovative Dermatology | Glasgow Delaware | Glasgow Dermatologist | Glasgow Cosmetic Dermatologist | Glasgow Medical Dermatologist | Glasgow Surgical Dermatologist | Glasgow DE 19701 | Delaware | DE | 19702
Urlhttps://789skin.com/glasgow-dermatologist-de-glasgow-dermatologist-delaware-dermatologist-glasgow-de-dermatologist-glasgow-de-19701-dermatologist-de-dermatologist-19702/
DescriptionInnovative Dermatology provides the best Glasgow dermatologist services in the Glasgow DE 19701 area. When you are in need of a cosmetic dermatologist, medical dermatologist, pediatric dermatologist or surgical dermatologist near Glasgow DE, Innovative Dermatology is the best choice. Our dermatology office specializes in a number of areas such as dermatologic surgery, skin cancer treatment, cosmetic procedures, facial rejuvenation, injectable fillers and many other areas of dermatology. Come to our dermatology clinic near Glasgow DE for treatment of all of your skin conditions including acne, hair loss, brown spots, melanoma, moles, varicose veins, skin tags, and more. Call Innovative Dermatology today for the best dermatologist in the Glasgow DE 19702 area
Date
Organic Position18
H1Glasgow Dermatologist
H2
H3Call (610) 789-7546 Today for a Dermatologist in Glasgow DE 19701
The Best Dermatologists in Delaware
Glasgow Medical Dermatologist
Glasgow Cosmetic Dermatologist
H2WithAnchors
BodyGlasgow Dermatologist Call (610) 789-7546 Today for a Dermatologist in Glasgow DE 19701 . The Best Dermatologists in Delaware. The dermatologists at Innovative Dermatology are known by their patients for their respect and hospitable attitudes. We are grateful that you have chosen us to provide you with your dermatological care and needs. As a patient of Innovative Dermatology, you can rest assured that we strive to provide the best care to you and your loved ones in the Glasgow DE area. We understand that you want to feel and look your very best, and will apply our expertise to best suit your needs. In addition to our treatment, our dermatologists enjoy giving back to the communities in Delaware and ensuring that skin treatments are accessible to all in the Glasgow DE area. Our team is led by Dr. Minh Thieu, MD and Dr. Khanh Thieu, MD. Both of our dermatology doctors are board-certified dermatologists who specialize in a range of treatments from general and medical dermatology to cosmetic and surgical procedures. Our Delaware Dermatologists:. Dr. Minh Thieu, MD studied at Jefferson Medical College. After graduating at the top of her class, she completed her residency training at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. Since 2005, she has been treating adults and children alike in her private practice. Dr. Minh Thieu's expertise ranges from dermatologic surgery and skin cancer treatments to cosmetic procedures including Botox and other fillers, sclerotherapy, chemical peels, and laser procedures. In her free time, Dr. Minh Thieu enjoys giving back to the community. She is a faculty member at the University of Delaware where she volunteers her time in the Department of Dermatology teaching residents and medical students. More About Dr. Minh Thieu Dr. Khanh Thieu, MD obtained his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He trained in dermatology at Columbia University Medical Center and was chief resident during his final year. In his practice, Dr. Khanh Thieu is happy to work with both children and adults. His expertise includes facial rejuvenation with injectable fillers as well as chemical peels, sclerotherapy, and the cosmetic removal of moles and skin growths. When he isn't in the office, Dr. Khanh Thieu researches the genetics of melanomas and squamous cell cancers. He has presented at national dermatological conferences, and has a number of publications in dermatology and scientific journals. More About Dr. Khanh Thieu Glasgow Medical Dermatologist. The dermatologists at Innovative Dermatology are skilled in treating both common and serious skin conditions found in the residents of Delaware. For those in the Glasgow DE area with chronic conditions such as psoriasis and eczema, we frequently recommend light therapy in order to lower the number of recurrences. Our dermatologists are also experts at treating common conditions like acne, hair loss and rosacea. No matter your skin condition, we will work with you to discuss the appropriate treatments and care needed to ensure you are feeling and looking your best. In adults, the most common skin condition treated by dermatologists from the Glasgow DE area is actinic keratosis. Although frequently mistaken as age spots due to their rough, scaly appearance, actinic keratosis or AK is actually a precancerous lesion that develops due to long-term exposure to sunlight. If left untreated, AKs will develop into a more serious skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Our dermatologists specialize in the treatment of skin cancers like squamous cell carcinoma as well as melanoma and basal cell carcinoma, and our dermatologist, Khanh Thieu, continues to research the genetics of the melanomas and squamous cell cancers found in his Delaware patients. Some Medical Conditions We Treat:. Acne Eczema Hair Loss Brown Spots Melanoma Moles Birthmarks Psoriasis Rosacea Rashes Scars Skin Tags Varicose Veins Vitilgo Glasgow Cosmetic Dermatologist. The cosmetic dermatologists at Innovative Dermatologists want you to look and feel your best! Although cosmetic dermatology primarily focuses on the aesthetic improvement of the skin, nails and hair, in certain cases a treatment can also resolve medical dermatological concerns. The range of cosmetic surgery treatments is great; from rejuvenating, deep cleansing procedures that restore skin texture and tone, to the reduction and removal of skin imperfections, at Innovative Dermatology everything is possible. No matter what you decide, the expert dermatologists at Innovative Dermatology will have you looking young and beautiful. For those seeking treatment on any unsightly or painful varicose, spider and bulging veins, you can rest assured knowing our cosmetic dermatologists are experienced in sclerotherapy and can also eliminate your vein imperfections with lasers. If you're interested in injectable fillers like Botox, Juvederm, Radiesse, and Restylane, our dermatologists are experts at facial rejuvenation. Additionally, our dermatology clinic near Glasgow DE specializes in hyperhidrosis treatments as well as a range of chemical peels that enhance the appearance of and smooth skin texture. Our cosmetic dermatology office is equipped with the latest laser technology. Whether you are looking to reduce the number of wrinkles on your face or save yourself time by investing in laser hair removal, the cosmetic laser solutions at Innovative Dermatology can keep you looking and feeling young and beautiful. That tough section of fat that you haven't been able to reduce no matter how much time you spend exercising and dieting can be removed using laser technology as well. Don't worry about your stretch marks, scars or any aesthetic concerns any longer, at Innovative Dermatology, our cosmetic dermatologists do it all. Both before and after your treatment, it's important to maintain your youthful skin through the use of medical, anti-aging skin care products. Although everyone in the Glasgow DE area loves to enjoy their time in the sun, it is important to regularly apply sunscreen to diminish the impact of sun damage and the effects of premature aging. In order to preserve your youthful appearance, our dermatologists will suggest limiting your exposure to pollution and avoiding the harsh chemicals present in cigarette and cigar smoke. Cosmetic Dermatology Treatments Include:. Chemical Peels Earlobe Repair Hand Rejuvenation Keloid Excision Sclerotherapy Skin Tag Removal Scar Revisions Dermal Fillers Injectable Fillers Botox & Dysport Restylane & Radiesse Mole Removal If you are looking for Glasgow dermatologists or are in need of Glasgow dermatologists near Glasgow DE 19701, call (610) 789-SKIN today or send us a message. Gladwyne Dermatologist, Glasgow Dermatologist, Glen Mills Dermatologist, Glenolden Dermatologist, Greenville Dermatologist, Haverford Dermatologist, Havertown Dermatologist, Hockessin Dermatologist, Kennett Square Dermatologist, King of Prussia Dermatologist, Lansdowne Dermatologist, Main Line Dermatologist, Malvern Dermatologist, Marcus Hook Dermatologist, Media Dermatologist, Merion Dermatologist, Middletown Dermatologist, Morton Dermatologist, Narberth Dermatologist, New Castle Dermatologist, Newark Dermatologist, Newport Dermatologist, Newtown Square Dermatologist This site uses cookies to improve your user experience. Read More Okay
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • dermatologist
  • 46
  • 18
  • skin
  • 17
  • 18
  • dermatology
  • 16
  • 18
  • glasgow
  • 14
  • 18
  • treatment
  • 12
  • 18
  • cosmetic
  • 12
  • 18
  • thieu
  • 11
  • 18
  • dr
  • 10
  • 18
  • medical
  • 10
  • 18
  • glasgow de
  • 8
  • 18
  • de
  • 8
  • 18
  • innovative
  • 8
  • 18
  • innovative dermatology
  • 7
  • 18
  • khanh thieu
  • 6
  • 18
  • delaware
  • 6
  • 18
  • khanh
  • 6
  • 18
  • laser
  • 6
  • 18
  • condition
  • 6
  • 18
  • glasgow de area
  • 5
  • 18
  • dr minh thieu
  • 5
  • 18
  • dr khanh thieu
  • 5
  • 18
  • dermatologist glasgow
  • 5
  • 18
  • de area
  • 5
  • 18
  • dr minh
  • 5
  • 18
  • minh thieu
  • 5
  • 18
  • dr khanh
  • 5
  • 18
  • area
  • 5
  • 18
  • minh
  • 5
  • 18
  • cancer
  • 5
  • 18
  • filler
  • 5
  • 18
  • chemical
  • 5
  • 18
  • time
  • 5
  • 18
  • removal
  • 5
  • 18
  • cell
  • 5
  • 18
  • glasgow dermatologist
  • 4
  • 18
  • dermatologist innovative
  • 4
  • 18
  • thieu md
  • 4
  • 18
  • chemical peel
  • 4
  • 18
  • squamou cell
  • 4
  • 18
  • cosmetic dermatologist
  • 4
  • 18
  • range
  • 4
  • 18
  • procedure
  • 4
  • 18
  • sclerotherapy
  • 4
  • 18
  • peel
  • 4
  • 18
  • melanoma
  • 4
  • 18
  • squamou
  • 4
  • 18
  • hair
  • 4
  • 18
  • dermatologist glasgow de
  • 3
  • 18
  • dermatologist innovative dermatology
  • 3
  • 18
  • skin cancer
  • 3
  • 18
  • injectable filler
  • 3
  • 18
  • skin condition
  • 3
  • 18
  • cell carcinoma
  • 3
  • 18
  • cosmetic dermatology
  • 3
  • 18
Result 19
TitleDermatologists in Glasgow
Urlhttps://findit.kirkintilloch-herald.co.uk/search/glasgow/dermatologists
DescriptionFind Dermatologists in Glasgow on the Kirkintilloch Herald directory. Get reviews and contact details for each business including phone number, postcode, opening hours and photos
Date
Organic Position19
H1Dermatologists in Glasgow
H2dermal filler clinic
Botox Clinic Glasgow | Cloud Nine
Dermatologists in Bareilly - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Ultim8 Skn
Stepps Beauty Clinic
Dermatologists in Raj Nagar, Ghaziabad - Consult Online, Book Appointment
Dermatologists in Cantonment, Lucknow - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Dermatologists in Alambagh, Lucknow - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Dr. Nivedita Dadu - Dermatologist - Consult Online, Book Appointment
Dermatologists in Thane West, Thane - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Sk:n
