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Keyword how to market your business correctly
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=how+to+market+your+business+correctly&oq=how+to+market+your+business+correctly&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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Search Enginegoogle.co.uk
No. Of Results262000000
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creative ways to market your businesshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Creative+ways+to+market+your+business&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgrEAE
marketing tips for small business 2020https://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Marketing+tips+for+small+business+2020&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgyEAE
how to promote your business ukhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+promote+your+business+UK&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgxEAE
how to promote your small businesshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+promote+your+small+business&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgsEAE
how to market your business on social mediahttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+market+your+business+on+social+media&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgzEAE
how to market your business onlinehttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+market+your+business+online&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgpEAE
how to promote your business locallyhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+promote+your+business+locally&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgoEAE
how to market your business to other businesseshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+market+your+business+to+other+businesses&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8z_D__qP1AhUwS_EDHfvsCCkQ1QJ6BAgnEAE
Result 1
TitleThe seven most popular ways to promote your business | FSB, The Federation of Small Businesses
Urlhttps://www.fsb.org.uk/resources-page/the-7-most-popular-ways-to-promote-your-business.html
Description
Date
Organic Position
H1The seven most popular ways to promote your business
H2
H3Marketing your business
H2WithAnchors
BodyThe seven most popular ways to promote your business Blogs 31 Aug 2020 From Facebook adverts and newsletters to traditional print and PR, there are so many ways to promote your small business. But how do you know which is best? PR specialists from FSB PR/Crisis Management explain the seven most popular ways to market and advertise a small business, both online and offline. 1. Media relations. Also known as PR, media relations is simply getting articles about you and your business in publications and their online websites. Perhaps you’ve won a new contract, launched a new product or service, appointed new people or achieved record results. It might be that something quirky has happened within your business or you’ve reached a milestone, such as an anniversary, or you’ve sold a significant number of items. Another way to get coverage is by giving advice or having strong views about a subject and being prepared to openly state them. What are the benefits of PR? Provided you appear in the ‘right’ places, you’ll be seen by your target audience. If you run an engineering business, you’ll benefit from being seen in select trade publications. If, however, you’re keen to raise awareness of your café, then the local newspaper and magazines are the places to be.  Such media coverage not only raises your profile, but it’s also ideal for conveying important factual messages about your business, along with promoting its values and culture. Should I use a PR agency? Although you can contact a reporter or journalist yourself to tell them about a potential story, this can seem daunting, so you might want to consider using a specialist PR agency.  They can: deal with journalists and identify stories in your business advise you on the best places for your articles to appear and how to ‘pitch’ provide you with original content for your website However, there are no guarantees your piece will feature.  It boils down to the strength of the story – again, this is why using an agency is advisable because they instinctively know what will work. 2. Social media. Social media plays a critical role in marketing your business if used effectively. With over 45 million active users reported in the UK and 1.3 million users joining in 2020 alone, the opportunity to reach and engage with such a huge audience is not to be missed. Social media is a great way to connect with people who already engage with your brand and introduce the business to people who are yet to discover you. Recent research revealed that 58 per cent of consumers visit a brand’s social pages before visiting their website – that’s an 81 per cent increase from last year. What are your business goals? Before you begin developing a social media marketing campaign, you need to consider your business goals and marketing plan. Do you want to reach a wider audience, generate more traffic to your website or increase product sales? It is also important to understand who your target audience is, what platforms they are likely to use and what kind of content they will find useful and engaging. Our guide to social media platforms will help you find the right one for you. What should I post on social media? Creating relevant content for your audience is crucial to the success of your social media, whether it’s on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. When creating content, think about what your audience wants to see and what valuable content you can give them in return for their attention. If you are in a service-based industry, free resources and tips from your business can go a long way – you’ll become their go-to when searching for information, leading to potential new clients. If you are a product or brand, invest in photography and video and create a consistent brand identity with your assets. It’s also worth knowing that video is one of the most engaging assets, so use it whenever possible. Social media is not just about putting the right content out there.  As a business, you need to generate a two-way conversation with your audience so they feel a human connection, making you more memorable and more likely to keep followers. It’s important to regularly review your channels to understand what’s working. Each social platform offers basic analytics.  It’s good practice to dig deep into your analytics on a weekly and monthly basis to analyse, review and tailor your strategy to maximise results. Download our free guide and start improving your digital strategy today  free social media planner  easy to follow checklists for key areas of your digital strategy   10 ways to create a successful online advert  Download now 3. Digital advertising. Targeting specific audiences, executing data-led strategies and delivering measurable results are only a few of the benefits of marketing your business via digital advertising. The main digital advertising channels are PPC (Pay-Per-Click), display and paid social. All of them run across mobile and desktop devices.  Digital advertising can be a minefield, but it’s completely transparent and accountable – you will be able to see, down to the penny, where your budget has gone and which aspects of your campaign have been the most effective. What is Pay-Per-Click? Search (PPC) campaigns are often run on Google Ads, which is Google’s own online advertising network. They can help you advertise to your target audience whilst optimising any ad spend to give the best return on investment. PPC campaigns can be tailored so your ads are only shown to people who have made a search that is relevant to your product or service. What is display advertising? If your objective is more about brand awareness and not leads, then you should consider display advertising instead.  Believe it or not, the Google Display Network (GDN) claims to reach 90 per cent of all Internet users worldwide. It’s a vast network of web pages, news sites, blogs, video platforms like YouTube and email providers such as Gmail. Users browsing sites within the GDN may not be interested in your product or service just yet, but you will get the chance to pitch it to them. You can even remarket to users who have already visited your site in the past but didn’t convert to remind them of the solutions your business can offer them.  What is paid social advertising? Whilst social media profiles are free to set up, consider investing in paid content, too, particularly on Facebook and Instagram. In basic terms, this means you assign a set budget to a post which boosts its reach, allowing it to be seen by more people. Facebook, the world's largest social network, is an excellent alternative to Google if you want to advertise your business in a highly targeted way.  You can do this by setting up ad campaigns targeting users by age, gender, location, job title, interests and even behaviours. They’ll see text, image and videos displayed in Facebook stories, in-stream videos, Facebook search and messages, articles and the Facebook app. If you decide to appoint an agency to look after your digital advertising: make sure you understand what they are saying to you, keep asking until you do be prepared to pay a fee for their strategic advice and implementation in addition to the advertising spend itself. Find out more about how to build a successful online advertising campaign using Facebook and Google.  4. Press advertising. To be effective in magazines and newspapers, your advertisement needs to be both big and bold. If your advertisement doesn’t stop someone in their tracks and make them take notice, then you will have wasted your money on buying the space.  What should be in my advert? The headline, text and images you use are crucial.  Rather than focusing on what you want to say, think about your target customers – what do they want or need to hear from you?  Get inside their heads, think about a message that will resonate with them. Focus on the benefits of your product or service rather than the features.  If your business manufactures underfloor heating, plumbers will want to know that it’s easy to install and will deliver them a good profit but if you’re targeting homeowners directly, they’ll want to know how it makes them feel when they step on it in the middle of a bitterly cold night. Sometimes it can be challenging to think in this way, so you might want to consider using a creative agency to help you formulate ideas.  The added benefit is that you’ll then be able to adapt their ideas into all sorts of other marketing materials – e-shots, mailers, posters – so paying someone to come up with ideas is definitely worth the cost. Read our top tips for creating a successful advert. 5. Direct mail. Back in the pre-digital era, direct mail earned the nickname ‘junk mail’. Not a morning went by without there being a pile of letters and leaflets on the doormat. It had become a victim of its own success – sadly, all the well-targeted and relevant messages were lost among the irrelevant ones. Direct mail can be wonderfully effective, provided you follow three key rules: Use good quality data.  If you manage your own database, make sure it’s clean and up-to-date.  Alternatively, consider buying data from a reputable data broker – it’s far more affordable than you might think. Send content that is relevant to the recipient.  It’s pointless promoting a children’s nursery to a database of over 70’s. Make sure your mailer piques interest by standing out and featuring intriguing messages that resonate with the recipient. Although direct mailers are more expensive than e-shots, they can be far more impactful and effective.  Emails can be easily deleted and go unread, whereas it’s far harder to ignore a physical mailer which also has a longer shelf life, especially if the creative content is strong.   Marketing your business. Learn how to market your small business successfully and attract new customers with resources, videos and guides from marketing and PR experts. Visit the hub   6. Search engine optimisation. SEO has established itself as one of the key practices to market your business online. It has become essential for most companies to have a well-optimised website and this is where SEO is crucial. If you’re new to SEO, our beginner’s guide takes you through the simple things you can do to boost your strategy. In order for your webpages to show up for relevant search terms or ‘keywords’ in search engines like Google, they need to be optimised across three different areas: technical, on-page and off-page.  Technical SEO ensures that Google understands and can easily and quickly access all pages you want to rank. Having a technically sound website is only one aspect of great SEO. Ultimately, users want to read about your product or services, so you need high quality, engaging content that’s optimised in order for Google to rank it.  Tips for writing online content Write for the user, not the search engine. If your content isn’t readable, you will struggle to convert users into customers. Within your copy and HTML code, you will need to pay attention to optimising page titles, headings, internal linking and image descriptions for every page you wish to rank. Now you’ve got qualitative content live, you need a ‘vote of confidence’ from topically relevant, external sites.  Attract links naturally as well as manually through local link building, guest blogging, influencers, content marketing and PR campaigns. 7. Email marketing . The key to generating great sales is being able to communicate clearly and in a timely manner to your target audience.  Email marketing is great for creating short-term urgency and adding incremental revenue as part of your regular marketing activity. You can use emails tactically to drive a limited time offer, end of season sale or to promote a new service. Email marketing is: Cost-effective Measurable Immediate Scalable Efficient Tailor your message Once you have your customer list to hand, you can tailor your messaging to the right audiences - engagement rates will probably be high for customers who have previously used your services or purchased from you. Those customers can also share the email with their friends or contacts, expanding the reach and awareness of your brand to an audience you might never have engaged with before. Staying in touch with existing customers is a great way to keep your brand front of mind and present loyal, lapsed and potential customers with the most up to date offers and new products or services. Track your results The results of email marketing are immediate and you can quickly see the number of customers who have received your email, opened it and clicked on any of the links or offers within it. This will give you a quick indication of how well the email is performing in terms of overall engagement, sales and return on investment (ROI). The data will give you actionable insights, too, so you can see which are the most popular types of content, products, services or offers for any specific audience. You can then tailor your follow-up emails to reflect these learnings. Integrated as part of a wider campaign or used as a standalone activity, email marketing is one of the best ‘return on investment’ channels there is.  Don’t know where to start? Our PR experts are on hand to help FSB members with their public relations management, from drafting press releases to advising in the event of a PR crisis.   Affordable PR support you can count on in a crisis. Protect your reputation with FSB PR/Crisis Management. Professional PR advice for small businesses, with specialist crisis communications support and insurance of up to £10,000 in the event of a major public relations crisis. FIND out more   Return to listing
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Result 2
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Result 3
TitleSmall Business Marketing 101
Urlhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinessdevelopmentcouncil/2018/01/23/small-business-marketing-101/
DescriptionFiguring out how to market yourself can be a challenge for small businesses, so here's some simple tips to help you get started
Date23 Jan 2018
Organic Position2
H1Small Business Marketing 101
H2
H3More From Forbes
H2WithAnchors
BodySmall Business Marketing 101Elizabeth PritchettForbes Councils MemberForbes Business Development CouncilCOUNCIL POSTExpertise from Forbes Councils members, operated under license. Opinions expressed are those of the author.| Membership (fee-based)LeadershipPOST WRITTEN BYElizabeth PritchettSales & Marketing Director at Center Point Business Solutions. I passionately care about helping businesses succeed!Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to Linkedin Shutterstock Branding, services, promotions, products, pricing, prints, blogs, advertising, research and social media -- all of this is marketing. With all the marketing options out there, it can be difficult for small businesses to know what to do. Marketing is a concentrated effort to do push your brand across a variety of platforms and hope that enough makes it through to your customer. Customers need to hear your message several times, so brand, brand, brand! Here are some simple steps to help you market your small business: 1. Get organized. Getting an organized plan is the first step in any marketing effort. Make one. Start with brainstorming, create themes and transfer action items to a calendar or to-do list. Start small, and try to get a good ROI for everything you do. Create an elevator pitch: What can you tell people about your business, products and services in 30 seconds or less that keeps them interested and wanting more? Get customer input early -- if you are opening a storefront or restaurant, try hosting a soft opening or invitation-only event to get your kinks worked out and your mishaps and mistakes out of the way. Whatever you do, make a good first impression. Forbes Business Development Council is an invitation-only community for sales and biz dev executives. Do I qualify? 2. Get a website. In today’s technology-based world, the first thing a potential customer or employee does is Google your business. You need a website to show you’re real and to offer information about your business to potential customers. Make sure your website is mobile-friendly and be sure to ask for search engine optimization. Use Google Analytics to track the traffic to your website, but be leery of people who promise you top positions on search engines. While there are lots of things that can be done to increase your ranking on various search engines, unless the developer works for Google, I would be leery of a promise to get you to the top. Remember that you get what you pay for. There are a ton of do it yourself website services, but depending on the features you need on your site, some things are better left to the experts. 3. Leverage social media. Let’s face it, everyone is on social media these days, and the majority of traffic still occurs on Facebook. If you are not using Facebook for your business, create a page today. You are leaving an opportunity on the table if you don’t. There has been a shift the past few years with more and more retirees joining the social media world. I guess they realize that if they want to keep up with their kids, grandkids, friends and neighbors, they better get with the program. In fact, retirees are often my best brand ambassadors and help promote our events. 4. Set up and claim your business online. Whether you get on board or not, information about your business is and will be on the internet. Wouldn’t you rather proactively control what people read or see about your business when they Google it? Do a search on different browsers to see what information you see about your company and then claim or create a listing for your business. 5. Use Google AdWords. Try utilizing Google AdWords to specifically target the types of products or services you offer. Remember to focus on the quality of a few keywords instead of choosing too many. AdWords are great for targeting specific geographic locations and give you the ability to control your budget with flexible pricing options. 6. Create local awareness and establish a network. Join chambers, business associations, community groups, etc. Find ways to get involved. Networking is a great way to capture business leads as long as you don’t come on too strong. It allows you to meet new contacts and create more brand awareness and new referrals. Sponsor sporting events, nonprofit events or anything that is for a good cause. Get your name out there while also being a good community steward. Give away SWAG (promotional items with your business name, logo and contact info on them). T-shirts are a great example of free walking advertisements for your business. 7. Offer coupons or free products/services. Create loyalty early on. A happy customer will come back and will tell their friends about you. Create a buzz with brand ambassadors. These can be family and friends who help promote your products or services. 8. Advertise. If you build it, they still may not come. You must get out there and tell people who you are, why your product or service is different from the competition and how to find you. Advertising is not a one-size fits all solution. Find what works for you, but whatever you do, you must advertise. More than anything, focus on consistent, repetitive branding. Many marketing professionals believe in the “rule of seven," which means people need to hear or see your message at least seven times before taking any action. In today’s world of constant connectivity, you must make sure you’re seen and heard. The most common reason that people do not buy your product is that they do not know about it yet. Elizabeth PritchettPrintReprints & Permissions
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Result 4
Title42 Ideas for Your 2021 Small Business Marketing Strategy
Urlhttps://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/small-business-marketing-guide
DescriptionStart your small business marketing strategy and drive customers with these 42 ideas that will attract, engage, and delight your customers
Date11 Feb 2021
Organic Position3
H142 Ideas for Your 2021 Small Business Marketing Strategy
H2Small Business Marketing
Small Business Marketing Strategies
Marketing Tips for Small Businesses
Start Marketing Your Business Today
H31. Know your audience
2. Emphasize your value proposition
3. Stay focused on singular goals and objectives
4. Capitalize on short-term plays
5. Double-down on what works
6. Understand the power of existing customers
7. Use free promotional tools
8. Create a website to own your online presence
9. Consider blogging to attract prospects for your website
10. Promote yourself on social media
11. Invest in ads
12. Make sure you're capturing web prospects' information
13. Use email marketing to nurture leads
14. Manage relationships with a CRM
15. Lean into word of mouth as a promotion channel
1. Determine your brand's identity
2. Identify your buyer persona
3. Design a logo and other assets
4. Build your website with a CMS template
5. Track your site with analytics tools
6. Consult agencies or freelancers for web design help
7. Boost your Google ranking with SEO
8. Research keywords opportunities
9. Optimize your website for mobile devices
10. Write optimized blog posts
11. Experiment with photo and video content
12. Hire a freelancer to help you scale your content
13. Launch business pages on Facebook and Yelp
14. Build out your social media strategy
15. Use social media for customer service
16. Build interesting landing pages
17. Plan an email marketing strategy
18. Offer coupons in newsletters or on landing pages
19. Share your distribution channels on your website
20. Offer a free webinar
21. Consider PPC Advertising
22. Advertise on social media
23. Experiment with influencer marketing
24. Try co-marketing
25. Draw up a go-to-market strategy
26. Encourage happy customers to share their experiences
27. Try out marketing experiments
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Body42 Ideas for Your 2021 Small Business Marketing Strategy Written by Katherine Boyarsky @katboyarsky Download the Free Marketing Strategy Planning TemplateDownload a Free Marketing Plan Whether you're in the process of launching a new business or already have one, having a strong online presence for your brand is extremely important. In fact, consumers learn about local businesses online more than anywhere else. In 2019, 70% of shoppers surveyed say the ability to shop in-person or in a store was important when deciding which brand or retailer to buy from. Small business owners looking for a way to track ROI and brand awareness need digital marketing. Not only is digital marketing a must-have for promoting your products or services, but optimizing your online assets is also critical to your business' overall success. For local businesses, it's equally as important to have essential and updated information readily available for potential clients. If you're a small business owner with little experience in online marketing, this might all sound like a foreign language to you. Have no fear -- we'll go through what all these words mean, and why you should care about them! In this post, we'll help you build and optimize your marketing strategy using inbound marketing, setting you up to attract new clients and ultimately grow your business. Small Business Marketing. Marketing is meant to raise brand awareness and build a pipeline of qualified leads that turn into sales. With a small business, getting the word out can be challenging due to less visibility and lack of resources (like budget or time). However, there are key strategies that can help you scale your small business's marketing efforts. Whether you're struggling with a limited budget, the time restraints caused by having a smaller team, or even a lack of direction, a marketing plan that's appropriate for your business can provide guidance as you scale. Small Business Marketing Strategies. Know your audience. Emphasize your value proposition. Stay focused on singular goals and objectives. Capitalize on short-term plays. Double-down on what works. Understand the power of existing customers. USe free promotional tools. Create a website to own your online presence. Consider blogging to attract prospects for your website. Promote yourself on social media. Invest in ads. Make sure you're capturing web prospects' information. Use email marketing to nurture leads. Manage relationships with a CRM. Lean into word of mouth as a promotion channel. These strategies are fundamental as you generate awareness and revenue for your organization: 1. Know your audience. A key mistake is thinking that "anyone" is your buyer. Larger companies may be able to appeal to a wide market, but they say, "the riches are in the niches" for a reason. A niche is where you'll have the most leverage as a small business. And to develop a niche and appeal to buyers within the niche, you must understand their pains, problems, triggering events, and priorities. What is pushing them to make a purchasing decision? What does it look like if they succeed? Knowing these things will help you craft messaging that resonates and makes a compelling case for your solution. Start by thinking about your existing customers and who you'd like to work with. Then, create a buyer persona to start the process of getting into the head of your ideal client. Download Free Buyer Persona Templates 2. Emphasize your value proposition. If there's no difference between you and your competition, there's no reason why a buyer would be compelled to work with you. Your value proposition is what will differentiate you from others in your space and make up your prospects' minds that you're the provider to go with. What do you do better than anyone in the industry? Conveying this makes a compelling argument. 3. Stay focused on singular goals and objectives. If you're exploring the world of marketing, you may have noticed that there are a gazillion directions you can go in. It's tempting to do it all at once and craft a complicated machine in hopes that you covered all your bases, and it's easy to take on too much. Instead, identify where the biggest impact will be. Where is the biggest blind spot in your marketing that's prohibiting your growth? Set a performance goal around that one key area and focus your resources on the activities and tactics that will achieve that one performance goal. You can expand your efforts or pivot to other initiatives when you've made more progress toward that singular goal. 4. Capitalize on short-term plays. Start scrappy. As you scale, it's critical to see ROI sooner. This will give you the momentum and cash flow to put toward larger projects, long-term plays, and more sustainable growth models. Tactics that take time to build (such as SEO) are poor fits for your primary initiatives because you won't see a return soon enough for your liking. If you have enough resources to start there, great, but don't put all your eggs in that basket. If you have evidence that people are taking to Google with purchasing intent for your particular solution, you may find that paid ads will give you that short-term ROI. 5. Double-down on what works. Once you have your initiatives running and you've experimented with a few things, pay attention to the data. This can inform you of what's working. As you scale, it's a good idea to double-down on proven methods of generating revenue. 6. Understand the power of existing customers. A 1990 study by Bain & Company and HBR, found that it costs, on average, five times more to acquire a new customer than close an existing one. This means you shouldn't stop marketing once they've made a purchase. Identify your opportunities for repeat purchasing, upselling, and cross-selling. Because your existing customers have already made a purchase, they already know, like, and trust you. If you've provided a good experience, you've given them a reason to do business with you again should the need ever arise. Even if the need doesn't arise (in cases where it's a one-and-done purchase with no upsell opportunities), you should still delight your customers. Word of mouth is a powerful (and free) promotional tool. 7. Use free promotional tools. Speaking of free promotional tools, it's important to note that since you've committed to a limited goal and scope, there's no need to inflate your overhead with gadgets. Use free promotional tools where possible, and only commit to paid tools if you know they will drastically improve existing operations or performance. Here's a helpful list of marketing tools (some free and paid). 8. Create a website to own your online presence. Having a professional-looking website is one of the most important assets you will create for your small business. This is where you will show who you are, what you offer, where you are, and how a potential customer can get in touch with you. It is a channel you will always own (unlike other platforms which may change policies or go in and out of style), and it has the capability of generating organic traffic in addition to being a place to send traffic from advertising and other marketing initiatives. Your website isn't just a simple brochure, either. You have the capability of turning it into a 24-7 salesperson by understanding how to convert traffic and turn them into leads (more on that later). For one of the best website tools, check out HubSpot's CMS. 9. Consider blogging to attract prospects for your website. Blogging is a great way to generate organic traffic, particularly for those prospects who have not reached a purchasing decision yet. In addition, it can establish credibility in your space and position you as a thought leader. To start a blog, you can use an inexpensive or free website tool to make a free site and use one of their templates. Even if you only publish once a week, it will improve your website's visibility online and help educate your potential customers on why they should trust your company. If you're planning to write your posts yourself, check out this beginner's guide to writing. Once you start writing, you can add a call-to-action on your posts for visitors to subscribe to your blog and receive emails This is a great way to start collecting leads and offering potential customers a way to get information if they aren't ready to buy anything from you yet. Download Free Blog Post Templates 10. Promote yourself on social media. Social media might seem like it's just a fun platform for people to socialize and connect, but it's actually a powerful business tool. Social media can help you increase your domain authority, improve your search engine rankings, and engage with potential customers. Why wouldn't you want to be seen where your potential customers spend their time? Download the Free Social Media Content Calendar Template 11. Invest in ads. Organic traffic takes a while to build, and as a small business, you want to invest in short-term plays. Pay-to-play tactics that target buyers with high intent are great for short-term wins to jump-start other objectives. Google Ads are perfect if you know that your target audience is searching the web for your product or solution. If they aren't, you might consider social media ads instead. Individuals on social media have less buying intent, but with highly targeted ads and enough impressions, you'll gain the interest of your audience. Download the Free Advertising Planning Kit 12. Make sure you're capturing web prospects' information. We've been talking a lot about visibility and traffic but haven't really covered how these will help drive revenue yet. One simple way to start generating leads or customers from your website is to implement a conversion tool. A simple, free option is HubSpot Marketing Free. By using this tool to add a pop-up widget to your website, you can start collecting the email addresses of potential customers. From there, you can send out promotions and offers and convert them into paying customers. You can also implement any of these 24 conversion tools to help you optimize your website and use it to drive leads. 13. Use email marketing to nurture leads. Just because you've converted website traffic into leads doesn't mean those leads are ready to buy yet. It's important to stay top of mind and move them closer to a purchasing decision. Email marketing is a critical part of your marketing toolkit. In fact, 73 percent of millennials prefer communications from businesses to come via email. This strategy is an easy, free, and scalable way to communicate with both new and existing customers. Once you have an email marketing tool in place (many are inexpensive or even free), experiment with emailing out newsletters (with your sleek new blog posts), and other promotions to your database. We know small business owners don't have tons of free time to devote to digital marketing, so consider using marketing automation to make this process even easier for yourself. To get started planning your email marketing strategy, check out this guide and template from HubSpot. 14. Manage relationships with a CRM. Email marketing works best when you're sending personalized, targeted emails. This begins with a customer database or customer relationship management (CRM) system. Your CRM stores information about your leads, prospects, and customers so that you can keep track of customer interactions and identify sales opportunities more effectively. HubSpot has one of the best CRMs (and best of all, it's totally free). 15. Lean into word of mouth as a promotion channel. As mentioned previously, delighting customers can have a big impact on your business, primarily in repeat purchases and word of mouth. If you provide a great experience, your customers will be more inclined to leave reviews, give testimonials, and tell their friends about you. That's why it's a good idea to measure customer satisfaction and encourage customers to spread the word. Marketing Tips for Small Businesses. Determine your brand's identity. Identify your buyer persona. Design a logo and other assets. Build your website with a CMS template. Track your site with analytics tools. Consult agencies and freelancers for web design help. Boost your Google ranking with SEO. Research keyword opportunities. Optimize your website for mobile devices. Write optimized blog posts. Experiment with photo and video content. Hire a freelancer to help you scale your content. Launch business pages on Facebook and Yelp. Build out your social media strategy. Use social media for customer service. Build interesting landing pages. Plan an email marketing strategy. Offer coupons in newsletters or on landing pages. Share your distribution channels on your website. Offer a free webinar. Consider PPC Advertising. Advertise on social media. Try co-marketing. Draw up a go-to-market strategy. Encourage happy customers to share their experiences. Try out marketing experiments. 1. Determine your brand's identity. Having a consistent brand identity to promote your business will make you look more professional and help you attract new customers. According to a 2020 study, nearly 9 out of 10 people are brand loyal with nearly 25% of them climbing to be more brand loyal in 2020 compared to 2019. Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, has described a company's branding as "what other people say about you when you're not in the room." In other words, your brand is the feelings and emotions people have when hearing your company name. It's is a combination of your brand name, logo, aesthetic, and the design of all your assets. 2. Identify your buyer persona. When you imagine a customer searching for your product or service, what are they like? What are their pain points? What is their job? Creating a buyer persona that tells a story of your ideal customer can help you make a website that's optimized for them. By learning more about your target customer through creating a buyer persona, you can better figure out what types of things they may be searching for so you can include those terms on your website. 3. Design a logo and other assets. To start getting the creative juices flowing, consider your color scheme and peruse palettes with Adobe Color or Coolors. You can create your own or look through pre-made or customized color palettes. To create a logo, I'd recommend checking out Upwork or Freelancer. There are free and less expensive options for designing your own logo online, although using a freelancer or agency can give you a higher quality product and connect you with a designer who can change and update your brand assets as your company grows. 4. Build your website with a CMS template. If you're a fairly tech-savvy small business owner, you'll probably want to build your own website. A CMS (content management system) makes the process simple. Most CMSs offer customizable templates for your site that you can get for free or a small fee. There are templates for various skill levels -- from beginner all the way to advanced. Once you've created your website, most CMS platforms offer plugins to help you optimize your content for search (look for SEO plugins). This will help you rank better in Google -- which we'll discuss more in-depth in a bit. 5. Track your site with analytics tools. If you've never made a website before and aren't entirely comfortable with the technical elements, there are a variety of free tools and services to help you get started. When you create your website, make sure you implement Google Analytics or HubSpot Marketing Free (both of which are free products) so you can easily track who's looking at your site. 6. Consult agencies or freelancers for web design help. If you aren't on the technical side and want a website built for your small business, you can use a freelancer or a marketing agency that specializes in web design. This is a great option for businesses that already have a website but need it to be updated and revamped for SEO (search engine optimization) to help improve your Google ranking. To find a freelancer or marketing consultant in your area, you can use Upwork (filtering by design/creative), Codeable (for WordPress experts) or Freelancer. 7. Boost your Google ranking with SEO. If you already have a business, have you ever searched for yourself or your product/service online? If so, did you think, "Why isn't my website showing up on Google?" If so, you probably thought, "How do I rank on Google?" or "How can I improve my Google ranking?" There are a lot of factors that play into why a certain site or page appears in the top spots on the Google (or another search engine) search engine results page (SERP). Backlinko reports some of Google's top factors, which include having relevant keywords (and their placement on your site), the length of your content, having high-quality content, how fast your page loads, how often you post content, and more. When it all boils down, Google essentially tries to find the best piece of content to present to the person searching. For example, if I'm searching for the best salon in Newport, Rhode Island, it wouldn't be helpful for me to find a web page of a salon that has closed down and is located in Newport, Kentucky. It would, however, be helpful for me to find a salon in my area with great Yelp reviews, an easy-to-navigate website, and contact information readily available. Google always wants to surface the most relevant, highest-quality piece of content. To rank higher on Google, you can leverage the power of SEO, or search engine optimization. To start learning everything there is to know about this powerhouse marketing tactic, check out The Ultimate Guide to SEO. HubSpot explains SEO as "techniques that help your website rank higher in search engine results pages (SERPs). This makes your website more visible to people who are looking for solutions that your brand, product, or service can provide via search engines like Google, Yahoo!, and Bing." In other words, it's the basic concept of structuring your website and blog posts to be in the best shape for appearing first on search engines. SEO strategy usually consists of a few things. These include buyer persona research, keyword research, and on-page SEO research. These three areas can help you learn how your target market is searching online, and position your business to get discovered by the right people. 8. Research keywords opportunities. Keyword research is an extension of buyer persona research. You can use the personas you've created to search for the best keywords for your brand, then use a tool like KW Finder to find related keywords for your target audience. Then, you can do some on-page SEO research and optimization. This is where you put those keywords in the correct places on your website -- like in the meta-description, page titles, and H1 tags. 9. Optimize your website for mobile devices. Most Google searches are done on mobile devices, so it's important to have a site that looks clean and easy to navigate when someone enters it on their smartphone. A mobile site can also be beneficial for SEO, with search engines like Google which rewards you with a higher ranking if you have a mobile site. You don't have to be a tech expert to build a site that looks good on mobile. In fact, most CMS platforms like HubSpot already offer mobile-optimized templates. 10. Write optimized blog posts. Content and blogging are extremely important when it comes to your search engine ranking. The more often your desired keywords appear in your high-quality and helpful content, the more likely you are to appear in search results. A great way to become an authority on your topic, product, or service is to blog. Make sure you're writing with SEO in mind -- use this SEO checklist for bloggers, or a WordPress plugin like Yoast. 11. Experiment with photo and video content. According to HubSpot Research, more than 50% of consumers want to see videos from brands. Additionally, most social media apps, like Facebook and Instagram are embracing more visual layouts. To keep up with these trends, it's a good idea to make a few marketing videos. If you use these tips, producing a few can be quite inexpensive. 12. Hire a freelancer to help you scale your content. If you need some help creating regular blogs or promotional content, consider hiring a freelancer over investing in a full-timer. Try Upwork for a freelance blogger, videographer, or photographer. You could also consider hiring a marketing agency for a larger project. 13. Launch business pages on Facebook and Yelp. If your business is focused on a local area, the most important accounts for you are Facebook, Yelp, and Google's business feature. Having high Yelp reviews improves your authority online and helps your search ranking. You can claim your business on Yelp for free, customize your profile and add pictures, and start asking for reviews. The same thing goes for registering your Google business page. You can register your business with Google (for free) and add pictures. (If you've ever searched for your business in Google Maps and been disappointed not to see it, it's because you haven't claimed it yet!) On Facebook, you can create a Facebook business page so that people can find your location and hours. For any business, having up-to-date social media accounts will help you be found and engage with prospects. Create a Twitter account, Facebook page, learn how to use Instagram, create a Pinterest page (if relevant), and use them as a way to discover new clients. 14. Build out your social media strategy. While Facebook and Yelp will be great tools for local searches and reviews, platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter will offer you even more opportunities to share your posts, content, and promotions. If your customers can purchase your products or services online, these platforms will also give them another way to find you. Be sure not to spread yourself too thin by joining too many platforms at once. To make strategizing easier, here's a guide to the five types of social media platforms and the pros and cons of each. 15. Use social media for customer service. Once you're on your chosen platforms, be sure to answer customer or follower questions when they ask them through post comments or direct messages. This will make your company look responsive and credible. Here are some great examples of how brands have used Twitter for customer service. If you have the means, consider hiring a social media manager with community management experience. On top of posting content on a regular schedule, community managers are charged with responding to questions or concerns of followers. Interested? We published a guide on what it takes to be a great social media community manager. 16. Build interesting landing pages. A landing page offers your potential customers a free resource in exchange for filling out a short form of contact information. When they receive the resource, they might be even more pleased by your company and more interested in buying the full product. Because landing pages raise your chances of customer conversion, you want yours to look enticing. To get started, read this landing page guide to learn more about what makes this strategy successful. Then check out these free and professionally designed templates. 17. Plan an email marketing strategy. Once you start creating regular content and building out landing pages, you'll want to share them with the prospects who seem most interested in learning more about your product. For this reason, we suggest building an email marketing strategy. While you want to be careful not to bombard those who sign up for your email list with too many emails, you want to send just enough to keep your prospects informed and engaged. Here's how our metrics improved when we streamlined our email marketing strategy. If you've never sent regular newsletters before, you can use HubSpot or a number of other affordable tools to create and send an email with a professionally designed template. Many email tools also offer basic analytics that allow you to track open and click rates. 18. Offer coupons in newsletters or on landing pages. Placing a coupon in your marketing emails can engage and delight your audience. After buying a product or service at a discounted rate, they also might be more willing to pay for it in full price. If you have a subscription service, it can also be helpful to offer prospects a code for a free trial so they can test it out. 19. Share your distribution channels on your website. Once you have a few social media accounts and can allow people to sign up for your newsletter, highlight this on your website so your visitors can follow you. One way companies do this is to display all of their linked social icons and a newsletter sign-up call to action on all pages of your website. A good place to include these is on the top right corner or on the footer of each page. This way they are visible but aren't distracting from any content. 20. Offer a free webinar. A webinar allows potential customers to sign up for a short online course hosted by you. These courses are usually between 30 minutes to an hour and allow you to give tips and answer questions related to a topic your brand is familiar with. While this strategy can help you boost your credibility in your field, it can also offer you potential leads and sales opportunities. 21. Consider PPC Advertising. If you're working hard on SEO, but are still looking for an extra boost, consider PPC -- or pay-per-click -- advertising. With this search engine marketing technique, you use Google AdWords or Bing Ads to show up higher. and as an advertised listing, in search results. Before you dive into PPC, you'll want to make sure your landing page is as optimized as possible. If you are paying by the click and those who click on the page don't convert, you will lose advertising dollars. To help you get started, read this Ultimate Guide to PPC. Then, use this PPC planning template to plan an optimized campaign. You can also use a few handy tools and software to edit, track, and report on your campaigns. 22. Advertise on social media. Most of the major social media platforms offer affordable advertising options that can help you target your posts to a specific audience. While many small businesses have been advertising on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn for years, Instagram now allows brands to advertise through its Shoppable tool. 23. Experiment with influencer marketing. Is there someone in your area with a high social media following who's considered an expert in a field your company exists in? If you're able to reach out to them, see if they'd be willing to share an experience they've had with your product or service on social media. This will alert their follower base of your product. These followers may also trust your product more because an expert is endorsing it. If you can't find an influencer to volunteer, you can also consider paying one or two on a freelance basis. To learn more about this strategy, check out our Ultimate Guide to Influencer Marketing. 24. Try co-marketing. Is there a local business in your area that isn't a direct competitor but offers a product or service to a similar target audience? Consider working with them on a cobranded campaign where you promote each other on social media, via email, or in your blog. While you'll give your partnering company added promotion, it will also allow their fanbase to learn more about you. 25. Draw up a go-to-market strategy. Once you've activated all the tools you need to promote your product or service, you'll need to create a promotional plan that aligns with the customer journey. Consider which content will attract, engage, and delight your prospects and how you will convert them into a customer. To help you plan out this process, use this template. 26. Encourage happy customers to share their experiences. When a happy customer talks about how great your company is on social media or a review site, your product or service looks like a good investment. Even on social media, word of mouth is still a huge factor in someone's purchasing decision. If a prospect sees a friend raving about your business on Facebook or if they post a photo of a meal from your restaurant on Instagram, they could be more likely to go. After all, 71% of consumers are more likely to purchase based on social media referrals. If customers are telling you they love your product, encourage them to share about the experience on Yelp, Google, or social. If you have a physical business, you might also want to place signs up with your account handles so customers know who to tag if they post a picture of your product. 27. Try out marketing experiments. If there's a new social platform you're interested in or a new marketing trend, don't be afraid to experiment. If an experiment goes well, you could be ahead of the game, and it never hurts to be a thought leader in your industry. When you experiment with a new marketing strategy, be sure to have a solid hypothesis or question in mind. This will keep you focused on the end goal and reduce the desire to chase the next big thing as it comes along. Also, prepare for what your next steps will be if you get good or bad results. Here's a quick guide to leading a successful marketing experiment. Well, there you have it. Here's a round-up of the key takeaways from this article: Start Marketing Your Business Today. You probably have a long road ahead to build your online presence, but any steps you can make will have a huge impact on your business. Some things like blogging definitely take a few months to start kicking in and generating traffic, but social media posts pay-per-click ads can have immediate effects. If you’re still not sure which direction is the perfect fit for your business, brainstorm your ideas in this marketing plan template. Editor's note: This post was originally published in September 2020 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.   Originally published Feb 11, 2021 7:00:00 AM, updated August 25 2021 Topics: Marketing Strategy Don't forget to share this post! Related Articles. 15 Marketing Job Titles + The Roles That Leaders Plan To Invest In Next Year . Marketing  | 8 min read The Ultimate Guide to Marketing Strategies & How to Improve Your Digital Presence . Marketing  | 13 min read How to Create a Holiday Marketing Campaign: A Step-by-Step Guide . Marketing  | 9 min read Expand Offer Social Media Content Calendar Template Get it now Get it now Download for Later.
