Copywriteroffice

Serp data

Request Result Detail

The request result help you to show your API requests results.

Copywriteroffice - why do I need a subwoofer for my sound system? serp result detail
Keyword why do I need a subwoofer for my sound system?
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=why+do+I+need+a+subwoofer+for+my+sound+system%3F&oq=why+do+I+need+a+subwoofer+for+my+sound+system%3F&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Devicedesktop
Languageen
LocationGB
Search Enginegoogle.co.uk
No. Of Results33400000
RelatedSearch
is a subwoofer necessary for musichttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Is+a+subwoofer+necessary+for+music&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAg7EAE
what does a subwoofer do with a soundbarhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=What+does+a+subwoofer+do+with+a+soundbar&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAg5EAE
does sound come out of a subwooferhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Does+sound+come+out+of+a+subwoofer&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAg2EAE
speakers that don't need a subwooferhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=speakers+that+don%27t+need+a+subwoofer&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAgzEAE
do i need a subwoofer for computer speakershttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Do+I+need+a+subwoofer+for+computer+speakers&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAgyEAE
subwoofer speakerhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Subwoofer+Speaker&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAgwEAE
subwoofer vs speakerhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Subwoofer+vs+speaker&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAguEAE
where to place subwooferhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Where+to+place+subwoofer&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7wN7E_qP1AhWtzYUKHXpUDOEQ1QJ6BAgpEAE
Result 1
TitleThe Importance of Subwoofers in Your Home Audio System - Electronic House
Urlhttps://www.electronichouse.com/home-audio/the-importance-of-subwoofers-in-your-home-audio-system/
Description
Date
Organic Position
H1The Importance of Subwoofers in Your Home Audio System
H2The subwoofer is often one of the most important speakers in the room
Reader Interactions
Footer
H3Related Content:
Downloadable guide you may like:
Electronic House
Free Downloadable Guides
H2WithAnchorsThe subwoofer is often one of the most important speakers in the room
Reader Interactions
Footer
BodyThe Importance of Subwoofers in Your Home Audio System The subwoofer is often one of the most important speakers in the room.June 21, 2014 EH Staff A lot of people, especially if they’re fairly new to high-end home audio systems, are surprised to learn that two speakers, a left and right stereo speaker, isn’t all they need. In a home music or home theater audio system, the subwoofer is often one of the most important speakers in the room. What’s a subwoofer? A subwoofer is a loudspeaker that handles the lower frequencies or bass. While it also can reproduce the LFE (low frequency effects), also known as the .1 in a 7.1 system, a subwoofer is more than that. How low or high a subwoofer plays varies greatly with brand or product. Why do you need one (or more)? Subwoofers are important because most speakers in an audio or home theater system are not capable of reproducing all the frequencies your audio source sends to them. Without a subwoofer you’ll be missing out on some of the sound. The low frequencies are also the ones that help produce the full, rich, three-dimensional effect we love in movie soundtracks and in music. You need them for music too? Yes, usually. Few speakers called “full-range” really are. They can’t fully reproduce everything or if they do, the extremes may be stressed and not fully realized. While some full-range tower speakers are capable of producing rich bass (some even have subwoofers built in), most will benefit from adding an extra subwoofer. Aren’t subwoofers big? Yes and no. The traditional image most people have of a subwoofer is a large box with one large driver. Those are still popular, and often are the best choices, but many people don’t like the idea of having to hide something that big in their room. Newer technologies, more efficient amplifiers and dual driver designs have greatly reduced the size of some subwoofers so that they can easily be concealed in a room (sometimes even in a cabinet). The key is making sure the subwoofer’s amplifier is strong enough to power the driver well, and that the subwoofer’s range (and crossover setting) blends nicely with your main speakers. Often you’ll need to depend on the expertise of your dealer or installer for this decision. What if I have in-wall speakers? In-wall speakers have improved in performance so much that they’ve become the standard speakers for many multiroom audio and even home theater installations. Luckily in-wall (even in-floor or in-ceiling) subwoofers have also come along to perfectly complement in-wall speakers. Just because you don’t want a large box on the floor of your room doesn’t mean you can’t have a quality subwoofer in your system. Do I need more than one subwoofer? Often you do. Bass waves are large which means there are peaks and dips in the room. Sometimes getting even bass distribution is difficult, so multiple subwoofers can be used to fill in all the dips. Ask your audio pro to help you with this selection and placement. Related Content:. Samsung Galaxy Home Smart Speaker Unveiled; Powered by… New Soundbar from Yamaha Loaded with Features Dave Matthews “Crush” Wine Cork Works Like a… Where to Hide Your Speakers? Put Them Above… Downloadable guide you may like:. Electronic House 2017 Holiday Gift GuideComplete with pictures, the 2017 Holiday Gift Guide is a great place to start your shopping. Give Santa a run for his money and download your copy today.Reader Interactions. Footer. Electronic House. Home News About us Contact us Advertising Privacy policy Terms of Use facebook twitter google rss pinterest youtube Free Downloadable Guides. Download our FREE Guides to help you better plan for integrating the products and technologies you see on Electronic House into your own home. View All Guides Near me 40 miles
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 22
  • 1
  • speaker
  • 14
  • 1
  • wall
  • 9
  • 1
  • home
  • 9
  • 1
  • audio
  • 7
  • 1
  • system
  • 6
  • 1
  • wall speaker
  • 5
  • 1
  • room
  • 5
  • 1
  • guide
  • 5
  • 1
  • system subwoofer
  • 4
  • 1
  • range
  • 4
  • 1
  • frequency
  • 4
  • 1
  • bass
  • 4
  • 1
  • large
  • 4
  • 1
  • subwoofer important speaker
  • 3
  • 1
  • audio system
  • 3
  • 1
  • subwoofer important
  • 3
  • 1
  • important speaker
  • 3
  • 1
  • home theater
  • 3
  • 1
  • electronic house
  • 3
  • 1
  • important
  • 3
  • 1
  • person
  • 3
  • 1
  • music
  • 3
  • 1
  • theater
  • 3
  • 1
  • low
  • 3
  • 1
  • full
  • 3
  • 1
  • driver
  • 3
  • 1
  • electronic
  • 3
  • 1
  • house
  • 3
  • 1
Result 2
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position1
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 3
TitleWhat are Subwoofers and Why Do You Need One? | Klipsch
Urlhttps://www.klipsch.com/blog/what-are-subwoofers-and-why-do-you-need-one
DescriptionSubwoofers are speakers that delivers the lower frequencies, specifically 20-200 Hz, that a traditional two-channel or surround setup can’t reproduce on its own
Date11 Oct 2021
Organic Position2
H1What are Subwoofers and Why Do You Need One?
H2SHOP SUBWOOFERS NOW>
What is a Subwoofer?
Why Do I Need One?
Learn how to connect your subwoofer to your system>
Where Do I Place a Subwoofer?
Check out our 3 Tips on Where to Place a Subwoofer blog for more tips and hints
Downfiring vs Front-Firing Subwoofers:
Learn the Difference Between Front-Firing and Downfiring Subs>
How Do I Dial-in My Subwoofer?
SHOP SUBWOOFERS NOW>
Should I Get More Than One?
WHAT SIZE SUBWOOFER SHOULD YOU GET? LEARN MORE>
H3
H2WithAnchorsSHOP SUBWOOFERS NOW>
What is a Subwoofer?
Why Do I Need One?
Learn how to connect your subwoofer to your system>
Where Do I Place a Subwoofer?
Check out our 3 Tips on Where to Place a Subwoofer blog for more tips and hints
Downfiring vs Front-Firing Subwoofers:
Learn the Difference Between Front-Firing and Downfiring Subs>
How Do I Dial-in My Subwoofer?
SHOP SUBWOOFERS NOW>
Should I Get More Than One?
WHAT SIZE SUBWOOFER SHOULD YOU GET? LEARN MORE>
BodyWhat are Subwoofers and Why Do You Need One? Devon Dean October 11, 2021 What Is A Subwoofer And Why Do You Need One? If you’re slowly starting to build your home theater system, the first thing you probably picked out was a pair of speakers. This is only the beginning, though. Whether your setup is for movies, music, games, or all of the above, a powered subwoofer is one of the key components to a complete audio system. We’re here to answer some common questions about subwoofers and how they can elevate your home theater experience. SHOP SUBWOOFERS NOW>. What is a Subwoofer? In the words of Meghan Trainor, a subwoofer is all about that bass. It’s the speaker that delivers the lower frequencies – specifically 20-200 Hz – that a traditional two-channel or surround sound setup can’t reproduce on its own. These low frequencies come from instruments such as the kick drum, bass guitar, and pipe organ, as well as movie sound effects like explosions. Why Do I Need One? While you may hear the bass from your bookshelf or floorstanding speakers, a subwoofer allows you to feel the sound. Listening to bass-heavy music like hip hop or EDM or watching a full-throttle action flick without a subwoofer leaves a lot to be desired. Plus, you’re not experiencing the song or movie the way the artist or director intended. You might be asking yourself: I don’t listen to rap or watch action movies, so why do I need one? Sure, a subwoofer is a bass-thumping juggernaut, but that’s only scratching the surface. A great subwoofer helps take away the heavy lifting from your loudspeakers, improving your overall system. The dynamics are more compelling, the soundstage widens, and the stereo imaging becomes more accurate. Even if you prefer spinning folk records and watching dialogue-driven indie dramas, a subwoofer helps produce a more vibrant, all-encompassing sound. Learn how to connect your subwoofer to your system>. Where Do I Place a Subwoofer? Honestly, you can place your subwoofer anywhere. But since all rooms are constructed differently, the results are going to vary. If you’re serious about getting optimal bass performance from your subwoofer, there may be some trial and error involved. We get it. Not everyone has a dedicated home theater or listening room with the flexibility to place your subwoofer anywhere. Most likely, your system is located in your living room, which means décor, furniture, and other things are competing for floor space. You might have to rearrange some stuff, but it’s worth it to find the “sweet spot.” A wireless subwoofer like the RW-100SW can make the process much smoother. Along with placement, acoustic treatment is another factor to consider if you want to get the most out of a subwoofer. You can have the best subwoofer on the planet, but when it’s in an acoustically poor room, expect subpar bass performance. Acoustic panels, diffusers, and bass traps are all excellent ways to improve your room’s acoustics. Plus, many modern A/V receivers come equipped with room correction technology such as Audyssey and AccuEQ. It calibrates each speaker to create a more harmonious home theater experience.Check out our 3 Tips on Where to Place a Subwoofer blog for more tips and hints.Downfiring vs Front-Firing Subwoofers:. Placement can also be determined by whether you've opted for a down-firing or front-firing subwoofer. While there's no discernible difference between how each option sounds, there are certain factors you need to evaluate depending on the space you're looking to fill, specifically whether you're placing the sub in a home or an apartment.Learn the Difference Between Front-Firing and Downfiring Subs>. Shop Subs Now How Do I Dial-in My Subwoofer? A subwoofer works best when it doesn’t draw attention to itself. Your subwoofer and loudspeakers should act as one unit. The bass coming from the subwoofer should blend seamlessly with the rest of your speakers. On the back of our subwoofers, you’ll find a low-pass crossover knob. Crossover is the frequency where your speakers begin to roll off, and the subwoofer starts to produce bass notes. Set your crossover point about 10 Hz above your speaker’s lowest frequency range. For example, 35 Hz is the lowest frequency the R-820F can handle, so you would set your crossover at around 45 Hz. The 0/180-degree phase switch is another subwoofer control. The mechanics behind the phase can get pretty complicated. In layman’s terms, subwoofers and speakers perform best when their woofers move forward and backward in a synchronized fashion. When they don’t, the speakers and subwoofer are out of phase, which cancels out the bass. To dial in your phase, play some bass-heavy music, listen for a bit, and have a friend switch between both settings. Whichever one sounds better, leave it there. If you can’t hear a difference, set it at 0 degrees. SHOP SUBWOOFERS NOW>. Should I Get More Than One? A large subwoofer like the SPL-150 can take any home-theater setup to the next level. However, as your system grows, adding a second sub can help ensure the bass is evenly distributed throughout the whole room. Two SPL-150s increase your output capability by close to 6 dB, meaning everyone in the room can feel those powerful, low tones while watching action and sci-fi movies. A pair of subwoofers can also minimize the seat-to-seat variance of bass response, offering an even coverage pattern of low frequencies throughout the room. Depending on room size and placement, one sub alone makes it challenging to deliver accurate bass response at multiple listening positions. This is because the frequency response of an individual subwoofer tends to have peaks and nulls. A peak is an exaggeration of a bass note, while a null is the absence of bass. When paired together, two subwoofers smooth out those peaks and nulls, offering a more accurate frequency response at more locations in the room. All in all, a subwoofer is an essential part of your system. If you’re on a budget or in the infancy of your home-theater development, start with just one subwoofer. As your system grows, think about adding a second low-toned beast to your setup. You’re adding more bass and evenly distributing it throughout the room. The results? Improved bass performance. Are you looking to dive deeper? Read our other subwoofer post that touches on construction, wattage, and wired vs. wireless subwoofersWHAT SIZE SUBWOOFER SHOULD YOU GET? LEARN MORE>. Categories: Subwoofer << Previous Next >> This is a modal window to compare 2 or more products. 0 products selected to compare. COMPARE NOW CLEAR
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 43
  • 3
  • bass
  • 19
  • 3
  • room
  • 13
  • 3
  • speaker
  • 10
  • 3
  • frequency
  • 9
  • 3
  • system
  • 8
  • 3
  • home
  • 7
  • 3
  • home theater
  • 6
  • 3
  • theater
  • 6
  • 3
  • sound
  • 6
  • 3
  • firing
  • 5
  • 3
  • movie
  • 5
  • 3
  • low
  • 5
  • 3
  • subwoofer subwoofer
  • 4
  • 3
  • product
  • 4
  • 3
  • place subwoofer
  • 4
  • 3
  • acoustic
  • 4
  • 3
  • set
  • 4
  • 3
  • compare
  • 4
  • 3
  • setup
  • 4
  • 3
  • hz
  • 4
  • 3
  • place
  • 4
  • 3
  • crossover
  • 4
  • 3
  • phase
  • 4
  • 3
  • response
  • 4
  • 3
  • subwoofer system
  • 3
  • 3
  • bass performance
  • 3
  • 3
  • front firing
  • 3
  • 3
  • action
  • 3
  • 3
  • accurate
  • 3
  • 3
  • performance
  • 3
  • 3
  • placement
  • 3
  • 3
  • front
  • 3
  • 3
  • difference
  • 3
  • 3
  • adding
  • 3
  • 3
  • peak
  • 3
  • 3
  • null
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
TitleYou already have great speakers. Do you really need a subwoofer? - CNET
Urlhttps://www.cnet.com/tech/home-entertainment/you-already-have-great-speakers-do-you-really-need-a-subwoofer/
DescriptionThe Audiophiliac checks out the new Zu Audio Undertone Mk. II subwoofer to see what it does for a system with large floor-standing speakers
Date8 Aug 2015
Organic Position3
H1You already have great speakers. Do you really need a subwoofer?
H2
H3Tech
H2WithAnchors
BodyYou already have great speakers. Do you really need a subwoofer? The Audiophiliac checks out the new Zu Audio Undertone Mk. II subwoofer to see what it does for a system with large floor-standing speakers. Steve Guttenberg Aug. 8, 2015 9:06 a.m. PT While subwoofers are all but required for home theater, the role subs play in music systems is almost as crucial. So even if you have a pair of bookshelf or tower speakers with 5-inch or smaller woofers and are perfectly satisfied with the bass, you literally don't know what you're missing. Adding a sub to larger speakers also makes sense -- in fact, all but the most humongous speakers benefit from adding a sub. Here's the best part: Adding a sub isn't just about more bass. With a great sub the system's dynamics rock harder, and soundstage depth and spaciousness improve. A well-matched sub will dramatically enhance the overall sound of your system, and adding the right sub will make a bigger difference than upgrading electronics.Jeff with his Zu Soul Supreme speaker and Undertone Mk. II sub Steve Guttenberg/CNET That was certainly the case with enthusiast Jeff K.'s hi-fi, which sports a pair of Zu Audio Soul Supreme towers, which have 10-inch (254mm) woofers. After consulting with the folks at Zu Audio he took the plunge and bought their Undertone Mk. II subwoofer. I've heard Jeff's system before so I was eager to hear how the sub changed the sound. Subs are at their best when they're not calling attention to themselves. That is, you shouldn't be aware of any bass coming from the subwoofer, all of the bass should seem to come from the speakers. Ah, but when you turn off the sub you'll be amazed by what the sub was contributing, even with recordings that didn't have a lot of bass! In Jeff's room the Undertone Mk. II provided a much deeper foundation for the music. There was a newfound solidity to the sound that the Soul Supremes on their own couldn't match. Jeff thinks the sub made a huge improvement to the overall sound of his system, and not just the bass. The music's energy and dynamics kicked harder, turning off the sub and returning to just the Supremes was a letdown. Jeff spent hours turning me onto new music -- he has 2,500 LPs, a few hundred singles and 2,000 CDs. I'd never heard of Jackie Mittoo, but his organ-fueled instrumentals fully exercised the system. Then we went deep into a few Treasure Isle (a Jamaican record label) collections, and the bass textures and rhythms were fantastic. The Undertone MK. II's contributions were hard to miss, so when we turned the sub off the Soul Supremes sounded smaller and less energetic. When I asked Jeff if he could go back and run the system sans sub he said no way. After all, the bass is part of the music, and now he's hearing and feeling it.Jeff's Roksan Xerxes 20 Plus turntable Steve Guttenberg/CNET The Undertone Mk. II measures 25 by 15 by 15 inches (635 by 38 by 38cm), it weighs 68 pounds (31kg), and is offered in a range of finishes. This sub can be used with other brands of speakers, as long as they produce bass down to 60 or 70Hz; the Undertone Mk. II won't mate well with really small monitor or satellite speakers. It's a sealed box (non-ported) design, with a 12-inch (305mm) Eminence LAB 12 paper cone driver. Connectivity runs to speaker- and line-level inputs, and a LFE input. The internal amp is rated at 400 watts. You can definitely add this sub to any stereo system, even ones that don't have dedicated subwoofer output jacks. The Undertone Mk. II runs $2,000 in the US (around £1,300 or AU$2,700 converted) -- not steep by high-end standards, but that's still a lot of money. If that's out of range I can't say enough nice things about the more affordable JL Audio E-Sub e110 sub, and Hsu Research's even more affordable subs are awfully good. Zu sells direct with an unusually long 60 day, no-risk return policy in the US, and through its distributors in the UK and Australia. Close Discuss: You already have great speakers. Do you really need a subwoofer? Sign in to comment Be respectful, keep it civil and stay on topic. We delete comments that violate our policy, which we encourage you to read. Discussion threads can be closed at any time at our discretion.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • speaker
  • 12
  • 4
  • system
  • 9
  • 4
  • bass
  • 9
  • 4
  • undertone mk ii
  • 8
  • 4
  • undertone mk
  • 8
  • 4
  • mk ii
  • 8
  • 4
  • undertone
  • 8
  • 4
  • mk
  • 8
  • 4
  • ii
  • 8
  • 4
  • subwoofer
  • 7
  • 4
  • jeff
  • 6
  • 4
  • audio
  • 5
  • 4
  • sub
  • 5
  • 4
  • inch
  • 5
  • 4
  • zu
  • 5
  • 4
  • music
  • 5
  • 4
  • supreme
  • 5
  • 4
  • soul supreme
  • 4
  • 4
  • adding
  • 4
  • 4
  • sound
  • 4
  • 4
  • soul
  • 4
  • 4
  • zu audio
  • 3
  • 4
  • great
  • 3
  • 4
  • steve
  • 3
  • 4
  • run
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
Title6 Reasons Why Subwoofers are Important for Music | SVS
Urlhttps://www.svsound.com/blogs/subwoofer-setup-and-tuning/114690950-is-a-subwoofer-important-for-music
DescriptionA great subwoofer elevates the listening experience in a way no other audio component can. Our Sound Experts share 6 reasons why a properly engineered subwoofer is important to music playback
Date
Organic Position4
H16 Reasons Why Subwoofers are Important for Music
H2Browse SVS Subwoofers by Series
Audio System Setup Articles
Share Your Thoughts
H31000 Pro Series
2000 Pro Series
3000 Micro
3000 Series
4000 Series
16-Ultra Series
Choosing Between Bookshelf and Tower Speakers
5 Ways to Improve the Sound of Your TV
Which Sounds Better, Vinyl or Digital Music?
H2WithAnchorsBrowse SVS Subwoofers by Series
Audio System Setup Articles
Share Your Thoughts
Body6 Reasons Why Subwoofers are Important for Music There’s a lingering sentiment in the audiophile community that subwoofers are only for home theater and the benefits to music playback are suspect or even negative. It’s true that lesser subwoofers are not designed to optimally handle the speed, detail and nuance of certain music, but it’s certainly not the rule for subwoofers in general. A great subwoofer elevates the listening experience in a way no other audio component can. Below is a list of six different reasons why a properly engineered subwoofer, like an SVS, is important to music playback. 1. Reveals Sounds and Feelings Your Speakers Can’t Reproduce – The majority of speakers start dropping off at about 50Hz, which deprives you of the full depth and clarity of bass tones. A great subwoofer will reach down to 20Hz or lower, right down to the limit of human hearing. This means you never miss a note and can even feel the lowest notes from something like a pipe organ, kick drum, bass guitar or the occasional cannon volley from the 1812 Overture, for a much more immersive experience. 2. Plays as Loud as You Want with No Distortion – In many systems, when you really start bumping music at high volumes, the woofers in your speakers can have trouble keeping up with the mid drivers and tweeters. A great subwoofer plays effortlessly loud and distortion free, no matter how demanding the musical material and how loud you like to play it. 3. Accurately Reproduces Every Note in the Low Frequency Spectrum – Unlike speakers, which can have a “sonic signature”, a great subwoofer is completely faithful to the musical content delivering bass notes exactly as the artist intended. This is also why a great subwoofer can be matched with any brand or model of speaker to add weight and energy to the overall listening experience. 4. Adds Speed and Control in Low End Transients – Many genres of music present rapid starts and stops in the vocals and instrumentals that lesser subwoofers can struggle with, resulting in a smeared or undetailed acoustic image. A great subwoofer has the speed and transient response to present bass with phenomenal realism and impact so even the fastest bass lines are rendered with feeling and precision. 5. Blends Seamlessly with Full Range Speakers – A great subwoofer should always sound and feel like an extension of the speakers without overpowering them or drawing attention to itself. When blended perfectly, a great subwoofer allows speakers to sound their absolute best, across the frequency spectrum, so highs sparkle and mids have perfect clarity without being overpowered. 6. Unleashes Sonic Potential of Smaller Speakers – A powered subwoofer brings its own low frequency amplifier and with proper bass management, a connected AV receiver or amplifier can drive smaller speakers in the mid and high frequencies above the crossover point. This allows speakers to perform to their full potential no matter what the content. Looking past the technical enhancements, having a subwoofer adds a whole new dimension to music. A great subwoofer should never be overbearing or boomy, but instead, should add color, depth and impact to the final output delivery. From infectious bass guitar riffs and hypnotic drum beats to the most complex electronic bass compositions, a great subwoofer reveals layers of sound a speaker is simply not equipped to handle. And while some subwoofers merely add a few notes of bass, a truly great subwoofer elevates the listening experience in a unique and palpable way. If you’ve never experienced this level of performance with your music, SVS offers a risk free 45-day in-home trial with fast and free shipping, so you can judge for yourself, in your own home, how dynamic and impactful a subwoofer can be for music. You can also try our intuitive SVS Subwoofer Selection Tool, which recommends the perfect subwoofer for your exact model of speaker. SVS makes a variety of subwoofers that work exceptionally well with music and fit every room, audio system and budget. Browse all SVS subwoofers and use the compare tool to look at features and specifications side-by-side as you choose the best subwoofer for your system. Have questions? Our Sound Experts are available 7 days-a-week to help you choose the best subwoofers based on your set-up and listening preferences. Browse SVS Subwoofers by Series. 1000 Pro Series. Reference performance hits an all-time low with the 1000 Pro Series. Includes all-new 12-inch high-excursion drivers, 325 watts RMS, 820+ watts peak power amplifier with discrete MOSFET output, 50 MHz Analog Devices DSP, and the SVS subwoofer control smartphone app for advanced tuning and control. View 1000 Pro Series 2000 Pro Series. Complete reimagining of the most popular SVS subwoofer models of all-time. The 2000 Pro Series feature 12-inch high-excursion driver and 550 watts RMS, 1,500+ watts peak power amplifier with advanced DSP tuning and smartphone app control. View 2000 Pro Series 3000 Micro. Chest-pounding, musical bass with depth and slam from a shockingly compact 10-inch cabinet. SVS 3000 Micro seamlessly blends into any speaker system, energizing a space with effortless output from dual active 8-inch drivers and an 800 watt RMS, 2,500+ watt peak amplifier. Also features SVS subwoofer control app. View 3000 Micro 3000 Series. Reference performance hits new lows. The 3000 Series feature 13-inch high-excursion driver with 800 watts RMS, 2,500+ watts peak power amplifier with fully discrete MOSFET output and SVS smartphone app for convenient DSP and control. View 3000 Series 4000 Series. Reference quality bass, groundbreaking SVS value. The 4000 Series feature 13.5-inch high-excursion driver, 1,200 watts RMS, 4,000+ watts peak power amplifier with fully discrete MOSFET output and SVS smartphone app for convenient DSP and control. View 4000 Series 16-Ultra Series. The ultimate reference standard for bass. The 16-Ultra Series feature a 16-inch high-excursion driver with 8-inch voice coil, 1,500 watts RMS, 5,000+ watts peak power amplifier with fully discrete MOSFET output and SVS smartphone app for convenient DSP and control. View 16-Ultra Series Audio System Setup Articles. Choosing Between Bookshelf and Tower Speakers . Our Sound Experts frequently get questions about the differences between and ... Read more 5 Ways to Improve the Sound of Your TV . Let's face it—the sound produced by the speakers in virtually all TVs is d... Read more Which Sounds Better, Vinyl or Digital Music? . Which Sounds Better, Vinyl or Digital Music? Analog vinyl r... Read more Share Your Thoughts. Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. × Sep 3, 2020 You've selected to compare. You may remove items to compare others. Continue Shopping Compare Learn More Learn More Learn More
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 31
  • 5
  • speaker
  • 16
  • 5
  • series
  • 16
  • 5
  • sv
  • 14
  • 5
  • sound
  • 12
  • 5
  • music
  • 12
  • 5
  • bass
  • 12
  • 5
  • watt
  • 12
  • 5
  • great subwoofer
  • 11
  • 5
  • great
  • 11
  • 5
  • inch
  • 10
  • 5
  • driver
  • 8
  • 5
  • high
  • 8
  • 5
  • control
  • 8
  • 5
  • amplifier
  • 8
  • 5
  • view
  • 7
  • 5
  • excursion driver
  • 6
  • 5
  • sv subwoofer
  • 6
  • 5
  • pro series
  • 6
  • 5
  • watt rm
  • 6
  • 5
  • watt peak
  • 6
  • 5
  • add
  • 6
  • 5
  • output
  • 6
  • 5
  • feature
  • 6
  • 5
  • pro
  • 6
  • 5
  • rm
  • 6
  • 5
  • peak
  • 6
  • 5
  • app
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3000
  • 6
  • 5
  • inch high excursion
  • 5
  • 5
  • high excursion driver
  • 5
  • 5
  • watt peak power
  • 5
  • 5
  • peak power amplifier
  • 5
  • 5
  • inch high
  • 5
  • 5
  • high excursion
  • 5
  • 5
  • peak power
  • 5
  • 5
  • power amplifier
  • 5
  • 5
  • smartphone app
  • 5
  • 5
  • control view
  • 5
  • 5
  • note
  • 5
  • 5
  • system
  • 5
  • 5
  • low
  • 5
  • 5
  • excursion
  • 5
  • 5
  • power
  • 5
  • 5
  • dsp
  • 5
  • 5
  • smartphone
  • 5
  • 5
  • discrete mosfet output
  • 4
  • 5
  • listening experience
  • 4
  • 5
  • day
  • 4
  • 5
  • discrete mosfet
  • 4
  • 5
  • mosfet output
  • 4
  • 5
  • series feature
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1000 pro series
  • 3
  • 5
  • 2000 pro series
  • 3
  • 5
  • power amplifier fully
  • 3
  • 5
  • amplifier fully discrete
  • 3
  • 5
  • fully discrete mosfet
  • 3
  • 5
  • mosfet output sv
  • 3
  • 5
  • output sv smartphone
  • 3
  • 5
  • sv smartphone app
  • 3
  • 5
  • smartphone app convenient
  • 3
  • 5
  • app convenient dsp
  • 3
  • 5
  • convenient dsp control
  • 3
  • 5
  • dsp control view
  • 3
  • 5
  • 16 ultra series
  • 3
  • 5
  • 1000 pro
  • 3
  • 5
  • series reference
  • 3
  • 5
  • 2000 pro
  • 3
  • 5
  • 3000 micro
  • 3
  • 5
  • 3000 series
  • 3
  • 5
  • amplifier fully
  • 3
  • 5
  • fully discrete
  • 3
  • 5
  • output sv
  • 3
  • 5
  • sv smartphone
  • 3
  • 5
  • app convenient
  • 3
  • 5
  • convenient dsp
  • 3
  • 5
  • dsp control
  • 3
  • 5
  • 4000 series
  • 3
  • 5
  • 16 ultra
  • 3
  • 5
  • ultra series
  • 3
  • 5
  • read
  • 3
  • 5
Result 6
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position5
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 7
TitleDo you really need a subwoofer? - Premium Sound | Hi-Fi & Home Cinema Retailer in London UK
Urlhttps://premiumsound.co.uk/do-you-really-need-a-subwoofer/
Description
Date16 Jun 2018
Organic Position6
H1Do you really need a subwoofer?
H2Do you really need a subwoofer?
H3EMAIL US
CALL US
Share this post
Leave a Reply Cancel reply
H2WithAnchorsDo you really need a subwoofer?
BodyDo you really need a subwoofer? 16JunJune 16, 2018 Do you really need a subwoofer? ezelenkovecs2018-06-16T21:47:55+00:00 Articles 1 Comment Views: 1,773 [products_mixed title=”Our Subwoofers” ids=”14877,9480,11551,8806″] View All Subwoofers You can ask any person if he actually want a subwoofer — audiophile enthusiasts, industry professionals, or movie lovers — the reply is probably yes. Still is this honestly correct? Let us try to answer this concern as genuinely and neutral as possible. The cause that a lot of people want a subwoofer is because of the idea that a regular surround system is not going to be suitable for generating low frequencies noticed in movies or music. It is simply physically impossible. To produce the very low frequencies that match bass, heavy R&B music or those blockbuster movies with special effects , you will require a speaker driver a minimum of 8” in diameter, ideally larger. This is not promotion, it’s physics. To obtain precise low frequencies using a tower speaker you will have to look for top-quality solutions. If you count yourself an audiophile and wish more depth than two channel stereo has to provide, then you will probably need a subwoofer. In other words, you are not gaining it all your music has to provide without having a sub. This is specifically true with bass heavy music. If you are a cinephile, the same applies. Action movies with heavy explosions are likely to lean very much on low frequency reproduction using the subwoofer. Without one, you are not enjoying the movie in the way in which it was supposed. Although imagine if you are none of these. What if you love movies, but just watch dramas? Let’s say you love music, but nothing with pounding bass? If your aim is to stay away from a subwoofer, then you will need speakers with great woofers. Tower speakers normally have more drivers, and the point that the cabinets are bigger, implies more airflow, and consequently more bass. If you won’t need those extra low frequencies accomplished via subwoofers, towers can still render clean bass. Alone, bookshelf speakers are usually about to have difficulty reproducing bass. Despite the fact that you do not listen to so much material with significant bass, a subwoofer will always be a huge advantage if your primary speakers are smaller. Nowadays, it is possible to have wireless subwoofers, in-wall subwoofers, and other versions that make working with the big black box convenient. We definitely suggest heading one of those paths instead of going without. Then again, if you are going without, make sure to do your research and buy yourself tower speakers that can actually pack a punch. Share this post. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google + Email Leave a Reply Cancel reply. Related Posts. 16DecDecember 16, 2017 7 Reasons to Upgrade to Klipsch Headphones . Most people carry a smart phone or tablet that contains all of their music and video. Headphones are one... read more 03NovNovember 3, 2016 Home Cinema System vs Home Cinema Speakers .   There are many choices when choosing the best sound system for your home’s entertainment system. After you’ve chosen your... read more 01OctOctober 1, 2019 Bluesound: streaming revolution . [products_mixed title="Bluesound streamers and amplifiers" ids="13757,13767,13748"] Streaming has come of age. Whether you are looking for a new, standalone, streamer... read more 27AprApril 27, 2020 Short Guide to Dolby Atmos at Home . What is Dolby Atmos Dolby Atmos, until a few years ago, was known for being one of the most recognised... read more 14SepSeptember 14, 2016 Essential set of Audio Components for a true Audiophile . Hello world! In our first blog article we have decided to write a short summary for newbies outlining what... read more 14OctOctober 14, 2018 Understanding Speaker Impedance . Speaker impedance is sometimes shown as a complicated subject and thus is either misunderstood or ignored. A fundamental idea... read more 20OctOctober 20, 2016 How to Set Up a Turntable . How to Set Up a Turntable Listening to music from a stereo system rather than a tiny MP3 player can... read more 24AugAugust 24, 2021 Pro-Ject Debut Pro vs Pro-Ject X1 . Add to cart Pro-Ject Debut Pro Turntable £699.00 Select options Pro-Ject X1 Turntable with Pick-IT S2 MM Cartridge £799.00 The reaction to the new Debut... read more 13NovNovember 13, 2016 Do Speaker Cables Really Make a Difference? . Do Speaker Cables Really Make a Difference?   Speaker cables are those long wires that connect speaker to receiver. They deliver... read more 12MarMarch 12, 2017 Short Audiophile Headphones Overview . It’s no secret that audiophile headphones are only available at a premium price, but they’re certainly worth the cost.... read more © 2021 - Premium Sound Limited company registered in England and Wales. VAT No. GB261534810 All Rights Reserved. You've just added this product to the cart: View Cart Continue Speakers Hi-Fi Floorstanding speakers Bookshelf speakers Active speakers Hi-Fi packages Home Cinema 5.1 Speaker packages Centre channel speakers Subwoofers Atmos speakers Surround speakers Other Speakers Soundbars Wireless speakers Speaker parts Custom Install In-ceiling speakers In-wall speakers In-wall subwoofers On-wall speakers Outdoor speakers Hifi Separates Separates Integrated amplifiers Pre-amplifiers Power amplifiers All-in-one Systems Streamers Music servers CD players DACs Valve amplifiers Turntables Turntables Phono preamps Phono cartridges Styli Headshells Tonearms Dustcovers Vinyl care and cleaning Other Isolation products Master clocks Power supplies Wireless transmitters Remote controls Accessories Custom Install Installation amplifiers Subwoofer amplifiers Installation streamers Home Cinema AV Components AV receivers AV processors AV power amplifiers Blu-Ray players Speakers 5.1 Speaker packages Centre channel speakers Subwoofers Atmos speakers Surround speakers Custom Install Projectors Projection screens Cinema seating Headphones Headphones In-ear On-ear Over-ear Hi-FI Headphone amplifiers Hi-res players DACs Other Professional headphones Headphone parts Furniture Speaker stands Hi-Fi racks AV racks Wall brackets Absorber panels Diffusor panels Cables Analogue Speaker cables Connectors Headphone cables RCA Interconnect cables XLR Interconnect cables Subwoofer cables Digital Coax cables Ethernet cables HDMI cables Optical cables USB cables Mains Mains blocks Mains cables Brands Sale About Us Delivery Returns Home Trial Trade In Our Services Log InRegister We use cookies on our website to give you the most relevant experience by remembering your preferences and repeat visits. By clicking “Accept All”, you consent to the use of all the cookies. However, you may visit "Cookie Settings" to provide a controlled consent.Cookie SettingsAccept AllManage consent Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may affect your browsing experience. Necessary Necessary Always Enabled Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. These cookies ensure basic functionalities and security features of the website, anonymously. CookieDurationDescription__stripe_mid1 yearThis cookie is set by Stripe payment gateway. This cookie is used to enable payment on the website without storing any patment information on a server.__stripe_sid30 minutesThis cookie is set by Stripe payment gateway. This cookie is used to enable payment on the website without storing any patment information on a server.cookielawinfo-checkbox-advertisement1 yearThe cookie is set by GDPR cookie consent to record the user consent for the cookies in the category "Advertisement".cookielawinfo-checkbox-analytics11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookie is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Analytics".cookielawinfo-checkbox-functional11 monthsThe cookie is set by GDPR cookie consent to record the user consent for the cookies in the category "Functional".cookielawinfo-checkbox-necessary11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookies is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Necessary".cookielawinfo-checkbox-others11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookie is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Other.cookielawinfo-checkbox-performance11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookie is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Performance".CookieLawInfoConsent11 monthsRecords the default button state of the corresponding category & the status of CCPA. It works only in coordination with the primary cookie.store_notice[notice id]sessionAllows customers to dismiss the Store Notice.viewed_cookie_policy11 monthsThe cookie is set by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin and is used to store whether or not user has consented to the use of cookies. It does not store any personal data.woocommerce_cart_hashsessionHelps WooCommerce determine when cart contents/data changes.woocommerce_items_in_cartsessionHelps WooCommerce determine when cart contents/data changes.woocommerce_recently_viewedsessionShows recently viewed productswordpress_logged_in_*This cookie indicates when you're logged in and who you are.wordpress_sec_*wordpress_test_cookiewp_woocommerce_session_*2 daysContains a unique code for each customer so that it knows where to find the cart data in the database for each customer. Functional Functional Functional cookies help to perform certain functionalities like sharing the content of the website on social media platforms, collect feedbacks, and other third-party features. Performance Performance Performance cookies are used to understand and analyze the key performance indexes of the website which helps in delivering a better user experience for the visitors. Analytics Analytics Analytical cookies are used to understand how visitors interact with the website. These cookies help provide information on metrics the number of visitors, bounce rate, traffic source, etc. Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement cookies are used to provide visitors with relevant ads and marketing campaigns. These cookies track visitors across websites and collect information to provide customized ads. SAVE & ACCEPT Powered by
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • speaker
  • 36
  • 7
  • cooky
  • 25
  • 7
  • cookie
  • 23
  • 7
  • subwoofer
  • 19
  • 7
  • consent
  • 16
  • 7
  • cable
  • 15
  • 7
  • website
  • 14
  • 7
  • set
  • 12
  • 7
  • headphone
  • 10
  • 7
  • read
  • 10
  • 7
  • cookie set
  • 9
  • 7
  • amplifier
  • 9
  • 7
  • system
  • 8
  • 7
  • home
  • 8
  • 7
  • music
  • 8
  • 7
  • user
  • 8
  • 7
  • cookie set gdpr
  • 7
  • 7
  • set gdpr cookie
  • 7
  • 7
  • gdpr cookie consent
  • 7
  • 7
  • consent cooky
  • 7
  • 7
  • set gdpr
  • 7
  • 7
  • gdpr cookie
  • 7
  • 7
  • cookie consent
  • 7
  • 7
  • bass
  • 7
  • 7
  • gdpr
  • 7
  • 7
  • category
  • 7
  • 7
  • store
  • 7
  • 7
  • user consent cooky
  • 6
  • 7
  • consent cooky category
  • 6
  • 7
  • user consent
  • 6
  • 7
  • cooky category
  • 6
  • 7
  • movie
  • 6
  • 7
  • provide
  • 6
  • 7
  • turntable
  • 6
  • 7
  • pro
  • 6
  • 7
  • cart
  • 6
  • 7
  • checkbox
  • 6
  • 7
  • cookie consent plugin
  • 5
  • 7
  • low frequency
  • 5
  • 7
  • consent plugin
  • 5
  • 7
  • store user
  • 5
  • 7
  • atmo
  • 5
  • 7
  • hi
  • 5
  • 7
  • av
  • 5
  • 7
  • plugin
  • 5
  • 7
  • visitor
  • 5
  • 7
  • monthsthi cookie set
  • 4
  • 7
  • store user consent
  • 4
  • 7
  • home cinema
  • 4
  • 7
  • pro ject
  • 4
  • 7
  • speaker cable
  • 4
  • 7
  • hi fi
  • 4
  • 7
  • website cooky
  • 4
  • 7
  • monthsthi cookie
  • 4
  • 7
  • consent plugin cookie
  • 3
  • 7
  • plugin cookie store
  • 3
  • 7
  • cookie store user
  • 3
  • 7
  • tower speaker
  • 3
  • 7
  • dolby atmo
  • 3
  • 7
  • custom install
  • 3
  • 7
  • plugin cookie
  • 3
  • 7
  • cookie store
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
TitleDoes a Soundbar Need a Subwoofer? - The Home Theater DIY
Urlhttps://thehometheaterdiy.com/does-a-soundbar-need-a-subwoofer/
Description
Date9 Mar 2021
Organic Position7
H1Does a Soundbar Need a Subwoofer?