Skin Pigmentation Laser Treatment in Mumbai
Urticaria Treatment Cost in Mumbai
Dr. Nandini Teli - Dermatologist in Pune - Consult Online, Book Appointment
H3
H2WithAnchorsdermal filler clinic
Botox Clinic Glasgow | Cloud Nine
Dermatologists in Bareilly - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Ultim8 Skn
Stepps Beauty Clinic
Dermatologists in Raj Nagar, Ghaziabad - Consult Online, Book Appointment
Dermatologists in Cantonment, Lucknow - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Dermatologists in Alambagh, Lucknow - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Dr. Nivedita Dadu - Dermatologist - Consult Online, Book Appointment
Dermatologists in Thane West, Thane - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment
Sk:n
Skin Pigmentation Laser Treatment in Mumbai
Urticaria Treatment Cost in Mumbai
Dr. Nandini Teli - Dermatologist in Pune - Consult Online, Book Appointment
BodyDermatologists in Glasgow Find Dermatologists in Glasgow on the Kirkintilloch Herald directory. Get reviews and contact details for each business including phone number, postcode, opening hours and photos. List Map dermal filler clinic . Is this your business? Claim now! 21 21 Bath Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, G2 1HW  0141 28...  0141 28...  Website  Message now  Review Now Botox Clinic Glasgow | Cloud Nine . Is this your business? Claim now! 11 Somerset Place, Glasgow, Glasgow, G3 7JT  0141 43...  0141 43...  Website  Message now  Review Now Dermatologists in Bareilly - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now Ultim8 Skn . Is this your business? Claim now! 51 Lomond Dr, Bishopbriggs, Glasgow, G64 3BY  07380 8...  07380 8...  Website  Message now  Review Now At Ultim8 SKN Glasgow, we not only have the latest must-have treatments that should be on everyone's list, but we also have the...  Chemical Peels, fibroblasting, Laser Hair Removal, Hair Removal Treatments, Acne Treatments Stepps Beauty Clinic . Is this your business? Claim now! 14 West Avenue, Stepps, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, G33 6ES  07757 6...  07757 6...  Review Now Dermatologists in Raj Nagar, Ghaziabad - Consult Online, Book Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now Dermatologists in Cantonment, Lucknow - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now Dermatologists in Alambagh, Lucknow - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now Dr. Nivedita Dadu - Dermatologist - Consult Online, Book Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now Dermatologists in Thane West, Thane - Consult Online, Book Instant Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now Sk:n . 4850 Gordon Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, G1 3PU Online Orders  0333 06...  0333 06...  Website  Message now  Review Now  6 Photos Save Up To 50% On Laser Hair Removal! sk:n clinics Glasgow is a CQC registered British brand with the largest network of specialist skin care clinics in the UK. With... Skin Pigmentation Laser Treatment in Mumbai . Is this your business? Claim now! 101-03, 1st floor, Mangal Simran CHS Ltd, Above Talwalkars Gym, 28th Road, Bandra (West), Mumbai, Mumbai, Maharashtra, 400050  01224 6...  01224 6...  Message now  Review Now Urticaria Treatment Cost in Mumbai . Is this your business? Claim now! 101-03, 1st floor, Mangal Simran CHS Ltd, Above Talwalkars Gym, 28th Road, Bandra (West), Mumbai, Mumbai, Maharashtra, 400050  01224 6...  01224 6...  Message now  Review Now Dr. Nandini Teli - Dermatologist in Pune - Consult Online, Book Appointment . Is this your business? Claim now!  07777 7...  07777 7...  Website  Review Now 1
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • 07777
  • 42
  • 19
  • website
  • 19
  • 19
  • review
  • 18
  • 19
  • website review
  • 15
  • 19
  • claim 07777
  • 14
  • 19
  • business
  • 14
  • 19
  • business claim
  • 13
  • 19
  • claim
  • 13
  • 19
  • 01224
  • 12
  • 19
  • glasgow
  • 11
  • 19
  • message review
  • 9
  • 19
  • dermatologist
  • 9
  • 19
  • message
  • 8
  • 19
  • online
  • 8
  • 19
  • consult online book
  • 7
  • 19
  • appointment business claim
  • 7
  • 19
  • business claim 07777
  • 7
  • 19
  • 07777 07777
  • 7
  • 19
  • 07777 website
  • 7
  • 19
  • consult online
  • 7
  • 19
  • online book
  • 7
  • 19
  • appointment business
  • 7
  • 19
  • treatment
  • 7
  • 19
  • consult
  • 7
  • 19
  • book
  • 7
  • 19
  • appointment
  • 7
  • 19
  • review dermatologist
  • 6
  • 19
  • mumbai
  • 6
  • 19
  • website message
  • 5
  • 19
  • clinic
  • 5
  • 19
  • website message review
  • 4
  • 19
  • online book instant
  • 4
  • 19
  • book instant appointment
  • 4
  • 19
  • instant appointment business
  • 4
  • 19
  • 07380
  • 4
  • 19
  • 07757
  • 4
  • 19
  • book instant
  • 4
  • 19
  • instant appointment
  • 4
  • 19
  • 0141
  • 4
  • 19
  • instant
  • 4
  • 19
  • skn
  • 4
  • 19
  • west
  • 4
  • 19
  • online book appointment
  • 3
  • 19
  • book appointment business
  • 3
  • 19
  • website review dermatologist
  • 3
  • 19
  • glasgow lanarkshire
  • 3
  • 19
  • hair removal
  • 3
  • 19
  • book appointment
  • 3
  • 19
  • lanarkshire
  • 3
  • 19
  • dr
  • 3
  • 19
  • laser
  • 3
  • 19
  • hair
  • 3
  • 19
  • removal
  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
TitleDermatology Vets in Glasgow | Dermatology referrals in Glasgow - The Dermatology Referral Service
Urlhttps://www.vetdermreferrals.co.uk/
DescriptionWe are a dedicated team of Veterinary professionals serving clients across Glasgow, Paisley, East Kilbride, Bishopbriggs and Renfrew. Find out more about our practice here
Date
Organic Position20
H1
H2Our Cookies
About Cookies
H3Cookie settings
H2WithAnchorsOur Cookies
About Cookies
Bodysrc="https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-W6NJS2S" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> Our Cookies . We use cookies on our website to make it easier for you to use. Read more. Accept our cookies Turn cookies on or off About Cookies. Our website uses cookies to distinguish you from other users of our website. This helps us to provide you with a good experience when you browser our website and also allows us to improve our website. See our cookie policy. Cookie settings. We use 3 different types of cookies on our website. You can say which ones you're happy for us to use below. Functional cookies. These cookies do things like keep the website secure. They always need to be on. Analytics cookies. These cookies store information about how you use our website, such as what you click on. On Off Marketing cookies. These cookies do things like tell us if you've seen our adverts on social media, such as Facebook or Twitter. On Off Update cookies
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • cooky
  • 14
  • 20
  • website
  • 8
  • 20
  • cooky cooky
  • 5
  • 20
  • cooky website
  • 3
  • 20
Result 21
TitleBritish Association of Dermatologists - Event Calendar
Urlhttps://www.bad.org.uk/events/eventcalendar?l=10sitesectionid%3D156&from=01%2F07%2F2022&to=01%2F08%2F2022&range=July+2022&direction=future
Description
Date
Organic Position21
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
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Result 22
TitleGlasgow- TJ Samson Glasgow, KY: Dermatologists: : Access Dermatology Clinic
Urlhttps://www.accessdermclinic.com/location/ky/glasgow/glasgow-tj-samson
DescriptionTrusted Dermatologists serving Glasgow- TJ Samson Glasgow, KY. Contact us at 270-238-8769 or visit us at 1337 N. Race Street, Basement of the Marketing Building, Glasgow, KY 42141: Access Dermatology Clinic
Date
Organic Position22
H1Access Dermatology Clinic Glasgow- TJ Samson, Glasgow, KY Office
H2
H3Send A Message To Access Dermatology Clinic
H2WithAnchors
BodyAccess Dermatology Clinic Glasgow- TJ Samson, Glasgow, KY Office Access Dermatology Clinic Contact Us Glasgow- TJ Samson Glasgow Driving Directions Opening hours Monday Closed Tuesday Closed Wednesday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm Thursday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm Friday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm Saturday Closed Sunday Closed Get in touch Request Appointment 270-238-8769 1337 N. Race Street Basement of the Marketing Building Glasgow, KY 42141 fax: 855-975-3140 [email protected] Contact Us Send A Message To Access Dermatology Clinic . If you have any questions, concerns, or comments regarding Access Dermatology Clinic , please fill out the short contact form below. × Contact Access Dermatology Clinic . ×
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • access dermatology clinic
  • 5
  • 22
  • access dermatology
  • 5
  • 22
  • dermatology clinic
  • 5
  • 22
  • access
  • 5
  • 22
  • dermatology
  • 5
  • 22
  • clinic
  • 5
  • 22
  • glasgow
  • 5
  • 22
  • contact
  • 4
  • 22
  • closed
  • 4
  • 22
  • 800 400 pm
  • 3
  • 22
  • 800 400
  • 3
  • 22
  • 400 pm
  • 3
  • 22
  • 800
  • 3
  • 22
  • 400
  • 3
  • 22
  • pm
  • 3
  • 22
Result 23
TitleUniversity of Glasgow - Schools - School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing - Undergraduate Medical School - Our facilities - A Significant Medical History - 20th Century - 1948-2018 - Dermatology
Urlhttps://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/medicine/mus/ourfacilities/history/20thcentury/1948-2018/dermatology/
Description
Date
Organic Position23
H1A Significant Medical History
H2Dermatology
University Department of Dermatology
NHS Dermatology Contributions
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Analytics cookies
Hotjar
Marketing cookies
H3The Scottish Melanoma Group
Clinical trials and Collaboration with Department of Medical Genetics
H2WithAnchorsDermatology
University Department of Dermatology
NHS Dermatology Contributions
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Hotjar
Marketing cookies