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Title8 steps to marketing your business | Small Business Development Corporation
Urlhttps://www.smallbusiness.wa.gov.au/marketing/8-steps-to-marketing
DescriptionDiscover the eight essential steps you need to follow to market your business. This includes researching opportunities, identifying your target market and using the right channels
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H18 steps to marketing your business
H2Marketing plan template
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H3smallbusiness.wa.gov.au
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H2WithAnchorsMarketing plan template
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Body8 steps to marketing your business Researching opportunities, identifying your target market, developing a unique proposition, and choosing your channels are all important steps in marketing your business. Discover the eight essential steps you need to follow to market your business. Step 1. Conduct market research. Market research is a key part of developing your marketing strategy. It is about collecting information that provides an insight into your customers thinking, buying patterns, and location. In addition, market research can also assist you to undertake an initial sales forecast, monitor market trends and keep an eye on what your competition is doing. Learn more about market research. Step 2. Profile your target markets. Trying to promote your product or service to everyone can be costly and ineffective. Grouping or segmenting your potential customers based on certain characteristics will help to focus your marketing efforts. Generally segmentation is based on factors such as:  Geography Where do they live? Where do they work? Demographics Gender Age Level of education Occupation Income Behaviour What is the primary reason they would use your product or service? What appeals to them about your particular brand? What are their usage rates of your product or service? Where do they typically source information about your type of product or service? Lifestyle and values What is their family situation? What do they value in their lives? What are their hobbies and interests? Do they have children? Do they have pets? Your target market should have a need for your product or service and be willing to pay for your offer. Step 3. Identify your unique selling proposition (USP). A USP is the unique reason your customers buy from you and not your competitors – it’s what makes your business stand out from the crowd. It is important to define what you do differently and be able to convey that to potential customers. Commonly, this reflects your special knowledge or skills. Your USP may be having a new or unique offering or providing exceptional service. Start developing your USP by answering the following questions: What do you love most about your products and services? What special skills or knowledge do you have? What makes your customers come to you instead of your competitors? How do your customers benefit by purchasing your products or services? Which aspects do you generally highlight when you describe your business to strangers? Step 4. Develop your business brand. Every business, regardless of size, is likely to need a brand. A brand is more than a logo, colour or tagline. A well-articulated brand emotionally connects with your target customers and conveys who you are, what you stand for and what you can deliver. Step 5. Choose your marketing avenues. While there are many available, consider your target audience when you are determining which to use. Options include: a business website  social media blogging brochures and flyers networking events print advertising word of mouth cold calling letter drops. Step 6. Set your goals and budget. Marketing goals will help you to define what you want to achieve through your marketing activities. Your goals should be SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-based. You will also need to allocate a budget to your marketing activities. Your marketing budget will need to include elements such as: website development and maintenance search engine optimisation strategy design of branding printing of promotional material (business cards, brochures, signage, etc) advertising donations and sponsorships employing staff to undertake marketing activities. Free download Marketing plan template. As a general rule of thumb you should spend between three and five percent of your actual or expected annual turnover on marketing. If your business is new you may need to allocate more funds initially to build your business profile. To help you create a marketing plan for your business, download our free template and how to guide. Download the template Download the how to guide Step 7. Nurture your loyal customers. Your customers are the key to your success so it is important to look after them and encourage loyalty. Providing exceptional customer service can keep people coming back and set you apart from your competitors. Strategies to build loyalty in customers include: communicating regularly with customers through social media, blogs or e-news providing after-sale follow up delivering on your promises going the ‘extra mile’ and providing benefits that exceed initial expectations using feedback and complaints as an opportunity to improve services listening to customers training staff in customer service and basic sales processes. Step 8. Monitor and review. It is important to regularly monitor and review your marketing activities to determine whether they are achieving the desired outcome, such as increased sales. Initially you should review your marketing plan every three months to ensure your activities are supporting your strategy. Once your business becomes more established review your plan when you introduce a new product or service, if a new competitor enters the market or if an issue arises that affects your industry. Monitoring activities may include reviewing your sales figures on a regular basis (monthly) or monitoring customer activity during an advertising campaign. You can also access and review free analytic tools to determine the effectiveness of your social media or website campaigns. Learn more about digital marketing. Downloads. Guide to marketing and branding. Maintaining and developing a successful, sustainable business depends on your customers’ perception and experience of your product or service. That's where marketing and branding can help. Download the guide Marketing plan template. Spreading the word about your business and attracting customers is important for any successful business. This marketing plan template will help you determine how to get your business noticed by the people who need or want your product. Download the template Guide to using the marketing plan template. This guide will walk you through the process of completing a marketing plan for your business. It's designed to be used alongside our marketing plan template. 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Result 6
TitleTop 60 ways to promote your business - Entrepreneur Handbook
Urlhttps://entrepreneurhandbook.co.uk/how-to-promote-your-business/
DescriptionDiscover how to cost effectively promote your business at a national or local level with our complete list of business promotion strategies
Date
Organic Position5
H1Top 60 ways to promote your business
H2Learn the different ways you can promote your business including newspapers, awards, social networking and your website
1. Create a brand & logo
2. Create a website
3. Get some business stationary
4. Engage with Google
5. Optimise! Search engine optimisation
6. Check your online NAPs
7. Go Mobile and create an app
8. Socialise!
9. Start building your email list from day one
10. Get yourself a trusted email marketing platform
11. Add calls to action in your emails
12. Ask for reviews
13. Set up a blog
14. Business directories
15. Advertising
16. Google AdWords
17. Learn to repurpose content
18. Take steps to boost conversions
19. Distribute promotional merchandise
20. Outdoor promotion
21. Use vehicle branding
22. Don’t ignore the power of videos
23. Use affiliates to promote your products
24. Join associations and attend meetings of professional groups
25. Partner up
26. Offer a free consultation
27. Word of mouth
28. Teach classes in your community
29. Donate a prize to a local fundraiser
30. Offer to speak at a local event or meeting
31. List your business on online marketplaces
32. Hold a competition
33. Corporate social responsibility
34. Host events in your community
35. Wear and use your products in public
36. Get talking
37. Get in touch with your local newspaper
38. Enter as many business awards as you can
39. Get on the phone
40. Comment on related blogs
41. Start guest posting
42. Exhibit at trade shows
43. Go on air
44. Facebook ads
45. Leverage the following of relevant Instagrammers
46. Build credibility on Trustpilot and Yelp
47. Set up Google Alerts
48. Create a customer loyalty scheme
49. Offer discounts
50. Improve your customer service
51. Open house
52. Renew Interest
53. Pinterest
54. Sponsor an event or sports team
55. Host a webinar
56. Run a social media competition
57. Add a visual aspect to your content
58. Start a podcast
59. Hire a marketing consultant
60. Last but not least – don’t spam!
Case study of business promotion
H3Related topics
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About
Topics
H2WithAnchorsLearn the different ways you can promote your business including newspapers, awards, social networking and your website
1. Create a brand & logo
2. Create a website
3. Get some business stationary
4. Engage with Google
5. Optimise! Search engine optimisation
6. Check your online NAPs
7. Go Mobile and create an app
8. Socialise!
9. Start building your email list from day one
10. Get yourself a trusted email marketing platform
11. Add calls to action in your emails
12. Ask for reviews
13. Set up a blog
14. Business directories
15. Advertising
16. Google AdWords
17. Learn to repurpose content
18. Take steps to boost conversions
19. Distribute promotional merchandise
20. Outdoor promotion
21. Use vehicle branding
22. Don’t ignore the power of videos
23. Use affiliates to promote your products
24. Join associations and attend meetings of professional groups
25. Partner up
26. Offer a free consultation
27. Word of mouth
28. Teach classes in your community
29. Donate a prize to a local fundraiser
30. Offer to speak at a local event or meeting
31. List your business on online marketplaces
32. Hold a competition
33. Corporate social responsibility
34. Host events in your community
35. Wear and use your products in public
36. Get talking
37. Get in touch with your local newspaper
38. Enter as many business awards as you can
39. Get on the phone
40. Comment on related blogs
41. Start guest posting
42. Exhibit at trade shows
43. Go on air
44. Facebook ads
45. Leverage the following of relevant Instagrammers
46. Build credibility on Trustpilot and Yelp
47. Set up Google Alerts
48. Create a customer loyalty scheme
49. Offer discounts
50. Improve your customer service
51. Open house
52. Renew Interest
53. Pinterest
54. Sponsor an event or sports team
55. Host a webinar
56. Run a social media competition
57. Add a visual aspect to your content
58. Start a podcast
59. Hire a marketing consultant
60. Last but not least – don’t spam!
Case study of business promotion
BodyTop 60 ways to promote your business Learn the different ways you can promote your business including newspapers, awards, social networking and your website. Editorial team | October 8, 2013 Finding a product or service to sell is only half the story. Now you have to get out there and tell people about it. In the days before the internet and social media, promoting your business meant spending a fortune on advertising or PR services, a high cost for a small business trying to get off the ground. Not anymore. Thanks to new technology, there are now lots of ways that a small fledgling business can get word of their products or services out to prospective customers – many of them free. There is a variety of online and offline mechanisms to market your business, such as social networking, advertisements, word of mouth and outdoor advertising, some pricier than others. Here are 60 ways you can promote whatever business, product or service you have, whether it’s offline or online. 1. Create a brand & logo. Don’t be fooled by how simplistic this first tip may seem. Widespread brand recognition is your ultimate goal, and your business needs to inspire credibility and persuade others to spread the word about your work. You need to create a brand you can build on from the start. Start by taking inventory of your business’ unique value proposition, its personality, and the values that define it. Then you can start to think about your visual brand. Hiring a design firm may be costly, but there are popular crowdsourced design services on the web, such as crowdspring, that provide a selection of custom logo designs for your brand, and at an affordable price. You can even create a logo using an online logo maker if you’re on a very tight budget. Your visual brand may evolve with your business, but you need to start with something on which you can build your business’ reputation. 2. Create a website. Setting up a website is relatively easy. Making sure it’s attractive, functional, accessible, and mobile-friendly can make your business look professional. There are many affordable website services you can use to get your business online fast and with little cost. These services offer ready-made website templates with lead-generation features, free logos and other features. Or, if you’d prefer to have more control over your site, you can always use WordPress, the world’s most popular (and entirely free) content management system. Thanks to the vast selection of available WordPress themes for professional business websites, anyone can easily set up a fully functional and expertly designed site. The overall cost of a site can vary from the type of design and function. Additionally, before marketing your website through any online channels, make sure your metadata is accurate and follows Google Webmaster guidelines. Remember, too, to put everything on your website. If you book a stand at a trade fair, for example, get your team to wear t-shirts with your logo, phone number and website details on the back. You could even paint your car with your company logo and include your brand’s contact details. 3. Get some business stationary. You’ve got your brand, you’ve got your logo – now to get it out there. You want to create the strongest association possible between your logo and branding and your actual business, this is where business stationary comes into play. Print business cards, order letterheads and envelopes – you can even get a franking machine to print your company brand onto all outgoing post. Make sure you’ve got your website listed on your business card, at the bottom of emails, printed onto all physical advertising copy leaving your office. The best way to get the word out, is to establish mental imagery with your company. 4. Engage with Google. Google has some smart tools to help promote your business. You can create an account on Google Business and Google Places. More people search for businesses online than anywhere else, and adding your website and company information to Google’s business directory can be helpful. Most importantly, it’s free and straightforward, so there’s no reason not to. You can also manage your listing information, including business description, product or service details, pictures, videos and offers. Being listed in local directories can also increase the number of trusted inbound links to your website. 5. Optimise! Search engine optimisation. Your website will be of little use if nobody can find it on their search engine. To generate the most online traffic, and therefore customers, you need to rank highly on Google. Because really, does anyone click to the second page of results? To rank, you will need to work on your SEO techniques regularly, monitoring your statistics closely and refining your features accordingly. One of the first things to do is carry out keyword research on sites like Serpstat, SEMRush or Keywords Everywhere. What phrases are your customers searching? What questions do they have? Do your best to answer all their queries, in one place. But be wary of keyword stuffing: Google can spot this a mile off and may penalise you for it in the rankings. You will also need to update your site frequently with keyword-rich content and work on building quality backlinks to your site. Make use of internal links too: spread credibility from high-ranking sites to your own by creating natural links between pages. 6. Check your online NAPs. In SEO, NAP stands for name, address and phone number. It’s a crucial factor in ranking well in organic search results. Google takes your contact details into account when determining what results to show for geo-targeted searches. If you’ve listed your company on Google My Business, make sure your details are correct first and foremost, and make sure they line up with all your other listings on the web. 7. Go Mobile and create an app. An effective online promotion involves more than just a mobile-friendly website. Firms with a mobile app are ahead of the game when it comes to next-level marketing. That’s just to say that mobile apps increase the visibility of your business to customers at all times, improve customer engagement, and turn them into loyal lovers of your product or service! 8. Socialise! When setting up your business profile on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter, make sure to include a good description, relevant keywords and a link to your website. Join groups or conversations that talk about your type of products or services and participate in the discussions. Be careful not to spam them with constant promos for what you sell, or you’ll damage your reputation. On Facebook, you can create a page for your business, on which you can post information, offers, photos and details of forthcoming events. You can use Twitter to build up a following amongst potential and existing customers – the secret is to initiate conversations with potential consumers rather than pushing how fantastic your product is. Linkedin is an online address book which you can use to connect to professionals in your industry. The best way to get your business noticed, however, is to create a dedicated YouTube Channel just for your company – effectively free marketing which you can use to reach thousands of potential customers. 9. Start building your email list from day one. Many small businesses aren’t aware of the benefits of email marketing and fail to leverage their website or blog to grow their mailing list. Having a simple email signup form on your website can yield great results and should be done from the very beginning. Email signup is also a quick way to learn more about your customers – when they enter their contact details, consider including an optional box asking them how they got to your site, or why they’re here. This will double as active market research. 10. Get yourself a trusted email marketing platform. Once you’ve got your own email list of leads, go ahead and start sending those enticing emails that will draw customers to your landing page. The best way to do that is to get yourself a reliable email service, along with other access to communication channels like Web Push or SMS to promote your business. 11. Add calls to action in your emails. We are inundated with emails every single day. At work, at home, on the move. How is yours going to stand out from the hundreds of others crowding your customers’ inboxes? Ultimately, what you want is a click – you want your customers to read your email, and visit your site. There’s no better way to achieve this than with a big, bright call to action button. Ask a question, spike your reader’s interest or give them an offer, with a blindingly obvious button they can hit to follow this interest. 12. Ask for reviews. Most local and national sites and directories allow customer reviews. Encourage your customers to write reviews about your products or services. Whether good or bad, reviews make your business more credible to future customers and can be lessons learned for you. You can ask for reviews on the website by leaving a comment section, include a review link in your email marketing or even add a Pop-Up on your website to encourage people to leave feedback. Be sure to record customer feedback somewhere prominent on your site, so that others can find and read the results. 13. Set up a blog. Setting up a blog costs next to nothing. So long as it’s easily maintained, a blog is an excellent way to engage with your customers (both existing and prospective), provide them with updates, and publish content that is useful for your search engine presence. Interviewing other experts in your field is a fantastic way to network, and can help you build credibility among your audience. Create useful content that your readers will want to share. If you need free editorial images for your blog, check out our post on free stock photos. 14. Business directories. You can get free advertisement on various directories, so take advantage of this offline marketing method. Yellow pages directories are updated and distributed to millions of households every year. They also have online equivalents and offer small businesses discounts for buying advertising in both formats. There are also plenty of free and paid-for local directories. 15. Advertising. Maximise your brand awareness by sending out press releases, advertising in local or national newspapers, magazines and radio stations. If you’re just starting out, your local newspaper may have a section in the paper just for that. Also, try printing out the URL of your website on your business cards or letterhead, as a well-known URL can play a significant role in business advertisement. High-quality ads can be costly, but they’re an expense that’s likely to have a lucrative payback. The single best way to increase your revenue is to increase your client base, which, quite simply, means reaching more people. That leads us on to Google ads. 16. Google AdWords. Google’s paid advertising program is a very effective way to get your website listed on search engines for your desired search terms. It can be a game-changer, particularly in the short-term while you work on improving your organic rank in the free listings. Due to increasing competition, the cost per click can be high, but you can set a maximum monthly budget to keep your costs under control. You can also try free advertising vouchers and get some advertising for your business for free. 17. Learn to repurpose content. Disseminating your marketing or blog content to promote your business is extremely important, but creating content takes a lot of time and effort. SEO teaches us that quality content is vital, but how do you create killer content again and again? This is where repurposing becomes useful. When you repurpose content, you use existing information and repackage it in a different format, to distribute through new channels and increase your marketing reach. For example, you can convert a blog post into a podcast, or an article into a video. Squeeze every drop of value out of your best content by reusing the material in ingenious ways. 18. Take steps to boost conversions. Your website may get a lot of traffic, but if you fail to convert visitors into leads, this traffic is of little use. An easy way to convert website visitors into leads would be to use a call-to-action on your website, and in all your marketing material. Make sure call-to-actions appear prominently throughout your site, and make sure they appeal directly to your target market. Want to get the best car insurance deals sent straight to your inbox? Do you want to be the first to get your hands on my new book? Include relevant questions that grab your readers’ attention, with a call-to-action such as: enter your email address below for the latest offers! 19. Distribute promotional merchandise. Taking your business promotion offline can also reap sizeable rewards. Research from the British Promotional Merchandise Association (BPMA) has shown that over 79% of survey respondents feel appreciated when they receive a promotional gift (such as custom air fresheners, luxury pens or novelty mugs). How useful a promotional product is, is one of the most significant factors that customers consider when deciding whether or not to keep a product, so be sure to do some research on the best, most useable items for your brand and target audience. Keep in mind that single-use plastics and other throwaway items harm the environment and are likely to upset eco-conscious customers. On the contrary, things like travel mugs or reusable bags can be great options. These items are highly useful and often used, which will maximise your brand awareness. 20. Outdoor promotion. Outdoor advertising, like a billboard ad, is considered expensive for small businesses. But, hiring one out in a strategic location – e.g. in close proximity to your firm – can cost about the same as an advert in a newspaper, will last far longer and be seen by your potential customers. 21. Use vehicle branding. Using your own vehicle as advertising space is also a smart, cost-effective idea for creating local or regional brand awareness. If you run a business which involves a lot of driving, capitalise on this by using your drive-time as a marketing tool. If you’ve got a fleet of vehicles, you can order car magnets and stick them on to all your company-owned vans. Anywhere your vehicles go, people will see your branding, which is great for boosting name-recognition in your area. 22. Don’t ignore the power of videos. Videos are very popular with today’s consumers and offer an excellent way to market your business. Displaying videos showing your product, or publishing instructional videos is a very effective way to increase your customer base. There are many ways a small business can use videos as part of their marketing strategy. Being active on YouTube is one of them: YouTube is the most widely used video platform on the web. Building a YouTube presence is fantastic exposure for your business. A popular channel can attract enormous passive footfall and ultimately attract new customers. Commenting on videos relevant to your niche is another way to engage with users and increase your brand visibility. 23. Use affiliates to promote your products. Affiliate marketing is one of the most effective ways to maximise brand awareness. It involves enlisting other people with wide-reaching platforms and capitalising on their following to increase your company’s exposure. In return for endorsing your product, the affiliate marketer will get a commission on all sales generated through their link. The most valuable affiliate marketers are undoubtedly social media influencers. The term ‘influencer’ is crucial here: not only will their endorsement reach hundreds of thousands of potential customers, but if followers think their favourite Instagram personality is using your product, they’re more than likely to follow suit. Items of clothing, for example, have been known to sell out in minutes when a famous Instagram influencer tags their outfit. To capitalise on this method, be sure to use social media marketers within your niche. Fitness influencers are inundated daily with affiliate marketing opportunities from health and fitness brands, as their target audiences match almost exactly. If you don’t have the time to seek out relevant affiliate marketers, there are many affiliate channels you can use, which have tens of thousands of affiliates actively seeking products to promote. 24. Join associations and attend meetings of professional groups. Groups such as your local Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club, or civic associations represent powerful networking opportunities for your company. Meet-ups of local businesses and entrepreneurs have become common in most cities. Attend as many as you can, and try and forge relationships with companies or individuals in your industry. Have business cards at the ready, and don’t forget to listen to the people you speak to. Ask them what they do and take in an interest in what they have to say. They’ll be flattered by your attention, and better remember you because of it. Even better is to follow up these connections when you get home – connect on LinkedIn, or send them an email to cement your links. 25. Partner up. Network with other small businesses who are doing similar work to you and collaborate with them to offer a special deal to local customers. The aim is for both companies to profit by coming up with an offer that benefits the customer base of both companies. A dual offer should encourage customers to take up both services, so make sure that your companies offer products that complement each other. Pairing up creates not only a doubly attractive offer for a client, but also halves your marketing costs. By working together, you can save money on promotional costs and get valuable referrals. 26. Offer a free consultation. Offering a no-obligation consultation gives you the opportunity to turn prospective clients into customers. Find people you think could use your services and offer them a free visit or meeting. This allows you to provide practical solutions to the client and demonstrate the value you can bring them. It’s also a fantastic way to explain what your business offers and how it can help them personally, which will ultimately encourage them to try out your services. 27. Word of mouth. 92% of people trust the recommendation of friends and family, which can work to your advantage, particularly in a local community-based setting. Getting your first few customers is the hardest work you’ll have to do. When you’re working with your first customers, don’t forget that you’re already indirectly marketing to their circles of friends and family. Go the extra mile for your customers, and they’re more likely to tell other people about your service. Make it easy for them to recommend you through referral and rewards schemes. 28. Teach classes in your community. If your business area lends itself to specialist knowledge, offer to teach some free classes at local venues. You’ll attract like-minded individuals, which could mean prospective clients or useful industry connections. Either way, it will increase your brand awareness as well as reputation, particularly if the classes are free of charge and offer a benefit to the community in some way. Alternatively, sign up to be a teacher for Community Education classes through a local college. Make sure that all your attendees have your company details, and encourage them to get in touch and engage with your business on social media. 29. Donate a prize to a local fundraiser. If you make or sell hard goods, try donating some of your products to be a prize at a local fundraiser. If you offer services, donate a gift certificate instead. Not only will you be helping local causes, but you’ll be increasing your brand exposure in the local community. The better the prize, the more people will talk about it, and the more money the charity will make, too. 30. Offer to speak at a local event or meeting. This is much like the idea of teaching classes in your community but requires much less time and commitment. A talk can be an hour or less and is an opportunity to gather prospective customers together, which gives you a valuable marketing opportunity. Not only does a talk showcase your knowledge and skills, but it can also be an invaluable place to network with people that may not generally attend actual ‘networking events’. Talks relevant to your industry will attract meaningful connections, which is essential for expanding your business network. Try to include a mixer at the end of such events, to give you a chance to build a rapport with prospective customers and links. 31. List your business on online marketplaces. Many online marketplaces connect buyers and sellers. Listing your business on these platforms is a great way to improve the visibility of your brand and promote your services. Established platforms attract high traffic volume, which can lead to a dramatic spike in sales without any active effort on your part. Selling on reputable sites also boosts your credibility, another valuable currency in the marketing world. 32. Hold a competition. We’ve already talked about donating a prize for a local competition or fundraiser. But why not host your own? Use your social media channels to promote an exciting competition. Encourage your followers to share it with their friends by tagging people they know for extra entries, to increase your following. Giveaways, freebies, prize draws or sweepstakes will generate a buzz around your business. The bigger the buzz, the better the exposure – focus on getting your giveaway as viral as possible for maximum impact. Make sure the freebie is relevant to the products you sell or your business services in some way. Check out websites such as CustomInk to find customisable products that link well with your business. Choose products that’ll grab the attention of your target market, and that they’re likely to use regularly. 33. Corporate social responsibility. Make sure your business has a corporate social responsibility strategy integrated into your business model. Such a strategy involves integrating social or environmental concerns into your business operations, to hold the business accountable to its impact on society, and to build an invested engagement with your employees. CSR endeavours are valuable for the company as well as the community. They’re important for building positive relationships with employees and connecting the business with the public. Publicise your activities internally as well as externally to all stakeholders, and encourage them to join you in your efforts. 34. Host events in your community. Community events are a great way to build a rapport with the public. Some businesses have collaborated to host scavenger hunts in their local towns. Participants pick up a map from the starting point, which could be your company’s office or your shop storefront, before following a set route around other participating businesses. On the way, they’re on the lookout for items to collect or spot, with a prize incentive. Not only does the publicity around a scavenger hunt create brand awareness, but the design of the event means all participants will have to pass by your shop or premises, making sure they know where you are. Events like these aim to show people what’s available locally. Be sure to give the most enthusiastic participants the chance to win prizes. 35. Wear and use your products in public. If you ever bump into Graham Milton at a party, there’s a high chance that he will be wearing a tuxedo shirt with an extravagant design on the back. That’s because his business, Fluxedo Shirts, sells exactly that. Milton seizes every opportunity to show off his shirts, wearing them to all kinds of places such as Notting Hill Carnival and music festivals, where his formal attire makes him stand out from the crowd. Whenever he goes, he gets a lot of questions about his clothes and where to buy them. This publicity is efficient marketing. Don your products every opportunity you get, to squeeze in marketing wherever you can! 36. Get talking. Every kind of occasion, whether planned or unexpected, presents an opportunity for an entrepreneur to promote their venture. Always carry a business card or samples of your products. Ali Wallace, who started up the recruitment agency DNA, has found several new clients by merely getting chatting to his fellow travellers on the commuter train from his home in North Hertfordshire to London. Even if a business opportunity doesn’t immediately present itself, it is worth staying in touch with people you meet by sending them an email after an event or introducing them to other useful contacts to keep the connection alive.  That way, they are more likely to remember you when something comes along that’s helpful for your business. 37. Get in touch with your local newspaper. Contact your local newsagents, papers and magazines. See if they want to do a feature on your business. Not only is coverage like this free, but it will also give your company and product far greater credibility than a paid-for advert could ever achieve. The smaller the paper, the more likely you’ll feature. Start with local publications and work your way up once you’ve had some successful feature pieces. 38. Enter as many business awards as you can. There seems to be a new ‘Entrepreneur of the year’ competition popping up every week – someone has got to win, and if you are creating something unique, there’s no reason why it can’t be you! If you win – or are even shortlisted – you’ll get lots of press coverage and recognition, which is a truly fabulous way of promoting your business. 39. Get on the phone. Put together a call list of useful contacts and prospective clients and reach out. Cold-calling has a bad rep, but can be a brilliant tactic for introducing yourself to potential clients and arousing interest in your brand. Try and find the contact for the person who’s going to be best able to help you, or who’s in a position to make a decision about working with you, to cut out waiting time needed for the message to filter up internally. Your best bets will be the head of marketing or, if you can, the director themselves. Briefly describe your business model and what you can offer them. Ask to book in a meeting or appointment to discuss how you can solve an issue for them or help them meet their needs. Depending on the service you offer, an informal chat, such as going for a coffee, might work better. 40. Comment on related blogs. Capitalise on the readers of blogs related to your business by engaging on these sites. Find blogs in your niche, and comment on posts, including your URL if you can. Not only will this build links within the community you’re targeting, it also serves an SEO purpose. If the website is reputable, Google will pick up the link between the blog and your site and index your content higher in the rankings by association. Aside from SEO, valuable comments will provoke interest and get engagement from the public. Anyone who interacts with you, or even anyone who sees your comment, is a potential customer. Building friendly relationships with competitors and other bloggers also opens the door for future collaborations. 41. Start guest posting. Maximise your exposure by taking advantage of other people’s followers and readership. Guest posting is where you produce content such as a post or article as a guest on somebody else’s site. They’ll publish it to their audience, which gives your brand authority and credibility among a new group of people. Now, If you are looking for a guest posting provider, you can contact Outreach Solutions. This is also an effective way to procure backlinks to your website from popular sites with impressive domain authority. This will spread valuable link authority back to your own site, which is a vital part of SEO. Writing an article closely linked to your business – or better, one that actively promotes your product – is also free marketing. You can even offer to reciprocate with similar brands by offering them a guest spot on your own site. 42. Exhibit at trade shows. Attending networking events is one thing, but exhibiting at trade shows has even greater value. Not only can you make valuable connections with key players in your field, but you can also target prospective customers. Trade shows are usually industry specific, which means you’re instantly exposed to masses of buyers looking for products like yours. The only downside is that a spot at a popular trade show can be expensive. Do your research first, to figure out how much you’re likely to profit from each one. 43. Go on air. Local TV stations are always looking for new guests and local features. Talk shows, too, are on a constant look-out for innovative content and interesting people to interview. You’ve got nothing to lose – contact as many talk shows and news stations as you can and offer to appear. Include a brief profile about who you are, what your business does and why you’re unique or interesting. The podcast market has also exploded in recent years. There are now thousands of podcasts freely available to huge audiences. Find some popular podcasts in your niche and write to them, offering to share your expertise or carry out an interview. If you can, find podcasts published on the larger platforms such as Apple Podcasts or Spotify, which have greater authority and more download traffic. 44. Facebook ads. One form of advertising that deserves a special mention is Facebook ads. Facebook holds a lot of data on its users, which means they can perfectly target specific demographics of people who might need your products. To get the most out of Facebook ads, you need to know your customer well, so you can tell Facebook who they should target. You can use metrics like age, marital status, geographic location and hobbies to whittle down your target market. Using these metrics, you can implement strategic landing pages, where you can encourage visitors to enter their data, creating valuable business leads. Facebook ads can be costly but have the advantage of reaching the public on a colossal scale. Experiment with your Facebook ads and see which copy and landing pages generate the most leads. 45. Leverage the following of relevant Instagrammers. We’ve already talked about the power of Instagram Influencers as a marketing tool, under affiliate marketing. But you don’t need to pay these Instagrammers to capitalise on their following. If there are big Instagram Influencers in the same niche as your business, they’re unlikely to reject a free product. Send them a freebie they want and there’s a good chance that, if they like the gift, they’ll mention it on their page – even just a simple tag to your Instagram account or a mention of your brand can amplify your outreach on a huge scale. If the Influencer wants it, there’s no doubt this will influence their followers to check you out, too. The same goes here for YouTube stars. If a YouTube sensation likes your product and uses it in their videos, this is huge exposure for you. Find the biggest social media personalities within your niche market and shower them with gifts! 46. Build credibility on Trustpilot and Yelp. According to Trustpilot, over 93% of customers read reviews before they buy from an unfamiliar company. Sites like Trustpilot and Yelp collate reviews from consumers on thousands of specific products, websites and brands. Having a credible profile on these review websites can go a long way in establishing credibility, authority and trust in your brand. Trustpilot offers a free tool called Benchmark, which allows you to see how you’re performing on their site. It uses the data entered on the website to give you an overview of your company’s performance. This information is vital to improving your brand’s reputation – the key is to listen to your customers. With this in mind, the best way to establish a good relationship with your customers is to invite, promote and act on their feedback. Ask for reviews and display them prominently on your site. Consumers like to feel that their voices are heard, and listening to your target audience is vital for retaining existing customers, as well as attracting new ones. 47. Set up Google Alerts. In the same vein, you need to be aware of your public image. This includes how you’re seen by the public, and what people have to say about your products and services. Google Alerts send you the latest content relevant to whatever terms you enter. You can set up an alert for your brand name, your website domain or your company email address, and you can even create an alert for your competitors. You’ll receive a report anytime somebody publishes new content about your business, or other keywords you’ve set up. If somebody posts a bad review, you’ll be the first to know, which means you can respond quickly to mitigate the damage. Perhaps you can address the issue on your site or social media or contact the reviewer personally to see if you can change their mind. It’s also helpful to learn what good things people are saying about you. If a local media outlet publishes a glowing review of your product, you can share the content to boost your sales. 48. Create a customer loyalty scheme. Encourage committed consumers and keep happy customers coming back by introducing a loyalty scheme. You can do this via a points system, a loyalty card, or by sending perks to long-standing customers or frequent buyers. Perhaps you’ll give a discount out to customers on their birthday, or you’ll offer a free product with their tenth purchase. Any programme that encourages customers to increase how often they buy, or how much they buy, is a fantastic way to boost sales and grow a loyal customer base. 49. Offer discounts. This may seem like an obvious one, but you’d be surprised how many people overlook it. People love a good deal. Even the smallest of discounts can generate a huge increase in sales, if targeted in the right way. Too often, small businesses are scared of reducing their prices and suffering a loss in revenue, forgetting that the promotion will bring in new customers they wouldn’t otherwise have. If you’re worried about lowering your prices too much, a clever trick is to increase your base price, and then offer discounts on those. Your products are instantly more psychologically appealing if they’re reduced. If you’ve got an eCommerce store, use an active discount code. Send it out via email and post it on your social media pages to increase your online sales. 50. Improve your customer service. There’s nothing worse than poor customer service. Not only are you likely to lose individual customers, but word quickly spreads. A strong customer service strategy focuses on prevention. Implement a slick, professional customer service where it’s easy for customers to contact you when they’re unhappy. The quicker you can deal with a problem, the better. Customer satisfaction ultimately goes back to the product itself, so work on delivering the best product you can, under the best conditions. A fantastic product and a speedy delivery are unlikely to generate many complaints. Your customer service strategy should also focus on responding to negative reviews. Follow up with dissatisfied customers and offer to make amends. Perhaps you can offer them a free product or a discount on their next service. Sometimes just a sincere apology can be the difference between losing and retaining a customer. If you can make amends publicly, even better – this will boost your company’s reputation and encourage positive reviews on the web. 51. Open house. If you’ve recently rebranded or relocated, hosting an open house is an excellent way to generate local interest. You can provide drinks and snacks yourself or hire a catering company to host on a larger scale. Send out invites to your mailing list, put up adverts in local shops and post flyers round the local area. Offer a special promotion to everyone that shows up or advertise a demonstration or performance which will take place on the evening. Anything you can do to encourage attendance and create some hype around your event will boost the visibility of your brand. 52. Renew Interest. Don’t let former customers slip through the net. Sometimes all it takes is a simple reminder that you exist to prompt previous customers to make a new purchase. Introduce a system where you send emails to customers who haven’t engaged with you for a while. To take it one step further, include a special discount code in their letter or email. People love to feel special, and a personalised promotion is the perfect way to retain customers. 53. Pinterest. A lesser-used social media platform is Pinterest, but it can be an innovative way to market your products to a specific target audience. Image-centric platforms have high engagement levels, so if you can post attractive photos of your products, you’ll likely attract some attention. As marketing goes, it’s cheap, simple and often effective. 54. Sponsor an event or sports team. If you’re a local business, there’s no better way to promote your business than by giving back to your community. Sponsoring a local event or sports team is a great way to market your business in a way that positively impacts the community. Bigger companies can consider sponsoring a local sports team for a year, by providing funding for the club and paying for tournaments. You can negotiate the terms of the sponsorship: you might want the players to wear your branding on their kit, or you may want exclusive advertising rights at their tournaments. If you’ve got a smaller budget, consider sponsoring a one-off event, such as the town firework display. Your branding will go on all the tickets and advertisement for the event, which for popular events can mean big exposure. Sponsoring something in your local area is also a form of corporate social responsibility, which makes it a nice two-in-one. 55. Host a webinar. If your business centres around specialist knowledge, consider hosting an online webinar. Holding a seminar online has the added benefit of reaching potential customers and business connections all over the world, which can seriously expand your network. A really easy way to hold a webinar is by going live on Instagram or Facebook and taking questions from comments, private messages or the ‘Ask a question’ function on Instagram. Alternatively, you can invest in some webinar software to create a professional online seminar. If your webinar is particularly helpful or instructive, people are likely to spread the word. 56. Run a social media competition. One way to grow your social media following is by hosting a competition which encourages social media users to share your page. This can be as simple as offering giveaways to several people who comment on your posts and tag their friends. For a more wide-reaching campaign, consider using a photo competition. Ask your followers to take a photo of your product in a funny or interesting location, or upload a photo of themselves using your product. The crucial thing is to create a simple hashtag to go with your competition. Not only will this let you see all the entries, but it’ll allow your competition to reach all of your entrants’ followers, too. Your competition doesn’t need to be related to your product at all – you can ask for a funny photo, a photo that fits a particular caption, or something completely different and use your product as the prize, instead. Think of something catchy and innovative – something on-trend is more likely to snowball. Funny content has the best shot at going viral. 57. Add a visual aspect to your content. This is a super straightforward way to increase the power of your content. People get bored easily. The best way to keep people reading is to break up your text – keep your paragraphs short and snappy and keep your piece eye-catching. Make sure your website design and branding are sleek and appealing, but not so distracting that it detracts from the content. Within articles, include relevant pictures and photos that link to what you’re saying to keep your readers entertained. To promote your content, create an interesting, shocking or funny infographic. The key is to make sure it’s shareable: a jarring statistic or some fun information presented as catchy imagery is most likely to get shared amongst friends and family and on social media, which is great business promotion. 58. Start a podcast. Podcasts have soared in popularity in recent years. Whether you’re commuting, on a run, in the bath or even working, you can listen to a podcast. More and more people are using the medium not only for entertainment but to learn about topics they find interesting, or to get up to date on issues in their field. If you operate within a particular industry, consider starting a podcast. You can share expert knowledge and advice, provide an insight into your company, or interview key players in your field. If you can find a unique concept, you could reach hundreds of thousands of listeners, which is invaluable for marketing. You can upload your podcast for free onto sites like Buzzsprout and Podbean. 59. Hire a marketing consultant. Implementing an effective marketing strategy can be time-consuming but is one of the best investments you can make. It’s the single best way to increase your revenue and ultimately grow your business. You might consider outsourcing your marketing to a marketing consultant who can help you find the most effective combination of strategies for your venture. Not only can you save your own time, but outsourcing can be a cost-effective way to market, too. Marketing consultants have lots of contacts in the industry and can earn you massive savings on many marketing methods, which will quickly cover the expense of their employment. Look for someone with an impressive background in marketing who can offer you specialised skills and expertise. 60. Last but not least – don’t spam! We’re all fed up of content that’s irrelevant, or far worse – boring! The simple way to avoid frustrating your customers is to make sure you send emails that include an authentic announcement for a new product, new feature, new event or contest. The number of people unsubscribing from your email list will likely be far fewer if they have a genuine interest in what you have to say! Case study of business promotion. Kate Jenkins is such a Twitter enthusiast, that she’s almost grown her entire business, Gower Cottage Brownies, through Twitter alone. She started out in 2007 making chocolate brownies in the kitchen of her cottage in Llanmabog, in the Gower Peninsula in Wales, which she sold in the local village shop. People loved them, and when she started winning awards for her brownies, she spent £200 creating a basic website and began to sell them online, posting out her sweet treats via Royal Mail in boxes of 16. A year later, a friend suggested that Kate joined Twitter to promote her venture. Initially, she was hesitant. But she signed up anyway as @gowercottage and started running a competition each week to win a box of her brownies. The competition was never actually about brownies – it would always be something funny or silly, such as suggesting the best chat up line for Valentine’s Day, or imagining what song might be playing in the changing room at a rugby match. The brownies would go to people tweeting the funniest or most original answer. Her ‘Monday Mayhem’ competitions quickly built up a following, to the extent that Kate would often find herself trending on Twitter – meaning she was a hot topic. More than 75,000 tweets later, Kate has more than 5,000 followers, and the turnover of her business has risen to £120,000. She estimates that £40,000 of this sum has come entirely from her efforts on Twitter. Votes from her followers also helped her win The Observer Food Monthly award for Best Welsh online retailer two years in a row. Jenkins said, “it is not just that people are buying my brownies; they are also supporting me and doing PR for me because they are talking about my brownies. Twitter is my biggest word of mouth.” Related topics. Tags: B2B MarketingBillboard advertisingDirect marketingPromotionSEO Related Posts. Digital marketing 6 SEO mistakes to avoid in your first year of business . There are a number of SEO resources available around the internet and, as a new business owner, it may be ... Published by Editorial team 25th June 2021 Digital marketing Link Building: Definition and importance . Whether backlinks are a new concept for you or not, you may find something helpful from this short guide. The ... Published by Editorial team 30th March 2021 Marketing Five marketing hacks for B2B SaaS startups . Getting your marketing efforts off the ground can be a huge headache for entrepreneurs - where do you start? Digital ... Published by Richard Mabey 27th July 2021 About. Advertise with us Privacy policy Terms of use Contact us Topics. Finance Insurance Technology Marketing Human resources Legal eCommerce Leadership Procurement Luxury Start a business Advertise with us Contact us Cookie list Home Alpha Join the Entrepreneur Handbook community Notifications error Privacy & cookie policy Terms and conditions of use Thanks for subscribing! Copyright © 2013 - 2022 Entrepreneur Handbook Ltd. All rights reserved. Registered offices at 20-22 Wenlock Road, London, N1 7GU, United Kingdom. Finance Insurance Technology Marketing Human resources Legal eCommerce Leadership Procurement Luxury Start a business Advertise with us Privacy policy Terms of use Contact us Copyright © 2013 - 2022 Entrepreneur Handbook Ltd. All rights reserved. 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Title10 Ways to Market Your Small Business on a Shoestring Budget | Constant Contact
Urlhttps://blogs.constantcontact.com/market-your-small-business/
DescriptionMarketing your small business on a shoestring budget isn't easy — but it is possible. Take a look at these ten cost-effective tools to create your plan
Date28 Sept 2021
Organic Position6
H110 Ways to Market Your Small Business on a Shoestring Budget
H2Grow your business with online marketing
Ready to do more business with email marketing?
1. Craft an elevator pitch
2. Leverage your community
3. Collaborate
4. Network
5. Give a speech
6. Create buzz
7. Ask for referrals
8. Build relationships
9. Offer coupons
10. Give it away
Looking for more ways to market your business?
Ready to do more business with email marketing?
H3Related Features
Related Features
Related Articles
Learn the Marketing Must-Haves with Our Free Online Marketing Guide
10 Roofing Marketing Ideas That Are Must-Haves for 2022
Marketing Industrial Products Online: A Non-Techie Guide
H2WithAnchorsGrow your business with online marketing
Ready to do more business with email marketing?
1. Craft an elevator pitch
2. Leverage your community
3. Collaborate
4. Network
5. Give a speech
6. Create buzz
7. Ask for referrals
8. Build relationships
9. Offer coupons
10. Give it away
Looking for more ways to market your business?
Ready to do more business with email marketing?