H2What Is a Soundbar?
What Is a Subwoofer?
When Do You Need a Subwoofer for a Soundbar?
Where to Place a Subwoofer
How to Connect a Subwoofer to a Soundbar
Great Soundbars without Subwoofers
Conclusion
H3The Basics of a Soundbar
The Basics of a Subwoofer
Sonos Playbar
Bose Solo 5
Bose Soundbar 500
VIZIO SB3820-C6
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is a Soundbar?
What Is a Subwoofer?
When Do You Need a Subwoofer for a Soundbar?
Where to Place a Subwoofer
How to Connect a Subwoofer to a Soundbar
Great Soundbars without Subwoofers
Conclusion
BodyDoes a Soundbar Need a Subwoofer? By: Author Jonah Matthes Whether you currently have a soundbar or are looking to purchase one, you may be wondering how important a subwoofer is. Some soundbars have subwoofers built-in. Some soundbars have external subwoofer add-ons, and some soundbars don’t have any subwoofers at all. Does a soundbar need a subwoofer? A soundbar doesn’t need a subwoofer to sound good. Soundbars include multiple internal speakers that can sound great on their own, but a subwoofer helps produce low frequencies that many soundbars cannot. When deciding whether or not a subwoofer is right for you, you’ll want to understand exactly what is included in a soundbar and in a subwoofer, review your home entertainment needs, and look through different soundbar options — with and without a subwoofer. What Is a Soundbar? Soundbars have been gaining popularity over recent years since they are a simple, easy addition to a flat-screen TV. They were originally created to be a step up from your flat screen’s included speakers, which are usually pretty low-quality. As people started turning to soundbars to pair with their flat-screen TVs, the market grew and grew. Now, soundbars are more popular than ever, which means that manufacturers are making some very impressive soundbar systems. The Basics of a Soundbar. Simply put, a soundbar is a compact speaker system. They are thin and lightweight and typically come in a long rectangular shape. They sit beneath your TV on your entertainment stand and many can be mounted below or above your TV. Soundbars contain a number of speakers — anywhere from two to five and in some cases, even more. Even though all of the speakers are contained in the enclosure (or bar), manufacturers do their best to create a surround sound system, so sometimes, speakers are angled toward the sides of the room for a more room-filling sound. You’re able to purchase soundbars by themselves or in a package deal, which can include external speakers, as well as a subwoofer. Since traditional surround sound speaker systems are typically more expensive and more complicated, soundbars are a hot alternative for even the biggest sound gurus. Soundbars come in a number of speaker configurations — 2.0, 2.1, 3.0, 3.1, 5.1, and beyond (if you’re confused about these, check out our soundbar channels guide). They are often equipped to connect with your smart home devices, and many are compatible with Dolby Atmos, which can help you create an impressive surround sound in your home theater or entertainment room. It is easier than ever to make a soundbar the base of your surround sound system and customize/upgrade as you wish. What Is a Subwoofer? Soundbars seem like the complete package themselves: multiple speakers, upgrading the TV’s default sound, compatibility with best technologies, and integrating with your devices, so why do you need more? Even though soundbars can take a flat-screen TV’s sound up a notch on their own, a subwoofer is a popular upgrade and is often included in many soundbar packages — but is it necessary? The Basics of a Subwoofer. A subwoofer is a type of speaker that is known as a loudspeaker. It is responsible for reproducing low-pitched audio frequencies, which most speakers are not capable of producing on their own. Whether you listen to music a lot or mainly watch TV, your audio source sends low-pitched frequencies that won’t be enjoyed the same without a subwoofer. If you’ve never had a subwoofer in your home entertainment room, you probably wouldn’t even know what you are missing, but those who have subwoofers are hooked. They see them as a critical component of a proper sound system. When a lot of people think of subwoofers, they think of the large, tower speakers that sit on the floor that are an eyesore, or they think of that friend’s car with the huge subs in the back to make their music loud and bass-heavy. While those options are still available, subwoofers have now upgraded a notch. Subwoofers come in a range of sizes and quality, and many come wireless. Say goodbye to the bulky subwoofers you once thought of. Subwoofers can sit on a bookshelf, be mounted, etc., and they don’t have to be an eyesore in a shared living room. When Do You Need a Subwoofer for a Soundbar? When it comes to figuring out if you need a subwoofer, it all comes down to what your priorities are and who you ask. Are you trying to fill a room with immersive sound or stick to a low-budget sound system? If you ask a music or movie buff with a subwoofer, they’d say you absolutely have to have one if you love getting the full sound experience in your bass-heavy music or cinema. If you are looking for a low-budget sound system that “does the job”, adding a subwoofer may not be a good use of your money. A subwoofer is a key to getting a truly and fully immersive sound experience, no matter what you’re watching or listening to. If you have a dedicated home theater room or simply want your speaker system to go above and beyond the call of duty, you’ll want to get a subwoofer. Subwoofers aren’t always a highly expensive add on — sometimes, they come with the subwoofer for a decent price. As soundbars continue to gain popularity, soundbars with subwoofers will continue to drop in price. If you’re looking for a better-than-average soundbar, you might as well look for one with a built-in subwoofer or an external subwoofer. On the other hand, there are soundbars that do a good job of reproducing low-pitched sounds without an external soundbar. There are many options on the market that are raved about by reviewers for having an immersive surround sound experience without your traditional subwoofer. Manufacturers are creating some impressive technology that shouldn’t be ignored. If you’re interested in a soundbar that doesn’t use a subwoofer, check out our recommended soundbars without subwoofers! Where to Place a Subwoofer. If you do decide to purchase an external subwoofer or buy a soundbar with an included external subwoofer, you may be wondering where you should place your subwoofer. It’s an important question — because the placement of your subwoofer can affect the overall surround sound experience. For a more in-depth explanation of subwoofer placement, check out my guide to soundbar subwoofer placement! When deciding where to place your subwoofer, it first depends on whether it’s wireless or wired. If it’s wired, you can only place it so far from your soundbar, and if it’s wireless, you’ll want to make sure it still gets a great wireless signal. More often than not, subwoofers are placed next to the TV or on an entertainment stand. This is a good option if you have a small room or sit near the TV. If you have a large room and have many seats throughout your room, such as a dedicated home theater, you can opt to place your subwoofer in the corner of your room or behind your seating. These are both great options that can add to the surround sound of the larger room. You may also choose to mount your subwoofer if that option is compatible with your soundbar. You can also set it high on a shelf to create a more vertical surround sound, without the addition of upward-firing speakers. How to Connect a Subwoofer to a Soundbar. Since your soundbar acts as a subwoofer’s receiver, you’ll want to connect the subwoofer to the soundbar (more on how to connect other devices to soundbars in our guide). There are two options: a manual or wired connection and a wireless connection. Both are simple and quick to do, and once connected, your subwoofer will automatically turn on when you power on your soundbar. If you have a manual or wired connection, your subwoofer will come with a cord that will connect to the output on your soundbar. If you have a wireless subwoofer, you’ll simply want to link your subwoofer and your soundbar through Bluetooth. If your subwoofer came packaged with your soundbar, the setup should be easy and instructions are available from the manufacturer. If you decide to purchase a subwoofer separately from your soundbar, you’ll want to make sure that it’s compatible with your soundbar. In addition, if you purchase a soundbar on its own and are considering adding a subwoofer at a later time, you’ll want to make sure that it is manufactured to connect to a subwoofer through an output. Great Soundbars without Subwoofers. When deciding whether or not a subwoofer is right for you, you’ll want to look at some of the great options of soundbars without subwoofers. Here are a few to consider. Sonos Playbar. The Sonos Playbar (on Amazon) is a great option for a soundbar without a subwoofer. It is highly rated and popular, and if you ever want to add on a subwoofer, you have the choice of adding on the Sonos Sub — plus wireless Sonos speakers. It features crisp dialogue, impressive bass, the ability to mount or sit atop of your stand, voice control, and more. The only downfall is that it is a high-priced soundbar, and the subwoofer that you may later add on also sits at a high price. Sonos is a top, trusted speaker manufacturer, but there are definitely comparable options at lower prices. Bose Solo 5. The Bose Solo 5 (on Amazon) TV sound system is another great soundbar without a subwoofer from another heavy-hitting speaker brand. It sits at a pretty low price and comes with a number of advanced technology features — dialogue mode, Bluetooth connectivity for streaming, mounting, rich sound, deep bass with a bass button on the remote, and more. It sits at a pretty low price, so if you’re a fan of Bose speaker products, this might be a great option for you — no matter your budget. Bose Soundbar 500. The Bose Soundbar 500 (on Amazon) is another great choice by top brand Bose. This is a mid-range priced soundbar with a lot of sought after features: Dolby Digital and DTS compatibility, app control, Bluetooth streaming, Apple AirPlay 2 compatibility, built-in Google Assistant and Alexa with high-quality voice pickup, and more. While the sound can be great on its own, this Bose soundbar supports the addition of a Bose Bass Module and Bose Surround Speakers. This is another great option for Bose lovers and for music and TV buffs of all types. VIZIO SB3820-C6. VIZIO has been a top player in the soundbar game, and this low-priced VIZIO SB3820-C6 (on Amazon) 2.0-channel soundbar is a great buy. It comes with 100 dB of sound power, deep bass modules for extra bass without an additional subwoofer, compatibility with Dolby Digital and DTS, Bluetooth streaming, and more. At such a low price, this powerful soundbar that is packed with great features is hard to beat. This is definitely worth checking out. Conclusion. There are a lot of great reasons to add a subwoofer to your soundbar, but it’s not always necessary. You may end up choosing a soundbar package that includes a subwoofer, or you may find a great soundbar that has additional bass technology that helps fill in the gap for the low-pitched audio frequencies. You could easily purchase a soundbar without a subwoofer and add on one later if you see fit, but you’ll need to make sure that your soundbar has that capability. Of course, you could also buy a soundbar with a built-in subwoofer from our list of the top 10.  Whatever route you choose, a subwoofer is a specialized speaker that helps you get the full, immersive surround sound experience that many movie and music buffs love to enjoy. It’s a great idea to look at all of your options before making the right choice for you. Be sure to test out your options as much as possible and read the reviews to see how the bass sound compares from one soundbar another – to see if the subwoofer is necessary. There are so many great soundbars out there, so you shouldn’t have any problem finding a great one for you. Click here to cancel reply. Charl Lamprecht Monday 3rd of January 2022 Great and helpful review, thank you. Ian Smyth Sunday 1st of August 2021 I'm hard of hearing and bought samsung 550 soundbar. I still find it 'flat no matter what combinations of settinG s on tv and soundbar. Does turning off the sub change soundbar quality. Is there any other way To lift treble on digital, out from tv? Sound bar eq doesn't seem to do anything Cherri Saturday 22nd of August 2020 Thank you! Great advice, helped me out Alisha Tuesday 18th of February 2020 Thanks, Jonah I was planning to buy a Subwoofer for my home. And I was a bit confused. This blog helped me to clear my confusion.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 78
  • 8
  • soundbar
  • 74
  • 8
  • sound
  • 29
  • 8
  • speaker
  • 21
  • 8
  • great
  • 20
  • 8
  • soundbar subwoofer
  • 17
  • 8
  • tv
  • 16
  • 8
  • option
  • 14
  • 8
  • low
  • 12
  • 8
  • room
  • 12
  • 8
  • system
  • 11
  • 8
  • bose
  • 11
  • 8
  • subwoofer soundbar
  • 10
  • 8
  • surround
  • 10
  • 8
  • bass
  • 10
  • 8
  • surround sound
  • 9
  • 8
  • price
  • 9
  • 8
  • sit
  • 8
  • 8
  • sound system
  • 7
  • 8
  • add
  • 7
  • 8
  • home
  • 7
  • 8
  • wireless
  • 7
  • 8
  • sound experience
  • 6
  • 8
  • experience
  • 6
  • 8
  • purchase
  • 6
  • 8
  • external
  • 6
  • 8
  • connect
  • 6
  • 8
  • music
  • 6
  • 8
  • flat screen
  • 5
  • 8
  • great option
  • 5
  • 8
  • entertainment
  • 5
  • 8
  • flat
  • 5
  • 8
  • manufacturer
  • 5
  • 8
  • place
  • 5
  • 8
  • sono
  • 5
  • 8
  • screen tv
  • 4
  • 8
  • built
  • 4
  • 8
  • external subwoofer
  • 4
  • 8
  • low pitched
  • 4
  • 8
  • place subwoofer
  • 4
  • 8
  • great soundbar
  • 4
  • 8
  • feature
  • 4
  • 8
  • top
  • 4
  • 8
  • subwoofer soundbar subwoofer
  • 3
  • 8
  • flat screen tv
  • 3
  • 8
  • surround sound experience
  • 3
  • 8
  • bose solo
  • 3
  • 8
  • subwoofer add
  • 3
  • 8
  • pretty low
  • 3
  • 8
  • speaker system
  • 3
  • 8
  • purchase soundbar
  • 3
  • 8
  • soundbar package
  • 3
  • 8
  • home theater
  • 3
  • 8
  • subwoofer subwoofer
  • 3
  • 8
  • add subwoofer
  • 3
  • 8
  • connect subwoofer
  • 3
  • 8
  • low price
  • 3
  • 8
  • bose soundbar
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleIs a subwoofer really necessary for music? : audiophile
Urlhttps://www.reddit.com/r/audiophile/comments/2r1q0y/is_a_subwoofer_really_necessary_for_music/
Description35 votes, 71 comments. Hopefully this won't be too long-winded. I have never seriously considered buying a subwoofer before, always enjoying my …
Date4 days ago
Organic Position8
H1Is a subwoofer really necessary for music?
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyIs a subwoofer really necessary for music? Close35Posted by7 years agoArchivedIs a subwoofer really necessary for music? Hopefully this won't be too long-winded.I have never seriously considered buying a subwoofer before, always enjoying my music from just two speakers. Over the years I've seen the popularity of subwoofers explode, and even took a brief listen back in the late 90's but wasn't impressed enough to justify adding one. Lately, a very good friend of mine (who is very big into the home-theater world) insists I would benefit quite substantially from adding a modern, decent quality subwoofer to my music-only setup.For movies, I get it. Subwoofers are required to pump out the the low-frequency action and explosion at wall-shaking realistic levels, but I don't have these same requirements for music. In fact very little music of mine seems to really ask too much from the bass drivers of my B&W CM9s.Anyway, over the long holiday week he brought over one of his since-replaced SB-2000 subwoofers from his theater to give a listen in my setup. For what seems like a very affordable subwoofer, the bass sounded wonderful and tight and easily filled my moderately sized listening room, but it felt overwhelming and completely exaggerated. I think my buddy was just a bit excited and trying to make sure I noticed the difference. We crossed my mains over at 80Hz and and dialed the sub back to where it felt 'neutral' again for me and I put on Radiohead's - Kid A album.I'm trying to be as objective as I can, despite decades of listening without a subwoofer, but I'm really not seeing it. Or, should I say hearing it. There is a low kickdrum in the title track which I struggled to discern a difference between the two setups. Was the subwoofer playing the note a little lower than my mains? Was there a bit more power behind the electronic bass lines of "Idioteque"? Or was it just in my head? I really don't know. And that's basically my final impression after demoing this subwoofer on a few other albums ranging from 'Dylan to 'Davis.Do subwoofers really make sense for a music-only setup? Maybe a larger sized room would better show the benefits, or possibly specific kinds of music, or maybe a higher-end subwoofer? Even the well rated subwoofers seem affordable enough to warrant getting one if they help even a little bit, but honestly I can't hear a difference.71 commentssharesavehidereport79% UpvotedThis thread is archivedNew comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be castSort by: best level 1 · 7 yr. agoSierra 2-EX|Revel F206|Focal 906|RythmikIt depends what type of music you listen to and how 'hot' you want to run your bass. Organ music can go as low as 16 Hz, so you'd need a subwoofer to hit those bottom octaves. For most music, however, you probably don't need one, provided you have a speaker that can hit sub 40 Hz with some authority.46ShareReportSavelevel 2 · 7 yr. agoThis pretty much sums it up. It also depend on how you like your music .16ShareReportSavelevel 2 · 7 yr. ago · edited 7 yr. agoJust adding to this - the benefit of a good sub is that it will get to 40Hz and lower easily. Your 'normal range' 2.0 speakers will probably be dropping off around the 50Hz mark which does two things - you won't get the full clarity of the bass tones (regardless of what kind of music) and your amplifier will probably be working harder to supply power to the speakers, which may in turn affect its performance.I to-ed and fro-ed on 2.0 and 2.1 setups. Most sub woofers I find are terrible for music. They seem to be made for one purpose only - shake a room when there's explosions in a movie. They get very sloppy when trying to reproduce music, and produce a muddy sound rather than articulate the bass. But I found one that I really like - a B&W ASW608. It's quite small, so most sub-woofer fans overlook it. But it's fast - so it works really well for music - and it sounds fantastic. It's an active sub, so it helps the amplifier out by not needing to drive all the bass power alone.I'm satisfied with it for movies too. My feeling about movies is - if you want something to shake the room, then buy a shaker, not a sub-woofer :).5ShareReportSaveContinue this thread level 2Op · 7 yr. agoThat is very interesting, I can't say I've listened to a whole lot of organ music! Do you have any recommendations to check out while I've still got this subwoofer connected? Thanks5ShareReportSaveContinue this thread level 2 · 7 yr. agoSay no to MQAThe issue, i think, is that outside near-field listening, hitting sub-40 with authority is a hard problem that is solved by displacement. A 6.5 inch driver can do it if you're planning for only slightly above polite levels before you're effectively listening to distortion.1ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. ago · edited 7 yr. ago/u/DieselWang is absolutely correct - but I would add an important point.The low end is the hardest part to get "right". Room modes are a very real issue in nearly all rooms and can lead to massive swings in frequency response at the listening position. Even if bass extension isn't a problem for you, it may make sense to use 2 or more subs, placed in a particular manner (Note: this takes some time and research into the JBL procedures or Geddes procedures - which can be found by a google search) in order to cancel some of the worst ones out. This can also be done with room treatments, and to some extent with EQ.There is an impression in much of the audiophile community that subwoofers are crude - that they are only for home theater. This is outdated and only true if you don't know what you are doing. You use separate drivers for highs and mids, why are lows any different? Let's also not forget the equal loudness contour, which means that in many systems, if you really like to bump your speakers, your woofers likely won't be able to keep up with your mids.How do you set this up correctly? As I said, google those procedures, and try to find an auto EQ system. There are easy ones and there are difficult and tweaky systems. Behringer DEQ, MiniDSP, DEQx (expensive), velodyne's software and others can do this with little effort - of course, you could also just go buy a Denon receiver for Audyssey.14ShareReportSavelevel 2 · 7 yr. agoElitist JerkDEQX is not a room correction tool, it's a speaker correction tool. It does have a 11 band parametric EQ for tweaking the speaker sound and trying to do something with bass, but there are much cheaper options that do that and more for the room.2ShareReportSavelevel 2 · 7 yr. agoOr you can get a subpac and have no room modes, and all the bass. http://thesubpac.com/1ShareReportSaveContinue this thread level 1 · 7 yr. ago · edited 7 yr. agoThe problem is with how speakers are designed. It is very difficult to produce a two driver bookshelf that the woofer can go from the crossover point to below 55hz authoritively. Also lets assume these are self-powered monitors to make pricing easier to calculate at the end, although I'm still going to factor in crossover network issues.Lets say that tweeter and woofer crossover at around 2800hz, which is the top of the vocals band. If the woofer is big enough to dig below 55hz authoritatively (for any typical design, 6.5" or larger), than the vocal range, say, 900hz to 2800hz, suffers badly because the woofer can't both do mids and bass at the same time competently.So, okay, lets put a mid between the tweeter and the woofer. Now you have two crossovers, one at 600, one at 2800. You have now doubled the complexity and cost of your crossover network, you now have to tune not just two but now three drivers to sound well together, and your enclosure is much larger thus more expensive, and due to three drivers being in the enclosure it is now harder to design.So, you now have, say, a 1" tweeter, a 4" mid, and a 6.5" woofer. You still can't get down to below 55hz well, but you no longer need to worry about mids, so you grow it to 8". You can now go down to 45hz well, but now your enclosure is even bigger, thus more expensive, but you can't get below 45hz authoritatively with just that 8".Okay, so, you then stretch your 4" mid to cover down to 300hz, and replace your 8" with a 10". Bigger enclosure, again, bigger driver, again, more expense all around. You're now compently doing the entire thing at four times the cost, and your bass still isn't as tight or as low as you'd like, and now you need a much more powerful amp to drive this than what you had started with.Now, lets rewind a bit, and just go back to the two driver speaker. 1" tweeter, and lets say, a 5.25" woofer, instead of the 6.5" we started this with. Smaller enclosure, cheaper, easier to tune, less power handling requirements, more bang for your buck all around. Now, you pair this with a single SVS SB-1000 at 80hz.Your 1" crosses over at 2800hz, the 5" only needs to be competent down to 80hz, and then it crosses over into the single sub. The SVS-SB1000 is its own speaker, away from your two drivers, thus is much easier to design and tune. It has its own amp, tuned and designed for being a subwoofer amp, and the driver itself is designed to handle the subwoofer task well without trying to be a good performer above around 120hz. Everything in that sub is designed to be a sub, and only be a sub, and it is a damned good 12" sub at $500.So, lets say that 1" + 6.5" (down to 55hz) bookshelf costs $400. And lets say that 1" + 4" + 8" (down to 45hz) costs $1200. And also lets say that 1" + 4" + 10" (down to 35hz) costs $2000 or more. That 1" + 5.25"? Lets say that costs $300, but only gets you to 65hz.$2000 * 2 = $4000, in two speakers, gets you down to 35hz, and you're still not happy with it. Now, lets look at that 5.25" + sub setup: $300 * 2 + $500 = $1100, and you now get to go down to 24hz.Oh, and that SB-2000 you have? SB-1000's newer better brother. Different but better 12" driver, twice the power in the amp, and goes down to 19hz, and only $800 new.So, 2x 1" + 2x 4" + 2x 10" for $4000, or 2x 1" + 2x 5.25" + 1x 12" for $1100, and it beats the $4000 system single handedly? I'll take $1100 system with the sub.25ShareReportSavelevel 2 · 7 yr. agoSay no to MQAIt is very difficult to produce a two driver bookshelf that the woofer can go from the crossover point to below 55hz authoritively.You'll very much need to qualify that statement. Allow me to elaborate:How low a driver plays is almost solely defined by the driver itself - TangBand makes a 3.5" driver that you can tune for a -3dB of below 40 Hz (Fs = 35 Hz, and that's also very roughly the -3dB ).Will it play loud at that frequency? No. In a vented enclosure, it's capable of 87.5 dB/1m at the -3dB point, which is 35 Hz. The SPL you could squeeze from a pair of speakers, with these drivers, in the near field (0.5m) would be something like: 90.5 dB (max SPL in the passband) + 3 dB (gain from adding a second speaker) + 6 dB (halving of distance): 99.5. In the nearfield for pop/rock, that's pretty damn loud. Listening from your couch (2.5-3 m)? This thing would essentially be useless.Granted, this particular driver can't be mated to a traditional tweeter, as it starts breaking up at 900 Hz, so you'd typically pair it with a full range speaker of some sort, but it'd still be a two-way system.In those few last paragraphs lies my issue with your statement: It's perfectly possible to have two-way bookshelf systems that reach way below what you are suggesting, as long as you can live with excursion-limited SPL. My el-cheapo desktop rear channels (M-Audio BX5) are, for my use, perfectly capable of 55 Hz, and my fronts (Stealth 6) are capable of about 40 Hz at pretty much any SPL I would want to listen. For that use, I have absolutely no use for a sub - getting the last octave in any meaningful way is not practical at all: It'd roughly take 2x12" drivers to keep up with the monitors.Listening from your couch? It very much depends on what your needs are. At five times the distance of the tiny 3.5" TangBand driver, you pretty much need an 8" long-throw woofer to keep up.Note: I'm not saying there aren't potential advantages to subwoofers - they can offload many typical two-way speakers where the woofer isn't long-throw: A good 6.5 inch driver in a sealed enclosure is, at the "couch listening" position (2.5m or 6.5 ft), typically excursion-limited to 92-93 dB @40 Hz. Add a few dB if it's the right driver and you port the enclosure. Subtract a few dB if you don't apply a high-pass filter below tuning. Add 3dB for a pair. In reality: Those 6.5 inch drivers should get you to ~95 dB. Is that enough? For a lot of music, yes, especially if you want to preserve your ears.Movies? All bets are off: 30 dB headroom for explosions while dialog remains at 70 dB? All bets are off. You're going to need an LFE.2ShareReportSaveContinue this thread level 2 · 7 yr. agoGreat post.1ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoIt sounds like you know the answer for you already. I have some Polk floorstanders that hit 45Hz at -3dB. I listen to a lot of acoustic music and a lot of electronic music. For the electronic they weren't getting it done. A crossover in the 70-80Hz range and an SVS cylinder sub made all the difference for the electronic music. Before there were notes the speakers would struggle to hit and notes they would simply miss. Now they roll out effortlessly. There's so much more energy to the soundstage.When I'm really tracking with the acoustic I may go to 2 channel mode — eliminating both the sub and the high pass. As you said, the sub can be overpowering and exaggerated. When an acoustic guitar starts coming from the sub it sounds terrible. That's the answer for me. I need a sub, but when it makes things worse I remove it from the equation.You heard the answer for yourself. What's true for me in an apartment with floorstanders and my music taste may not be true for you in your scenario. I'm less interested in technically correct and what everyone says I should be doing and more interested in what makes me enjoy my music.5ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoWhy not let a powered subwoofer take care of the lowest frequencies found in music? Your mains will likely sound better too. Most floorstanders struggle below 60 Hz and bookshelves higher. A sub can also be moved to where it sounds best in your unique room since it is not part of stereo imaging. Use a modern AVR with bass management settings for best results, and then a program like Room EQ Wizard for the next step.3ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoThe use of a sub is dependent on what kinds of music you like, what kind of speakers you currently have and personal choice. If you're one of the guys that has like 4 12" subs in his car a pair of NTH super zeros or Micca club 3's is not going to cut it...ever. If you're coming from a bluetooth speaker that is the size of a large keychain then yeah they would be great. I happen to like the use of a sub as I don't have to have a pair of larger speakers to get the bass that I want. That's just me.2ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoI like subs in music, BUT... with a disclaimer that it comes down to personal taste. The human ear is not great at perceiving low frequencies. A sub helps this in my opinion.I feel like it adds a different dimension to the music. It doesn't have to be overbearing, thumpy, etc, but can add color and depth to the final output delivery.That said, it's up to you and your tastes. If you like your mains alone, great. I personally like the extra richness, color on the low end (maybe slightly too much, but I try to stay reasonable). Some genres benefit more than others.2ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. ago[music->ears]It depends on the music, your speakers, and how loud you like to listen.A decent tower speaker can produce adequate bass for a wide range of music at listen levels that average around 75-85 dB.At such volumes you aren't really able to hear the 20-30hz region well anyway, and most good tower speakers can get into the mid 30's without much trouble.If you listen much louder or really want some low low subbass presence, then you'll find a pair of towers lacking. If not, then enjoy.2ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoI'm not going to post anything as long or as insightful as a lot of the other responses in this thread, but hear me out. A lot of times in production for movies, synthesized sounds are produced for explosions, gun fire, etc. that deliberately simulate subwoofers. These are usually sine waves at low frequencies that give a bodily response to the action.Having said that, some electronic music recently has picked up on the trend and adds super low tones like those to music. Not having a sub isn't hurting you more than getting an accurate frequency response across the rest of the spectrum for any music except that which is intentionally trying to stimulate those frequencies.Having said that, having an adequate woofer on your main speakers is important, even if it doesn't reach near 20Hz. Look at the measurements of many subwoofers and you will find many that fall short of covering the 20-40Hz spectrum that anyone seriously considering extending an already solid set speakers wishes to cover.2ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. ago · edited 7 yr. agoAlmost always a yes. Instead of writing out a long explanation, I encourage you to listen to to these two recordings. There's also a chance your friend didn't tune it perfectly:Toccata and Fugue in D (Bach) - http://www.magle.dk/music-forums/23-bach-toccata-fugue-d.htmlHotel California - Hell Freezes Over (not the studio version, specifically the live version)Note that these are not uncommon recordings where you'll benefit from a sub. When I first got into high end audio, I thought the same thing after I built my first set of speakers. Now, I can't imagine listening to music without a sub.Edit: Also looks like for your speakers, the F3 seems to be around ~70 hz. While I haven't heard the CM9s, I would expect you to hear a big difference with above two recordings. Crossing them at ~90 hz should also help with efficiency for your mains. If you don't really hear a difference or don't think it's subjectively "worth" the extra cost, maybe you don't need one.source for freq response: http://www.soundandvision.com/images/archivesart/210bwspeak.meas.jpg2ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoFor me, it is an absolute necessity. Then again I mainly listen to reggae, hip hop, and electronica so ymmv. And I will say it is a struggle to get the right sound without overpowering a setup... My 150 watt powered sub is usually set between 10 and 20% of power.2ShareReportSavelevel 1 · 7 yr. agoI ALWAYS sub - i have speakers that are flat into the low 30s...I sub them too.2ShareReportSaver/audiophiler/audiophile is a subreddit for the pursuit of quality audio reproduction of all forms, budgets, and sizes of speakers. Our primary goal is insightful discussion of home audio equipment, sources, music, and concepts.1.7mMembers502ListeningCreated Sep 15, 2008JoinTop posts january 1st 2015Top posts of january, 2015Top posts 2015helpReddit coinsReddit premiumReddit giftsaboutcareerspressadvertiseblogTermsContent policyPrivacy policyMod policyReddit Inc © 2022 . All rights reservedBack to Top
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • yr
  • 67
  • 9
  • music
  • 35
  • 9
  • speaker
  • 32
  • 9
  • subwoofer
  • 23
  • 9
  • driver
  • 22
  • 9
  • woofer
  • 17
  • 9
  • level
  • 16
  • 9
  • let
  • 15
  • 9
  • bass
  • 15
  • 9
  • low
  • 14
  • 9
  • hz
  • 12
  • 9
  • db
  • 11
  • 9
  • room
  • 11
  • 9
  • sound
  • 10
  • 9
  • mid
  • 9
  • 9
  • 65
  • 9
  • 9
  • listen
  • 9
  • 9
  • dont
  • 9
  • 9
  • yr ago
  • 8
  • 9
  • ago edited
  • 8
  • 9
  • long
  • 8
  • 9
  • listening
  • 8
  • 9
  • enclosure
  • 8
  • 9
  • thread level
  • 7
  • 9
  • 2x
  • 7
  • 9
  • frequency
  • 7
  • 9
  • youre
  • 7
  • 9
  • crossover
  • 7
  • 9
  • cost
  • 7
  • 9
  • pair
  • 7
  • 9
  • thread
  • 6
  • 9
  • lot
  • 6
  • 9
  • add
  • 6
  • 9
  • system
  • 6
  • 9
  • yr ago edited
  • 4
  • 9
  • edited yr
  • 4
  • 9
  • subwoofer music
  • 4
  • 9
  • tweeter
  • 4
  • 9
  • 40 hz
  • 4
  • 9
  • edited
  • 4
  • 9
  • woofer crossover
  • 4
  • 9
  • 65 inch driver
  • 3
  • 9
  • 2x 2x
  • 3
  • 9
  • low frequency
  • 3
  • 9
  • kind music
  • 3
  • 9
  • 65 inch
  • 3
  • 9
  • inch driver
  • 3
  • 9
  • electronic music
  • 3
  • 9
Result 10
Title4 reasons your hi-fi setup needs a subwoofer
Urlhttps://thenextweb.com/news/4-reasons-your-hi-fi-setup-needs-a-subwoofer
DescriptionAdding a subwoofer is one of the best investments you can make for your hi-fi system, yet too many audiophiles dismiss then off the bat
Date18 Mar 2021
Organic Position9
H14 reasons your hi-fi setup needs a subwoofer
H2Stop buying new speakers if you don't already have a sub
H3More Bass
It’ll make your other speakers sound better and play louder
It can help fix room problems
They can last you through many speaker upgrades
Also tagged with
H2WithAnchorsStop buying new speakers if you don't already have a sub
Body4 reasons your hi-fi setup needs a subwoofer Stop buying new speakers if you don't already have a sub . Story byNapier Lopez. Story by Napier Lopez . Reporter Napier Lopez is a writer based in New York City. He's interested in all things tech, science, and photography related, and likes to yo-yo in (show all) Napier Lopez is a writer based in New York City. He's interested in all things tech, science, and photography related, and likes to yo-yo in his free time. Follow him on Twitter. It’s easy for audio enthusiasts to succumb to GAS, or the Gear Acquisition Syndrome. Once you listen to a decent pair of speakers, you want to try the next best thing, and then something else, and then the cycle perpetuates itself.Yet one of the biggest updates you can do to your hi-fi system will probably cost less than a whole new pair of speakers, and will last you through a multitude of speaker purchases.I’m talking about what’s in the headline, of course. If you don’t already have one, your next audiophile purchase should probably be a subwoofer.Will Google kill banks?How banks can compete with big techREAD ARTICLEUnfortunately, I still see too many audiophiles dismiss subwoofers right off the bat. Sometimes it’s because they think they don’t need that much bass. Other times it’s because they think it’ll make their system sound boomy. But I’m here to tell you why these aren’t things you should worry about — and why buying a subwoofer is one of the most sensible purchases a music lover can make.More Bass. Duh. A subwoofer’s main job is to increase the bass extension and/or output of your sound system. That’s particularly important if you use bookshelf speakers, but even full-sized towers rarely extend linearly all the way to the limits of our hearing.Humans can hear roughly from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, and we can still feel frequencies below 20 Hz. Yet bookshelf speakers typically decrease in output below 100 Hz — they have significant output below 40 Hz. Subwoofers are usually crossed over with your other speakers at around 80 Hz, taking over as you go lower. A good subwoofer will get all the way down to 20 Hz or below.Even on a good, large bookshelf speaker like the Focal Chora, output decreases significantly in the sub-bass range. Placing a speaker close to a wall will help regain some output, but not enough, and likely in an unbalanced way.Getting that last bit of bass may not sound like much in the vast range of frequencies we can perceive, but it truly can make a dramatic difference (and remember, we hear frequencies logarithmically, so a few Hz in the bottom counts for a wide range of notes). Without that last bit of sub-bass, bass-heavy genres like rap and pop obviously suffer, but even orchestral music often sounds ‘incomplete.’ Pipe organs can even reach below 20Hz, for instance.A small subwoofer like the KEF KC62 won’t get crazy loud, but it can still significantly increase the bass extension of your system, allowing it to reach down below 20Hz.Those low frequencies are particularly important for the physical impact you get from bass, and they can help a small system sound bigger and more enveloping. Sure, some speakers can reach pretty low at quieter SPLs (sound pressure levels), and you can give bass a bit of a boost by placing speakers closer to a wall, but chances are you’re not getting the full breadth of the bass content that is in the recording. Even if your speakers can hit 30 or 40 Hz, you probably aren’t getting that at the levels intended in the recording.And before you complain about having too much bass, or worry about annoying neighbors, a subwoofer’s bass output is completely up to you. You are typically able to regulate the sub’s volume independent of your other speakers and can use a subwoofer to ‘fill out’ the lowest frequencies without waking up the entire building.It’ll make your other speakers sound better and play louder. When you add a subwoofer to your sound system, you are effectively making life easier for your other speakers. Adding a subwoofer can have a direct impact on not just the amount of bass in your sound system, but on the sound quality for higher frequencies as well.Generally speaking, asking a small speaker to play low frequencies at high volumes will increase distortion and require a lot of power from an amplifier (there’s a reason you don’t see many small speakers hitting 20 Hz, after all). But subwoofers already have their amplifiers built in, and they usually pack larger or multiple drivers which are far better equipped for handling very low frequencies than the single 5 or 6-inchwoofers in most bookshelf speakers.Credit: SVSThe SVS SB-1000 Pro lets you EQ the subwoofer to your room acoustics.By handing off those lowest frequencies to the subwoofer, your speakers are free to perform more effectively in their comfort zone.Closely related to the above point, handing off those lowest frequencies to your subwoofer typically means your speakers will be able to play louder without audibly distorting. And because the lowest frequencies are often the most difficult for an amplifier to drive, handing these off to a sub — which again, almost always have a built-in amp — means less load on your amp too.It can help fix room problems. One of the biggest, least appreciated benefits of a subwoofer — or better yet, multiple ones — is they can reduce some of the most adverse effects of your room on sound quality. Your room always affects the sound of your speakers, but nowhere is this influence worse than in the bass.At lower frequencies, sound waves will create ‘modes‘ or standing waves in your room. The net effect is that some bass frequencies get dramatically boosted, while others see massive dips. This is one of the things that can contribute to speakers sounding boomy — not only are some of these low frequencies boosted tremendously, they will also tend to ‘ring’ for an extended amount of time.Using multiple subwoofers and room EQ can help address nasty peaks and dips in the bass across a wide range of listening positions.Integrating a subwoofer with careful placement and equalization — whether done automatically through room EQ software like Dirac or manually through an app like REW — can help significantly decrease these peaks and dips at your listening position. The how of this goes beyond the scope of this article, but properly managed bass is often the difference between a bad-sounding room and a great-sounding one.(You can also apply EQ to just a stereo pair of speakers, but having a subwoofer gives your more flexibility for dealing with these room issues.)This effect is amplified massively by adding two or more subwoofers, particularly if you want to improve sound quality across a wider listening area. You will need an AV Reciever or other hardware to integrate a subwoofer, so that can be an additional expense, but it’s one of the biggest potential benefits of adding a sub to your system. For more reading on this, I recommend this article by Audioholics.They can last you through many speaker upgrades. As I noted in the intro paragraph, once get hooked on audio gear, chances are you’ll eventually want to upgrade to another set of speakers. Part of the reason I recommend getting a subwoofer before you try upgrading your speakers, is that having one offers you more flexibility in your choices.After all, bass extension is normally a crucial variable in any speaker purchase. Say you have to choose between a speaker with a more neutral frequency response and bigger soundstage, or opt for one that performs worse but offers more bass extension. Which one do you choose?Having a subwoofer makes the choice much easier: you can significantly disregard bass performance pick the one that’s better in other aspects of acoustic performance.One last note: contrary to what some manufacturers might have you believe, there’s rarely a reason a subwoofer should ‘pair’ or ‘match’ better with a particular set of speakers. So choose the best subwoofer(s) you can afford and fit in your space — it’ll last you many years through your audio journey.This article only scratches the surface of the benefits and process of integrating a subwoofer, let alone actually choosing the right one for your setup. Still, hopefully it sets you on the right path — one of glorious bass.Follow @pluggedAlso tagged with. SubwooferHi-fifeaturePlugged Features
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 28
  • 10
  • speaker
  • 28
  • 10
  • bass
  • 23
  • 10
  • frequency
  • 15
  • 10
  • sound
  • 14
  • 10
  • hz
  • 9
  • 10
  • room
  • 9
  • 10
  • system
  • 8
  • 10
  • reason
  • 7
  • 10
  • output
  • 6
  • 10
  • lowest frequency
  • 5
  • 10
  • significantly
  • 5
  • 10
  • lowest
  • 5
  • 10
  • thing
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 5
  • 10
  • low
  • 5
  • 10
  • bass extension
  • 4
  • 10
  • 20 hz
  • 4
  • 10
  • low frequency
  • 4
  • 10
  • lopez
  • 4
  • 10
  • yo
  • 4
  • 10
  • pair
  • 4
  • 10
  • extension
  • 4
  • 10
  • bookshelf
  • 4
  • 10
  • range
  • 4
  • 10
  • small
  • 4
  • 10
  • eq
  • 4
  • 10
  • napier lopez
  • 3
  • 10
  • pair speaker
  • 3
  • 10
  • system sound
  • 3
  • 10
  • sound system
  • 3
  • 10
  • bookshelf speaker
  • 3
  • 10
  • sound quality
  • 3
  • 10
  • benefit
  • 3
  • 10
  • effect
  • 3
  • 10
  • dip
  • 3
  • 10
  • sounding
  • 3
  • 10
  • listening
  • 3
  • 10
  • article
  • 3
  • 10
  • set
  • 3
  • 10
Result 11
TitleHow Important is a Subwoofer in a Home Theater System? - AudioReputation
Urlhttps://www.audioreputation.com/subwoofer-in-a-home-theater-system/
DescriptionTechnically speaking, a subwoofer is not absolutely necessary – your speaker system will work even without one, but there are many reasons why you should have it and here they are
Date3 Nov 2020
Organic Position10
H1How Important is a Subwoofer in a Home Theater System?