BodyA Significant Medical History A Significant Medical History20th Century1948-2018Dermatology Dermatology. University Department of Dermatology. The academic Department of Dermatology was established in 1960 under the leadership of John Alexander Milne who was at that time appointed Reader in Dermatology. He was awarded a personal chair in 1968, and then appointed to the Chair of Dermatology which was established in 1971. The department was situated in the Anderson College Building adjacent to the Western Infirmary and housed laboratories for routine dermatopathology and dermatological research. Medical mycology was also affiliated to dermatology under the leadership of James Gentles, with laboratories on the top floor of the Anderson College. Clinical facilities were provided in a 20 bedded ward on the ground floor of G block of the Western Infirmary with adjacent facilities for biopsy and minor surgery. Outpatient clinics were held in the Church Street outpatient section of the Western. Milne, primarily a pathologist, established a well respected dermatopathology department and ran an annual week-long course on histopathology of the skin which attracted trainee dermatologists from all parts of the UK. He published a well received textbook of dermatopathology. Basic research in the laboratories concentrated on the biochemical abnormalities in acne vulgaris and the molecular biology of psoriasis. John Milne died in 1977 and was succeeded in the chair by Rona Mackie, the first female full professor in the history of the University of Glasgow.   Mackie’s particular interest was cutaneous malignant melanoma, and in her MD thesis she pioneered the technique of dermatoscopy as a diagnostic aid. This method is now used worldwide. Mackie built up the clinical side of the department while consolidating the research laboratories. The addition of a “new blood” competitive non clinical senior lectureship (Dr Michael Edward) and a clinical teaching senior lectureship (Dr David Tillman) strengthened the department. A feature of the clinical department throughout the 1980s was a succession of bright overseas trainees who applied to spend a year or more of their training in the department. Six New Zealanders, two Australians, one Canadian, one South African and one German all spent a year or more in the department carrying out research projects and receiving clinical training. These bright men and women greatly enhanced the department’s international reputation. Mackie also encouraged UK trainees attached to other NHS dermatology departments in Glasgow- the Royal Infirmary, and Stobhill, Victoria and Southern General hospitals, to participate in weekly clinical and dermatopathological meetings and to carry out research projects in the University laboratories.   Rona Mackie was President of the British Association of Dermatologists in 1994-95. In 1999 she was awarded the Archibald Grey medal, the highest award of the British Association of Dermatologists. Mackie wrote an undergraduate textbook, Clinical Dermatology, which was well received in the UK and overseas, and ran to five editions. It won the BMA prize for the best undergraduate textbook, a part of the prize being membership of the Society of Authors (read more). In the late 1980s, the laboratory facilities in the rear section of the Anderson College were inadequate for future development.The dermatology department therefore raised significant sums to enable them to be rehoused in the 4th and 5th floors of the newly built Robertson Building, Western Infirmary, giving the department the best laboratory facilities of any dermatology department in the UK. Dr David Greenhalgh was appointed as a third non clinical senior lecturer in the department in 1992. Mackie retired in 2000, and the University suspended the chair. Dr Malcolm Hodgins was appointed as a reader and non clinical head of department, and the close link between clinical and scientific activities was lost. Hodgins retired in 2006, and the medical mycology section of the department moved to medical microbiology based in Stobhill Hospital. The laboratory space available to dermatology was reduced to one floor of the Robertson building in 2010, and in 2014 the one remaining non clinical senior lecturer,  Dr Greenhalgh, was relocated to the Institute of Cancer Studies in Glasgow Royal Infirmary. The Scottish Melanoma Group. Mackie, together with colleagues, established the Scottish Melanoma Group in 1979 with the aim of obtaining accurate epidemiological data on melanoma in Scotland. This initial aim was extended to providing a multidisciplinary research and treatment group, involving plastic surgeons (Mr Ian Mcgregor and Mr David Soutar) and vascular surgeons who led the arterial limb perfusion service (Mr Alan Mackay and Mr Dominique Byrne). A steady stream of high impact papers was published throughout the 1990s as a result of these collaborations. Clinical trials and Collaboration with Department of Medical Genetics. The department played a major role in clinical trials for patients with later stages of melanoma in collaboration with the World Health Organisation Melanoma Group and the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer.As a result of data gathered for the Scottish Melanoma Group, a large cluster of familial melanoma patients was referred to the Dermatology Department which led to research into the molecular genetic basis of melanoma susceptibility. A fruitful collaboration was developed with the University Department of Medical Genetics. The Dermatology Department became one of the two UK based academic centres working within Genomel, a European framework programme -funded collaborative group. A large number of significant high impact papers have been published by this group.   NHS Dermatology Contributions. In Glasgow Royal Infirmary in the 1960s and 1970s, Dr Alan Lyell worked with Dr (later Professor) Sir John Arbuthnott to follow up Lyell’s description of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (Lyell’s Disease) with studies on the implicated staphylococcal toxins. Postgraduate clinical training also took place at the Royal Infirmary, and from the mid-1990s throughout the West of Scotland. NHS consultants conducting research of international significance were recognised by the award of Honorary Professorships. These were Colin Munro (2002) in South Glasgow for work on molecular mechanisms of genodermatoses, and David Burden (2010) in the Western Infirmary for genetic and therapeutic studies of psoriasis. In 2006, Glasgow NHS dermatology services were combined into an integrated service unit, and Alan Lyell was able to attend the inauguration of the new Allan Lyell Centre for Dermatology, named in his honour. In 2015, the reorganisation of clinical and teaching services in Glasgow concentrated this dermatological specialist experience in the new Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Govan, providing a platform for continuing clinical research.Professor Rona Mackie Images provided by Professor Mackie 20th Century   Diabetes > The University of Glasgow uses cookies for analytics and advertising. Find out more about our Privacy policy. privacy settings close We use cookies Necessary cookies. Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences. Analytics cookies. Analytical cookies help us improve our website. We use Google Analytics. All data is anonymised. Switch analytics ON OFF Hotjar. Hotjar helps us to understand and improve our users’ behaviour by visually representing their clicks, taps and scrolling. All data is anonymised. Switch hotjar ON OFF Marketing cookies. 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  • dermatology
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  • mackie
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  • cooky
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  • glasgow
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  • medical
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  • university
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  • dr
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  • group
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  • dermatology department
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  • western
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  • uk
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  • marketing
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  • glasgow royal infirmary
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  • scottish melanoma group
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  • anderson college
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  • rona mackie
  • 3
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  • clinical senior
  • 3
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  • nh dermatology
  • 3
  • 23
  • glasgow royal
  • 3
  • 23
  • scottish melanoma
  • 3
  • 23
  • marketing cooky
  • 3
  • 23
Result 24
TitleDr. Lauren Evans | Skin Consultations | Aesthetic Clinic in Glasgow
Urlhttps://www.drlaurenevans.com/
DescriptionDr. Lauren Evans is an aesthetic clinic based in Glasgow, Scotland that provides dermal fillers, anti-wrinkle injections, and medical micro needling
Date
Organic Position24
H1★ VIRTUAL SKIN CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE ★
H2AVAILABLE SERVICES
CLIENT TESTIMONIALS
GET IN TOUCH
H3Kate
Lesley
Abigail
H2WithAnchorsAVAILABLE SERVICES
CLIENT TESTIMONIALS
GET IN TOUCH
Body★ VIRTUAL SKIN CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE ★Lauren provides virtual skin consultations for a variety of cosmetic skin concerns,including ageing skin, dullness, pigmentation, acne, rosacea, and sun damage.Your booking will include a full skin questionnaire, a 20-30 minute virtual consultation, and this willbe followed by a full skin report emailed to you within 72 hours that includes all your concerns,your skin findings, and recommendations, so you leave feeling more empowered about your skinand how to achieve your skin goals.If you would rather an in person skin consultation, Lauren will soon be providing this at Advanced Dentistry in Hyndland.Book your Virtual Skin ConsultationLearn More AVAILABLE SERVICES. With Dr Lauren Evans you know you're in safe hands. With 7 years of aesthetics experience and 4 years as an aesthetics trainer, Lauren is skilled at assessing the whole face and listening to your concerns as well as your budget to create a bespoke treatment just for you. With her bubbly, friendly approach, you'll feel right at ease. She is able to provide the following services:Introductory ConsultationVirtual and in person Skin ConsultationsDermal FillersAnti-wrinkle InjectionsProfound Skin TreatmentsChemical PeelsMedical MicroneedlingDaily Skincare AdviceBook an AppointmentMore Info CLIENT TESTIMONIALS. I cannot recommend Lauren enough!!! So professional, made me feel comfortable & explained the whole procedure from start to finish. The loveliest, friendliest, sweetest person. I will most definitely be visiting Lauren again. Thank you xKate. Dr Evans was very polite and professional. I was apprehensive about my first aesthetics treatment. She took the time to explain thoroughly and answered all of my questions before any treatment was administered. The treatment itself was painless and quick. Very happy with the procedure. I would absolutely recommend her professional services and I will 100% be back. Thank you again xLesley. I have visited Lauren for a number of years for treatment and I wouldn't go to anyone else. She never fails to put me at ease and her treatments always have amazing lasting results. I couldn't recommend her enough. A great experience from start to finish and aftercare is second to none too!Abigail. See more reviews on GoogleSee more reviews on Instagram GET IN TOUCH. Lauren operates out the well renowned private dental clinic,Advanced Dentistry, in Glasgow's West End To book an appointment, call 0141 339 7579154 Hyndland Road, Hyndland,Glasgow, G12 [email protected]  
Topics
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  • 24
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  • 24
  • consultation
  • 4
  • 24
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  • aesthetic
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Result 25
TitleBest Cigna Dermatologists Near Me in Glasgow, KY | Zocdoc
Urlhttps://www.zocdoc.com/dermatologists/glasgow-ky-251113pm/cigna-307m
DescriptionFind Cigna Dermatologists in Glasgow, Kentucky & make an appointment online instantly! Zocdoc helps you find Dermatologists in Glasgow and other locations ...