Body10 Ways to Market Your Small Business on a Shoestring Budget When budgets are tight, online marketing might be the first expense you look to cut.Let me stop you right there.While traditional advertising methods are costly and hard to measure, small businesses have never had greater access to cost-effective, trackable marketing tools. The best way to market your business might be a lot more accessible than you think.But with so many digital tools available, how do you know where to start? Email marketing is the tried and true digital marketing channel with an average return of $36 for every $1 spent.And email marketing is just the start! Here are the ten best ways to market your business on a shoestring budget.Table of Contents1. Craft an elevator pitch2. Leverage your community3. Collaborate4. Network5. Give a speech6. Create buzz7. Ask for referrals8. Build relationships9. Offer coupons10. Give it awayLooking for more ways to market your business?Ready to do more business with email marketing? Start your free 60-day trial today. Learn more about our 60-day free email marketing trial.1. Craft an elevator pitch. You should be marketing all the time — wherever you are. Therefore, you need a compelling elevator pitch.Research shows the average attention span of an adult is about six to eight seconds. That’s all the time you have to grab someone’s attention.If you successfully engage them, then you only have a little over a minute to really sell them on your product or service. Invest the time to craft a killer elevator pitch. The return on your investment will pay huge dividends in terms of creating business opportunities.2. Leverage your community. You don’t have to think big when it comes to your marketing efforts. Think locally. What’s going on in your community?Sponsor a Little League team or a 5k charity walk/run. Print bookmarks and leave them at the local library. Get to know your ideal customer and think about how and where they spend their time.Then search for opportunities to get in front of your customer with your marketing message.3. Collaborate. Put together a group of synergistic, non-competitive businesses in your area and agree to cross-promote.You can use coupons, fliers, reciprocal website links, bundled promotions or social media platforms. By collaborating with each other, you can expand your customer base because you’ll be reaching new people.4. Network. I’m a huge fan of networking. I don’t think there is any better way to build a business than to get out there, shake some hands, and get to know people.Networking requires a time commitment and it doesn’t provide instant gratification, but a strong network is one of the greatest assets any business person can have.5. Give a speech. A lot of people hate public speaking. However, there are many organizations looking for qualified, subject-matter experts who can present to their groups.Take a deep breath and volunteer. You don’t have to be a pro as long as the information you share is helpful to the audience. And the upside — the more you do it the easier it gets. Plus, it positions you as a credible authority in your field.6. Create buzz. I started my corporate career in the field of public relations and the business has changed significantly because of technology.Today, a small business owner can accomplish a lot without hiring a professional firm. Subscribe to Help a Reporter Out. You can respond to reporters’ queries that are looking for story ideas and resources. Some are small media opportunities, but others are major media outlets that use this service too.7. Ask for referrals. Don’t be shy about asking for customer referrals. The majority of people say they are willing to provide a referral if asked, but very few take the initiative to do it on their own.Referrals make it easier to get in the door with new customers. If you aren’t asking for them, you are missing opportunities.8. Build relationships. It is a lot less expensive to keep a customer than it is to get a new one. That’s why establishing strong relationships with your customer base is crucial. One of the ways you can do that is by keeping in touch with people through email marketing.Ask customers for their email address when they visit your store or website. Then, make your communications informative, helpful and professional — something your customers will look forward to receiving.9. Offer coupons. Coupons are a good way for many businesses to attract new customers. Research shows that people will go out of their way to use a coupon, proving that this method is successful in expanding your customer base.Coupons can also generate return visits. For example, if you give a customer a coupon for a discount to use on future business, there’s a high probability they’ll be back.10. Give it away. If someone has the opportunity to experience your product or service, chances are they will want to purchase more.Don’t be afraid to give someone a free trial or a sample. In today’s economy, people are more comfortable purchasing something they have been able to experience first.These ten inexpensive marketing strategies will help you engage customers, build relationships, and ultimately keep your brand top-of-mind. It’s not always about the money you have to spend on marketing, it’s about the time and effort you put into it and above all, the relevance it has for your customers.Looking for more ways to market your business?Check out The Download, Constant Contact’s complete guide on how to market your business in the digital age. We’ll show you practical, step by step small business marketing tips to help you build your brand, promote your business, and gain new customers.Not sure where to start with marketing? That’s why we created The Download.The Download is the ultimate practical, step-by-step guide to online marketing. In this free guide, we’ll show you how people find you online and how to set yourself up for success to meet your business or nonprofit goals.Get The Download: Making Sense of Online MarketingReady to do more business with email marketing? Start your free 60-day trial today. Learn more about our 60-day free email marketing trial. Susan Solovic. Susan Solovic is THE Small Business Expert -- An award-winning entrepreneur, keynote speaker, New York Times bestselling author, media personality, and attorney.Related Features. Related Features. Email Coupons. Promote your business and drive more sales with coupons – turn contacts into customers. Email Marketing. Create email marketing campaigns like a pro with our easy-to-use features. Social Media Marketing Tools. Get more from your social media and email marketing with these easy-to-use social sharing tools. Related Articles. Learn the Marketing Must-Haves with Our Free Online Marketing Guide. Whether you’re a small business owner, nonprofit professional, entrepreneur, creative, or side-hustler, you’ve likely already started Read More >> 10 Roofing Marketing Ideas That Are Must-Haves for 2022. Entrepreneurs in the home services industry are often so busy with managing day-to-day operations and coordinating with fellow contractors that Read More >> Marketing Industrial Products Online: A Non-Techie Guide. Manufacturing can be considered a niche industry with marketing practices that don’t always apply in other fields. Decision-makers in this Read More >>
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Result 8
Title8 Powerful Ways to Market Your Business on a Limited Budget
Urlhttps://www.entrepreneur.com/article/286171
DescriptionWhen money is tight, think outside the box
Date13 Dec 2016
Organic Position7
H18 Powerful Ways to Market Your Business on a Limited Budget
H21. Go guerilla
2. Socialize on social media
3. Create valuable content
4. Contests and giveaways
5. Piggyback your partners
6. Leverage scalable advertising channels
7. Milk the media
8. Help yourself by helping others
Written By
More About Marketing
Latest on United States
H3Chris W. Dunn
Step 1 to Personal Brand Building is Not What You Think
This Is How AI Content Marketing Will Shake Up 2022
3 Trends to Keep Customers Engaged in 2022
8 Natural Wellness Habits That Will Keep You Mentally Healthy and Happy
5 Critical Reasons to Stop Procrastinating and Write Your Book Now
Every Entrepreneur Could Use a Spy Pen to Keep Track of Your Busy Life
H2WithAnchors1. Go guerilla
2. Socialize on social media
3. Create valuable content
4. Contests and giveaways
5. Piggyback your partners
6. Leverage scalable advertising channels
7. Milk the media
8. Help yourself by helping others
Written By
More About Marketing
Latest on United States
Body8 Powerful Ways to Market Your Business on a Limited Budget When money is tight, think outside the box. By Chris W. Dunn December 13, 2016 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. According to HubSpot, the third top marketing challenge for companies is the lack of budgeting resources. Unless you are a startup with venture or angel capital, you probably have a limited marketing budget. Here some ways you can market your business on a limited budget. rwdkr | Getty Images 1. Go guerilla.Guerilla marketing looks to leverage creativity, imagination and originality in place of a big budget. Smart small businesses with a limited budget often use guerilla marketing to compete with huge companies. There is no shortage of creative guerilla marketing ideas. Here are just a few examples:If you have a brick and mortar location, pay someone to create eye-catching art with chalk.If you sell a product that can be used on the street, employ undercover agents to promote your product directly to potential customers. For example, Sony hired agents to ask strangers to take photos of them and then raved about their camera.Organize a flash mob to garner crowd attention and promote awareness of your brand.Related: How to Be Like Banksy and Reap Massive Exposure Through Guerilla Marketing2. Socialize on social media.According to the Pew Research Center Report of Social Media Usage: 2005-2015, nearly two-thirds of American adults use social media now. This is a near tenfold increase within the last decade.Popular social media channels include Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Reddit, LinkedIn, Google Plus and Snapchat. Each of these social media platforms are unique in its own right and require unique ways of engagement. Rather than try to master it all at once, choose a few you like and try to master those first.3. Create valuable content.Not only do potential customers love great content, but so does Google. There are many ways to share information -- blogging, creating videos, hosting podcasts, designing infographics or submitting articles to online authority sites. Not only do you gain authority as an expert, but you also get free traffic. You can also offer to be a guest blogger for another complementary website or be interviewed on a podcast.You don’t always have to produce the content yourself. You can hire freelance writers, graphic designers and personal assistants through websites like Upwork. If you run out of ideas, you can repurpose old content and give it a new spin.4. Contests and giveaways.Everyone loves free gifts! Give away desirable or fun items to gain goodwill, build brand awareness and connect with potential customers. They don’t need to be expensive. Things such as online ebooks, white papers and checklists don’t cost you anything but your time.You can also promote your products through Facebook groups where members agree to try your product for free or a discounted price in exchange for an honest review. Physical gifts with your advertising on it such as balloons, smartphone wipes, key chains, fridge magnets, pens and notepads are always popular too.You can also create a viral marketing effect by making your marketing interesting, attractive and fun. One of the craziest marketing efforts that went viral is the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. People dared their friends and family to pour ice cold water on themselves within 24 hours. Those who failed to do so would then have to donate to the ALS charity.5. Piggyback your partners.When you are a small business with a limited marketing budget, it makes sense to partner with other complementary businesses. These can include manufacturers, suppliers and vendors. Not only do you both win when your businesses succeed, but there is added credibility when another business recommends you.Related: The Ultimate Networking Guide: 4 Ways to Expand Your NetworkAs an example, you can exchange customer lists and offer to pay the business a commission for every sale you make. Just make sure that you have requested permission from your customers to share their details!For direct mail marketing, offer to share postage costs and include your flyer with the other businesses’ mail. If the other business has a physical retail space, ask to put your business cards in their customer waiting area.You can also seek partners within your existing customer base. Create a referral rewards program where you reward your customers for referring business to you. Word of mouth is extremely effective when it comes to marketing.6. Leverage scalable advertising channels.Conventional advertising mediums such as TV, radio and newspaper ads can be extremely costly and hard to measure effectiveness, but online advertising can be cheaper and more targeted. Popular options are Google Pay Per Click ads and Facebook ads. Also, don’t forget to list your business in free online directories like Google Business for Google Maps and Yelp.You also can promote your latest products and services through these free or cost effective methods:A telephone message that plays your promotions while customers are on hold.Window decals advertising your latest offer if you have a retail shop.Car magnets and bumper stickers displaying your advertising while you drive around town.Advertising on email signatures or letterheads.Sending special holiday discounts, birthday coupons and surprise rewards to your mailing list.7. Milk the media.Getting your business featured by the media is free marketing. To capture the attention of the media, try these and invite the media to come and cover it.Create a publicity stunt. Think of some of the crazy ones that Richard Branson has pulled off including dressing as a female flight attendant onboard his airline.Do something for the community, and send out a press release prior to the event. For example, some innovative hair dressers have offered free haircuts to the homeless.Sponsor an event by donating your products or services as giveaways or prizes or host a contest.Nominate yourself for a business contest or award. If you win, even better!You can also seek opportunities to be interviewed for print, radio and TV. To look for opportunities to contribute your expertise, sign up to an email list like Help A Reporter Out.Related Book: Market Like You Mean It by Al Lautenslager8. Help yourself by helping others.All your marketing should be of some use to your audience. There are many ways that you can make your marketing efforts a welcome intrusion rather than an annoyance to your audience. Try these:Provide useful information. Information marketing has proven to be highly effective in increasing sales. By educating your audience on problems that they care about, you are also not only growing your customer base but also positioning yourself as the solution. To do this, host a Meetup group, an event, a class or even an online webinar. Offer to speak at events.Provide assistance. Answer questions posted on forums and websites like Quora and direct your audience to your website for more information. There are online directories that list a whole variety of forums such as Find A Forum.Net.Entertain your audience. Make them laugh or cry. Think of the funny and touching ads that you see and how quickly they are shared.Marketing your business on a limited budget is completely possible. You just need to get creative and think out of the box. Written By . Chris W. Dunn. Chris Dunn is an entrepreneur, digital currency trader and advocate, author, real estate developer and angel investor. He is the founder and CEO of Skill Incubator, which helps entrepreneurs and investors develop valuable skills. He is also the host of the Pathways To Wealth podcast. More About Marketing . Marketing Step 1 to Personal Brand Building is Not What You Think . Marina Byezhanova Jan 8, 2022 Marketing This Is How AI Content Marketing Will Shake Up 2022 . Thomas Helfrich Jan 7, 2022 News and Trends 3 Trends to Keep Customers Engaged in 2022 . Shama Hyder Jan 7, 2022 Read More Latest on United States . The Business Traveler's Journal 8 Natural Wellness Habits That Will Keep You Mentally Healthy and Happy . Sonia Singh Jan 8, 2022 Growth Strategies 5 Critical Reasons to Stop Procrastinating and Write Your Book Now . Stephanie Mojica Jan 8, 2022 Prepare to Succeed Every Entrepreneur Could Use a Spy Pen to Keep Track of Your Busy Life . Entrepreneur Store Jan 8, 2022 Read More Successfully copied link
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Result 9
TitleHow To Promote Your Business: 20 Proven Strategies - BuildFire
Urlhttps://buildfire.com/how-to-promote-your-business/
DescriptionReach your target audience and learn how to promote your business with these 20 proven strategies that are simple yet highly effective and low cost
Date
Organic Position8
H1How To Promote Your Business: 20 Proven Strategies
H21. Insert Calls To Action In Your Team’s Email Signatures
2. Set Up A Google My Business Account
3. Audit Your Online NAPs
4. Set Up A Joint Venture
5. Create An Email Marketing Strategy
6. Offer a Free Or Discounted Product/Service
7. Give A Presentation or Webinar
8. Ask for Reviews
9. Comment on Blogs In Your Niche
10. Do “It” Better Than Your Competitors
11. Write A Bunch Of Guest Posts
12. Utilize Facebook Instant Articles
13. Use Visual Media To Build Your Social Media Presence
14. Create Content That Attracts Your Audience
15. Promote Your Content
16. Implement Search Engine Optimization
17. Participate in Community Events
18. Exhibit at Trade Shows
19. Join A Paid Membership In Your Niche
20. Pay For Advertising
Conclusion: How To Promote Your Business
More from the blog
33 Creative Ways to Promote Your App for Free (App Marketing Strategy)
The 5 Ways to Build a Mobile App
What to Expect from a Mobile App Development Platform
8 Steps You Must Take Before Starting Mobile App Development
How Much Does Mobile App Development Really Cost?
5 Hidden Costs of Software You Need to Anticipate AFTER You Launch
The Definitive Guide to Mobile App Design
Mobile App Download and Usage Statistics (2021)
H3
H2WithAnchors1. Insert Calls To Action In Your Team’s Email Signatures
2. Set Up A Google My Business Account
3. Audit Your Online NAPs
4. Set Up A Joint Venture
5. Create An Email Marketing Strategy
6. Offer a Free Or Discounted Product/Service
7. Give A Presentation or Webinar
8. Ask for Reviews
9. Comment on Blogs In Your Niche
10. Do “It” Better Than Your Competitors
11. Write A Bunch Of Guest Posts
12. Utilize Facebook Instant Articles
13. Use Visual Media To Build Your Social Media Presence
14. Create Content That Attracts Your Audience
15. Promote Your Content
16. Implement Search Engine Optimization
17. Participate in Community Events
18. Exhibit at Trade Shows
19. Join A Paid Membership In Your Niche
20. Pay For Advertising
Conclusion: How To Promote Your Business
More from the blog
33 Creative Ways to Promote Your App for Free (App Marketing Strategy)
The 5 Ways to Build a Mobile App
What to Expect from a Mobile App Development Platform
8 Steps You Must Take Before Starting Mobile App Development
How Much Does Mobile App Development Really Cost?
5 Hidden Costs of Software You Need to Anticipate AFTER You Launch
The Definitive Guide to Mobile App Design
Mobile App Download and Usage Statistics (2021)
BodyHow To Promote Your Business: 20 Proven Strategies Success in business breaks down into two simple things: Can you supply something that people want at a price they’re willing to pay? Can you get your offer in front of those people? Nine times out of ten, people start a business because they are capable, competent, or even brilliant at that first part. They know their industry and they are able to supply what people want. The second part is where things get tricky. How do you get your offer in front of the right people? Or in other words, how do you promote your business? Today, we’re going to be looking at # incredibly simple yet highly effective ways to promote your business. You can implement all of these quickly without needing special expertise or significant investment. If you’ve been looking for new ways to reach your target audience, you’re in the right place. 1. Insert Calls To Action In Your Team’s Email Signatures. The average office worker sends a receives 122 emails per day. For a business with ten staff, that adds up to around 600 outgoing emails per day. These emails are actually a tremendous promotion opportunity, but not using traditional email signatures. Nobody is going to take notice of your employees’ job titles or websites. Nobody cares about your favorite quote. What CAN get attention is a big obvious Call To Action button. Notice how well this CTA stands out and attracts attention. When you view email signatures as a marketing tool, they become dynamic ways of introducing your products or services to potential customers. For a single email, you can simply set something like this up via your email client, but if you are interested in rolling it out across your entire team (most beneficial), you’ll want to use an app like Sigstr, which will let you manage signatures and rollout campaigns across your entire team at once. The best way to take advantage of email CTAs is to offer some sort of lead magnet or freely available offer that will interest your target audience and push them forward in your funnel. 2. Set Up A Google My Business Account. Google is not only a search engine, but also a small business directory. Take advantage of these tools. Setting up a Google My Business Account provides three major benefits for companies who rely on local business: Your local business is listed on Google maps and search. It’s good for search engine optimization, so that your business gets found easier by the people who are looking for the services or products you provide. It’s good for when your customers start adding reviews of your business; these reviews help Google display your business in their “3-pack”, which gives you free advertising at no cost. Google My Business Reviews have earned these companies the top spots in Google search results. Your GMB listing is the baseline for all your online citations and listing, and it’s important that every listing matches your GMB listing, particularly when it comes to your three primary pieces of information, known as NAP (Name Address Phone Number). 3. Audit Your Online NAPs. NAP stands for Name, Address, Phone number, also often referred to as citations. Out of Moz’ top 6 “Foundational Ranking Factors”, (for search engine ranking), 3 are related to NAP quantity, quality, and consistency, and out of the top 13 “Competitive Difference Makers,” 6 are about NAP quantity, quality, and consistency. If you’ve listed your company on Google My Business, you need to make sure the details there are the same for all your online listings. Image Credit: Moz If any of the details elsewhere are not the same as it is listed in Google My Business, then you might not be “rewarded” by search engines and it could also damage your search ranking. A suggestion is to keep an Excel spreadsheet of all your listings, to make it easy to keep them consistent. Moz offers in-depth information about NAP audits and how to do them. 4. Set Up A Joint Venture. As I mentioned earlier, promoting your business is all about getting your offer in front of the right people. One of the easiest ways to do this is to find existing audiences filled with the “right” people and simply place your offer in front of them. In some instances, that can be done via advertising, but an even better option in the short term is to partner with non-competing businesses marketing to the same people as you are. Joint ventures are a brilliant way of getting more customers fast. Take Teachable, which was started in 2014 by Ankur Nagpal. He says that 6 months into starting the business, they had less than 20 active customers making money from courses. In 2015, they created a joint venture which gave them more customers fast. Nagpal lists a few examples of joint ventures they’ve since used in their marketing strategies, one of them being a simple affiliate partnership with marketer Melyssa Griffin. Teachable gave Melyssa a unique promotional tracking link plus 50% commission on every sale. Melyssa Griffin, affiliate marketer and joint venture partner with Teachable. Find out more about joint venture examples from the founder of Teachable, which now boasts a monthly growth rate of more than 20% in 2016, increasing its revenue tenfold in one year, with more than 1 million students. 5. Create An Email Marketing Strategy. Email marketing is the cornerstone of online marketing. From a technology standpoint, email has withstood the test of time as a communication channel. From a marketing standpoint, email converts at a higher rate than nearly any other channel. As recently as 2016, email marketing was the leading marketing expense among global business leaders. Email marketing allows you to nurture relationships with potential buyers over time. It allows to place visitors who aren’t ready to buy into a funnel that keeps them connected with your business instead of having them forget about you. To begin taking advantage of email marketing, you’ll need to create something valuable that can be given away for free in exchange for a visitor’s email address. Digital info products are often best for this purpose. Next, you’ll want to create a series of emails designed to introduce the new lead to your offer, establish your authority in the industry, and deliver educational value on related topics of interest. To learn more, check out these fantastic email marketing examples. 6. Offer a Free Or Discounted Product/Service. In a similar vein to the lead magnets we just talked about, offering something free or at a discount is a great way to draw in new customers. Depending on your business model, it can even be effective to take a loss on this in order to pull in market share. There are many iterations of this that can be used to drive leads, sales, referrals, etc. Ecommerce stores in particular have had amazing success with introductory discounts. Here’s an example from lingerie e-retailer Yandy.com: Other possibilities include free software apps or free trials. For example, BuildFire allows prospective customers to create an app for free, allowing them to experience the actual product before being required to pay anything. 7. Give A Presentation or Webinar. This strategy can be equally effective online and offline. By offering a webinar or workshop, you can attract your target audience and collect their contact information for future followup. First locate where your target audience hangs out, then set up meetings. For instance, AwaiOnline recommends “Lunch ‘n Learn” sessions of one hour. Organize lunch and do some advertising to the right people, and then teach them something in one hour, over lunch. Try hosting it at your local Chamber of Commerce or other business networking groups. Copywriter freelancer Steve Slaunwhite used online “Lunch ‘n Learn” sessions to promote his copywriting services to his target audience and said, “The Virtual Lunch ‘n Learns would get me in front of my target audience and position me as an expert at what I do. Of those who attended the teleconferences, some would decide to give my services a try. These were small numbers of prospects, but they were high quality. I got several leads and referrals and some very good clients by doing these sessions.” (Source) Mary-Ann Shearer, health guru, whose vegan restaurant is located in an area known for its affinity for meat, educates people by holding talks for groups at gyms, running clubs, churches, etc. When she does, she gets email addresses from people that are already “sold out” to her, because within minutes, she is able to prove herself as an authority on her subject. When her presentation is over, she has collected well qualified leads; people who are sure to start buying products from her online store. Mary-Ann Shearer conducting a group talk about natural health at a local gym. If you don’t want to go the offline route, you could instead host a webinar or podcast interview (I recommend using PodMatch.com to quickly get booked on podcasts), or do a joint venture with a partner who hosts a webinar, as a way to collect email addresses. Jeff Rose hosted a webinar on “How to Protect Your Investment Portfolio”. 8. Ask for Reviews. 54% of people visit a website after reading positive reviews about the business, and 84% trust reviews as much as they trust a personal recommendation. (Source) Reviews build trust and credibility for your business, and they carry a lot of weight. You can also use them on your website, specifically your home and about page. But that’s not the only thing reviews are good for. They also increase your search engine ranking, which results in increased website traffic. Why? Because search engines recognize the value of customer reviews. Bella Luna Toys, an ecommerce company, started using reviews on their website, and since doing so, their conversion rates shot up by 15%. They’ve also generated more than 4500 genuine customer reviews. (Source) Bella Luna Toys have increased conversions by 15% since incorporating reviews onto their website. To collect reviews, simply setup your Google My Business listing and other citations that take reviews, and then send the links to your customers with the request that they leave a review. Alternatively, you can use an app like Yotpo to collect written reviews or VocalReferances to collect video reviews as an automated part of your checkout system. 9. Comment on Blogs In Your Niche. Leaving a comment on other related blogs can help rank your content on search engines faster, because: Adding a link to your site from a comment on another site, gets Google and other search engines to pick it up, and if the website you’ve left a comment on, is reputable, search engines are likely to index your content with a higher ranking, because of your association to the website through the link left in your comment. If your comment adds value, it may get attention from a future customer who is so impressed by what you’ve written, that they click back to your website. Adding value-add comments on other blogs helps build relationships with bloggers and others in your niche, which may very well open doors to joint ventures. Example of comments that are well written and add value to anyone reading them. The image below is taken from a data analytics page and shows how backlinks from comments are counted, even if they are no-follow links. 10. Do “It” Better Than Your Competitors. Business are often started as an attempt to do something better than the existing marketplace. The same mentality is true for promotion. When it comes to any marketing channel, usually the top marketer or two in that channel will captivate 90% of the competition. Instead of being middle of the road on multiple channels, it’s best to identify a channel where you can “do it the best” and pursue that channel. For instance, an online academic book and technology business in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, wanted to increase their website visitors. A consultant was brought in who compiled a report showing what the worldwide benchmark company was doing, and these are some of the findings: The benchmark company had a whopping 7394962 Facebook likes, with a 100% response rate, while the other company had a mere 5839 Facebook likes, and a 0% response rate. In addition, the benchmark company had tons of content and their product descriptions were customized. When analyzing the online activities of a worldwide benchmark company, it was found that their differentiating factor was lots of value-add content. Next, they checked how their top local competitors were doing online, and found that if they were to implement a content strategy, they could whip all the others in their area. What they took home from the analysis: The need to start creating Facebook posts that would attract their target audience, and to start paying for Facebook ads to boost their Facebook page engagement rates. The necessity of responding quickly to social media messages from their customers. The need to start writing customized product descriptions. The importance of website content. 11. Write A Bunch Of Guest Posts. Guest posting is one of the most effective ways to promote your brand online. Guest posting is where you can write an article for another website that they then publish and promote to their audience. While guest posting will rarely drive any significant amount of actual traffic, it can be very valuable for a number of reasons: Establish yourself and your brand as an authority in the space Get backlinks to your website from popular, high-ranking websites Get your brand directly in front of your target market Network with influencers in your niche (potential joint venture partners) Link to people who will then link to you in their own guest posts Silvio Porcellana is the CEO and founder of Mob.is.it. The company provides a tool which helps agencies and professionals build mobile websites and native apps. When he realized that the website needed more organic search traffic (visitors brought in from search engine results), they decided to implement a guest blogging campaign. Within 5 months, they published 44 guest posts on 41 different blogs. The result? The website’s search traffic increased by 20%. Here’s an illustration by Writers In Charge of why guest blogging is so effective: 12. Utilize Facebook Instant Articles. Facebook Instant Articles is a distribution platform where you can share content just like you would on your own website, or on Linkedin articles, but with interactive elements that enhance the mobile viewing experience. The content on Facebook Instant Articles is accessible to Facebook users on Android and iPhone devices. It’s especially valuable if you want to build value, credibility and brand awareness. The benefits of using this function is: Fast load time. Facebook reports that Instant Articles has 70% lower bounce rates and 30% higher share rates than most of the web articles accessed via mobile devices. You can make money right from the platform with your own display and media rich ads and you also have the ability to display Facebook Audience Network ads if you so choose. You have control over your own branding. The platform allows integration with other measurement tools like Google Analytics. Interaction for a better reader experience. You can add content that’s already been published on your website, and there’s a plugin to make it all easier if you’re on Wordpress. Gray Television integrated local news with Instant Articles and generated $250,000 in revenue from the Facebook Audience Network. Gray Television integrated Instant Articles with local news. 13. Use Visual Media To Build Your Social Media Presence. There are 2.3 billion active social media users. Whatever your target audience looks like, you can find them on social media, and visual content is one of the best ways to expand your social presence. Here’s a good place to start: Create visual content that is relevant to your niche Use high quality images or video Get your customers involved Tap into trending hashtags and current events In the beginning, before you have an audience of your own, it’s important to engage with people directly and tap into your target niche. One of the easiest ways to find these individuals is hashtags. These are images that were uploaded to Instagram, all hashtagged, “veganrecipes”: If you wanted to get in front of people in the vegan niche, finding out what people are talking about and favoriting around #veganrecipes would be a great place to start. For more insights into this strategy, read this case study about how Fusion Farm used hashtags to promote an event. 14. Create Content That Attracts Your Audience. Some of the tops blogs in the world make an average of $15,000 to $30,000 a day. People love consuming blog content online, and it’s highly unlikely your niche is exempt. In order to tap into that demand, you simply need to create content that attracts the same audience you wish to sell to. For example, Glen Allsop, founder of PluginID, was a complete newbie in his field when he first started blogging. Because of adding great content to his site, his subscription list grew to 26,000 subscribers, many of whom also became customers, helping his business take off. Glen Allsop’s internet marketing blogging content grew his subscriber list to 26,000 in a short timespan. And just like we are giving you ways to promote your business, you will also need ways to promote your blog content. 15. Promote Your Content. Promoting blog content is a great way to build authority in your niche will also directly promoting your business. In fact, it’s one of the few ways you can get away with shamelessly promoting yourself. You can share blog posts is a lot more locations than you can directly advertise a product or service. There are many, many ways to promote content, but here are some of the best ones I’ve tried: Send the content to your email subscribers Share it with your social followers Share it on Reddit and other community sites Use the best paid promotion channels you can find Answer questions on Quora Etc. There are many different ways to promote content, and to know what will work for your business, at the end of the day, you’ll just have to experiment. 16. Implement Search Engine Optimization. Search engine optimization, mostly known as SEO for short, is a way to optimize a website  for search engines and improve your search engine rankings. The goal is that when people search via Google for phrases that are relevant to your product, your website shows up as quickly as possible. Unlike most other promotion tactics, getting your site ranked for various keyphrases will result in increasing amounts of traffic over time, or at least for as long as people continue to use search engines. You get traffic month and month after month, and outside of the expense to rank the site and maintain your ranking, the traffic is free. By incorporating an SEO strategy, Candoni Wines experienced a 70% improvement in organic search traffic within 6 months. In addition, their site ranks for more than 1000 keywords, and as a byproduct, 20,026 Facebook page likes were added throughout the initial campaign. By implementing an SEO strategy, this website experienced a 70% improvement in their organic search traffic within 6 months. 17. Participate in Community Events. We live in a predominantly digital world, but promoting your business at physical events is still a great way to grow. As Digital Vidya discusses, both offline and online marketing are essential: “As the marketing maxim goes, consumers do not make purchase decisions based on a single ad or message alone. The marketing ‘rule of 7 ‘ states that consumers need to be exposed to a message seven times, on average, before purchase. Buyers gather bits of information from various channels and piece them together in making their decision. Data gathered, from multiple channels, through multiple stages of the buying process, are the building-blocks of sales. Integrated messages that build upon each other, make a compelling case for purchase. Consistency across channels, renders messages more impactful and increases the probability of conversion. As such, integration (of online and offline marketing) is not just about brand synergy – it is about improving ROI.” Going back to a graphic we looked at earlier, we can see that offline events still make up a sizable percentage of investment for most business decision makers. This chart shows that global business leaders are still investing in offline events in their marketing strategies. Participate in those community events where your target audience are. For example, if you are targeting a national audience of retailers, being at a big trade show (see the next point) makes sense. Or  to save costs, you could join another company in the same niche at the trade show. If you depend on local business, local events can be a great way to get new customers, or at least add new people to your email list. Another idea – if it’s relevant to your business – is to check online event sites for local events. You just need to figure out what events will be most beneficial to you according to your target audience and goals. 18. Exhibit at Trade Shows. A whopping 99% of marketers say they find unique value from trade shows that they don’t get from other marketing mediums, probably because trade shows pull together a mass group of buyers and sellers in particular industries, who can be considered “hot leads”: According to Exhibit Surveys, Inc.,67% of attendees represent a new prospect for exhibiting companies. According to CEIR, 81% of tradeshow attendees have buying authority, and 46% of them are in executive or higher management. Trade shows can be costly to set up, so how do you know if you should take the gamble? Colleen Francis, an influential sales person, recommends participation only if you can make 10x the revenue back within 6 months of the show vs. what it costs you to be there. Xeikon, a digital printing company, used a trade show as their one main marketing focus for the year, gearing up towards it and following up after it. They experienced these results: About 1,000 prospects were identified A 14% response rate from email marketing efforts 140 new, qualified leads 300% return on investment Find out more about using the sales funnel approach to managing tradeshows. 19. Join A Paid Membership In Your Niche. If you can find some sort of group that requires money to get in AND caters to your target audience, you’ve just struck marketing gold. Joining some sort of paid membership is a perfect, if perhaps a bit sneaky, way to get in front of your target audience. Paid memberships create an automatic level of trust. The monetary barrier ensures, at least theoretically, that everyone there is committed to being there and on the same page. It’s very easy to promote your products and services in a group you have paid to be in, provided you do so in a subtle way that seems helpful as opposed to spammy. Examples of this could be local business groups, mastermind groups, paid clubs, course communities, etc. 20. Pay For Advertising. Many of the methods provided in this article help to build a customer base over time, but one of the most effective ways to get quick and consistent exposure is to pay for advertising. Three of the current most popular advertising methods include: PPC ads Facebook ads Television ads In 2015, the Content Marketing Institute, conducted a survey of 3,714 worldwide marketers, and found that 76% of B2C marketers use paid advertising; 64% rated search engine ads as effective, and 59% reported that they found paid social ads to be effective: Paid advertising requires some expertise to get right and some experimentation to find the right channel. This is one of the more common promotion activities that business outsource to agencies. Conclusion: How To Promote Your Business. I hope this article has given you a better feel for how to promote your business. These relatively low investment methods will help you get the ball rolling. Ultimately, there is no single guaranteed winning strategy for promoting a business. It’s a lot of trial and error, and this list should get you started. More from the blog. Mobile App Marketing 33 Creative Ways to Promote Your App for Free (App Marketing Strategy). Mobile App Marketing The 5 Ways to Build a Mobile App. Mobile App Marketing What to Expect from a Mobile App Development Platform. Mobile App Development 8 Steps You Must Take Before Starting Mobile App Development. App Costs How Much Does Mobile App Development Really Cost? App Costs 5 Hidden Costs of Software You Need to Anticipate AFTER You Launch. Mobile App Design The Definitive Guide to Mobile App Design. Mobile App Marketing Mobile App Download and Usage Statistics (2021). Powerful app builder. iOS, Android & PWA. Unlimited customization.
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Result 10
TitleThe 30 Best Ways to Promote Your Business in 2021-With or Without Money
Urlhttps://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2020/11/02/promote-your-business
DescriptionThis post covers the most effective ways to promote your business in 2021—most of which are free. You'll learn how to promote your business on Google Search and Maps, social media channels, online directories and review sites, as well as through events, local outlets, and more!
Date2 Nov 2020
Organic Position9
H1The 30 Best Ways to Promote Your Business—With or Without Money
H2How to promote your business on Google
How to promote your business using online directories
How to promote your business on social media
How to promote your business in your community
Other effective ways of promoting your business
Bottom line: you can effectively promote your business, with or without money
More Articles Like This
Comments
H31. Create and verify your Google Business Profile
2. Get a website
3. Implement search engine optimization
4. Create a business blog
5. Share your content
6. Run Google Ads
7. Create listings on the major directories
8. Optimize your listings
9. Get online customer reviews
10. Monitor and respond to reviews
11. Prioritize Facebook
12. Connect and contribute on LinkedIn
13. Upload videos to YouTube
14. Advertise on YouTube
15. Engage your audience on Instagram
16. Share on Twitter
17. Give Pinterest a shot
18. Try out TikTok
19. Join online communities
20. Try an influencer marketing collaboration
21. Invest in social media advertising
22. Strive to get local press
23. Form partnerships
24. Network network network
25. Attend, host, or sponsor local events
26. Try out direct mail
27. Advertise locally and offline
28. Attend trade shows
29. Run email marketing campaigns
30. Make advocates out of your employees
Kristen McCormick
The [Hands-Down] 50 Best Marketing Tips & Tricks We Revealed This Year—in Every Category
The 8 Biggest Marketing Fails of All Time (With Practical Takeaways)
9 Popular Email Marketing Strategies to Stop Doing ASAP (+13 to Do Instead)
H2WithAnchorsHow to promote your business on Google
How to promote your business using online directories
How to promote your business on social media
How to promote your business in your community
Other effective ways of promoting your business
Bottom line: you can effectively promote your business, with or without money
More Articles Like This
Comments
BodyThe 30 Best Ways to Promote Your Business—With or Without Money Kristen McCormick Last Updated: December 3, 2021 | Marketing Ideas Home — Blog — The 30 Best Ways to Promote Your Business—With or Without Money In order to survive and grow, your business needs customers. In order to get customers, you need to promote your business. In the good old days, this was a matter of deciding between a flyer, a brochure, a postcard, or an ad in the local newspaper. But in today’s digital world, the possibilities are endless (read: overwhelming). Image source So if you are struggling to figure out the best ways to promote your business; or even just what your options are, you are (a) not alone and (b) in the right place. In this post, I’m going to cover the 30 most effective ways to promote your business, whether you have no budget, a limited budget, or some wiggle room. We’ll go over how to spread the word with respect to: Search engines (namely, Google Search and Maps). Social media channels (including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, TikTok, and Pinterest). Online directory listings (there’s more to them than you may think!) Your local community (events, sponsorships, and press). Promoting your business is a must if you want to stand apart from your competitors and out to your customers, so let’s get started with the most popular channel: Google. How to promote your business on Google. Using Google to promote your business is a no-brainer. Capturing more than 90% of the market share, it’s one of the best ways to get in front of consumers that are actively searching for solutions. Here are the best ways to use Google to get your name out there: 1. Create and verify your Google Business Profile. Your Google Business Profile (Google’s term for your Google listing) is what allows your business to show up in Google Maps results, the local section of Google Search results, and also—when someone types in your business name (ideas for creative business names here!) and location—the right-side Knowledge Panel in Search results. As Google gets better and better at catering its results to the searcher’s location, this free listing should be a top priority. The key to using your Business Profile to promote your business is to verify ownership of your listing through your free Google My Business account. Once you have ownership, you can optimize your listing to show up higher in search results and for more relevant searches. If you’re ranking on Google Maps or showing up in the Local Pack (as seen above) of regular results pages (this is very doable), your business is basically promoting itself 24/7. Even better, you can publish posts directly to your Google listing, putting attractive promotions in front of your audience at a time when they have high intent. For a deeper dive into this very free, very effective method of promoting your business, visit 13 Google My Business Optimizations for 2020. 2. Get a website. Every business needs a website, no matter how old-fashioned your business or clients may be. Your website is the go-to for current and prospective customers. Even if they find you on social media or Google, they will want to go to your website and, like your Google listing, it serves to promote your business around the clock. A good business website not only serves as a promotional tool in and of itself—it tells the story of your business and what you offer, provides contact information, and reflects your brand’s personality and distinguishing characteristics—but it is also essential for measuring and improving the success of your other promotional tactics. For example, when you run ads, you need landing pages, which live on your website. When you post helpful information on social media, it should link to its home on your website. With all of your marketing channels flowing into your website, you can use analytics to see which strategies are working best and get invaluable insights about your audience. Although there are completely free solutions to get a website in place for your business, almost inevitably you will need to move to some form of a paid website if you are serious about promoting your business. Having your own domain name, a professional look and feel, and the ability to scale and add features as needed are all essential for growth. 3. Implement search engine optimization. It’s one thing for you to promote your business; it’s another thing for Google to promote your business. SEO is a set of practices that align your business with Google’s ranking algorithm. But because this algorithm has evolved to use machine learning and user behavior to produce the most accurate and quality results for searchers, optimizing for search engines is really just optimizing for searchers—particularly those searching for what you have to offer. SEO isn’t just one tactic, but many tactics that collectively work together to improve your rank. Also, because Google has superb location-based results, you have just as much of a chance as big retailers to show up on the first page of Google— without spending a dime! (With the exception of the costs to get a website, of course). SEO tactics to promote your business include: Adding relevant (industry- and location-based) keywords to specific places on your website. Producing original, high-quality content regularly, with tagged images. Maintaining high page load speeds and security. For more SEO tips, check out this post on The Top 10 Google Ranking Factors of 2020 (+How to Optimize for Them). When your business is ranking high in results, Google is basically promoting your business for you—and not just to anyone, but to the people searching for what you have to offer. Doesn’t get much better than that. 4. Create a business blog. We just touched on this in the previous strategy, but content is such an important driver of SEO that it really deserves its own category as a promotional strategy. A blog is not LiveJournal for businesses. Sure, you can create some posts about milestones and events, but a lucrative business blog is one that produces educational content, in your brand voice, around questions and terms your ideal customers are searching in Google. An example of a targeted blog post from our friends at LOCALiQ These questions and terms are called keywords, and the more content you produce targeting these keywords, the more opportunities you create for your business to show up in search engine results pages. Great blog posts can be any of the following: How-tos and instructional posts Lists of strategies and resources (top 10, 5 best, 3 crucial, etc.) Q&A or interview writeup with an industry expert Thought leadership posts Example/template posts Guest posts Customer testimonials or case studies Seasonal posts (such as this one) For help finding keywords and creating SEO-friendly blog posts, check out these resources: WordStream’s Free Keyword Tool What is SEO Content? A Guide to Creating Content for SEO Blog SEO Tips for Non-SEOs 5. Share your content. A blog that shows your expertise, approachability, and genuine desire to help your audience is the perfect promotional tool for a business. So don’t just publish posts—promote them! On social media, via email newsletters, or even turn them into downloadable guides to help you collect leads. Better yet, if you produce content with shareability in mind, your blog posts will likely get noticed by other credible websites who will mention and link back to your site on their site or social media feeds—promoting your business for you. 6. Run Google Ads. While SEO will help you to get to the top of results pages, it is a long-term strategy that can take weeks, even months to start seeing results. For more immediate exposure, and if you have the budget, Google Ads is the way to go. Google Ads ads show up at the very top of search engine results pages, above organic and local listings. And of the search engines available, Google is by far the most popular not only because they control the largest share of search engine traffic, but also because of its high level of flexibility, ad building features, and detailed performance metrics. Though mastering Google Ads takes some time as well as plenty of trial and error, an optimized campaign is far worth the investment. Advertising on Google can be done through text ads on the Search Network or branded banner ads on the Display Network. You can check out our Google Ads crash course here. If you’re already advertising on Google, see how your campaigns are *really* performing with our Free Google Ads Performance Grader How to promote your business using online directories. Consumers routinely visit online directories to search for and vet businesses that fit their specific needs. These sites tend to be high-traffic, long-standing websites with high domain authority, so it’s not uncommon for your profile page or your business name to show up on the first page of Google through one of these domains. Online listings do not take long to create and can help enhance your online presence, promoting your business to nearby, high-intent customers. 7. Create listings on the major directories. Smaller directory sites pull data from larger ones, which means that by creating listings on the major sites, you’ll also likely begin showing up on smaller directories automatically. Below is a list of the major directories to start with. All of them are free, but often have paid options for advanced features. Google (see tactic #1) Yelp Facebook Applicable niche directories like TripAdvisor, Angie’s List, etc. Better Business Bureau Glassdoor Foursquare (Even though it’s dead as a social platform, its data is used by thousands of platforms.) Yellow/White Pages Bing For a deeper dive, check out this post on the Top 10 Free Local Listing Sites. 8. Optimize your listings. It’s one thing to create a listing, but it’s another to optimize it. By filling out every field in your profiles, adding photos, and collecting reviews, you can improve the appeal of your business and rank above competitors in searches. It’s also important to make sure your information in all of your listings is consistent with the information on your website. Inconsistencies can cause the Goog to raise an eyebrow about your trustworthiness. Finally, be sure to monitor your listing and fix any inaccuracies, which can happen when listings are auto-populated. For more ways to optimize your listings, use the same post I linked to above (but I’ll link it here just because). 