H2What Is Subwoofer and How It Works?
Subwoofer’s Role in a Home Theater System
How to Optimize Subwoofer Performance?
H3Related posts:
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Subwoofer and How It Works?
Subwoofer’s Role in a Home Theater System
How to Optimize Subwoofer Performance?
BodyHow Important is a Subwoofer in a Home Theater System? Updated on November 3, 2020 by James Longman Table of ContentsWhat Is Subwoofer and How It Works?Subwoofer’s Role in a Home Theater SystemHow to Optimize Subwoofer Performance? Have you ever had one of those moments when watching a movie in a cinema and wondering how they managed to achieve such a nice and powerful sound? Well, in most of the action or dramatic scenes, the key is the subwoofer. This thing is one of the key elements of every good speaker system, no matter if it is 2.1, 5.1, 7.1, or bigger. If you want to buy a great home theater system or to add a subwoofer to your existing speaker system, stay with us and you will find out all about the importance of a subwoofer and about different ways of optimizing the subwoofer’s performance. What Is Subwoofer and How It Works? Subwoofers are different from the regular speakers because they are made specially for reproducing very low-frequency tones, usually from 20 to 125 Hz (or up to 200Hz). Subwoofers are the inseparable part of every quality speaker system because regular speakers can’t produce such low tones. Actually, these tones are so low that you may not even hear some of them but you will definitely feel them due to strong vibrations. Subwoofers are easily noticed because they are often the largest speakers in the speaker system, they have their own enclosure and their diameter can vary from 20cm to 40cm. When it comes to subwoofers, the larger is always better because only large speakers can reproduce extremely low frequencies. These speakers are usually connected to the audio receiver or amplifier/preamplifier (like all the other speakers in a system), which sends the low-frequency signals or low-frequency effects (LFE) to the subwoofer. The speaker amplifies the incoming current, the magnetic coil moves and creates the cone vibrations which are converted to sound that we hear. In order to produce such powerful sounds, the subwoofers are usually provided with their own power supply. Subwoofer’s Role in a Home Theater System. Technically speaking, a subwoofer is not absolutely necessary – your speaker system will work even without one, but there are many reasons why you should have it and here they are. As we’ve said, regular speakers can’t reproduce all the frequencies – they won’t be able to deliver the lowest tones and, as a result, an important part of sound will be taken away from you. Without the subwoofer, you will be exposed to poor bass or too stressed highs. The sound won’t be balanced and full. However, bass and sub-bass frequencies are the ones that add fullness to the sound, making it complete, rich, powerful and even three-dimensional. This means that without the low-frequency tones, you will be just a passive listener of a soundtrack or a passive observer of a movie scene. Well-produced low-frequency tones involve you into every scene, into the music, and, of course, enable you to feel, hear and see exactly what the artist wanted you to feel, hear or see. Even if you aren’t able to hear some of the extremely low bass tones, you should have a subwoofer that can produce them because you will definitely be able to feel them through the vibrations of your furniture. Without well-produced bass, you won’t be able to hear the drums well just like you won’t be able to feel all those explosions in action movies. Of course, in order to get a perfect subwoofer performance, it is not enough to simply buy the subwoofer and connect it to the source (receiver, amp). Good installation is the key factor. In the following text, we will explain what you can do to improve the subwoofer’s performance. How to Optimize Subwoofer Performance? Poorly installed and placed subwoofer could deliver too boomy or poorly defined bass. In both cases, there will be a gap in the frequency spectrum between the regular speakers and the subwoofer, which means that you won’t be able to enjoy your music or video content completely. On the other hand, a nicely installed subwoofer brings so much joy to every room and once you experience the real feeling, you won’t be able to settle for anything less than perfect. When we say “subwoofer installation”, we actually mean its setup and its placement. These are the key factors that affect its performance. Let’s see how you can optimize it and adjust to your requirements and preferences. Subwoofer placement Many will say that subwoofers are non-directional speakers and that you don’t really have to worry too much about their placement. This means that there is no fixed or special place where your subwoofer should stay in your apartment in order to produce perfect bass. Well, this is only partially true. You will definitely feel the vibrations and hear the bass wherever you place the subwoofer but that doesn’t mean that its position in the room is completely irrelevant. The subwoofer placement can significantly lower or enhance the overall sound quality. The perfect placement should be thoughtfully planned because the final effect depends not only on the subwoofer placement but also on the furniture placement. You can find out more about this in our previous articles. Poor/wrong subwoofer placement can be the key reason for disappointment with a new home theater system, so let’s see how to avoid that. Place your subwoofer near a wall Placing the subwoofer in one of the corners of the room or simply near one of the walls, improves its performance in the way that increases the overall level of bass. This happens because wall proximity causes the sound coming from the subwoofer to reflect from the walls, which increases the bass power and strength. Place your speaker under your couch If you really want to feel every movie scene, try placing your subwoofer under your couch or coffee table. Most of them have cavities that are perfectly sized and shaped for placing an average subwoofer. This way, you will be closer to the source of powerful bass tones and vibrations that will drag you into every scene. Use a separate subwoofer amplifier Maybe you haven’t noticed it but numerous surround sound amplifiers have a special subwoofer output and it is used to power the subwoofer and enhance its performance. You can simply take a cable that will go from your main amp to the second stereo or mono amp dedicated to your subwoofer, set this up once and later control every change with the main amp. Sometimes two is better than one 5.1 and other X.1 systems are the most popular ones. They all have only one subwoofer. In some cases, especially if you have a large room, having two or even 3 subwoofers instead of one is completely fine. In fact, it’s desirable and it will improve bass performance. Good bass management What does bass management mean? This is the process of removing the bass portion from the signal that goes towards the speakers and re-routing them to the subwoofer or subwoofers. This is actually very similar to a regular crossover. The device that separates the bass portion from the signal is placed either in the subwoofer or in the receiver. In case of 2.1 systems, the bass is managed in the subwoofer that filters the signals and passes the mid and high-frequency signals to the satellites / regular speakers. The situation is a bit different with 5.1 or larger home theater systems because they have the AV receiver that receives all the signals and filters them out, removes the low-frequency tones from the signal that goes to the satellites and sends them to the subwoofer. Choosing the subwoofer with the right enclosure You probably know that the subwoofer enclosure affects the bass quality a lot. One of the common ways of achieving high-quality bass is to buy the subwoofer with an opened “bass-pass” enclosure. These cabinets are tuned, resonant and the sound can go out through more than one port. These cabinets are great when you need powerful bass for watching action movies with many explosions and crashes but it can also be too boomy and inadequate for high-quality songs where you want to listen carefully to the bass guitar sequence. Correct alignment One of the most important things related to speaker system installation, especially if your subwoofer and your satellites are made by different manufacturers, is to match their phases. This actually means that all the parts of the system should have the same polarity and time alignment. In the opposite case, the crossover region will have some kind of level dip and that won’t sound good. Every part of the system has different phase characteristics that have to be aligned. Also, when they are located in different parts of the room and at different distances from the listening position, you could experience some kind of time delay. All of this can be solved with a good phase controller that is usually located on the quality subwoofers. A small adjustment can change the overall sound quality and harmonize the speaker system. In the end, we just want to say that all these tips should be taken with a pinch of salt because every home theater system and every apartment or house are completely different, with different features and acoustic properties. This is why the only correct and honest advice is to experiment with both – your speaker system and your furniture in order to find the perfect combination. James LongmanHello, my name is James Longman. I’m a writer and editor at AudioReputation. I disassembled my first portable AM/FM radio when I was only 8. At the age of 11, I burned the circuit board on my old boombox cassette player. I’m not going to explain how but it was reckless and stupid. Since then, I have become much more careful around radios, boomboxes, and other audio devices (at least, I like to think so) but I have never lost the passion for audio equipment. Throughout 20 years of my professional career, I’ve been working for various audio equipment manufacturers and even started building speakers on my own in my little workshop. I love the work we do here at AudioReputation. Testing, comparing, and evaluating all kinds of audio devices (speakers, soundbars, headphones, home theater systems, etc.) is something I truly enjoy. I try to be unbiased and give you my honest opinion on every piece of equipment I test. Still, you should take my reviews with a pinch of salt and always be just a little bit skeptical. The fact that I liked some speaker or soundbar doesn’t mean that you are going to love it. If you have the opportunity, you should test it/hear it before buying it. Related posts:. How to Build the Ultimate Home Theater Experience? Understanding Speaker Frequency Response Home Audio Speaker Systems – Wired vs. Wireless Soundbars vs Surround Sound Systems: Is There a Difference? How to Optimize Speaker Performance Best High-End Home Theater Speakers In 2021 5.1 Surround Sound vs. 7.1 Surround Sound Understanding Surround Sound Formats
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 59
  • 11
  • speaker
  • 29
  • 11
  • bass
  • 24
  • 11
  • system
  • 22
  • 11
  • sound
  • 16
  • 11
  • performance
  • 12
  • 11
  • frequency
  • 12
  • 11
  • home
  • 11
  • 11
  • home theater
  • 10
  • 11
  • speaker system
  • 10
  • 11
  • theater
  • 10
  • 11
  • low
  • 10
  • 11
  • tone
  • 9
  • 11
  • placement
  • 8
  • 11
  • home theater system
  • 7
  • 11
  • theater system
  • 7
  • 11
  • low frequency
  • 7
  • 11
  • quality
  • 7
  • 11
  • hear
  • 7
  • 11
  • feel
  • 7
  • 11
  • signal
  • 7
  • 11
  • powerful
  • 6
  • 11
  • room
  • 6
  • 11
  • regular
  • 6
  • 11
  • audio
  • 6
  • 11
  • subwoofer performance
  • 5
  • 11
  • regular speaker
  • 5
  • 11
  • surround sound
  • 5
  • 11
  • movie
  • 5
  • 11
  • scene
  • 5
  • 11
  • key
  • 5
  • 11
  • good
  • 5
  • 11
  • part
  • 5
  • 11
  • vibration
  • 5
  • 11
  • high
  • 5
  • 11
  • perfect
  • 5
  • 11
  • surround
  • 5
  • 11
  • low frequency tone
  • 4
  • 11
  • frequency tone
  • 4
  • 11
  • subwoofer placement
  • 4
  • 11
  • wall
  • 4
  • 11
  • place subwoofer
  • 3
  • 11
Result 12
TitleDo You Need a Subwoofer with Your Bookshelf Speakers?
Urlhttps://edifier-online.com/us/en/blog/do-you-need-a-subwoofer-with-your-bookshelf-speakers
DescriptionLearn how subwoofers work and how they can enhance your bookshelf speaker system
Date
Organic Position11
H1Do You Need a Subwoofer with Your Bookshelf Speakers?
H2Blog And News
H3
H2WithAnchorsBlog And News
BodyDo You Need a Subwoofer with Your Bookshelf Speakers? Subwoofers are often associated with intense, room-shaking bass, but do all bookshelf speakers benefit from adding a standalone subwoofer? The best answer depends on a number of factors, including the type of source material you’re listening to and the frequency range that the bookshelf speakers are designed to produce. Most bookshelf speakers do not include a dedicated subwoofer out of the box, but as you’ll soon learn, not all bookshelf speakers are created equal.In this post, we’ll explain what a subwoofer is, how it works, and describe some situations where you may, or may not, need a subwoofer to achieve an optimal listening experience. What is a Subwoofer? A subwoofer is a speaker designed for the sole purpose of producing low-frequency audio, and typically has a frequency response range of roughly 35 Hz to 200 Hz, depending on the model. These specialized speakers are limited to handling audio reproduction within their specified range and do not produce sound above it. Subwoofers come in a variety of sizes—and in general, the larger the diameter of the subwoofer, the deeper the bass. Common sizes for home-listening subwoofers are 8”, 10” and 12”, with some as large as 15”, designed for premium home theaters. They almost always have a dedicated, integrated amplifier which provides ample power for all the low-end energy the sub needs to generate. Determining the Frequency Range of Bookshelf Speakers If you look at the technical specifications for an average pair of digital bookshelf speakers, you might find a frequency response range that is approximately 60 Hz to 20 kHz—some may have smaller or wider response curves. Even so, unless you are listening on high-end, premium speakers, it is unlikely that they are producing the full depth of bass all the way down to 60 Hz, as specified. This is due to the desire to keep bookshelf speakers compact and aesthetically pleasing for the home. As a result, most bookshelf speakers have woofers that are around 5” in diameter. While speakers of this size can provide great performance from around 100 Hz and up (depending on the model), they may fail to produce crucial low-end information that, depending on the source material, you probably never knew you were missing. Determining whether it’s worth investing in a subwoofer for your particular needs depends on two primary factors:1. The type of source material you’re listening to. 2. The low-frequency performance of your bookshelf speakers. Bass Frequency of the Source Material If you mostly listen to older recordings, like classic rock vinyl records, your typical set of high-quality bookshelf speakers is likely to offer you a great experience as-is. In the days of LPs, mastering engineers would regularly reduce, or attenuate, the lowest frequencies before the vinyl was cut. This was done for a number of reasons, but most importantly, it helped reduce rumble and ensured that the needle stayed in the vinyl’s groove more reliably. As a result, a medium like vinyl doesn’t benefit much from a bookshelf speaker system that includes a subwoofer. On the other hand, if you are listening to EDM, hip hop, or other bass heavy music, a subwoofer (or a speaker that provides bass performance equivalent to a subwoofer) can significantly enhance your listening experience. These musical genres are known for their use of fundamental bass frequencies that well exceed average bookshelf speakers. However, as mentioned in this article’s opening, not all bookshelf speakers are created equal. Not All Bookshelf Speakers Are Created Equal Conventional wisdom suggests that if you want the deepest, richest bass possible, you need to add a subwoofer to your bookshelf speaker system. While average bookshelf speakers may provide enough bass for casual listeners, they simply cannot offer the full-throated low-end often found in recordings of classical music, EDM, and hip hop—not to mention movie audio for home theater enjoyment. However, Certified Hi-Res digital bookshelf speakers, like the Edifier S3000Pro, reproduce frequencies as low as 38 Hz, which is better than some of the most popular standalone subwoofers on the market. The Edifier S1000DB digital bookshelf speakers also offers bass performance on par with standalone subwoofers, reproducing frequencies down to 48 Hz. Both of these digital bookshelf speakers are examples of audio systems that do not require a dedicated subwoofer in order to produce the full spectrum of sound needed to create a powerful and dynamic home listening experience. A Better Home Audio Experience At this point, you’ve read about how subwoofers can supplement conventional bookshelf speakers when they are unable to produce rich, deep bass on their own. You’ve also learned how certain digital bookshelf speakers, like the Edifier S1000DB and S3000Pro, provide low-frequency performance that meets or exceeds many standalone subwoofers. You might be wondering how this affects your listening experience in practical terms. In popular music, especially classical, pop, hip-hop, and rap, you’ll discover entire new low-end elements in your favorite songs. In movies, you’ll literally feel the rumble usually reserved for theater-goers. In video games, you will become more immersed than ever before, because what you’re seeing on screen will finally be matched to what you’re hearing in-game. You’re likely to be surprised by how much your experience improves when you hear the fuller, deeper bass that was originally intended. In systems that do require a standalone subwoofer to achieve this level of performance, using a subwoofer is likely to make your bookshelf speakers sound better too! By choosing a bookshelf speaker system that includes a subwoofer, like the Edifier S350DB, the bookshelf speakers can be kept smaller and therefore housed in a smaller enclosure. And since the enclosure is smaller, there is less surface area and material to potentially vibrate and resonate. With virtually no resonance, you’ll hear more of your music with greater clarity and without any distracting rattling from your speaker cabinet. A Recap of Subwoofers Subwoofers offer exceptional low-frequency performance, with a typical response between 35 Hz - 45 Hz at the bottom end of their range. Although standalone subwoofers are often used in combination with bookshelf speakers, hi-fi speakers like the Edifier S3000Pro and S1000DB, offer bass performance on par or better than most subwoofers. This proves that not all bookshelf speakers are created equal, and that with the right design and quality components, a standalone subwoofer is not necessarily required to achieve the ultimate audio experience. With all that said, many bookshelf speaker systems are certainly functional without a subwoofer. But, if you’re the type of person who seeks the best home entertainment performance possible, you should consider upgrading to a system with a frequency response that matches the type of content you’ll be listening to. Even though you may not know what you’ve been missing, you definitely won’t regret the upgrade, and you’ll wonder how you’ve made it this far without experiencing the deep, rich bass typically reserved for standalone subwoofers. Looking for a pair of high-quality bookshelf speakers that don’t require a subwoofer? Check out our wide selection of wireless bookshelf speakers.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • speaker
  • 38
  • 12
  • subwoofer
  • 33
  • 12
  • bookshelf speaker
  • 31
  • 12
  • bookshelf
  • 30
  • 12
  • bass
  • 14
  • 12
  • frequency
  • 14
  • 12
  • listening
  • 11
  • 12
  • experience
  • 10
  • 12
  • low
  • 10
  • 12
  • hz
  • 9
  • 12
  • performance
  • 9
  • 12
  • standalone subwoofer
  • 8
  • 12
  • standalone
  • 8
  • 12
  • home
  • 7
  • 12
  • system
  • 7
  • 12
  • range
  • 6
  • 12
  • audio
  • 6
  • 12
  • end
  • 6
  • 12
  • digital bookshelf speaker
  • 5
  • 12
  • low frequency
  • 5
  • 12
  • digital bookshelf
  • 5
  • 12
  • smaller
  • 5
  • 12
  • vinyl
  • 5
  • 12
  • material
  • 5
  • 12
  • produce
  • 5
  • 12
  • response
  • 5
  • 12
  • digital
  • 5
  • 12
  • offer
  • 5
  • 12
  • edifier
  • 5
  • 12
  • bookshelf speaker created
  • 4
  • 12
  • bookshelf speaker system
  • 4
  • 12
  • hip hop
  • 4
  • 12
  • source material
  • 4
  • 12
  • speaker created
  • 4
  • 12
  • listening experience
  • 4
  • 12
  • low end
  • 4
  • 12
  • speaker system
  • 4
  • 12
  • type
  • 4
  • 12
  • source
  • 4
  • 12
  • created
  • 4
  • 12
  • music
  • 4
  • 12
  • subwoofer bookshelf speaker
  • 3
  • 12
  • low frequency performance
  • 3
  • 12
  • speaker created equal
  • 3
  • 12
  • subwoofer bookshelf
  • 3
  • 12
  • frequency response
  • 3
  • 12
  • frequency performance
  • 3
  • 12
  • bass performance
  • 3
  • 12
  • created equal
  • 3
  • 12
  • speaker edifier
  • 3
  • 12
  • s1000db
  • 3
  • 12
  • require
  • 3
  • 12
Result 13
TitleAll You Wanted To Know About Subwoofers
Urlhttps://www.soundonsound.com/sound-advice/all-you-wanted-know-about-subwoofers
DescriptionIf you want to get your low-frequency monitoring right, a subwoofer can be your best friend — or your worst enemy! Learn how to optimise your setup..
Date
Organic Position12
H1All You Wanted To Know About Subwoofers
H2You are here
The Subwoofer Advantage
Concept
One Or Two?
Bass Management
Subwoofer Cabinet Types
Alignment
Practical Placement
New forum posts
Active topics
Recently active forums
H3
H2WithAnchorsYou are here
The Subwoofer Advantage
Concept
One Or Two?