Date
Organic Position25
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TitleThe 10 best dermatologists in Glasgow, West Dunbartonshire
Urlhttps://www.starofservice.co.uk/dir/scotland/west-dunbartonshire/glasgow/dermatology
DescriptionSee here the whole list of our best dermatologists from Glasgow and their surroundings reviewed by StarOfService community from West Dunbartonshire ...
Date
Organic Position26
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Result 27
TitleThe Dermatology Referral Service - Home
Urlhttps://www.facebook.com/vetdermreferrals/
DescriptionThe Dermatology Referral Service is a veterinary practice based in Glasgow and Aberdeen that... 528 Paisley Road West, G51 1RN Glasgow, UK
Date
Organic Position27
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Result 28
TitleGlasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology | Care Opinion
Urlhttps://www.careopinion.org.uk/services/g107h_330
DescriptionFeedback from patients and carers about Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology
Date
Organic Position28
H1Dermatology
H2(Glasgow Royal Infirmary)
Other services from Glasgow Royal Infirmary
10 stories have been told about Dermatology
Keyboard Shortcuts
H3Search within results
H2WithAnchors(Glasgow Royal Infirmary)
Other services from Glasgow Royal Infirmary
10 stories have been told about Dermatology
Keyboard Shortcuts
BodyDermatology (Glasgow Royal Infirmary) . Description Use this page to find stories people have written about this service Address G4 0SF Resources G4 0SF Dermatology Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde Other services from Glasgow Royal Infirmary . 10 stories have been told about Dermatology . Search within results. Latest stories Latest responses Latest changes Story Progress Activity "Dermatologist was unprofessional" STORY HAS A RESPONSE Response 10 months ago About: Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology "Nearly 6 months later and still not seen" STORY HAS A RESPONSE Response 12 months ago About: Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology and New Stobhill Hospital / Dermatology "Dermatology issue" STORY HAS A RESPONSE Response about a year and a half ago About: Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology "I felt belittled" CHANGE PLANNED Response 2 years ago About: Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology "Nothing but praise for all the nurses" STORY HAS A RESPONSE Response 2 years ago About: Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology "Very professional, enthusiastic, knowledgeable" STORY HAS A RESPONSE Response 2 years ago About: Glasgow Royal Infirmary / Dermatology First Prev 1 2 Next Last Loading blog posts for this service Keyboard Shortcuts. Navigation Shortcut Help ? Go to Home g + h Go to Tell Your Story g + t Go to About Us g + a Actions Focus Search Box /
Topics
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  • dermatology
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  • glasgow
  • 10
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  • glasgow royal infirmary
  • 9
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  • infirmary dermatology
  • 8
  • 28
  • royal infirmary dermatology
  • 7
  • 28
  • response response
  • 7
  • 28
  • year
  • 7
  • 28
  • ago glasgow royal
  • 6
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  • 6
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  • 6
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  • 3
  • 28
  • year ago glasgow
  • 3
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  • latest
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Result 29
TitleMinor Surgery & Aesthetic Clinic Glasgow | Altruderm
Urlhttps://altruderm.co.uk/
DescriptionWelcome to the Altruderm Clinic, Newton Mearns, led by Dr. Kieron McDaid. Your first choice for minor surgery and dermatology procedures in Glasgow
Date
Organic Position29
H1Minor Surgery &Dermatology Procedures
H2Welcome to Altruderm Minor Surgery & Aesthetic Clinic
H3Minor Surgery Service
At Altruderm We Take Pride in Offering
AlumierMD Skin Care
H2WithAnchorsWelcome to Altruderm Minor Surgery & Aesthetic Clinic
BodyMinor Surgery &Dermatology Procedures Minor Surgery & Dermatology Procedures Welcome to Altruderm Minor Surgery & Aesthetic Clinic. Looking for a regulated minor skin surgery clinic in Glasgow? Thinking about mole removal? Is building a relationship with your practitioner and receiving a highly personalised level of care throughout your treatment journey important to you? Read our latest HIS Inspection Report here We’re Glad You Found Us Our areas of expertise are minor skin surgery and dermatology reflecting the skills, training and experience of our Clinical Director, Dr. Kieron McDaid. We offer a broad range of treatments and use advanced technology to achieve the best cosmetic outcome and are pleased to be Scotland’s only private clinic to offer Ellman radiowave surgery as a leading technique in mole removal. BOOK A CONSULTATION We believe consultation is fundamental to ensuring you make an informed decision when it comes to choosing the right treatment. Dr. McDaid will devise your treatment plan alongside you based on assessing your skin and listening to your specific concerns and you will be treated by him throughout your treatment journey in the clinic. Minor Surgery Service. You may be looking for a minor surgery clinic because you have a lump or bump that you would like diagnosed and/or removed. At the Altruderm clinic, our consultation process will establish the best course of action.  We carry out a broad range of minor surgical procedures on a day-case basis in the clinic with all specimens sent to the histopathology lab to confirm diagnosis. Contact us today to find out more about our minor surgery service. At Altruderm We Take Pride in Offering. A first-class minor surgery service Doctor-led, contemporary clinic Advanced technology to aid diagnostics and patient outcomes Bespoke treatment plan and aftercare A discreet location with private parking A first-class minor surgery service Doctor-led, contemporary clinic Advanced technology to aid diagnostics and patient outcomes Bespoke treatment plan and aftercare A discreet location with private parking We uphold the highest standards of patient care and are registered with the independent regulator Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS). AlumierMD Skin Care. We prescribe the luxurious and scientifically effective AlumierMD professional skin care range to treat a wide variety of skin concerns including the signs of ageing, acne, pigmentation and rosacea. A consultation at Altruderm will identify your skin profile and allow us to customise a skin care regime suited to your individual needs. With in-clinic treatments supported by homecare products the range delivers therapeutic doses of active ingredients to address multiple skin concerns, produce exceptional results and work progressively over time. I’m so happy with the removal of my mole. It’s allowed me to gain in confidence. I feel great and that’s thanks to Dr McDaid and the Altruderm clinic. Emma M Altruderm operate a fantastic service which is friendly, calming and informative at all stages and I am very pleased to be able to return at any time to have a consultation on any skin concerns and would also recommend my family and friends and anyone with concerns to consider attending the clinic. I cannot thank the Altruderm ‘team’ enough in the care and attention to my concerns and the detailed description of treatments and procedures. Alan C Fantastic experience. Made to feel extremely comfortable, everything explained and my questions answered. I would highly recommend. Great results. Lorraine B I can’t recommend Altruderm enough. I went to Dr McDaid to have a mole removed on my nose after being told by the NHS that they would not remove it. Having this procedure done has really changed my life and confidence and I can’t thank the clinic enough for everything! Katie B I highly recommend Altruderm. Very friendly, professional and a beautiful immaculate place. So happy with my results can’t thank you enough! Danielle F View all testimonials We have enhanced our safety measures in the clinic during the Coronavirus pandemic. Read More Book a Consultation
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  • minor surgery
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  • care
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  • consultation
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  • concern
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  • procedure
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  • minor surgery service
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  • surgery service
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  • highly
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  • private
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  • mole
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  • dr
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  • mcdaid
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  • range
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  • surgery dermatology
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  • advanced technology
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  • skin care
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  • skin concern
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  • dermatology
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  • removal
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  • advanced
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  • technology
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Result 30
TitleHistory of the Scottish Dermatological Society | Scottish Dermatological Society
Urlhttps://www.sds.org.uk/history/history-scottish-dermatological-society
Description
Date
Organic Position30
H1History of the Scottish Dermatological Society
H2
H3History of the Scottish Dermatological Society
Foreword
The Early Years
After the War
The Modern Era
Conclusion
References
Acknowledgements
Appendix
H2WithAnchors
BodyHistory of the Scottish Dermatological Society Home SDS History History of the Scottish Dermatological Society. Gordon Fraser MD FRCP(Ed), Consultant Dermatologist, Raigmore Hospital, Inverness Foreword. The Scottish Dermatological Society, previously known as the North British Dermatological Society, has been in existence for over sixty years. During that time it has provided a forum for clinical dermatology, and, particularly in more recent times, for the presentation of material more specifically scientific or educational in nature, and the discussion of diverse matters relating to the practice of dermatology. But almost as important as the formal proceedings, have been the informal exchanges among members. This has not only been a useful supplement from a professional standpoint, but has fostered a spirit of friendliness and encourages a sense of common purpose. The result has been a Society able to adapt in a progressive manner to the changing demands made upon it, so that today it is stronger and more active than at any time in its history.  