9. Get online customer reviews. We just mentioned collecting reviews, but because reviews are so important for small and local businesses, they deserve their own section. Word of mouth is one of, perhaps the most, powerful way of promoting your business to the right people. Testimonials on your own website are great, but reviews on official platforms like Google, Facebook, and Yelp are even better. These websites can increase your exposure, and because they have measures in place to prevent fake or spam reviews, people trust the reviews here more than anywhere else. Plus, reviews are a major ranking factor for local search results. To get reviews, check out these posts: How to Ask for Reviews (with Examples) Get More Google Reviews with These 16 Tried and True Tactics 10. Monitor and respond to reviews. Many online directories allow anyone to add a listing, so even if you didn’t list your business, it may still be on there, collecting reviews. Be sure to claim your listings wherever possible, and monitor these sites frequently. This way you can respond to reviews—which is another great way to promote your business. Not only can you resolve (and even reverse) negative reviews, but the way you answer reviews (positive and negative) can reveal your brand’s values and give potential customers an idea of what it’s like to do business with you. How to promote your business on social media. Social media is another free way to get the word out about your small business. The most popular business accounts are Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter, but make sure to consider using other sites that might be specific to your niche, such as Pinterest or Reddit. 11. Prioritize Facebook. Facebook is the largest social network online and it can be a great way to keep in touch with existing customers and to reach new customers. Promoting your business on Facebook can vary substantially depending upon your industry, but here are some basics: Create a Facebook business page with your contact information and a CTA. Use Facebook events to promote and maximize attendance to your events. Run Facebook live sessions, of tutorials or behind-the-scenes sneak peeks. For more ways to promote your business using Facebook, take a look at our post 22 Facebook Marketing Tips for Small Businesses on a Budget. And don’t forget Facebook ads! Facebook advertising allows you to reach highly specific audiences, since you can target according to user profile information such as marital status, occupation, interests, and more. To get started with or even improve your Facebook advertising, check out our post on The 8 Best (and Free!) Facebook Ads Courses for Any Level. If you’re already advertising on Facebook, make sure you’re not wasting any spend with our Free Facebook Ads Performance Grader! 12. Connect and contribute on LinkedIn. LinkedIn has become more than just a place to post your online resume; it’s also a place to join in on group discussions, connect with potential customers, form new partnerships, or just to do general online networking. Potential customers can check out you or your company before doing business with you to find out how many employees you have and to get more information on the background of the company personnel. You can also promote your business indirectly on LinkedIn by providing perspectives in group discussions and/or providing links to relevant content on your website. Just make sure you’re not always promoting your own content. 13. Upload videos to YouTube. Video marketing is a great way to promote your business, and YouTube lets you do it for free! Promoting your business via YouTube is an effective way to help potential customers or clients connect with your business. Putting together a quick overview video of your business and then uploading it to YouTube gives you a nice sales tool that you can post on the homepage of your website or circulate in emails to prospective clients. You can also post educational videos, tutorials, or how-tos in your YouTube channel in order to get discovered by people looking for what your business offers. There are plenty of affordable options out there for making videos; just check out our post on DIY at-home videos. You can also add videos to your blog posts which can enhance their SEO quality, such as with this WordStream post below: Note also that videos tend to show up in results for very niche searches, sometimes at the very top, like this one: 14. Advertise on YouTube. As with the other paid strategies mentioned in this post, YouTube advertising can be an investment that pays off if it’s done right. You can advertise on YouTube by creating video ads that play before videos in relevant categories, or through text ads that appear in search results: 15. Engage your audience on Instagram. Despite being one of the more recently launched social media platforms, Instagram is the third most popular platform out there. With its diverse posting formats (permanent images, short-lived Stories, IGTV series, live sessions, Story Highlights, and more), there exists a variety of ways to use Instagram to engage your audience and promote your business. You can: Promote your sales and deals with hashtags to expand your reach. Run contests with a free or discounted product/service to generate positive buzz (and obtain a list of leads to reach out to). Offer advice and tutorials to stand out as a go-to resource. For more ways to promote your business on Instagram, check out these 11 Instagram marketing tips. 16. Share on Twitter. Twitter is another free channel that can be used to promote your business online—mainly if your audience is comprised of 18-24 year-olds. It tends to require a bit more activity to build an audience, but if you’re consistently active, you can master the platform and experience its benefits. You can promote your products or services: Or simply invite nearby customers to stop in: 17. Give Pinterest a shot. While Pinterest is fundamentally focused on sharing photos, the fact that your photos can link back to your website creates an opportunity to promote your business and drive more traffic to your site. Pinterest is especially powerful for ecommerce businesses looking to reach a female audience (Pinterest users are heavily skewed towards the female demographic).  If this fits your profile, you may want to think about getting active on the Pinterest network. 18. Try out TikTok. TikTok was only launched in 2016, but it has already surpassed Twitter, LinkedIn, Snapchat, and Pinterest in active users. Its ease of use in creating compelling videos with special effects makes it a great video marketing platform—and not just for Zillenials. You can jump right on the platform to provide how-to, tutorial, or behind-the-scenes videos, but you may want to promote your new Tik Tok channel across other networks, as with the example below: 19. Join online communities. One of the best ways to get a hand up is to offer a hand up to others. Join communities and groups relevant to your business or industry on LinkedIn, Reddit, and Facebook, and offer people good advice and suggestions when they have problems or questions. (Make sure your own profile information points back to your business, of course.) This is a great way to build a genuine reputation and form solid connections with people relevant to your work. What goes around generally comes around. And remember that while you’re helping one person with their query, you’re being observed by a thousand silent others who will see your name and what you’re doing. 20. Try an influencer marketing collaboration. Your business can be a part of communities both geographically-based and niche-focused, and influencers are celebrities within your niche. They’re not on the red carpet or hosting their own talk shows, but they are highly respected, wildly popular, and deeply trusted experts in your niche. Influencers have a large social media and/or blog following, which means that getting mentioned or featured by one of these influencers can promote your business to a massive, relevant audience. Influencer marketing is a careful strategy, however. Before reaching out to an influencer, take the time to familiarize with their accounts across all networks; comment on, like, and share their content; and be sure to approach them with a specific ask and something of equal value in exchange. For example, you might offer them a month of free classes in exchange for a review on their blog and mentions on social media. Or you might offer to write a high-quality guest post on their blog that benefits their audience while also supplying a backlink to your site. Here’s an example of an influencer in the automotive niche (David Patterson) promoting a local auto shop: And here’s an example of an influencer in the home and parenting niche (Leticia Barr) promoting FabFitFun: 21. Invest in social media advertising. Social media advertising is among the most forward-thinking, highly-utilized, and profitable forms of digital advertising today. More than 3.6 BILLION people use it and it’s constantly evolving to offer ease-of-use and exceptional value for your advertising dollar. When done right, paid social promotes your business to a highly targeted audience with these advantages: Familiarity: Meet people on the channels they use most. Cost-effectiveness: Advanced targeting ensures your ads are shown to only the most relevant audience. Supporting content: Your organic posts serve to support your sponsored posts. Brand loyalty: Attracting more followers to your accounts helps to build community and loyalty around your business. Analytics: Know what’s working so you can allot your budget accordingly. How to promote your business in your community. For local businesses, the community is a critical component of their success. Retailers and restaurants understand this implicitly, of course, and even those businesses focused more on the wider world still have a considerable attachment to the place or places in which they operate. That said, let’s talk about a few ways to promote your business in your community. 22. Strive to get local press. For some reason, the idea of pitching your business happenings to the local press feels intimidating, but the truth is, local blogs, newspapers, online publications are always on the hunt for fresh content. Reach out to your local news sources and see if you can contribute an article—whether it’s a thought leadership piece, a list of resources, or a newsworthy update about your business. If your business’s story is compelling enough, you might even be able to get someone else to publish a featured write-up. You can also ask to write about an event you are hosting in your community, or invite a local writer to attend for free in exchange for a recap. If you have a little more budget, you may even consider a public relations partner, firm, or app to get your stories published in multiple media sources. If your budget is a little bit lower, you can publish your own press releases through companies like www.prweb.com. These press releases may get picked up by some media outlets and they can also help your search engine optimization by providing links back to your website. You can learn how to write a great press release here. 23. Form partnerships. Partnering with non-competitive businesses that serve the same clientele can be a great way to promote your business in your local network. Once you have established a relationship, you can cross-promote each other’s services through your email lists and in-store flyers or coupons, or by engaging them through social media. Don’t be afraid to get creative to maximize the promotional value of the partnership. 24. Network network network. Attending local networking events is a great way to increase your presence in your community. This works better for some types of businesses than others. If you provide services directly to other small businesses or consumers, then local networking is going to be far more rewarding than if you sell products online, for example. However, every kind of networking helps, even if it’s just to share ideas and inspiration with other business owners. Whether online or offline, inexpensive marketing techniques like these can get your business humming with the energy from new customers and clients. And if you do partake in networking (I’m not trying to tell you how to live your life, but you should), do not miss out on my nine networking email templates, like the one below: 25. Attend, host, or sponsor local events. Even in a world that is increasingly digital, attending, hosting, or sponsoring events in your community is a great way to promote your business while strengthening your connection with local customers. You could run a class at your location, offer to teach a class at a school, library, or other local establishment, or even just host a fun seasonal and/or family-oriented event. Leverage the time you put into creating and teaching the class by having a friend take video of you teaching, then put that video on your website and on YouTube. 26. Try out direct mail. Despite the dominance of digital media today, sending postcards, flyers, letters, or other types of mail can still be a very effective way to promote your business to nearby customers. One of the biggest challenges with this promotional method is that you can’t exactly target your mailings, so you’ll need to print out and send a high volume of mail in order to get a response. The benefit is that if you get it right, promoting your business through the mail can help you get new customers with a very repeatable process. You could also send your loyal customers little gift packages during the holidays to keep them coming back and (most likely) promoting your business to their friends and family. 27. Advertise locally and offline. Newspapers, magazines, radio, and even television are some other traditional places for paying to promote your business. If you are considering promoting your business through print ads or any of these offline strategies, the key is to make sure you are tracking everything so that you can know the effectiveness. For more local advertising tips, head here: 10 Effective Local Advertising Ideas for Small Businesses Other effective ways of promoting your business. These three promotional strategies are last but definitely least—they’re just a bit miscellaneous with regard to the way I grouped the strategies in this post. 28. Attend trade shows. If you are targeting a national audience and you want to sell your products to retailers, going to a big trade show might make sense. If you are unsure of how beneficial the trade show will be for you, and you have some time to figure it out, you might consider just attending as a visitor before investing the money in your own booth. If you have a good relationship with a company already planning on exhibiting at a trade show, they may let you “hang out” in their booth for a portion of time, where you can observe and learn, and maybe even promote your business free of charge. 29. Run email marketing campaigns. Email marketing has been around for ages, but the strategy has by no means become less effective over time. In fact, 77% of people prefer to get permission-based promotional messages via email versus other modes of communication. Email is a popular channel for consumers and businesses alike: People like to stay informed. People constantly check their email. Email offers detailed reporting. You can segment your lists for targeted, personalized emails. Email marketing generates a 30x average return on investment. Email marketing platforms offer flexibility, creativity, and most importantly, ease of use. For more tips on using email marketing, check out my post on How to Write Undelete-able Promotional Emails. 30. Make advocates out of your employees. Good leadership and proper treatment of your employees will naturally turn them into advocates for your business. Hold brainstorm sessions, encourage employee blog post contributions, host fireside chats, get them involved in local events, run family and friend promotions—value them and they will value the business they work for. You can then encourage social media sharing and equip them with news and tools to effortlessly spread the word about your business. Bottom line: you can effectively promote your business, with or without money. There are a plethora of options when it comes to promoting your business, no matter your budget. Implementing the strategies in this post is sure to pay off, especially if you regularly review and revise your strategy. We’ve covered a lot in this post, so let’s recap to wrap things up: Create and verify your Google Business Profile Get a website Implement SEO Start a business blog Share your content Run Google Ads Create listings on the major directories Optimize your listings Get online customer reviews Monitor and respond to reviews Prioritize Facebook Connect and contribute on LinkedIn Publish videos to YouTube Advertise on YouTube Engage your audience on Instagram Share on Twitter Give Pinterest a shot Try out TikTok Join online communities Collaborate with an influencer Advertise on social media Seek after local press Form partnerships Network, network, network Host, attend, or sponsor local events Send direct mail Try local offline advertising Attend trade shows Send marketing emails Form employee advocates Meet The Author Kristen McCormick. Kristen is the Senior Managing Editor at WordStream, where she helps businesses to make sense of their online marketing and advertising. She specializes in local SEO, copywriting, and conversion optimization, and she finds life to be exponentially more delightful on a bicycle. See other posts by Kristen McCormick More Articles Like This. The [Hands-Down] 50 Best Marketing Tips & Tricks We Revealed This Year—in Every Category. This is the Sparknotes of digital marketing that you need for A+ success in 2022—for PPC, copywriting, SEO, email, social, and more. The 8 Biggest Marketing Fails of All Time (With Practical Takeaways). Be prepared for more than just marketing takeaways. This one's an eye-opener. 9 Popular Email Marketing Strategies to Stop Doing ASAP (+13 to Do Instead). Just because you can still do them doesn't mean you should! Learn how to stay successful amidst the Apple iOS 15 email privacy updates. Comments. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting. Sign up for our weekly newsletter! Related Articles. The [Hands-Down] 50 Best Marketing Tips & Tricks We Revealed This Year—in Every Category The 8 Biggest Marketing Fails of All Time (With Practical Takeaways) 9 Popular Email Marketing Strategies to Stop Doing ASAP (+13 to Do Instead) The 21 Best Marketing Podcasts to Listen, Learn & Laugh in 2022
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Result 11
Title13 Ways to Market Your Business Online - Single Grain
Urlhttps://www.singlegrain.com/blog-posts/13-ways-to-market-your-business-online/
Descriptionin our fast-paced world, it’s getting harder to be seen and remembered by customers. Here are 13 truly simple ways to market your business online
Date26 Apr 2019
Organic Position10
H113 Ways to Market Your Business Online
H21) Get Off Your Website (And On To Social Media)
2) Have Conversations with People
3) Leverage Your Brand
4) Talk About Yourself
5) Be Consistent Everywhere Your Brand Goes
6) Start Building a Brand with the Rule of 7
7) Pay for Promotion
8) Create Email Campaigns
9) Give Stuff Away
10) Know What Your Customers Want
11) Talk About Others
12) Work with Influencers
13) Ask People to Talk about You
Final Thoughts
H3
H2WithAnchors1) Get Off Your Website (And On To Social Media)
2) Have Conversations with People
3) Leverage Your Brand
4) Talk About Yourself
5) Be Consistent Everywhere Your Brand Goes
6) Start Building a Brand with the Rule of 7
7) Pay for Promotion
8) Create Email Campaigns
9) Give Stuff Away
10) Know What Your Customers Want
11) Talk About Others
12) Work with Influencers
13) Ask People to Talk about You
Final Thoughts
Body13 Ways to Market Your Business Online Megan Mahoney [Free Consultation] Are you spending money on advertising but not getting the results you want? Are you looking for more sales and leads but have no idea where or how to start? Get help from our world-class marketing experts in a free consultation call. Click Here To Schedule Your Free Consultation NowMarketing is about face-time – and in our increasingly fast-paced world, it’s getting harder and harder to be seen and remembered by customers and clients. Being available online is essential, especially in places where new people see you every day.If you’re thinking about how to market your business online, here are 13 ways to get your name and brand out there. Just remember that although they might seem basic, these ideas can always be built upon.We’ve helped Fortune 500 companies, venture backed startups and companies like yours grow revenues faster. Get A Free Consultation1) Get Off Your Website (And On To Social Media). If you are thinking about how to market an online business, having a website should be the top priority right? Wrong. A large percentage of transactions these days comes from platforms other than websites. At Single Grain, we always talk about having an omnichannel approach, which simply means that you need to ensure that you are leveraging more than one platform. If you aren’t, you’re leaving money on the table. Instead, you need to create relevant profiles on at least a few social media sites and start interacting with the users there. We offer a full guide to setting up a social media strategy.If you have a brick-and-mortar business, establish a presence on social media sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram to make sure that people can: Submit reviews Find information about your businessAsk questionsRead your blog posts or product reviewsDive Deeper: Omnichannel Marketing: Using the Content Sprout Method to Overcome Info OverloadThe Beginner’s Guide to Crafting a Highly Effective Social Media Strategy in 20194 Ways to Acquire Customer Reviews Using Social Media2) Have Conversations with People. Interaction is the name of the game. You need to be able to address people’s needs or frustrations about your business or your field. In fact, according to HubSpot, 85% of jobs are filled by networking. Sadly, however, one in four people don’t even try to network. Imagine how much potential for new clients and customers you are ignoring by talking with people. This is where the above tip comes into play – social media platforms are excellent places to have conversations, from Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to Quora, Yelp and Reddit.Above all, have conversations, not sales pitches. Don’t try to sell – just talk to people. If they are curious enough, they can click through your profile and learn more about you.3) Leverage Your Brand. Regardless of whether you have a personal or corporate brand, be sure to leverage it. How do you do that?First of all, make sure that you have a story that is relatable to the audience that you are targeting. For example, here at Single Grain, we offer an Agency Accelerator program that targets people who are starting a marketing agency. These people are usually struggling to get started, so our story of how our CEO Eric took over Single Grain from a negative business to having clients like Lyft is both relatable and has the target market’s desired end result.Another extremely important part of a brand is building up your trust and credibility. Talking about clients you worked with (if you are allowed to) and having testimonials on your site will help.4) Talk About Yourself. People go to your website – especially your About page – to find out about your business. Don’t settle for a paragraph of ambiguous words about your goals or mission. Make it real by putting the personal touch on everything you do, and including plenty of mentions of how others describe you.If you’re looking for good examples, HubSpot created a list of great About pages. Some characteristics of a good About page include data-driven stats, a personal tone and talking directly to the target market.5) Be Consistent Everywhere Your Brand Goes. You need people to be able to recognize your brand no matter where they are online. Logos and colors help, and so do faces and catchphrases. But you also need to make sure that you are reaching out to your target audience wherever you are. So spread consistent messages and don’t try to rebrand yourself every few months.We’ve helped Fortune 500 companies, venture backed startups and companies like yours grow revenues faster. Get A Free Consultation6) Start Building a Brand with the Rule of 7. The best time to be establishing your brand is as soon as possible. Even if your future customers are not in a position to be buying from you now, if you aren’t visible right away, you won’t be remembered when they are ready to pay for your products or services. Remember the Rule of Seven: Your brand has to be seen seven times before anyone will remember who you are.This is also very important from an SEO standpoint as Google’s CEO, Eric Schmidt, said that the Internet is a cesspool but that trusted brands can help: “Brands are the solution, not the problem…. Brands are how you sort out the cesspool.”So how can you do this? The Content Sprout Method is a great place to start in 2019. This technique starts with a “seed”, which can be one video, one blog post, etc. Next, you have the “sprout”, which is quite simply taking the seed content and creating it in another form. So if you started with a video, now you also have audio for a podcast, which you can transcribe into a blog post. From there you then “pollinate” it by pushing it out to many platforms. That can be an email list or putting ad spend into it.7) Pay for Promotion. If you’re wondering how to market online, you’ve probably considered paid advertising. PPC is not an SEO strategy per se, but it is an online awareness strategy. Advertising, especially well-targeted advertising, still serves its purpose, and Internet ads are much easier to track than television or print ads. Experiment with different ad copy, the size and placement of banner ads, and different advertising channels. And be sure to send each ad to one specific landing page. If you aren’t keeping track of your results, you won’t be able to measure or improve them.It’s no secret that paying for space is getting more and more expensive. Does that mean we shouldn’t use it anymore? No! We wrote a guide to Google AdWords (now Google Ads) or you can watch the video below to learn how you can still crush it in 2019.8) Create Email Campaigns. An email campaign is a great way to keep reminding former customers who you are, what you do, and what you have to offer. Prospective customers might also use your emails to judge whether they want to do business with you or not. Make sure that there is something your reader can find helpful in each email blast, like a new product, a holiday special, an informative blog post or even a product demo video.Need some help getting started? We provided a couple of examples of great email structures. Remember that an effective email is an email that adds value to the customer. If your email isn’t providing value, it won’t help increase your conversions.Dive Deeper:Cold Email Templates that Get Responses8 Ideas for Compelling Emails to Send During the HolidaysBeyond the Newsletter: You’ve Got Their Email, Now What?9) Give Stuff Away. Free things are music to most peoples’ ears – and that doesn’t always mean giving stuff away. It could also mean having a sale with deep discounts. If you are marketing physical products, it could mean providing an exceptional guarantee to back your products. When selling information products like e-books and courses, try letting people have the first chapter or lesson for free.In fact, Neil Patel has been known to create content for $30,000 and then give it away for free. He also purchased Ubersuggest for $120,000 and then released it as a free tool. And guess what happened to his traffic? Yup, it skyrocketed. Just focus on creating value.We’ve helped Fortune 500 companies, venture backed startups and companies like yours grow revenues faster. Get A Free Consultation10) Know What Your Customers Want. Just because you have a great product or service, doesn’t necessarily mean that you know what they want. The best way to discover this is to do a little research and create buyer personas.Simply put, a buyer persona is a detailed description of your target customer. A fully fleshed out buyer persona includes everything from demographic information to hobbies, and from income bracket to family size – all written as if the persona were a real person.However, just because your product solves a prospect’s pain point doesn’t mean that he or she will immediately purchase. Originally you will have cold traffic, so you should focus on warming them up. Here is a guide we created on how to target warm, hot and cold traffic.Dive Deeper: Attract the Right Prospects With Buyer Personas (Includes Step-by-Step Templates!)How to Implement User Intent to Build an Audience for Your Content4 Steps to Discover Your Ideal Buyer Persona for B2B Marketers11) Talk About Others. There’s no better way to get someone’s attention online than to flatter them, especially if you send a noticeable amount of web traffic in their direction. Establish yourself as a fan first by following them on social media, reading their articles (or watching their videos, etc.), and adding your thoughts to the comments section. You can then write blog posts that link to one of their articles (it must be a relevant link, of course, and your own post should be very well written), and share it with them with a note saying how they inspired you.And don’t forget about flattering the little guy, too – it’s not just the big brands or personalities that are important. Though they will likely become loyal to your business in return, remember that you should be giving without hoping to get anything in return.12) Work with Influencers. Social sites allow people to share and talk about what is relevant to them. Find the people who are active within your niche and start to spark conversations and build relationships. This is a great way to be seen as an influencer. In addition, create high-quality resources that people will want to link to and tell their friends about.If some of these influencers are difficult to get in touch with, think about how you can help them. What keeps them up at night? How can you solve one of their problems? Make sure that when you do reach out to them, you are speaking on a personal level. If you want more info on how to carry out these steps, here are 5 hacks to start a conversation with an influence that you can use.Dive Deeper: How to Reinforce Your Customer Acquisition Strategy with Influencer MarketingHow to Work with YouTube Influencers to Grow Your BusinessHow Artificial Intelligence Is Transforming Influencer Marketing13) Ask People to Talk about You. Encourage feedback, positive or negative, from your customers. Remind them that you will be reading all reviews or survey answers. Treat all your customers with equal respect, even when you disagree with their opinion. Remember that it is much more expensive to acquire a new customer than it is to maintain a current customer, so focus on how you can make your current customers happy.In fact, according to a study from SuperOffice: 86% of customers will pay more for a good customer experience73% consider it an important factor while making a purchase decision65% find a positive experience with a brand more influential than great advertisingWe’ve helped Fortune 500 companies, venture backed startups and companies like yours grow revenues faster. Get A Free ConsultationFinal Thoughts. There are many more ways to market your growing business online, and much more depth to the thirteen tips listed here, but if you're overwhelmed and aren't sure where to start, this blog post will help you. To learn more about digital or online marketing, check out these guides and articles:How to Perform Marketing Competitor Analysis (+ 6 Best Tools Comparison)7 Marketing Strategies that Work to Increase Conversions10-Step Checklist to Digital Branding for SMBsThe #1 Marketing Strategy for 2019: The Content Sprout Method44 Must-Have Marketing Tools for any Business in 2019What Single Grain’s Marketing Focus Looks Like in 2019How to Choose the Best Digital Marketing Agency for Your Business in 2019And if you still need some help, call us for a FREE consultation! Read this next Grant Deken • Apr 29, 2019 MQL vs. SQL – Serve Up The Right Type Of Content To Your LeadsPrevious ArticleJoydeep Bhattacharya • Apr 26, 2019 9 Rules for Creating Ads that ConvertMore like this Raghav Haran • Jan 3, 2017 The Ultimate Guide to Conversion Rate Optimization Eric Siu • Mar 14, 2018 The Ultimate Guide to Blockchain Digital Marketing and Cryptocurrency Single Grain Team • Oct 28, 2014 The Step-by-Step Guide to Crafting Content for Conversions Joydeep Bhattacharya • Jan 31, 2020 17 Best Paid Media Tools for Marketers Eric Siu • Nov 28, 2011 How Using Twitter Hashtags Increased our Following by 13.4%Latest Posts Nick Chernets • Jan 6, 2022 10 Underrated SEO Reporting Metrics That’ll Impress Your Clients in 2022 Devin Pickell • Jan 3, 2022 8 Best Shopify Apps for Growing E-commerce Merchants Mark Quadros • Dec 30, 2021 6 Referral Marketing Strategies to Boost Sales in 2022 Eric Siu • Dec 27, 2021 How Social Tokens Will Change Marketing Forever Sarah Rickerd • Dec 23, 2021 5 Best MarketMuse Alternatives to Rank BetterBack to our blog Thank you!You’ll be hearing from us very soon. Close Visit SingleGrain.com Get started in 1 minute → Keep goin’! Start my free consultation WAIT! Don’t leave without getting a FREE consultation with a marketing specialist. 👉 Are you looking to build your company’s online presence? Generate leads and attract more potential clients? Increase traffic to your website? Get a leg up on the competition by scheduling your free marketing consultation. Yes! I want my free consultation now! No thanks, I’ll pass on this free opportunity. This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more. Okay, thanks Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
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Result 12
Titledummies - Learning Made Easy
Urlhttps://www.dummies.com/article/business-careers-money/business/small-business/general-small-business/marketing-your-small-business-for-dummies-cheat-sheet-209175
Description
Date27 Mar 2016
Organic Position11
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Bodysorry but dummies doesn't work properly without JavaScript enabled. Please enable it to continue.
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Result 13
TitleHow to Market Your Business — A Small Business Growth Guide | Mailchimp
Urlhttps://mailchimp.com/resources/how-to-market-your-business/
DescriptionWhether you’re a brand-new entrepreneur or a seasoned pro who wants to increase sales, learning how to market your small business effectively is vital to your success
Date
Organic Position12
H1How to Market Your Business — A Small Business Growth Guide
H2Step One: Define your brand
Step Two: Find your potential customers
Step Three: Build relationships with your customers
Step Four: Use advanced marketing techniques
How it all fits together
H3Try searching for
Describe your target market
Identify your USP
Define your brand identity
Improve your search visibility
Reach out to media
Advertise online
Use social media wisely
Create contests and giveaways
Create an email marketing strategy
Get to know your customers
Remarketing
Lookalike audiences
Partnerships
Offline marketing
H2WithAnchorsStep One: Define your brand
Step Two: Find your potential customers
Step Three: Build relationships with your customers
Step Four: Use advanced marketing techniques
How it all fits together
BodyHow to Market Your Business — A Small Business Growth Guide Whether you’re a brand‑new entrepreneur or a seasoned pro who wants to increase sales, learning how to market your small business effectively is vital to your success. A thoughtful, well-designed marketing plan will build awareness of your business, drive sales, and turn your customers into lifelong fans. The best way to create a cohesive marketing plan is to begin by defining your niche, unique selling proposition, and brand identity. This triad forms the base of your plan. Once you’ve established that foundation, all the other pieces will fall into place more easily. Step One: Define your brand . Consumers have the entire world at their fingertips when they’re shopping and their lives are already overflowing with marketing messages. How can you make sure your voice will be heard in all that noise? Defining your niche and your brand as narrowly as possible is the best way to succeed in today’s crowded marketplace. The more personalized your marketing messages are, the more people will pay attention to them. Your target market, unique selling proposition, and brand identity should be tightly intermingled. Aim to keep them closely connected as you refine them. Describe your target market. You may find yourself instinctively wanting to throw out as wide a net as possible in the search for customers. Surely everyone could benefit from your amazing products and services, right? But when you try to sell to everyone, your message gets so watered down that no one pays attention to it. Instead, define your potential customers as precisely as possible. You can choose more than one target group, as long as each one is clearly specified. But if you’re just getting started in marketing, your life will be easier if you begin with just one. Here are some possibilities for narrowing your market and defining your buyer persona: Gender Age group Urban vs. rural Geographic area Income level Profession Education level Personality traits Household size Values Spending habits Your goal is to create a cohesive buyer persona: a portrait of your ideal customer. For instance, perhaps your customer is Alice, a fun-loving, young, middle-class mother who is concerned about her family’s security. Or maybe your customer is Karl, a free-spirited man in his 50s who needs to plan for retirement but doesn’t enjoy thinking about money. Use your customer stories to create detailed profiles for your buyer personas. Consider the needs, struggles, hopes, and goals of these personas, and adjust your marketing accordingly. Identify your USP. One of the core concepts in marketing is the Unique Selling Proposition or USP. This is a clear statement of what sets your business apart from your competitors, and it defines your position in the marketplace. Here are some examples of how you might express the USP of popular brands: Apple: Cutting-edge tech made user friendly Whole Foods: Well-curated selection of organic, healthy, earth-friendly foods Aldi: The stock-up store, with lowest prices on pantry staples Nike: Serious athletic performance gear To define your USP, answer the question “Why should people come to you for X instead of anyone else?” in a single phrase or sentence. If you’ve already been in business for a while, you might want to survey your customers to find out why they chose you, and why they would choose you again. If you don’t have customers yet, set aside a few minutes to write out different ideas that come to mind when you think of your brand, as quickly as possible and without editing your thoughts. Then, pick through that list for the strongest words and ideas and distill them into one statement. Pro tip: Look behind the obvious reasons people buy from you and seek emotional reasons instead. People buy from Whole Foods and Nike because of how they want to see themselves, not because of tangible needs. Define your brand identity. Your brand identity (often just referred to as your brand) should grow out of your USP, but it’s slightly different. Your brand is the personality your business exudes, and can usually be expressed in a single word or short phrase. For instance, the brands mentioned above can be expressed as: Apple: Sleek Whole Foods: Conscious living Aldi: Bargains Nike: Strength To understand the importance of a well-defined brand, imagine two companies that are both marketing vacation resorts. If they use similar pictures of swimming pools and market themselves to “everyone who wants a vacation,” neither one will be very successful. But suppose one resort defines its target market as young families, and its USP is that it offers lots of activities for children. That resort might represent its brand identity as “family fun,” and use bright colors, playful fonts, and action photos of laughing families for its marketing. Imagine the other travel company has a target market of affluent women aged 40 and over, and its value proposition is that it specializes in peaceful retreats from the stresses of daily life. This company might define its brand as “serenity” and represent itself with light, neutral colors and photos of women in hammocks on secluded beaches. Now that these companies are fully differentiated, each one is far more likely to catch the eye of its ideal potential customers. Remember, your target market, USP, and brand identity are meant to work together. Try to define your brand in a way that stresses your USP and speaks directly to your target market, this will make a difference when promoting your business. Step Two: Find your potential customers . Now that you know exactly who your market is and what you need to tell them, you’re ready to find ways to bring your brand to their attention. Improve your search visibility. Want more traffic to your website without spending money? Optimizing your site so that you get found by search engines is easier than you might think. Choose a long-tail keyword First, figure out what phrase your target market might type into a search engine when they look for your products or services. Choosing a long-tail keyword — a phrase of 3 to 5 words instead of a single word — narrows your competition and helps you get higher placement in search results. For instance, in the example above, one resort might choose “best vacation with young kids” while the other might choose “luxury beach getaway.” Both are better choices than a highly-sought-after and less specific keyword like “travel” or “vacation.” It would be very difficult to get to the top of the search results for a competitive keyword like that. Note: If your business is local, be sure your metro or town name is in your long-tail keyword. Optimize your content Put your long-tail keyword in as many of the following locations as you can, so the search engines know that this is what your site is about: Your URL, if you don't already have one Your site name Your homepage title The first paragraph of text At least one subheading The meta description of the page “Alt” tags for images on the page Sprinkle more repetition of the keyword phrase throughout the text where it feels natural — just don't overdo it. Search engines prioritize websites that use natural language over ones that pack keywords in where they don’t belong. You can optimize for more than one keyword phrase, but it’s easiest to get started with just one. If you add more keywords later, create a landing page or blog post for each one and optimize that page. Including search engine optimization tactics in your online marketing plan can help you grow your business in the long term with little or no marketing budget. Add blog posts Publishing blog posts is a great way to bring organic traffic to your site for more keywords. You can write them yourself or pay someone to do it. Either way, think about the questions that your potential customers might type into a search engine and try to answer them. Use the words from those questions as your long-tail keywords for that page. For instance, the family resort website might publish a blog post for the keywords “what to pack for children on vacation” or “best airline to fly with kids.” The blog posts would answer the questions thoroughly and invite the visitor to sign up for an email list, possibly offering a discount or prize drawing in exchange for subscribing. Create a Google My Business Account Setting up a listing with Google My Business can pay off in terms of search engine placement, especially if you run a local business, and it’s free. Your listing also lets you control how your company appears on Google Maps and gives options for collecting reviews and offering discounts. Reach out to media. Which websites and magazines are your customers reading? Email them a press release periodically, describing anything innovative or newsworthy that your company does. You can also let them know that you have experts on staff who are willing to give interviews when needed. Writing guest posts for popular blogs that your audience reads is another good way to let them “meet” you and get links back to your website. If your business is local, be sure to include local news sources in your media outreach as well. Advertise online. A small budget doesn’t need to limit your advertising options. Google and Facebook, the two giants of online advertising, both let you set your own budget. Even better, you can opt for a “pay-per-click” model, which means you only pay for advertising that brings traffic to your site. With Google Ads, all you have to do is set a daily budget and Google multiplies that by 30.4 to reach a monthly maximum. So if you want to spend $30 a month on Google’s paid advertising, set a $1 daily budget. When you reach $30.40 for the month, your ads will stop running. Creating display ads for Google is easier than you probably think. Once you specify which page on your website you want an ad to link to, Google will pull the headline and images directly from that page. Google can automatically build ads of different shapes and sizes using those elements, and if you don't like the results, you can change them. Facebook's display advertising has very similar features. Facebook also lets you boost posts that you create on your Facebook page, setting limits as low as $1 per day to send your post to an audience you define. Facebook ads are a great marketing tool for promoting your business if you operate with a limited budget. Both Google and Facebook let you specify an audience according to age, income, location, and interests. Whether you want your ads to reach young moms who love to knit, or retirees who like decorating, or teenagers in your town, you can accomplish that with either platform. Use social media wisely. Focus your social media efforts by choosing just one or two channels to work with at first. Start with the one where you feel the most comfortable and where you think you’re most likely to connect with your target audience. For instance, Facebook is widely used by people ages 30 and over, while Instagram appeals to teens and young adults. Men are more likely to be on Twitter or YouTube, but Pinterest is a good place to reach women. Whatever social media Platforms you choose, create posts that reflect your brand identity while being useful to your audience. Some of your posts should be about your products, services, and promotions, but make sure you’re also offering tips, humor, and links that your followers will enjoy. Engage them in conversation by asking questions or polling them for their opinions. If you’re already creating blog posts, you can use excerpts from those as social media posts, with or without links to the blog itself. Look for new ways to present the same information, like recording explainer videos or turning a series of tips into a collection of simple graphics that you can share individually. If you keep sharing useful, interesting content, your audience will grow organically over time. You can also boost that growth with contests or giveaways. Create contests and giveaways. Some small businesses use contests and giveaways as their main tool to build a social following, increase brand awareness and grow their email list. Here are some tips to make this marketing method work for your business: Choose a prize that your target market will be excited about. Create posts and ads to advertise the contest that also promote your brand and USP. Have people enter by joining your email list and/or following your social media. Give them additional entries if they share the contest. Follow up with a welcome email for all your new audience members. Step Three: Build relationships with your customers . As your customer base grows and your audience expands through email and social media, make sure you give as much attention to nurturing those connections as you do to creating new ones. Create an email marketing strategy. While social media lets you broadcast messages to large groups, email allows you to talk to people one-on-one. Your email strategy needs to include a welcome email (or series) when people join your list and a regular schedule of messages to stay in touch. What kind of messages should you send? While you definitely want to let your audience know when you have a promotion or a new product, you should also send information that will entertain, amuse, and engage them. If you regularly share useful tips, discounts, and resources, your audience will be more likely to open your emails than they would if they expected self-promotion in every message. Think of email as an opportunity to build strong relationships with existing and potential customers. Show them that you understand their needs and want to help them. Give them a chance to get familiar with your brand and learn more about your business. If people connect deeply with your brand, they’ll become ambassadors who not only buy from you again but recommend you to their friends. Email automation lets you go far beyond sending a welcome email and monthly newsletter. You can set up a system that greets new audience members, onboards new customers, reminds visitors of items they’ve left in their cart, follows up with people who opened a previous message, and gives customers recommendations about other items similar to the ones they've purchased. With automation, you write the messages and design the series, and then your business stays in touch with your customers automatically — even while you sleep, vacation, or run other aspects of your company. Get to know your customers. Communication should always be a two-way street. While you’re helping your email audience get acquainted with your business, you should be learning as much about them as possible too. The more you know about your subscribers, the more targeted your messaging can be — and the fewer emails you’ll send that miss the mark. Segmenting your email list enables you to speak more directly to each customer. You can create segments based on the items they’ve purchased in the past, how often they interact with you or open your messages, which page they were on when they subscribed, or specific interests you know they have. Integrating your marketing platform with your e-commerce system will save you a lot of time in this regard. With platforms like Mailchimp, you can assign customers to segments based on their buying patterns and behaviors. Then, the system can keep tracking their behavior and send them emails you've created for specific situations. For instance, Mary buys a set of wine glasses on your website. With a connected marketing and e-commerce system, you can automatically send Mary a thank-you note for becoming a customer and add her to a "wine lovers" segment of your list. Mary then receives some tips for buying, storing, and enjoying wine, and two discount offers — one for a wine storage rack and one for a different kitchen item. If she buys the kitchen item, she might be added to a new segment and receive emails with more cooking tips and kitchen item discounts. Step Four: Use advanced marketing techniques . Once you have the basics in place, you may want to add more tools to your marketing plan. Here are some popular options that work well for many small businesses. Remarketing. You probably spend a lot of time and resources bringing people to your website. But how can you follow up with them if they leave without signing up for your list or buying anything? Remarketing campaigns (also called retargeting campaigns) are aimed at your recent visitors. This type of campaign will show your ads to them whenever they visit sites that are part of the Google marketing network. Remarketing lets you follow up with people who were interested enough to visit your site once and hopefully bring them back to complete a sale. Lookalike audiences. One of the best ways to find new prospects is to analyze your existing customer base and look for people who are similar to them. This is called a lookalike audience, or a similar audience. Google, Facebook, and Mailchimp all have systems that can analyze your list, find other people who share demographics and interests with them, and target ads to those people. Once you have a strong, responsive list, this is an effective way to expand your reach. Partnerships. Marketing partnerships can be a win-win for two companies that sell different things to the same audience. The ideal partner is a business that shares your niche and has some overlap in brand identity, but isn’t a direct competitor. Once you find a partner you’d like to work with, brainstorm ideas for ways to enhance your businesses together. For instance: Co-sponsor a live or virtual event and invite both your audiences Offer discounts on one another’s products as customer incentives Create a giveaway together, with prizes from both businesses Write guest posts for one another’s blogs or newsletters Trade advertising on your websites or in your emails Offline marketing. Not all marketing has moved online. There are still viable ways to market your business offline as well. Direct mail is one option. Sending postcards to the people who have interacted with you online is an affordable way to build awareness and promote your products or services. Another option is hosting or attending events. If your business is local, or part of an industry that hosts conventions, seek out the events your customers are most likely to attend. Rent a booth and hand out branded swag — or useful digital downloads, if the event is virtual. Even better, volunteer to speak and give a helpful presentation related to your industry. How it all fits together. There are a lot of elements to keep track of when learning how to market your business. However, as you work through all these methods and techniques, you’ll see that they fit neatly together to form a cohesive marketing strategy. After you create some blog posts for your website, for example, you can recycle that content into social media posts, videos, or guest posts for other blogs. You can use similar content to engage your email audience as well. Plus, you can use your emails, ads, and social media posts to drive traffic to your website, then target those visitors with a remarketing campaign to make the most of their interest in what you're offering. Weaving your brand identity and USP through all of your marketing efforts will create synergy and tie everything together. In the end, you’ll have an effective plan that brings new customers and increased sales to your business. Share This Article Share this article on Twitter Share this article on Linkedin Share this article on Facebook Email this article
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TitleThe Role of Marketing: How it Affects Business and How to Market the Right Way - Digital Marketing Blog
Urlhttps://www.insegment.com/blog/role-marketing-affects-business-market-right-way/
DescriptionThe Role of Marketing: Learn How Marketing Affects Business and How to Market the Right Way from inSegment, a Boston based digital marketing agency
Date
Organic Position13
H1The Role of Marketing: How it Affects Business and How to Market the Right Way
H2Definition of Sales and Marketing
Introduction –What is the Purpose of Marketing?
7 Functions of Marketing
The Difference Between Sales and Marketing
What Is Inbound Marketing?
Inbound Marketing Strategy Examples
What About Marketing Performance Metrics?
The Importance of Marketing in Business
Now You Know the Difference Between Sales and Marketing!
H3Distribution—Distribution Strategy in Marketing
Financing—The Role of Marketing in Business
Market Research—Importance of Market Research
Pricing—Again, the Importance of Market Research
Product and Service Management—Measuring Advertising Effectiveness
Promotion—What Is Promotion in Marketing?
Selling—What Is the Difference Between Sales and Marketing?
Social Media—Marketing via Social Media
Content Creation—Types of Content Marketing
Email Marketing—Email as a Service
H2WithAnchorsDefinition of Sales and Marketing
Introduction –What is the Purpose of Marketing?
7 Functions of Marketing
The Difference Between Sales and Marketing
What Is Inbound Marketing?
Inbound Marketing Strategy Examples
What About Marketing Performance Metrics?
The Importance of Marketing in Business
Now You Know the Difference Between Sales and Marketing!