Bass Management
Subwoofer Cabinet Types
Alignment
Practical Placement
New forum posts
Active topics
Recently active forums
BodyAll You Wanted To Know About Subwoofers ...But Couldn't Find On The Internet! Monitors / MonitoringBy Hugh Robjohns Published April 2007 If you really want to craft your bass end, a subwoofer can be indispensable. Here's the low-down... When I was first getting interested in all things audio, home subwoofers were rather specialist devices that were only of interest to two groups of hi-fi enthusiasts: those who listened to large pipe organ recitals and those who enjoyed reggae! Things have moved on a great deal since those distant days, and today subwoofers are now considered — more for the 'domestic acceptance' factor than any potential sonic benefits — to be an almost standard part of modern hi-fi and studio monitoring systems.PMC's TLE1 Subwoofer. It is therefore becoming increasingly common to have smaller 'satellite' left and right speakers, plus one or more subwoofers — a format often referred to as 2.1. The two refers to the main pair of stereo (left and right) speakers, while the '.1' refers to the limited-bandwidth subwoofer. In the same way, a surround sound system is often denoted as 5.1, meaning five main channels plus a subwoofer to handle the low frequency effects channel (LFE). However, in the case of 5.1 home theatre and surround sound systems, a dedicated subwoofer is required specifically to handle the low frequency effects (LFE) channel. The fact that this sub usually also doubles up, through the use of bass management (explained later), to handle the bass content of all five main channels as well, is just a convenience that allows the use of smaller satellite speakers. Again, I'll come back to this topic later, but I first want to consider 2.1 stereo monitoring arrangements. The Subwoofer Advantage. When designed and used appropriately, subwoofers can be extremely effective and very convenient. Equally, though, it is very easy to destroy any chance of good monitoring quality with an inappropriate or badly set-up subwoofer — and it is worth stating that I have probably seen nine unsatisfactory installations for every good one! Poor subwoofer installations usually suffer from too much, or poorly defined, bass. Often there is an obvious 'hole' in the frequency spectrum in the crossover region between the satellite speakers and the subwoofer. It is the 'integration' through this crossover region that really makes or breaks the system as a whole. The worst kind of subwoofer system will only provide a boomy or monotonal 'woomf' of energy, regardless of the pitch or dynamics of the bass instrument, and the bass might thus appear to be slow or late relative to the main speakers. On the other hand, a well-designed and well-configured system will usually enable more accurate imaging, and have a clearer, more transparent mid-range (thanks to lower distortion and intermodulation levels) and higher overall output than could be achieved with the satellites alone. From a practical point of view, a satellite and subwoofer combination is much easier to site and to move around. The individual speaker cabinets are more compact and lighter than full-range speakers, and that is often an important consideration — especially in small home studios and for location-recording rigs. So the aim of this article is to try to explain the hows and whys of choosing and using a subwoofer, in the context of both stereo and surround sound applications. Concept. The first thing to understand is the basic concept of a subwoofer system. What it is trying to do, and how does it work? Obviously, the fundamental idea is to reproduce low frequencies. In most cases, this is roughly the bottom two octaves, from 20Hz to 80Hz. However, here lies the first major issue we need to take onboard: having a special box that generates low frequencies doesn't guarantee good bass in the listening room — in fact, far from it! The room's own acoustic properties are of paramount importance. If you put the world's best subwoofer in an acoustically poor room, you'll get very poor bass performance! I have frequently come across monitoring systems where the owner has added a subwoofer in the hope of curing a weak or lumpy bass response, only to discover the situation either doesn't improve or actually gets worse! If the room has nasty standing-wave problems — and almost all home studios do — it's vital that these acoustical problems are sorted out first, before you spend money or time on a subwoofer. Bass trapping to control and reduce room standing-waves is a subject that we've covered many times, and is also a popular topic for ongoing discussion and guidance on the Studio Design & Acoustics forum on the SOS web site. You can often improve a room's acoustics dramatically for minimal cost with some basic DIY. And with a treated room you may well find that your existing speakers actually deliver much more and better bass than you thought! Another useful benefit of a subwoofer is the additional power handling accorded to the system as a whole. The acoustic energy in music is highest at low frequencies and tails off with increasing frequency. So employing a dedicated box to handle much of the power-hungry bass takes that burden from the satellites, with useful benefits in overall power handling and clarity. One Or Two? Most stereo systems have two main speakers, yet we have only one subwoofer. Why not two subwoofers as well? In some situations there can be advantages to having two (or more) subwoofers, but in general one is usually sufficient. The reason for this is connected to the fact that, for frequencies below about 700Hz, our sense of hearing measures the phase difference between a sound arriving at each ear, whereas above this frequency it uses mainly level differences. Out of doors, our ability to determine a sound's direction remains quite accurate down to remarkably low frequencies, but this ability collapses when listening indoors. Sources generating low-frequency sounds (below about 100Hz) tend to do so more or less omnidirectionally (the sound wave travels from the source in all directions) because the wavelength of sound is usually larger than the object itself. When a low-frequency sound is generated within an enclosed space, the spherical sound waves created will reflect off the boundary surfaces of the room to arrive back at the ears with a multiplicity of phase variances, due to path-length differences. This confusion of signals makes it impossible for the ear and brain to extract a reliable phase difference, so normal directional acuity fails. So in theory, since you can't tell where the low frequencies are coming from in a room, one subwoofer will be entirely sufficient. The harmonics of the bass notes will be reproduced by the satellite speakers — which typically start to take over above about 90Hz — and these will provide plenty of directional information through phase and level differences, in the usual way. So, although the bass itself is folded down to mono, the impression of stereo imaging is actually preserved perfectly satisfactorily. This theory is all well and good, but I often hear people comment that they can hear where a subwoofer is placed in the room. This isn't because of some special acoustic ability on their part, though —rather, it is because of the poor performance of some subwoofers! Designs constructed at a low cost, employing inferior drivers, and those designed to favour efficiency above all else, tend to generate a lot of 'out of band' noise — lots of harmonic distortion and audible port noises, or other artifacts. These occupy the mid-frequency range, which not only makes their position easily detectable, but also obscures and masks the critical mid-range frequencies from the satellite speakers. So adding a cheap subwoofer to quality satellites will actually tend to make the system less rather than more accurate. A good subwoofer needs to have a very linear driver (which is expensive), an accurate and powerful amplifier (which is expensive), and a well designed and built cabinet (which is... expensive). But cutting corners on any of these aspects is a false economy. I've listened to and used a lot of different subwoofers, and the best are, for all the obvious reasons, produced by the same companies you associate with good monitor speakers. Blue Sky, ATC, Genelec and PMC all produce superb subwoofer systems that integrate extremely well with their intended partnering designs. They are all relatively easy to set up because of the inherent close matching and the appropriate electrical alignment facilities. In my own monitoring system I use the PMC TLE1 subwoofer (shown above), both as part of a large 5.1 rig, and to extend the bottom end of the tiny DB1 or nearfield TB2 monitors. Whereas many subs are large cuboid boxes, the TLE1 has the form factor of a computer tower case, which I find both aesthetically and practically appealing. When buying a sub, the key is to try it in your own listening environment, with your own satellite speakers — particularly if the subwoofer is from a different manufacturer. Some combinations will integrate far better than others, and only a home audition will reveal the success or failure of a particular combination.The diagram shows a bass-management system. Each of the five main channels goes through a high-pass filter to remove the low-frequency element of the signal, before being passed on to the appropriate amplifier and speaker. Bass Management. Bass management is the process of removing the bass element of the signal fed to each satellite speaker, and routing it instead to one or more subwoofers. In essence this is no different to a normal crossover — it's just that the bass driver happens to be housed in a separate enclosure, and there needs to be some sort of mixing facility included to combine the low-frequency contributions from at least two channels. In the case of a simple 2.1 stereo system, this bass management or crossover filtering is usually built into the subwoofer, and may be active or passive (most systems are active these days). There are various approaches to wiring, but most route line-level signals from the controller or preamp to the subwoofer first, which filters the signals and outputs them for the satellites. Some systems work the other way around, connecting the signal to the satellite first, and then down to the subwoofer. Systems intended for domestic use often work with speaker-level signals. For 5.1 surround systems, the bass management is normally performed in the surround sound controller or monitoring controller, rather than in the subwoofer itself. The diagram on the previous page shows such a system. Each of the five main channels goes through a high-pass filter to remove the low-frequency element of the signal, before being passed on to the appropriate amplifier and speaker. All five channels are also summed and passed through a low-pass filter to remove the mid- and high-frequency content. This signal is then combined with the dedicated LFE signal (which is also low-pass-filtered and boosted in gain, according to the appropriate specifications), and routed to the subwoofer speaker. It is worth bearing in mind that, since each of the five channels in a 5.1 system is a full-bandwidth channel, the subwoofer has to be able to cope with the bass contribution of five full channels, plus whatever might be conveyed on the LFE channel — and that could be a lot of bass! So you shouldn't really expect a very small box to be able to cope if you like listening at serious levels. Of course, different systems implement bass management in slightly different ways. Some employ active filtering everywhere, whereas some only low-pass-filter the signal feeding the sub, relying on the satellite speakers' natural roll-off for mechanical high-pass filtering. Some will allow the filter turnover frequencies and slopes to be adjusted. Professional units usually do this with meaningful technical parameters, while domestic controllers tend to have simpler 'large' or 'small' speaker descriptions. The better systems often include some sort of limiting or overload protection for the subwoofer, and some also include facilities for delaying the sound to each speaker, in order to compensate for less than ideal physical positions. Most domestic systems only apply bass management to digital surround inputs (Dolby Digital and DTS sound tracks) but not to discrete multi-channel analogue inputs, and this can present problems if you want to use a cheap domestic surround controller for your surround monitoring. Another common trap is that some DVD players have their own bass-management facilities built in, which means that you need to make sure you don't end up duplicating the processing! Subwoofer Cabinet Types. While it is relatively easy to generate high levels of bass over very small bandwidths (and that's what most cheap subwoofers tend to do), designing something that can generate a high output over a broad bandwidth, with very low distortion, and remain a sensible size, is pretty tricky. Creating low-frequency sound at studio replay levels requires the movement of a lot of air. This requires a powerful amplifier, a very large bass driver (or several smaller ones), and a lot of diaphragm displacement.An easy way of achieving high efficiency is to place the driver in what's called a 'band-pass cabinet'. This is essentially a resonant, tuned box, with the driver hidden inside and the sound escaping through one or more ports. You see these quite commonly on cheap home theatre systems and in car 'boom boxes.' Although efficient (for which read loud!), this kind of design always tends to sound boomy, with a one-note kind of response. This is great for film explosions and crashes, but is not much use if you want to hear which notes the bassist is playing, so it is best avoided for serious monitoring duties.The majority of subwoofers employ some form of 'reflex' design, which combines practical efficiency with useably wide bandwidth, and in convenient sized enclosures. The design principles are thoroughly understood, with the front of the driver radiating directly and its rear contributing via the enclosed cabinet volume through one or more ports. Not all reflex designs are born equal, but most studio-quality subs will be of this kind of design.A rather less common alternative is the 'closed box' design. The cabinet is sealed, and only the front side of the driver contributes sound to the room. Efficiency is relatively low, and significant demands are placed on the amp and driver (the latter needs to be able to cope with unusually large excursions). However, this approach has considerable benefits in terms of its phase response, timing and distortion. Another close variation on this theme is the 'transmission line' approach, which aims to combine the best elements of both sealed and reflex cabinets. These two types tend to be the most expensive, but also the easiest to align and integrate, and with the most accurate sound.Don't be fooled by the size of the subwoofer. Bigger doesn't necessarily mean better, or even greater low frequency extension, although it does usually equate with louder; that business about needing to move a lot of air, again. Alignment. The physical and electrical alignment of a subwoofer is a much misunderstood process, but to get it wrong is to destroy the accuracy of the monitoring system as a whole. Firstly, it is vital that the subwoofer and satellite speakers are all in the same phase as each other — by which I mean their electrical polarity and time alignment. If this is not the case, the crossover region will have an obvious bulge or dip in level. Potentially, there are a lot of sources of phase shifts that can mess up the crossover region. The subwoofer and the satellite speakers have their own mechanical phase responses to take into account, plus the electrical phase characteristics of the crossover filters themselves. There is also the time delay caused by having speakers located at different distances from the listener, and some cabinet designs introduce further acoustic delays, which often vary dramatically with frequency (and in some cases can exceed 40ms — a whole video frame!).If there is a phase control on your subwoofer, as on the PMC TLE1 pictured here, you will find that small phase adjustments can often make surprisingly large differences to the smoothness of the crossover region, especially if the subwoofer and satellites are from different manufacturers. A lot of the better specified subwoofers include a phase-adjustment facility (either switched or continuously variable), which can help to correct for the mechanical and electrical phase differences between the satellites and the subwoofer. Unfortunately, though, not all designs are equally effective and, more importantly, phase correction is not the same as delay compensation. If the subwoofer is located nearer to, or farther from, the listener than the satellites, some delay compensation will be required to achieve the correct time alignment. Though some bass-management or surround sound monitoring systems incorporate this function, not all do so. When it comes to placing a subwoofer, there are several things to consider. Although a high-quality subwoofer should not output the higher frequencies that allow its position to be determined by listening, that doesn't mean it can be put down just anywhere. Firstly, the subwoofer's location in the room — especially its proximity to walls — will have a significant effect on its frequency and time-domain responses. In a typical room, there will be a few 'best' places amongst many more that are unacceptable. Secondly, unless delay compensation is available, the sub should ideally be located at the same distance from the listener as the satellite speakers. It makes sense to place a single subwoofer in front of the listener, rather than behind, and directly facing the listening position too. It should be well away from corners, but you should also avoid placing it at the centre of the room width, in order to minimise excitation of standing waves. The closer the subwoofer is placed to the wall, the greater the bass boost will become. Some models are designed to be placed close to a wall, specifically to benefit from this, but some are not — which means you should always check the manufacturer's recommendations. Often, small changes of distance in relation to a wall can make a big difference in the balance of deep bass, so don't be afraid to experiment. For the subwoofer to work properly and not be locatable, the crossover between satellite and subwoofer should be set below about 90Hz, and that means the satellite ideally needs to have a decent response down to 70Hz or so. Anything above that starts to intrude into the mid-range and the subwoofer will become locatable. The THX organisation recommends crossing over at 85Hz, and I've found that to be a good starting point in most cases. Practical Placement. Ideally, a subwoofer and satellite system would be aligned using proper acoustic measuring equipment, but few of us have access to that, or the experience to interpret the results properly. Fortunately, though, you can usually get very good subjective results if you give it some time and patience, and take a logical approach. Start by placing the subwoofer in the listening position, with approximate filter and volume settings — 85Hz and a volume that seems roughly right. You'll then need to play through a collection of music tracks with well-recorded bass lines in different keys. Alternatively, create your own test track using a sound generator or keyboard, playing each note percussively (not continuously) and with uniform velocity settings. All you then have to do then is crawl around on the floor listening at each potentially practical subwoofer location for which position gives the most consistent and natural bass sound. You'll find some places exhibit some boomy and resonant notes, while others will have obviously weak or missing notes. Hopefully, you will discover one or two places where the sound is well balanced and all bass notes are pretty uniform. Having identified an optimal location, place the subwoofer there and reinstate your listening chair.Placement of your subwoofer is important. Finding the right place is a matter of getting down on your hands and knees, moving around and listening to some well-recorded bass, with the sub in your normal listening position. When you've found where it sounds best, relocate the sub there. You can now optimise the subwoofer level and, if provided, the filter turnover frequency and phase/delay. These controls tend to be interactive, so you'll probably have to cycle around their setup before you arrive at the best combination. I usually start with the subwoofer turned right down and then play through a wide collection of music, concentrating on how the mid-range and upper bass notes sound. Once familiar with what the satellites are doing on their own, I start to increase the level of the subwoofer until all the bass notes are even in level, regardless of pitch. It is very easy to overcook the subwoofer level, and although it may sound impressive, this quickly becomes tiring and leads to bass-light mixes, so take your time and listen critically. If the deepest and highest bass notes seem right, but it all goes wrong in the crossover region, try adjusting the crossover frequency up or down slightly to find the smoothest transition. If there is a phase control, you will find that small phase adjustments can often make surprisingly large differences here too, especially if the subwoofer is from a different manufacturer from the satellites. Remember, all three controls will interact, so take your time, live with a good setting for a while, and don't be afraid to experiment. I normally allow at least an hour to set up a subwoofer by ear, and I usually carry on with the fine-tuning for a couple of days afterwards, until I'm happy that I have achieved the best possible performance. Finally, remember that low frequencies are very hard to contain. Adding a subwoofer will inevitably result in some of your new-found deep bass leaving the listening room. This may well annoy your neighbours, even if they previously tolerated the system without the subwoofer. Generating low bass may also excite room standing-waves that you were not previously aware of, and it may also result in various structures of your building rattling and resonating in ways you've not heard before! The last time I recalibrated the subwoofer in my own 5.1 system at home, my daughter came rushing down to complain that everything on her dressing table was rattling and falling over! Buy PDF version Previous articleNext article New forum posts. Re: Loft conversion studio/office ManFromGlass >09 Jan 2022, 03:08DIY Electronics & Studio Design Re: Mixes: art or product ManFromGlass >09 Jan 2022, 03:06Mixing, Mastering & Post Production Re: Mixes: art or product Watchmaker >09 Jan 2022, 02:40Mixing, Mastering & Post Production Re: Mixes: art or product jimjazzdad >09 Jan 2022, 01:33Mixing, Mastering & Post Production Re: The ‘RIGHT way’ to record Drum(samples!)? James Perrett >09 Jan 2022, 00:20Recording: Gear & Techniques Active topics. AudioThing Hand Clapper 40% OFF Mixes: art or product Beginners : The right keyboard midi controller for electro music composition ? Cubase 11 iper high CPU usage on A Mac Mini late 2012 Novation Bass Station 2 - overlay sticker for updated on-key controls (afx mode etc) Using a small mixer as an FX expander. I produced 45 beats. Check it out! Lead Vocal Treatment On This Classic Song,,, Guitar cable Google Arts & Culture - Music, Makers & Machines Recently active forums. Forum FAQs Recording: Gear & Techniques Mixing, Mastering & Post Production New Products & Industry News Music Business Mac Music Windows Music Apps & Other Computers/OS Guitar Technology Keyboards & Synthesis DIY Electronics & Studio Design Live Sound & Performance Music Theory, Songwriting & Composition User Reviews Remote Collaboration Feedback SOS Support Forum       
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 77
  • 13
  • bass
  • 42
  • 13
  • system
  • 29
  • 13
  • frequency
  • 28
  • 13
  • speaker
  • 26
  • 13
  • satellite
  • 25
  • 13
  • sound
  • 25
  • 13
  • low
  • 24
  • 13
  • room
  • 16
  • 13
  • phase
  • 16
  • 13
  • low frequency
  • 15
  • 13
  • listening
  • 13
  • 13
  • channel
  • 13
  • 13
  • level
  • 13
  • 13
  • design
  • 12
  • 13
  • note
  • 11
  • 13
  • crossover
  • 11
  • 13
  • signal
  • 11
  • 13
  • bass management
  • 10
  • 13
  • satellite speaker
  • 10
  • 13
  • monitoring
  • 10
  • 13
  • management
  • 10
  • 13
  • time
  • 10
  • 13
  • surround
  • 9
  • 13
  • good
  • 9
  • 13
  • music
  • 9
  • 13
  • difference
  • 9
  • 13
  • driver
  • 9
  • 13
  • lot
  • 9
  • 13
  • high
  • 9
  • 13
  • filter
  • 9
  • 13
  • cabinet
  • 8
  • 13
  • small
  • 8
  • 13
  • crossover region
  • 6
  • 13
  • 09 jan 2022
  • 5
  • 13
  • surround sound
  • 5
  • 13
  • bass note
  • 5
  • 13
  • 09 jan
  • 5
  • 13
  • jan 2022
  • 5
  • 13
  • mix art product
  • 4
  • 13
  • mastering post production
  • 4
  • 13
  • speaker subwoofer
  • 4
  • 13
  • main channel
  • 4
  • 13
  • subwoofer system
  • 4
  • 13
  • mid range
  • 4
  • 13
  • satellite subwoofer
  • 4
  • 13
  • monitoring system
  • 4
  • 13
  • pass filter
  • 4
  • 13
  • subwoofer satellite
  • 4
  • 13
  • mix art
  • 4
  • 13
  • art product
  • 4
  • 13
  • mastering post
  • 4
  • 13
  • post production
  • 4
  • 13
  • low frequency sound
  • 3
  • 13
  • pass filter remove
  • 3
  • 13
  • standing waf
  • 3
  • 13
  • studio design
  • 3
  • 13
  • system main
  • 3
  • 13
  • phase difference
  • 3
  • 13
  • frequency sound
  • 3
  • 13
  • high pass
  • 3
  • 13
  • filter remove
  • 3
  • 13
  • element signal
  • 3
  • 13
  • low pass
  • 3
  • 13
  • phase adjustment
  • 3
  • 13
  • delay compensation
  • 3
  • 13
  • listening position
  • 3
  • 13
Result 14
TitleDoes a Surround Sound Need a Subwoofer?
Urlhttps://hometheateracademy.com/surround-sound-need-a-subwoofer/
DescriptionA surround sound does not require a subwoofer but it can make your audio experience so much better. So, even if you do not need one for the surround sound in your home theater, you should consider adding a subwoofer
Date
Organic Position13
H1Does a Surround Sound Need a Subwoofer?
H2Does Your Surround Sound Need A Subwoofer
What Makes a Subwoofer Worth Buying?
Tips for Installing a Subwoofer on Your Surround Sound
Sources
H3Front and down-firing
Additional ports
Crossovers
Passive radiator
Try using a wireless transmitter
Set up the controls
Find the right location for your subwoofer
Combine sounds
H2WithAnchorsDoes Your Surround Sound Need A Subwoofer
What Makes a Subwoofer Worth Buying?
Tips for Installing a Subwoofer on Your Surround Sound
Sources
BodyDoes a Surround Sound Need a Subwoofer? Does your surround sound need a subwoofer? You might be thinking that you already have excellent surround sound. However, what you do not know is that you can make that even better. How? By using a subwoofer. A surround sound does not require a subwoofer but it can make your audio experience so much better. So, even if you do not need one for the surround sound in your home theater, you should consider adding a subwoofer. Also read: Can You Use a Subwoofer as a Speaker? If you are skeptical about getting a subwoofer for your surround sound, then you should know a few things about the benefits that it can provide.  Does Your Surround Sound Need A Subwoofer. A subwoofer is not necessary for surround sound. But the role it plays in your audio system is still essential. For this reason, adding a subwoofer to other speakers makes sense. What is even better is that adding a subwoofer is not just about better bass. The reality is that an excellent sub can produce soundstage depth and improved spaciousness. When your subwoofer matches your surround sound perfectly, it will enhance the sound quality of your home theater dramatically. Getting the right subwoofer will make a big difference in terms of improving your sound system’s electronics.  Apart from being effective in terms of improving audio quality, a subwoofer is also a convenient sound system. It serves as a vital part of a home theater. With this sound equipment, you can hear even the lowest frequency sound that the human ear can capture. Moreover, it is essential to note that a subwoofer is different from regular speakers such as your surround sound. The reason is that they are specially made to produce low-frequency tones. They can even reproduce sound at a frequency of 20Hz or so. Do you still not think your surround sound need a subwoofer to give you the best home theater experience? Let’s keep looking into it here. A subwoofer should be a part of the surround sound in your home theater as it produces a sound that no other speakers can make. For instance, they can reproduce low-frequency sounds that you cannot even hear. However, you will feel the vibration of those sounds booming in your home’s entertainment area.  Your surround sound will work just fine on its own. But, you will expose yourself to sounds of poor quality. That includes bass that is either too low or too high. That means that you will not experience watching your favorite movie with audio balance and fullness.  But with a subwoofer, every audio you will place will have fullness, making it powerful, rich, and 3D.  Without the low-frequency sound that your subwoofer makes, you will be a passive viewer of a movie or a passive listener of a song. On the contrary, well-created bass and low-frequency sound will make you feel involved with every scene you are watching.  What Makes a Subwoofer Worth Buying? When you are watching a movie, you do not just focus on the crystal clear images that the screen makes. When will surround sound need a subwoofer? Any time you want to tell the difference in the movie or music from decent to incredible. Instead, you also focus on the sound that is circulating all around you. What makes the experience even better is the deep bass that vibrates around you. Thanks to subwoofers, you can enjoy such a great audio experience. Below are the characteristics that make subwoofers a must-have: Front and down-firing. A subwoofer has a speaker mounted in it. For this reason, it can radiate the sound from one side to another and on the front of the subwoofer’s enclosure. In addition, this equipment also boasts a speaker that radiates downward, facing your home theater’s floor. This speaker positioning allows the soundwaves to bounce off, surrounding you with solid bass and treble. Additional ports. Some subwoofers feature an additional port on their enclosures. These ports push more air out. As a result, the equipment can increase bass response more efficiently than sealed enclosures. Such a type of design is more commonly known as the bass reflex. Crossovers. The crossover is described as the electronic circuit that routes every frequency in the subwoofer. It connects all these frequencies to a particular point in the equipment. On the other hand, the main, enter, and the surround speakers reproduce all the frequencies above that point. Moreover, a primary crossover point would measure between 80Hz and 100Hz. Passive radiator. Apart from speakers, some subwoofers also use a passive radiator rather than a port. The function of the passive radiator is to increase the sub’s preciseness and efficiency. Passive radiators can come in the form of either speaker without voice coils or a flat diaphragm. The deep bass frequencies that a subwoofer produces are non-directional. For this reason, the human ear will have a hard time pointing out where the sound’s direction is. Thanks to the non-directional characteristics that extremely low-frequencies have, you can place your subwoofer anywhere in your room. This way, you will find the best spot for the equipment depending on the size of the room, the type of the room, furniture, and wall construction.  Tips for Installing a Subwoofer on Your Surround Sound. Watching a movie or listening to your favorite song sounds like a fun experience. However, you will find that sometimes, installing a subwoofer in your home theater is a tricky challenge. To help you avoid such a problem, here are some tips for installing a subwoofer: Try using a wireless transmitter. Sometimes, you will find a wire connection as a non-practical way of installing a subwoofer to your surround sound. The reason is that placing cables all around the home theater is a tedious task. For this reason, you should opt-in to using an excellent wireless transmitter. Such allows you to send signals from your receiver to any equipment in the room. Set up the controls. At most times, subwoofers have two knobs that you can use. One for adjusting the volume, and the other is for the crossover frequency. The crossover frequency produces the high notes produced by the show or music you are streaming. So, you need to pick a setting that will allow your subwoofer to produce the correct frequencies. If you set the frequency too high, it will sound disturbingly pitchy. But if you set it too low, it would sound like there is a hole between the subwoofer and the speaker. So, you need to get the crossover frequency just right. Find the right location for your subwoofer. Placing your subwoofer in a good location will further improve its quality. If you place it in a corner, the sound it produces will become boomy. But if you place it somewhere with huge space, you will not boost the bass note, which sometimes makes it muted. Fortunately, the human ear will not be able to hear where the bass originates. For this reason, you will have a lot of choices in terms of where you need to put your subwoofer. Combine sounds. If you are an audiophile who cares so much about the bass sounds in all the areas of your home theater, the easy solution is to purchase two subwoofers. True enough, such may sound expensive. But if you have enough budget to improve your home theater further, then it is a solution worth considering. Place one subwoofer in the front left corner of your home theater. Meanwhile, place the other one on the front right. Such will result in smoother, more solid, and more consistent bass that will never change even if you move from one seat to another. This way, you will have an optimal audio experience through your surround sound and your subwoofer.  Sources. Steve Guttenberg, You Already Have Great Speakers. Do You Really Need A Subwoofer?, Cnet.Com, https://www.cnet.com/news/you-already-have-great-speakers-do-you-really-need-a-subwoofer/ Kramer Kane, Home Theater Subwoofers Buying Guide, Crutchfield, https://www.crutchfield.com/S-SOANvl2cJqn/learn/home-subwoofers-buying-guide.html/ Robert Silva, Subwoofers – What You Need To Know, Lifewire, https://www.lifewire.com/subwoofers-information-1845744/ Rozette Rago, The Five Cs of Subwoofer Setup, New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/the-five-cs-of-subwoofer-setup/
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 56
  • 14
  • sound
  • 40
  • 14
  • surround
  • 18
  • 14
  • surround sound
  • 17
  • 14
  • frequency
  • 16
  • 14
  • speaker
  • 15
  • 14
  • home
  • 14
  • 14
  • home theater
  • 13
  • 14
  • theater
  • 13
  • 14
  • bass
  • 12
  • 14
  • sound subwoofer
  • 8
  • 14
  • front
  • 8
  • 14
  • produce
  • 8
  • 14
  • surround sound subwoofer
  • 7
  • 14
  • audio
  • 7
  • 14
  • experience
  • 7
  • 14
  • reason
  • 7
  • 14
  • low
  • 7
  • 14
  • subwoofer surround sound
  • 6
  • 14
  • subwoofer surround
  • 6
  • 14
  • radiator
  • 6
  • 14
  • make
  • 6
  • 14
  • equipment
  • 6
  • 14
  • place
  • 6
  • 14
  • passive
  • 6
  • 14
  • crossover
  • 6
  • 14
  • passive radiator
  • 5
  • 14
  • low frequency
  • 5
  • 14
  • movie
  • 5
  • 14
  • subwoofer speaker
  • 4
  • 14
  • frequency sound
  • 4
  • 14
  • installing subwoofer
  • 4
  • 14
  • quality
  • 4
  • 14
  • watching
  • 4
  • 14
  • time
  • 4
  • 14
  • port
  • 4
  • 14
  • room
  • 4
  • 14
  • find
  • 4
  • 14
  • installing
  • 4
  • 14
  • low frequency sound
  • 3
  • 14
  • audio experience
  • 3
  • 14
  • adding subwoofer
  • 3
  • 14
  • human ear
  • 3
  • 14
  • crossover frequency
  • 3
  • 14
  • point
  • 3
  • 14
  • set
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
TitleDo I Need A Subwoofer in my Car (Is It Necessary & Why?)
Urlhttps://www.maxyourhometime.com/do-i-need-a-subwoofer-in-my-car/
Description
Date15 Aug 2021
Organic Position14
H1Do I Need A Subwoofer in my Car (Is It Necessary & Why?)
H2Do I need a subwoofer in my car?
What to look for in a subwoofer
Does a subwoofer make a difference in a car?
How can I get bass in my car without a subwoofer?
Where should you place a subwoofer?
How do I make my subs hit the hardest?
In summary
H3Compatibility
Type of enclosure
Space in your car
Specs
Sound deaden the doors
Upgrade your speakers
Adjusting the equalizer
Install a subwoofer
Do I Need A Subwoofer (Are They Really Necessary & Why?)
Should A Subwoofer Be On The Floor (And Why)?
H2WithAnchorsDo I need a subwoofer in my car?
What to look for in a subwoofer
Does a subwoofer make a difference in a car?
How can I get bass in my car without a subwoofer?
Where should you place a subwoofer?
How do I make my subs hit the hardest?
In summary
BodyDo I Need A Subwoofer in my Car (Is It Necessary & Why?)Trevor Smith | November 26, 2021August 15, 2021 | Helping Your ChoiceMaxYourHomeTime is reader-supported. When you buy something using the links on our site, we earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.Do I Need A Subwoofer in my Car (Is It Necessary & Why?)You've asked, do I need a subwoofer in my car?Keen audiophiles know that it’s hard to get the best sound out of your car’s factory audio system. You won’t be able to get anywhere near the same nuances in tone that you’re after if you want to truly be able to appreciate your favorite tunes. You can swap out the generic speakers for more high quality models.But can you really get the best listening experience from your car if you don’t add some subwoofers? And do you even need a subwoofer, anyway?Do I need a subwoofer in my car?We’d say that yes, you do need a subwoofer in your car. This is because a subwoofer works to give you better quality bass. If you just rely on your car’s normal speakers, you won’t be able to get that hard hitting bass that you’re after. With the addition of subwoofers to your car, you’ll notice a marked difference in the quality of sound that you get. And doesn’t every audiophile want to experience powerful bass?If you’re new to the audiophile hobby, you may be confused as to what a subwoofer actually is and how it differs from your normal speakers. You’ll get the best sound out of your new subwoofer when you pair it with a good quality set of speakers.First things first, you will need to know that subwoofers come in all shapes and sizes, and not every subwoofer is born equal. Subwoofers are available in either 8 inches, 10 inches, 12 inches, or 15 inches.In theory, the larger the subwoofer, the more power that feeds into it, and the louder it will be. However, you will also need to install the correct amp in your car so that your subwoofer can work properly.You may even find that some of the larger 15 inch subwoofers aren’t as crystal clear as you’d like them to be. You will be better off opting for a more medium sized 12 inch subwoofer to give you the best sound possible. If you’re looking for a smaller subwoofer for your car, you can of course opt for the 8 inch or 10 inch subwoofers. What will really determine the subwoofer that you’re able to afford will be your particular budget as well as the space you have available for them in your car.You should also weigh up what will be most important to you in terms of buying a subwoofer for your car. Are you looking for a subwoofer so that you can enjoy better bass and better quality music on long drives?Then you will most definitely need a subwoofer in your car. If you’re not all that fussed about the quality of your music when you’re in the car, then chances are you won’t notice much of a benefit to adding a subwoofer to your setup.What to look for in a subwoofer. It’s important to note that you can’t just buy any old subwoofer to install in your car. There are a couple of things you will need to bear in mind when it comes to finding the best subwoofer for your needs.Compatibility. The first thing to note is how compatible your new subwoofers will be with your current setup. You will get the very best sound from them if you combine them with a set of high quality speakers. So if you’re thinking of upgrading your entire sound system, then your subwoofers will be able to perform at their best. You will also need to ensure that you have the correct amplifier installed in your car to work with your subwoofers. If you have the wrong type of amplifier in your car, then you won’t be able to hear anything at all from your subwoofers. This is because every speaker needs an amplifier to change the frequencies into actual sound. So if the amp in your car isn’t compatible with your subwoofers, you will need to upgrade the amplifier.Type of enclosure. Remember to consider how you’re going to mount the subwoofers in your car. They will need a type of enclosure for them to be mounted into so that you can get the best out of your new subwoofers. You can choose between either a sealed box type of enclosure, bandpass, or ported enclosure. Ported and bandpass enclosures are able to give you more volume, whereas sealed enclosures give you deeper, more accurate bass tones. So it will be important to choose the right enclosure type based on the sound that you’re looking for from your subwoofers.Some subwoofers will be designed for certain types of enclosures, too. Choosing the right enclosure type for your car will also determine where you’re able to mount it.Space in your car. It’s all well and good opting for the largest subwoofers that you can afford. But what if your car doesn’t actually have the room to accommodate these? Before you even consider what style or type of subwoofer to install in your car, you will need to measure the space you have available.If your car is on the smaller side, it will be best to opt for an 8 inch subwoofer. These don’t need as much space as a 12 or 15 inch subwoofer, and should be fairly easy to install in your vehicle.Specs. Don’t forget to check out the specs of your preferred subwoofer before you commit to buying it! You will need to consider things such as the sensitivity rating of the subwoofers, how many voice coils it has, as well as the subwoofer impedance.The sensitivity rating of your subwoofer is a crucial factor. This typically determines whether the subwoofer is able to achieve the high output that matches its power rating.Basically, if your subwoofer comes with a much higher sensitivity rating, it won’t need as much power plowed into it in order to achieve that great sound.The number of voice coils that your subwoofer has will also be an important factor to consider. Dual voice coils are preferred by many audiophile enthusiasts.These give you more flexibility when it comes to wiring your system. They are also able to deal with higher temperatures than single voice coils, so won’t wear out as quickly.Last but not least, you will also need to think about the impedance of your subwoofer. Impedance is measured in ohms, which tells you the resistance against the pressure of the amplifier in your car. This is again where getting the right subwoofer for the amplifier in your car will become important.The lower the impedance of your subwoofer, the less power is needed to power it up. If you don’t have the right amp for your subwoofer, you will damage one or both of these elements.Does a subwoofer make a difference in a car?A subwoofer does make a difference in a car, yes. This is because in order to get all of the nuances of tone that you’re after, you will need a speaker to help you hear the bass. Standard car stereos aren’t able to deliver a bass that slaps quite in the same way as a subwoofer.This is because subwoofers are designed to produce the low frequency sounds that standard speakers struggle with. This will immediately improve the sound of your favorite music. These low frequency sounds don’t just apply to stereotypical drum and bass music, either. It will allow you to appreciate your favorite tunes better than a car system that doesn’t come with a set of subwoofers.Because subwoofers do all the work of producing these low frequency sounds, they can also alleviate the load from your smaller car speakers. These typically focus on producing higher frequency sounds, which is typically why you might not notice the bass as much in a normal car. Forcing smaller or mid-range speakers to produce these low frequencies will give you distortion, which is the bane of any audiophile’s life. Distortion typically happens when the cone of your speaker has been vibrated intensely beyond its usual sound capacity.Surprisingly, using a subwoofer can even help the rest of your audio system to last longer. This is because if you rely on your smaller speakers to produce the low frequencies that you’re after, it puts them under a lot of strain. This can of course result in that unwanted distortion and a sound that’s not great in quality. Consistently using your smaller speakers to produce these low frequencies can damage them beyond repair. So using a subwoofer to do the job for you can help to improve the lifespan of your smaller to mid-range speakers.How can I get bass in my car without a subwoofer?If you don’t have the time or money to invest in a quality subwoofer for your car, you may be wondering how you can add bass to your vehicle without one. There are a couple of tricks you can try, however, they won’t be able to compare with the effects of adding a new subwoofer to your car’s system.Sound deaden the doors. One of the ways that most of your bass sound gets lost in your car is because of the doors. There’s a lot of bass response lost in thinner air because doors have large gaps in them. There are tiny holes scattered along the inside of your door which can dampen the sound of the bass tones.You will need to try and deaden this material so there’s less space for the sound to get lost. Add some pieces of MDF wood as well as sound deadening material over your doors. This should help to improve the sound of your standard speakers.Upgrade your speakers. You may have already noticed that the standard speakers provided with your car don’t deliver as great a sound as you would like. This is because these factory speakers are made using much cheaper components than a high quality speaker. They will tend to distort and degrade quicker over time because they haven’t been designed to last for long periods of time. This is because car manufacturers don’t particularly care about the quality of sound in the stereo system.Upgrading the speakers in your car to a different set will make a hell of a lot of difference to the quality of sound you’ll get. You will also need to invest in a quality external amplifier to ensure that you get the very best sound quality from your new speakers.Adjusting the equalizer. Another way to increase the bass in your car’s sound system is to adjust the equalizer. By adjusting the bass of your equalizer inside the stereo unit of your system can get much more boom through your vehicle’s speakers. All you need to do is adjust the first slider on the far left. This focuses on the bass that your car sound system produces, and is typically set at the 50Hz to 60Hz range.Remember that the higher you adjust this equalizer, the more likely you will encounter distortion. Especially if you’re playing your music at a higher volume.Install a subwoofer. Yes, yes, we know… The question you asked was how can you improve your car’s bass without a subwoofer. However, the sad truth is that no matter which of the three above methods you try, none of them will be able to compare to actually adding a subwoofer to your car.While upgrading your speakers is a fantastic thing to do in order to improve the sound in your car, you will still be putting them under strain. This is because they won’t be able to cope as well with the low frequencies needed for hard hitting bass as a subwoofer can.If trunk space is your main concern, then you should opt for a model of subwoofer that can be installed under your back seats.Where should you place a subwoofer?Usually most subwoofers are placed in the trunk of your car. As for which direction you should then place them in, this is a hotly contested topic among audiophiles. Ultimately finding the best position for your subwoofer will be down to trial and error. You will find the best positioning for them by placing them facing the rear of your car, the front of your car, or facing upwards towards the hatch of your trunk.Placing your subwoofers to face the rear of your car is one of the most common placement methods. This typically involves placing the subwoofer against the rear seats of your car, facing away from you as the driver.The bass of your subwoofers should become more evenly distributed throughout the car, and more pronounced. This will be the ideal position for those looking to make their bass hit hardest.One of the more unusual positions for a subwoofer is to be facing the rear seats of your car. This will involve placing the sound enclosure so that it’s facing the driver and any passengers.If you’re not particularly bothered about getting an overwhelming bass out of your subwoofer, this might be the placement for you. This subwoofer placement typically allows the bass to be felt in every part of the car.If you’re looking to save on trunk space, then you should consider placing your subwoofer facing upwards, towards the hatch. This still gives you an impressive range of bass without taking up too much space in your car.There may be a slight disadvantage in terms of treble and high frequencies. However, you would still get a crisp sound from your subwoofer, and it won’t rattle parts of your car as much as one of the other positions.We’d recommend experimenting with where you want to place your subwoofer so that you can get the best sound for your needs. If you’re finding that the bass is slightly muffled, then you can make a few small holes between the trunk and your car. Cover these with a thin, disguised material, and you should be able to hear the bass properly.How do I make my subs hit the hardest?To get bass that truly hits hard, you will need to pair your new subwoofer with the right amp for your needs. You will need to match the power requirements of your subwoofer to the output of the specific amplifier you need. This will allow you to maximize the power output of your subwoofers so that you can get the hardest hitting sound.It will also be worth considering a bandpass box out of all the enclosure types. When you pair this type of enclosure with certain subwoofers, you can increase their maximum sound output. You should ensure that your preferred subwoofer is suitable for this type of enclosure before you commit to buying it.Another factor to consider is adjusting the settings of your stereo unit and amplifier. This should allow you to better accommodate your new subwoofer. It’s worth remembering that every stereo unit and amp are different, but they should all come with features that allow you to fine tune your settings for your requirements.In summary. So there you have it! You now know that yes, a subwoofer is an incredibly important part of your car’s audio setup. Particularly if you’re an audiophile who wants to get the very best sound of your system! Asking your smaller to mid-range speakers to produce the lower frequencies needed for bass can end up in them becoming damaged.Overall, a quality set of subwoofers in your car will help to improve the sound quality of your favorite tunes. You’ll be able to enjoy the lower frequencies without it damaging your car’s audio system.It will also be important to carefully look at the specs of your subwoofer before you buy it and install it in your car. You will need to make sure that it works with your car’s amplifier so that everything can work smoothly and efficiently.PreviousDo I Need A Subwoofer (Are They Really Necessary & Why?). Should A Subwoofer Be On The Floor (And Why)?Nextreport this adreport this adreport this adreport this adreport this ad Closexx
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 89
  • 15
  • car
  • 62
  • 15
  • sound
  • 35
  • 15
  • bass
  • 28
  • 15
  • speaker
  • 21
  • 15
  • quality
  • 16
  • 15
  • subwoofer car
  • 13
  • 15
  • enclosure
  • 13
  • 15
  • inch
  • 12
  • 15
  • frequency
  • 12
  • 15
  • amplifier
  • 10
  • 15
  • type
  • 10
  • 15
  • system
  • 9
  • 15
  • audiophile
  • 8
  • 15
  • smaller
  • 8
  • 15
  • low frequency
  • 7
  • 15
  • power
  • 7
  • 15
  • space
  • 7
  • 15
  • typically
  • 7
  • 15
  • low
  • 7
  • 15
  • inch subwoofer
  • 6
  • 15
  • work
  • 6
  • 15
  • give
  • 6
  • 15
  • set
  • 6
  • 15
  • important
  • 6
  • 15
  • produce
  • 6
  • 15
  • improve
  • 6
  • 15
  • facing
  • 6
  • 15
  • sound system
  • 5
  • 15
  • bass subwoofer
  • 5
  • 15
  • type enclosure
  • 5
  • 15
  • amp
  • 5
  • 15
  • music
  • 5
  • 15
  • higher
  • 5
  • 15
  • stereo
  • 5
  • 15
  • door
  • 5
  • 15
  • produce low frequency
  • 4
  • 15
  • quality sound
  • 4
  • 15
  • bass car
  • 4
  • 15
  • car subwoofer
  • 4
  • 15
  • voice coil
  • 4
  • 15
  • produce low
  • 4
  • 15
  • frequency sound
  • 4
  • 15
  • improve sound
  • 4
  • 15
  • speaker produce
  • 4
  • 15
  • low frequency sound
  • 3
  • 15
  • smaller mid range
  • 3
  • 15
  • speaker produce low
  • 3
  • 15
  • favorite tune
  • 3
  • 15
  • high quality
  • 3
  • 15
  • subwoofer work
  • 3
  • 15
  • adding subwoofer
  • 3
  • 15
  • install car
  • 3
  • 15
  • amplifier car
  • 3
  • 15
  • enclosure type
  • 3
  • 15
  • sensitivity rating
  • 3
  • 15
  • smaller mid
  • 3
  • 15
  • mid range
  • 3
  • 15
  • stereo unit
  • 3
  • 15
  • adreport adreport
  • 3
  • 15
Result 16
TitleWhy Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio?
Urlhttps://www.pmtonline.co.uk/blog/2015/04/21/why-do-i-need-a-subwoofer/
DescriptionWondering 'Why Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio?' Here's why you need a subwoofer as part of your home studio for better monitoring results
Date21 Apr 2015
Organic Position15
H1Why Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio?
H2Why Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio? The benefits of having a sub woofer in your home studio.
Comments
Related Posts
H3Search
ADDING A SUB TO YOUR CURRENT SETUP
SHOULD YOU USE ONE OR TWO SUBWOOFERS?
WHERE TO PLACE YOUR SUBWOOFER
Use the Features Designed for the Pros - Bypass Footswitch
11 Best Home Studio Microphones - 2021
9 Of The Best Home Studio Monitors Today - 2021
Home Studio Acoustic Treatment For Less Than £250
H2WithAnchorsWhy Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio? The benefits of having a sub woofer in your home studio.