The Early Years. The Society was founded in December 1924 by Sir Norman Walker (Figure 1), physician-in-charge of the Skin Department at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh (Figure 2) and the senior Scottish dermatologist. An able administrator as well as a distinguished dermatologist, he convened a meeting in his department of dermatologists from all four Scottish centres, together with Dr Robert (later Sir Robert) Bolam from Newcastle. The group consisted of thirteen dermatologists in all: five from Glasgow, four from Edinburgh, two from Dundee and one each from Aberdeen and Newcastle. Figure 2: Entrance to the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh (Photograph by courtesy of the Medical Illustration Department, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh) The inclusion of Newcastle arose from the close friendship between Sir Norman Walker and Sir Robert Bolam, a friendship which had arisen from their membership of the General Medical Council. Both were active and prominent members of that body, and used to travel together to the meetings in London. Later, after the death of his friend, Sir Norman was to write: 'In the North Bolam was held in very high esteem and when we decided to have a Scottish organisation we felt we must have Bolam with us, even at the cost of calling it North British - a name not popular, in Scotland (1) While the name may not have been universally popular, the liaison itself worked well, and led to the Newcastle dermatologists having closer ties with the Scottish group than with their colleagues in England. At that first meeting in Edinburgh cases were demonstrated by the four local dermatologists, and the task of arranging the next meeting and drawing up the rules and constitution of the Society was assigned to Dr Herbert Brown of Glasgow and Dr Cranston Low of Edinburgh. Rules and Constitution. The second meeting was held at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow (Figure 3), on Thursday 12 March 1925, with Dr Wylie Nicol, physician-in-charge of the Skin Department and the senior Glasgow dermatologist, in the chair. The rules were presented and agreed (See Appendix). The Society was to be called the North British Dermatological Society (NBDS), and was to meet three times a year - March, June and December - with one meeting in Edinburgh, one in Glasgow and the other held in rotation between Aberdeen, Dundee and Newcastle. Figure 3: Entrance to the Skin Wards at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow. Originally, this had been the entrance to the Glasgow Skin Dispensary in Elmbank Street, but was re-erected a the Western Infirmary after the Dispensary closed in 1908. (Reproduced by Mr I McKie, by permission of Professor R M MacKie) By tradition the Edinburgh meeting was always held in December, the Glasgow meeting in March and the meeting in the other three centres in June. Incidentally, the venue of the Glasgow meeting remained the Western Infirmary until 1930, when a rotation began with the Victoria Infirmary and the Royal Infirmary. However, all Glasgow dermatologists were involved in the presentation of cases irrespective of the venue. The Society was to have a Secretary who would be responsible for arranging the meetings, and the chairman was to be voted in at each meeting. Qualifications for membership were not stipulated, but in the ballot vote one adverse vote in five was to exclude. This check was scarcely necessary, however, for in the pre-War period only senior dermatologists were proposed for membership. Figure 4: Dr Cranston Low (left), the first Secretary of the Society, with Dr Allan Jamieson (centre), the father of Edinburgh dermatology, and Dr Norman Walker. The photograph was taken in Ward 2 of the Royal Infirmary some time after Dr Jamieson's retiral in 1906. (Photograph by courtesy of Dr N Cranston Low). The first Secretary of the Society, appointed at the second meeting, was Dr Cranston Low (Figure 4). A popular and interesting figure, he was a gifted artist (Figure 5) as well as a dermatologist of international repute. Later, when he retired from dermatology he was to abandon his original intention of devoting his time to painting, and returned to medicine, this time to bacteriology where he achieved further distinction by editing a highly successful Atlas of Bacteriology with Mr Tom Dodds. (2) Figure 5: 'The Vaults', a watercolour painting by Cranston Low. It was painted in 1901 while he was still a medical student. (Photograph by the Department of Medical Illustration, Leicester Royal Infirmary, by permission of Dr N Cranston Low.) Development of the Society. Meetings of the Society were held almost invariably on Thursday afternoons with a starting time which varied between 2 and 4 pm. The third Thursday of the month was the most popular date but the second Thursday was also popular, particularly for the Edinburgh meeting. The number of members attending was small, averaging about 10 and never more than 15 in the pre-War years. Indeed, attendance at meetings outside Edinburgh and Glasgow was always below average, and fell to only four, including the host, Dr Tom Anderson, at the Aberdeen meeting in 1936. Such was the disappointment and annoyance of those present that a notice of motion was tabled which stated that 'there should be a fine of 6d for non-attendance, this to be used to cover postage' ! Happily, at the next meeting in Edinburgh wiser counsels prevailed and a levy of 6d was placed on each member present. Unlike the fine, this was quite in order as the imposition of levies as required had been sanctioned by the constitution of 1925. Incidentally, an annual subscription was not introduced until 1971. The amended constitution of 1950 had stated: 'There shall be an annual subscription of half-a-crown to cover secretarial and other costs' but this had never been implemented. The meetings themselves consisted of clinical and business sections. In the clinical part, patients were brought into the room where members were gathered and presented to the assembled group. This practice was modified in 1932 when the Society agreed with Sir Norman Walker's suggestion that members be allowed to examine patients before they were presented. The only addition to clinical material in the pre- War years was the introduction of discussion on selected topics. However, only one such discussion took place when infectious eczematoid dermatitis was considered at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow in March 1939. The report states that most of the members took part. In the business section of meetings little appears to have transpired apart from election of new members, but in 1926 Sir Norman Walker did ask for statistics of lupus vulgaris, a condition in which he had a special interest. There is, however, no record of a response to this request. One other matter considered was publication of the more unusual cases seen. Before this could be implemented, rule 7 of the constitution which stated that no report of the proceedings was to be sent to the lay or medical press, had to be amended. Figure 6: Original patient with multiple squamous carcinomata with spontaneous healing, showing depressed scars and slightly active lesions affecting the inferior surface of the nasal vestibules. (Reproduced by permission of the British Journal of Dermatology.) This was duly carried out, agreement on publication obtained from the Editor of the British journal of Dermatology and Syphilis and the first report published in May 1934. (3) Of note in this submission was a summary of the original patient of Dr John Ferguson Smith with multiple squamous carcinomata with spontaneous healing. (Figure 6) This patient had been shown at the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow in March and was more fully documented in the subsequent issue of the journal. (4) The onset of the Second World War in 1939 brought this period in the Society's history to a close as meetings were suspended until the War was over. Only limited change had taken place in these pre-War years, and the total number of members enrolled during this period was only 25. But the Society had become firmly established and was ready for the challenge of the post-War era. Never again, however, was it to regain the informality and friendliness of these early years. After the War. When the Society eventually reassembled in the Victoria Infirmary in Glasgow (Figure 7) on Thursday, 21 March 1946, it's leading figure, Sir Norman Walker was dead. He had died in November 1942. At that meeting the chairman Dr Herbert Brown, after referring with deep regret to Sir Norman Walker's decease, noted with pleasure the appointment of Dr George Percival to the newly established Chair of Dermatology in the University of Edinburgh - the first University Chair of Dermatology in Britain. Professor Percival was to play as prominent a role in the affairs of the Society in the post-War period as Sir Norman Walker had done in the pre-War era. Figure 7: Victoria Infirmary of Glasgow, venue of the first post-War meeting. (Photograph by courtesy of the Medical Illustration Department, Victoria Infirmary). Political Awakening. Two main issues concerned the Society at this time. The first, and one in which Professor Percival played a leading role, was the future of dermatology, particularly in Scotland, in the light of the imminent establishment of the National Health Service. Two extraordinary meetings were held in Edinburgh in 1947 and 1948 respectively, at the first of which a Subcommittee was formed to collate statistics of outpatients attending the various centres. It appeared from the figures obtained that in Glasgow and Edinburgh one in twelve of the total population were seen annually as skin patients. Numbers attending other centres were somewhat lower. At the second of the extraordinary meetings Society policy, which was to be available for the Scottish Home and Health Department if requested, was formally adopted. It was agreed that: 'No new major dermatological centre is at present required in Scotland.' The possibility of a major centre at Inverness had been considered, but Professor Percival moved against . 'With the possible exception of Inverness, no new subsidiary dermatological centre shall be created unless there is a likelihood of an annual attendance thereat of not less than 2,000 patients. Such a centre, if set up, shall be visited weekly by a specialist in dermatology.' 'There must be adequate bed accommodation in main and subsidiary centres for skin cases, the ratio being one bed per 5,000 of the population.' 'Nursing staff for centres shall be in ratio of one nurse to two patients and there shall be one bath provided for five beds.' 'Main units shall have at least four specialists working in it. Juniors intending to specialise will be trained in such units and there must be ready access to adequate laboratory and library facilities if teaching was to be successful.' One other subject discussed at these special meetings was the possibility of a Diploma in Dermatology but, although promoted by Professor Percival, it did not receive general support. Amending the Constitution. The second major issue to which the post-War Society directed its attention was a review of the constitution. This was carried out in 1950 by a small Subcommittee formed as a result of prompting by Dr James Sommerville of Glasgow, who had sought clarification of the qualifications required for membership and the procedure to be followed in the election of members. But even before this review the Society had begun to change its practices. In December 1948, it had been agreed for the sake of standardisation that meetings be held on the second Thursday of the month. To some of the members at least this had been the date fixed by tradition even although it had been honoured more in the breach than the observance. At all events, the agreement did by and large hold firm. More significantly the Society also decided at this time to hold a second annual meeting in Glasgow in October. This was to alternate between Stobhill General Hospital and the Southern General Hospital, while the March meeting continued as before. As with the other local centres all Glasgow dermatologists were invited to contribute cases to meetings at these hospitals, a practice which continued into the late Fifties. This pattern of meetings in Glasgow was not to change until the Southern General Hospital decided to withdraw from the rotation in 1968, and combine with the Western Infirmary, with which it had a close working relationship. The venue of the other meetings throughout the Society's area did not alter, although meetings at various peripheral centres had been mooted, and the possibility of one in Ayrshire considered but rejected in 1956. These innovations were incorporated into the new Constitution by the Subcommittee along with other changes. On the question of membership the Subcommittee decided that those who held, or had held, a post above the rank of Junior House Officer in a Dermatological Unit or University Department were eligible. Later, in 1956, after a postal ballot the minimum requirement was altered to the grade of Registrar. The result of this relaxation of entry qualifications was a significant increase in membership with the average attendance at meetings in the Fifties rising to about 20. Then again the Subcommittee proposed that the chairman at each meeting would be the senior dermatologist of the host unit, rather than a member who had been voted in. All these recommendations were accepted by the Society and in addition the Subcommittee was instructed to include a further rule proposed by Dr John Kinnear of Dundee allowing Honorary Membership. No such members, however, were elected. Finally, from the Secretary's notes, it appears that the possible election of a President on an annual basis was considered. More Business. These were not the only issues confronting the Society at this time. Many other matters were discussed leading to expansion of the business