BodyThe Role of Marketing: How it Affects Business and How to Market the Right Way Marketing Channels Definition of Sales and Marketing. Let’s set the scene: you’re on the couch, relaxing and watching television. Your mom is there watching as well—a commercial comes on that is funny and you both laugh. Your mother then says, “That was some good marketing.” Now many questions arise: is an entertaining commercial really “marketing”? Is there a lot more that goes into it than just a funny idea? This seems like sales, what’s the difference between sales and marketing? What’s the definition of sales and marketing? What is inbound marketing? What is marketing research? Are there different distribution channels in marketing? The answers to these questions will be answered when we discuss the role of marketing and explain how everything works in this complex world. Defining sales is pretty easy, as it states, “any of a number of activities designed to promote customer purchase of a product or service. Sales can be done in person or over the phone, through e-mail or other communication media. The process generally includes stages such as assessing customer needs, presenting product features and benefits to address those needs and negotiation on price, delivery and other elements.” (per American Marketing Association). However, the term “marketing” can yield many different results, and many people may not know what the term truly means. So what does marketing mean? Marketing is defined as “the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.” (per American Marketing Association). This definition seems a little too simple, right? Especially with the buildup I gave you coming in—well it is correct, but it only covers the general term. There are many different aspects of marketing, such as inbound marketing, the difference between sales and marketing, how to do market research and the different functions of marketing. Now, let’s work on giving a more expanded definition of marketing and helping to understand that there’s a lot more than just creating “offerings that have value for customers.” Introduction –What is the Purpose of Marketing? Marketing has many different areas—one of which is inbound marketing, but we’ll get to that later. We’ll then analyze the difference between sales and marketing; then answer the question “what is inbound marketing”, which will include some inbound marketing examples. Finally, we’ll discuss the importance of marketing in business and wrap up what we’ve learned. First, we’re going to list the functions of marketing. In the marketing world there are seven functions of marketing and they are as follows: distribution, financing, market research, pricing, product and service management, promotion and selling. 7 Functions of Marketing. Distribution—Distribution Strategy in Marketing . Distribution strategy in marketing entails how a company is going to deliver its products or services to a customer. This strategy can vary depending on what service or good you’re offering, as there are different distribution channels in marketing. You’re not going to start a digital marketing agency in the middle of a wheat field in Kansas—you probably want to be in an urban area where there’s plenty of businesses around. Distribution strategy in marketing needs to be considered when developing any idea. Financing—The Role of Marketing in Business . If you want to have a successful marketing campaign, it’s going to take some money. You don’t want to throw all your eggs in one basket, but you still want to create a smart financial plan that allocates some ability to spend, but not so much that you don’t see a profit. Market Research—Importance of Market Research  . Market research is arguably the most crucial of the seven functions. What is marketing research? It revolves around researching your target demographic so you can build a sound marketing strategy. Effective market research requires using tools to find out who you should be targeting based on what you’re selling. If you’re a tech company that came up with a new social media platform, are you going to target octogenarians? Didn’t think so. If you want a more in-depth look at how to do market research, this article is a good starting point. Pricing—Again, the Importance of Market Research. Once you know how to do market research, you’ll find that market research also can help with pricing. Make sure you’re not losing any profits by selling too low. However, you don’t want to overcharge and then not see any kind of return because customers found a cheaper alternative. Product and Service Management—Measuring Advertising Effectiveness . In order to prevent falling behind with your customers, you must constantly make improvements to the product or service you offer. By staying on top of customer feedback and online reviews, you can see what’s working and what isn’t. Additionally, employing marketing performance metrics is a smart way to keep up with service management. Interested in learning more about marketing performance metrics? Check out this article Promotion—What Is Promotion in Marketing? Promotion involves confirming your advertisements are seen in the right places by the right people. You’ll want to make sure there’s plenty of advertising from your brand’s end, as well as to keep up with which advertising strategies are trending. Advertising on Facebook is certainly a great place to focus your promotion efforts. Selling—What Is the Difference Between Sales and Marketing? Selling is NOT marketing. But does provide an essential foundation for marketing. The selling process begins once you’ve completed market research and determined what your prospects want and need. Speaking of selling, it’s time to discuss another major point: the difference between sales and marketing. The Difference Between Sales and Marketing. Some people think there’s no difference between sales and marketing. But when it comes to distinguishing between the two, there’s actually a big difference between sales and marketing. Understanding the complexities that separate them isn’t so simple, as they’re more complementary than similar. So you’re probably wondering, “What’s the difference between sales and marketing?” Let’s start with an example. Say you’re a salesperson from 1995 and you have an amazing product you want to sell. It’s a cell phone, but it also can access the internet and send emails. It even has these amazing things called apps that you can use to play games and check the weather, among other exciting possibilities. Now you’re probably thinking there obviously were no smartphones in 1995. But this is exactly the point—a salesperson can’t sell something that doesn’t exist. Sales focuses on what salespeople can control, which is selling a tangible, already created product. They don’t pitch ideas—marketers do. This is the key difference between sales and marketing. Marketers are the ones who create the idea that a salesperson will sell. Then, marketers conduct research to find what customers’ needs are to determine what their needs are. Another difference between sales and marketing is that marketers stay ahead of changes by anticipating where things are leading, keeping ahead of the competition, and coming up with big ideas. Then, those ideas become tangible and can be sold as products or services. What Is Inbound Marketing? . Inbound marketing does what it sounds like it does: it brings people in. Inbound marketing is the “new(ish) school” method of marketing; instead of outsourcing (or outbound marketing), inbound relies heavily on creating solid content that draws people into your company. There are many ways to ensure you’ll get results—with all of Google’s advancements, companies can attract more attention by creating content that’s relevant to people’s needs and by using keywords that yield results. Inbound Marketing Strategy Examples. Now that you know what inbound marketing is, let’s take a look at a few examples of inbound marketing strategy examples: Social Media—Marketing via Social Media. One of the more recent inbound marketing strategy examples, social media is a great way to engage potential leads. Companies that take advantage of it are most likely to succeed because a whopping 78 percent of the U.S. population have a social profile of some sort—a number that has more than tripled since 2008. By employing social media strategies, you increase your chances of gaining organic leads. Content Creation—Types of Content Marketing. Need to come up with content that attracts attention? Create a blog! At inSegment, we have our own blog to comment on trending topics and promote the work we do. Any company can self-promote, and a blog is one of the best ways to do it. Also consider generating different types of content marketing, including videos, webinars, infographics, and whitepapers. Email Marketing—Email as a Service . Email as a Service (EaaS) is another great example of inbound marketing. Marketers can use email marketing to draw attention to solutions that companies or consumers need, and encourage them to learn more with intriguing copy and creative calls-to-action (CTAs). In fact, email marketing is frequently cited as the most important marketing tactic for companies: *per https://www.emailmonday.com/marketing-automation-statistics-overview/ These inbound marketing strategy examples are foundational to successful companies everywhere. And if you take advantage of and implement these inbound marketing strategy examples, you can guarantee you’ll see improvements in your business, from increased traffic to better customer relations. What About Marketing Performance Metrics? . If you want to see how your campaigns are performing, invest in marketing performance metrics, which are a key aspect of marketing and market research that can help your business reach its full potential. Websites such as Marketing Score give you detailed marketing performance metrics that you can analyze to see what you need to improve. The Importance of Marketing in Business . Ultimately, the main reason for the importance of marketing in business is that companies need to market themselves in order to attract potential customers. If you aren’t reaching out and constantly learning what your target audiences want, it becomes much more difficult to succeed. Once again, you can’t start to sell if you don’t have a product or service to promote in the first place. This is why the importance of marketing in business is key: regardless of the type of industry your business falls under, if you don’t successfully market yourself, you’ll fall behind the competition. But taking advantage of tactics like social media and content creation can help enormously. By producing high-quality content that implements best SEO practices, you’ll be better off than where you started—this is why the importance of marketing in business can’t be ignored. Now You Know the Difference Between Sales and Marketing! After going over the role of marketing, the functions of marketing, the difference between sales and marketing, distribution strategies in marketing, and other topics, you should be equipped with a better understanding of marketing and its importance. Having a firm grasp on industry trends will benefit any company by increasing profits and keeping everyone happy, from executives and employees to customers. In the end, the importance of marketing in business cannot be denied. Hopefully these explanations and definitions have shown how marketing helps businesses achieve success by staying ahead of the curve. Popular posts like this. Don’t Leave Your Customers Brokenhearted: How to Create a Great Valentine’s Day Campaign B2B Communities Transforming Marketing: How Tough Mudder & Hubspot Are More Alike Than You Think Sochi’s Social Media Problem: What Businesses Can Learn About Branding
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Result 15
TitleHow to Market a Product in 7 Easy Steps - Toggl Blog
Urlhttps://toggl.com/blog/how-to-market-product
DescriptionEveryone needs to market their product. From the biggest corporations to mom and pop shops, product marketing can make or break your business
Date11 Nov 2020
Organic Position14
H1How to Market a Product in 7 Easy Steps
H2The challenges of bringing a new product to market
How to market a product
Over to you
Related Posts
H31. Understand your audience
2. Know your product
3. Create a plan
4. Prepare to educate
5. Promote, promote, and promote some more
6. Learn what’s working
7. Hit repeat
H2WithAnchorsThe challenges of bringing a new product to market
How to market a product
Over to you
Related Posts
BodyHow to Market a Product in 7 Easy Steps Written by Kat Boogaard You have a brand new product that you’re sure will be a hit. That’s great news! But how to market your new product? If you assume that you can sit back and watch the buzz about your new offering spread like wildfire, you’re sorely mistaken. Your new product may be a big deal to you. However, it doesn’t carry the same weight for everybody else–particularly if you don’t already have a solid customer base that’s eagerly following your business’ every move. With that in mind, it takes some clever product development and product marketing in order to have a successful product launch and get your innovative offering into the hands of eager consumers. Increase your profitability by 20% by keeping track of runaway time. Get started for free So, what do you need to know in order to pull off this new product introduction? Here are the details on how to promote a product–and get people to care about it. The challenges of bringing a new product to market. First, let’s start with a bit of bad news. According to Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen, each year more than 30,000 new consumer products are launched. But unfortunately, a whopping 95% of them fail. Why is this? There are a multitude of reasons at play here. It could involve a lack of customer demand. Or it could have something to do with an incorrect pricing structure. However, many experts cite a lack of marketing for this flop of new products. “There a number of reasons why new product introductions fail; however, the one we see most often is lack of rigor behind sales and marketing planning and execution,” explains Kurt Schroeder in a post for The Business Journals. After all, products aren’t a “build it and they will come” sort of thing–even major companies like Apple aggressively market their new offerings in order to generate buzz and get customers in the door. Needless to say, marketing will be a huge piece of your product launch puzzle. But what steps can you take to do this well? Follow these seven key steps for successfully marketing a product. How to market a product. 1. Understand your audience. The first step in any successful marketing initiative is to understand exactly who you’re marketing to. Ask anybody—trying to sell bacon to vegetarians will never end well for you. So, you need to dig in and identify your target market. Who is your ideal customer?What demographic information should you be aware of?What outlets do they use to get their information? While understanding those nuts and bolts about your customer is important, you also need to dive a little deeper by answering this one key question: What problem does your product solve for them? In order to be successful, your product has to have some demand–which also means that it needs to meet a need. If you can’t think of a single pain point that your product addresses? Well, that could be an indicator that you’re solving a problem that’s actually non-existent for your customers. “Many organizations need to become better at asking the right questions so that they tackle the right problems,” explains Dwayne Spradlin in a post for Harvard Business Review.“Your products must truly solve your customer’s problems in compelling ways, and most product companies spend too little time immersing themselves in the customer’s reality,” said Spradlin (now CEO of Buzz Points) in an email. One way that you can really gain the customer understanding that you need? Begin selling to them directly at first. To learn how to bring a product to market, begin by selling directly to end-users, advises entrepreneur Tamara Monosoff in an article for Entrepreneur. “This’ll give you confidence that there’s demand for your product and will also create referenceable customers that you can contact for product and packaging feedback before you hit the bigger leagues.” By having those early conversations with your target market, you’ll not only have a better grasp on their goals and challenges but also have the opportunity to make any necessary tweaks–to your product, your pricing structure, or anything else–before you get too much further down the rabbit hole. 2. Know your product. You not only need to understand your audience, you also need to have an intimate understanding of your product. This is especially when your product is in its early stages. You need to think of yourself as the all-knowing expert on your offering: What is it?How does it work?How much does it cost?What challenges does it address?How is it better than your competitors?What advantages does it offer to your consumers? You’ll need to answer all of those questions (and then some!) in order to identify your product’s value proposition–which will be the common thread that weaves throughout all of your marketing materials and messaging. While it’s undeniably important to understand the ins and outs of your product, you also need to ensure that you have an understanding of how it fits into the larger picture for your target market. For example, which quick sales pitch do you find more effective? Option A: This widget that we created uses state-of-the-art technology that we spent months refining. Option B: This widget will help you better keep track of your customer contact information, empowering you to nurture those relationships, increase your sales, and improve your bottom line. If you’re like most people, Option B resonated with you far more than Option A. Why is that? Rather than getting so wrapped up in product features, it focused specifically on results. Ultimately, your customers don’t care about the behind-the-scenes stuff—they really only want to hear what’s in it for them. 3. Create a plan. Once you have that foundation laid, it’s time to create a plan. It might sound obvious. But without this breakdown in place, your product marketing efforts will feel a lot like being on a road trip without a map or a GPS. Fortunately, you have plenty of flexibility here in order to create a plan that works best for you and your unique product. Here are some questions you’ll want to be sure to answer when hashing out your next steps: What are your revenue goals? Over what amount of time?What price will your product be launched at?With that in mind, how many products do you need to sell in order to meet your goal?Is this the type of product that customers will buy multiples of?Do you have existing customers that will be interested in this product offering?What are your biggest challenges in getting customers to purchase this product?What steps will you take to overcome those challenges? With that self-reflection in place, you can begin hashing out different tactics and strategies to get your product to market. However, remember this: You need to stay flexible. Launching a new product is a learning process, and your plan might require some tweaking (or even major changes!) along the way. 4. Prepare to educate. Imagine your doorbell just rang. You swing open your front door and there’s a salesman standing there with a vacuum cleaner. “This is a great vacuum,” he says, “You should buy it.” What are you going to do? You’re probably going to shut the door in his face. You see, as a business, you’re intimately aware of all of the benefits and advantages your own product offers. But your customers don’t immediately have the same knowledge simply because you put your new product in front of their eyeballs. Any new product launch requires a high degree of customer education in order to be successful. You need to help your customers understand not just what your product is, but why they need it in their lives. So how do you do this? By creating various educational materials that your customers can reference. These can include things like: A short demo video that lives on your website or gets shared on social, like this explainer on how to use Toggl Track.An informative blog post (like ours) that walks them through how your product works.A FAQ page that answers questions that are commonly asked by prospective customers. A free trial that gives them access to your product (if applicable) so that they can learn by doing.A designated customer support person who is willing to answer questions and provide tutorials. There are plenty of other things you can do. But it’s important to remember that you absolutely need to educate your customers. When businesses blindly assume that their prospects already have the information they need and are simply making a choice between brands, they shift from a learning-focused mindset to a competitive one, explains Mark Quinn in an article for Business Insider. “The smart consumer will opt to buy from the company that’s educated him on the issue and presented him with multiple solutions. That company’s selflessness has built trust–and its ability to teach him has bought his loyalty in the future.” 5. Promote, promote, and promote some more. All of this groundwork is important. But you’re likely wondering this: When do you get around to actually promoting your product? When are you going to start drawing in more people? Promotion is a major part of your new product launch. However, your promotional efforts will fall on deaf ears if you don’t take the time to gain an understanding first. So, now that you’ve done that, it’s time to start blanketing your target market with the news of your new product. There are tons of different ways you can do that, including (but certainly not limited to!): Targeted social media adsGuest posting on industry-related sitesUtilizing industry influencersAttending conferences or speaking engagements How can you make sure your marketing messages really pack a punch? Try a few of these tactics: Use testimonials from your current happy customers. Social proof is huge, and 88% of consumers trust online reviews just as much as a personal recommendations. Use statistics and figures. That one used just above likely added legitimacy in your own mind, so why not leverage that same power in your own marketing efforts? 6. Learn what’s working. Unfortunately, not every single thing you do will be effective. Some of your marketing efforts will result in a huge payoff, while others seem to totally flop with your consumer base. That’s normal–particularly when you’re just getting your product off the ground. However, you don’t want to keep channeling time, energy, and resources into initiatives that aren’t actually pushing you forward. Make sure you schedule some regular times to look at your results and analytics to identify how your efforts are resonating. What’s working really well?What isn’t working so well?What adjustments need to be made in order to keep making forward progress? By taking a magnifying glass to the things you’re already doing, you’ll continue to keep learning what’s effective for your product and your target market–getting you that much closer to landing on a winning product management strategy. 7. Hit repeat. Would you go on a diet for one day and expect to see a difference the next morning? Probably not. That same rule holds true with your product marketing. You’re probably not going to see results after doing things once. Posting one social media update won’t lead to an influx of sales. Drafting one blog post won’t cram your inbox full of inquiries from eager customers. The secret with marketing is to stay consistent and–as just mentioned–repeat what’s working well. “When you dabble in your marketing, you’re right! It won’t work. Not because that marketing channel isn’t suited to your business, but usually because you didn’t maintain it for long enough,“ advises Ashley Davis in a post for Skyline Social.“The businesses that produce the best results (in terms of generating both leads AND sales) are those that are consistent in their marketing,” according to Davis. “They’ve regularly been sending clear, consistent messages to potential clients. Not just for weeks or months, but for years.”So while you may be understandably eager to get your new product off the ground, remember that it’s not a one-and-done sort of strategy.A successful product will require a hefty dose of patience and a real investment in your time and your efforts. Over to you. You’re excited to share your brand new product with the world. But a successful product launch requires a lot more than posting an announcement and watching the customers roll in. Marketing products involves plenty of thought, strategy, and prior planning. That might sound overwhelming. However, don’t panic yet–it’s much more doable than you think, and will ultimately lead to a better, more impactful product introduction. Work your way through the seven actionable steps we outlined above and you’re far more likely to zone in on an interested and engaged audience for your new products on the market (and, thus, meet your sales goals!).In the meantime, track your time and progress with Toggl Track. November 11, 2020 Related Posts. Track Nine Ideas to Make Your Employees Track Time. I’ve implemented time tracking in several companies and it was as difficult as talking Gabrielle Solis into a three month backpacking trip in Central Asia. First, in most companies there is a tragic history of time-tracking gone wrong. Usually it involves some complicated systems with names like Trackrmax or Megonomy — the soviet pocket calculators Track What Overwhelm Is and How To Cope With It. Stories accompany us each day. Whether we realize it or not, our life is defined by the stories we tell ourselves: who we are, what we can do, what we like and what we don’t. These tales can help us live a life that’s full of joy, nurture, and accomplishment. But they can also sabotage us. Track 8 Tips for Successfully Working from Home with Kids. When the coronavirus pandemic shut down workplaces and schools with little notice, working parents like me had to scramble to figure out a way to be efficient employees and mindful parents. Kids threw an endearing wrench into the works. Suddenly, I was given no other choice but to homeschool.
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Result 16
TitleSmall Business Marketing Guide: Everything You Need to Know to Grow
Urlhttps://sproutsocial.com/insights/guides/small-business-marketing-101/
DescriptionLooking to grow your small business? Our small business marketing guide teaches you leading strategies for email, social media, video, inbound and more!
Date
Organic Position15
H1Small Business Marketing 101: Using Email, Social, Video and More
H2Send us an email
Introduction to Small Business Marketing 101
Small business marketing with inbound
Small business marketing with video
Small business marketing with email
Small business marketing with social
Recommended for you
Build and grow stronger relationships on social
H3Send us an email
What is inbound marketing?
Inbound 101: The basics for getting started
Know your personas & target markets
Map out your channels and tactics
Create content and execute on the playbook
Conclusion
Why Video matters for small businesses
Overcoming the hurdles to video marketing
Small business videos ideas
Video tips and tricks for small businesses
Animoto for small business
Email marketing is alive and well
Before your first send
What to look for in an email marketing platform
The value of social media for small business
Getting started with small business marketing on social
Advanced tips for small business social
Using a social media tool
Digital creators vs. influencers: What’s the difference?
Template: Essential Questions to Ask in Your Social Media Management Software RFP
What is earned media? 5 Tips for a successful earned media strategy
Template: Create a Better Annual Social Media Budget
H2WithAnchorsSend us an email
Introduction to Small Business Marketing 101
Small business marketing with inbound
Small business marketing with video
Small business marketing with email
Small business marketing with social
Recommended for you
Build and grow stronger relationships on social
BodySmall Business Marketing 101: Using Email, Social, Video and More Introduction to Small Business Marketing 101. Whether your small business has existed for years, or just recently started up, finding the most effective marketing strategies is critical. That’s because small businesses don’t have the same resources to execute as larger scale firms. In fact, you may be the founder and CEO who has also taken up the mantle of marketer. That’s why Sprout Social worked with our amazing partners at HubSpot, Animoto and Campaign Monitor to put together this guide to small business marketing.Together, we’ve covered some of the most frequently discussed topics among small business marketers. We’ll continue to work with more partners to expand on these topics over time. For now, keep reading for the following:HubSpot on inbound marketing for small businessesAnimoto on video marketing for small businessesCampaign Monitor on email marketing for small businessesSprout Social on social marketing for small businesses Section 1Small business marketing with inbound. Would you rather have your customers searching for you instead of the other way around? Look no further than inbound marketing. In this section, HubSpot discusses the importance of inbound marketing for small business, the basics of getting started and how to choose the right channels for your organization.Let’s talk about a framework for bringing the ideal customer to your website. It’s used by tons of businesses, big and small, and it can work for you as well.What is inbound marketing?One quick definition we at HubSpot use is to think of outbound marketing as “push” marketing and inbound marketing as “pull.” Rather than interrupt customers with disruptive ads or unethical sales tactics, you attract them via valuable content that helps them accomplish their goals.To further elaborate, it’s about three pieces:AttractEngageDelightYou attract prospects and customers to your website and blog through relevant and helpful content.Once they arrive, you engage with them using conversational tools like email and chat and by promising continued value.Finally, you delight them by continuing to act as an empathetic advisor and expert.The inbound methodology isn’t specific to marketing, by the way. The same process and mindset can be used in sales and services, too.So, how do you actually do inbound marketing?Inbound 101: The basics for getting started. There have been many books and courses on inbound marketing, so we won’t be able to comprehensively cover the idea here. Rather, we’ll give the 80/20 so you can start to take action. After you get your wheels on the ground, you can always go back and learn more about the methodology.So what are the basic steps for getting started?First, map out your ideal audience, aka your target market. Who do you want to sell to?Second, map out the channels you can use to attract, engage and delight your customers. Where do they hang out and how do they communicate?Finally, begin crafting content and messaging that will be used to attract, engage and delight customers. Make sure you have analytics in place, because you’ll need to constantly learn and update your strategy based on the results you get.Let’s dive into each one of these individually.Know your personas & target markets. It’s possible you know your target market and have already built your buyer personas, but even if that’s the case, it never hurts doing this work again and learning more about your customers. The more you know about your customer, the better you can craft your messaging and strategy.In defining a target market, you narrow down your audience to the level that you can choose correct marketing channels and start to define a buyer persona for messaging.In building a buyer persona, you create a representative model of your prototypical customer. As in machine learning, you need to split the difference between perfect accuracy and perfect utility. In other words, you should gather enough data and information to make a buyer persona largely accurate to the real world, but you shouldn’t gather too much information and make it too complex.How do you gather data to inform your buyer persona? There are many ways, some easier, some harder, depending on the stage of your company:Customer interviews (phone or in person)Digital analyticsSurveys (on-site polls like Qualaroo and customer surveys)User testingLive chat transcripts and intelligence via sales and service teamsYou’ll want to answer core questions about your ideal buyer, such as:What are their motivations and fears?How do they prefer to make purchases?How much research do they do and what kind of content is useful to them?How do they interact with brands? What do they prefer the relationship to look like?Who do they look to when they’re making decisions? Who influences them?Where do they hang out? How can you reach them?What type of language do they use?All of these things will help you a) choose channels and b) craft messaging.Just don’t create a silly made-up buyer persona with a cute name just to go through the motions. Also, it probably doesn’t matter what your buyer persona’s favorite color of car is unless you’re selling paint or used vehicles. Stick to the stuff that’s important and knowable.Map out your channels and tactics. When you have a target market and buyer persona, you can look into different channels. There are only so many inbound marketing channels:BloggingSEOSocialFacebook Ads (suggested reading: Are ads inbound?)BrandingReferralViralitySome channels won’t work for your business no matter how hard you try. For example, virality probably doesn’t make sense if you sell dish soap.Similarly, some channels could potentially work but will take so much effort and risk to pull off, that you should probably table them for the time being in favor of higher impact channels. For example, if you’re a LawnStarter (lawn care) or ProTranslating (translation services), social media may not pay off.Though oddly enough, MoonPie kills it on TwitterTo identify your best channels, use this heuristic: “how does a customer buy this type of product?”In the case of lawn care, it’s usually when their lawn grows too long and they need someone right away. SEO and search ads are perfect to capture this type of demand.Some products, such as Chubbies or Airpods, are naturally viral. Just optimize the viral components and add a little wind to the sail.Others make a perfect fit for content marketing, such as B2B software companies like Wordable or Mutiny. These products tend to require a little bit of upfront education, and their target customers are accustomed to learning via blogs, webinars and ebooks.Content often works well for SaaS productsIn any case, just think about it and discuss with your colleagues before jumping into a channel. Don’t simply join a channel because your competitors have or because it’s new and buzzworthy. We don’t need more gurus or businesses trying to make it big on Snapchat, and we especially don’t need more businesses trying to go viral on Reddit. Do what makes sense for you.Create content and execute on the playbook. Any inbound channel—nay, any marketing channel—will require some sort of messaging strategy. How you execute on messaging will largely determine how effective the channel becomes.Let’s say, for example, we want to use blogging and SEO as our inbound channel. This usually forms the basis of such efforts, as it’s an owned channel, and you can generally compete with very large players and win some or much of the time on quality and 10x content.Now, what do you blog about?While you can answer this question many ways with some degree of validity, we like to follow the Pillar + Cluster model.In plain English, your “pillar content” represents the big topic you want to rank for, and “cluster content” represents supporting content that relates to your big topic. Hyperlinking pages together shows Google they’re related to each other.For example, let’s say your big topic is “personalization” For this, you might create a pillar page called “The Ultimate Guide to Web Personalization.”Then you could create several cluster content blog posts to support the pillar page. These could be on topics like:How to personalize email newslettersTop personalization tools in 2019Personalization examplesHow to measure ROI from personalization…And on and on.We like to start backwards from our product and branch out from there. So, basically, what’s the end goal? Define that product page, and then come up with high traffic pillar page ideas that can support that. From there, break topic ideas off of your pillar page to create long tail blog posts. A good way to find long tail ideas is on Answer The Public.Soon, you’ll bring in tons of traffic, and then you’ll simply have to worry about converting that traffic into leads, users, demos…whatever your goal conversion is.Unfortunately, that’s a huge topic, and one we can’t crack into here. So here are some resources on email marketing and conversion optimization to check out:Lead Magnets – Ideas to get people to sign up for your listWeb forms guide – Best practices to get form completions, no matter the purpose)A/B testing guide – Everything you want to know about running your own testsConclusion. Obviously this is a short primer on inbound, and there’s a lot more to talk about. But if we could boil it down to the simplest possible summary, we’d say, “Define your audience, go where the fish are and craft your messaging in a way that resonates with them.”This sounds easy, but it takes a lot of work. In fact, we’ll end by emphasizing the need to keep learning and improving.Make sure you have proper analytics in place, and continue to improve and optimize your inbound funnel.When it works, it really works. And when it really, really works, you can build a moat that is hard to compete with. Section 2Small business marketing with video. Is your growing business interested in taking advantage of the power of video? Then you have come to the right place. This section discusses the importance of video marketing for small business, how to overcome hurdles in video marketing. It ends with ideas to consider for your own strategy.According to Forbes, 90% of consumers say videos help them with buying decisions. Sixty-four percent say that watching videos makes them more likely to purchase. Forbes also reports that businesses that use video in their marketing see a 41% increase in search traffic compared to those that don’t.Video has taken social media, and marketing in general, by storm. But for small business owners or marketers, it may feel daunting. Here at Animoto, we’ve spoken with countless small business owners that already wear a lot of hats. We know adding video to the mix may feel overwhelming—especially without the time, resources or technical expertise needed for video creation.But guess what? Video marketing isn’t as time-consuming or difficult as you may think. We’ve put together a quick guide to help you get started (and show you how easy it can be). We’ll share:Why video matters for small businessesHow to overcome the hurdles to video creationSmall business video ideasTips and tricks for small business video creationHow to get started with video marketing todayLet’s dive in!Why Video matters for small businesses. Video affords marketers at businesses of all sizes a massive opportunity. We’ll take a quick look at what video can do for your marketing on social media, on YouTube, on your website, in your emails and even in your store or at an event.Social video for small business. According to a recent Animoto survey, consumers rank video as their number one favorite type of content to see from brands on social media, and 93% of marketers using video on social media say it’s landed them a new customer.Video has become increasingly important on social media, where it generates 1200% more shares than images and text combined. Video can be incorporated into your social marketing throughout the customer journey to maximize the success of your campaigns.YouTube video for small business. You’ve likely already heard that YouTube is the second largest search engine, after Google. What does this mean for you? More consumers than ever (including your own customers) search YouTube for product reviews, how-tos and more.Creating YouTube videos means that you’ll get in front of more customers searching for videos related to your industry and products or services.Website video for small business. Did you know that the average customer spends 88% more time on a website if it has video? Pretty incredible, right? There are all sorts of ways to incorporate video into your website, including an introductory video on yourHomepageProduct videosA personal video for your about page that showcases your small business storyand moreAnd guess what? These videos can also be repurposed to share on YouTube and social media.Email video for small business. Including video in email can lead to an up to 19% increase in open rate and an up to 50% increase in click-through rate, according to Campaign Monitor.The even better news? Adding video to your emails isn’t as complicated as it may sound. In fact, the videos don’t actually have to play in your email. Rather, you can simply link out to them and mention “video” in your subject line to start seeing results.In-person video for small business. Video doesn’t have to be limited to the web. You can also use it for your in-person marketing—in your shop, at events and trade shows and in sales sessions. Loop a video on a screen to attract foot traffic or include videos to make presentations more engaging.Overcoming the hurdles to video marketing. Our recent survey on the State of Social Video Marketing showed that marketers aren’t making as many videos as they’d like. The reasons? They say video requires too much time and budget and the tools and software seem too complicated.As a small business owner, you likely face similar hurdles. We’ll break them down here and show you why video is easier to get started with than you may think.Myth #1: Video is too time consuming. There’s a common misconception when it comes to video that it takes days (or even more) to create a single video. In truth, this may be accurate when it comes to professional productions with big production crews, designed to be run as television ad campaigns. However, creating videos for social, or to embed on your blog and website, doesn’t have to take a ton of time.You can get started with as little as a couple hours a week, and as you get better at making videos, you’ll need even less. You can repurpose photos and videos you already have or use stock imagery to save time on production.We’d also like to call out that even big brands with big budgets have started opting for less polished social videos for a more authentic look. You don’t have to spend hours to reap the benefits of video.Myth #2: Video is too complicated. But even with the time set aside, a lot of small businesses don’t use video because they believe they don’t have the expertise. Yes, some video editing softwares require advanced know-how. But a wide range of video editing solutions cater to non-professionals. And you can use these to create professional videos on your own. We promise you.We should also mention that, when it comes to social video especially, you don’t need heavy production. A lot of the most engaging videos are short clips with just a few shots, or even a single clip with text on it. Start simple and as you get more familiar with video creation you can try new, more complicated things.Myth #3: Video is too expensive. Finally, video production doesn’t have to break your budget. As we mentioned above, you likely have the photos and video clips you need to get started. If you don’t, you can use your smartphone instead of an expensive video camera.Add text over your video clips and you don’t need to worry about expensive audio equipment (85% of people watch with the sound off anyway). And you can tie it all together with an inexpensive, easy-to-use video editing tool.Small business videos ideas. Okay, so now we’ve convinced you that you need video. But what types of videos should you make? This is one of the biggest questions faced by small business marketers looking to get started with video. We’ve rounded up some small business video ideas and examples for inspiration.And to help you out, each of these video examples includes a template that you can customize to make your own.About us video. Share the story behind your business. Who are you and what products or services do you offer? An About Us lets you show off the people and story behind your business, which can work especially well for small and growing businesses.Product story video. A product video ad, which we’ll get to next, works when you want to close the deal and make a sale. But telling the story of your product or service can engage with potential customers on a whole other level. Telling the backstory of a specific product can make for share-worthy content, as you can see in this example. Do you offer a product with an interesting backstory?Video ad. We promised a product video ad, and here it is. A video ad should be short and sweet. It introduces your product to the target audience and provides a clear call to action (CTA) so they know how they can purchase.Fun social video. Looking for a quick video idea for your social media pages? Try a quote. Quote videos take little time to make and rack up shares to boot. Just pair a nice photo or video clip with a quote that’s relevant to your business or industry.How-to video. A how-to video lets you showcase your expertise. Answer a question you hear a lot from your customers or share an insider tip based on your industry expertise. Share it on social media and YouTube too, where potential customers are searching for answers. You can also share your expertise with a list or step-by-step instructional video.Blog teaser video. If you’ve got a blog or other content on your website, try creating a short video teaser to promote it. Make sure to include a clear call to action with the link where viewers can go to read more.Testimonial video. With testimonial videos, you can share social proof and help new customers feel comfortable doing business with you. While you can actually shoot interviews with your customers to create testimonial videos, there are some easy alternatives too. Try using quotes from Yelp, social media or customer emails, paired with accolades and imagery of yourself or your product.Video tips and tricks for small businesses. We hope we’ve inspired you to start making videos. Before you dive in, here are a few tips to help you get the most out of your video marketing.Get started with what you have. You likely already have photos and video clips you can use to create your first videos. Look on your phone, your desktop, your website, and your social media profiles for content to get started with.Plan for sound off. When creating videos for social media, remember that 85% of people watch with the sound off. Use text to tell a story that translates whether or not viewers turn the sound on.Keep mobile in mind. More and more viewers watch videos on mobile devices,. Make text large enough to read and go for a square or vertical format for videos designed for mobile or social media.Target your video ads. With the targeting capabilities of Facebook Ads Manager and other social platforms, you can reach the audience most likely to engage with your business or product.One size doesn’t fit all. Creating a video for Facebook? For the Instagram feed? Twitter? An Instagram story? Different types of formats and content work best on different platforms, so plan your video content accordingly. Here’s a cheat sheet to help you out.Use your smartphone. You don’t need fancy equipment to get started. We’ve all got great professional cameras in our pockets. Your phone shoots better video than you think!Pay attention to lighting. Good light (or lack of it) can really make or break the quality of your video. Don’t have professional lighting equipment? Try shooting outside in the sunlight, next to a window or simply turn on as many lights as you’ve got indoors.Pay attention to audio. Similarly, the state of your audio can have a big impact on the quality of your video. When recording, listen with headphones to make sure everything sounds OK. And remember, even if you do plan on using audio you should plan for sound-off viewing and use text or captions.Animoto for small business. Ready to dive in? We’re here to help. Animoto provides everything small businesses and marketers need to drag and drop their way to powerful and professional videos. With customizable video templates, designed with success in mind, Animoto makes it easy for anyone to create their own videos in minutes. With over a decade in the industry and partnerships with Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter and LinkedIn, Animoto is used by more than one million businesses worldwide.Video templates for a variety of small business use cases, including all the ideas we shared earlier in the article, can be selected and customized. Add your own photos, video clips and text. Then, add your logo and update the colors to fit your brand and you’re doneWe invite you to try it for free today. Happy video making! Section 3Small business marketing with email. Email marketing is a must-have for business, but that doesn't mean it's easy to get right. In this section, Campaign Monitor discusses why email marketing is important for your small business, how to send amazing emails and, most importantly, how to scale your efforts.When you started your own business or started working at one, there were probably a few hats you were expected to wear—like creator, CEO, founder or visionary.But as your business grows, there will inevitably be a few more hats you have to put on—hats that may not fit quite as easily, like email marketing aficionado.At Campaign Monitor we want to empower you with email marketing tools and tips that are powerful yet simple, so you can get back to doing what you do best.Email marketing is alive and well. With so many options for marketing a new and growing business, you may struggle to decide where to focus. Research supports prioritizing email marketing. Let’s take a look at the stats:There are over 3.7 billion email users in the world currently, which means the projected number of users by 2021 is 4.1 billion.59% of marketers say email is their biggest source of ROI.Email marketing drives $44 for every $1 spent.89% of marketers say email serves as their primary channel for lead generation.Before your first send. So you’ve decided to implement an email marketing strategy. Now what? First, you need to understand the purpose of email marketing: to create, secure and nurture relationships. Yes, you’ll likely meet other goals along the way, like increasing customer engagement and ROI, but don’t lose sight of the people whose inboxes you’re sending to. With this in mind, we’ve compiled a few tips for maximum success.1. Start with a plan. There’s no right or wrong formula for your first email marketing plan, as long as it answers the following questions:Why am I sending emails?Who am I sending them to?What value can I offer subscribers?What are my email marketing goals?Once you’ve answered these questions, it’s time to map your customers’ journey. Think of this like mapping out a route for marathon runners; make sure the path is clear of barriers and the signs point the right way. You need to be familiar with the journey your customers take from lead to conversion so you can anticipate any needs or questions they will have along the way.2. Segment your audience. When setting up your email subscription form, consider the information you’ll need long-term. Name and email address are the traditional fields, but collecting additional demographic information will help you to segment your audience into groups based on age, gender, location or another variable.Rather than send the same mass email to your entire list every time, segmentation allows you to send customized and relevant content that your subscribers will more likely engage with. After all, proper email list segmentation can double email open rates.As an example, Facebook segmented their list based on location and invited users to events in their area:3. Personalize your messages. Once you’ve divided your list into groups based on purchase history, interest or other variables, it’s time to create content specifically for the people in that group. Maybe something they indicated interest in has gone on sale, there’s an event happening in their area or you want to address them by name and recommend something they’ll love.One of our favorite ways to do this using Campaign Monitor is by inserting dynamic content into your message. This shows your audience that you understand and care for them, and it will add an extra “wow” factor that will surprise and delight them. And in case you needed additional convincing, MarketingSherpa’s research shows that open rates increase by 41% when a personalized subject line is used.See how Lyft uses the information they’ve gathered about their customers to create a pretty cool personalized email:4. Scale your efforts. So you’ve mapped out a plan, organized your list into segments and created personalized content that drives engagement. It’s time to take all the tools and tactics that work and scale them to reach more people. At this point, automation is your go-to.By scheduling emails to meet your subscribers at each point in their customer journey (which you already mapped out in step #1), you’ll continue to ensure that your content is relevant and fulfilling your customers’ needs. Plus, automated email messaging can increase open rates by 70.5%.Paravel uses automation and personalization to send customized trip “postcards” to their customers:5. Measure your success. You made it to the final step—see, that wasn’t so bad. The best way to continue to improve and refine your email marketing skills is to look at the data and find out what works, what you could do better and what you can live without.Keep an eye on your metrics, try to retarget the subscribers who don’t engage and maintain good deliverability to ensure long-term email marketing success. Seventy-seven percent of ROI comes from segmented, targeted and triggered campaigns, so find what works for you and continue to help it grow.What to look for in an email marketing platform. When it comes to email marketing platforms, there are a lot of options to choose from and ideas to consider. We’ve given you tips and tricks to begin creating your email marketing strategy, but choosing the right provider can make or break your business growth. Of course, you’ll want to choose a provider that can grow with your business in terms of subscriber list size and functional capability, but what about features to enhance your segmentation, personalization and automation?If you’re looking for a service provider that will help you focus on your subscribers’ needs, design beautiful emails and scale your success, Campaign Monitor could be the perfect fit. With robust features for segmentation, personalization and automation, as well as 24/7 access to customer support, our team is here to help you drive engagement and increase ROI. Happy sending! Section 4Small business marketing with social. Social media is a critical channel for growing your audience, showcasing your organization, and creating lasting relationships that will yield delighted customers. In this section, Sprout Social discusses the value of social for small business, how to get started on social and shares tips for advanced audiences.Sprout Social works with thousands of small businesses to help them improve their social marketing strategy while also saving time online. Over the course of working with so many organizations, we’ve gotten good at helping guide their social strategy.Here we’ve put together the essentials for small business marketing on social, but for a more comprehensive guide you can see our entire guide to social media for small business.The value of social media for small business. Social is essential for driving your inbound marketing strategy, sharing your videos and increasing leads to email.But social media is also important on its own.Social media is valuable for businesses of any size or industry, and finding customers on social media has a direct impact on sales and your bottom line.In fact, those individuals who follow you on your social channels are 57.5% more likely to buy from you.But it doesn’t stop there. If you can actually manufacture a great positive social media experience that number increases to 71%.These numbers prove your brand should capitalize on the power of social media for small business marketing.We’ve broken the next sections down by where you may be in your social strategy, including information for those just getting started and more advanced tips for those with an established presence.Getting started with small business marketing on social. 1. Define your social goals. If you don’t know what you want to accomplish on social media, then you’ll never know when you succeed or fall short. Without this, you’ll likely struggle to maintain a nimble strategy.Goals can vary wildly from one industry to the next. While a retail company may look for direct purchases from social, someone in higher education may look at new enrollment rates.Our recent Sprout Social Index asked social marketers about their biggest goals. You can use their responses to help you choose your initial social media goals, then refine those as you get a better sense of what social marketing can provide your business. We’ve included a cheat sheet to define each item below.Increase brand awareness: How familiar social users are with your brandIncrease community engagement: Authentic conversations you have with your followersIncrease web traffic: The number of website visitors driven from social channelsGenerate sales/leads: Individuals who purchase your goods or services, or those who fill out a website form, from social channelsDistribute content: Sharing your content to your social channels.Increase brand advocacy from customers: Getting happy customers to share their experiences on socialSupport customers: Using social to respond to customer inquiries and create better customer experiencesGrow influencer marketing program: Increase the number of influencers discussing your brand on social2. Define your core metrics. Think of your social goals as the destination and your core metrics as the map that helps you get there. Once again, we’ve provided a cheat sheet to some key metrics for social media marketing below.Impressions: The number of times an individual saw your messageEngagements The number of times an individual has interacted with your message, including:LikesFavoritesSharesRetweetsClicksRepliesFollowsEngagement Rates: The number of engagements divided by the number of impressionsSite Visits: The number of times someone visited your profile pageMentions: The number of times your handle or brand was mentioned on social.Followers: The number of individuals who follow you on social, usually shown as an increase or decrease over timeNew Sales/ROI: The new revenue generated from social visitors, trackable with UTM tagging and website analytics3. Target your audience and social networks. Social media provides one of the best ways to reach a targeted audience, but first, you have to identify that audience. Consider things like:AgeLocationIncomeEducationCareerInterestsRemember the more specific you can get, the better. This will enable you to create a strong social media marketing strategy around these individuals and take a targeted approach to reach the right people at the right time.Once you know who you want to reach, you’ll have to figure out where they are. Earlier in this guide, HubSpot noted that not every single inbound channel works for small business marketing. The same is true for specific social media networks—not every single one will make sense for your business. Social networks have varied user bases. Don’t invest in one network if your core audience is on another.Before choosing a platform, ask yourself things like:Which platform best fits your B2B or B2C interactions?How often do you publish content?What’s the lifespan of your content?Are you using social media for customer service?Are you engaging with user-generated content?Can you automate parts of your social media?The answers to those questions will inform the networks you should choose.4. Figure out what to share. To figure out what content to post, look no further than what has worked best in the past. If you’ve published to social media before, tools like Sprout Social, Twitter or Facebook Insights can help you understand what resonated most with your audience.Below is an example of how to view your Sent Messages with Sprout (available with a free trial).Sort your messages by your key metric and you’ll see the top posts for that metric. Look through a handful to find any consistencies and leverage that insight when choosing what to publish.5. Build your publishing calendar. Once you know what kind of content works, you can create social media posts to automatically publish at the times and days of your choosing. Additionally, you can use a social media publishing tool like Sprout Social to visualize your entire Publishing Calendar, across all of your networks and profiles.Automatically export your calendar as a PDF to share with other key stakeholders throughout your organization.6. Respond to inbound messages. Unless you sell the most niche product in the world, your customers likely post about it (and you) on social media. Whether they directly tag you or use certain keywords and phrases that relate to your company, it’s your job to respond to their messages to create a better user experience.Monitor your social channels for conversations or posts that warrant a response. You can use a social media engagement tool to pull in the conversations that directly mention you or mention something relevant to your organization.7. Analyze your results. Once you’ve established the metrics that matter most to your brand, and spent time on social channels posting and engaging, you can start to track the impact of your efforts.The frequency with which you analyze your social media results will likely depend on your time and how much you utilize social. Remember that it’s important to track metrics to optimize your strategy. You can use a social media analytics tool to automatically run high-level or in-depth reports if your time is limited.Advanced tips for small business social. 1. Search social for new opportunities. We’ve established that small business marketers must respond to social media posts that tag or mention them. For a more advanced tactic, we suggest monitoring social media for conversations on topics related to your business, and then joining in.Let’s say you own a pizza restaurant in Chicago that prides itself on its gluten-free offering. By using a social media listening tool, you can track everyone who mentions a term like “gluten free pizza” in the Chicago area.These conversations will populate in your inbox in real time so that you can reach out to anyone looking for a recommendation and suggest your restaurant.2. Run competitive analyses. Keep an eye on your competition’s social media strategy. Doing so will help you understand the industry and how you measure up as well as develop unique ideas to stand out from the crowd. We’ve created this entire guide on running a competitive analysis, including a free template to help you conduct your research.3. Leverage relevant hashtags. Hashtags help you get your content in front of new audiences on social media. Not sure which to use? Our free Hashtag Holiday calendar contains a ton of ideas. Just make sure that the hashtags you use actually make sense for your brand and you’re not forcing it.4. Create great visuals and videos. Earlier in this guide, Animoto shared the importance of video:“Video has become increasingly important on social media, where it generates 1200% more shares than images and text combined. Video can be incorporated into your social marketing throughout the customer journey to maximize the success of your campaigns.”They also shared some tips to make creating videos easier on your team. Now that you’ve bought in, make sure that you share any and all videos you create with their guidance on your relevant social channels.5. Get your teammates on social. Social media poses so many opportunities for businesses that it can feel a little overwhelming at times. As a small business marketer, you may be in short supply of resources, but if there is anyone at your organization that can help you keep up, then invite them to join you.If your concern is in doubling efforts or reducing how secure your accounts are, then never fear. Social media collaboration tools can ensure that you effectively manage your presence as a team.6. Boost your content with paid ads. If you don’t get the impressions you hoped for on social media, it could make sense to boost your views by putting some paid advertising dollars into your posts until your presence takes hold. Each native network has its own paid social functionality, or you can use a paid social tool to quickly boost your posts.Using a social media tool. A social media marketing tool like Sprout Social saves you countless hours managing your presence. Long gone are the days that you should find yourself manually logging in and out of each social profile when it’s time to publish a message, respond to customers or get your social media analytics.Learn all about Sprout Social for your small business and start a free 30-day trial today. Recommended for you . View all Recommended for youRecommended for youCategories Social Media Content Social Media Strategy Digital creators vs. influencers: What’s the difference? . Published on January 6, 2022 • Reading time 5 minutes Categories Template Social Media Strategy Template: Essential Questions to Ask in Your Social Media Management Software RFP . Categories Social Media Strategy What is earned media? 5 Tips for a successful earned media strategy . Published on October 21, 2021 • Reading time 7 minutes Categories Template Social Media Advertising Template: Create a Better Annual Social Media Budget . Now on slide Now on slide Now on slide Now on slide Build and grow stronger relationships on social . Sprout Social helps you understand and reach your audience, engage your community and measure performance with the only all-in-one social media management platform built for connection. Try Sprout For Free
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Result 17
TitleCreate your marketing strategy
Urlhttps://www.infoentrepreneurs.org/en/guides/create-your-marketing-strategy/
DescriptionIdentify clients to concentrate on and your key objectives for reaching them, and learn what to include in your marketing strategy
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Result 18
TitleHow to Effectively Market Your Small Business on Social Media
Urlhttps://www.quicksprout.com/social-media-for-small-business/
DescriptionSocial media marketing is no longer optional for small businesses in 2018. I see this problem all too often when ..