Comments
Related Posts
BodyWhy Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio? Posted on: 21 Apr 2015 by Richard Bloomer Why Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Studio? The benefits of having a sub woofer in your home studio. . A pair of good-quality speakers are essential for any audiophile or music producer - from listening to music to watching films on your home cinema or mixing down a track with professional quality. But one thing some people still fail to realize is that using an additional subwoofer also makes a huge difference - and once you try it, you won't go back! good subwoofer, such as the KRK 10s, greatly improves your listening experience, by making the audio source sound bigger and more lifelike. The main reason is that most compact speakers - as often used in project studios or home cinemas, for instance - are quite "bass-shy". Adding a subwoofer fixes this problem and provides you with a better and much richer sound. But that's not all! Even if you happen to own some bigger, professional monitors, by adding a dedicated low-frequency speaker - the sub-woofer - you can dramatically improve your sound, by freeing your main speakers to do what they do best, handling the high and mid-range frequencies. That's why professional recording studios, cinemas and live music venues all use subwoofers. A subwoofer will help your amplifier and main speakers to work more efficiently, with less distortion, and allow sounds such as vocals and instruments to be heard more cleanly. At a glance, a subwoofer looks similar to an ordinary speaker, but it's very different: it doesn't reproduce high or mid-range frequencies, and are designed differently, to allow for the massive cone movement required by low bass reproduction. Another great advantage of subwoofers, is that they greatly help with a realistic imaging of the sound: the best room placement of a pair of stereo speakers is usually not the best placement for optimum bass sound. With a subwoofer, then, you can have the best of both worlds, without making compromises - you place it where the bass sounds best, and the main speakers where they'll provide the best possible stereo imaging. ADDING A SUB TO YOUR CURRENT SETUP. Adding a subwoofer to your current setup does not require updating your other speakers. Subwoofers are made to complement any pair of stereo speakers, and any good sub such as the aforementioned KRK 10s can be used alongside whatever other speakers you may have, regardless of the brand. It's important to highlight this fact, because some people may think they're not happy with their current sound and think that investing on a new set of stereo monitors is the solution, when in fact what they need is the extra definition and depth only a sub can offer. If you want a better sound but you know that your stereo monitors are already of good quality, maybe you should look into simply adding a sub to your setup and - presto! - you'll get a much richer sound. SHOULD YOU USE ONE OR TWO SUBWOOFERS?In most cases, one subwoofer is enough. In smaller rooms, the human ears can't detect the source of low-frequency sounds (below about 100Hz). But in some situations, driving the room from two points instead of one, two different sets of room modes are excited, which can result in a smoother overall low-frequency balance.WHERE TO PLACE YOUR SUBWOOFER. Just because bass frequencies are largely non-directional does not mean that you can ignore the subwoofer's placement in the room. In fact, a sub's physical position in the room in relation to the floor, walls and other surfaces radically influences its bass response. The best subwoofer in the world will sound bad in a room that has a bad acoustic, or if left at a non-adequate place in that room. In a monitoring situation, it is desirable to place the subwoofer so that it produces the smoothest frequency response at the listening position. In addition, since the subwoofer's output will interact with the other monitor speakers in the room, it is important to consider the subwoofer and near-field speakers as a total system. At this stage, you have only the subwoofer operating. Once you find its optimum position and settings, you can turn on the complete monitoring system to verify that all components interact properly. What you are attempting to do is find a place in the room where the subwoofer interacts smoothly with the acoustics to even out the bass response at the listening position. After you find the optimal spot, place the subwoofer there and listen to it from the mix position. Move the subwoofer around a foot at a time until the bass response is as even as possible at the listening position. Remember that you do not want any Single frequency to be exaggerated during monitoring, as that will result in the final music mix having too little bass. One caveat: if your subwoofer's optimum position is under your console, make sure to leave the removable grill on the subwoofer to protect the speaker from your feet. You do not want to kick a hole in the subwoofer speaker!  Check out the picture below and a complete how to guide on subwoofer placement from KRK HERE.An example of subwoofer placement in a home studioUse the Features Designed for the Pros - Bypass Footswitch. Professional engineers like the ability to hear how the sub is affecting the mix. Plugin any standard latching 1/4 inch footswitch to bypass the KRK10s and send full range audio to your top monitors. A ground lift feature helps tame pesky ground hum. You will need to use a standard 1/4 inch, mono, latching footswitch. Any standard latching 1/4 inch mono footswitch (such as the Boss FS-5L) should be compatible.SHOP STUDIO SUBWOOFERS Comments. Related Posts. 11 Best Home Studio Microphones - 2021. Here are the 11 best home studio microphones & home recording microphones for those who want high-quality sound, anytime, anywhere. Read More 9 Of The Best Home Studio Monitors Today - 2021. Finding the best home studio monitors for your studio is easy. Here's 9 of the best studio speakers in the world today. Read More Home Studio Acoustic Treatment For Less Than £250. Read how to acoustically treat a room on a budget and get your home studio sounding great! Read More Close
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 31
  • 16
  • speaker
  • 17
  • 16
  • studio
  • 15
  • 16
  • sound
  • 13
  • 16
  • home
  • 12
  • 16
  • room
  • 11
  • 16
  • bass
  • 9
  • 16
  • home studio
  • 8
  • 16
  • frequency
  • 8
  • 16
  • monitor
  • 7
  • 16
  • position
  • 7
  • 16
  • place
  • 6
  • 16
  • low
  • 5
  • 16
  • read
  • 5
  • 16
  • listening
  • 5
  • 16
  • adding
  • 5
  • 16
  • placement
  • 5
  • 16
  • stereo
  • 5
  • 16
  • low frequency
  • 4
  • 16
  • good
  • 4
  • 16
  • quality
  • 4
  • 16
  • music
  • 4
  • 16
  • professional
  • 4
  • 16
  • main
  • 4
  • 16
  • response
  • 4
  • 16
  • footswitch
  • 4
  • 16
  • response listening position
  • 3
  • 16
  • main speaker
  • 3
  • 16
  • place subwoofer
  • 3
  • 16
  • subwoofer placement
  • 3
  • 16
  • bass response
  • 3
  • 16
  • response listening
  • 3
  • 16
  • listening position
  • 3
  • 16
  • 14 inch
  • 3
  • 16
  • mix
  • 3
  • 16
  • standard
  • 3
  • 16
  • latching
  • 3
  • 16
  • 14
  • 3
  • 16
  • inch
  • 3
  • 16
  • microphone
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
TitleBenefits of Adding a Subwoofer to Your Car Audio System - AudioMotive
Urlhttps://www.audiomotive.com/top-reasons-to-splurge-on-your-subwoofer/
DescriptionWhen installed properly and paired with a good amp and head unit, a quality subwoofer will add depth and realism to your music
Date
Organic Position16
H1Top Reasons to Splurge on Your Subwoofer
H2The Benefits of Adding a Quality Subwoofer to Your Car Audio System
H3Get a Quote Today!
Why Subwoofers Are Used
Subwoofer Advantages and Benefits
H2WithAnchorsThe Benefits of Adding a Quality Subwoofer to Your Car Audio System
BodyTop Reasons to Splurge on Your Subwoofer The Benefits of Adding a Quality Subwoofer to Your Car Audio System. Subwoofers add bass and clarity to your stereo’s sound. And they can also add to a system’s performance in a variety of ways. A quality subwoofer will add depth and realism to your music that you would otherwise miss out on with a factory car stereo system. When installed properly and paired with a good amp and head unit, a quality subwoofer will bring your music-listening experience to a whole new level. Here’s how. Why Subwoofers Are Used. Bass is the most difficult range of the frequency spectrum for a speaker to reproduce. Speakers move air to reproduce sound. And a lot of air must be moved to reproduce the powerful and extended bass sounds in music. Speakers that are powerful enough to move this large amount of air for bass frequencies are usually larger and more expensive to manufacture. So, to save on costs and space, many speakers that come with car stereo systems are too small and are not equipped to handle bass effectively. Instead, the speakers limit the depth and realism of the music and create distortion when trying to reproduce the bass frequency, especially at higher volumes. This is where subwoofers come in. What is a Subwoofer? A subwoofer is an often large speaker specifically designed only to reproduce the low-frequency range of bass sounds. To have an optimal low bass response, most car stereo systems require a professionally-installed quality subwoofer system paired with a high-power amplifier and head unit. When choosing car subs, you’ll need to consider: The Subwoofer Size. Large subs can go loud and low—the bigger the sub, the better the bass. But you’ll also have to keep space in mind. Take measurements of your vehicle before shopping so you can find a sub that will fit in your car—such as in your trunk or under a seat. The Type of Enclosure. Subwoofer enclosures are boxes that contain the subwoofer. A sealed enclosure will create deeper bass than an open enclosure, even if the sub is small. Sealed enclosures are recommended for music genres focused on all frequencies. Ported enclosures produce a more powerful (louder) bass line and are recommended for music focused on bass, like rap, trap, house, and dubstep. Power. The RMS power level refers to the power handling of a subwoofer, with higher RMS values meaning more bass. To match a sub to an amp and head unit, you must consider the RMS power rating. At the very least, the head unit and amp’s power should match the sub’s power handling. And preferably, the RMS of the amp and the head unit will exceed the RMS of the sub. Sensitivity. The sensitivity of a subwoofer is how much power the sub needs to produce a given volume. And this sensitivity is expressed as a sound pressure level (SPL) number. Subs with high SPL ratings are more sensitive, so they don’t require as much power to produce high volumes compared to subs with low SPL ratings. If you have an underpowered amp or head unit, you’ll want a sub with high sensitivity. Impedance. You’ll also need to match the impedance on your amp and sub. The impedance refers to the electrical resistance of the sub and is represented in ohms. Subwoofer Advantages and Benefits. When matched with a good amp and head unit, a quality subwoofer will provide the following benefits for your car audio system: Better Bass Response. Subwoofers expand the bass response to reveal sounds in your music that your speakers alone cannot reproduce. The majority of car stereo speakers start dropping off at around 50Hz. But a quality subwoofer will reproduce low frequencies down to 20Hz or lower. The result is the full depth and clarity of bass, so you’ll never miss the lowest notes and you’ll get to enjoy a more immersive experience with your music in your car stereo system Greater Clarity in All Sound. Quality subwoofers have the speed and transient response to reproduce bass clearly, so even the fastest bass lines are clear and precise. Lower-quality subwoofers may not be able to handle the rapid starts and stops in vocals and instrumentals that are found in many genres of music. And, as a result, these lesser subs will have unclear acoustic sound. Reduction in Distortion. Subwoofers lower distortion by reducing the acoustic demands on your other speakers. When a full-range speaker reproduces low-frequency bass, the large cone and diaphragm in the speaker can create distortion. And when you play music at high volumes, the woofers in your speakers may not be able to keep up with the tweeters and mid drivers. But quality subwoofers allow you to play your music loud without distortion, even if your music is demanding and filled with bass. Takes Load off of Smaller Speakers. Subwoofers relieve smaller speakers from having to reproduce extremely low frequencies. As a result, smaller speakers can reproduce sound in a more comfortable frequency range. Subwoofers essentially lighten the load for full-range speakers, improving their overall performance so they can reproduce quality sound without distortion. Full Spectrum Response. A quality subwoofer will sound like an extension of your full-spectrum speakers without overpowering them. Quality sound systems with subwoofers help speakers perform at their best across the frequency spectrum, so even high and mid frequencies will have optimal clarity. With a car subwoofer, low-frequency amplifier, proper bass management, and a connected AV receiver or amplifier to drive smaller speakers in the mid and high frequencies above the crossover point, your car stereo speakers can perform at their full potential with all types of music. On their own, your car’s factory speakers are not equipped to handle the bass and range of many genres of music. So without a quality subwoofer, you’re missing out on the notes and experiences that musicians intended for you to hear with their music. Subwoofers can enhance your music-listening experience, adding depth and clarity that you would not be able to hear with your speakers alone.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 30
  • 17
  • bass
  • 22
  • 17
  • speaker
  • 22
  • 17
  • music
  • 16
  • 17
  • car
  • 14
  • 17
  • sound
  • 13
  • 17
  • quality
  • 13
  • 17
  • frequency
  • 13
  • 17
  • power
  • 12
  • 17
  • reproduce
  • 12
  • 17
  • quality subwoofer
  • 11
  • 17
  • system
  • 10
  • 17
  • low
  • 9
  • 17
  • stereo
  • 8
  • 17
  • amp
  • 8
  • 17
  • head unit
  • 7
  • 17
  • head
  • 7
  • 17
  • unit
  • 7
  • 17
  • high
  • 7
  • 17
  • car stereo
  • 6
  • 17
  • range
  • 6
  • 17
  • distortion
  • 6
  • 17
  • enclosure
  • 6
  • 17
  • full
  • 6
  • 17
  • amp head unit
  • 5
  • 17
  • amp head
  • 5
  • 17
  • speaker reproduce
  • 5
  • 17
  • low frequency
  • 5
  • 17
  • clarity
  • 5
  • 17
  • response
  • 5
  • 17
  • sub
  • 5
  • 17
  • rm
  • 5
  • 17
  • car stereo system
  • 4
  • 17
  • stereo system
  • 4
  • 17
  • smaller speaker
  • 4
  • 17
  • spectrum
  • 4
  • 17
  • large
  • 4
  • 17
  • volume
  • 4
  • 17
  • sensitivity
  • 4
  • 17
  • smaller
  • 4
  • 17
  • reproduce low frequency
  • 3
  • 17
  • reproduce low
  • 3
  • 17
  • bass response
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleWhy do I need subwoofers in my car? - Quora
Urlhttps://www.quora.com/Why-do-I-need-subwoofers-in-my-car
Description
Date
Organic Position17
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodySomething went wrong. Wait a moment and try again.Try again Please enable Javascript and refresh the page to continue
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 19
TitleThe Five Cs of Subwoofer Setup | Wirecutter
Urlhttps://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/the-five-cs-of-subwoofer-setup/
DescriptionCorrect hookup, positioning, and adjustment of a subwoofer is critical for good sound. Here’s a simple, five-step method
Date21 Jun 2019
Organic Position18
H1The Five Cs of Subwoofer Setup
H2Real Talk
H31. Connect
2. Controls
3. Crawl
4. Combine
5. Check
The Best Stereo Receiver
How to Get the Most Out of Your Travel Reward Points
The Best Record Player Setup for Beginners
Checking It Twice: Retesting the Monoprice Subwoofer
H2WithAnchorsReal Talk
BodyThe Five Cs of Subwoofer SetupPublished June 21, 2019A subwoofer is to sound what wasabi is to sushi. Use it carelessly, and it’ll overpower everything else. But use it judiciously, and it can make the whole experience much more satisfying.Subwoofers are far more complicated to connect and fine-tune than anything else in an audio system. The acoustics of your room have a far greater effect on subwoofer performance than on your other speakers. Subwoofers often must be connected to different AC outlets than the other components in the system, and most audio systems don’t include dedicated subwoofer connections. But millions of people have set up subwoofers to their satisfaction, and you can, too.We’ve simplified the process into five steps, all of which conveniently begin with a C: connect, controls, crawl, combine, and check. In nearly 30 years of reviewing and measuring subwoofers, I’ve found that this method gets almost any subwoofer working well with almost any speaker system, no matter what other audio gear I’m using. It’ll work with any of the picks in our Best Budget Subwoofer guide—and with any other conventional subwoofer, too.1. Connect. Photo: Rozette RagoIf you are using your subwoofer with a home theater receiver, the connection is simple: Just run an audio interconnect cable like this one from the receiver’s subwoofer output to the subwoofer’s line input (pictured above). If the subwoofer has an input labeled LFE, use that one. If it just has right and left stereo inputs (line level), use either one. Photo: Brent ButterworthIf you are using your subwoofer with a stereo receiver that lacks a subwoofer output (and many of them do), you can connect the subwoofer using an extra set of speaker cables, as shown above—provided the subwoofer has speaker-level (speaker wire) connections, as the picks in our Best Budget Subwoofer guide do. Typically, you’ll run the left and right speaker cables from the receiver to the sub, then from the sub to the speakers. The subwoofer’s manual will likely include diagrams that show the connections clearly.If you are using your subwoofer with a computer speaker system, your speaker system may have a subwoofer output or a set of line outputs that can be connected to a subwoofer. If neither is present, get a Y-adapter like this one. Plug the Y-adapter into your computer’s audio output, then connect one leg of the Y-adapter to your computer speakers using a 3.5 mm cable like this one (most computer speakers include this cable), and connect the other leg of the Y-adapter to the subwoofer’s line inputs using a 3.5-mm–to–RCA cable like this one.Hum problems are common with subwoofers because people often plug the subwoofer into a different AC outlet than the rest of the audio/video system; if the two outlets are on different circuit breakers, a "ground loop" can result, which produces a 60 Hz hum. Sometimes hum can even occur when the sub is plugged into the same outlet or outlet strip.To fix a hum problem, first check the audio connection between the subwoofer and the receiver. A damaged or partially disconnected cable can produce hum. If the cable is in good condition and the connections are solid, and if your subwoofer has a detachable AC cord that you can flip in its socket on the sub, try flipping the connector. If your sub’s AC cord is permanently attached or not designed to be flipped, and the sub’s plugged into a different outlet, try plugging the subwoofer into a power strip shared by the rest of the audio/video system. If this trick eliminates the hum, but keeping it connected this way permanently isn’t practical for you, try using an isolation transformer on the cable going from the receiver to the subwoofer or using a wireless subwoofer transmitter.2. Controls. Photo: Rozette RagoInexpensive subwoofers usually have just two knobs you need to adjust: volume and crossover frequency.The crossover frequency determines the highest notes the subwoofer will play. Set the frequency too high and it could make Ariana Grande sound like Vin Diesel because part of her voice is coming out of the subwoofer. Set it too low and there will be a sonic "hole" between the subwoofer and the speakers, and Vin Diesel may start to sound a little like Ariana Grande.The idea is to get the subwoofer to pick up right where the speakers leave off. You can generally find the lowest frequency the speakers are rated to play in the spec sheet on the manufacturer’s website or in the owner’s manual. For example, the spec sheet for the Q Acoustics 3020i, which we tested for our guide to the best bookshelf speakers for most stereos, shows the speaker as having a rated frequency response of 64 Hz to 30 kHz. In this case, you should set the subwoofer’s crossover frequency at 64 Hz or a little higher.Be forewarned, though—some manufacturers get a little optimistic with these specs. For example, the spec sheet for the Audioengine HD3, which we tested for our best wireless powered bookshelf speakers and best computer speakers guides, rates its response down to 65 Hz, even though the HD3 is much smaller than the Q Acoustics 3020i and has a tiny 2.75-inch woofer. Your best bet is to set the subwoofer crossover frequency to match the rating of the speakers, then turn the frequency higher if you hear a "hole" between the subwoofer and the speakers—for example, if Vin Diesel’s voice sounds thin and wimpy, or if the crashes and explosions in action movies don’t have the impact that they probably should.Note that if you use your subwoofer with a home theater receiver, you should set the subwoofer’s crossover frequency control to the maximum and use the receiver’s subwoofer crossover settings. The standard crossover frequency in home theater systems is 80 Hz. If your speakers are small—with woofers measuring 4 inches or less—you might want to set the frequency at more like 120 Hz; this will relieve your speakers of the need to produce low frequencies, so they’ll be able to play a little louder, and the system will sound clearer. If you have larger speakers, such as tower speakers, you might prefer the way a 60 Hz crossover frequency sounds. In this case, there’s no hard-and-fast rule because the acoustics of your room will have a large effect on the results.Now you need to set the level (or volume) of the subwoofer relative to the other speakers. If you’re using a home theater receiver, it has a built-in test tone that will help you set the subwoofer’s level. In this case, it’s usually best to leave the subwoofer’s volume control about halfway up and adjust the volume of the subwoofer using the receiver’s controls. If setting the sub’s volume halfway up doesn’t give you enough volume, try turning it up about three-quarters of the way and then fine-tuning the level with the receiver’s subwoofer level control. If you have to turn up the level on the subwoofer past halfway, don’t worry about it. Practically all powered subwoofers have an internal limiter that will protect the driver and amplifier. Unless you’re hearing gross amounts of distortion, there’s no problem.If you’re using the subwoofer in a stereo or computer system, just set the subwoofer volume so that it sounds the best from the chair you usually sit in to listen. The sound should be neither boomy nor thin. You can also change the subwoofer volume on the fly to suit whatever music or movies you’re listening to. There are no rules here.Most subwoofers also have a phase control—a switch or knob that adjusts the timing of the bass slightly so that the subwoofer is more in sync with the main speakers. In some cases, this can help the subwoofer blend better with the main speakers, but the setting of this control usually isn’t critical. Try different settings and see what sounds best to you; if you don’t hear a difference, don’t sweat it.Note that most home theater receivers have automatic room-correction technology that should, in theory, balance your subwoofer with your main speakers and adjust the subwoofer’s sound for the best performance in your room. There’s no harm in trying this out or sticking with the results if you like the sound. However, this technology is notoriously unreliable and may even make the sound worse. Read our best AV receiver guide for more information.3. Crawl. Photo: Rozette RagoThe location of the subwoofer and listening chair in your room will probably have a greater effect on the sound than your choice of subwoofer. Put it in the corner, and it’ll sound boomy. Put it somewhere else, and some bass notes will be boosted while others will be somewhat muted. And the effects will differ depending on where you’re seated. Fortunately, your ears can’t detect where deep bass sounds come from, which means you have a lot of flexibility when it comes to placing your subwoofer.If you want the best sound from your subwoofer, there’s a time-honored technique you can use to find the optimum place for it. Put the subwoofer in the chair you most often sit in when you listen (no, really) and play a tune with a melodic bassline, like Steely Dan’s "Aja." Now crawl around the room with your head near the floor (yep, we’re still serious) and find the place where the bassline sounds the most even. That’s the spot where you want to place the subwoofer.Unfortunately, this placement will deliver the most even bass only for that one seat. For many audio enthusiasts, that’s fine, because other people in the room with them might not be so picky. If you do care about giving everyone the best sound, go ahead and do the crawl, then listen to the bassline again from your primary listening seat and then the other seats. Then move the subwoofer around until you find the best compromise. Or better yet, move on to the next section of this article.If sound isn’t so important but appearance is, just put the subwoofer wherever it’s convenient. It should still sound pretty good, regardless of location, if it’s adjusted correctly.4. Combine. Photo: Rozette RagoIf you care about how even the bass sounds in all the seats in your room, there’s an easy, although usually more costly, solution: Buy two subwoofers instead of one. Placing one subwoofer in the front left corner of your room and a matching sub in the front right corner will provide smoother, more consistent bass response as you move from seat to seat. In a widely heralded research project (PDF), scientists from Harman International (parent company of JBL, Infinity, Revel, Mark Levinson, and a host of pro-audio brands) determined that placing four subwoofers in a room (one in each corner or one in the middle of each wall) produced the most consistently smooth bass throughout a room. They also found that two subwoofers (in corners or in the middle of opposing walls) didn’t deliver quite as good a result but were still far better than just one subwoofer—and obviously a far more realistic solution for most people. Considering the low prices of our top picks in our guide to the best budget subwoofer, buying two subwoofers can be a practical alternative for more serious listeners.That’s not to say two subs are the best solution for everyone. In a considerably less heralded research project I did for Sound & Vision magazine, my listeners and I (including Wirecutter’s Lauren Dragan and Geoffrey Morrison) confirmed the Harman International results when multiple seating positions were considered, but we found that for a single listener (or a listener who doesn’t care what everyone else in the room hears), it’s generally smarter to spend your money on one large subwoofer than two smaller ones. This way, you get more rock-’em/sock-’em bass for your bucks.Hardcore enthusiasts tend to use a subwoofer equalizer to adjust the sound of one of the two subwoofers so that it corrects the flaws in the response of the other one, but at that point you’re getting into a much more expensive system and (much more complicated setup) than we’re talking about here.5. Check. Photo: Rozette RagoWhen I worked at Dolby Laboratories—the company that’s done more than any other to establish the technologies and standards for home theater sound—an audio journalist asked me how to achieve the most accurate balance between a subwoofer and the main speakers. Within Dolby’s huge, well-funded research department, I found one engineer who was considered the company’s top subwoofer expert. “So what should I tell them?” I asked after he described from memory the results of eight studies on the subject, some of which dated back decades. “Just tell them to set it by ear,” he replied.As the Dolby engineer implied, the large number of variables in subwoofer setup—volume level, crossover frequency, the characteristics of the main speakers, the room acoustics, and the subwoofer’s own idiosyncrasies—make achieving a “perfect” setup practically impossible. Many home theater enthusiasts get a little closer to perfection by using a measurement microphone and a USB interface (or a USB measurement microphone) in conjunction with the free Room EQ Wizard computer application to fine-tune subwoofer performance, and that’s what I do when I test subwoofers for Wirecutter. But that’s a lot more serious than most casual listeners will probably want to get.A simpler, although much less precise, alternative is to use the real-time analyzer (RTA) function in a smartphone app such as AudioTool (for Android) or Audio Spectrum Analyzer dB RTA (for iOS). If you play pink noise (available from many sources, including YouTube) through your system, these apps will show you how smooth the bass response in your room is and how well the subwoofer is blending with your main speakers. Two caveats: Choose an app with at least ⅙-octave resolution, and do the measurements from your primary listening chair (or sofa).Even if you do have measurement gear and the knowledge and patience to use it, the ultimate test of subwoofer setup is whether you like the sound. So when you’re all done, just sit back and listen to some of the movies and music you like. The goal is to get your system to the point where female voices don’t sound bloated and male voices don’t sound thin. You should also be able to feel couch-shaking impact during explosions in action movies without making the bass sound boomy in lighter music, such as most pop and jazz. Even after you get everything sounding great, you may find yourself adjusting the subwoofer volume frequently to best suit the movie or music you’re listening to.And if all this seems like too much trouble, unplug the subwoofer for a minute or two and you’ll quickly realize why it was all worth the effort.Further readingThe Best Stereo Receiver. by Brent ButterworthThe Sony STR-DH190 stereo receiver is a great way to start an affordable traditional stereo system, especially if you’re into vinyl.How to Get the Most Out of Your Travel Reward Points. by Ganda SuthivarakomIn this week's newsletter: We asked senior staff writer Taylor Tepper for tips on how to make the most of travel rewards cards for the summer.The Best Record Player Setup for Beginners. by Adrienne MaxwellStart your vinyl music journey here with our picks for turntable, receiver, speakers, and more.Checking It Twice: Retesting the Monoprice Subwoofer. by Brent ButterworthFollowing up on reader complaints about the Monoprice 9723M subwoofer, we did more testing, and found out why some buyers might have run into problems.EditDismiss
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 98
  • 19
  • speaker
  • 33
  • 19
  • sound
  • 30
  • 19
  • receiver
  • 20
  • 19
  • set
  • 15
  • 19
  • system
  • 15
  • 19
  • room
  • 15
  • 19
  • volume
  • 13
  • 19
  • frequency
  • 13
  • 19
  • audio
  • 12
  • 19
  • crossover
  • 11
  • 19
  • control
  • 10
  • 19
  • bass
  • 10
  • 19
  • set subwoofer
  • 9
  • 19
  • crossover frequency
  • 9
  • 19
  • level
  • 9
  • 19
  • cable
  • 9
  • 19
  • computer
  • 8
  • 19
  • home theater
  • 7
  • 19
  • connect
  • 7
  • 19
  • guide
  • 7
  • 19
  • home
  • 7
  • 19
  • theater
  • 7
  • 19
  • stereo
  • 7
  • 19
  • hz
  • 7
  • 19
  • main speaker
  • 6
  • 19
  • outlet
  • 6
  • 19
  • connection
  • 6
  • 19
  • photo
  • 6
  • 19
  • main
  • 6
  • 19
  • seat
  • 6
  • 19
  • photo rozette
  • 5
  • 19
  • listening
  • 5
  • 19
  • corner
  • 5
  • 19
  • setup
  • 5
  • 19
  • home theater receiver
  • 4
  • 19
  • cable receiver
  • 4
  • 19
  • subwoofer output
  • 4
  • 19
  • subwoofer speaker
  • 4
  • 19
  • vin diesel
  • 4
  • 19
  • spec sheet
  • 4
  • 19
  • voice sound
  • 4
  • 19
  • subwoofer volume
  • 4
  • 19
  • theater receiver
  • 4
  • 19
  • computer speaker
  • 4
  • 19
  • adapter
  • 4
  • 19
  • receiver subwoofer
  • 3
  • 19
  • adapter computer
  • 3
  • 19
  • subwoofer crossover
  • 3
  • 19
  • speaker system
  • 3
  • 19
  • budget subwoofer
  • 3
  • 19
  • stereo receiver
  • 3
  • 19
  • sound boomy
  • 3
  • 19
  • bass sound
  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
TitleSound bars with subwoofers: do they really produce better sound? – Which? News
Urlhttps://www.which.co.uk/news/2019/01/sound-bars-with-subwoofers-do-they-really-produce-better-sound/
DescriptionMost sound bars come with an external or built-in subwoofer. But sound bars are supposed to be an adequate solution to poor TV audio without the need to couple them with additional speakers. So is a subwoofer really necessary and do they always do a good job? Find out whether sound bars with subwoofers do better in our testing
Date25 Jan 2019
Organic Position19
H1Sound bars with subwoofers: do they really produce better sound?
H2News
Picking a sound bar with a subwoofer may not always guarantee better sound quality. It really does pay to do your research before buying
Sound bars with subwoofers
Sound bars without subwoofers
Should I choose a sound base over a sound bar?
H3LG SK5, £239
Hitachi AXS460BTU, £150
Samsung HW-N300 Wireless Compact Soundbar, £199
Panasonic SC-HTB200, £80
H2WithAnchorsNews
Picking a sound bar with a subwoofer may not always guarantee better sound quality. It really does pay to do your research before buying
Sound bars with subwoofers
Sound bars without subwoofers
Should I choose a sound base over a sound bar?
BodySound bars with subwoofers: do they really produce better sound? Picking a sound bar with a subwoofer may not always guarantee better sound quality. It really does pay to do your research before buying. By Haddi Browne 25 Jan 2019 Share this page . Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by email Most sound bars come with an additional speaker called a subwoofer, which is designed to provide extra bass. Subwoofers can be built in or come as an external box – but are they really necessary for an epic home movie night? A great sound bar should ideally offer the complete package on its own, delivering audio that is crystal clear, detailed and natural without the need to pair it with additional devices such as speakers or a subwoofer. Sound bases in particular can deliver effective bass all by themselves. The extra bass created by a subwoofer should dramatically enhance movie audio and deliver those legendary Hollywood action scenes with the impact and power they deserve. However, not all subwoofers do a good job and some can even ruin your entertainment experience. While we’ve found some flawless sound bars with excellent subwoofers, our tests have also uncovered models that produce excessive, uncomfortable bass levels when the subwoofer is turned on. Some subwoofers deliver bass notes so late it’s distracting, making movie scenes that could have been great lose impact – you’ll see the sudden explosion before you hear it. Others overpower sound and are so boomy you’ll suddenly be scrambling for the remote to turn the volume down. Out test results have been mixed, so buying a sound bar or sound base can really be a gamble. Choose the right model by checking out our Best Buy sound bars. Sound bars with subwoofers. These are two of the models we’ve tested that have subwoofers. Read our reviews to find out whether they provide the right levels of bass. LG SK5, £239. The SK5 should, in theory, be the perfect sound bar for an unforgettable home cinematic experience. It’s bursting with fancy features, including a wireless subwoofer and DTS Virtual X surround sound technology that fires sound waves around you to deliver a rich three dimensional experience. Movies, TV dramas, music and sports each have their own unique audio properties so should be listened to using different sound modes for the best experience. So LG has added Adaptive Sound Control to the SK5 to automatically adjust the sound to conform to what’s playing. For ultimate convenience, you have the choice of controlling the sound bar with your TV’s remote or with LG’s smartphone app. Many sound bars betray their enticing marketing description. Plus, only a small minority of sound bars actually manage to create surround sound well. Find out whether this model lives up to expectations by reading our LG SK5 review. Hitachi AXS460BTU, £150. This attractively priced model also comes with a wireless subwoofer. It has all the common features you would expect from a sound bar, including a range of digital connection options and Bluetooth, which allows you to stream music from your phone, tablet or laptop. Additionally, it has wi-fi so can be connected to speakers all over the house to form a multi-room music system. With many sound bars costing almost as much as your TV, Hitachi’s low-priced models are usually popular because many people simply want to watch their favourite programmes with more oomph than their TV speakers can provide. You’re unlikely to get an abundance of features at this price but that’s fine as long as the sound is good. We’ve found excellent Best Buy sound bars under £200. Sound bars without subwoofers. Here are two examples of models we’ve tested that don’t come with a subwoofer. Follow the links to see whether they are still great additions to your living room. Samsung HW-N300 Wireless Compact Soundbar, £199. Samsung promises there’s no need to pair the HW-N300 with a separate subwoofer because it has four built-in speakers for dynamic and powerful audio. If you own a compatible Samsung TV, you may be attracted to the sleek, compact design as it’s great for saving space. There’s also no need to have wires cluttering up the room as it can be connected to the TV wirelessly using Bluetooth. In a further bid to win your custom, Samsung offers a free six month trial with Deezer to help music lovers make the most of their new sound bar. Many people are satisfied with the depth of bass provided by a standalone sound bar and feel no need to buy a subwoofer. Does this all-in-one model successfully enhance movies and TV all on its own? Read our Samsung HW-N300 review to find out. Panasonic SC-HTB200, £80. If Panasonic’s description of the SC-HTB200 holds up in practice, you should be amazed at the room-filling, high quality sound produced by this compact sound bar. It’s compatible with Panasonic TVs up to 40 inches and, with two full-range built-in speakers, you shouldn’t need to buy a subwoofer. You can also download the app, which lets you stream music from your device and control the sound bar. This model doesn’t offer much in the way of features, which isn’t a problem as long as the sound quality is up to scratch. Some are brimming with exciting features that mask dull, mediocre sound quality. In contrast, we’ve found Best Buys with minimalistic features. Find out which category this one fits into by reading our Panasonic SC-HTB200 review. Should I choose a sound base over a sound bar? If your TV isn’t wall mounted, you may want to consider getting a sound base over a sound bar. Sound bases sit under your TV and are larger than sound bars so have more room for bigger speakers. Thus, they tend to produce better bass due to having larger drivers and better in-built amplification. A sound base has additional bass drivers for extra bass so shouldn’t need a subwoofer. Head to our sound base reviews to see which ones came out on top in our testing. Share this page . Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by email Share this page . Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by email Back to top Back to top
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • sound
  • 43
  • 20
  • sound bar
  • 23
  • 20
  • bar
  • 23
  • 20
  • subwoofer
  • 22
  • 20
  • share
  • 12
  • 20
  • model
  • 11
  • 20
  • tv
  • 11
  • 20
  • bass
  • 10
  • 20
  • speaker
  • 9
  • 20
  • built
  • 7
  • 20
  • feature
  • 6
  • 20
  • sound base
  • 5
  • 20
  • lg
  • 5
  • 20
  • panasonic
  • 5
  • 20
  • movie
  • 5
  • 20
  • base
  • 5
  • 20
  • buy
  • 5
  • 20
  • review
  • 5
  • 20
  • music
  • 5
  • 20
  • room
  • 5
  • 20
  • samsung
  • 5
  • 20
  • sound bar subwoofer
  • 4
  • 20
  • bar subwoofer
  • 4
  • 20
  • quality
  • 4
  • 20
  • great
  • 4
  • 20
  • audio
  • 4
  • 20
  • deliver
  • 4
  • 20
  • experience
  • 4
  • 20
  • find
  • 4
  • 20
  • sk5
  • 4
  • 20
  • share page share
  • 3
  • 20
  • page share facebook
  • 3
  • 20
  • share facebook share
  • 3
  • 20
  • facebook share twitter
  • 3
  • 20
  • share twitter share
  • 3
  • 20
  • twitter share email
  • 3
  • 20
  • sound bar sound
  • 3
  • 20
  • sound quality
  • 3
  • 20
  • share page
  • 3
  • 20
  • page share
  • 3
  • 20
  • share facebook
  • 3
  • 20
  • facebook share
  • 3
  • 20
  • share twitter
  • 3
  • 20
  • twitter share
  • 3
  • 20
  • share email
  • 3
  • 20
  • extra bass
  • 3
  • 20
  • bar sound
  • 3
  • 20
  • hw n300
  • 3
  • 20
  • sc htb200
  • 3
  • 20
  • compact
  • 3
  • 20
  • sc
  • 3
  • 20
  • htb200
  • 3
  • 20
  • top
  • 3
  • 20
Result 21
Title5 reasons you need a subwoofer for your outdoor event – BishopSound
Urlhttps://bishopsound.com/blogs/news/5-reasons-you-need-a-subwoofer-for-your-outdoor-event
DescriptionPlaying inside or outside subwoofers make all the difference to sound and truly matter if you love to hear every note of your favourite music! 12” and 15” Compact speaker pa systems do a great job but sadly physics dictates that many cannot reproduce the lower frequencies. To get that tight punchy bass inside or outsid
Date23 Mar 2021
Organic Position20
H15 reasons you need a subwoofer for your outdoor event
H2
H3Subwoofers for Indoor gigs
Subwoofers for Outside Events
H2WithAnchors
Body5 reasons you need a subwoofer for your outdoor event Playing inside or outside subwoofers make all the difference to sound and truly matter if you love to hear every note of your favourite music! 12” and 15” Compact speaker pa systems do a great job but sadly physics dictates that many cannot reproduce the lower frequencies. To get that tight punchy bass inside or outside you have to pump some air! 8”, 10” 12” and 15” speakers deal well with mid-range frequencies but are too busy dealing with everything over 100Hz up to 2000hz to take care of bass. Many pubs, clubs, DJ’s and venues, desperate for bass drive their speaker too hard producing distortion, when all they needed to do was add a subwoofer! Subwoofers for Indoor gigs. If you are a live performer or DJ with no subwoofer all the bass sounds you have worked to create are not as good as they could be. Your music may sound great in the studio and on headphones but live, in front of an audience it will sound as thin and lacklustre like school gravy! Why? As a band, your bass sounds and kick drums will lack that meaning and soul you need to sound your best. If bass is lacking your PA speakers could distort when you drive the lower frequencies. A dedicated subwoofer delivers all those low frequencies that are missing from your mix and brings warmth and meaning to your performance. When you add a subwoofer your main speakers do not have to work so hard on reproducing the low frequencies which means your pa system sounds louder, clearer and much more defined. Finally sub bass inside a venue is not directional so your subwoofer can be positioned in a safe, event friendly location. Subwoofers for Outside Events. Remember what they say? "Outside Space Needs More Bass"! Q- What happens when there are no walls and ceilings? A- You need plenty of sub bass power to move more air! Why? With no room surfaces to contain the sound and with the high ambient noise typically found at outdoor events the first issue you face outdoors is the amount of sound. The lack of walls to boost the bass response means you lose several decibels. Working in a tent, marquee or in the open air with nothing to retain sub bass 18” subs are the most popular solution to ensure a Full Range reproduction of sound. Working against you is the fact that human hearing is less sensitive at low frequencies than at mid and high frequencies. Audiences like to feel the bass. Getting great sub bass outdoors takes effort. Playing outdoors you will not need to tinker too much with the mids and highs, but an injection of sub bass boost in the 35Hz to 100Hz range will improve balance and deliver impact. Subwoofers can be self-powered often referred to as active or simply woofers in cabinets called passive subs. The most popular size is 18” but 12”, 15”, 18” and even 21” for extra low cinematic bass can be used. The reggae crew love the 21” subwoofers. Email today at [email protected] or message us using our Live Chat for more info. English French Spanish English German
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • bass
  • 16
  • 21
  • subwoofer
  • 12
  • 21
  • sound
  • 10
  • 21
  • frequency
  • 7
  • 21
  • outdoor
  • 5
  • 21
  • speaker
  • 5
  • 21
  • air
  • 4
  • 21
  • event
  • 4
  • 21
  • low
  • 4
  • 21
  • 12 15
  • 3
  • 21
  • low frequency
  • 3
  • 21
  • inside
  • 3
  • 21
  • 12
  • 3
  • 21
  • 15
  • 3
  • 21
  • pa
  • 3
  • 21
  • great
  • 3
  • 21
  • mid
  • 3
  • 21
  • range
  • 3
  • 21
  • live
  • 3
  • 21
  • high
  • 3
  • 21
  • 18
  • 3
  • 21
Result 22
TitleBefore You Buy a Subwoofer: What Factors Are Important?