section of meetings. In 1951, the Society, seeking to publicise its active and vigorous nature, obtained the agreement of the Editor of the British Journal of Dermatology to resume publication of Society proceedings. There were, however, many difficulties in this arrangement which kept the item irritatingly under review. On the one hand there was the selection of cases to be submitted and the adequacy of the material presented, and on the other editorial reluctance to publish mere lists of cases. Then again, in 1962, Professor Percival raised the question of the propriety of advertisement for a Senior Registrar post in dermatology which asked for a higher degree but did not require experience in dermatology. As a result, representation was made to the Department of Health and the Consultants and Specialists Committee and the Society itself set up a Subcommittee to review the training of dermatologists in Scotland. Two other issues which figured prominently were case reporting for the Ministry of National Insurance and training in dermatology for nurses. The former problem was mainly concerned with the fact that these reports undertaken in private practice commanded a fee, whereas when completed in hospital practice, often by the same consultant, no fee was payable. Representation on this issue was made to Sir Kenneth Cowan, Medical Officer of Health for Scotland and eventually a statutory fee became payable for all these reports. As to training in dermatology for nurses, the concern here was that this was being reduced and was no longer obligatory. The response of the General Nursing Council was to point out that training could not be obligatory if it was not universally available, but the assurance was given that dermatology would continue to be taught wherever facilities allowed. Educational Content. Alongside the increased prominence of business matters in the post-War Society, was evidence of a desire for a greater educational content in meetings. In 1949, Dr James Innes, a haematologist gave a short paper at the Edinburgh meeting on The Technique and Dangers of Nitrogen Mustard Therapy in Reticuloendotheliosis and this practice was repeated from time to time. In 1953 discussion on selected topics was revived and was continued for five years despite limitations which were reflected in the minutes: 'A short discussion on the treatment of infantile eczema shed little light on the subject!' or 'A spirited but very inconclusive discussion followed on 'Is nummular eczema an entity?' The desire for presentation of more substantive information is also seen in the Society's acceptance of Dr Herbert Brown's suggestion in 1954 that each meeting should include a group of cases for discussion. These cases were to be notified to members beforehand but the procedure proved too difficult to implement. Although at the Edinburgh meeting later that year three cases of porphyria were shown, followed by a short talk on the general aspects of the condition by a physician, Dr Alastair Macgregor. More significantly in 1958 Dr Owen Finn of Dundee (later of Stirling), stimulated by the development of postgraduate education in England and also desirous of helping younger members acquire the skill of presenting papers in a friendly atmosphere, proposed that one meeting every 18 months should be set aside for papers only. Aware of the likely opposition who would argue that such an innovation would be in competition with the British Association of Dermatology and the Royal Society of Medicine, Dr Finn deliberately set his sights low in the hope of obtaining agreement. Professor Percival for one appeared to be sympathetic, but on the suggestion that papers would last thirty to sixty minutes his riposte was: 'No paper should last longer than twenty minutes. If a person cannot say his piece in twenty minutes he either does not know his subject or his material is badly prepared!' The outcome was an agreement that at one meeting each year a paper of twenty minutes would be delivered in place of the discussion of cases. Consequently, Dr Jack Alexander of Glasgow spoke on: The Role of Hyaluronidase in Dermatitis Herpetiformis at the Edinburgh meeting in 1959. Unfortunately, the meeting also included a period of case discussion and as a result of trying to accomplish too much in a limited time the practice was not repeated. The difficulty of accommodating in an afternoon session all that members expected from the Society had been fully debated before Dr Alexander's paper was delivered. Indeed, the clinical section of the meeting at the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow in March 1959 had been restricted to six cases, so that the 'The future of the Society' could be considered. The keenness of the discussion was thought to augur well for the Society, but no further change was forthcoming and indeed the previous authorisation for a yearly paper was only reaffirmed reluctantly . Desire for Change. Society meetings in the Sixties must have been very different from the relaxed and leisurely gatherings of earlier times. The membership roll had increased markedly in the post-War years with an average attendance at meetings in the Sixties rising to over 20. Many of the new recruits were from the junior ranks and among this group in particular, expectations were high. They looked for change to accommodate new developments. Others, already carrying a heavy work load, were reluctant to set aside time for meetings. Despite the reservations of this latter group, it was agreed in 1963 to ballot members on holding whole-day meetings. Those who voted for change were still in the minority but it was now a substantial minority, and as a result it was decided to allow individual units to determine their own timetable. The next meeting after this decision, the summer meeting in Dundee in 1464 was a whole-day meeting. It was considered a real success with a high standard of hospitality, but it did not set a new pattern; although a second whole-day meeting was held in Aberdeen in June 1969. A change in practice which was established at this time was in the recording of minutes. From 1924 they had been kept in the Minute Book, the contents of which were not communicated to the membership at large, but from 1965 minutes of the business section of meetings were circulated to all members. 'Wee Red Book'. Figure 8: Minute Book or ''Wee Red Book'. As a record of the Society's history the Minute Book or ''Wee Red Book' (Figure 8) as it was otherwise known, has proved invaluable and much of interest can be gleaned from perusal of its pages. Indeed, its very existence is a matter of interest for rule 7 in the original constitution had stated: 'The meetings shall be quite informal. No minutes shall be kept...' Not until the constitution was revised in 1950 was the keeping of minutes officially sanctioned. Despite that the Minute Book contains a careful record of Society proceedings from the beginning. But there is something of a mystery in the entry for 1929. Only one meeting is detailed for that year, the Edinburgh meeting in December. However, it would appear that in 1935 Dr John Kinnear, who had been appointed Secretary in 1932, pencilled in the dates of two further meetings in 1929 and altered the numbering of subsequent meetings by adding two (Figure 9). Were these unminuted meetings actually held in 1929 and if so, why had the Secretary, Dr Cranston Low failed to record them? The explanation may lie in the fact that after the death of Dr Wylie Nicol in 1928, Dr Goodwin-Tomkinson was appointed physician-in-charge of the Skin Department at the Western Infirmary. The March meeting of 1929 would normally have been held there, but may have been cancelled as Dr Goodwin-Tomkinson was at that time President of the British Association of Dermatology and Syphilology (BADS), and would have been preparing to host the annual meeting of that Association in Glasgow in June. Furthermore, and this too may be relevant, Dr Goodwin-Tomkinson was never a member of the NBDS. As to the June meeting, due for Dundee, study of the rotational programme indicates that this meeting was postponed for a year. This would have been consistent with the procedure adopted in 1934 and again in 1937 when the BADS also held its annual meeting in the Society's area in Newcastle and Edinburgh respectively. Oddly enough, these latter meetings of the BADS were entered in the Minute Book as joint meetings of both Societies, although reference to the minutes of the BADS does not reveal any acknowledgement of this arrangement. Figure 9: Page of Minute Book showing interpolated dates and alteration of the number originally ascribed to the December meeting. All this must cast some doubt on the numbering of Society meetings from 1929 onwards, and in particular on the validity of the celebration to mark the 100th meeting in June 1960 in Aberdeen. Although it was Aberdeen's right to host the 100th meeting with a founder member of the Society in the chair, it was only allowed after a vote. Presumably some members felt the celebratory meeting should have been held in Edinburgh or Glasgow. Be that as it may, the meeting itself was a resounding success. Figure 10: Station Hotel in Aberdeen where part of the 100th meeting was held. (Photograph by courtesy of the Medical Illustration Department, University of Aberdeen). A large number of members, many accompanied by their wives, gathered in the Station Hotel, Aberdeen (Figure 10) on the evening of Friday 3 June, and were entertained to sherry by Dr and Mrs Tom Anderson followed by a Society dinner. The following morning, cases were presented at the Royal Infirmary and discussed at length, with Dr Ferguson Smith, a founder member, in the chair. 'There was a pleasant feeling', wrote the Secretary, Dr Robert Carslaw of Glasgow, 'that time was unlimited and there was no need to watch the clock and catch the train.' Thereafter, members passed the afternoon playing golf, fishing and sightseeing. This was the first major social occasion in the Society's history; although dinners had been held after three of the meetings in the years 1947-48, the first at the North British Hotel, Glasgow in March 1947. The Minute Book, however, is coloured not only by its cases seen', to find Dr Carslaw writing of a meeting in the Western Infirmary in 1962:'after a rather meagre tea an interesting discussion of the cases followed.' Or again, at the very next meeting in Newcastle he wrote: 'Business concluded, a very lively discussion of the cases demonstrated took place, while Edinburgh and Newcastle battled on the field, Glasgow and Dundee stood on the sidelines.' Aberdeen appears to have stayed at home! The Modern Era. New Constitution. Distribution of the minutes to members was in itself an important step forward in facilitating the business of the Society, but those pressing for change looked for more radical reform. In 1968, a questionnaire was circulated to seek views on the preferred format of future meetings and on the formation of an Executive Committee to conduct the business of the Society. The proposal for an Executive Committee was accepted almost unanimously, but there was also majority support for whole-day meetings and the inclusion of peripheral centres in the rota. As a result, an Executive Committee was formed, comprising one member from each of the six regions in the Society's area and was asked first to redraft the constitution to accommodate the agreed changes. However, the Committee was divided between those who saw in the review an opportunity for radical reform, and those who interpreted the remit more literally, some of whom, it must be said, were opposed to any reform. Indeed, one Committee member striving to retain the informality of the past adopted the slogan: 'Down with formal meetings' In the event, amendments to the constitution were made but not such as would have been likely to alter significantly the conduct of the Society: a rule was introduced on the structure and function of an Executive Committee (already in existence) and on the holding of whole-day and half-day meetings (an option accepted by the Society in 1964). Other changes were even less radical, and many were disappointed with the outcome of the review. Despite that, it is likely that the draft constitution would have been accepted but for the intervention of Professor John Milne and Dr Alan Lyell of Glasgow. In a joint letter to the Secretary, they proposed that a Subcommittee be formed to consider again the future activities of the Society. This Subcommittee was to be more broadly based with representation not only on a regional basis but also on a proportional basis and