Date30 Sept 2021
Organic Position17
H1How to Effectively Market Your Small Business on Social Media
H2Additional menu
H3Create profiles on multiple platforms
Define your marketing goals
Post content on a daily basis
Give consumers a reason to follow you
Form relationships with social influencers
Implement automation tools
Encourage user-generated content
Take advantage of ephemeral content
Broadcast live video streams
Conclusion
H2WithAnchorsAdditional menu
BodyHow to Effectively Market Your Small Business on Social Media Published on September 30, 2021Social media marketing is no longer optional for small businesses in 2018. I see this problem all too often when I’m consulting small business owners. They have this mentality that social media won’t benefit their companies. “Our customers know who we are, and they know where to find us.” Does this sound familiar to you? Don’t get me wrong: it’s great that you have established a steady customer base. But using social media to market your small business will help you get more money from your existing customers in addition to acquiring new ones. Failure to have an effective social media strategy can be detrimental to your small business. Do you want more social media traffic? To get help with improving your traffic, leads, and revenue, fill out your info. While you may not think your lack of a social media presence is having an impact on you today, it will eventually catch up with you down the road. So don’t wait until it’s too late to get started. You’ve got to keep up with the latest social media trends and apply them to your small business. If you’re a small business owner not quite convinced you need to use social media to improve your business, you’ll benefit tremendously from reading this guide. If you are currently using social media to market your small business but not seeing the results you hoped for, I’ll steer you toward the path to success. Follow the marketing tips and strategies I’ve outlined in this guide, and you’ll set yourself up for sustainable growth today and in the future. Create profiles on multiple platforms. “We’re on Facebook.” I hear this all the time when I’m talking with small business owners about their social media strategies. If you have a Facebook page for your business, that’s great. You’re headed in the right direction. But Facebook alone won’t be enough to maximize your reach. You need to establish a presence on as many social platforms as possible. Here’s a look at the social media channels that small businesses use the most: As you can see, Facebook leads the way for small businesses. Less than half of small businesses use Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter to market their brands. Furthermore, less than one-third of owners are taking advantage of LinkedIn and Snapchat. Before you rush to create a profile on all the channels listed above, it’s important you understand your target market. For example, LinkedIn is more beneficial to B2B companies. That’s because 80% of leads generated by B2B brands come from LinkedIn. Let’s say your small business is targeting Generation Z as your primary audience. Well, 71% of Gen Z uses Snapchat at least six times each day. More than half of this generation uses Snapchat over 11 times daily. But if your small business is trying to generate leads from Baby Boomers, it wouldn’t make sense to prioritize Snapchat. For the most part, starting with a Facebook profile is a safe bet. With nearly 1.5 billion daily active users, you can assume your target audience has a presence there. Believe it or not, after all these years, Facebook is still the fastest growing social network. So it’s not going anywhere in the near future. After you create a Facebook page, you need to determine which other channels are suitable for your brand and marketing strategy. I’d recommend creating a YouTube channel. The video content you upload to YouTube will be easy to repurpose for your other marketing channels. These videos will give you an excuse to post content on other platforms when you’re running low on ideas, but we’ll talk about that in greater detail shortly. Define your marketing goals. You can’t just blindly start posting content on social media without some sort of rhyme or reason. Before you do anything else, you need to identify your marketing goals. These are some of the top goals that small businesses are trying to accomplish with their social media strategies: While lead generation, brand awareness, and customer engagement are all good reasons to use social media, it doesn’t mean these should be yours. You may be using social media to provide better customer service or directly drive sales. Whatever your reasons, make sure they are clearly defined. Think of it as you would of any other marketing strategy for your company. You wouldn’t run an ad on the radio or a print advertisement without establishing a goal first, so you need to treat your social media strategy the same way. Once you decide the purpose of your social media campaigns, it will be much easier for you to come up with content to post. As we’ll discuss soon, it can be tough to think of ideas for new posts. But if you can establish what you want to accomplish with your content, you’ll know what to post to achieve those goals. Post content on a daily basis. Now that you have a social media profile on multiple platforms, you’ve got to make sure those accounts are active. If someone stumbles upon one of your pages and the most recent post was from three weeks ago, they aren’t going to follow you. What’s the point of following a brand that doesn’t post content? Furthermore, think about all the people already following your business page. These people won’t just navigate to that page on their own to see what you’re up to. You need to post new content that will appear on their homepages and timelines. Let’s take a look at how frequently small businesses are posting on social media: As you can see from this graph, just over half of small businesses post on a daily basis. This is your opportunity to stand out from your competitors. If your competition is only posting once a week or just a handful of times per month, it will be easier for you to make a lasting impression on your followers by posting daily. Each time you post new content, you remind your followers that your brand exists. When they need or want whatever you’re offering, they’ll think of your company as opposed to another small business in the area. One of the reasons why small businesses aren’t posting content daily is because they simply don’t know what to post. If you fall into this category, refer back to your marketing goals. For example, if your goal is to promote new products for sale on your ecommerce site, then post a promotional offer for those products. Repurpose previously published content. I briefly mentioned this earlier when we discussed why you should create a YouTube channel. Let’s say you have an instructional guide or tutorial on how to use a product that you published to your YouTube page. You can post that same video or snippets of that video to your other distribution channels. Share new content from your website. Post links to your most recently published posts. In addition to posting content daily, it’s also important for you to respond to your customers. I’m referring to direct messages as well as comments. 48% of consumers say that when a company is responsive on social media, it will prompt them to make a purchase. Give consumers a reason to follow you. In order to have a successful social media marketing strategy for your small business, you need to have lots of followers. Otherwise, nobody is going to see your content. Once you’re able to grow your social following, it will be easier for you to convert your followers into customers. That’s because consumers are more likely to buy from brands they follow on social media. Here are some of the top reasons why people would be interested in following your small business on social media: they’re curious about your products or services you offer exclusive promotions your content is entertaining they need to reach a customer service representative you offered an incentive their friends or family follow your brand So make sure your content is worth following. As you’ve seen, getting more followers will ultimately increase your chances of driving more sales. Run a contest. Promote flash sales and discounts. Just don’t post too many promotions, or it will cause people to unfollow you. In fact, 46% of consumers say they’ll unfollow brands that post too much promotional content. There is a difference between posting daily and spamming your followers. People don’t just want to see posts from your brand. If you’re posting several times per day, these posts will flood the timelines and homepages of your followers. Nobody wants to see that. If you want to post content multiple times per day, consider sharing ephemeral content, which we’ll discuss in greater detail shortly. Form relationships with social influencers. What if I told you there was a way for you to increase your social media presence without posting any content to your page? Well, as I’m sure you were able to guess, this is definitely a possibility. When people think of social influencers, they think of celebrities and athletes. But partnering with a celebrity probably won’t fit within the marketing budget of a small business. However, influencer marketing is the fastest growing method for customer acquisition in the digital world. Furthermore, 67% of brands are planning to increase their influencer marketing budget within the next year. So how can a small business afford to implement a strategy like this? You can find social influencers who are much more cost-efficient than a celebrity. Try partnering with micro influencers to increase your product credibility. This type of influencer may not have millions of followers, but you can get them to post content about your brand for a few hundred dollars. You may even be able to get away with offering just offering them free products in exchange for a post about your brand. This strategy is effective because micro influencers have stronger engagement metrics with their followers. That’s because they are just regular people. An average citizen can’t relate to the lives of Kanye West and the Kardashians. But they can definitely relate to someone who has a regular job. Consider searching for social influencers who live within the area or region of your small business. It’s more likely that their followers will be interested in supporting your brand. Implement automation tools . I know what you’re thinking. Everything that we discussed so far sounds extremely time-consuming. As a small business owner, you need to wear multiple hats throughout the day. Depending on the size of your business, you might be handling the majority of the company’s responsibilities. Becoming a social media content manager wasn’t something you planned for, and it might feel as if there aren’t enough hours in the day for you to handle this. Plus, hiring someone to take on these tasks can be expensive. That may not be something that your business can afford right now. Fortunately, automation resources will solve this problem for you. Check out my favorite time saving social media marketing tools. Using an automation platform—some good examples are Buffer, Hootsuite, and Missinglettr—will allow you to schedule your posts in advance. You can take time once at the beginning of your week to set the dates and times for your posts in the future. Another benefit of using an automation tool is the ability to respond to messages in a timely fashion. Rather than having to check each social platform individually for these messages, you can find software that sends all messages to one inbox. Then you can reply directly from the software. I highly recommend these tools for small business owners who feel they don’t have enough time to effectively manage their social media profiles. Don’t let that impair your marketing strategy. Encourage user-generated content. This connects to my discussion about the type of content you should be posting. You can’t go wrong by sharing content that encourages UGC. As you can see from these numbers, user-generated content has a direct correlation with the consumer buying decision. UGC will also help you build brand awareness. Here’s why. Let’s say you run a contest on Instagram where participants have to post pictures featuring them using one of your products. Your small business just got exposed to a wider audience. Anyone who follows people who enter the contest will see your brand being promoted, even if those people don’t follow you. A whopping 92% of consumers say they trust a referral if it comes from someone they know. UGC is a great way for you to get more followers and ultimately turn those new followers into buyers. Take advantage of ephemeral content. Ephemeral content is different from a regular post. This type of content is only displayed for a short period of time, such as 24 hours. The most common places where you’ll find ephemeral content for social media is on Instagram and Snapchat. Both of these platforms have a “story” feature. I highly recommend using an Instagram story to promote your business. I briefly mentioned this earlier when discussing how frequently you should post content. If you want to post several times per day, do it on your story. This won’t spam the timelines of your followers. If you haven’t used ephemeral content just yet, give it a try in your next promotion to see how it goes. Broadcast live video streams. Small businesses can also benefit from broadcasting live video content on social media platforms. Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram all have options to do this. Just take a look at some of these statistics about Facebook Live: Basically, your live stream will boost your engagement metrics. It will also give you a more authentic interaction with your audience. You can use your live broadcast in many different ways. But one of my favorites for small businesses is a behind the scenes look. Show your followers what happens behind closed doors at your business. Give them a tour of your production facility, office, and introduce them to your staff. This will make them feel as if they are seeing something that’s exclusive and ultimately bring them closer to your brand. Live video is also a great distribution method for product demonstrations, events, or Q&A sessions. Your live audience will be able to comment on your stream in real time. Make sure you acknowledge those comments and respond to your followers. Conclusion. Your small business needs to use social media to stay relevant in today’s day and age. Just having a Facebook profile alone is no longer acceptable if you want to maximize your social media marketing proficiency. Create profiles on multiple platforms as long as your target audience is active on those channels. You need to post content on a regular basis. Just make sure your posts are all related to your clearly established marketing goals. Your profiles need to be appealing to consumers. Run campaigns designed to get more followers. To further extend your reach, find social influencers to promote your business. Encourage user-generated content. Add ephemeral content and live broadcasts to your social media marketing strategy. If you don’t have time to manage all your social media pages, consider using automation tools to make your life easier. Follow the advice I’ve outlined in this guide, and it will bring the social media marketing strategy of your small business to the next level. Do you want more traffic? To get help with improving your traffic, leads, and revenue, fill out your info. Copyright © 2022 • Quick Sprout Work With Us • Privacy Policy • Terms of Service This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish.Accept Read MorePrivacy & Cookies Policy Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. 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Title52 Low-Cost Ways To Promote Your Business | ZenBusiness Inc
Urlhttps://www.zenbusiness.com/blog/low-cost-ways-to-adverstise/
Description52 low cost ways to promote and advertise your business. Proven marketing strategies and low-cost advertising methods for small business and home business owners
Date11 Aug 2021
Organic Position18
H152 Low-Cost Ways To Promote Your Business
H2Business Know-How
52 Ways to Promote Your Business
Learn How To Promote Your Business Online
Use Traditional methods to Promote and Advertise Your Business
Start an LLC in Your State
Ready to get started?
H3When it comes to compliance, costs, and other factors, these are popular states for forming an LLC
H2WithAnchorsBusiness Know-How
52 Ways to Promote Your Business
Learn How To Promote Your Business Online
Use Traditional methods to Promote and Advertise Your Business
Start an LLC in Your State
Ready to get started?
Body52 Low-Cost Ways To Promote Your Business Blog Menu Blog Home Business Ideas & Tips Finance Your Business Market Your Business Keep Your Business Compliant Business Know-How. Powered by by Janet Attard August 11, 2021 Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share by Email Are you starting a business on a shoestring or need ways to stretch your small business marketing budget? Marketing a business doesn’t have to cost a lot. Here are 52 low-cost, high-impact methods to advertise and promote your business. Determining how to promote your business can be an ongoing challenge. If your business is new, you may not know how to advertise your business to get your name known. If you’ve been in business for years, you may be wondering how to market your business effectively when the promotional methods you’ve always used aren’t working very well. The way customers shop for what you sell may have changed, their needs may be different, or you are missing younger, new customers with your outreach efforts. Whatever your business structure or circumstances, you need proven advertising and marketing tactics to find new customers without spending a fortune. These need to include a mix of traditional and digital marketing. 52 Ways to Promote Your Business. You can’t promote and advertise your business effectively until you take these two steps: Plan your marketing. To market your business successfully you need a planned, organized approach. Hit or miss marketing wastes time and money. Start by defining your marketing strategy and setting a budget. Identify your best prospects, and then determine the best promotional strategies to reach them. Be as specific as possible. Is the decision-maker the CTO of the company, the director of human resources, the paralegal filing new business LLC‘s or a 37-year-old working mom? Will you find them on Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook, YouTube, or Instagram? What about in-person networking at local business meetings or community organizations?  What about advertising? Will customers be searching for your type of product on Google or Bing? Do they look for coupons in newspapers? Do you want to start promoting your business to them at the start of their buying cycle, or when they’re about ready to pull out their credit card and make the purchase? Write your answers down and refer to them before you start any new marketing tactic. Use this marketing plan worksheet to gather your information. Learn How To Promote Your Business Online . Digital marketing isn’t an option—it’s a necessity. Whether you sell turquoise jewelry, empanadas, or asbestos removal services, you need to promote and advertise where your customers are searching for what you sell. And that’s online. Here are ways to accomplish that affordably. If you don’t have a website, get one set up. A working website is critical for marketing your business and for making your brand known even if your business has a big social media following. You’re going to need to get a business domain because depending on what you sell, your website serves as a lead generation tool, online brochure, catalog, and information source for your potential customers. You have complete control over how you promote your products and services on your website and how long promotions and other content is visible. You don’t have that control with social media. If you can’t afford to have someone custom-design your website, set up your site using one of the builders like Wix, Squarespace, or Godaddy that provide templates and tools that make it easy to create a basic website. Whether you choose a ready-to-use template or have someone build a site for you, be sure the design is responsive. (In other words, that it looks good and is easy to read on mobile devices as well as on desktop and laptop computers.) RELATED: How to Advertise Your Website for Free  Include a blog. A blog (or other written articles on your site) serves two functions. It informs your customers and prospects, and the content, in turn, improves your chances of being found in search engines. You don’t have to be a professional writer to add a blog. Just write information your customers will find helpful at different stages of the buying cycle or provide tips and hints on using what you sell. Use Basic SEO for your website. SEO stands for search engine optimization – in other words, setting up your web pages so the search engines understand the content of the pages and may link to you when someone searches for what you sell or the kind of information you provide. Although some companies spend a lot of money on SEO, there are a number of things you can do yourself to improve the SEO of your site. Among them: – using a different title for each page on your website – using phrases people search for in the page title – including your business name, location, and phone number on all pages on your site Set up a business listing for your company on Google and Bing. Google and Bing both offer a free listing for local businesses. To get listed on Google, go to Google My Business To get listed on Bing, go to Bing Places for Business. Fill out all the information you can, including phone number, website, business address, and hours of operation, when appropriate. Doing so can help your business show up at the top of search results when someone in your general vicinity is searching for your products or services. Set up your business profile or page on social media sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest. You can and should set up a Facebook page for your business that is separate from your personal profile. To attract attention from potential customers, be sure to include a good description, keywords, business phone number, and a link to your website. Keep your business and personal pages separate on other social media sites as well. Participate in social media discussions related to your field. Look for groups or conversations that talk about your type of products or services and participate in the conversations, but don’t spam them with constant promos for what you sell. Use email marketing to bring in business. Email marketing is the most cost-effective way to communicate with customers and prospects and get them to make purchases or visit your website. Sign up for an email marketing service and ask customers, website visitors, and social media followers to sign up for your email list. Then, send an email newsletter and/or promotional offers to customers and prospects on a regular basis. One good way to build a permission-based email list of people who want your mailings is to give something away. It could be a free ebook or even a free tip-sheet on how to do something related to your business. If you’re a health coach, for instance, you might offer people who sign up for your free newsletter a tip sheet with “10 Easy Ways To Lose Weight Without Going on a Diet.” If you don’t have anything to give away, try offering a signup discount on products or services as an incentive. An email service like Constant Contact* makes it easy to manage your list and send professional-looking mailings. Post Interesting information and pictures regularly to your social media accounts. The information or photos should be interesting to your audience. If Tips on how they can improve their life or business or special offers are likely to get the most likes and shares. Pay to boost your most popular posts on social media sites. Target the boosted posts at groups of people who are most like your customers. This can be an inexpensive way of getting your business in front of potential customers in very targeted locations or who have interests that match what you sell. Run Facebook Ads or ads on other social networks. Although boosting a social media post is one type of ad, you get more options and when you create an ad instead of boosting a post. On Facebook, for instance, creating an ad will let you set objectives such as conversions or lead generation, create call to action buttons, take advantage of more advanced targeting options, and do other things you can’t do by boosting a post. Run a webinar.  Pick a topic for the webinar that will be popular with customers and prospects. Some topics that can foster customer engagement are important industry news, strategies for improving some aspect of life or business, and ways to solve common problems. You could also teach a short introductory course in a webinar. Promote the webinar on social media and in your newsletter. Encourage friends to promote it on their social media accounts and newsletters, too. Require attendees to register with an email address so you can remarket to them after the webinar. Create PDF versions of your promotional materials. Convert your promotional literature to PDF format so you send product literature to those who request it in email. You save the postage; they get the material in minutes instead of days.  Test buying Pay Per Click (PPC) advertising on the search engines. If you are not yet advertising on search engines search for offers that give you $50 or $75 in free advertising to start. Read the directions for the service you plan to use, and very carefully watch what you spend on a daily or more frequent basis until you are comfortable using PPC ads and see you are getting a return on your investment Look into Google Local Service Ads if available for your type of business.  Google local services ads are shown at the top of Google Search results when people search for the services you offer in areas you’ve chosen.  Potential customers can click or tap on your ad to either call you or send you a message request. An added benefit: a Google Guarantee badge is available for businesses that pass a Google screening and qualification process. You pay only for valid leads, but the cost per call or text can be very high. Thus these ads are best suited for established businesses that know how to convert leads and know that the average customer charge and/or lifetime value of a customer will allow them to profit to make a profit.Ask Customers to Review Your Business. When someone is ready to choose a product or a service provider, they want to be assured that they are making a good choice. One way they gain that assurance is by looking at the reviews.  To increase the chance that customers will leave a review, send them a note thanking them for their business, and ask them to review your site online. Include a link to a place you’d like them to post their review. Related: How to Get Referrals and Recommendations Use Traditional methods to Promote and Advertise Your Business. Although online marketing and advertising are essential for bringing in business today, that doesn’t mean you should neglect traditional marketing tools. Online and offline marketing methods work hand-in-hand to bring in customers and clients and keep them coming back. Here are off-line promotional strategies that are just as important now as they were in the past. If you’re just starting out and don’t have a business card and business stationery, have them made up — immediately. They tell prospective customers you are a professional who takes your business seriously. Your business card is important for marketing your business because it helps people you meet remember you, your brand, and what your company does. Be sure to list your website address on your business card, letterhead, and any handouts you create. Include your main social media profile link, too, if possible. Another good strategy: include a QR code on the back with a link to sign up for your email list. Get your business cards into the hand of anyone who can help you in your search for new clients. Call your friends and relatives and tell them you have started a business. Visit them and leave a small stack of business cards to hand out to their friends.  Give several business cards to your customers if you are a service provider. That way, when their friends and neighbors ask them for a recommendation, they have an easy way to pass on your business name and contact information. Talk to all the vendors from whom you buy products or services. Give them your business card and ask if they can use your products or service, or if they know anyone who can. If they have bulletin boards where business cards are displayed (printers often do, and so do some supermarkets, hairdressers, etc.), ask if yours can be added to the board. Attend meetings of professional groups, and groups such as the Chamber of Commerce, other local business groups, local chapters of national groups such as NAWBO, or civic associations. Have business cards in a pocket where they are easily reachable. Don’t forget to ask what the people you speak with do, and to really listen to them. They’ll be flattered by your interest, and better remember you because of it. Become actively involved in 2 or 3 of these groups. That will give you more opportunity to meet possible prospects. But remember: opportunists are quickly spotted for what they are, and get little business. While you won’t want to become involved in many organizations that require a lot of your time, you can—and should—make real contributions to all of them by offering useful ideas and helping with projects when possible. Being active in local groups can bring you valuable word of mouth marketing. Pay for membership in those groups that attract your target customers. Becoming a paying member lets others in the group know you are one of them, are interested in the group’s mission and that you’re not just a freeloader or fly-by-night. Get Listed in Member Directories. Many business groups maintain member directories that they publish online. Being listed in these accomplishes two things. It helps members you’ve met, or members who are looking for services like yours find your contact information. It also provides a link to your website that can be useful for search engine optimization. Some groups may list you automatically. Others will require you to submit your own information. In either case, be sure your contact information is correct and the link to your website works. Exhibit at local trade shows. Local trade shows, when they are held, give you a way to display your products and services to the general public and to other local vendors who may need your products, or know someone to recommend you to. Sponsor a local trade show or event if the price is affordable. Doing so get your business name and logo seen wherever the event organizers promote the show. That could be in pre-show mailings, the organization’s website, and in handouts and displays set up during the show. Give away promotional products people will keep and use. Jar openers, keychain flashlights or hand sanitizers, refrigerator magnets, calendar magnets, drinkware, and pens are all items that can be imprinted to advertise your business, and they are all items people tend to hang onto and use. Help your community. Think about the needs in your community. Could you help get your name known by organizing a food or clothing drive? Could you give free coffee one day a week to local police or nurses? Sponsor a youth group?  Look for something unusual about what you do and publicize it. Send out press releases to local newspapers, radio stations, cable TV stations, and magazines whose audiences are likely to be interested in buying what you sell. Post the press releases on one or more online press release services, too, being sure to include links to your website. To increase your chance of having the material published, send along a photo (but not to radio stations) with your press release. Editors of printed publications are often in need of “art” (drawings or photos) to fill space and break up the gray look of a page of text. Help reporters find you. Reporters are constantly looking for sources to quote in their stories. One way they find those sources is to use services that distribute their request for sources to publicists, experts, marketers, and others who want to be sources. To find out when reporters are looking for information you can provide, sign up for these lists and scan them regularly. One such service is HARO (short for Help a Reporter Out) and is free. Another service, called PRLeads is fee-based. Write an article that demonstrates your expertise in your field. Send it to noncompeting newspapers, magazines, and websites in your field that accept submissions from experts. Be sure your name, business name, phone number, and a reference to your product or service is included at the end of the article. If the editor can use the article you get your name in print, and possibly get your contact information printed for free, too. Publicize your publicity. Whenever you do get publicity, get permission from the publisher to reprint the article containing the publicity. Make photocopies and mail the copies out with sales letters or any other literature you use to market your product or service. The publicity clips lend credibility to the claims you make for your products or services. Add an “As Seen On” or Press section to your website. List the names of publications you’ve been mentioned on and link to the articles that mention you. Ask for work. Contact friends, acquaintances, former employers (if you left on good terms), nonprofit organizations, schools and colleges, and even other businesses and ask for work. Let them know what you do and ask if they can use your services. If you don’t know who to contact at various businesses, call and ask who is in charge of buying what you sell. Don’t be discouraged by people who aren’t interested. One “Yes” can make up for a lot of “No” replies. Network with others who are doing the same type of work you are. Let them know you are available to handle their work overloads. (But don’t try to steal their customers. Word will get out, and will ruin your business reputation.) Offer to be a speaker. Industry conferences, volunteer organizations, libraries, and local business groups often need speakers for meetings. You’ll benefit from the name recognition, contacts, and publicity you gain from being a speaker at these events. If your product or service is appropriate, give demonstrations of it to whatever groups or individuals might be interested. Or, teach others how to use some tool you use in your work. Put videos of your product or service on YouTube and other video-sharing and slide-sharing sites.  Find out what federal, state, and local government programs are in existence to help you get started in business. Most offer free business counseling, and some can put you in touch with government agencies and large corporations that buy from small and woman-owned businesses.  If you are a woman-owned or minority-owned business, post that fact on your website. You should also consider getting certified by private, state, or federal organizations. Many purchasing agents have quotas or guide for the number of goods and services they need to buy from minority- and woman-owned businesses.  Send out sales letters to everyone you think might be able to use what you sell. Be sure to describe your business in terms of how it can help the prospect. Learn to drop a business card in every letter you send out. Follow up periodically with postcard mailings. If you use a car or truck in your business have your business name and contact information professionally painted on the side of the vehicle. That way your means of transportation becomes a vehicle for advertising your business.  Use a magnetic sign on your vehicle. If you don’t want to have your name painted on your car or truck, order a magnetic sign with your name, logo phone number, and slogan. You can get them in various sizes and can remove them whenever you want. Magnetic signs can be ordered through many online printing and sign shops and are very reasonably priced. Get on the telephone and make “cold calls.” These are calls to people with whom you would like to do business. Briefly describe what you do and ask for an appointment to talk to them about ways you can help them meet a need or solve a problem. Get samples of your product or your work into as many hands as possible. Offer a free, no-obligation consultation to people you think could use your services. During such consultations offer some practical suggestions or ideas–and before you leave ask for an “order” to implement the ideas.  Ask for referrals. A satisfied customer is often glad to refer you to their friends. Help them remember to do so by asking for referrals and leaving them extra business cards or fliers that they can give to their friends and family who need your services. If someone gives you a lead, follow up on it right away. Use other people to sell your product or service. Instead of (or in addition to) selling your products yourself, look for affiliates, resellers or people who will generate leads for you in return for a commission on sales. Be sure your pricing structure allows for the fees or commissions you will have to pay on any sales that are made. Get together with businesses that serve the same market but sell different products and services. Make arrangements to cross-promote each others’ goods and services bypassing leads back and forth, sharing mailings, and making referrals. Have sales letters, brochures, flyers, and other pertinent information printed and ready to go. Ask prospects who seem reluctant to buy from you: “Would you like me to send information?” Follow up promptly with a note and a letter that says, “Here is the information you asked me to send.” Run a contest. Make the prize something desirable and related to your business — it could be a free gift basket of your products, for instance, or free services. Find dozens of additional small business marketing ideas in our marketing channel. Start an LLC in Your State. When it comes to compliance, costs, and other factors, these are popular states for forming an LLC. How To Start an LLC in California How To Start an LLC in Florida How To Start an LLC in Texas How To Start an LLC in Colorado How To Start an LLC in Michigan How To Start an LLC in New York How To Start an LLC in Ohio How To Start an LLC in North Carolina How To Start an LLC in Nevada How To Start an LLC in Illinois How To Start an LLC in Delaware How To Start an LLC in Alabama How To Start an LLC in Alaska How To Start an LLC in Arizona How To Start an LLC in Arkansas How To Start an LLC in Connecticut How To Start an LLC in Georgia How To Start an LLC in Hawaii How To Start an LLC in Idaho How To Start an LLC in Indiana How To Start an LLC in Iowa How To Start an LLC in Kansas How To Start an LLC in Kentucky How To Start an LLC in Louisiana How To Start an LLC in Maine How To Start an LLC in Maryland How To Start an LLC in Massachusetts How To Start an LLC in Minnesota How To Start an LLC in Mississippi How To Start an LLC in Missouri How To Start an LLC in Montana How To Start an LLC in Nebraska How To Start an LLC in New Hampshire How To Start an LLC in New Jersey How To Start an LLC in New Mexico How To Start an LLC in North Dakota How To Start an LLC in Oklahoma How To Start an LLC in Oregon How To Start an LLC in Pennsylvania How To Start an LLC in Rhode Island How To Start an LLC in South Carolina How To Start an LLC in South Dakota How To Start an LLC in Tennessee How To Start an LLC in Utah How To Start an LLC in Vermont How To Start an LLC in Virginia How To Start an LLC in Washington How To Start an LLC in West Virginia How To Start an LLC in Wisconsin How To Start an LLC in Wyoming About the Author: Janet Attard is the founder of the award-winning Business Know-How small business web site and information resource. Janet is also the author of The Home Office And Small Business Answer Book and of Business Know-How: An Operational Guide For Home-Based and Micro-Sized Businesses with Limited Budgets. Follow Janet on Twitter and on LinkedIn Previous Article Marketing Plan: 10 Components You Should Include in Your Marketing PlanNext Article Business Cards – 12 Common Mistakes You Should Avoid Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share by Email Ready to get started? Get the expert support you need. Start Now Log In [email protected] 1-844-4-ZENBIZ (1-844-493-6249) Services Formation Services Registered Agent Worry Free Compliance EIN Number Operating Agreement Annual Reports New York Publication Company About Careers Reviews Blog Articles Media Kit API Refer Friends Support F.A.Q. Help Center Contact Us Terms of Use Privacy Policy State Fees Partners Made with 🌮 remotely by ZenBusiness INC © 2022. All Rights Reserved.
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Result 20
TitleTop 10 Most Effective Marketing Strategies for B2B and B2C
Urlhttps://www.weidert.com/blog/top-10-most-effective-marketing-strategies
DescriptionIs your marketing plan maximized or meh? Use these Top 10 B2B and B2C techniques in your marketing strategy to land more leads and grow your business
Date11 Aug 2021
Organic Position19
H1What Are the Top 10 Most Effective Marketing Strategies?
H2Top 10 B2B Marketing Strategies
Top 10 B2C Marketing Strategies
Top 10 B2B Marketing Strategies
Top 10 Business-to-Consumer Marketing Strategies
Every Strategy Requires an Effective Marketing Plan
H3Content Marketing
Inbound Marketing
Social Media Marketing
Search Engine Optimization
Search Engine Marketing/PPC
Account Based Marketing and Retargeting
Earned Media and PR
Referral Programs
Industry Events
Conversational Marketing
Social Networks and Viral Marketing
Paid Media Advertising
Internet Marketing
Email Marketing
Direct Selling
Point-of-Purchase Marketing (POP)
Cobranding, Affinity, and Cause Marketing
Conversational Marketing
Earned Media/PR
Storytelling
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE...