Urlhttps://www.lifewire.com/before-you-buy-a-subwoofer-1847583
DescriptionSubwoofers have emerged as a critical element of a home theater system. Find out what you need to know before you purchase one
Date7 Aug 2021
Organic Position21
H1Before You Buy a Subwoofer: What Factors Are Important?
H2The ultimate subwoofer buying guide
Are Subwoofers Worth It?
Powered Subwoofers
Passive Subwoofers
Front-Firing and Down-Firing Subwoofers
Ports and Passive Radiators
Subwoofer Crossovers
Subwoofer Placement
Wired or Wireless?
H3
H2WithAnchorsThe ultimate subwoofer buying guide
Are Subwoofers Worth It?
Powered Subwoofers
Passive Subwoofers
Front-Firing and Down-Firing Subwoofers
Ports and Passive Radiators
Subwoofer Crossovers
Subwoofer Placement
Wired or Wireless?
BodyBefore You Buy a Subwoofer: What Factors Are Important? The ultimate subwoofer buying guide. By Robert Silva Robert Silva Writer San Diego State University Robert Silva has extensive experience in consumer electronics and home theater product sales and sales supervision; he has written about audio, video, and home theater topics since 1998. Robert has articles published on HBO.com and Dishinfo.com plus has made appearances on the YouTube series Home Theater Geeks. lifewire's editorial guidelines Updated on August 7, 2021 Tweet Share Email Audio Speakers Stereos & Receivers In This Article Are They Worth It? Powered Subwoofers Passive Subwoofers Front-Firing vs. Down-Firing Ports and Passive Radiators Subwoofer Crossovers Subwoofer Placement Wired or Wireless? Subwoofers are a special type of speaker capable of reproducing the lowest audible frequencies. The ideal subwoofer for your system depends on the characteristics of the room and your preferences. Here's how to choose a subwoofer that best fits your surround sound setup. Are Subwoofers Worth It? . Subwoofers are crucial to the home theater experience. When you go to a movie theater, you feel the sound emanating around you. Subwoofers are responsible for the deep bass that shakes you and hits you right in the gut. To get this experience at home, use a home theater receiver that provides outputs referred to as a Sub Out, Sub Pre-Out, or LFE (low-frequency effects). The best home subwoofers cost hundreds of dollars. However, you can find budget subwoofers for under $100. If you have a large home theater, you may need a high-end system. For small rooms, choose a self-powered subwoofer that doesn't require a separate amp. Polk Audio If possible, take a CD with a lot of bass information to the retailer. Then, test how the bass sounds through various subwoofers before you buy one. Powered Subwoofers . The most common type of subwoofer is self-powered, which means it has a built-in amplifier. Powered subwoofers usually provide volume (gain) and other controls that can be adjusted separately from the home theater receiver. A powered subwoofer needs a connection to the Sub output from a receiver (you don't need an extra amp between the subwoofer and the receiver). This connection setup takes the audio power load away from the amp/receiver and allows the amp/receiver to power the midrange and tweeters. Passive Subwoofers . An external amplifier powers a passive subwoofer in the same fashion as other speakers in your system. The best solution for using a passive subwoofer in a home theater setup is to place an external subwoofer amplifier between the passive subwoofer and the home theater receiver's subwoofer preamp outputs. This setup frees the receiver from supplying the needed amplifier power for the subwoofer. Low-frequency bass output needs more power to reproduce low-frequency sounds. Suppose you connect a passive subwoofer to the receiver's speaker terminals instead of a separate amplifier between the sub and receiver. In that case, the receiver must output enough power to sustain bass effects in the subwoofer without draining the amp. The amount of power depends on the passive subwoofer's requirements, the size of the room, and how much bass you desire. Front-Firing and Down-Firing Subwoofers . Front-firing (or side-firing) subwoofers are designed so that the sound radiates from the side or front of the subwoofer enclosure. In down-firing subwoofers, the sound radiates downward toward the floor. Both types deliver similar results. Since the deep-bass frequencies reproduced by subwoofers are non-directional, it's difficult for our ears to pinpoint the direction the sound comes from. Nonetheless, front-firing subs are usually placed in the front of the room. Down-firing subs deliver the best results when placed in a corner or side wall. When handling a down-firing subwoofer, don't puncture the exposed driver when you pick it up or set it down. Ports and Passive Radiators . Some subwoofer enclosures have an additional port that forces out more air, increasing bass response more efficiently than sealed enclosures. Other enclosures use a passive radiator in addition to the speaker, instead of a port, to increase efficiency and preciseness. A passive radiator can be a speaker with the voice coil removed or a flat diaphragm. Instead of vibrating directly from the electrically transmitted audio signal, a passive radiator reacts to the air pushed by the active subwoofer driver. Since the passive radiator complements the action of the active driver, it increases the low-frequency response of the subwoofer. Subwoofer Crossovers . The crossover is an electronic circuit that routes all frequencies below a specific decibel point to the subwoofer. All frequencies above that point are routed to the main, center, and surround speakers. Typically, a good subwoofer has a crossover frequency of about 100 Hz. Subwoofer Placement . Since the low frequencies reproduced by a subwoofer are non-directional, you can place it anywhere in the room where it sounds best. Optimal placement depends on room size, floor type, furnishings, and wall construction. Typically, the best placement for a subwoofer is in the front of the room, to the left or right of the main speakers, or in the front corner of the room. Many home theater receivers provide two subwoofer outputs, making it possible to connect two or more subwoofers. Wired or Wireless? . A growing number of powered subwoofers offer wireless connectivity. The wireless capability eliminates the need for a long connection cable between the subwoofer and the receiver. A wireless-enabled subwoofer usually comes with a transmitter kit that can be plugged into the subwoofer outputs of any home theater receiver. The transmitter connected to the home theater receiver transmits low-frequency audio signals to the wireless subwoofer. In turn, the wireless receiver built into the subwoofer allows the built-in amplifier to power the speaker driver, producing the needed low-frequency sound. Was this page helpful? Thanks for letting us know! Tell us why! Other Not enough details Hard to understand More from Lifewire The 8 Best Home Subwoofers of 2022 What Are Powered Speakers? Subwoofers - What You Need To Know The Onkyo HT-S3800/HT-S7800 Home Theater-in-a-Box Systems What Bass Management Is and How It Works Woofers, Tweeters, and Crossovers: Understanding Loudspeakers How to Make Wired Speakers Wireless How to Get the Best Performance Out of Your Subwoofer The Difference Between a Passive and Powered Subwoofer The 5 Best Surround Sound Speakers of 2022 What Is Dolby Atmos Immersive Surround Sound? What Is Wireless Home Theater? How to Connect a Subwoofer to a Receiver or Amplifier How Do I Position Loudspeakers for My Home Theater System? What to Do When the Subwoofer Isn't Working Properly Surround Sound: The Audio Side of Home Theater
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 64
  • 22
  • home
  • 20
  • 22
  • theater
  • 19
  • 22
  • home theater
  • 17
  • 22
  • receiver
  • 16
  • 22
  • passive
  • 14
  • 22
  • firing
  • 12
  • 22
  • speaker
  • 12
  • 22
  • frequency
  • 12
  • 22
  • sound
  • 12
  • 22
  • powered
  • 11
  • 22
  • powered subwoofer
  • 9
  • 22
  • amplifier
  • 9
  • 22
  • wireless
  • 9
  • 22
  • bass
  • 9
  • 22
  • front
  • 8
  • 22
  • room
  • 8
  • 22
  • power
  • 8
  • 22
  • passive subwoofer
  • 7
  • 22
  • low frequency
  • 7
  • 22
  • audio
  • 7
  • 22
  • output
  • 7
  • 22
  • low
  • 7
  • 22
  • home theater receiver
  • 6
  • 22
  • firing subwoofer
  • 6
  • 22
  • passive radiator
  • 6
  • 22
  • theater receiver
  • 6
  • 22
  • surround
  • 6
  • 22
  • radiator
  • 6
  • 22
  • surround sound
  • 5
  • 22
  • enclosure
  • 5
  • 22
  • crossover
  • 5
  • 22
  • system
  • 5
  • 22
  • amplifier power
  • 4
  • 22
  • front firing
  • 4
  • 22
  • subwoofer receiver
  • 4
  • 22
  • port
  • 4
  • 22
  • placement
  • 4
  • 22
  • type
  • 4
  • 22
  • setup
  • 4
  • 22
  • side
  • 4
  • 22
  • driver
  • 4
  • 22
  • robert silva
  • 3
  • 22
  • subwoofer front
  • 3
  • 22
  • down firing
  • 3
  • 22
  • subwoofer crossover
  • 3
  • 22
Result 23
TitleSubwoofers - Hi-Fi Speakers - Hi-Fi
Urlhttps://www.richersounds.com/hi-fi/hi-fi-speakers/subwoofers.html
Description
DateItems 1 - 12 of 143
Organic Position22
H1
H2Q Acoustics 3070S (Graphite)
Polk Audio PSW10e (Black)
Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (Black)
Monitor Audio Bronze W10 6G (Urban Grey)
REL HT1003 (Black)
REL H1205 (Black)
KEF KW1 Receiver
Yamaha NSSW050 (Black)
Polk Audio PSW10e (Black)
Monitor Audio IWB10
Cambridge Audio SX120 (Matte Black)
Q Acoustics Sub 80SP
Q Acoustics 3070S (Graphite)
ELAC Debut S10.2 (Black)
KEF KW1
Tibo Harmony Sub 6 (Black)
Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (White)
Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (Black)
H3Our hottest subwoofer deals
H2WithAnchorsQ Acoustics 3070S (Graphite)
Polk Audio PSW10e (Black)
Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (Black)
Monitor Audio Bronze W10 6G (Urban Grey)
REL HT1003 (Black)
REL H1205 (Black)
KEF KW1 Receiver
Yamaha NSSW050 (Black)
Polk Audio PSW10e (Black)
Monitor Audio IWB10
Cambridge Audio SX120 (Matte Black)
Q Acoustics Sub 80SP
Q Acoustics 3070S (Graphite)
ELAC Debut S10.2 (Black)
KEF KW1
Tibo Harmony Sub 6 (Black)
Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (White)
Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (Black)
BodyJavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Stores Store Finder 51 stores nationwide Join VIP Club Sign In My Basket Free delivery to most of GB mainland. on all purchases over £50 Pick A Delivery Day. Optional Monday - Saturday Click & Collect. From any of our stores with next working day from your local store 6 Year Guarantees available. on a wide range of products for our VIP Club members. Lowest Price Guaranteed! Ts&Cs apply. Must be brand new, in stock & with a similar guarantee. Click here. Expert Advice. by appointment, phone & video call Free delivery to most of GB. On all purchases over £50. Exclusions apply. Pick a delivery day. Optional Monday - Saturday Home Hi-Fi Hi-Fi Speakers Subwoofers Filter results Show Filter products Clear All Brand Acoustic Energy 2 Scansonic 4 Apart 2 Audio Pro 3 Bluesound 1 Bowers & Wilkins 7 Cambridge Audio 5 DALI 10 DLS 1 Elac 2 Elipson 7 Focal 4 Gallo Acoustics 7 Harman Kardon 5 JBL 2 KEF 11 Klipsch 1 Mission 2 Monitor Audio 19 Orbitsound 1 Polk Audio 1 Q Acoustics 6 REL 11 Sonos 2 Sony 2 SVS 19 Tibo 2 Wharfedale 3 Yamaha 1 show 20 more show less Clear Price From £ To £ Apply Clear Active or Passive? Active 112 Passive 3 Clear Colour Silk Black 1 Silk White 1 Black 50 Black Ash 11 Black Gloss 1 Black Wood 1 Carbon Black 1 Dark Walnut 1 Gloss Black 10 Gloss White 2 Graphite 2 Grey 3 Matte Black 1 Mineral White 1 Piano Ebony 1 Piano Gloss Black 1 Red 1 Satin Black 5 Satin White 8 Urban Grey 1 Walnut 6 White 20 White Gloss 1 White Sandex 1 show 15 more show less Clear Features Auto On/Off 44 Clear Bluetooth No 1 Yes 2 Clear Speaker Type Ceiling Speaker 1 Wall Speaker 3 Clear Clear All Done Buy By Phone. Speak to one of our friendly UK based team 0333 900 0093 Mon to Fri: 10:00 - 18:00 Sat: 10:00 - 17:00 Sun: 12:00 - 16:00 Phil,Telesales manager19th year of service     If you're trying to add some extra bass to your music or want to feel every thump and bang in your home cinema, then you'll need a subwoofer to do the business. Thanks to huge leaps in design, they don't have to be as big as you might think! Our hottest subwoofer deals. Q Acoustics 3070S (Graphite) . Subwoofer £179 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales £179 Polk Audio PSW10e (Black) . Subwoofer £129 Was £149 from 18/08/21 SAVE£20 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Frequency Response: 40 - 160 Hz £129 Was £149 from 18/08/21 SAVE£20 Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (Black) . Subwoofer £249 Was £269 from 01/12/21 SAVE£20 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Frequency Response: 36 - 200 Hz £249 Was £269 from 01/12/21 SAVE£20 Monitor Audio Bronze W10 6G (Urban Grey) . Subwoofer £549 Was £579 from 06/04/21 SAVE£30 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Frequency Response: 29 - 150 Hz £549 Was £579 from 06/04/21 SAVE£30 REL HT1003 (Black) . Subwoofer FREE next working or nominated day delivery. Click here £499 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Frequency Response: 24Hz Hz £499 REL H1205 (Black) . Subwoofer FREE next working or nominated day delivery. Click here £699 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Frequency Response: 22Hz Hz £699 Showing Items 1-12 of 143 Page You're currently reading page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page Checkout Show 12 24 36 per page Filter results Sort By Relevance Recommended Price low to high Price high to low Alphabetical A-Z Alphabetical Z-A Set Descending Direction KEF KW1 Receiver . Wireless Subwoofer Receiver £99 Order In-store/Telesales Yamaha NSSW050 (Black) . Subwoofer £119 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Polk Audio PSW10e (Black) . Subwoofer £129 Was £149 from 18/08/21 SAVE£20 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Monitor Audio IWB10 . Single In Wall Subwoofer Back Box £165 Special Order Subwoofer Not Included Cambridge Audio SX120 (Matte Black) . Subwoofer £169 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Q Acoustics Sub 80SP . Single In Wall Subwoofer £169 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Q Acoustics 3070S (Graphite) . Subwoofer £179 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales ELAC Debut S10.2 (Black) . Subwoofer £199 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales KEF KW1 . Wireless Subwoofer Adapter Kit £199 Special Order Tibo Harmony Sub 6 (Black) . Subwoofer £249 Special Order Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (White) . Subwoofer £249 Was £269 from 01/12/21 SAVE£20 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Cambridge Audio Minx X201 (Black) . Subwoofer £249 Was £269 from 01/12/21 SAVE£20 Buy Online/In-store/Telesales Showing Items 1-12 of 143 Page You're currently reading page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page Checkout Show 12 24 36 per page Filter results Sort By Relevance Recommended Price low to high Price high to low Alphabetical A-Z Alphabetical Z-A Set Descending Direction category /Hi-Fi/Hi-Fi Speakers/Subwoofers 1756 1878 Subwoofers https://www.richersounds.com/hi-fi/hi-fi-speakers/subwoofers.html 1 4 price_asc Compare products (   of 3) Clear All You have no items to compare.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • page
  • 44
  • 23
  • black
  • 28
  • 23
  • subwoofer
  • 23
  • 23
  • alphabetical
  • 18
  • 23
  • audio
  • 17
  • 23
  • storetelesale
  • 17
  • 23
  • onlinein storetelesale
  • 16
  • 23
  • clear
  • 15
  • 23
  • buy
  • 15
  • 23
  • buy onlinein storetelesale
  • 14
  • 23
  • buy onlinein
  • 14
  • 23
  • acoustic
  • 14
  • 23
  • white
  • 14
  • 23
  • onlinein
  • 14
  • 23
  • black subwoofer
  • 11
  • 23
  • page page
  • 10
  • 23
  • show
  • 9
  • 23
  • 20
  • 9
  • 23
  • save
  • 9
  • 23
  • gloss
  • 8
  • 23
  • cambridge audio
  • 7
  • 23
  • save 20
  • 7
  • 23
  • 12
  • 6
  • 23
  • store
  • 6
  • 23
  • cambridge
  • 6
  • 23
  • delivery
  • 6
  • 23
  • price
  • 6
  • 23
  • save 20 buy
  • 5
  • 23
  • 20 buy onlinein
  • 5
  • 23
  • onlinein storetelesale frequency
  • 5
  • 23
  • storetelesale frequency response
  • 5
  • 23
  • polk audio
  • 5
  • 23
  • 20 buy
  • 5
  • 23
  • storetelesale frequency
  • 5
  • 23
  • frequency response
  • 5
  • 23
  • day
  • 5
  • 23
  • frequency
  • 5
  • 23
  • response
  • 5
  • 23
  • hz
  • 5
  • 23
  • 249
  • 5
  • 23
  • 249 269 011221
  • 4
  • 23
  • 269 011221 save
  • 4
  • 23
  • 011221 save 20
  • 4
  • 23
  • monitor audio
  • 4
  • 23
  • walnut
  • 4
  • 23
  • grey
  • 4
  • 23
  • subwoofer 249
  • 4
  • 23
  • 249 269
  • 4
  • 23
  • 269 011221
  • 4
  • 23
  • 011221 save
  • 4
  • 23
  • 269
  • 4
  • 23
  • 011221
  • 4
  • 23
  • low
  • 4
  • 23
  • high
  • 4
  • 23
  • order
  • 4
  • 23
  • gloss black
  • 3
  • 23
  • 129 149 180821
  • 3
  • 23
  • 149 180821 save
  • 3
  • 23
  • 180821 save 20
  • 3
  • 23
  • cambridge audio minx
  • 3
  • 23
  • audio minx x201
  • 3
  • 23
  • black subwoofer 249
  • 3
  • 23
  • subwoofer 249 269
  • 3
  • 23
  • filter result
  • 3
  • 23
  • 129 149
  • 3
  • 23
  • 149 180821
  • 3
  • 23
  • 180821 save
  • 3
  • 23
  • audio minx
  • 3
  • 23
  • minx x201
  • 3
  • 23
  • special order
  • 3
  • 23
Result 24
TitleDo I Need A Subwoofer for My Home Theater?
Urlhttps://hometheater.vegas/do-i-need-a-subwoofer-for-my-home-theater/
Description
Date
Organic Position23
H1Do I Need A Subwoofer for My Home Theater?
H2Do I Need a Subwoofer? The Real Questions is: Do I Need TWO?
H3The Influence of Room Resonance
Solving Room Resonance Problems With Multiple Subwoofers
H2WithAnchorsDo I Need a Subwoofer? The Real Questions is: Do I Need TWO?
BodyDo I Need A Subwoofer for My Home Theater? Blogs, News and Events Multiple subwoofers solve room resonance problems in home theaters. Proper positioning of speakers and subwoofers ensures the best audio experience. Do I Need a Subwoofer? The Real Questions is: Do I Need TWO? Subwoofers supplement speakers with their ability to manage bass. This equipment can accommodate very low bass frequencies while the speakers produce the higher frequencies. At higher volumes, subwoofers reduce distortion that could occur if speakers were dealing with the bass on their own. Film soundtracks also include stronger bass than most music, which makes subwoofers beneficial to home theater surround sound systems. In many cases, the size of your room might require two subwoofers to achieve optimal sound distribution. The Influence of Room Resonance. The sound dynamics of your home theater room create room resonance. In some places, the sound waves from a subwoofer focus too strongly. The result is overly loud bass that booms uncomfortably. Room resonance can also cancel out or diminish bass sound and reduce the sound quality for some seats in the room. A home theater technician will analyze seating positions in relation to room resonance and place subwoofers in the best places to avoid the negative effects of too much or too little bass. This is a critical step during surround sound installation. A technician from a professional home theater company in Las Vegas can test different speaker and subwoofer positions to ensure every seat receives excellent sound. Solving Room Resonance Problems With Multiple Subwoofers. Two subwoofers are often necessary to deliver optimized audio complete with smooth bass to every seat in a room. Especially spacious rooms require two and sometimes more subwoofers because the space is simply too large for a single subwoofer to distribute bass evenly. Immersive Results With properly positioned subwoofers, you and your guests will fully experience low bass sounds such as explosions. The sound will physically register throughout your body and place you in the middle of a movie’s action. When it comes to subwoofers for a home theater, two is better than one. A professional home theater technician can assess your property to determine your specific needs. Product Categories. Accessories Automation & Universal Control Control4 Savant URC Cables & Bulk Wire Bulk Wire Digital Optical Ethernet HDMI Power Cables Subwoofer Cables Cooling Fans Lighting Mounts & Brackets Power Receivers & Amplifiers Power Amplifiers Receivers Security & Surveillance Speakers In-Ceiling Speakers In-Wall Speakers Wireless Speakers Tools TVs Voice Assistants WiFi & Networking Blog Topics. AV Company (1) AV Company Las Vegas NV (1) Blogs (131) Business Security System (1) Business Security System Las Vegas NV (1) Camera Surveillance System (1) Camera Surveillance System, Las Vegas, NV (1) Commercial (4) Commercial Automation (1) Commercial Automation Las Vegas (1) Dedicated Home Theater (2) Dedicated Home Theater Henderson NV (1) Dedicated Home Theater Las Vegas NV (1) Home Audio (12) Home Automation Company (3) Home Automation Company Henderson NV (1) Home Automation Company Summerlin NV (2) Home Decor (3) Home Lighting Control (1) Home Lighting Control Summerlin NV (1) Home Movie Theater Company (1) Home Movie Theater Company Las Vegas (1) Home Theater (8) LED Lighting (1) LED Lighting Las Vegas NV (1) Motorized Blinds (1) Motorized Blinds Summerlin NV (1) Network & WiFi (3) News and Events (24) Outdoor Audio Video (2) Outdoor Audio Video Henderson NV (1) Outdoor Audio Video Summerlin, NV (1) Outdoor Sound System (1) Outdoor Sound System Las Vegas NV (1) Promos & Deals (3) Restaurant AV (1) Restaurant AV Las Vegas NV (1) Restaurant Bar Sound System (1) Restaurant Bar Sound System Las Vegas NV (1) Restaurant Surveillance System (1) Restaurant Surveillance System Las Vegas NV (1) Security Camera Company (1) Security Camera Company Las Vegas NV (1) Smart Climate Control (1) Smart Climate Control Henderson NV (1) Smart Climate Control System (1) Smart Climate Control System Las Vegas NV (1) Smart Home Automation (13) Smart Home Company (1) Smart Home Company, Henderson NV (1) Smart Lighting Control (1) Smart Lighting Control, Summerlin NV (1) Speaker Store (1) Speaker Store Las Vegas NV (1) Surveillance & Security (3) TV Retailers (1) TV Retailers, Las Vegas, NV (1) TV Store (4) TV Store Henderson NV (1) TV Store Las Vegas NV (2) TV Store Summerlin NV (1) Whole Home Audio (1) Whole Home Audio Summerlin NV (1)
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • nv
  • 54
  • 24
  • home
  • 37
  • 24
  • vega nv
  • 28
  • 24
  • la vega
  • 19
  • 24
  • system
  • 19
  • 24
  • vega
  • 19
  • 24
  • subwoofer
  • 18
  • 24
  • smart
  • 17
  • 24
  • company
  • 17
  • 24
  • la
  • 17
  • 24
  • theater
  • 16
  • 24
  • home theater
  • 15
  • 24
  • la vega nv
  • 14
  • 24
  • summerlin nv
  • 14
  • 24
  • sound
  • 14
  • 24
  • tv
  • 13
  • 24
  • speaker
  • 13
  • 24
  • henderson nv
  • 12
  • 24
  • restaurant
  • 12
  • 24
  • control
  • 12
  • 24
  • room
  • 11
  • 24
  • bass
  • 10
  • 24
  • tv store
  • 9
  • 24
  • outdoor
  • 9
  • 24
  • security
  • 9
  • 24
  • audio
  • 9
  • 24
  • smart climate
  • 8
  • 24
  • store
  • 8
  • 24
  • automation
  • 8
  • 24
  • lighting
  • 8
  • 24
  • home audio
  • 7
  • 24
  • sound system
  • 7
  • 24
  • surveillance
  • 7
  • 24
  • summerlin
  • 7
  • 24
  • system la vega
  • 6
  • 24
  • dedicated home
  • 6
  • 24
  • surveillance system
  • 6
  • 24
  • home automation
  • 6
  • 24
  • lighting control
  • 6
  • 24
  • room resonance
  • 6
  • 24
  • system la
  • 6
  • 24
  • av
  • 6
  • 24
  • camera
  • 6
  • 24
  • resonance
  • 6
  • 24
  • henderson
  • 6
  • 24
  • nv home
  • 5
  • 24
  • outdoor audio
  • 5
  • 24
  • smart home
  • 5
  • 24
  • commercial
  • 5
  • 24
  • climate control
  • 5
  • 24
  • company la vega
  • 4
  • 24
  • nv smart
  • 4
  • 24
  • smart climate control
  • 4
  • 24
  • theater company
  • 4
  • 24
  • automation company
  • 4
  • 24
  • audio video
  • 4
  • 24
  • company la
  • 4
  • 24
  • place
  • 4
  • 24
  • climate
  • 4
  • 24
  • commercial automation
  • 3
  • 24
  • dedicated home theater
  • 3
  • 24
  • home automation company
  • 3
  • 24
  • led lighting
  • 3
  • 24
  • motorized blind
  • 3
  • 24
  • outdoor audio video
  • 3
  • 24
  • restaurant av
  • 3
  • 24
  • speaker store
  • 3
  • 24
  • tv retailer
  • 3
  • 24
  • nv tv
  • 3
  • 24
  • dedicated
  • 3
  • 24
Result 25
TitleSubwoofer sound is low
Urlhttps://www.samsung.com/us/support/troubleshooting/TSG01109875/
DescriptionThe subwoofer is responsible for low frequency sounds, like the rumbles of an explosion in an action movie. Its job is to add to the sounds from the front, left, and right speakers, so you may not always hear sound from it
Date
Organic Position24
H1Subwoofer sound is low
H2Remove a Product
Privacy Policy
Check Preferences
What are you looking for?
Contact Samsung Support
H3You Are About To Be Redirected To Investor Relations Information for U.S
Redirect Notification
H2WithAnchorsRemove a Product
Privacy Policy
Check Preferences
What are you looking for?
Contact Samsung Support
BodySubwoofer sound is low The subwoofer is responsible for low frequency sounds, like the rumbles of an explosion in an action movie or the bass guitar and drum in your favorite music. It adds rich bass tones and deepens the sound quality you hear. However, since the subwoofer only plays low tones, it will stay silent when low frequency sounds are not in use. Related Content No sound from the home theater system If you are not hearing any sound from your Home Theater System, it can ruin movie night. Depending on which speakers you are not hearing sound from, there may be an issue, or the fact that you aren't hearing sound may be due to the settings you're using. There may also be a loose connection to correct. Home theater system shuts down automatically or displays "Protection" Your home theater system has built in overheating protection. If it gets too hot, it will shut itself down to prevent itself from melting. If it is turning off without shutting itself down first, there could be an issue with the power supply from the wall outlet. Samsung TV has low or no audio As beautiful as the image on your screen is, sound still remains an important function, or you won't get the full experience of your favorite show or movie. Fortunately, as frustrating as sound dropout can be, your TV is rarely the reason for it. Your TV comes with a Sound Test to start with, and after that you can check ports and connections on yo Samsung TV has low audio when watching movies A common complaint when watching movies is that the sound is too low or the dialog is too hard to hear. This is because movies are recorded at a lower volume than normal TV. These tips can help make it easier to hear everything that is going on. Samsung TV is not outputting 5.1 audio through the optical output The optical audio output on the TV is capable of outputting 5.1 audio but only when the TV is decoding the audio signal. Our guide will help you determine when 5.1 will be available and with what audio cables. Share Video Thank you for your feedback! We're here for you Contact Samsung Support. Contact us online through chat and get support from an expert on your computer, mobile device or tablet. Support is also available on your mobile device through the Samsung Members App. Get support Contact tap here to text SMSCARE to 62913 for 24/7 live support Message Us Message Us start an online chat with Samsung 1-800-SAMSUNG 8 AM - 12 AM EST 7 days a week IT/ Computing - 8 AM to 9 PM EST Mon to Fri Order Help Samsung Promotions Call Us Want help right away? Email as a contact option was discontinued as of April 3rd, 2019. Please contact us via Live Chat for a faster response. Give us a call 1-800-SAMSUNG (1-800-726-7864) Mobile Support 8 AM - 12 AM EST 7 days a week Home Electronics & Appliance Support 8 AM - 12 AM EST M-F 9 AM - 6 PM EST Sat, Closed Sunday IT/Computing Support 8 AM - 9 PM EST, Mon - Fri Closed Sat-Sun Order Support Order Help televisions-home-theater|home-theater|sound-bars Fast, easy checkout with Shop Samsung App Easy sign-in, Samsung Pay, notifications, and more! Get the app Or continue shopping on Samsung.com × The Shop Samsung app Free standard shipping, exclusive offers and financing options. GET × The Shop Samsung app Free standard shipping, exclusive offers and financing options. GET × You Are About To Be Redirected To Investor Relations Information for U.S. Thank you for visiting Samsung U.S. Investor Relations. You will be redirected via a new browser window to the Samsung Global website for U.S. investor relations information. CANCELCONTINUE × Redirect Notification. As of Nov. 1, 2017, the Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. printer business and its related affiliates were transferred to HP Inc. For more information, please visit HP's website: http://www.hp.com/go/samsung * For Samsung Supplies information go to: www.hp.com/go/samsungsupplies * For S.T.A.R. Program cartridge return & recycling go to: www.hp.com/go/suppliesrecycling * For Samsung printer support or service go to: www.hp.com/support/samsung Select CONTINUE to visit HP's website. CANCELCONTINUE Go to site Need Help? Chat Now
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • samsung
  • 22
  • 25
  • support
  • 14
  • 25
  • sound
  • 13
  • 25
  • est
  • 10
  • 25
  • 12 est
  • 9
  • 25
  • pm
  • 9
  • 25
  • tv
  • 8
  • 25
  • low
  • 7
  • 25
  • home
  • 7
  • 25
  • audio
  • 7
  • 25
  • pm est
  • 6
  • 25
  • home theater
  • 6
  • 25
  • 800
  • 6
  • 25
  • 12
  • 6
  • 25
  • movie
  • 6
  • 25
  • theater
  • 6
  • 25
  • contact
  • 5
  • 25
  • app
  • 5
  • 25
  • home theater system
  • 4
  • 25
  • 800 samsung
  • 4
  • 25
  • theater system
  • 4
  • 25
  • system
  • 4
  • 25
  • chat
  • 4
  • 25
  • information
  • 4
  • 25
  • shop samsung app
  • 3
  • 25
  • hearing sound
  • 3
  • 25
  • samsung tv
  • 3
  • 25
  • 51 audio
  • 3
  • 25
  • shop samsung
  • 3
  • 25
  • samsung app
  • 3
  • 25
  • investor relation
  • 3
  • 25
  • subwoofer
  • 3
  • 25
  • hear
  • 3
  • 25
  • hearing
  • 3
  • 25
  • 51
  • 3
  • 25
  • mobile
  • 3
  • 25
  • order
  • 3
  • 25
  • option
  • 3
  • 25
  • shop
  • 3
  • 25
  • investor
  • 3
  • 25
  • relation
  • 3
  • 25
  • website
  • 3
  • 25
  • hp
  • 3
  • 25
Result 26
TitleDo I Need A Subwoofer?
Urlhttps://www.bravoav.com/post/do-i-need-a-subwoofer
DescriptionDo you need a Subwoofer? Yes! And here is why-
Date6 Sept 2020
Organic Position25
H1Do I Need A Subwoofer?