containing members of the training grades. Such was the authority of these two senior members that their proposal was carried by a large majority. Following the vote a Subcommittee of 12 members was duly elected and met in Dundee on Saturday, 18 April 1970. Dr William Frain-Bell of Dundee was appointed chairman, and a comprehensive review was set in motion which was to lead to the most radical constitutional changes since 1925. All aspects of the Society were reviewed but appropriately the first item to be considered was the Society's name. Some felt that for the Society to represent Scottish dermatological opinion at national level the name should be changed to Scottish Dermatological Society (SDS). Others were reluctant to support the alteration without ascertaining the views of all members in the Newcastle and Carlisle areas. Later, when these views were obtained there was no dissenting voice, although one Newcastle member rather mischievously suggested that the Society be renamed the Scottish and Newcastle Dermatological Society and thereby enable tapping a similarly named, and even better known, organisation for funds! The change of name was subsequently ratified by the whole Society and thereafter, the desire of the Society to formulate national policy relating to the practice of dermatology in Scotland was incorporated into the new constitution. Other radical changes recommended by the Subcommittee involved membership, office bearers and the organisation of meetings. The constitution in operation at that time had restricted membership to dermatologists of at least Registrar status, but the Subcommittee recommended that membership should be open to those with 'an interest in dermatology', and should encompass scientifically qualified as well as medically qualified persons. The ethical problem of attendance of non-medical members at the clinical section of meetings was referred to the Medical and Dental Defence Union of Scotland and the Central Ethical Committee of the British Medical Association, but these bodies ruled that the practice was acceptable provided patients were informed that such persons would be present. As to the office bearers of the Society, there was to be a President elected for a period of three years and an Honorary Secretary/Treasurer and Assistant Secretary whose term of office was also set initially at three years but subsequently reduced to two years. The role of the Assistant Secretary was to attend to publication of Society proceedings and it was envisaged that normally this person would succeed the Secretary. An Executive Committee was to be formed and elected on a regional basis, with some deference to proportional representation by having two members from the Western region as opposed to one from each of the other five regions. Members were to serve for a period of two years. Separate representation of junior grades was not accepted, but an agreement was reached that such a member be co-opted, if not already on the Committee, when matters affecting the careers, training or work load of these grades were being considered. The other major constitutional reform recommended by the Subcommittee concerned the organisation of meetings. The rota for meetings was to be determined by the Executive Committee and was to include both teaching and peripheral centres. Only three meetings were to be held annually, one of which would be the Annual General Meeting (AGM). Whole-day meetings would not be mandatory but were to be encouraged, and would comprise clinical, scientific and business sections. Even the traditional Thursday came under review, and it was agreed that at least some meetings be held on Fridays. In practice, meetings were to continue on the second Thursday of the month in March and October (the March date was altered to February in 1973 to allow better spacing), but the AGM which began in Dundee in June 1971 with a two-day meeting on a Friday and Saturday, and a Society dinner on the Friday evening, was to continue on this pattern after the second successful two-day trial AGM in Aberdeen in 1972. Figure 11: Dr William Frain-Bell, the first President of the Society. (Photograph by courtesy of the Medical Illustration Service, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.) The complete recommendations of the Subcommittee were set before the Society in June 1970, and duly approved with only minor alterations. Thereafter, the procedure for the election of office bearers was set in motion and Dr Frain-Bell (Figure 11) whose firm yet tactful chairmanship of the Subcommittee had been a critical element in reaching a successful conclusion, was appointed the first President of the Society. The Executive Committee was also elected and set about the task of formally drawing up the constitution. This was finally completed in 1972, and accepted by the Society at the AGM at Aberdeen in June. Further alterations were made in 1974 to allow the election of Honorary Foreign Members, and again in 1975 to secure charity exemption. Guidance on the requirements for charity exemption was obtained from the constitution of the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD). Thus, the aims of the Society were amended to emphasise that Society activities were for the public benefit, and clauses were inserted to safeguard the charitable status of the Society in the event of future changes to the constitution and to provide for the disposal of Society funds in the event of its dissolution. These amendments were sufficient to satisfy the Inland Revenue who, incidentally had previously in 1973 allowed tax relief on subscriptions. A Political Voice. Figure 12: St Andrew's House in Edinburgh, home of the Scottish Home and Health Department. (Photograph by courtesy of the Property Services Agency.) A consequence of these latter constitutional changes was exclusion of the clause indicating the Society's wish to represent the interests of dermatology in Scotland at national level. This did not, however, prevent the pursuance of this aim. Indeed, dissatisfaction with new administrative structures, which channelled dermatological opinion through medical divisions and other committees to area health boards, added further impetus to this aspiration. Consequently, in 1975 Professor John Milne (President) and Dr John Saving of Edinburgh (Secretary) met Sir John Brotherston, Chief Medical Officer of the Scottish Home and Health Department at St Andrew's House (Figure 12) in Edinburgh, to clarify the relationship between the specialty and the Department. The advice received was that while representation on matters relating to dermatology was to be offered at local level through the available machinery, and at national level through the National Medical Consultative Committee, it could be made, if required, by direct contact with the office of the Chief Medical Officer. Following that, the opportunity for direct contact was regularly utilised mainly to discuss the Consultant and Senior Registrar establishment. Also, the National Medical Consultative Committee was approached in 1977 with a view to the establishment of a Subcommittee for dermatology. While that was refused, the Subcommittee for Medicine later agreed, in 1980, to accept a member nominated by the Society. Meanwhile, in 1978, the BAD had indicated their willingness to nominate the President of the SDS as the Scottish representative on its Executive Committee, and stated that the member would also be likely to serve as one of the BAD representatives on the Dermatologists' Subcommittee of the Central Committee for Hospital Medical Services. Thus, the desire for an effective political voice for the Society was fully realised. Business Old and New. The success of the Society in projecting itself on to the national medico-political scene was reflective of the increased activity to be seen at the business section of meetings. Many issues were discussed including several which had been considered previously. One such subject was education in dermatology. Undergraduate teaching was felt to be the responsibility of individual departments, but training of dermatologists was deemed the legitimate concern of the Society. Hence, publication of the range of facilities present in the Society's area was undertaken to allow individual units to take advantage of the opportunities available. Later, in 1985, the question of a Diploma in Dermatology, first mooted by Professor Percival in 1947, was raised again, but as before little support for this qualification was forthcoming. Another matter which had previously concerned the Society was the structure and staffing of dermatological units. Further consideration again stressed the importance of separate units with appropriate facilities, and expert nursing care. A bed complement of ten beds per 200,000 of the population, the guideline figure produced by the Medical Manpower Subcommittee of the BAD was accepted. In relation to medical staffing, the Consultant and Senior Registrar establishment was kept under continuous review by the Society, as noted above, and a ratio of one Consultant Dermatologist for 150,000-200,000 of the population was regarded as appropriate for most areas (the average figure for Scotland was quoted as 1 in 180,000). But other grades were also reviewed, including the Clinical Assistant grade where concern was expressed over training and career structure. Reappraisal of old problems, however, formed only part of the upsurge of business debate during this period. After an unsuccessful attempt to inaugurate a Mycosis Fungoides Register in 1967, the project was revived by Professor Rona MacKie of Glasgow in 1974. Also, a number of therapeutic issues were brought forward for discussion. In 1967, Dr Peter Grant of Inverness alerted the Society to the inclusion by the Standing Joint Committee on the Classification of Proprietary Preparations (5) of certain antihistamine and local anaesthetic creams in Category A (acceptable preparations) in Proplist. Complaint was made to the Committee on the grounds of the sensitising potential of these creams and they were reclassified in Category B (unacceptable preparations). However, a request to the Scottish Home and Health Department to ban the use of local antihistamine creams was unsuccessful. Another issue satisfactorily resolved was the request to the Society by Dr Robert Main of Aberdeen in 1973 for the provision of guidelines on the management of warts, in view of the increasing number of patients seeking treatment. A memorandum on this subject was prepared by Dr Mary Bunney of Edinburgh setting out available treatments and discussing the role of the general practitioner and dermatologist. The Society had hoped that this document might be circulated to all general practitioners, but the Scottish Home and Health Department ruled that it would be 'construed as advice on clinical matters' and thus unacceptable. They did, however, suggest publication and accordingly an article by Dr Bunney entitled A Rational Approach to the Management of Warts was published in the Prescribers' Journal in December 1974. (6) A circular from the Scottish Home and Health Department in 1979 setting out reservations on the use of PUVA treatment, (7) was carefully considered, and the value of this form of therapy defended provided it was used with proper safeguards. At the same time, the Society expressed concern over the lack of a standardised commercially available preparation of 8-methoxypsoralen. Other therapeutic matters considered included the inappropriate advertising of potent topical steroids for the treatment of dandruff and psoriasis, and the inability to prescribe special footwear for adults with contact dermatitis of the feet. Figure 13~ Gavel and base presented by Dr Robert Main in 1982. (Photograph by courtesy of Professor R M MacKie.) On a rather different note, there were during this period, two submissions of a more symbolic than practical significance, reflecting the increased vigour and self-esteem of the Society. Dr Main at the end of his Presidency in 1982, presented a gavel and base (Figure 13) on which were to be inscribed the names of each of the Society's Presidents. Then, in 1986, the Society accepted a motif (Figure 14) designed by the Medical Illustration Department at Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, at the suggestion of Dr Gordon Fraser, recording its inception in 1924 and symbolising its origins, with the thistle to represent Scotland and three castles to represent Newcastle. With some modification to the design, the motif obtained the approval of the Lord Lyon King of Arms. Figure 14: Society motif with the