H2WithAnchorsTop 10 B2B Marketing Strategies
Top 10 B2C Marketing Strategies
Top 10 B2B Marketing Strategies
Top 10 Business-to-Consumer Marketing Strategies
Every Strategy Requires an Effective Marketing Plan
BodyWhat Are the Top 10 Most Effective Marketing Strategies? Posted by Vicki Woschnick on August 11, 2021 Looking for growth marketing strategies proven to be the most effective for generating leads and driving business? This article is designed to help you explore the best marketing tactics for any business situation — whether B2B or B2C! Below you'll find two routes — one for B2B and another for B2C businesses. Click or scroll to learn about the strategies that match your business situation and explore the best approaches to deploy for your business's marketing plan. Get a complete understanding of how to plan an effective marketing strategy. Download our "FREE Annual Marketing Plan Template." Each top 10 list is backed by data from a variety of sources, and has been updated with the latest information from market leaders, such as Drift, Forrester, HubSpot Research, Invesp, Saasquatch, Statista, and MarketingProfs.com. Click to jump to section or scroll to read all Top 10 B2B Marketing Strategies. Content Marketing Inbound Marketing Social Media Marketing Search Engine Optimization Search Engine Marketing/PPC Account Based Marketing (ABM) and Retargeting Earned Media and PR Referral Programs Industry Events Conversational Marketing Top 10 B2C Marketing Strategies. Social Networks and Viral Marketing Paid Media Advertising Internet Marketing Email Marketing Direct Selling Point-of-Purchase (POP) Marketing Co-Branding, Affinity, and Cause Marketing Conversational Marketing Earned Media/PR Storytelling Top 10 B2B Marketing Strategies. Curious about what business professionals think of different marketing strategies. We took a look at recent survey results and reports that compiled data on the topic, and created a list of 10 B2B marketing strategies commonly recognized as successful regardless of industry. Here’s what we found, in no particular order: Content Marketing. Content marketing emphasizes education over selling to influence buying behavior. This strategic marketing approach focuses on creating and distributing information relevant to prospects’ needs in order to attract those best aligned with — and most likely to purchase — your product or service. Since communication is ongoing, content can be tailored to reflect what you learn about leads over time, and may include varied formats like infographics, webpages, podcasts, videos, blogs, white papers, webinars, and eBooks. It’s important to note that content marketing is not synonymous with inbound marketing (more on inbound below). Content marketing is an important component to an overall inbound growth strategy, but it does not integrate other marketing methodologies to maximize content value. Content marketing is effective because it: Draws prospects through the sales funnel Grows brand visibility, credibility, and desirability Aligns target markets with relevant information Fast Fact: 9 out of 10 B2B buyers say online content has a moderate to major effect on their purchase decisions Inbound Marketing. Inbound is far and away the most effective B2B marketing strategy because it leverages the strengths of the majority of the other nine strategies to attract, engage, and delight customers. Unlike traditional marketing methods — even the other strategies listed here — inbound marketers earn the attention of customers and pull them to a company website by producing and providing meaningful content. Because messaging is relevant and appears in the right place at the right time, inbound invites visitors in rather than annoying them with interruptive traditional advertising. Inbound marketing is effective because it: Works for businesses of any size or type Creates more knowledgeable prospects Can be easily integrated and managed using a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system and a content management system (CMS), like HubSpot Fast Fact: Fast Fact: 80% of corporate decision-makers favor getting brand information through an article or blog series more than ads Social Media Marketing. Social media marketing focuses on providing users with content they find valuable and want to share across their social networks, resulting in increased visibility and website traffic. Social media shares of content, videos, and images also influence SEO efforts in that they often increase relevancy in search results within social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Instagram as well as search engines like Google and Yahoo. Social media marketing is effective because it: Reduces marketing spend while increasing lead generation Provides metrics that give companies additional marketplace insight “Humanizes” brands and encourages conversions Fast Fact: 83% of all B2B marketers use at least one of the "Big Four" social media sites (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube) to distribute content. Drive traffic and revenue with these B2B social media marketing strategies Search Engine Optimization. Search engine optimization, or SEO, is the process of increasing awareness about — and traffic to — a particular website by making sure it appears among the top unpaid (or “natural”) search results on search engines like Google, Bing!, and Yahoo. While there is a common misperception that it's a stand-alone marketing tactic, SEO is accomplished by many tactics working together and is central to an effective inbound marketing strategy. While social media, email, banner ads, and other marketing tools generate website visits, SEO visibility is particularly important because search engines are the primary way users navigate the Internet. SEO automatically increases your audience in a relevant, targeted way — they self-identify as someone who is interested in your product or service. Search engine optimization is effective because it: Continues to evolve to keep pace with mobile and local search engine use Simplifies searches for customers interested in your product or service Is a cost-effective way to keep your brand competitive with similarly situated companies Fast Fact: SEO tops B2B lead sources at 14%, followed closely by email marketing (13%), and social media (12%). Explore more in this free SEO Survival Guide! Search Engine Marketing/PPC. Search engine marketing, or SEM, is a tool that companies use to grow their website traffic through paid online advertising. One of the most popular SEM methods is pay-per-click (PPC) links. Essentially, a company buys or “sponsors” a link that appears as an ad in search engine results when keywords related to their product or service are searched. Every time the ad is clicked, the company pays the search engine (or other third party host site) a small fee for the visitor — a literal “pay per click.” Search engine marketing is effective because of its: Breadth in online tools and reach Cost-effectiveness in generating high visibility Adaptability to multiple markets and audiences Fast Fact: PPC users are 50% more likely to make a purchase than organic site visitors. Account Based Marketing and Retargeting. Account Based Marketing (ABM) is a B2B strategy that focuses on a targeted set of accounts using highly personalized campaigns. It provides marketing and sales teams with a number of advantages, including a faster sales process, cost effectiveness, and a more efficient use of marketing resources. With all of the things ABM is, though, it’s important to remember that ABM is not the same as targeted outbound marketing. It’s much more strategic, using methods like online retargeting to personalize marketing efforts. Retargeting uses browser cookie-based technology to identify users who visited your site but left (or “bounced”) before completing a transaction or conversion. The cookie allows for targeted advertisements to appear in those users’ subsequent web searches and interactions, even if they’re not related to your site specifically. Retargeting is an effective conversion tool because it repeatedly gets your brand in front of audiences that already demonstrated interested in your product or service. Retargeting is effective because it: Recaptures the attention and purchase power of “window shoppers” Generates high click-through rates Lends itself to visitor segmentation and tailored messaging Fast Fact: The average click-through rate for retargeted ads is 0.7% (compared to 0.07% for display ads). Earned Media and PR. Earned media (or “free media”) is publicity that’s created through efforts other than paid advertising. It can take a variety of forms — a social media testimonial, word of mouth, a television or radio mention, a newspaper article or editorial — but one thing is constant: earned media is unsolicited and can only be gained organically. It cannot be bought or owned like traditional advertising. RELATED: Taking an earned media approach to inbound marketing Earned media and PR are effective because they: Are generally “free” advertising channels Are unsolicited and, therefore, have instant perceived credibility Increase awareness of valuable, educational, and trustworthy content Fast Fact: Earned media accounts for 25-40% of all traffic and lead generation. Referral Programs. A referral program is an umbrella term used to describe a systematic approach companies take to incentivize people to tell others about their products or services. Implementing specific affiliate programs, customer referral programs and partner programs within a marketing plan structure are meant to offer the instant credibility of existing customers to grow a customer base. “Referral programs” is often used synonymously with “referral marketing.” Referral programs are effective because they: Leverage the recommendations of happy customers Authentically recognize customers’ brand loyalty and reinforce it Are perennially popular with customers Fast Fact: The lifetime value for new referral customers is 16% higher than non-referrals. Want more leads? Improve Your Voice of the Customer (VoC) Program! Industry Events. In-person and online tradeshows remain a top B2B networking tool (especially when inbound tactics support event efforts), as they gather companies within a specific industry into one location, whether physical or virtual, to connect and demonstrate their latest products and services. Rarely open to the public, trade shows give companies the chance to establish or strengthen relationships with key industry partners, customers, and prospects; identify market trends and opportunities; and gain an understanding of what their competition is offering in the market. In light of the pandemic-driven “new normal,” networking has met with some limitations. However, technology is a decided advantage, as in-person events have been successfully converted to virtual events that offer similar benefits, including: Meaningful interactions and relationship-building Good attendance, creating a target-rich environment for lead generation Opportunities for businesses of every size to access the same audience and information Fast Fact: Events like trade shows generate the most B2B leads, while case studies are the catalysts behind lead conversion and acceleration. Improve Trade Show & Exhibition Rsults with These Inbound Tactics Conversational Marketing. Conversational marketing is just that — a conversation. Real-time interaction via a chatbot or live chat gets the right information in front of prospects and customers at the right time, and follow-up questions are addressed immediately. Personalized, relevant engagement vastly improves the user experience, increasing the likelihood of getting referrals from happy customers. For businesses, conversational marketing methods typically cut the time buyers stay in the sales funnel. Conversions happen quicker because relationships are established quicker. Set up live chat on your website in 6 steps using HubSpot Conversations Conversational marketing is effective because it: Removes layers of impersonal lead capture and creates an authentic, personal customer experience Fosters clear communication — buyers can plainly state their needs, and businesses can more readily understand and assist since there is appropriate context around the request Strengthens relationships as bots can also recommend additional content to supplement buyer education Fast Fact: Messaging is the preferred method of customer communication with businesses — 90% of customers want a chat option. Taken individually, the majority of the strategies we listed provide limited marketing clout. However, inbound marketing aligns the heavy-hitters — SEO, SEM, content marketing, social media, and earned media — to deliver a well-rounded, cost-effective marketing approach that generates qualified leads, strengthens customer relationships, and successfully builds brands. Related: Top 6 B2B Marketing Strategies and Trends for 2021 If you're interested in learning how to incorporate the most effective marketing techniques into your inbound marketing program, click the link below to get our free guide and start today! Top 10 Business-to-Consumer Marketing Strategies. What do business professionals think about different types of marketing strategy to reach consumers? We took a look at recent survey results and reports that compiled data on the topic, and created a list of 10 B2C marketing strategy examples commonly recognized as successful regardless of industry. Here’s what we found, in no particular order: Social Networks and Viral Marketing. Social media marketing focuses on providing users with content they find valuable and want to share across their social networks, resulting in increased visibility and traffic. Social media shares of content, videos, and images also influence Search Engine Optimization (SEO) efforts in that they often increase relevancy in search results within social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram and search engines like Google and Yahoo. Fast Fact: 61% of companies use social to increase conversions, and 50% use it to gain customer or market insights. Paid Media Advertising. Paid media is a tool that companies use to grow their website traffic through paid advertising. One of the most popular methods is pay-per-click (PPC) links. Essentially, a company buys or “sponsors” a link that appears as an ad in search engine results when keywords related to their product or service are searched (this process is commonly known as search engine marketing, or SEM). Every time the ad is clicked, the company pays the search engine (or other third party host site) a small fee for the visitor — a literal “pay per click.” Fast Fact: As customers approach their purchase decision, 65% will click on a paid ad. Internet Marketing. Internet marketing, or online marketing, combines web and email to advertise and drive e-commerce sales. Social media platforms may also be included to leverage brand presence and promote products and services. In total, these efforts are typically used in conjunction with traditional advertising formats like radio, television, and print. There’s also a lot to be said about online reviews and opinions. Word-of-mouth advertising is unpaid, organic, and oh-so-powerful because those people who have nice things to say about your product or service generally have nothing to gain from it other than sharing good news. A recommendation from a friend, colleague, or family member has built-in credibility and can spur dozens of leads who anticipate positive experiences with your brand. Fast Fact: Global e-commerce is anticipated to reach $3,056.3 billion at a CAGR of 14% through 2023, with the spike largely attributed to contactless buying behaviors resulting from the global pandemic (COVID-19) Email Marketing. Email marketing is a highly effective way to nurture and convert leads. However, it’s not a game of chance, as to whether your message winds up in spam filters. Instead, email marketing is an automated process that targets specific prospects and customers with the goal of influencing their purchasing decisions. Email marketing success is measured by open rates and click-through rates, so strategy comes into play, particularly when it’s used as a component of a larger internet marketing initiative. Fast Fact: The average expected email marketing ROI is $42 for every $1 spent. Direct Selling. Direct selling accomplishes exactly what the name suggests — marketing and selling products directly to consumers. In this model, sales agents build face-to-face relationships with individuals by demonstrating and selling products away from retail settings, usually in an individual’s home (e.g., Amway, Avon, Herbalife, and Mary Kay). Fast Fact: The direct selling market is currently valued at $63 billion dollars. Point-of-Purchase Marketing (POP). Point-of-Purchase marketing (or POP marketing) sells to a captive audience — those shoppers already in-store and ready to purchase. Product displays, on-package coupons, shelf talkers that tout product benefits, and other attention-getting “sizzle” often sway buying decisions at the shelf by making an offer simply too good — and too visible — to pass up. Fast Fact: In the U.S., annual impulse purchases total $17.78 billion, while Canadians dole out about half that much — $8.8 billion per year. Cobranding, Affinity, and Cause Marketing. Co-branding is a marketing methodology in which at least two brands join together to promote and sell a single product or service. The brands lend their collective credibility to increase the perception of the product or service’s value, so consumers are more likely to purchase and willing to pay more at retail. Secondarily, co-branding may dissuade private label manufacturers from copying the product or service. Similarly, affinity marketing is a partnership between a company (supplier) and an organization that gathers persons sharing the same interests — for instance, a coffee shop that sells goods from a local bakery. There is no shortage of co-branding partnerships, but several more recent examples demonstrate particularly good natural brand alignment including the adventurous GoPro and Red Bull, luxurious BMW and Louis Vuitton, and fashion-forward Alexander Wang and H&M. Likewise, cause marketing leverages and enhances brand reputation. Cause marketing is a cooperative effort between a for-profit business and a non-profit organization to mutually promote and benefit from social and other charitable causes. Cause marketing is not to be confused with corporate giving, which is tied to specific tax-deductible donations made by an organization. Cause marketing relationships are “feel goods” and assure your customers you share their desire to make the world a better place. Fast Fact: Customers interpret co-branding as a value endorsement from a brand they already trust, creating a potentially lucrative halo effect. Conversational Marketing. Conversational marketing is just that — a conversation. Real-time interaction via a chatbot or live chat gets the right information in front of prospects and customers at the right time, allows them to self-service, and get questions answered immediately. Personalized, relevant engagement vastly improves the user experience. For B2C businesses, conversational marketing is especially effective because it scales your customer service and typically cuts the time buyers stay in the sales funnel. Conversions happen quicker because relationships are established quicker. Set up live chat on your website in 6 steps using HubSpot Conversations Conversational marketing is effective because it: Removes layers of impersonal lead capture and creates an authentic, personal customer experience Fosters clear communication — buyers can plainly state their needs, and businesses can more readily understand and assist since there is appropriate context around the request Strengthens relationships as bots can also recommend additional content or products relevant to buyers based on their past behavior Fast Fact: Messaging is the preferred method of customer communication with businesses — 90% of customers want a chat option. Earned Media/PR. Earned media (or “free media”) is publicity that is created through efforts other than paid advertising. It can take a variety of forms — a social media testimonial, word-of-mouth, a television or radio mention, a newspaper article or editorial — but one thing is constant: earned media is unsolicited and can only be gained organically. It cannot be bought or owned like traditional advertising. Fast Fact: 92% of customers say they trust earned media. Storytelling. Brand storytelling uses a familiar communication format to engage consumers at an emotional level. Rather than just spew facts and figures, storytelling allows you to weave a memorable tale of who your company is, what you do, how you solve problems, what you value, and how you engage and contribute to your community and the public in general. Fast Fact: In a recent survey, 91% of respondents reported having a positive emotional connection with at least one brand. Return to Top Every Strategy Requires an Effective Marketing Plan. Ready to ramp up your marketing efforts, but unsure of where to begin? Reach out to us or check out our complete guide to building an annual marketing plan for any size of business. Topics: Inbound Marketing YOU MAY ALSO LIKE... . 37+ Useful Social Media Stats for B2B Inbound Marketers Top 6 B2B Marketing Strategies and Trends for 2021 What is Sales Enablement in B2B Inbound Marketing? Posted by Vicki Woschnick An experienced writer and content planner, Vicki has a variety of client-side and agency experience in all of Weidert Group's service areas. She is highly adept at learning various industrial niches and producing effective content on behalf of clients. In Weidert Group's inbound marketing programs, Vicki plays a major role in crafting blog-form articles as well as downloadable advanced content offers.       Services Are We a Fit? Resources Blog About Us Careers Contact Us © 2022 Weidert Group, Inc. 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Result 21
TitleHow to Use Social Media for Small Business: 12 Simple Tips
Urlhttps://blog.hootsuite.com/social-media-tips-for-small-business-owners/
DescriptionIf you're wondering how to use social media for small business, look no further than these 12 essential tips to get started
Date
Organic Position20
H1How to Use Social Media for Small Business: 12 Simple Tips
H212 essential social media tips for business
Related Articles
Well this is awkward
H31. Start with a plan
2. Decide which platforms are right for you
3. Know your audience
4. Expand your audience
5. Build relationships
6. Pay attention to trends
7. Sell your stuff with social commerce
8. Mix up your formats
9. Focus on quality over quantity
10. Use the right tools
11. Use scheduling and automation to free up more time for engagement
12. Track and refine your performance
How to Bulk Schedule Social Media Posts and Save Time
How to Create a Social Media Posting Schedule (Free Template and Tools)
How to Manage Multiple Facebook Pages at Once (Without Crying)
H2WithAnchors12 essential social media tips for business
Related Articles
Well this is awkward
BodyHow to Use Social Media for Small Business: 12 Simple Tips If you're wondering how to use social media for small business, look no further than these 12 essential tips to get started. If you have a business, you likely spend a lot of your time trying to dig up the latest social media marketing tips. And for good reason. There are now 4.2 billion active social media users—almost twice as many as there were just five years ago. Those users spend an average of 2 hours and 25 minutes on social channels every single day. Those nearly 2.5 hours offer an incredible opportunity for businesses to: build brand awareness develop customer relationships and even make sales directly within social platforms. Here are all the social media tips you need to market your business in 2021. Table of Contents 1. Start with a plan 2. Decide which platforms are right for you 3. Know your audience 4. Expand your audience 5. Build relationships 6. Pay attention to trends 7. Sell your stuff with social commerce 8. Mix up your formats 9. Focus on quality over quantity 10. Use the right tools 11. Use scheduling and automation to free up more time for engagement 12. Track and refine your performance Bonus: Get a free social media strategy template to quickly and easily plan your own strategy. Also use it to track results and present the plan to your boss, teammates, and clients. 12 essential social media tips for business. 1. Start with a plan. It’s easy to get started using social media for business purposes. We all use social media in our day-to-day lives, so there’s a level of comfort with the tools. It doesn’t cost anything to create a Facebook Page for your business, or start posting on Instagram, or create a presence on Twitter. But before you leap in feet first, remember: every good business strategy starts with a good plan. Yes, you can use social tools for free. But the time and effort involved still represent an investment in your business. Without a plan, you have no clear goal for what you’re trying to achieve. That means there’s no way to know if you’re getting a return on that investment. Take the time to create a social media plan upfront. This ensures all your social efforts support specific business goals. Here are some strategic social media tips from our guide to creating a social media marketing plan: Set social media goals and objectives. Create goals that follow the SMART framework. They should be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Base your goals on metrics that will have a real impact on your business. For example, you could aim to acquire customers or raise your conversion rate, rather than simply racking up likes. Research the competition. How are your competitors using social media? While you don’t want to copy them, learning from what others have done is a great way to reduce your learning curve. A competitive analysis can help you learn what’s working and what’s not for other businesses like yours. Conduct a social media audit. If you’re already using social media, now’s the time to take a step back and evaluate your existing efforts. We’ve got an easy-to-use social media audit template to walk you through the process. Get inspired. You’ve looked at what your competitors are doing online, but what about other businesses? Take inspiration from the success of businesses in all industries. Where can you find these success stories? Head to the business section of most social networks’ websites and you’ll find useful case studies. This blog can also be a great source of inspiration, since we always include lots of examples. And just pay attention to what your favorite brands are doing. What makes you want to click or follow or buy? Create a social media calendar. A social media calendar helps you post the right content to the right social channels at the right time. It should include a plan for your content mix. Try starting with the 80-20 rule. Use 80% of your content to inform, educate, or entertain your audience. Use the other 20% to promote your brand or sell your products. 2. Decide which platforms are right for you. Don’t make assumptions about where your audience spends their time online. Your instinct might tell you that if you’re targeting Gen Z, you should skip Facebook and focus on Instagram and TikTok. But the data shows that nearly a quarter of Facebook users are aged 18 to 24. Source: Digital 2021 If you’re selling to baby boomers, social might not seem like a top priority. But it should be. Facebook and Pinterest are the top social networks for boomers. Adults over age 65 are Facebook’s fastest growing audience segment. Maybe you think TikTok marketing is not the right fit for your brand. But even well-established brands with an audience well outside Gen Z are experimenting with this platform. @washingtonpost I kind of have my hands full. ♬ original sound – betches Keep in mind that TikTok saw 56 million new app downloads in December 2020 alone. We’ve compiled demographics information for all of the major social networks. Use it to help gauge where your audience spends their time online. But remember that these demographics are just an overview. To make sure you’re using social media for business effectively, you’ll need to conduct some research of your own. This will help you to understand how your specific audience spends their time online. Choosing your platforms doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing approach. You can use different social channels to reach different audiences, or to meet different business goals. The average internet user has 8.4 social media accounts, so you can connect with them on different platforms for different purposes. For example, you could use Facebook to build your audience and generate leads, and Twitter for customer service. 3. Know your audience. One reason using social media for business is so effective is that you can micro-target your audience. But first, you need to understand who your audience is. Start by compiling data on your current customers. Then, dig deeper with social media analytics. You’ll soon start to understand who’s buying from and interacting with you online. Hootsuite Insights Powered by Brandwatch can help you uncover detailed information like the top hashtags, referral sites, and even specific social authors for terms relevant to your business. Once you’ve defined your audience, you can create buyer personas, which will help you understand the best ways to speak to your audience. We’ve got a free buyer persona template to help you get started. 4. Expand your audience. Once you have a clear picture of who your audience is, you can revisit your social media plan. It’s time to look for ways to reach more people just like them. For example, when lockdown measures meant more people were looking for ways to fill their time at home, The Great Courses Plus switched up its Facebook advertising strategy to expand its audience quickly. They created an extended free trial offer and advertised it to a broad audience in the United States. They then used lookalike audiences to reach new audiences in Canada, the UK, and Australia who were similar to their best existing customers. Source: Facebook This expanded audience strategy saw a more than 10 times increase in total average monthly subscriptions generated. You can also use social media to expand the audience for your local business. For example, Hootsuite geo-search streams can help you monitor and respond to local conversations about your business. You can then reach new potential customers who are already in your geographic area. 5. Build relationships. The unique benefit of social media marketing for small business is that it allows you to talk directly to customers and followers. You can build relationships over time, rather than asking for a sale upfront. That said, you certainly can use social to get a sale upfront, as we explain in Tip 7. More than 44% of internet users use social networks to research brands. Part of that discovery is getting to know who you are as a brand and what you stand for. When people engage with your organic content or ads, it’s a great idea to engage back. This helps to build trust and form a loyal following. As fans share and like your content, you rise in the social algorithms and gain new, free, exposure. For most Facebook users, there are more than 1,000 potential Newsfeed posts at any one time. Engagement is one of the signals Facebook uses to help predict which of those posts users are likely to see. When you establish relationships with your followers, they are more likely to see your posts. Nurturing relationships can also help you build a loyal community that will lead to ongoing sales over time. New customer acquisition is great, but don’t downplay the value of customer retention. In Hootsuite’s Social Transformation survey, 69% of respondents said social media helped maintain customer relationships during the very different marketing era of COVID-19. And Twitter data shows 70% of people say it’s important for bands to help boost positivity right now. So how do you build relationships, beyond responding to follower comments on your posts? Try these strategies: Create a Facebook Group. Facebook Groups are another great way to build community and brand loyalty. For example, the New York Times Podcast Club Facebook Group is “a book club for podcasts.” With more than 37,000 members, the group establishes the NYT as a go-to source for information beyond breaking news. It also motivates members to listen to the selected podcasts each week, helping to prevent listener drop-off. Connect with other entrepreneurs and influencers in your niche. Think your business is too small to work with influencers? Micro-influencers and nano-influencers with as few as 1,000 dedicated followers can be effective for establishing brand trust. As a bonus, they are often well within the budget range of smaller brands. The lingerie brand Lively partnered with influencers, including those with a small targeted following, to promote their bralettes and skincare products. View this post on Instagram A post shared by A L E ☆ I S • CREATOR (@alexismcbean_) Using analytics-based testing, the company found that ad creative from influencers promoted on their own profiles had a 75% higher conversion rate and 50% higher return on ad spend. Mention followers in your posts and Stories. Collecting user-generated content through contests and branded hashtags is a great way to source quality material for your social feed. UGC is also a powerful source of social proof. Even better, sharing your followers’ content on your social channels (and tagging them, of course), helps you establish relationships with some of your biggest fans. If a fan tags you in an Instagram Story, you’ll get a notification in your direct messages. Be sure to reshare—it’s an easy win-win. Use the social platforms’ built-in interactive tools. From Twitter polls to interactive stickers in Instagram Stories, there are plenty of ways to spark specific interactions with your followers. For example, Panera Bread launched a relationship-building campaign this summer to draw attention to its new coffee subscription. They announced they would give away free coffee all summer if 500,000 people voted Yes in in their Twitter poll. Do you want free unlimited premium ☕ all summer? 500,000 votes for YES by 6/22 and it's yours, America. #FREECOFFEE4SUMMER — Panera Bread (@panerabread) June 16, 2020 The poll got more than 588,000 responses. “We are a brand that is built on strong 1:1 relationships with our customers,” said Kelli Nicholson, Panera Bread’s Director of Brand Marketing. She told Twitter the campaign was an important way to evaluate whether the coffee subscription program was something customers would value. 6. Pay attention to trends. We’re not saying you should leap on every meme that goes viral. (Please don’t leap on every meme that goes viral.) But it is a good idea to pay attention to trends in social media, so you understand what people are looking for when they sign into their social channels. This helps you create appropriate content that resonates over time. State Farm insurance has an ongoing Pinterest campaign that provides informative content tied to major life changes like buying a car or having a child. Since these moments tend to impact insurance needs, it’s an obvious fit that has helped the insurance giant connect with millennials and Gen X. Bonus: Get a free social media strategy template to quickly and easily plan your own strategy. Also use it to track results and present the plan to your boss, teammates, and clients. Get the template now! Last spring, as travel changed from a worldwide affair to a much more local experience, road trips were a hot topic of online research. State Farm created a series of Pins about road trips and how the company helped protect their customers in uncertain times. The top five reasons people use social media now are: To stay up-to-date with news and current events To find funny or entertaining content To fill up spare time To stay in touch with friends To share photos or videos with others Souce: Digital 2021 Always keep your audience’s current needs in mind. What worked last year might not work today. Social listening is a highly valuable information gathering tool, helping you understand what your audience (and potential audience) might want to hear from your brand. That’s one reason why two-thirds of respondents to the Hootsuite Social Media Trends survey said social listening increased in value in 2020. We’ve created a whole guide on how to use social listening for your business. 7. Sell your stuff with social commerce. Social media marketing has evolved in recent years to include social commerce: the ability to sell your products directly from social channels. And business is booming, with a global market value of $89.4 billion in 2020. By June 2020, 18.3% of U.S. adults had made a purchase via Facebook, and another 11.1% via Instagram. Source: eMarketer You can now use social shopping tools to sell your products and services even without a website. We break down all the details in individual posts explaining how to use Instagram Shopping, how to sell with Facebook Shops, and the best ways to use Instagram Live Shopping. 8. Mix up your formats. Make sure to switch up your social post formats from time to time. If you usually post GIFs, try a JPG. If you normally post still images, try a video. Some video Tweet inspiration ✨ pic.twitter.com/TyEMgyZyeb — Twitter Business (@TwitterBusiness) August 25, 2020 And take advantage of all the formats within each social network, like Stories, or Reels, or Live video. For one thing, this helps you learn which formats work best for different types of content (more on that below) and for different social networks. For example, the conventional wisdom is that posts with images always fare better. But Hootsuite recently ran an experiment in which plain text Tweets outperformed those with an image or GIF. I've been testing different types of tweets to see how they perform (in terms of engagement) from the @hootsuite channel. Our most successful posts BY FAR have been linkless posts. No CTAs, no websites, nothing. Just sharing thoughts or helpful information as plain text. — Nick Martin 🦉 (@AtNickMartin) December 4, 2020 This was not true a couple of years ago, and Hootsuite would never have made this discovery if every Tweet contained an image. Here’s another reason not to fall into a rut: The Facebook algorithm uses “content type diversity” to ensure a person’s newsfeed had a good mix of content types. Switching up your formats may boost your content’s reach. When you do want to use images and don’t have a great photo library of your own, stock photo sites are a great source of free, high-quality photos to use in your social posts. Don’t use random images you find online. That is definitely not okay and can get you in some serious trouble. Finally, be sure all your posts, regardless of the format, are inclusive and accessible. For a start: Add alt text to images and make sure videos have captions. And make sure your audience is fully represented in the images you share. 9. Focus on quality over quantity. The sheer number of social media marketing options for small business might seem overwhelming—but you don’t need to do it all. It’s more important to create quality content on a couple of key channels than it is to have a presence on every single network. Above all, be sure that your social posts offer value. If all you do is pitch and sell, there’s very little motivation for people to follow you. Remember, social marketing is about building relationships. Be human. Be honest. Post great content. This is important, and you can’t fake it. You can’t do it all, and there’s no reason to try. Reach out to your audience in the places where they’re already spending time online. Focus on using one or two social channels really well, at least to start. Once you’ve got those mastered, you can build from what you’ve learned and expand your efforts. 10. Use the right tools. The secret to using social media effectively is to take advantage of tools that automate or simplify much of the work. There are loads of tools to help boost your productivity. That means you can start using social media for business without having a full-scale social media team. Here are some of our favorites. Engagement management. Social media is not a broadcasting system—it’s a way to engage with customers and fans. Social media management tools like Hootsuite can help you centralize all mentions and messages directed at your company in one dashboard. Then you can respond and engage without having to log into each of your individual social media accounts. Analytics. Getting all of your analytics data in one place can help you get a better picture of your social efforts overall. Hootsuite Insights powered by Brandwatch provides a great overview of how well you’re capturing the conversation in your space. And Hootsuite Analytics allows you to create detailed reports of your performance across social channels. Graphics. If you’re having trouble creating eye-catching images for your posts, turn to tools that will help get the job done. VSCO and A Color Story are some of our favorites. You can find more photo-editing tools in our post on how to edit Instagram photos. Content curation. It can be a struggle to come up with new content to share every day. Content curation can help. It’s the art of sharing quality posts from others (with credit, of course). It can be a great way to provide value for your followers and keep them engaged. Tools like BuzzSumo and Pocket can help you find and organize content to share. You can find more content curation tools in our beginner’s guide to content curation. 11. Use scheduling and automation to free up more time for engagement. We talked about creating a social content calendar way back at the beginning of this post. Once you have that calendar in place, you can create your social posts in advance and use scheduling tools like Hootsuite to post them automatically at the right time. This allows you to dedicate one block of time per day or even per week to creating your social content. It’s much more effective than letting social posting take you away from other tasks throughout the day. Automation tools like chatbots can also help you cut down on the number of hours you spend working on social media marketing. 12. Track and refine your performance. As you implement your social strategy, it’s important to keep track of what works and what doesn’t. You can then fine-tune your efforts and improve results. The analytics tools mentioned above give you a great picture of your social efforts and can help track whichever metrics matter most to you. Once you have an idea of how your strategy is working, it’s time to start looking for ways to improve. Using A/B testing, you can make small changes that boost your success over time. For example, the land development advertiser Newsome Interactive LLC used testing to discover that “Learn More” was the best call to action for their Facebook ads that clicked through to Messenger. It was not that “Learn More” resulted in the most clicks. Instead, it best set people up to complete a full chat sequence and contact form so Newsome could collect qualified leads. Source: Facebook “Chat Now,” on the other hand, led people to ask specific questions and drop out of the chat sequence before it was complete. No matter the size of your business, social tools can help you better connect with your audience, reach new potential customers, and increase awareness of your brand. If the possibilities seem overwhelming, just start small. As you find what works, expand your efforts and your audience. One of the great advantages of social media for small business is you can use the tools in whatever way makes the most sense for your business and your budget at any given time. Save time and grow your small business using Hootsuite. From a single dashboard you can publish and schedule messages to all your social media channels, engage your followers, and monitor what people are saying about your brand online. Try it free today. Get Started Easily manage all your social media in one place and save time with Hootsuite. Try it for Free Related Articles. Strategy How to Bulk Schedule Social Media Posts and Save Time. A good bulk scheduling tool makes daily posting more efficient and takes the worry out of keeping up with your content calendar. Strategy How to Create a Social Media Posting Schedule (Free Template and Tools). In this article we explain how to create a social media schedule. Then we share an easy-to-customize social media posting schedule template. Strategy How to Manage Multiple Facebook Pages at Once (Without Crying). Managing multiple Facebook pages might seem daunting. But with the right tools, tips, and systems, the process is actually quite easy. Show Comments x Well this is awkward. We could have SWORN you were someone who wanted to blow your competition out of the water on social media. Our bad. We’ll just leave this 60-day free trial here for someone else then… Start Your Free 60-Day Trial Normally, the free trial would be for 30 days Offer expires in 04m 20s No risk, all reward. Cancel anytime within 60 days Try it for Free. Try it for Free.
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TitleKey elements of a successful marketing strategy | nibusinessinfo.co.uk
Urlhttps://www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/key-elements-successful-marketing-strategy
DescriptionThe questions you should ask yourself before drawing up or reviewing your marketing strategy including customer segmentation, targeting and promotion
Date
Organic Position21
H1Create your marketing strategy
H2Latest advice and support straight to your inbox Sign Up
Key elements of a successful marketing strategy
Running your business checklist
H3Segmentation
Targeting and positioning
Promotional tactics
Monitoring and evaluation
Marketing plan
Know your legal responsibilities
Understand tax and VAT
Sell and market your products or services
Sell outside Northern Ireland
H2WithAnchorsLatest advice and support straight to your inbox Sign Up
Key elements of a successful marketing strategy
Running your business checklist
BodyCreate your marketing strategy Key elements of a successful marketing strategy. Guide There are several elements to consider when you are developing your marketing strategy. Segmentation. Your existing and potential customers fall into particular groups or segments, characterised by their 'needs'. Identifying these groups and their needs through market research and market reports, and then addressing those needs more successfully than your competitors, should be one of the key elements of your marketing strategy. Targeting and positioning. You should aim to sell to the market segments that will be most profitable for your business. It is important that your product offering meets the needs of your chosen target market. See target your most profitable customers and define your target market.  You should create a marketing strategy that makes the most of your strengths and matches them to the needs of the customers you want to target. For example, if a particular group of customers is looking for quality first and foremost, then any marketing activity aimed at them should draw attention to the high quality of your products or service. Promotional tactics. Once you have created your marketing strategy, you must then decide which marketing activity or activities will ensure your target market know about the products or services you offer, and why they meet their needs. There are many ways to achieve this - such as various forms of advertising, exhibitions, public relations, digital marketing and an effective 'point of sale' strategy. Try to limit your activities to those methods you think will work best with your target market, to avoid spreading your budget too thinly. Monitoring and evaluation. Monitoring and evaluating how effective your strategy has been is a key element, yet often overlooked. This control element not only helps you see how your strategy is performing in practice, it can also help inform your future marketing strategy. A simple approach is to ask each new customer how they heard about your business. Deeper analysis can come from questionnaires, focus groups and examining customers' online behaviour. Marketing plan. Once you have decided on your marketing strategy, draw up a marketing plan that sets out how you intend to execute that strategy and evaluate its success. The plan should be constantly reviewed and, if necessary, updated so you can respond quickly to changes in customer needs and attitudes in your industry and in the broader economic climate. Read more about how to write a marketing plan. Printer-friendly version Actions Download our marketing plan template (DOC, 409K) Also on this site Develop a digital marketing plan Price your product or service Market research and market reports Part of My New Business Running your business checklist. Show all Know your legal responsibilities. Do you need a licence? Get the right business insurance Know your customers' rights Understand pricing legislation Using personal data in your business or other organisation from 1 January 2021 UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) Pay your business rates Understand staff contracts and your responsibilities Taking on contractors and subcontractors Health and safety basics for business Know your legal obligations on pensions Understand tax and VAT. Understand Self Assessment and your tax return Understand VAT for your business Registering and getting started with PAYE National Insurance rates and classes Introduction to Corporation Tax Companies House annual returns and accounts Sell and market your products or services. 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Result 23
Title10 Steps to Building the Perfect Marketing Mix - Grow
Urlhttps://wearegrow.com/10-steps-to-building-the-perfect-marketing-mix-for-your-business/
DescriptionIn this article you’ll learn what a marketing mix is, why it matters, and the 10 steps to follow for building the perfect marketing mix
Date
Organic Position22
H110 Steps to Building the Perfect Marketing Mix for Your Business
H2What is a Marketing Mix?
The 4 Cs replace the 4Ps with:
Why is the Marketing Mix Important?
10 Steps to an Effective Marketing Mix
Conclusion
The 12 Marketing Secrets of Fast-Growth Companies
H3Step 1. Goals and Objectives
Step 2. Establish Your Budget
Step 3. Determine Your Unique Selling Proposition (USP)
Step 4. Who is Your Target Market?
Step 5. Ask Your Customers Advice
Step 6. Define Your Product in Detail
Step 7. Know Your Distribution Channels
Step 8. Create a Pricing Strategy
Step 9. Choose Your Promotional Techniques
Step 10. Use Inbound Marketing
Post a Comment Cancel reply
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Marketing Mix?
The 4 Cs replace the 4Ps with:
Why is the Marketing Mix Important?
10 Steps to an Effective Marketing Mix
Conclusion
The 12 Marketing Secrets of Fast-Growth Companies
Body10 Steps to Building the Perfect Marketing Mix for Your Business By Alasdair Inglis ShareTweetPinBufferShare76 SharesThe marketing mix is an essential tool in building and implementing an effective marketing strategy. It should be used to show prospects why your product or service is different and better than your competitors. In this article you’ll learn what a marketing mix is, why it matters, and the 10 steps to follow for building the perfect marketing mix for your business. What is a Marketing Mix? The marketing mix refers to the various elements of your company’s offering in the market. It is a varied “mix of ingredients” used by your business to achieve its objectives by marketing its products or services effectively to a particular customer group. The marketing mix, also referred to as the 4 Ps, is comprised of four main pieces – Products, Price, Promotion and Place. The 4Ps describe what marketers can control and are the most critical elements when building your marketing strategy. Image Source: bbc.co.uk Product Product is concerned with developing the right product or service for your target market. Your product or service must satisfy a specific consumer need. This first P is made up of two core components: Branding: The name, term, symbol and design used to identify your product. A good brand name can speed up shopping by helping customers identify the product they want. Packaging: This involves promoting and protecting the product. It can make a product more convenient to use or prevent it from spoiling or being damaged. Good packaging makes products easier to identify and promotes your brand. Kaffeine, a London-based coffee shop, attracts customers by branding their business and products as hassle-free and friendly. They use their shop design of crumbling brick walls and comfy wooden crate benches to create an image visitors can easily align with their brand. Image Source: www.cosycoffeeshops.co.uk Price When setting a price for your product, you must consider competition in your target market place, and the cost of the total marketing mix. Also estimate customers’ reactions to possible product prices. Thegymgroup.com offers a great pricing incentive. Unlike other gyms, they don’t bind you to an expensive contract and you receive 3 free training sessions. Image Source: http://www.thegymgroup.com/ Place This involves all the decisions in getting the right product to your target market’s environment. Placement decisions, such as accessing the right distribution channels, should take into consideration where customers would expect to find a product or service like yours. Part of the place decision is also the layout of your store or shop. It should pull customers into your shop, making it easy for them to locate merchandise. Nakedwines.com have created their whole marketing strategy around the element of place. Customers can fund independent winemakers and receive exclusive access to wines at wholesale prices, and it’s all available online. Source Image: https://www.nakedwines.com/ Promotion This is about telling your target market about your product or service. It involves direct communication between sellers and potential customers. ITC Luxury Travel uses various means of communication with their customers and promotion for their services. They’realso active on social media sites, including Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Google+. Their Newsletter sign-up offers yet another opportunity for product promotion. Source Image: https://www.itcluxurytravel.co.uk/ If the 4Ps seem outdated to you, try R.F. Lauterborn’s 4Cs and decide if his take on the marketing mix is a better fit for your business. The 4 Cs replace the 4Ps with:. Cost: Price is not the only cost being incurred when purchasing a product. Lauterborn refers to the cost you incur to satisfy a customer, the cost of time to acquire the product, cost of conscience when it comes to consuming the product and the cost of selecting or not selecting an alternative. Consumer: The value you provide a customer determines your position in the market place. Like with your Unique Selling Proposition (USP), your value should be clearly communicated. Communication: Marketers should aim to create an open dialogue with potential customers based on their wants and needs. Customers want to be engaged with meaningful interactions. Convenience: You need to be aware of how your target audience likes to make their purchases in order to make it convenient for them to buy. Remove all barriers to entry. For example, don’t make customers sign-up for a loyalty card before they can make their first purchase. Image Source: marketingmix.co.uk Why is the Marketing Mix Important? In your day-to-day business activities it’s difficult to turn your attention to the big picture, especially when you’re putting out fires left and right. Your marketing mix provides a roadmap for your business objectives. It keeps you on track, while keeping your target market in the forefront of your mind. Your marketing mix will help you make sure your business is marketing the right product, to the right people, at the right price and time. 10 Steps to an Effective Marketing Mix. Use these 10 steps to assist you in building your perfect marketing mix for a successful product offering. Step 1. Goals and Objectives. To create the right marketing mix you must first clearly define what you want the end result to be – more customers, brand awareness, higher sales, etc. Every marketing plan has its own marketing goals. Also ensure you have set a specific time frame in which to achieve your goals. Step 2. Establish Your Budget. How much money are you willing to spend on product innovation, consumer research and product promotion? Step 3. Determine Your Unique Selling Proposition (USP). Describe the benefits users will experience from using your product or service.  What unique problem are you solving better than anyone else? For example, Tom Shoes gives a new pair of shoes to a child in need for every pair you purchase. Image Source: Toms Shoes Step 4. Who is Your Target Market? In order to communicate effectively with your audience, you need to know who they are and how they prefer to be communicated with. Create an in depth profile of your ideal customer. Make sure you’ve gathered enough consumer data to develop a complete picture of your ideal buyer. Step 5. Ask Your Customers Advice. What do they think of your product? How satisfied are they with the quality? Are the benefits apparent? How is your product effectively or not effectively meeting their needs? Use their answers and the language they used in your marketing material. You’ll appear more relatable and approachable to your audience. Step 6. Define Your Product in Detail. Take your time describing the specific qualities and value of your product. Look for the unique features that show your product’s worth. Step 7. Know Your Distribution Channels. Identify the places your product will be marketed – which distribution channels you’ll make use of. Your choice of distribution channel will influence your pricing and your promotion decisions. Depending on your audience and product your main options will be: Selling to wholesalers who will sell to retail outlets, who will then sell to the consumer. Selling directly to the retail outlet. Selling directly to your customers. Image Source: web-books.com Step 8. Create a Pricing Strategy. You need to discover clever ways of differentiating your product on price. Research your competitors and make sure you’re not overcharging your customers. You will also need to consider what your target audience might be willing to pay and what it costs to actually produce your product. Step 9. Choose Your Promotional Techniques. Your target audience needs to be made aware of your product offering. Successful promotion of your product includes various elements, like: Direct Marketing: Directly connecting with carefully targeted individuals to cultivate lasting relationships. For example, catalogues, telephone marketing, and mobile marketing. Used for direct outreach to prospects in a database or sales list. Public relations: Press releases, exhibitions, sponsorship deals and conferences.  Used for getting newsworthy attention. Advertising: Television, radio and print media will be your offline focus. Used for introducing your audience to new products and services. Personal selling: Personal presentation by your sales force. Demonstrating how your product works is key. Used for selling expensive, specialised and technologically advanced products. Sales promotion: Short-term incentives to encourage a purchase. This includes discounts, promotions, and payment terms. Used for getting people to use your product more often and to gain new customers. Word of mouth: Creating positive word of mouth via your sale staff, recommendations from buyers and social media. Used for boosting brand awareness. Step 10. Use Inbound Marketing. The 4Ps of marketing creates the basis of your marketing strategy, but inbound marketing also plays a vital role in developing your marketing mix. An effective inbound marketing mix should include: Your Website: Customers today want to interact with your brand and newly developed products. Use your website to fulfil this need for interaction. Make sure your website is quick loading, impactful and easy to navigate. Search Engine Optimisation (SEO): In order for customers to interact with your website, they must be able to find it first. Use descriptive keywords to help search engines, like Google, direct users to your website. Email Marketing: One of the quickest, most direct ways to communicate with leads and customers. You need to continually collect prospects and customer contact information to grow your database and follow-up on a regular basis. Social Media: Besides having a website, you should use popular social networking sites to distribute your message and create brand awareness. Twitter and Facebook are invaluable for describing existing products, introducing new products, offering promotions and announcing sales. Blogging: Blogging will help your business stay top of mind by putting out regular content. Host the blog on your website and write good content, making sure to respond to each blog comment. Image source: marketectinc.com Conclusion. A well-developed marketing mix will help you develop products and services that better serve the wants and needs of your target market. Done right, your market mix will help your customers understand why your product or service is better than those of you competitors. Although the 4Ps should remain core to your marketing mix, inbound marketing should also form part of your overall marketing strategy. Use these 10 steps to help you develop your perfect marketing mix. We hope you’ve enjoyed this post. Please leave a comment below regarding any future business topic you’re interested in learning more about. Discover The 12 Marketing Secrets of Fast-Growth Companies. Find out what they do to achieve outrageous business success Get your free copy ShareTweetPinBufferShare76 SharesFiled Under: Inbound Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy Post a Comment Cancel reply. You must be logged in to post a comment. 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Result 24
TitleDevelop a marketing strategy | Business Queensland
Urlhttps://www.business.qld.gov.au/running-business/marketing-sales/marketing-promotion/strategy
Description
Date3 Jun 2021
Organic Position23
H1Develop a marketing strategy
H2Marketing and promotion
Write a successful marketing strategy
Also consider..
H3Identify your business goals
State your marketing goals
Research your market
Profile your potential customers
Profile your competitors
Develop strategies to support your marketing goals
Use the '7 Ps of marketing'
Test your ideas
Alerts
I want to..
Events
Top resources
Contact
Connect
Queensland Government
For Queenslanders
For businesses
H2WithAnchorsMarketing and promotion
Write a successful marketing strategy
Also consider..
BodyDevelop a marketing strategy Effective marketing starts with a considered, well-informed marketing strategy. A good marketing strategy helps you define clear, realistic and measurable marketing objectives for your business.Your marketing strategy affects the way you run your business, so it should be planned and developed in consultation with your team. It is a wide-reaching and comprehensive strategic planning tool that:describes your business and its products and servicesexplains the position and role of your products and services in the marketprofiles your customers and your competitionidentifies the marketing tactics you will useallows you to build a marketing plan (the tactics to deliver) and measure its effectiveness.A marketing strategy sets the overall direction and goals for your marketing, and is therefore different from a marketing plan, which outlines the specific actions you will take to implement your marketing strategy. Your marketing strategy could be developed for the next few years, while your marketing plan usually describes tactics to be achieved in the current year.Write a successful marketing strategy. Your well-developed marketing strategy will help you realise your business's goals and focus on the actions required to reach the right customers.Developing a marketing strategy that includes the components listed below will help you make the most of your marketing investment, keep your marketing focused, and measure and improve your sales results.Identify your business goals. Align your marketing strategy to the business goals outlined in your business plan; you can then define a set of marketing goals to support them. Your business goals might include:increasing awareness of your products and servicesselling more products from a certain supplierreaching a new customer segment.When setting goals it's critical to be as targeted as possible so you can effectively measure the outcomes against what you set out to achieve. A simple criteria for goal-setting is the SMART method:Specific – state clearly what you want to achieveMeasurable – set tangible measures so you can measure your resultsAchievable – set objectives that are within your capacity and budgetRelevant – set objectives that will help you improve particular aspects of your businessTime-bound – set objectives you can achieve within the time you need them.State your marketing goals. Define a set of specific marketing goals based on the business goals. These goals will motivate you and your team and enable you to track your success.Examples of marketing goals include increased market penetration (selling more existing products to existing customers) or market development (selling existing products to new target markets). These marketing goals could be long-term and might take a few years to successfully achieve. However, they should be clear and measurable and have time frames for achievement.Make sure your overall strategies are also practical and measurable. A good marketing strategy will not be changed every year, but revised when your strategies have been achieved or your marketing goals have been met. You may need to amend your strategy if your external market changes due to a new competitor or new technology, or if your products substantially change.Research your market. Research is an essential part of your marketing strategy. You need to gather information about your market, such as its size, growth, social trends and demographics (population statistics such as age, gender and family type). It is important to keep an eye on your market so you are aware of any changes over time, so your strategy remains relevant and targeted.Profile your potential customers. Use your market research to develop a profile of the customers you are targeting and identify their needs.The profile will reveal their buying patterns, including how they buy, where they buy and what they buy. Again, regularly review trends so you don't miss out on new opportunities or become irrelevant with your marketing message.While you try to find new customers, make sure your marketing strategy also allows you to maintain relationships with your existing customers.Profile your competitors. Similarly, as part of your marketing strategy you should develop a profile of your competitors by identifying their products, supply chains, pricing and marketing tactics.Use this to identify your competitive advantage – what sets your business apart from your competitors. You may also want to identify the strengths and weaknesses of your own internal processes to help improve your performance compared with your competition.Develop strategies to support your marketing goals. List your target markets and devise a set of strategies to attract and retain them. An example goal could be to increase young people's awareness of your products. Your corresponding strategies could be to increase your online social media presence by posting regular updates about your product on Instagram or Facebook; advertising in local magazines targeted to young people; or offering discounts for students.Use the '7 Ps of marketing'. Reach your selected market by utilising the 7 Ps of marketing mix. If you can choose the right combination of marketing across product, price, promotion, place, people, process and physical evidence, your marketing strategy is more likely to be a success. You can choose any combination of these to achieve your marketing strategy.Test your ideas. In deciding your tactics, do some online research, test some ideas and approaches on your customers and your staff, and review what works. You will need to choose a number of tactics in order to meet your customers' needs, reach the customers within your target market and improve your sales results.Also consider...Learn more about advertising.Read about the basics of marketing.Find out how to write and implement your marketing plan.Watch a recorded webinar to learn about local search marketing.Find out about other research resources for business and industry.Use our market research kit to conduct online research. Last reviewed: 27 May 2021Last updated: 3 Jun 2021 Print page Alerts. 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TitleA Step-by-Step Guide to Starting a Business - businessnewsdaily.com
Urlhttps://www.businessnewsdaily.com/4686-how-to-start-a-business.html
DescriptionStarting a business can require a lot of work, time and money. Follow this guide to start your business plan off on the right foot
Date
Organic Position24
H1How to Start a Business: A Step-by-Step Guide
H2Starting a new small business? Find out where to begin and how to achieve success
1. Refine your idea
2. Write a business plan
3. Assess your finances
4. Determine your legal business structure
5. Register with the government and IRS
6. Purchase an insurance policy
7. Build your team
8. Choose your vendors
9. Brand yourself and advertise
10. Grow your business
FAQs about starting a business
H3How to start a small business
Define your "why."
Consider franchising
Brainstorm your business name
Clarify your target customers
Conduct market research
Consider an exit strategy
Perform a break-even analysis
Watch your expenses
Consider your funding options
Choose the right business bank
Articles of incorporation and operating agreements
Doing business as (DBA)
Employer identification number (EIN)
Income tax forms
Federal, state, and local licenses and permits
Ask customers to opt in to your marketing communications.
How can I start my own business with no money?
What is the easiest business to start?
When is the best time to start a business?