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyDo I Need A Subwoofer?Updated: Sep 6, 2020Complete Illustrated Guide to Subwoofers Introduction Having the right subwoofer makes a real difference in the quality of your home theater experience or multi-room audio experience. You need a subwoofer in your system to faithfully reproduce the low frequencies of your music or movie soundtrack. The experts at Bravo AV will help you choose the right subwoofer for your application. We offer a selection from the finest brands and have solutions in all shapes, sizes and formats. Start here for everything Home Audio. What is a subwoofer? A subwoofer is a speaker that is specifically designed to reproduce low frequency sounds and is responsible for truly immersing yourself in a movie or concert. Most modern subwoofers include a specialized amplifier. This amplifier can be built into the enclosure of the subwoofer, or it can be a separate unit. The beautiful and powerful JL Fathom F112What is a Subwoofer? What is bass? Bass notes are those that cover the lowest frequencies of the audio spectrum, typically, 20 to 160 Hz. We describe frequency in units called “Hertz,” which represent the number of cycles per second of the sound. The complete range of frequencies humans can hear is generally defined from 20 to 20,000 Hz. The lower frequency range, from 20 to 160 Hz is the “bass” range. The highest frequency range, from 2,500 to 20,000 Hz, is called the “treble” range. That leaves the middle section, between 160 and 2,500 Hz, which we call the “mid-range. There are a surprising number of instruments that generate low frequency: drums, standup bass, cello and harp, bass guitar, organ, the low end of a piano, bass and baritone singers, and, of course, the explosions experienced in a movie. Bass is often described as the sound that you feel as well as hear—the powerful vibrations that physically shake you in your seat. Conventional speakers, be they 2-way or 3-way, typically take care of higher- and mid-range frequencies as well as a certain amount of bass. Subwoofers are designed to take on the task of handling the deep, detailed and rich bass that most loudspeakers struggle with. Do I need a subwoofer? You absolutely need a subwoofer in your Home Theater or Media room as the sound track has a Low Frequency Effects (LFE) output that sends information to the subwoofer. If you do not have a subwoofer your sound track will be very thin and lack emotional impact.  We recommend two subwoofers in HT Speakers in key rooms in your home’s multi-room audio system will benefit greatly from a subwoofer. The subs can be in-ceiling or in-wall. What size subwoofer do I need? Generally speaking, the larger the surface area of the woofer, the deeper it will play. Woofers come with drivers that range in size from 6 to 15 inches. While it may not seem like a big difference to go from a 10-inch driver to a 12-inch driver, doing so actually gives you a driver that is 44 percent bigger—a significant difference. JL Audio has four families of subwoofers. Listed below in increasing quality, they are:Dominion: 8-inch or 10-inch driversE-Sub: 10-inch or 12-inch driversFathom: 12-inch or 13.5-inch driversGotham: 5-inch drivers JL Audio also offers fantastic in-wall (IW) and in-ceiling (IC) subwoofer systems.Fathom IWS-108 and ICS-108: 8-inch driverFathom IWS-208 and ICS-208: Dual 8-inch drivers, each in its own cabinetFathom IWS-113: 13.5-inch driverFathom IWS-213: Dual 13.5-inch drivers, each in its own cabinetHome theater Two 12-inch subs are our minimum recommendation for home theaters. By using 2 to 4 subs we can get better distribution or bass energy in a theater. Multi-room applications One sub is usually enough. Bigger rooms require bigger subwoofers. How much power does my amplifier need? The spec to pay attention to is the sub's continuous power, or RMS rating. You will also see a "peak power" rating listed on many powered subs. Peak power is what the amp can deliver for short bursts.  RMS is a better number to make comparisons with. Home theater 1000 watts RMS Multi-room applications 500 watts RMS Good bass vs. just a lot of bass [Quantity vs. Quality] Based on the above two paragraphs, if money were no object, you would think, “OK, I will get the biggest driver size and the most powerful magnet.” However, power without control is useless. It is critical that the amplifier maintain precise control of the driver and that the drive cone does not flex when in operation.  There are moments in movies that might require a lot of bass output (quantity), and it is important that the subwoofer system can handle these passages comfortably. Bass quality, on the other hand, is important at any listening level with any type of program material. Many people equate subwoofers with the thump-thump they hear from other cars at stoplights. This is bad bass. Volume at the expense of quality. At Bravo AV we never sacrifice quality for volume. At Bravo AV we make sure that the bass energy dovetails with the rest of the musical spectrum so that it presents as a well-integrated whole. The goal with any speaker system is to accurately recreate all frequencies in the original recording. Well-reproduced bass it critical to letting music have its greatest emotional impact on the listener. The paradox of having a good subwoofer is that the difference it makes should be discreet, not glaringly obvious. The harmonious blending of all the speakers in a surround sound system is accomplished when Bravo AV acoustically tunes the room. Where can your sub go? Power: All subs need AC power. For an in-room unit the power needs to be by the sub location. For in-ceiling or in-wall subs you need power by the subwoofer’s separate amp, which is typically located with the other AV equipment. Subwoofers can be located: In-room as a free-standing cube on the floorIn-ceilingIn-wallWe don’t recommend locating subs inside a piece of furniture as the power generated by the sub can shake items in the cabinet. Characteristics of a subwooferType: In-room or freestanding, in-wall or in-ceiling. See, “Where can your sub go?”Construction [Enclosure Type]: There are two main types of subwoofer enclosures: sealed and ported. With sealed enclosures (also known as acoustic suspension) air does not move in or out. Ported boxes (or bass reflex enclosures) have a built-in air vent that helps reinforce low bass output. Both design types can sound good. At Bravo AV we prefer JL Audio’s sealed design coupled with a powerful amplifier.Power: As mentioned above we like at least 500 watts for a multi-room audio application and 1000 watts for a home theater application.Cabinet construction: You want a very well-made sturdy cabinet that is well braced to avoid any cabinet resonance.Dimensions and weight: For in-room sub placement you need to pay attention to its dimensions.  A 10-inch sub will be approximately 16 inches tall, 16 inches wide, and 18 inches deep.  A well-built sub is going to weigh a lot. For instance, the JL Fathom F112v2 weighs 115 pounds.Drive (cone) size: Minimum 8 inchesDSP and other controls: Home theater and high-performance media rooms need subs that have DSP capability and can be tuned to the room in which they will be used. These features are generally included in premium subwoofer models like the JL Audio Fathom v2 lineup and the Gotham v2.Frequency response: Typically, 20 to 200 Hz. Be very careful to look at the dB variance they are quoting. It should be no more than + or – 3dB.Wireless option: Wireless kits are available. But at Bravo AV we prefer a wired solution. An exploded diagram of what goes into a JL subwooferWhat Is Inside a Subwoofer and how does it work? Absolute Sound Magazine – The Competitive Landscape An article recently published in Absolute Sound magazine, “A Short Guide to Subwoofer Features & Specifications,” looked at subwoofer offerings from 31 manufacturers. The publication gathers data on 141 subwoofers. Bravo AV looked at every offering in relation to the JL Fathom F1112 v2, which—while not the most powerful in the JL Audio line—at 1800 watts, is one of our favorites. There were 11 subwoofers that were more powerful, but none at the same price as the JL. In fact, the most expensive subwoofer was 35 times more costly! About JL Audio and JL Awards JL Audio is an independent, privately held U.S. company active in the home, mobile, powersports and marine audio markets. JL Audio focuses on delivering unique engineering, superior quality, and high-performance audio to its customers around the world. Behind the company’s efforts is a strong belief that great audio has real value, and that customers can tell the difference. Founded by long-time friends Jim Birch and Lucio Proni in 1975, JL Audio has grown over the years into a global brand with headquarters in a 200,000 square foot facility in Miramar, Florida, and engineering facilities in Phoenix, Arizona, and Portland, Oregon. JL Audio home subwoofers have been awarded the highest honors from the audio press, including: Class A – Recommended Component from Stereophile Editors’ Choice from The Absolute Sound Golden Ear Award from The Absolute Sound Product of the Year from Home Theater and SoundFor additional resources, please visit our page on Home Audio with articles like this on everything you need to know about speakers and surround sound. Additionally, you can check out our photo gallery on the same page to explore our previous work. Bravo AV is proud to be an HTA (Home Technology Association) Certified Installation Firm and professional A/V experts. Tom Curnin, the owner of Bravo AV, is a CEDIA Professional Designer, a certified THX Level 1 home theater professional and a member of the Home Acoustic Alliance trained to Level II. You can contact Tom directly at (908) 953-0555 or through email at [email protected] Audio0 viewsPost not marked as liked80 Morristown Rd. Bernardsville, NJ 07924   |  Mon. - Fri. 9am - 6pm or by appointmentCall Today (908) 953-0555 
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 35
  • 26
  • inch
  • 23
  • 26
  • audio
  • 21
  • 26
  • bass
  • 19
  • 26
  • home
  • 17
  • 26
  • room
  • 17
  • 26
  • jl
  • 16
  • 26
  • sub
  • 13
  • 26
  • theater
  • 12
  • 26
  • sound
  • 12
  • 26
  • jl audio
  • 11
  • 26
  • power
  • 11
  • 26
  • frequency
  • 11
  • 26
  • av
  • 11
  • 26
  • home theater
  • 10
  • 26
  • bravo av
  • 9
  • 26
  • powerful
  • 9
  • 26
  • bravo
  • 9
  • 26
  • driver
  • 9
  • 26
  • ceiling
  • 8
  • 26
  • speaker
  • 8
  • 26
  • range
  • 8
  • 26
  • inch driver
  • 7
  • 26
  • quality
  • 7
  • 26
  • multi room
  • 6
  • 26
  • wall
  • 6
  • 26
  • multi
  • 6
  • 26
  • iw
  • 6
  • 26
  • low
  • 6
  • 26
  • hz
  • 6
  • 26
  • difference
  • 5
  • 26
  • system
  • 5
  • 26
  • enclosure
  • 5
  • 26
  • watt
  • 5
  • 26
  • low frequency
  • 4
  • 26
  • 10 inch
  • 4
  • 26
  • 12 inch
  • 4
  • 26
  • absolute sound
  • 4
  • 26
  • rm
  • 4
  • 26
  • type
  • 4
  • 26
  • absolute
  • 4
  • 26
  • multi room audio
  • 3
  • 26
  • room audio
  • 3
  • 26
  • jl fathom
  • 3
  • 26
  • 135 inch
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
TitleHow to Configure Your PA System | PreSonus
Urlhttps://www.presonus.com/learn/technical-articles/configure-your-pa
Description
Date
Organic Position26
H1How to Configure Your PA System
H2Recognizing Problem Rooms
Area Coverage
Distributed Delay Systems
Adding a Subwoofer (or Two)
Setting the Crossover
Sub Alignment
Subwoofer Arrays
System Configuration Suggestions
Stage Monitor Systems
Calibrating Full-Range Systems
Ringing Out Monitors
H3Calibrating Using a “Standard” Reference
H2WithAnchorsRecognizing Problem Rooms
Area Coverage
Distributed Delay Systems
Adding a Subwoofer (or Two)
Setting the Crossover
Sub Alignment
Subwoofer Arrays
System Configuration Suggestions
Stage Monitor Systems
Calibrating Full-Range Systems
Ringing Out Monitors
BodyHow to Configure Your PA System Learn with PreSonus How to Configure Your PA System Learn with PreSonus The performance of any loudspeaker will be influenced by the acoustics of the space in which they operate. Difficult room acoustics, combined with improper loudspeaker placement, can interfere with achieving the fidelity of which your loudspeakers are capable. Understanding how a room interacts with audio will help you to get the most out of your system. Recognizing Problem Rooms. In most live environments, the room is rarely designed to maximize the listening experience. For large-scale tour productions, venues are often sports arenas that have been designed to maximize crowd noise. Smaller music venues are often chosen for location or architectural aesthetics, rather than music reproduction. It’s necessary to recognize and correct what that space does to the sound system in order to optimize the P.A.’s performance in the venue. In general, the following physical features of a room can affect a sound system’s performance: Size. The size of the room directly impacts how well certain frequencies will be reproduced. This may seem odd until you think about the physical length of audio waves at various frequencies. When a room’s width or length correlates directly to the length of a waveform at a specific frequency, a standing wave can occur where the initial sound and the reflected sound begin to reinforce each other. Let’s say we have a long, narrow room where the distance from one side to the other is 22.6 feet. A 50 Hz wave is also about 22.6 feet long. (To calculate how long an audio wave is, divide the speed of sound—1,130 ft./second—by the frequency. For a 50 Hz wave, 1,130/50 = 22.6 ft.) When a 50 Hz wave bounces off the wall, the reflective wave travels right back along the same path and bounces off the other wall, and the cycle repeats. In a room such as this, 50 Hz reproduces very well—maybe too well. So any audio in that room will have a heavy low end because the low frequencies are being exaggerated by the room acoustics and you’re likely to have for compensate for them, either in your mix or by using a system EQ. Construction. Low-frequency waves can be powerful enough to cause the walls, ceiling, and even the floor, to flex and move. This is called “diaphragmatic action,” and it dissipates energy and strips away the low-end definition. So if your room’s walls and floor are made of solid brick and concrete that don’t vibrate much, the bass response is going to be much more powerful than if you’re in a room where the walls are normal sheet rock construction and the floors are hardwood. Reflectivity. Another way a room interacts with sound waves is through reflectivity. Like most room anomalies, reflections can be good and bad. Consider the effect of a cathedral’s reflections on a choir or a piano. This type of reverberation (reverb) is quite desirable for recording and acoustic listening but not for loudspeakers reproducing audio at normal stage volumes. If a speaker is placed near a reflective surface (such as a brick wall or window), the direct sound coming from the speaker and the reflected sound coming from the wall can arrive at the listener’s ears out of phase with each other, causing cancellation and/or reinforcement. If you are setting up your loudspeakers in a reverberant space, position your speakers so that as much sound as possible is focused on middle of the room and steered away from reflective surfaces. Installing acoustic treatment on the walls will also lessen the impact of reflections at your listening position. Wall and Corner Loading Very low frequencies are not directional, so they radiate from the sides and back of the loudspeaker, as well as from the front. If you place a loudspeaker against a wall, the rear sound propagates back into the room. This can increase the bass frequency output as much as 6 dB if the speaker is placed near one wall (half-space loading), 12 dB if placed near two walls (quarter-space loading), and as much as 18 dB if you put the loudspeaker next to the ceiling or on the floor in a corner (eighth-space loading). To have the most control over your sound, it’s best to start with the flattest response, so you normally should avoid wall and corner placement. On the other hand, if you need some extra bass boost, this technique may be worth a try. It is important to be aware of what’s happening and be prepared to take advantage of it or compensate for it. Because a floor monitor placed on the stage is unavoidably subject to half-space loading, PreSonus loudspeakers feature a “Monitor” preset. This preset is specifically designed to compensate for bass buildup while maintaining a tight mid-bass response and a clear midrange. Area Coverage. The size and shape of your room and the application for which it will be used determine, to a large extent, how many speakers you will need and where they should be placed. In every situation, keep in mind your loudspeaker’s coverage pattern. Horizontal Coverage. It is important to place loudspeakers so that there is a smooth transition from one loudspeaker’s coverage area to the next loudspeaker’s coverage area. This creates an even response throughout the listening space. Vertical Coverage. If you are using a ground stack with a pole mount, make sure your vertical coverage matches the listening plane. Suspending speakers will provide even further control. PreSonus loudspeakers feature dual-position pole mounts. Using the downward tilt mount will focus the loudspeaker’s energy onto the audience and avoid destructive reflections. This is ideal for situations where the loudspeaker is mounted atop a tripod stand and placed on a stage, or where the pole-mounted loudspeaker is on the floor and the coverage area is relatively shallow (conference, coffee house, etc.). A Quick Note on Stage Monitoring: When used as a floor monitor, a loudspeaker’s coverage pattern will reverse (that is, horizontal coverage becomes vertical coverage and vice versa). In most cases, this new pattern offers benefits. For example, when laid down as a floor monitor, a PreSonus ULT12 has a 50˚ (H) x 110˚ (V) coverage pattern. As the dispersion narrows to 50˚ in the horizontal, the floor monitor’s energy is focused to a relatively limited area that won’t bleed over into either side, creating listening zones and better clarity. The 110˚ dispersion in the vertical allows the performer the freedom to move forward and back within their zone. For instance, a singer can stand directly on top of their floor monitor to reach out to the audience and hear their mix as well as they can when they back up to the front of the drum kit to jump off the bass drum. Some loudspeakers, such as the PreSonus ULT-series, allow you to rotate the horn so that the dispersion pattern is the same in both vertical and horizontal orientations. In general, this feature should be reserved for horizontal mains use, not for floor monitoring. Distributed Delay Systems. In most situations, a PA system relies on a main speaker system, positioned at the front of the room, to reproduce audio for the entire performance space. As a result, the level of the system is considerably louder at the front of the room than it is at the mix position. In situations where sound must be reproduced outside of the main system’s optimum range, well-placed delay systems can extend the intelligibility of the front-of-house system. By creating listening zones throughout the room, your front-of-house system only needs to be loud enough to cover the front of the room. As a result, you can lower the mains level, give the front-row listeners’ ears a break, and get better fidelity from your speakers. The goal of distributed sound is for the people in the back row have the same listening experience as the people in the front, but it isn’t as easy as just putting up an extra pair of speakers. Since electricity travels much faster than sound, listeners in the rear of the room will hear the sound coming from the nearest set of speakers before they hear the sound from stage. This dampens the attack and intelligibility of the sound, creating an unpleasant phasing effect. In large venues, this can actually sound like a short echo. To create a delay sound system, you need to delay the signal going to the additional speakers. For example, since sound travels at about 1,130 feet per second (with some variation due to temperature, humidity, and elevation), it takes about 45 ms for sound to travel 50 feet. So if you put your delay speakers 50 feet away from the Front-of-House system, you need to delay the signal going to the satellite system by 45 ms. To calculate the delay, divide the distance measured in feet by 1.13. Once you have positioned and delayed your satellite system, use an SPL meter to match the output of the main and delay systems at the measurement point. For example, if you are standing 30 feet from the left side of the main system and 10 feet from the left side of the delay system, and the output of the main system is 85 dB, then the output of the delay system should also be 85 dB. It should be noted that frequencies in the sub-bass range of a delay system do not require distribution. In fact, a delay system’s highpass filter should be rolled up as high as 300 to 400 Hz to avoid sound going back toward the stage as low frequencies become omnidirectional. There are standalone speaker processors that provide output delays to configure distributed delay systems. Also, some digital mixers, like the PreSonus StudioLive series, offer delay on some or all outputs for precisely this purpose. Delay systems should be placed where the main system’s intelligibility falls apart as it is overcome by environmental obstacles: Inside. Indoors, you are trying to overcome the direct-to-reverberant reflections. Your goal is to find where the direct signal-to-reverberation ratio has reached about 50/50. At this point, the reflections in the room are at an equal level to the direct sound of the P.A., and vocal intelligibility is lost. Outside. Outdoors, you are trying to maintain level as the noise floor of the crowd begins to be at equal level to the P.A. in the intelligibility range. At this point, the main system needs more support in order to deliver the same perceived loudness as you get further from the source. Adding a Subwoofer (or Two). Adding a subwoofer to your sound system allows it to run more efficiently because the low-frequency content is reproduced by the subwoofer instead of the full-range system. This section will guide you through the steps necessary to add a subwoofer so that you get the most out of your investment. Most subwoofers, including those made by PreSonus, provide throughputs to connect satellite full-range systems. However, in a large venue, it’s recommended that you run your subwoofers on an output separate from your main front-of-house full-range loudspeakers. A post-fader aux mix output is ideally suited for this as it provides independent level control over the subwoofer system and greater flexibility over the bass content in your mix, while still following the main mix mutes. Creating an aux mix for your subwoofer system is just like creating an aux mix for a floor monitor only instead of creating a mix for a musician, you will be creating a mix using instruments that provide sub-energy content. Another advantage of using an aux mix is that if, for example, you want the kick drum to punch louder in the subwoofer, you can raise its level in the subwoofer only. It is also recommended that you run your subwoofer system in mono, even if your full-range system is in stereo. For information on creating an aux-fed subwoofer mix, please review this article. Setting the Crossover . When adding a subwoofer to your full-range system, you will also need a crossover. This external device provides a highpass filter for full-range loudspeakers to remove audio content below a specified frequency, as well as a lowpass filter for subwoofers that removes audio content above a specified frequency. Depending on the system, leaving a frequency content overlap between 60 to 120 Hz in your full-range loudspeakers and subwoofer can introduce destructive cancellation and reinforcement. Using a crossover will eliminate this frequency overlap and help you to create a more seamless transition with your subwoofer. Most external crossovers are fully variable, allowing you to create a smooth transition from your subwoofer system into your full-range system. Many full-range loudspeakers, including PreSonus StudioLive AI-series and ULT-series loudspeakers, help to mitigate this issue by including a 100 Hz highpass filter. Some subwoofers, like the PreSonus ULT18, AIR15s, and AIR18s, are equipped with a variable lowpass filter, allowing you to dial in the best crossover point for your system. In this way, you can set the upper end of your subwoofer at the lowest frequency point that your full-range system can reliably reproduce. PreSonus AIR-series subwoofers make this even easier by providing lowpass filter presets optimized for each AIR-series full-range speaker. For example, if you are using an AIR15s subwoofer with an AIR10 full-range speaker, enabling the AIR10 lowpass filter preset will correctly set the AIR15s lowpass filter for use with the AIR10. To set the crossover transition between your subwoofers and your full-range system: Set the subwoofer’s lowpass filter to its highest cutoff frequency. This will create an overlap between your subwoofers and your full-range system’s frequency response. Play program music with a lot of bass through your full system. Experiment with the polarity setting on your subwoofer to see which position provides the best bass response. Leave the polarity in the position that provided the loudest bass response. This means that your subwoofer is in phase with your full-range speaker. From this point, you can experiment with the lowpass and highpass filter settings until you find the one that provides the smoothest crossover transition. Again, your subwoofer should naturally extend the low-frequency response of your full-range system. You should not hear any frequency boosts or cuts. Once your crossover network is properly calibrated, listen to a wide variety of your favorite music and make any final adjustments. At the end of the day, your ears are the best tools you have. Sub Alignment. When your subwoofer and your full-range loudspeaker are placed some distance apart, low-frequency cancellation or reinforcement can occur when the same frequencies are reproduced by both systems. Using an alignment delay on your subwoofer system will compensate for this. To set the correct delay for a custom installation, you will need to do some calculating: Find the spot in the room where coverage from the main speakers and the subwoofers overlap. Measure the distance in feet from the overlap area to each speaker location. Subtract the smaller distance (the distance to the subwoofer) from the larger distance (the distance to the full-range loudspeaker). Divide that number by 1.13 and apply that delay value to the subwoofer. Keep in mind that the overlap area may be behind front-of-house. Even for mobile applications, where the subwoofer is relatively close to the full-range loudspeakers, aligning the subwoofer to its full-range companion will yield tighter bass response. Both PreSonus AIR-series and CDL18s subwoofers feature a variable alignment delay to guarantee that your three- and four-way systems stay in alignment. Sub-pole Mounted. When your full-range speaker is mounted directly atop your subwoofer, no delay is necessary. Tripod Mounted. When the subwoofer is about three feet from the full-range loudspeaker—a typical distance when the loudspeaker is on an adjacent tripod stand— delay your subwoofer by 2.7 ms. Full-range Onstage. When the full-range loudspeaker is on stage and the subwoofer is on the floor, the typical distance is around six feet. Delay your subwoofer by 5.3 ms. Subwoofer Arrays. Most subwoofers are essentially omnidirectional. This means that they radiate sound around the entire cabinet, including on the stage. In addition to causing feedback onstage, subwoofer energy can make monitoring more difficult because it overwhelms the frequency content performers need to hear. When two subwoofers are arranged on each side of the stage, there can be a build-up of energy, resulting in a “power alley,” as energy from each subwoofer arrives at the same time and in phase with one another, summing together. Unfortunately, moving left or right of this center summation, one will find cancellation alleys. Creating a cardioid subwoofer array forms a more directional radiation pattern that keeps energy off of the stage and in the audience, where it is needed. Ground-stacked Cardioid Array. For smaller spaces, creating a ground-stacked cardioid array is an easy way to focus the subwoofer onto the audience. This type of array is created by stacking two subwoofers, one on top of the other, with the top subwoofer facing away from the audience and toward the stage. You will need to polarity-invert the cabinet that faces away from the audience and delay it by the depth of the subwoofer. The AIR15s, and AIR18s subwoofers make this easy by providing presets to create a ground-stacked cardioid array. Once configured, your two subwoofers will radiate in a directional cardioid pattern, allowing you greater steering control over low-frequency energy. Endfire Cardioid Array. An end-fire array is created when subwoofers are placed in a row so that they are driving sound along the same axis. This focuses the sound in the direction the front speaker is facing. End-fire cardioid subwoofer arrays provide approximately 20 dB more cancellation behind the array than a ground-stacked array, so they will direct the most subwoofer energy away from stage. End-fire arrays can be very tricky to create, because each subwoofer requires its own delay but must use the same polarity as the other subwoofers in the array. Both the AIR15s and AIR18s make this quick and easy by providing a preset. The CDL18s provides all the tools necessary to create an end-fire array with two or more subwoofers. If you delay your subwoofer array relative to your full-range systems, be sure to set the same relative delay time on every subwoofer in the array. System Configuration Suggestions. This section describes some common system configurations. The size and shape of your room as well as your application will determine how many speakers you will need and where they should be placed. In any front-of-house situation, it’s important to ensure that the horn of your full-range loudspeaker is placed so that it is above the heads of your audience. In large venues, this will require suspending your loudspeakers from the ceiling or trussing. Please note: Suspending loudspeakers should only be done by a licensed and insured professional who can ensure that all safety precautions and building codes are followed. Stereo System. A stereo system allows panning and adds depth to the acoustic image. Because of this, it greatly enhances live or pre-recorded music. Locate speakers to give the best horizontal coverage. This will ensure that the listeners are well covered by the pattern. Mono Cluster with Down Fill. Center or mono systems can provide a simple, economical solution for venues where speech intelligibility is the priority, rather than music. As with a stereo system, make sure the coverage pattern of the speaker focuses the energy on the audience. The graphic below, shows two speakers. The upper speaker is throwing to the back of the room, and the lower speaker covers the space in the front of the room, closest to the stage. LCR Systems. An LCR system is a stereo system with a center speaker added. This configuration allows panning and adds depth to the acoustic image. This type of system will provide more control than a basic stereo system and is ideal in situations where music and speech intelligibility are equally important. Distributed Delay System. The goal in a complicated system with loudspeakers distributed throughout the venue is to delay each satellite system relative to its counterpart in the main system (e.g., the left front fill to the left FOH loudspeaker). Delay the main system relative to the source on stage. On small stages where the guitar amp and drum kit can be clearly heard above the FOH loudspeaker system, delaying the main system can “move up” the backline so that it aligns with these instruments and decreases blurring in the mix. This will tighten the overall mix and give it more punch. Delay the front fills relative to the main system by delaying each side of the system independently (e.g., delay the left front fill relative to the left FOH loudspeaker). Delay subwoofers relative to the main system. How you do this will depend on how your subwoofer system is positioned and configured. In general, you will want to delay each subwoofer relative to the full-range loudspeaker closest to it. Delay down-fill speakers (upper and under balcony) relative to the main system, again delaying each side of the system independently. Stage Monitor Systems . Below are two examples of typical stage-monitor layouts. For musicians (such as a vocalist) who don’t require a lot of low-frequency energy in their floor wedge, we suggest using a 10” or 12” loudspeaker. On larger stages, stereo monitors will provide better clarity at a lower volume. For musicians that need a little more bass, a 15” loudspeaker may be preferable. For the drum monitor on a large stage, it is useful to use a full-range, 3-way system (15” loudspeaker atop a subwoofer). For smaller stages, a 15” loudspeaker atop a low tripod or in the horizontal floor-wedge position will be more than adequate. _____________ Calibrating Full-Range Systems. After you have positioned your loudspeakers, it is helpful to set all the levels in the P.A. system so that every component is optimized. While not essential, taking the time to properly calibrate your speakers will give you a great starting point to both troubleshoot and fine-tune your listening environment. Speaker calibration ensures that a specific metered signal level on your mixer equals a predetermined SPL at front-of-house. Depending upon the method and reference levels used during calibration, proper calibration can help reduce unwanted noise, minimize the risk of damage to loudspeakers and to your ears, and ensure you hear the audio as accurately as possible. There are many methods for calibrating a loudspeaker system. The important thing is not the way you calibrate your environment but that your environment has been calibrated—even if you only use your ears, common sense, and your favorite recording. You should calibrate the right and left loudspeakers independently to ensure that both are set to the same acoustic level. This will ensure that your speakers are balanced and that the audience will have the same listening experience wherever they are in the venue. Calibrating Using a “Standard” Reference. Standard reference calibration is one of the most common calibration methods because it is the least subjective. The goal of this method is to ensure that when the output meters on the mixer register 0 dB, the SPL in the audience is a specified decibel level. This level will vary depending on your application: Acoustic (folk, spoken word, etc.): 75 to 90 dB Jazz: 80 to 95 dB Classical: 100 dB Modern house of worship: 90 to 95 dB Electric (rock, country, R&B): 95 to 110 dB This section will take you through the basics of standard-reference calibration. Calibrating speakers requires both an SPL meter and pink noise. Both signal noise generator and SPL meter apps are available for iOS® and Android™, many for free. Connect the main outputs of your mixer to your loudspeakers. Set the level on your loudspeakers to their lowest setting. Set the main mix level on your mixer to the lowest setting. Note: If you have any outboard processors (EQs, limiter, etc.) connected between the mixer and your loudspeakers, disconnect or bypass them. If your mixer has onboard processing, make sure that it is zeroed out or bypassed. Play 20 Hz to 20 kHz full-bandwidth pink noise at 0 dB through the main outputs of your mixer. Turn up the main mix to unity gain. Unity gain is the setting at which the signal level is neither boosted nor attenuated. It is usually marked by a “0” or a “U” on the mixer. You should not hear the pink noise. If you do, repeat step 2. Begin slowly increasing the volume of your left speaker until the acoustic level of the pink noise reaches 3 dB below your desired SPL in the center of the room. When both speakers play simultaneously, the overall SPL will increase by about +3 dB. Power down your left speaker. Slowly increase the volume of your right speaker until the acoustic level of the test tone playing reaches the same SPL as the level set on your left speaker. Stop the pink noise and turn your left speaker back on. Play some program music you are familiar with through your speakers and move throughout the room, making sure that your speakers sound balanced. If you are using a subwoofer, follow the same steps as above, but set the level on the subwoofer 6 dB less than the level you set on your full-range loudspeakers (that is, if you set the level on each loudspeaker to 95 dB, set the subwoofer level to 89 dB). Ringing Out Monitors . Feedback is short term for a feedback loop, where a portion of the signal from the speaker returns to the microphone, resulting in a constant tone at the offending frequency. “Ringing out” is a process of attenuating the frequencies that are feeding back to maximize gain before feedback in your floor monitors. Note: Ringing out stage monitors will produce feedback. If you are not careful, you can produce a lot of feedback. Do not make sudden gain boosts; go slowly and carefully to avoid causing damage to speakers and ears. With the mic input gain at an appropriate level, bring the aux send level up on the mic channel you wish to ring. Do not “gain up” the mic signal on the monitor mixer for the sake of getting more volume out of a stage monitor. Gain staging is very important in order to have a feedback-free show. Slowly bring the aux output level up until you hear feedback. Using a real-time analyzer (RTA) or spectrograph will allow you to see which frequency is causing the problem and use an equalizer to remove the offender from your stage monitor. If you don’t have an RTA or spectrograph, you can create a narrow notch in a parametric EQ and sweep it across the band until the feedback is removed. Stage-monitor feedback typically occurs in the higher frequencies, which also is where intelligibility comes from, so only reduce the offending frequency to just below the point of feedback. If you do not have these tools at your disposal, bring back the level on the channel send to just before the point of feedback so you don’t take out too much signal content. Maximizing your intelligibility and gain structure results in clearer-sounding monitors. When you are ringing out a system, and more than two or three feedback loops are happening simultaneously, you have reached the level where stability can no longer be achieved. Try bringing down the overall output level or find a physical solution, such as moving the speaker or microphone. Article Categories . Getting Started Guides AVB Networking Live Sound Podcasting and Live Streaming Recording Studio One StudioLive Series III Ecosystem Technical Articles Tips and Tricks Glossary   All Technical Articles LearnTechnical ArticlesHow to Configure Your PA System
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • system
  • 90
  • 27
  • subwoofer
  • 69
  • 27
  • loudspeaker
  • 57
  • 27
  • speaker
  • 43
  • 27
  • delay
  • 38
  • 27
  • range
  • 37
  • 27
  • frequency
  • 33
  • 27
  • room
  • 32
  • 27
  • full
  • 32
  • 27
  • full range
  • 31
  • 27
  • sound
  • 29
  • 27
  • level
  • 29
  • 27
  • front
  • 26
  • 27
  • db
  • 24
  • 27
  • stage
  • 24
  • 27
  • main
  • 22
  • 27
  • coverage
  • 20
  • 27
  • monitor
  • 20
  • 27
  • floor
  • 17
  • 27
  • energy
  • 16
  • 27
  • mix
  • 16
  • 27
  • set
  • 16
  • 27
  • array
  • 16
  • 27
  • wall
  • 14
  • 27
  • bass
  • 14
  • 27
  • output
  • 14
  • 27
  • main system
  • 13
  • 27
  • range loudspeaker
  • 13
  • 27
  • feedback
  • 13
  • 27
  • full range loudspeaker
  • 12
  • 27
  • delay system
  • 12
  • 27
  • range system
  • 12
  • 27
  • presonu
  • 12
  • 27
  • low
  • 12
  • 27
  • left
  • 12
  • 27
  • full range system
  • 11
  • 27
  • back
  • 11
  • 27
  • low frequency
  • 9
  • 27
  • floor monitor
  • 8
  • 27
  • front house
  • 7
  • 27
  • coverage pattern
  • 7
  • 27
  • lowpass filter
  • 7
  • 27
  • house
  • 7
  • 27
  • delay subwoofer
  • 7
  • 27
  • subwoofer full range
  • 6
  • 27
  • house system
  • 6
  • 27
  • pink noise
  • 6
  • 27
  • subwoofer full
  • 6
  • 27
  • subwoofer system
  • 6
  • 27
  • subwoofer array
  • 6
  • 27
  • stage monitor
  • 6
  • 27
  • coverage area
  • 5
  • 27
  • sound system
  • 5
  • 27
  • highpass filter
  • 5
  • 27
  • pa system
  • 5
  • 27
  • bass response
  • 5
  • 27
  • stereo system
  • 5
  • 27
  • loudspeaker coverage
  • 4
  • 27
  • full range speaker
  • 4
  • 27
  • 50 hz
  • 4
  • 27
  • space loading
  • 4
  • 27
  • front room
  • 4
  • 27
  • aux mix
  • 4
  • 27
  • transition subwoofer
  • 4
  • 27
  • range speaker
  • 4
  • 27
  • ground stacked
  • 4
  • 27
  • cardioid array
  • 4
  • 27
  • end fire
  • 4
  • 27
  • set level
  • 4
  • 27
  • left speaker
  • 4
  • 27
  • configure pa system
  • 3
  • 27
  • 50 hz wave
  • 3
  • 27
  • distributed delay system
  • 3
  • 27
  • ground stacked cardioid
  • 3
  • 27
  • stacked cardioid array
  • 3
  • 27
  • end fire array
  • 3
  • 27
  • relative main system
  • 3
  • 27
  • configure pa
  • 3
  • 27
  • listening experience
  • 3
  • 27
  • hz wave
  • 3
  • 27
  • sound coming
  • 3
  • 27
  • horizontal coverage
  • 3
  • 27
  • vertical coverage
  • 3
  • 27
  • distributed delay
  • 3
  • 27
  • system positioned
  • 3
  • 27
  • large venue
  • 3
  • 27
  • satellite system
  • 3
  • 27
  • spl meter
  • 3
  • 27
  • adding subwoofer
  • 3
  • 27
  • frequency content
  • 3
  • 27
  • main mix
  • 3
  • 27
  • creating aux
  • 3
  • 27
  • system stereo
  • 3
  • 27
  • air15 air18
  • 3
  • 27
  • system set
  • 3
  • 27
  • air series
  • 3
  • 27
  • stacked cardioid
  • 3
  • 27
  • fire array
  • 3
  • 27
  • front fill
  • 3
  • 27
  • foh loudspeaker
  • 3
  • 27
  • system delaying
  • 3
  • 27
  • relative main
  • 3
  • 27
  • 15 loudspeaker
  • 3
  • 27
  • acoustic level
  • 3
  • 27
  • standard reference
  • 3
  • 27
  • 95 db
  • 3
  • 27
Result 28
TitleWhy You Need a Subwoofer - Official Fluance® Blog
Urlhttps://blog.fluance.com/why-you-need-a-subwoofer/
DescriptionA subwoofer is the loudspeaker component used in home theater systems that produces the low bass frequencies that give music depth and richness. Without powered subwoofers, audio may come across as tinny
Date
Organic Position27
H1Why You Need a Subwoofer
H2Skip links
Main navigation
Reader Interactions
Footer
H3Leave a Reply Cancel reply
ABOUT US
PRODUCTS
CUSTOMER SERVICE
CONNECT WITH US:
H2WithAnchorsSkip links
Main navigation
Reader Interactions
Footer
BodyWhy You Need a Subwoofer ContentsWhy you need a subwoofer for your Home Theater.DB12 12-Inch Low Frequency Ported Front Firing Powered Subwoofer Why you need a subwoofer for your Home Theater. What Are the Benefits of Having a Subwoofer? For home theater systems as well as other audio setups, subwoofers are integral items that help to deliver great sound to listeners. A subwoofer is the loudspeaker component used in home theater systems that produces the low bass frequencies that give music depth and richness. Without powered subwoofers, audio may come across as tinny. The easiest way to improve home theater’s low frequency is to include a powered subwoofer. Subwoofers Can Reduce the Size of a Sound System Perhaps the biggest benefit of including a powered subwoofer in a sound system is that it can create larger-than-life sound without significantly adding to the size or cost of a home theater system. A subwoofer doesn’t have the same limitations as a traditional speaker, which means it can deliver unprecedented sound without taking up a lot of space in a living room. While installing several speakers throughout the space to create deeper, richer sound, investing in a powered subwoofer can make all the difference. Subwoofers Add Realistic Cinematic Sounds Arguably, the biggest benefit of installing subwoofers is to create an authentic cinematic experience. In order to realistically recreate sounds like the honking of a car horn, the crash of an ocean wave or the rumbling of an earthquake, subwoofers are a necessary component. While viewers can hear the sound without this addition, there is no question that a powered subwoofer can ensure that a movie is as captivating and realistic as possible, enhancing the film-viewing experience in a substantial way. Focus is Entirely on the Bass The primary purpose of a subwoofer is to provide a strong bass sound that is not possible from any other type of speaker. Bass is vital because it offers low-frequency sound, a kind of physical shaking in the chest that only deep, rich sounds can provide, and it may equalize the sound originating from the left and right speakers within a home theater system. Bass Can Come From Anywhere With a little background in audio engineering, it’s easy to understand just how versatile a bass-focused speaker can be. The human ear isn’t equipped with the capability to tell where bass sounds are coming from, so they assume that the bass sound is coming from wherever the rest of the audio is originating. In a nutshell, that means a powered subwoofer doesn’t have to be on display or in a central location in the living room. It simply has to be somewhere in the same space: in the corner, on a shelf or elsewhere out of the way. A powered subwoofer lets homeowners take back their living room, leaving plenty of space for the rest of the home theater system. Subwoofers are an integral component of any home theater sound system. They provide a richer sound, deliver better bass for music and movies, they can be placed almost anywhere in the room and they take up less space that most people expect. DB12 12-Inch Low Frequency Ported Front Firing Powered Subwoofer. The Fluance DB12 Powered Subwoofer is ready to rock your body with a powerful bass performance empowering you to become truly immersed in any music or movie experience from a mesmerizing bass guitar solo to a ground shaking movie explosion. Learn More Reader Interactions. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. You must be logged in to post a comment. Footer. Lifetime Warranty 30 Day Risk Free Trial Audio Support Experts Trusted by Industry Professionals Free Shipping on All Orders ABOUT US. About Us Professional Reviews Contest and Giveaways Why Choose Fluance? Community & Environment PRODUCTS. Home Theater Systems Floorstanding Speakers Music Systems Turntables Bookshelf, Surround & Bipolar Speakers Powered Bookshelf Speakers Center Speakers Subwoofer Accessories Deals & Special Offers Discontinued CUSTOMER SERVICE. Support Center Contact Us My Account 30 Day Risk Free in Home Trial Fluance Policies Bulk Purchases Privacy Policy Register Your Product Legal CONNECT WITH US:.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 24
  • 28
  • sound
  • 17
  • 28
  • home
  • 11
  • 28
  • powered
  • 11
  • 28
  • bass
  • 11
  • 28
  • home theater
  • 10
  • 28
  • powered subwoofer
  • 10
  • 28
  • theater
  • 10
  • 28
  • system
  • 10
  • 28
  • speaker
  • 9
  • 28
  • home theater system
  • 6
  • 28
  • theater system
  • 6
  • 28
  • low
  • 6
  • 28
  • low frequency
  • 5
  • 28
  • frequency
  • 5
  • 28
  • audio
  • 5
  • 28
  • space
  • 5
  • 28
  • music
  • 4
  • 28
  • room
  • 4
  • 28
  • movie
  • 4
  • 28
  • subwoofer home
  • 3
  • 28
  • sound system
  • 3
  • 28
  • living room
  • 3
  • 28
  • bass sound
  • 3
  • 28
  • benefit
  • 3
  • 28
  • deliver
  • 3
  • 28
  • component
  • 3
  • 28
  • create
  • 3
  • 28
  • living
  • 3
  • 28
  • experience
  • 3
  • 28
  • provide
  • 3
  • 28
  • fluance
  • 3
  • 28
  • free
  • 3
  • 28
Result 29
TitleDo I Need A Subwoofer In My Car? - Sound, Beat and Bass
Urlhttps://soundbeatandbass.com/do-i-need-a-subwoofer-in-my-car/
DescriptionTo subwoofer or not to subwoofer? More importantly do I need a subwoofer in my car? The answer is usually yes! Read on to find out more!