thistle to represent Scotland and the three castles to represent Newcastle. Papers, Lectures and Symposia. Even more striking than the success achieved in the business section of meetings, was the advancement of the scientific section. Short papers of up to 15 minutes each, usually of an investigative or therapeutic nature, but occasionally reporting or reviewing clinical material or commenting on a historical aspect of dermatology, were delivered. The pattern set was for three or four papers to be delivered in the morning of Ordinary Meetings, and seven or eight throughout the Friday of the AGM. These papers proved successful and in 1973 at the suggestion of Dr Main, a Society Prize was instituted for the most outstanding paper of the year. Funded by Imperial Chemical Industries pie, the Prize ran for five years before the predetermined review decided to discontinue it on the grounds that adjudication was too difficult in a small Society. More successful was the resolution passed in 1971 to publish extracts of papers read to the Society in the Scottish Medical Journal. The cost of this was defrayed by financial support from E R Squibb and Sons Ltd, whose Medical director, Dr Derek Chalmers, formerly Senior Registrar in Dermatology in Edinburgh, was a member of the Society. Furthermore, in 1984, another drug company, Glare Laboratories Ltd, agreed to sponsor the circulation of abstracts of papers prior to meetings. Figure 15: Professor Hermann Pinkus, the first Honorary Foreign Member of the Society. (Photograph by courtesy of Professor R M MacKie.) Other innovations which added to the Society's provision for the intellectual and educational welfare of its members, were the introduction of an annual guest lecture and occasional one-day symposia and the setting up of an informal Contact Dermatitis Group by Dr Paul Burton of Kirkcaldy in 1984. The guest lecture, incorporated into the AGM, was started in 1974 when Professor Hermann Pinkus (Figure 15) of Detroit spoke in Newcastle on Clinical Manifestations of Elastic Fibre Disturbances. At the same meeting, Professor Pinkus was elected the first Honorary Foreign Member of the Society. The guest lecture was continued annually, and an agreement on financial sponsorship reached with Roche Products Ltd in 1986. Not So Different. Amidst all this change the clinical section of meetings remained much as it always had been, although the Seventies and Eighties saw a trend towards the demonstration of larger numbers of patients - about 25 on average. This had the advantage of allowing a more satisfactory dispersal of those attending, by then regularly over 60 in number, but it did once again put pressure on the time available for discussion. Suggestions were made to limit the number of patients shown, to divide them into those shown for teaching purposes and those shown for discussion, and to notify members beforehand of the cases to be demonstrated. Apart from the latter suggestion which was considered too difficult to implement, the others were accepted. In practice, however, little change occurred. Publication of selected cases in the British Journal of Dermatology continued sporadically as before, until the practice petered out in the early Seventies. In addition, from 1967-70, case reports were also published in the Scottish Medical Journal. This had been arranged on a payment per page basis, with E R Squibb & Sons Ltd (through Dr Chalmers) agreeing to meet the cost. Finally, while the advent of the new constitution brought to an end the fixed rotation of meetings begun in 1925, the Executive Committee, ably guided by Dr Peter Grant, continued to rotate meetings equitably between the main teaching hospitals. However, the declared aim of involving peripheral centres was not realised untiI Dr Adrian Ive hosted a meeting at Dryburn Hospital (Figure 16), Durham in February 1977. Other centres involved later were Inverness, Carlisle and Airdrie. Indeed, the Inverness meeting became part of the seven year rotation of AGM's through the six regions of the Society (two of these meetings were allocated to the Western region). Another development in this area, although the practice had been recorded in the Thirties, was the holding of joint meetings with other societies: the Society met with the Dowling Club in Edinburgh in 1977 and 1987, and with the Scottish Pharmaceutical Sciences Group in Dundee in 1979. Figure 16: Dryburn Hospital in Durham. (Photograph by courtesy of Medical Illustration Department, Dryburn Hospital). Conclusion. In reviewing over 60 years of history, it is evident that the Society of modern times is in many respects very different from that of the early years: it is much larger, more formal and structured and perhaps more ambitious. But the change has been evolutionary rather than revolutionary: the development of old ideas rather than the introduction of new ones . Thus, although discussion of business matters did not feature prominently in the pre-War years and medico-political debate was conspicuous by its absence, it was largely the same Society which, in the immediate post-war period, responded promptly to the challenge of the National Health Service by setting out a comprehensive summary of its views on the practice of dermatology in Scotland. These views were formulated to allow the Society to advise the Scottish Home and Health Department - but only if requested, and there is no evidence that such consultations ever occurred. It was primarily this uncertainty over the representation of Scottish dermatological opinion, both in Scotland and the United Kingdom as a whole, which prompted the Society in the Seventies to seek and obtain the right to submit such opinion nationally. It was a bold initiative and the achievements were new and exciting, but thirty years before the Society had at least made a start along the same road. Similarly, the papers, guest lectures and symposia of the modern Society might seem a far cry from the clinical orientation of the early years. But even the need for more of an educational content in meetings had been recognised, and while the opposition in the Sixties to the introduction of a scientific section was real enough, papers by guests and members had by then been delivered on a number of occasions over many years. It can be said, therefore that the Society has responded to the needs of the moment by drawing on the ideas of the past, and no doubt a similarly enlightened attitude will guide its affairs in the future. In the beginning a small group of dermatologists came together to view and discuss patients with interesting and unusual diseases of the skin, and as long as this remains the central element in the proceedings of the Society, then surely tradition will be upheld and the Society will remain essentially the same. References. British Journal of Dermatology and Syphilis (1939). Obituary: Sir Robert Bolam, 51,326 Low R C and Dodds T C, Atlas of Bacteriology (1947), Livingstone, Edinburgh British Journal of Dermatology and Syphilis (1934), North British Dermatological Society, 46, 243 Ferguson Smith), British Journal of Dermatology and Syphilis (1934), 46, 267 Ministry of Health: Scottish Home and Health Department (1965). Classification of Proprietary Preparations, Report of the Standing Joint Committee, HMSO, London Bunney M H, Prescribers' Journal (1974), 14, 118 Scott G A, PUVA treatment: psoralens, Scottish Home and Health Department, (1979), Reference SHHD/CAMO (79) 5. Acknowledgements. I would like to thank the Scottish Dermatological Society for affording me access to the minutes and other documents of the Society, thus enabling this history to be written. I am grateful too for the assistance of many individual members, including Dr G A Grant Peterkin of Edinburgh and Dr R Mason Bolam, formerly of Newcastle, both of whom joined the Society in the early Thirties, and were, therefore, able to provide information from the pre-War period. I am indebted to Mr John G D McGhie and the Department of Medical Illustration, Raigmore Hospital, Inverness for preparation of the photographic material and the design of the cover. Finally, I would express my thanks to Mrs Dorothy McGinley, Assistant Librarian, Highland Health Sciences Library, Raigmore Hospital for searching for references containing background information; and to Miss Isabel Gordon for the secretarial assistance required in the preparation and completion of the manuscript. Appendix. Constitution of 1925 The Society shall be called the North British Dermatological Society. Meetings shall be held in March, June and December of each year. The meetings shall be held in rotation at Edinburgh and Glasgow each once a year and at Aberdeen, Dundee and Newcastle each every third year. There shall be no fixed Chairman for the year. Any member may be voted into the chair at any meeting. A Secretary shall be appointed to arrange and convene the meetings. The Secretary shall send out notices of meetings at least one fortnight before such meeting. The meetings shall be quite informal. No minutes shall be kept and no report of the proceedings sent to the lay or medical press. There shall be no subscription but the Secretary shall, from time to time, if necessary, ask leave at any meeting to make a levy. Any member of the Society may, by letter to the Secretary, not later than two weeks before any meeting, submit the name of a candidate for membership. The candidate's name shall be placed on the billet calling the meeting and candidates shall be voted on by ballot at the meeting. One adverse vote in five shall exclude. History Tags: History of the Scottish Dermatological Society
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Result 31
TitleDr Susan Holmes - British Hair and Nail Society
Urlhttps://bhns.org.uk/index.php?/dr_susan_holmes.html/
Description
Date
Organic Position31
H1
H2NHS PRACTICE
PRIVATE PRACTICE 1
H3
H2WithAnchorsNHS PRACTICE
PRIVATE PRACTICE 1
BodyJump to content Existing user? Sign In   Become a Member Home Home Existing user? Sign In   Become a Member The latest research in hair and nail science, reviewed by BHNS members Repository of Horizontal and Vertical Sections of Virtual Pathology Cases Since becoming a consultant dermatologist in 1999 I have run a specialist hair clinic at the Southern General Hospital. The clinic aim is to provide specialist investigation, diagnosis, management and support for those experiencing hair loss disorders. Running in parallel with the Hair Clinic, is a treatment service run by experienced dermatology nurses. This provides treatments such as diphencyprone (DCP),intralesional steroid injections and advice on wigs, hairpieces and hair loss camouflage. Hair loss disorders can be extremely distressing but are generally poorly understood and treatments are limited. I am actively involved in research into hair disorders and am keen to promote collaborative research which might lead to a better understanding of the causes of hair loss and to better treatments. I am a member of the British Hair and Nail Society and am currently society Secretary. I am also a member of the European Hair Research Society, British Association of Dermatologists and the Scottish Dermatological Society. INTEREST: Dermatologist with special interest in hair and scalp disorders NHS PRACTICE. Hospital Name: Southern General Hospital (Hair Clinic) Address: 1345 Govan Road Country: Glasgow Postcode: G51 4TF Sources of Referral: tertiary (NHS GG&C patients) A GP or tertiary for patients outwith NHS A GG&C area (tertiary preferred) NHS Secretary Name: Ms Anne Flynn Phone: 0141 211 4297 (Glasgow Royal Infirmary) Email: [email protected] Fax: 0141 211 4663 PRIVATE PRACTICE 1. Clinical/Hospital Name: Ross Hall Hospital Address: 221 Crookston Rd Country: Glasgow Postcode: G52 3NQ Sources of Referral: GP, tertiary, self referral (medical referral letter preferred) Private Secretary Name: none Phone: 0141 810 3151 Email: enquires via website Web: www.bmihealthcare/rosshall   × Existing user? Sign In Sign Up Home About Us Hair Conditions. Back Hair Conditions Hair Loss Cosmetic Management of Alopecia Hair Transplantation Hair Shedding Patterned Hair Loss Scarring Nail Conditions. Back Nail Conditions Abnormalities of the Cuticle and Nail Fold Abnormalities of Nail Shape Chronic Paronychia Diagnostic Biopsies Lesions around Nails Nail Discolouration Nail Manifestations Nail Surgical Anatomy Onychomycosis Pathology of Nail Disease Events Patient Resources. Back Patient Resources Patient Information Leaflets Support Groups Find a Specialist. Back Find a Specialist Find DPC Centres × Create New...
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