Date
Organic Position28
H1Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Car?
H2Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Car?
How Much Extra Bass Do You Want?
Conclusion
H3
H2WithAnchorsDo I Need A Subwoofer In My Car?
How Much Extra Bass Do You Want?
Conclusion
BodyDo I Need A Subwoofer In My Car? Spread the loveIt ought to be said: Most newly purchased automobiles on the market these days—even non-used models, fresh off the assembly line—are going to have poor sound systems in lieu of significant investment by you, the customer.Car manufacturers tend to treat a quality sound system as a quasi-luxury item that the buyer has to opt into, and, thus, spend a lot for in addition.This is okay with a large number of people, frankly, who mainly use their car speaker systems to listen to programs that do not require a good pair of high fidelity speakers. A lot of folks like to listen to the radio, or, maybe a little bit of music of their own (inputted through an auxiliary cord most of the time), but don’t require a lot more than that. For these customers, a basic speaker system is sufficient.Other customers, however, will want a sound system that delivers a stronger, more comprehensive sound.Do I Need A Subwoofer In My Car?If you’re a musician yourself, or a music journalist, or just an avid listener, you’re going to want to upgrade your speakers from the bland default apparatus that the automaker is going to fit you with initially, and there’s nothing wrong with that. If you have a trained ear, your favorite music is just going to sound worse through a poor sound system, and you’re right to want to correct that.You should invest in a high-quality sound system for the same reason you would (or, perhaps, would not) invest in a high-quality pair of headphones: namely, that is, because you’re interested in how the music sounds on a more minute level.Once you’ve decided you want an upgrade, though, there are a number of different directions in which you can decide to head.If you’re a fan of heavy rock, hip hop, or electronic music, for example, you might want some degree of added bass on your sound system.If that’s the case, then you might decide you want a subwoofer in your car.Subwoofers are the perfect amenity for the avid listener who wants a little (or a lot) of additional bounce in their step.That said, it’s simply not enough to know that you want a subwoofer, since subwoofers can do numerous different things; they can either pat you on the back, all nice and easy, or, proverbially speaking, slap you open-handed across the face.How Much Extra Bass Do You Want?That’s the question you have to ask yourself once you’ve decided you want to opt into a subwoofer, and the answer you concoct is going to determine what sort of subwoofer you decide you want to buy.First off, it’s worth summarizing what a subwoofer is, what it will run you in terms of cost, and what sort of equipment you’re going to need to purchase in order to operate your own subwoofer.The subwoofer is going to add a whole lot of bass to your car stereo system, true. But how does it do that exactly?A subwoofer, basically, amplifies the current that your car stereo emits, and then gives that current an output, resulting in increased bass output.Your car stereo produces a limited amount of roots-mean-squared (RMS), which is the quotient that determines how heavy the car’s sound is going to be. Your car speakers, working in congress with the source of the current, will only be able to output so many RMS.Basically, your car sound system can only create and handle so much sound on its own, and that total amount is pretty limited. What a subwoofer does—in congress with an amplifier—is make that sound bigger by increasing the RMS present, and then by giving that current an output source in the form of the subwoofer itself.Conclusion. So, if you purchase a subwoofer, you’re probably also going to want to purchase an amplifier, which will give your subwoofer the energy it needs to add bass to your system. There are certain stipulations as to which amplifiers you should and should not buy, but the gist of it is this: If you want more bass, get an amplifier that creates more RMS, and get a set of subwoofers that can handle more RMS than its competitors. Additional RMS, in a general sense, equates to additional bass. The more RMS, the more bass. It’s (almost) that simple.Ultimately, automakers are right to treat sound systems as an added amenity that consumers have to opt into, since different consumers have different needs and desires.Whether or not to have a subwoofer in your car is a choice you have to make on your own, but this article should give you a general idea of what a subwoofer is, when it might be necessary, and how to go about getting one for your vehicle.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 19
  • 29
  • sound
  • 15
  • 29
  • system
  • 11
  • 29
  • car
  • 10
  • 29
  • bass
  • 8
  • 29
  • sound system
  • 7
  • 29
  • rm
  • 6
  • 29
  • amplifier
  • 5
  • 29
  • lot
  • 5
  • 29
  • speaker
  • 5
  • 29
  • music
  • 5
  • 29
  • current
  • 4
  • 29
  • car stereo
  • 3
  • 29
  • current output
  • 3
  • 29
  • quality
  • 3
  • 29
  • opt
  • 3
  • 29
  • high
  • 3
  • 29
  • decide
  • 3
  • 29
  • additional
  • 3
  • 29
  • purchase
  • 3
  • 29
  • stereo
  • 3
  • 29
  • output
  • 3
  • 29
Result 30
TitleDoes your church need a subwoofer?
Urlhttps://collaborateworship.com/does-my-church-sound-system-need-a-subwoofer/
DescriptionAn explanation to why you should have a subwoofer as part of your church sound system
Date
Organic Position29
H1Does your church need a subwoofer?
H2So, what does a subwoofer do anyways?
Going From No Subwoofer to a Dual 18” Subwoofer
Get Free Weekly Training
H3So let me ask, is your church sound system described as ‘thin’, lacking energy, or lacking depth? Then it is probably time to purchase a subwoofer!
Submit a Comment Cancel reply
Kade Young
H2WithAnchorsSo, what does a subwoofer do anyways?
Going From No Subwoofer to a Dual 18” Subwoofer
Get Free Weekly Training
BodyDoes your church need a subwoofer? by Kade Young Share I have heard this question many times, and mainly from the older group of church leaders. For those who grew up without subwoofers, it seems like an unnecessary expense and way to much ‘noise’ for church. However, the younger generation knows that a ‘sub’ is absolutely necessary for quality sound, whether it be in church or in their car. So, what does a subwoofer do anyways? Subwoofers (or “Subs”) add a range of frequencies (120Hz and below) to the overall sound that is absolutely necessary if you desire a ‘full’ sound from your church sound system. Your main speakers may be producing these frequencies, but it is not near enough to compensate for the rest of the sound produced. What is going on in this frequency range? Mostly the sound that you ‘feel’ more than you ‘hear’, which is mainly produced by the bass guitar and kick drum. Have you ever been to a concert where you could feel the kick drum in your chest? You may not want that much for your church service, but I can guarantee that adding a subwoofer to your sound system will add energy and depth to your worship band. Going From No Subwoofer to a Dual 18” Subwoofer. When my church was planted in 2008, our first sanctuary was about 2,000 square feet, which would be considered pretty small. In this space, we had no sub, but we did have JBL JRX125 Dual 15” cabinets for our mains. These did a fairly good job reproducing lower frequencies, but it was always lacking that ‘in your chest’ energy. The bass guitar always seemed too ‘in your face’ and was a bit painful to the ears. In 2011, we moved into a new sanctuary, about 6,000 square feet, and purchased a new sound system that included a JBL728S Dual 18” Subwoofer. We feed this sub 3200 watts from a Crown XTi 4000. Going from no sub to this super-powered sub was probably the most exciting sound system purchase I have ever made. The energy that this speaker adds to worship is amazing. I can remember the first service with the new sound system, as many of our ‘subwoofer virgins’ were holding their chest through the first few songs, wondering if their heart was beating quite a bit harder than normal. I admit, we were probably running it a bit too loud at first, but the people still loved it. You can’t help but dance and move around with that much energy in the room, it is a very freeing experience! So let me ask, is your church sound system described as ‘thin’, lacking energy, or lacking depth? Then it is probably time to purchase a subwoofer! Next step: Buy the right equipment » Share Get Free Weekly Training. Ready to achieve great sound while keeping it simple? Join our email list and we will send you free weekly training. Your email is safe with us. Unsubscribe at any time. Join the conversation! 18 Mike on 01/22/2014 at 12:16 am we are meeting in a church that is about 1600 square ft. rectangle…have a decent sound system and was just given a 15″ subwoofer. ..had been using a home surround sound woofer. where do I place it for maximum effect? thanks.. Reply Kade Young on 01/22/2014 at 1:33 am Mike – I am currently leading worship in a room about the same square footage. We have two 18″ subs right next to each other placed in front of the stage near the middle. We started out with on sub on each side, under each main speaker, but then found that front-middle gave us quite a bit more ‘thump’. In your situation, putting your sub in front-middle would probably work best as well. However, I would experiment with putting it in a corner to see if you get more ‘thump’ out of it. Hope that helps! John on 03/04/2015 at 3:40 pm Middle works well with two subs because it gets rid of the comb filtering effects of having them at each side of the room. One sub on the floor against the wall gives you the biggest bang for your buck. Damon on 09/07/2014 at 2:40 am I am looking at installing a sub in our church (limited budget). Our sanctuary is one of those long thin layouts, about 4000 square feet. Would one 15 or 18 inch 400-600 watt rms sub, placed in the middle front, be sufficient for some good sound? Reply Kade Young on 09/07/2014 at 11:28 pm Damon – I am currently leading worship in a 3,000 square foot hall-shaped sanctuary. We have two JBL MRX518S subs, each powered by its own Crown XTi 1002 which gives 1,000W at 8ohm bridge. So a total of 2,000 watts of power split between two subs. There are many times when I wish there was more power to work with, but it gets the job done nicely most of the time. So, I believe you will find 400-600 watts insufficient for your application. I strongly suggest getting at least a dual 18″ sub at about 2,000 watts of power. Since you are on a budget, take a look around Craigslist. Used equipment would be better than taking a shortcut and only getting 400-600 watts. Let me know if you have any other questions! Yogen on 06/13/2015 at 5:11 am We are a Church of 400 people and to upgrade our sound system and have never used Subwoofer. I need to decide between if I need to get Yamaha DXR15 or DXR12 and I am need of advice if I need to go for 15 or 18 inch sub and which model. Or can I go for 15inch and place in middle. We are not playing drums and we music will be of acoustic guitars, bass, cajon, congas and percussions. Finally I need to decide between digital or analog mixer for our clutch much.Your advice will be much appreciated. Thank you. Reply Kade Young on 06/15/2015 at 8:47 am Thanks for reaching out, Yogen! I recommend you go with the 18″ sub, as a 15″ sub is generally not a good solution for live music. Even without drums, you will still want a sub that can easily push out the low frequencies that you ‘feel’ in your chest. This is where the energy comes from in sound. I am not familiar with Yamaha subs. I have always used JBL and been happy with the results. At my church, we still use an analog mixer but I hope to upgrade to digital soon. There are so many benefits to digital. Plus, you can get them fairly cheap now – like the Behringer X32. You should definitely go with digital if the budget allows. Eddie on 10/12/2015 at 8:14 am Hi Kade, Wonder why i did not come across your site earlier! It has so much info that I needed very much. We are currently looking into moving into a 4000 square feet place for our worship and being a stubborn cow, I had always insisted on Peavey products. I think I should be moving on to JBL. At present, our worship hall of 2000sqaure feet comprises of x2 Peavey SP2BX powered by a CS3000 and processed thru Behringer 2496. We have x1 Roland TD15, x1 Korg Synth, x1 Yamaha Piano, x1 Bass, x1 E.Guitar and x8 vocals running thru Peavey FX 32 channel mixer. If I would to change to JBL system, what would you recommend for a 4000 square feet hall? Many thanks for the advices!!! regards Eddie Reply Kade Young on 10/12/2015 at 9:59 am I have had experience with both JBL SRX and MRX subs – and SRX was way better. The JBL product line has changed a lot over the past few years, but I just noticed they came out with the JBL SRX828SP Dual 18″ Powered Sub. I’d recommend getting two of these guys for your size room. Hope this helps! Mark on 03/28/2016 at 11:37 am Great article, and everything you say is true. However, you didn’t sell it to the senior adults! I am sixty-one, a former pastor, a musician, a bass player, a sound tech in our church and I love subs, I “get” the need for energy in church music, and I look for that thump, thump from the bass and low tom drums and low end instruments. But most senior adults see no need at all for any of it, and infact are adamantly opposed to anything that manipulates emotions in a worship service. Unfortunately, in most churches, they pay the bills and make most of the decisions. Find a couple of seniors and ask them how to educate and then convince older people of the need for subs, then write an article specifically targeted to engage them in the justifiable needs. Elderly people generally don’t want to “feel it in their chest.” Try something along the lines of reaching out to the lost and the younger generations, making a cultural connection with the “next” generations, how to bridge the age gap, making the church ‘relevant” for today. Even that might not convince the “old guard” but it certainly is important to try. People with hearing aids, false teeth, and pacemakers are often driven out by speakers that cause their ears to hurt, their teeth to fall out and their heart to thump, thump, thump. And for every one’s future hearing, try to keep the sound pressure under 105db at all times. No, that is not loud, but it is not a techno-dance club, it is a worship venue. The music service is not the “worship service” it is an important part of worship, but worship is about God, not about how well “I” like the band’s sound. Love your article though, it had some very important information. Reply Kade Young on 03/28/2016 at 1:26 pm Totally agree, Mark. It is tough to get the older generation on board with subs, and I am always looking for ways to help them understand, and to be understanding myself. That being said, I don’t think I have ever played worship loud enough to knock out someones false teeth. We are generally between 90-100dB at our church. There is plenty of energy, but definitely not the kind of excessive energy you will get at a big concert. For me, it is all about a balanced, full-range sound. Nate on 07/09/2017 at 11:02 am Kade- I’m struggling. We have 2 18″ Subs on the sides of our rectangular church, which seats about 200 people. Our sound booth is on the very back wall, dead center, and elevated about 2 feet. The Subs are “built in” the stage unobstructed, and on the same level as the audience. I always mix from the audience via iPad, but I never feel like the Low frequencies are enveloping me the way I want them to. They’re just loud and seem to fly over the audience. When I’m in the sound booth, I get that feeling we all know and love from subs and it’s almost too much. I want my audience to feel that (maybe just a little less), but I don’t know why it seems like the audience is missing it entirely. Do you have any ideas? Reply Kade Young on 07/11/2017 at 8:25 am Hey Nate – Unfortunately, in a rectangular room you are always going to have inconsistencies with low frequencies. They will sound great in one part of the room and not so great in another. There are things you can do to make it better (like installing bass traps in the corners of your room, or experimenting with where you place the subs), but in the end, you will still have inconsistencies in a room that wasn’t built for sound. I wish there were a ‘magic bullet’ to fix this problem, but if there is, I haven’t found it yet. David Smith on 08/28/2017 at 5:08 am What about jbl srx828sp? I’m thinking about that one. Actually, the good thing about this is that it has great sound. jbl srx828sp Reply Kade Young on 08/28/2017 at 8:52 am Definitely a great sub. I love the JBL SRX series. David Smith on 08/31/2017 at 3:14 am Thanks for taking the time to lay all of that out. Your Post absolutely very helpful for people those love music. I know i loved it I hope other people will too.Thanks again! jbl srx828sp Reply Mark Choi on 07/19/2018 at 11:47 am So much of this is factually incorrect, and highlights the problem of most modern “sound engineers”, who use subs to mask poor set ups with improperly set crossovers or inadequate system design. In general subs in such venues, rather than add to high fidelity of sound reproduction, only serve to cover over gaping holes in the reproduced frequency spectrum, both as reproduced and as perceived because of this poor system design. In mosty venue, even professional concert venues, subs simply are not needed, and the same, or better, sound reproduction can be achieved with better thought out system implementation. Reply Kade Young on 07/20/2018 at 9:29 am Thanks for the comment, Mark! I guess we’ll have to agree to disagree on this one. 🙂 Submit a Comment Cancel reply. Filter by Category. Church Sound Essentials Live Stream Mix EQ Behringer X32 Mixing Drums Mixing Vocals Top Posts. The Most Important EQ Techniques How to Set Gain on Your Mixer 5 Tips for an Amazing Drum Mix Recent Posts. Increase your confidence behind the mixer ft. James Wasem Creating a Thriving Tech Team Avoiding Burnout About the Author Kade Young. Kade Young brought Collaborate Worship into existence with a dream of helping worship leaders around the world fulfill their calling with excellence. He has been leading worship since 2005, is a graduate of Rhema Bible Training College, and currently the worship leader at NoLimits Church in Owasso, Oklahoma.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • sound
  • 31
  • 30
  • church
  • 20
  • 30
  • sub
  • 18
  • 30
  • worship
  • 16
  • 30
  • kade
  • 13
  • 30
  • subwoofer
  • 12
  • 30
  • system
  • 12
  • 30
  • jbl
  • 12
  • 30
  • kade young
  • 11
  • 30
  • 18
  • 11
  • 30
  • young
  • 11
  • 30
  • energy
  • 10
  • 30
  • reply
  • 10
  • 30
  • thump
  • 9
  • 30
  • foot
  • 9
  • 30
  • reply kade young
  • 8
  • 30
  • sound system
  • 8
  • 30
  • reply kade
  • 8
  • 30
  • frequency
  • 8
  • 30
  • square
  • 8
  • 30
  • person
  • 8
  • 30
  • room
  • 8
  • 30
  • time
  • 7
  • 30
  • bass
  • 7
  • 30
  • drum
  • 7
  • 30
  • square foot
  • 6
  • 30
  • mixer
  • 6
  • 30
  • feel
  • 6
  • 30
  • watt
  • 6
  • 30
  • great
  • 6
  • 30
  • middle
  • 6
  • 30
  • low
  • 5
  • 30
  • x1
  • 5
  • 30
  • love
  • 5
  • 30
  • audience
  • 5
  • 30
  • thump thump
  • 4
  • 30
  • dual 18
  • 4
  • 30
  • jbl srx828sp
  • 4
  • 30
  • 4000 square foot
  • 3
  • 30
  • 400 600 watt
  • 3
  • 30
  • church sound
  • 3
  • 30
  • leading worship
  • 3
  • 30
  • 4000 square
  • 3
  • 30
  • 400 600
  • 3
  • 30
  • 600 watt
  • 3
  • 30
  • low frequency
  • 3
  • 30
Result 31
TitleBenefits of adding a subwoofer to your home audio system | Best Buy Blog
Urlhttps://blog.bestbuy.ca/tv-audio/tv-home-theatre-tv-audio/benefits-of-adding-a-subwoofer-to-your-home-audio-system
DescriptionIf your home audio system is lacking bass punch, you can upgrade without having to replace your speakers by adding a subwoofer to the mix. Here's how
Date26 Feb 2021
Organic Position30
H1Benefits of adding a subwoofer to your home audio system
H2Why a subwoofer is the solution to your home audio system’s lack of bass
Use the right cables
Positioning (and do I need two subwoofers for a stereo system)?
Adjusting the subwoofers settings: the key to great performance
Do I need a subwoofer with a soundbar?
Troubleshooting issues
Enjoy your home audio system with its improved bass performance!
H3The best reasons to file your taxes online
All new sound bars announced at CES 2022
Samsung TV impresses with Mini-LED and QD OLED at CES 2022
The latest in baby tech at CES 2022
New LG OLED TVs announced at CES 2022
Highlights from the CES 2022 Samsung Keynote
The Freestyle by Samsung
Elliptical Buying Guide
How to buy a treadmill
How to introduce your child to music
How to be efficient in your home office
Create a stylish home office
How to find the best gaming toys at Best Buy
5 ways to share photos, and not on social media
Corsair HS80 RGB wireless gaming headset review
Raycon Everyday speaker review
Insignia 4.8L air fryer review
Insignia 9.5L air fryer oven review
Riders Republic review
Amazon Kindle Paperwhite (2021) review
Samsung Galaxy Z Flip3 review
BenQ debuts its newest gaming technology at CES 2022
Biggest video game news from CES 2022
Virtual and augmented reality stand out at CES 2022
Enter for a chance to win Twinkly smart lights for your…
The best new TVs announced at CES 2022
Smart Home innovations at CES
Enter for a chance to win a Kobo Sage eReader from…
Crossover
Volume
Phase
Audio is too boomy, distorted or thin
Excess vibration
Hum
New LG OLED TVs announced at CES 2022
The Freestyle by Samsung
How to buy a TV
How to purchase a NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 Series Graphics Card..
Enter for a chance to win the Tineco Floor One S5..
Enter for a chance to win Twinkly smart lights for your..
Enter for a chance to win a Kobo Sage eReader from..
How to install the Google Play Store on your Amazon Fire..
H2WithAnchorsWhy a subwoofer is the solution to your home audio system’s lack of bass
Use the right cables
Positioning (and do I need two subwoofers for a stereo system)?
Adjusting the subwoofers settings: the key to great performance
Do I need a subwoofer with a soundbar?
Troubleshooting issues
Enjoy your home audio system with its improved bass performance!
BodyBenefits of adding a subwoofer to your home audio system By Brad Moon - February 26, 2021 662 0   We all know that a subwoofer is an integral part of any home theatre setup. Surround sound and 3D audio is incredibly immersive, but without the rumble of a subwoofer, movies lose a lot of their magic. Have you thought about adding a subwoofer to your home audio system? Many people have a system that’s used primarily for listening to music. One of the more popular configurations these days is a stereo system with two speakers, perfect for enjoying records on a turntable, CDs, or your favourite music streaming service. Many people opt for a pair of bookshelf speakers, which offer that coveted stereo sound without taking up a lot of space. The downside of home audio systems that use compact speakers—even very good ones—is a lack of bass response. The sound may be clean and in stereo, but it often lacks the low end punch that would make it perfect. The good news is it’s easy to fix that issue using the star of the home theatre setup. Just add a subwoofer. Why a subwoofer is the solution to your home audio system’s lack of bass. If your home audio system is equipped with a pair of large tower speakers, you’re likely in good shape (although you could still add a subwoofer for extra bass oomph). However, bookshelf speakers are far smaller. That makes them much more convenient. But when it comes to producing low frequencies, smaller speakers run up against a stark reality. Bass is low frequency sound waves, and to generate those low frequency waves you need a large driver capable of moving large volumes of air. Subwoofers are built around around large drivers, typically 8-inches, 10-inches, or 12-inches in diameter. In comparison, the woofer—the driver responsible for low and mid-frequency sound in most bookshelf speakers—might be anywhere from 4-inches to 6-inches. With many bookshelf speakers designed with a dual driver setup, that woofer is working hard to cover both the low end and the mid range. This bookshelf speaker is no match for the 10-inch subwoofer behind it for producing satisfying bass. Adding a subwoofer into the mix means your audio system now has a speaker that’s dedicated to low frequency sound, and equipped with a big driver that’s capable of producing those ultra lows. In a home theatre system this adds realism to effects like explosions and revving engines. It gives depth and adds subsonic rumble. In a home audio system, the subwoofer adds new prominence and depth to instruments like the bass guitar and drums. The bass may sound decent in a compact stereo listening system, especially one equipped with a good pair of bookshelf speakers, but the difference with a subwoofer in the mix can be night and day. Use the right cables. There are two ways that a subwoofer can be connected to an audio system and each method requires different audio cables. Some receivers and amplifiers have a subwoofer output jack. It’s usually labelled SUB OUT. In this case, connecting is as easy as using a RCA subwoofer cable to connect to the LFE or Line Input on the subwoofer. However, many stereo receivers and amplifiers lack that subwoofer output. Especially systems that are used primarily for listening to records. Many of these setups use a 2-channel stereo receiver or amplifier, often a vintage model that pre-dates subwoofers. However, these systems can still be used with a subwoofer. You’ll need to choose a subwoofer that offers speaker level input and output. This basically replicates the speaker jacks you see on the back of your receiver.  To connect the subwoofer in this case, you disconnect your speakers from the receiver and instead plug them into the Speaker Outputs on the subwoofer (they use the same left and right, black and red setup). Then you run a new set of speaker cables from the Speaker Input on the subwoofer, to the Speaker Outputs on your receiver. It’s recommended that you use fairly heavy duty speaker wire, 12-gauge to 16-gauge. Positioning (and do I need two subwoofers for a stereo system)? Positioning the subwoofer is important and it can be a bit of a challenge. Space is often the biggest issue to deal with. Subwoofers are big. They have large drivers, but also large enclosures to give those drivers room to move. Most subwoofers are powered, which means you need to be within range of an electrical outlet. The enclosures also require space for an amplifier (with powered subwoofers) and other electronics.  The size can have a lot to do with whether you choose a small subwoofer, or a large one.  The usual setup in an audio system setup is to use a single subwoofer, and to position it between the two speakers, ideally no more than a few metres away from the speakers. Set up like this, the bass will sound as though it is coming from the speakers, not the subwoofer. Technically, your setup won’t be true stereo for the low frequency notes, but you shouldn’t be able to tell. So you don’t need two subwoofers—although some people do choose to go that route. The subwoofer is often placed near a wall. Models that have front bass ports can be placed pretty much against the wall. Units with rear bass ports need to be kept some distance from the wall or the airflow out of the vent will be disrupted, affecting the sound quality. In my office setup (below), I have a pair of bookshelf speakers sitting on bookshelves (seemed appropriate), and the subwoofer is between them, hidden under my desk.  Adjusting the subwoofers settings: the key to great performance. Connecting the subwoofer and positioning it are the two basic steps, but now we get down to the fine-tuning. This is the step that will make or break your listening experience. Home theatre receivers usually handle the subwoofer fine-tuning on their own, or guide your through the process. When you’re connecting to a stereo receiver (especially one that lacks a dedicated subwoofer output), it’s time to get manual. You may have to fuss with these settings for a few minutes to find the perfect combination. Crossover. On the back of the subwoofer you’ll find a crossover dial. It may also be called low pass. This is the setting that controls the point at which the signal from your stereo system is handled by the subwoofer instead of the speakers. Anything above the frequency you choose goes to your speakers, as usual. Anything below that level is now handled by the subwoofer. The level you choose is going to depend on your speakers. For bookshelf speakers with a small woofer (4-inches or less), you’ll want to set that crossover fairly high. Try 120Hz. As the driver gets larger, the crossover can be lower, for example 100Hz for a 5-inch woofer. Then listen to music that features bass. If female vocals sound too deep, then the crossover is set too high and you should dial it back a bit. If male vocals or a bass guitar sound thin, then increase the crossover frequency. Volume. Volume controls how loud the subwoofer is in relation to your other speakers. Have it too loud and the bass will start to boom and distort, especially as music volume is turned up. Too low, and music will sound thin, especially as it gets louder. Try setting the subwoofer volume at 50% and adjust from there. Phase. This is a switch control (0 or 180-degrees) that ensures the subwoofer and woofers in your primary speakers are operating together in sync. Listen to music that features lots of bass while flipping between a phase of 0 and 180. Leave it at the one that sounds best. If you can’t tell the difference, go with 0-degrees. Do I need a subwoofer with a soundbar? Many people use a soundbar instead of a traditional stereo system. They’re great space-savers for TVs, but can also do double-duty as a home audio system. Do you need to use a subwoofer with a soundbar? For home theatre, gaming, and music listening applications, the audio is always going to sound better with a subwoofer. I have an older—but very capable—soundbar in my rec room. It’s equipped with 21 small 1.5-inch drivers and a pair of 4-inch woofers. When I first installed it, I thought it sounded pretty good. However, it wasn’t until I picked up the matching subwoofer that the system fully lived up to its potential. It’s the subwoofer that brought the missing rumble, and provided the low end for window-rattling bass. The complication is that many soundbars lack subwoofer or speaker output. If you already own a subwoofer, check its outputs—it’s also possible the manufacturer may sell a subwoofer specifically for use with it.  The good news is if you are shopping for a new soundbar, many brands including Samsung, Bose, JBL, Polk, Sony, Sonos, Klipsch, and Mission have soundbar packages that include a subwoofer.  Troubleshooting issues. Audio is too boomy, distorted or thin. If you’re lucky, everything will sound perfect when you get the subwoofer connected to your home audio system. However, it’s just as likely that there will be some tweaking required. If the audio seems boomy, distorted or thin, it’s time to fiddle with position of the subwoofer and the crossover, volume, and phase settings. Excess vibration. A subwoofer moves a lot of air. And sometimes that can can cause vibration, especially at higher volumes. In my case, the subwoofer came with feet to help dampen vibration. However, on a wooden floor the vibration was still enough to rattle objects on my bookcases. It goes without saying that vibration wasn’t just annoying, it was really bad news for my turntable. When vibration is an issue, the subwoofer needs to be isolated from the floor and/or walls. There are rubber and even shock-mount speaker feet designed for this purpose. I used a heavy sound isolation platform with integrated shock-absorbent feet. That completely eliminated the vibration. Hum. Sometimes a low frequency background hum can be heard when the subwoofer is powered up. If you experience this, check the speaker cables and connections between the subwoofer and the amplifier. A bad connection or damaged cable can cause hum. The other cause is usually electrical. Try plugging the subwoofer into the same electrical outlet as the amplifier (using a power bar of necessary). If the two devices are already plugged into the same outlet, try plugging the soundbar into an outlet on a different circuit. Enjoy your home audio system with its improved bass performance! Time to sit back and enjoy listening to music that sound the way it was intended to, including powerful bass. Pink Floyd has never sounded better on my system since I installed a subwoofer. The great thing about a subwoofer is that you can completely upgrade your audio system’s sound without the expense and hassle of replacing your existing speakers and components. And you don’t need to go with big tower speakers, you can make a system built around compact bookshelf speakers or even a soundbar sound impressive. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR. CES 2022 New LG OLED TVs announced at CES 2022. Best Buy Showcase The Freestyle by Samsung. TV & Home Theatre How to buy a TV. Stay Connected. 728,731FansLike92,166FollowersFollow106,528FollowersFollow14,500SubscribersSubscribe Popular Articles. How to purchase a NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 Series Graphics Card... December 8, 2021 Enter for a chance to win the Tineco Floor One S5... January 5, 2022 Enter for a chance to win Twinkly smart lights for your... January 7, 2022 Enter for a chance to win a Kobo Sage eReader from... January 7, 2022 How to install the Google Play Store on your Amazon Fire... January 28, 2020 Our Editors. Brad Moon626 POSTS63 COMMENTSChristine Persaud259 POSTS23 COMMENTSJon Scarr600 POSTS128 COMMENTSMartin Renaud237 POSTS801 COMMENTSShelly Wutke839 POSTS67 COMMENTSTed Kritsonis394 POSTS10 COMMENTS © 2021 Best Buy Canada Ltd. All rights reserved. For personal, noncommercial use only.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • subwoofer
  • 65
  • 31
  • speaker
  • 38
  • 31
  • system
  • 27
  • 31
  • sound
  • 20
  • 31
  • inch
  • 19
  • 31
  • audio
  • 18
  • 31
  • bass
  • 17
  • 31
  • audio system
  • 15
  • 31
  • home
  • 15
  • 31
  • low
  • 13
  • 31
  • good
  • 11
  • 31
  • stereo
  • 11
  • 31
  • bookshelf speaker
  • 10
  • 31
  • output
  • 10
  • 31
  • setup
  • 10
  • 31
  • driver
  • 10
  • 31
  • bookshelf
  • 10
  • 31
  • home audio system
  • 9
  • 31
  • home audio
  • 9
  • 31
  • lack
  • 9
  • 31
  • frequency
  • 9
  • 31
  • soundbar
  • 9
  • 31
  • 2022
  • 8
  • 31
  • woofer
  • 8
  • 31
  • large
  • 8
  • 31
  • music
  • 8
  • 31
  • receiver
  • 8
  • 31
  • volume
  • 7
  • 31
  • crossover
  • 7
  • 31
  • vibration
  • 7
  • 31
  • home theatre
  • 6
  • 31
  • low frequency
  • 6
  • 31
  • theatre
  • 6
  • 31
  • listening
  • 6
  • 31
  • cable
  • 6
  • 31
  • amplifier
  • 6
  • 31
  • stereo system
  • 4
  • 31
  • pair bookshelf speaker
  • 3
  • 31
  • enter chance win
  • 3
  • 31
  • january 2022
  • 3
  • 31
  • adding subwoofer
  • 3
  • 31
  • pair bookshelf
  • 3
  • 31
  • low end
  • 3
  • 31
  • frequency sound
  • 3
  • 31
  • large driver
  • 3
  • 31
  • system subwoofer
  • 3
  • 31
  • receiver amplifier
  • 3
  • 31
  • subwoofer output
  • 3
  • 31
  • stereo receiver
  • 3
  • 31
  • speaker output
  • 3
  • 31
  • subwoofer speaker
  • 3
  • 31
  • enter chance
  • 3
  • 31
  • chance win
  • 3
  • 31
  • january
  • 3
  • 31