H2WithAnchorsStarting a new small business? Find out where to begin and how to achieve success
1. Refine your idea
2. Write a business plan
3. Assess your finances
4. Determine your legal business structure
5. Register with the government and IRS
6. Purchase an insurance policy
7. Build your team
8. Choose your vendors
9. Brand yourself and advertise
10. Grow your business
FAQs about starting a business
BodyHow to Start a Business: A Step-by-Step GuideJoshua StowersBusiness News Daily StaffUpdated Dec 16, 2021Starting a new small business? Find out where to begin and how to achieve success.You want to make sure you prepare thoroughly before starting a business, but realize that things will almost certainly go awry. To run a successful business, you must adapt to changing situations.Conducting in-depth market research on your field and the demographics of your potential clientele is an important part of crafting a business plan. This involves running surveys, holding focus groups, and researching SEO and public data.Before you start selling your product or service, you need to build up your brand and get a following of people who are ready to jump when you open your doors for business.This article is for entrepreneurs who want to learn the basics steps of starting a new business.Tasks like naming the business and creating a logo are obvious, but what about the less-heralded, equally important steps? Whether it's determining your business structure or crafting a detailed marketing strategy, the workload can quickly pile up. Rather than spinning your wheels and guessing at where to start, follow this 10-step checklist to transform your business from a lightbulb above your head to a real entity.How to start a small business. Refine your ideaWrite a business planAssess your financesDetermine your legal business structureRegister with the government and IRSPurchase an insurance policyBuild your teamChoose your vendorsBrand yourself and advertiseGrow your business1. Refine your idea.If you're thinking about starting a business, you likely already have an idea of what you want to sell online, or at least the market you want to enter. Do a quick search for existing companies in your chosen industry. Learn what current brand leaders are doing and figure out how you can do it better. If you think your business can deliver something other companies don't (or deliver the same thing, only faster and cheaper), or you've got a solid idea and are ready to create a business plan. Define your "why.". "In the words of Simon Sinek, 'always start with why,'" Glenn Gutek, CEO of Awake Consulting and Coaching, told Business News Daily. "It is good to know why you are launching your business. In this process, it may be wise to differentiate between [whether] the business serves a personal why or a marketplace why. When your why is focused on meeting a need in the marketplace, the scope of your business will always be larger than a business that is designed to serve a personal need." Consider franchising.Another option is to open a franchise of an established company. The concept, brand following and business model are already in place; all you need is a good location and the means to fund your operation.Brainstorm your business name.Regardless of which option you choose, it's vital to understand the reasoning behind your idea. Stephanie Desaulniers, owner of Business by Dezign and former director of operations and women's business programs at Covation Center, cautions entrepreneurs against writing a business plan or brainstorming a business name before nailing down the idea's value.Clarify your target customers.Desaulniers said too often people jump into launching their business without spending time to think about who their customers will be and why would want to buy from them or hire them."You need to clarify why you want to work with these customers – do you have a passion for making people's lives easier?" Desaulniers said. "Or enjoy creating art to bring color to their world? Identifying these answers helps clarify your mission. Third, you want to define how you will provide this value to your customers and how to communicate that value in a way that they are willing to pay." TIP: To refine your business idea, identify your "why," your target customers and your business name.During the ideation phase, you need to iron out the major details. If the idea isn't something you're passionate about or if there's not a market for your creation, it might be time to brainstorm other ideas.2. Write a business plan.Once you have your idea in place, you need to ask yourself a few important questions: What is the purpose of your business? Who are you selling to? What are your end goals? How will you finance your startup costs? These questions can be answered in a well-written business plan. A lot of mistakes are made by new businesses rushing into things without pondering these aspects of the business. You need to find your target customer base. Who is going to buy your product or service? If you can't find evidence that there's a demand for your idea, then what would be the point? Free download: Here is our business plan template you can use to plan and grow your business.Conduct market research.Conducting thorough market research on your field and demographics of potential clientele is an important part of crafting a business plan. This involves conducting surveys, holding focus groups, and researching SEO and public data. Market research helps you understand your target customer – their needs, preferences and behavior – as well as your industry and competitors. Many small business professionals recommend gathering demographic information and conducting a competitive analysis to better understand opportunities and limitations within your market. The best small businesses have products or services that are differentiated from the competition. This has a significant impact on your competitive landscape and allows you to convey unique value to potential customers.Consider an exit strategy.It's also a good idea to consider an exit strategy as you compile your business plan. Generating some idea of how you'll eventually exit the business forces you to look to the future. "Too often, new entrepreneurs are so excited about their business and so sure everyone everywhere will be a customer that they give very little, if any, time to show the plan on leaving the business," said Josh Tolley, CEO of both Shyft Capital and Kavana. "When you board an airplane, what is the first thing they show you? How to get off of it. When you go to a movie, what do they point out before the feature begins to play? Where the exits are. Your first week of kindergarten, they line up all the kids and teach them fire drills to exit the building. Too many times I have witnessed business leaders that don't have three or four predetermined exit routes. This has led to lower company value and even destroyed family relationships." A business plan helps you figure out where your company is going, how it will overcome any potential difficulties and what you need to sustain it. When you're ready to put pen to paper, these free templates can help.3. Assess your finances.Starting any business has a price, so you need to determine how you're going to cover those costs. Do you have the means to fund your startup, or will you need to borrow money? If you're planning to leave your current job to focus on your business, do you have money put away to support yourself until you make a profit? It's best to find out how much your startup costs will be. Many startups fail because they run out of money before turning a profit. It's never a bad idea to overestimate the amount of startup capital you need, as it can be a while before the business begins to bring in sustainable revenue. Perform a break-even analysis.One way you can determine how much money you need is to perform a break-even analysis. This is an essential element of financial planning that helps business owners determine when their company, product or service will be profitable. The formula is simple:Fixed Costs ÷ (Average Price - Variable Costs) = Break-Even PointEvery entrepreneur should use this formula as a tool because it informs you about the minimum performance your business must achieve to avoid losing money. Furthermore, it helps you understand exactly where your profits come from, so you can set production goals accordingly. Here are the three most common reasons to conduct a break-even analysis: Determine profitability. This is generally every business owner's highest interest. Ask yourself: How much revenue do I need to generate to cover all my expenses? Which products or services turn a profit, and which ones are sold at a loss?Price a product or service. When most people think about pricing, they consider how much their product costs to create and how competitors are pricing their products. Ask yourself: What are the fixed rates, what are the variable costs, and what is the total cost? What is the cost of any physical goods? What is the cost of labor?Analyze the data. What volumes of goods or services do you have to sell to be profitable? Ask yourself: How can I reduce my overall fixed costs? How can I reduce the variable costs per unit? How can I improve sales? Watch your expenses.Don't overspend when starting a business. Understand the types of purchases that make sense for your business and avoid overspending on fancy new equipment that won't help you reach your business goals. Monitor your business expenses to ensure you are staying on track."A lot of startups tend to spend money on unnecessary things," said Jean Paldan, founder and CEO of Rare Form New Media. "We worked with a startup that had two employees but spent a huge amount on office space that would fit 20 people. They also leased a professional high-end printer that was more suited for a team of 100; it had key cards to track who was printing what and when. Spend as little as possible when you start, and only on the things that are essential for the business to grow and be a success. Luxuries can come when you're established."   Consider your funding options.Startup capital for your business can come from various means. The best way to acquire funding for your business depends on several factors, including creditworthiness, the amount needed and available options.Business loans. If you need financial assistance, a commercial loan through a bank is a good starting point, although these are often difficult to secure. If you are unable to take out a bank loan, you can apply for a small business loan through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) or an alternative lender. [Read related article: Best Alternative Small Business Loans]Business grants. Business grants are similar to loans; however, they do not need to be paid back. Business grants are typically very competitive, and come with stipulations that the business must meet to be considered. When trying to secure a small business grant, look for ones that are uniquely specific to your situation. Options include minority-owned business grants, grants for women-owned businesses and government grants.Investors. Startups requiring significant funding upfront may want to bring on an investor. Investors can provide several million dollars or more to a fledgling company, with the expectation that the backers will have a hands-on role in running your business.Crowdfunding. Alternatively, you could launch an equity crowdfunding campaign to raise smaller amounts of money from multiple backers. Crowdfunding has helped numerous companies in recent years, and there are dozens of reliable crowdfunding platforms designed for different types of businesses. You can learn more about each of these capital sources and more in our guide to startup finance options. Editor's note: Looking for a small business loan? Fill out the questionnaire below to have our vendor partners contact you about your needs.Choose the right business bank.When you're choosing a business bank, size matters. Marcus Anwar, co-founder of OhMy Canada, recommends smaller community banks because they are in tune with the local market conditions and will work with you based on your overall business profile and character. "They're unlike big banks that look at your credit score and will be more selective to loan money to small businesses," Anwar said. "Not only that, but small banks want to build a personal relationship with you and ultimately help you if you run into problems and miss a payment. Another good thing about smaller banks is that decisions are made at the branch level, which can be much quicker than big banks, where decisions are made at a higher level." Anwar believes that you should ask yourself these questions when choosing a bank for your business: What is important to me?Do I want to build a close relationship with a bank that's willing to help me in any way possible?Do I want to be just another bank account, like big banks will view me as? Ultimately, the right bank for your business comes down to your needs. Writing down your banking needs can help narrow your focus to what you should be looking for. Schedule meetings with various banks and ask questions about how they work with small businesses to find the best bank for your business. [Read related article: Business Bank Account Checklist: Documents You'll Need]Key takeaway: Financially, you will want to perform a break-even analysis, consider your expenses and funding options, and choose the right bank for your business.4. Determine your legal business structure.Before you can register your company, you need to decide what kind of entity it is. Your business structure legally affects everything from how you file your taxes to your personal liability if something goes wrong. Sole proprietorship. If you own the business entirely by yourself and plan to be responsible for all debts and obligations, you can register for a sole proprietorship. Be warned that this route can directly affect your personal credit.Partnership. Alternatively, a business partnership, as its name implies, means that two or more people are held personally liable as business owners. You don't have to go it alone if you can find a business partner with complementary skills to your own. It's usually a good idea to add someone into the mix to help your business flourish. Corporation. If you want to separate your personal liability from your company's liability, you may want to consider forming one of several types of corporations (e.g., S corporation, C corporation or B corporation). Although each type of corporation is subject to different guidelines, this legal structure generally makes a business a separate entity from its owners, and, therefore, corporations can own property, assume liability, pay taxes, enter contracts, sue and be sued like any other individual. "Corporations, especially C corporations, are especially suitable for new businesses that plan on 'going public' or seeking funding from venture capitalists in the near future," said Deryck Jordan, managing attorney at Jordan Counsel.Limited liability company. One of the most common structures for small businesses is the limited liability company (LLC). This hybrid structure has the legal protections of a corporation while allowing for the tax benefits of a partnership. Ultimately, it is up to you to determine which type of entity is best for your current needs and future business goals. It's important to learn about the various legal business structures available. If you're struggling to make up your mind, it's not a bad idea to discuss the decision with a business or legal advisor.Did You Know: You need to choose a legal structure for your business, such as a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation or LLC.5. Register with the government and IRS.You will need to acquire a variety of business licenses before you can legally operate your business. For example, you need to register your business with federal, state and local governments. There are several documents you must prepare before registering.Articles of incorporation and operating agreements. To become an officially recognized business entity, you must register with the government. Corporations need an "articles of incorporation" document, which includes your business name, business purpose, corporate structure, stock details and other information about your company. Similarly, some LLCs will need to create an operating agreement.Doing business as (DBA). If you don't have articles of incorporation or an operating agreement, you will need to register your business name, which can be your legal name, a fictitious DBA name (if you are the sole proprietor), or the name you've come up with for your company. You may also want to take steps to trademark your business name for extra legal protection. Most states require you to get a DBA. If you're in a general partnership or a proprietorship operating under a fictitious name, you may need to apply for a DBA certificate. It's best to contact or visit your local county clerk's office and ask about specific requirements and fees. Generally, there is a registration fee involved. Employer identification number (EIN). After you register your business, you may need to get an employer identification number from the IRS. While this is not required for sole proprietorships with no employees, you may want to apply for one anyway to keep your personal and business taxes separate, or simply to save yourself the trouble later if you decide to hire someone. The IRS has provided a checklist to determine whether you will require an EIN to run your business. If you do need an EIN, you can register online for free. Income tax forms. You also need to file certain forms to fulfill your federal and state income tax obligations. The forms you need are determined by your business structure. You will need to check your state's website for information on state-specific and local tax obligations. "You might be tempted to wing it with a PayPal account and social media platform, but if you start with a proper foundation, your business will have fewer hiccups to worry about in the long run," said Natalie Pierre-Louis, licensed attorney and owner of NPL Consulting. Federal, state, and local licenses and permits. Some businesses may also require federal, state or local licenses and permits to operate. The best place to obtain a business license is at your local city hall. You can then use the SBA's database to search for licensing requirements by state and business type. Businesses and independent contractors in certain trades are required to carry professional licenses. One example of a professional business license is a commercial driver's license (CDL). Individuals with a CDL are allowed to operate certain types of vehicles, such as buses, tank trucks and tractor-trailers. A CDL is divided into three classes: Class A, Class B and Class C. You should also check with your city and state to find out if you need a seller's permit that authorizes your business to collect sales tax from your customers. A seller's permit goes by numerous names, including resale permit, resell permit, permit license, reseller permit, resale ID, state tax ID number, reseller number, reseller license permit or certificate of authority. It's important to note that these requirements and names vary from state to state. You can register for a seller's permit through the state government website of the state(s) you're doing business in. Jordan says that not all businesses need to collect sales tax (or obtain a seller's permit)."For example, New York sales tax generally is not required for the sale of most services (such as professional services, education, and capital improvements to real estate), medicine or food for home consumption," Jordan said. "So, for example, if your business only sells medicine, you do not need a New York seller's permit. But New York sales tax must be collected in conjunction with the sale of new tangible personal goods, utilities, telephone service, hotel stays, and food and beverages (in restaurants)."Key takeaway: Register key documents like articles of incorporation or an operating agreement, a DBA, an EIN, income tax forms, and other applicable licenses and permits.6. Purchase an insurance policy.It might slip your mind as something you'll "get around to" eventually, but purchasing the right insurance for your business is an important step to take before you officially launch. Dealing with incidents such as property damage, theft or even a customer lawsuit can be costly, and you need to be sure that you're properly protected. Although you should consider several types of business insurance, there are a few basic insurance plans that most small businesses can benefit from. For example, if your business will have employees, you will at least need to purchase workers' compensation and unemployment insurance.You may also need other types of coverage, depending on your location and industry, but most small businesses are advised to purchase general liability (GL) insurance, or a business owner's policy. GL covers property damage, bodily injury, and personal injury to yourself or a third party.If your business provides a service, you may also want to consider professional liability insurance. It covers you if you do something wrong or neglect to do something you should have done while operating your business.7. Build your team.Unless you're planning to be your only employee, you're going to need to recruit and hire a great team to get your company off the ground. Joe Zawadzki, CEO and founder of MediaMath, said entrepreneurs need to give the "people" element of their businesses the same attention they give their products. "Your product is built by people," Zawadzki said. "Identifying your founding team, understanding what gaps exist, and [determining] how and when you will address them should be top priority. Figuring out how the team will work together ... is equally important. Defining roles and responsibility, division of labor, how to give feedback, or how to work together when not everyone is in the same room will save you a lot of headaches down the line."8. Choose your vendors.Running a business can be overwhelming, and you and your team probably aren't going to be able to do it all on your own. That's where third-party vendors come in. Companies in every industry from HR to business phone systems exist to partner with you and help you run your business better. When you're searching for B2B partners, you'll have to choose carefully. These companies will have access to vital and potentially sensitive business data, so it's critical to find someone you can trust. In our guide to choosing business partners, our expert sources recommend asking potential vendors about their experience in your industry, their track record with existing clients and what kind of growth they've helped other clients achieve. Not every business will need the same type of vendors, but there are common products and services that almost every business will need. Consider the following functions that are a neccessity for any type of business.Taking payments from customers: Offering multiple payment options will ensure you can make a sale in whatever format is easiest for target customer. You'll need to compare options are find the right credit card processing provider to ensure you're getting the best rate for your type of business.Managing finances: Many business owners can manager their own accounting functions when starting their business, but as your business grows you can save time by hiring an accountant, or comparing accounting software providers.9. Brand yourself and advertise.Before you start selling your product or service, you need to build up your brand and get a following of people ready to jump when you open your literal or figurative doors for business.Company website. Take your reputation online and build a company website. Many customers turn to the internet to learn about a business, and a website is digital proof that your small business exists. It is also a great way to interact with current and potential customers.Social media. Use social media to spread the word about your new business, perhaps as a promotional tool to offer coupons and discounts to followers once you launch. The best social media platforms to utilize will depend on your target audience.CRM. The best CRM software solutions allow you to store customer data to to improve how you market to them. A well-thought-out email marketing campaign can do wonders for reaching customers and communicating with your audience. To be successful, you will want to strategically build your email marketing contact list.Logo. Create a logo that can help people easily identify your brand, and be consistent in using it across all of your platforms.Also, keep these digital assets up to date with relevant, interesting content about your business and industry. According to Ruthann Bowen, chief marketing officer at EastCamp Creative, too many startups have the wrong mindset about their websites. "The issue is they see their website as a cost, not an investment," Bowen said. "In today's digital age, that's a huge mistake. The small business owners who understand how critical it is to have a great online presence will have a leg up on starting out strong."  Creating a marketing plan that goes beyond your launch is essential to building a clientele by continually getting the word out about your business. This process, especially in the beginning, is just as important as providing a quality product or service. Ask customers to opt in to your marketing communications.  . As you build your brand, ask your customers and potential customers for permission to communicate with them. The easiest way to do this is by using opt-in forms. These are "forms of consent" given by web users, authorizing you to contact them with further information about your business, according to Dan Edmonson, founder and CEO of Dronegenuity. "These types of forms usually pertain to email communication and are often used in e-commerce to request permission to send newsletters, marketing material, product sales, etc. to customers," Edmonson said. "Folks get so many throwaway emails and other messages these days that, by getting them to opt in to your services in a transparent way, you begin to build trust with your customers." Opt-in forms are a great starting point for building trust and respect with potential customers. Even more importantly, these forms are required by law. The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 sets requirements for commercial email by the Federal Trade Commission. This law doesn't just apply to bulk email; it covers all commercial messages, which the law defines as "any electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is the commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service." Each email in violation of this law is subject to fines of more than $40,000.TIP: Create a strategic marketing campaign that combines various marketing channels, like a company website, social media, email newsletters and opt-in forms.10. Grow your business.Your launch and first sales are only the beginning of your task as an entrepreneur. To make a profit and stay afloat, you always need to be growing your business. It's going to take time and effort, but you'll get out of your business what you put into it. Collaborating with more established brands in your industry is a great way to achieve growth. Reach out to other companies and ask for some promotion in exchange for a free product sample or service. Partner with a charity organization, and volunteer some of your time or products to get your name out there. While these tips will help launch your business and get you set to grow, there's never a perfect plan. You want to make sure you prepare thoroughly for starting a business, but things will almost certainly go awry. To run a successful business, you must adapt to changing situations. Free download: We've created a sales plan template you can use to scale customer acquisition."Be prepared to adjust," said Stephanie Murray, founder of Fiddlestix Party + Supply. "There's a saying in the military that 'no plan survives the first contact,' meaning that you can have the best plan in the world, but as soon as it's in action, things change, and you have to be ready and willing to adapt and problem-solve quickly. As an entrepreneur, your value lies in solving problems, whether that is your product or service solving problems for other people or you solving problems within your organization." FAQs about starting a business. How can I start my own business with no money?You can launch a successful business without any startup funds. Work on a business idea that builds on your skill set to offer something new and innovative to the market. While developing a new business, keep working in your current position (or "day job") to reduce the financial risk.Once you've developed your business idea and you're ready to start on a business plan, you'll need to get creative with funding. You can raise money through investments by pitching your idea to financial backers. You could also gather funding through crowdsourcing platforms like Kickstarter, or set aside a certain amount of money from your weekly earnings to put toward a new business. Finally, you can seek out loan options from banks and other financial institutions as a way to get your company up and running.What is the easiest business to start?The easiest business to start is one that requires little to no financial investment upfront, nor should it require extensive training to learn the business. One of the easiest types of new business to launch is a dropshipping company. Dropshipping requires no inventory management, saving you the hassle of buying, storing and tracking stock. Instead, another company will fulfill your customer orders at your behest. This company will manage the inventory, package goods, and ship out your business orders. To get started, you can create an online store by selecting curated products from the catalog available through partners.When is the best time to start a business?Each person's ideal timeline for starting a new business will be different. First and foremost, you should start a business when you have enough time to devote your attention to the launch. If you have a seasonal product or service, then you want to start your business a quarter before your predicted busy time of the year. For nonseasonal companies, spring and fall are popular times of years to launch. Winter is the least popular launch season, because many new owners prefer to have their LLC or corporation approved for a new fiscal year.Skye Schooley contributed to the reporting and writing in this article. Source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article.Image Credit: FlamingoImages/ShutterstockJoshua StowersBusiness News Daily StaffJoshua Stowers is a business.com and Business News Daily writer who knows firsthand the ups and downs of running a small business. An entrepreneur himself, Joshua founded the fashion and art publication Elusive Magazine. He writes about the strategic operations entrepreneurs need to launch and grow their small businesses. Joshua writes about choosing the choosing and building business legal structures, implementing human-resources services, and recruiting and managing talent.Start Your BusinessSee More >Updated 12.21.21How to Run a Business in FloridaWhat do you need to know to run a small business in Florida? We...Updated 12.21.21How to Choose the Best Legal Structure for Your...Choosing the right legal structure is a necessary part of running...Updated 12.21.21How to Run a Business in CaliforniaHere are some challenges, opportunities and resources that...Updated 11.19.21Business Bank Account Checklist: Documents You'll...Find out which documents and licenses you'll need to bring with...Updated 12.21.21How to Run a Business in PennsylvaniaWhat is it like doing business in Pennsylvania? Business News...
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Result 26
TitleHow to Use LinkedIn for Marketing
Urlhttps://business.linkedin.com/marketing-solutions/how-to-market-on-linkedin
DescriptionHow to market on LinkedIn. Best tips to engage your audience and grow your business.
Date
Organic Position25
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 27
TitleThe Essential Guide to Marketing Strategy
Urlhttps://info.hurree.co/en/marketing-strategy-essential-guide
DescriptionWithout a marketing strategy in place a business lacks focus, and will fail to reach their goals and objectives. Hurree's essential guide is here to help
Date11 Aug 2020
Organic Position26
H1Related reading: How To Build The Perfect Fashion Marketing Campaign
H2The Essential Guide to Marketing Strategy
Marketing Strategy: Definition & Importance
Marketing Strategy Definition
"The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.”
Marketing Strategy vs Marketing Campaign
Why Do I Need a Marketing Strategy?
The Importance Of A Repeatable Marketing Strategy
The Importance of a Scalable Marketing Strategy
Target Audience
“There is only one winning strategy. It is to carefully define the target market and direct a superior offering to that target market.”
Is There a Difference Between Target Audience & Target Market?
Target Market
Target Audience
The Importance of a Defined Target Audience
Audience Segmentation
Demographic
Geographic
Behavioural
Psychographic
What Does The Sales Funnel Have To Do With Marketing Strategy?
1. Awareness
2. Consideration
3. Decision
4. Retention
5. Advocacy
SMART Marketing Objectives & Goals
1. Specific
2. Measurable
3. Achievable
4. Relevant
5. Time-bound
PEST Analysis
What Does PEST Stand For
Political Factors
Economic Factors
Social Factors
Technological Factors
Environmental factors
Legal factors
SWOT Analysis
Strengths
Weaknesses
Opportunities
Threats
Competitor Analysis
What is a Competitor Analysis?
Direct Competitors
Indirect Competitors
Why do you need a competitor analysis?
“World trade means competition from anywhere; advancing technology encourages cross-industry competition. Consequently, strategic planning must consider who our future competitors will be, not only who is here today.”
How do you carry out a competitor analysis?
Reach
Act
Convert
Engage
Tips for Competitor Analysis Success:
Things to avoid:
Budget
How Much Should You Spend on Marketing?
Benefits of a Marketing Strategy Budget
Building Your Brand
Brand Positioning
Brand Identity
Brand Image
Brand Voice
Brand Personality
The Marketing Mix
History of the Marketing Mix
The 4Ps of the Marketing Mix
Product
Place
Price
Promotion
The 7Ps of the Marketing Mix
Physical Evidence
People
Processes
Marketing Channels
Digital Marketing
The best digital marketers have a clear picture of how each digital marketing campaign supports their overarching goals
Email
Mobile
Social Media
71% of consumers who have had a positive experience with a brand on social media are likely to recommend the brand to their friends and family
Content Marketing
SEO
How does SEO work?
1. Relevancy
2. Authority
3. Usefulness
Paid Advertising
Display
The average CTR (clickthrough rate) for display ads, across all industries, is 0.35%
Search
Remarketing
Native Advertising
Consumers look at native ads 53% more than display ads. Native ads create an 18% increase in purchase intent, and the visual engagement with native ads is the same, and even slightly higher than the original editorial content
Push Notifications
Traditional Marketing
Print Media
Broadcast
Direct Mail
Referral
70% of marketers said they have used or plan to use consumers to disseminate product-related content
Marketing Automation
80% of marketers report an increase in leads due to automation
Marketing Automation & Machine Learning
Customer Retention
What is Customer Retention?
Calculating Customer Retention
When and why is customer retention important?
97% of companies say retention is a priority
1. Retention saves money
2. Retention increases profitability
3. Retention encourages referrals
GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation)
What is GDPR?
How does this impact your customer retention?
Analysing your Marketing Strategy Performance
Why Are Marketing Analytics Important?
Businesses that use data to inform marketing and sales decisions see a 15-20% increase in marketing ROI
The Most Important KPIs Marketers Need To Measure
Conclusion
H3Market Strategy
What exactly do I want to achieve?
How will I know when I’ve reached my goal?
How can I achieve this goal? Is it realistic?
Is this goal worthwhile? If so, why? How does it align with the organisational goals?
When’s the deadline?
1. Stay organised
2. Utilise tools to streamline your research process
3. Snoop a little
1. Don’t think that your first competitive analysis will last forever
2. Don’t make assumptions about competitors based on your own bias
3. Don’t overdo it
H2WithAnchorsThe Essential Guide to Marketing Strategy
Marketing Strategy: Definition & Importance
Marketing Strategy Definition
"The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.”
Marketing Strategy vs Marketing Campaign
Why Do I Need a Marketing Strategy?
The Importance Of A Repeatable Marketing Strategy
The Importance of a Scalable Marketing Strategy
Target Audience
“There is only one winning strategy. It is to carefully define the target market and direct a superior offering to that target market.”
Is There a Difference Between Target Audience & Target Market?
Target Market
Target Audience
The Importance of a Defined Target Audience
Audience Segmentation
Demographic
Geographic
Behavioural
Psychographic
What Does The Sales Funnel Have To Do With Marketing Strategy?
1. Awareness
2. Consideration
3. Decision
4. Retention
5. Advocacy
SMART Marketing Objectives & Goals
1. Specific
2. Measurable
3. Achievable
4. Relevant
5. Time-bound
PEST Analysis
What Does PEST Stand For
Political Factors
Economic Factors
Social Factors
Technological Factors
Environmental factors
Legal factors
SWOT Analysis
Strengths
Weaknesses
Opportunities
Threats
Competitor Analysis
What is a Competitor Analysis?
Direct Competitors
Indirect Competitors
Why do you need a competitor analysis?
“World trade means competition from anywhere; advancing technology encourages cross-industry competition. Consequently, strategic planning must consider who our future competitors will be, not only who is here today.”
How do you carry out a competitor analysis?
Reach
Act
Convert
Engage
Tips for Competitor Analysis Success:
Things to avoid:
Budget
How Much Should You Spend on Marketing?
Benefits of a Marketing Strategy Budget
Building Your Brand
Brand Positioning
Brand Identity
Brand Image
Brand Voice
Brand Personality
The Marketing Mix
History of the Marketing Mix
The 4Ps of the Marketing Mix
Product
Place
Price
Promotion
The 7Ps of the Marketing Mix
Physical Evidence
People
Processes
Marketing Channels
Digital Marketing
The best digital marketers have a clear picture of how each digital marketing campaign supports their overarching goals
Email
Mobile
Social Media
71% of consumers who have had a positive experience with a brand on social media are likely to recommend the brand to their friends and family
Content Marketing
SEO
How does SEO work?
1. Relevancy
2. Authority
3. Usefulness
Paid Advertising
Display
The average CTR (clickthrough rate) for display ads, across all industries, is 0.35%
Search
Remarketing
Native Advertising
Consumers look at native ads 53% more than display ads. Native ads create an 18% increase in purchase intent, and the visual engagement with native ads is the same, and even slightly higher than the original editorial content
Push Notifications
Traditional Marketing
Print Media
Broadcast
Direct Mail
Referral
70% of marketers said they have used or plan to use consumers to disseminate product-related content
Marketing Automation
80% of marketers report an increase in leads due to automation
Marketing Automation & Machine Learning
Customer Retention
What is Customer Retention?
Calculating Customer Retention
When and why is customer retention important?
97% of companies say retention is a priority
1. Retention saves money
2. Retention increases profitability
3. Retention encourages referrals
GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation)
What is GDPR?
How does this impact your customer retention?
Analysing your Marketing Strategy Performance
Why Are Marketing Analytics Important?
Businesses that use data to inform marketing and sales decisions see a 15-20% increase in marketing ROI
The Most Important KPIs Marketers Need To Measure
Conclusion
BodyRelated reading: How To Build The Perfect Fashion Marketing Campaign   But that is an entirely different topic for another time, so let’s get back to focusing on your marketing strategy…    . Why Do I Need a Marketing Strategy? In an environment that is subject to frequent and unpredictable change, you might wonder, why should we have to focus so much energy on developing a long-term strategy that is likely to need amending anyway? Well, the answer to that is: without a strategy in place, we don’t have repeatability or scale.  . The Importance Of A Repeatable Marketing Strategy. Whilst your marketing strategy might require regular adjustments or tweaks, it provides you with a template of where to start and makes it easier to see similar or improved results from each campaign without having to completely reinvent the wheel. It also creates stability and a sense of predictability within the marketing department.  Christopher Penn cleverly compares a marketing strategy to a menu; a menu is a repeatable process and a framework. For example, if your dinner menu during the Thanksgiving holiday is typically made up of turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce, corn, and pumpkin pie, then it is probably fair to assume that this is going to be more or less the same each year. Yes, you might change your methods, or recipes or even add in or take away an extra item or two, but the core plan remains the same. As marketers, our ‘menu’ probably looks similar each quarter, as we work towards a comparable outcome of brand awareness or lead generation, using our variety of ‘dishes’, from email marketing to SEO (search engine optimisation) to PPC (pay-per-click advertising), and so on. Whilst our recipes are adaptable and can be altered, the menu is more or less the same, allowing us to have more free time to spend on improving our recipes, rather than changing the menu each week/month/quarter/year.    . The Importance of a Scalable Marketing Strategy. Once you have a solid marketing strategy in place that is repeatable, you can now also use it for scale. So in other words, you could share it with another employee, team, or division of the company. That way, the entire company is able to adopt the same marketing strategy for all of the products and services you offer. This will help to keep everyone on the same page and allow for consistency across all of your marketing campaigns.  Let’s go back to Penn’s Thanksgiving example one more time…  Imagine you were super busy on the run-up to Thanksgiving, and you hadn’t found a minute to properly plan out your holiday dinner, and so your neighbour shared theirs with you. This would be extremely helpful and save a lot of extra stress and time. Instead of having to focus on the why and what, you can now simply focus on the how. And if this menu was a success, then you might want to share it with your own friends and family. So this one menu is now helping many homes prepare great dinners. Taking this back to your marketing strategy...  With an effective plan in place, that is both repeatable and scalable, you are free to focus your efforts on improving the strategy and making it work, rather than wasting a lot of time that you don’t have, worrying about what the strategy is going to be.   Related Content:  Target Audience. Before constructing a solid marketing strategy, it is vital to know exactly who you plan to target. Who your target audience is will impact many important decisions that you need to make, from branding and pricing, right through to the messaging you use, and marketing channels you choose to promote your products or services on.   “There is only one winning strategy. It is to carefully define the target market and direct a superior offering to that target market.”. Phillip Kotler   The more defined your target audience is, the better your marketing strategy will be as you’ll be able to create all of the brand marketing content, messaging, and ads with them in mind. As time goes on, and you gather more insight, you will continue to gain a deeper understanding of who exactly falls into your target audience. So don’t be afraid to learn as you go, and be adaptable to change, as you might find you need to go after a different group of customers to those you originally set out to reach.  And no, before you ask, your target audience simply cannot be everyone. Unless of course, you’re Amazon, who after 26 years of establishing themselves as e-commerce royalty, have earned the ability to target everyone and anyone they want.   Is There a Difference Between Target Audience & Target Market? Yes. It can get pretty confusing when you see the terms ‘target audience’ and ‘target market’ being used interchangeably, and many marketers unknowingly assume that they are the same thing. Whilst sometimes they may be the same for your business, this is not always the case for others, so let’s quickly take a look at the differences.  . Target Market. The target market is essentially the general group of people who will use and consume the products or services you offer. These people may share demographic characteristics such as age, gender, income, and job. For example, the target market for nappies and baby wipes is babies and toddlers of all genders. Additionally, the target market for a luxury beauty salon might be women and men of a certain age, that come under a specific salary bracket and live in a particular location.   Target Audience. The target audience is whoever the business expects to purchase their product or service. If we use the earlier example of nappies, the product itself is aimed at the babies and toddlers but, of course, they aren’t going to be the ones making the actual purchase. In this circumstance, the advertising and marketing efforts should be directed at the target audience, which is made up of the parents and guardians making the purchase.  Your target audience can also be a subset of your target market; these are people you are trying to reach as part of a particular marketing communication or promotion. For example, a luxury beauty salon might be offering discounts off a number of anti-wrinkle treatments. As these treatments are generally age-specific, there is no need to target your entire market. Instead, your target audience can be made up of those who are within the right age bracket.   Related reading: Top Tips to Identify Your Ideal Target Audience  . The Importance of a Defined Target Audience. Having a defined target audience is a vital element of your marketing strategy. It enables marketers to: Perfectly tailor content within each campaign to appeal to the emotions and interests of the target audience  Understand the language used by the target audience, including the phrases and terms that might resonate with them Position their messaging in a way that connects with the audience’s problems, desires, and motivations Know where the target audience spends their time (be it online or in the physical world) so they can place their messaging in the most effective locations Understand what is expected of their products or services for future purposes   Being able to relate to the tone and content of a message is necessary in order for people to ‘buy into’ your brand. This ability to strike a chord with your customer allows you to make a personal connection and establish trust. By targeting consumers who are highly likely to have an interest in your brand, product, or service, you are more likely to see a higher return on investment (ROI), in comparison to sending out a direct mail to every possible household. Audience Segmentation. Once you have established your general target market, it’s time to segment. Customer segments are made up of a number of subgroups of your overall audience, often defined by their similar needs and wants. Consumers have become much more empowered and expect highly personalised messaging from brands, meaning that segmentation is now more crucial than ever.     For most companies, there are various types of customers that might have an interest in the products or services you offer. The process of segmentation involves identifying these different groups and effectively positioning your brand to each one.  So let’s briefly discuss some of the most common methods used by marketers to segment their target audience: Demographic. Demographic segmentation is one of the more basic methods and involves grouping consumers based on factors such as age, gender, marital status, education, religion, race, income, occupation, and family size. This data is one of the easiest and quickest for brands to collect and analyse, so it’s no real shock that most companies successfully segment their customers using (at least) demographic information. Geographic. Geographic segmentation involves the division of your target market based on their country, region, or state. In certain scenarios, for smaller companies, it can even be beneficial to drill this down further to the city, neighborhood, and zip code. But it doesn’t just focus on the ‘where’ of your customer. Geographic data factors in the urbancity, climate, culture, and language of your target audience, all of which can have a great impact on your marketing strategy. Behavioural . Behavioural segmentation involves dividing your audience based on the information you have gathered during their past interactions with your brand, be it online on your website and within your app, or how they behave in-store. Having this insight gives your company the advantage of knowing when, why, and how to optimise your customer’s experience. Any findings and decisions you make as a result are based on real data, rather than something presumed. Psychographic. Psychographic segmentation focuses on your target audience’s personality traits, values, interests, lifestyle choices, opinions, and motivations. This sort of data is often collected via focus groups, surveys, interviews, and case studies. Understanding the incredibly different needs and wants of each sub-group, and being able to apply this knowledge to your marketing campaigns is the key to achieving higher conversion rates. As a marketer, when you are equipped with an in-depth understanding of each of your customer segments, you will be able to set objectives and form ideas centered around your audience. This will ensure that you create only the most highly personalised campaigns that will achieve maximum impact. Your customer segmentation should underpin every part of your company’s marketing strategy.     While we’re on the topic of customer segmentation, it makes sense to touch on the sales funnel. Sometimes referred to as the marketing funnel or the buyer’s journey, the sales funnel is essentially the path taken by a potential consumer that leads them to the purchase of your product or service. The idea is that marketers ‘cast out their nets’ and draw as many leads as possible into the funnel. They will then slowly nurture each of these leads through the different stages and ultimately end up converting some of them into customers. In an ideal world, the funnel would be more of a cylinder, resulting in every lead converting into a customer. But of course, in the harsh world of marketing and sales, this is never the case - hence the narrowing funnel.  . What Does The Sales Funnel Have To Do With Marketing Strategy?  . Having a well thought out sales funnel should be a high priority for marketers. It provides great insight into the thought process, challenges, and decisions that are being made by your potential customers. As well as that, your communication with each consumer should be very different based on their stage in your sales funnel. So it has a huge impact on your marketing content too.   Related content: How to Delight Your Customers at Each Stage of The Buyer's Journey Having an understanding of your sales funnel will also highlight the points at which your target audience are dropping out and failing to convert. This valuable information will allow you to put a plan in place that helps prevent potential losses.     Each stage of the customer journey requires a different approach from the marketer if they want to move customers smoothly down the funnel. The last thing you want to do is send someone the wrong message at the wrong time.  It’s important to note that the sales funnel or buyer’s journey is not a one-size-fits-all model. It varies a lot from brand to brand and there is not a single agreed-upon version of the funnel. Some have more stages than others and give each stage a different name, but the overall idea remains the same. And that overarching idea is to provide your audience with marketing content that is timely, targeted, and relevant.  So, with that in mind, let’s take a look at a typical five-stage experience that your customer might take with your brand. From the initial awareness stage to becoming a loyal, paying customer: 1. Awareness. At this very first stage, it is likely that your target audience has never heard of your company before, or of the products or services you offer. This is the point where your prospective customers are realising they have a problem and educating themselves around it through research. It’s common for people to take to a search engine like Google at this initial stage, and find themselves typing various things into the search bar in order to find help. Check out these examples below and see how they could be applied to each of the indicated businesses:     As a marketer, you need to ensure that you have helpful, relevant content that ranks highly for the particular keywords and phrases your prospect might be searching for at this fundamental stage.  As well as from Google Search, you can also generate leads using other forms of awareness, be it a tweet, promoted Facebook or LinkedIn post, trade shows, advertising, webinars, PR, or whatever methods work best for you and your business.  Depending on the type of product or service, what background research your consumer has done, as well as how good your content is, this initial stage of awareness can result in a purchase right away.  But for most, the journey continues… 2. Consideration. At this stage of your customer’s journey they have figured out exactly what it is that is bothering them and want to know all the possible solutions. They know that your product or service is an option, but your prospect needs to do further research and compare prices and suitability.  Communications with your target audience at this point need to be as helpful and informative as possible. Avoid being too sales-y as this will only add pressure and drive them away. You want to highlight the key differentiator of your product/service over your competitors and help them to make an informed decision. Case studies, pricing guides, comparison-style checklists, and webinars are all examples of key pieces of content that we marketers should be providing at this consideration stage. 3. Decision. Once your prospect has reached the decision stage they are almost ready to buy; they have narrowed down their options to around 2 or 3, including you, hopefully! Consumers will bring together all their research and decide which option offers the best solution to their problem, at the best value for money.  Content at this stage of the sales funnel exists to reinforce your prospect’s confidence in your product or service. You’ve got them this far, so they already think you’re a pretty good option, but now you need to convince them that you are the best option.     Customer reviews and testimonials are hugely effective at this stage of the sales funnel, along with FAQs, product demos, a free trial, competitor comparisons and even a discount code. 4. Retention. Once your prospect reaches the retention stage, they have officially purchased from you and you have succeeded in turning them into a customer. But the journey doesn’t end here. As a marketer, you need to be thinking about how you can turn this one-time purchase into 10, or this monthly subscription into an annual one - whatever defines customer loyalty for your business.  It’s a well-known fact that retaining a current customer costs a company less than acquiring a new one. For most businesses, it’s about the quality of your customers, not the quantity. Loyal, returning customers are where you will make the most profits.  At this stage, you want to start strengthening the relationship by helping your customers to get the most out of the product or service they purchased from you. Follow up calls or emails to thank them for their purchase and ask for feedback is a great way to show you care, as well as deal with any issues that may have come up.  If your product or service requires some form of set up, then having an effective onboarding process in place to guide consumers through these steps, will also help to keep your customers happy. 5. Advocacy. The advocacy stage is all about turning your now loyal customers into active advocates for your brand, product or service.  This stage occurs when your customers become more than just your customers; they are now also your fans. This means that not only will they continue to purchase from you time after time, but they will also tell their closest friends and family about you whenever they get a chance. Be that in person or online via social media platforms or review sites.  People trust other people, making word of mouth (WOM) one of the most powerful forms of marketing - and the best part? It costs you absolutely nothing! To help encourage this behaviour it’s important to continue showing your most loyal customers just how much you appreciate them. Be sure that any communications you have with them are super personalised. You could even offer them discounts or other incentives in return for customer reviews, testimonials, and friend referrals.  Customers at the advocacy stage are also more likely to provide you with their honest feedback. They believe in you just as much as you believe in yourself so be sure to utilise this! Use tools like SurveyMonkey to send out an email in an attempt to gather as much constructive criticism as you can. The more insight you have from your current customers, the better experience you’ll be able to provide for them and future customers.    Related Content: SMART Marketing Objectives & Goals. When it comes to planning your marketing strategy, a good place to start is with your goals and objectives. Because, without them, how are you meant to know if your marketing efforts have succeeded or not? The SMART method is a commonly used framework in marketing for successfully setting goals and objectives. It stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound. Ideally, you want to set goals for your strategy that are ambitious, and force you to put in the work, but you need them to be achievable at the same time. There is nothing more demotivating than working towards a goal that you and your team know is impossible to reach. So let’s take a look into each of the five objectives in the SMART method, and how they can help you set practical goals. 1. Specific. What exactly do I want to achieve? Try to be as specific as possible when creating your goals and focus only on one clearly defined metric. Generally speaking, those who set vague and ambiguous goals are less likely to achieve them. With focused marketing objectives you can help to eliminate distractions and make your end goals clearly visible.   2. Measurable.  . How will I know when I’ve reached my goal? It is completely necessary to have some form of system in place that allows you to measure results. In the past, marketing was very much a guessing game. However, nowadays we have hundreds of tools available to gather, analyse and report back on the data. So make sure you know exactly how you’re going to get your hands on the data you need and how you’re going to analyse it.   Related content: [Infographic] Explain The 3 V's of Big Data   3. Achievable.  . How can I achieve this goal? Is it realistic? The most effective goals are those that are challenging, but still achievable. Don’t just set goals based on what you think your boss wants to hear. That will only make you sound great until you have to report back that you didn’t even come close to achieving this goal. Failing to hit your targets is very demotivating for both you and your team, so don’t make life harder than it needs to be. Of course, this doesn’t mean you should set easy goals either, you still need to be constantly challenging yourself and pushing the boundaries, so try to find the middle ground.   Related reading: 10 Effective Marketing Strategies for Business Growth   4. Relevant.  . Is this goal worthwhile? If so, why? How does it align with the organisational goals? The key to setting relevant goals is making sure the objective aligns with the overall strategic positioning of the brand. In other words, the goal needs to accomplish something that is going to boost business or enhance your brand's relationship with its customers. For example, you might set a goal to build a huge following on the latest up-and-coming social platform, TikTok, with the aim of drawing new leads and increasing your ROI by 3%. So you put all the tactics in place to do so and, hey presto, this ends up being pretty successful and you are now the proud owner of a TikTok account with 1000 followers.  But then you remember that you are a B2B business that sells office space in North America, and the audience you have acquired on TikTok is completely irrelevant to your company’s overall strategy. So despite the fact that you have partly achieved your goal by building a large following, you have not gained any valuable leads, which means increasing your ROI by any amount via this platform is irrelevant to your company.   5. Time-bound.  . When’s the deadline? Every goal must have an end date for when you expect to have achieved that metric. Getting the timing right is crucial to the success of the goal. You need to make sure you have given yourself enough time, otherwise, you will be writing your marketing efforts off as a failure before you have even given them a chance.  With no time limit in place, how will you know when it is the right time to call the strategy a failure or a success? Without deadlines, we tend to lose focus and can easily get distracted by other tasks that seem more urgent. Open-ended objectives have a habit of never being completed, so making sure your goals are time-bound will allow them to be more achievable. Having a deadline will also enable you to track your efforts and reflect on the overall process once you reach your goals.   PEST Analysis. When planning your marketing strategy it’s important to take a number of external factors into consideration. One of the most commonly used analytical tools for assessing such factors is the PEST Analysis.   What Does PEST Stand For. PEST is an acronym that stands for Political, Economic, Social, and Technological (analysis). PEST analysis is used to assess these four external factors in relation to your own company.     In order for your marketing strategy to run smoothly and be as successful as possible, it is vital to understand any opportunities and/or threats in both the current market and the wider environment. Carrying out a thorough PEST analysis will enable you to better understand the market trends and conditions, as well as helping to identify the expected constraints on your strategy.  Let’s take a look at each of the four factors to gain a better understanding…   Political Factors. Tax policies, employment laws, tariff & trade restrictions, consumer protection laws, environmental regulations, copyright, advertising regulations, political stability of a country, etc. This is an analysis of how politics is affecting the business world. There can be many different government regulations that will either go in your company’s favour, or they won’t and, besides, political factors will likely be out of your control anyway.  The best thing you can do is to make yourself aware of anything that could impact your marketing performance and adhere to the rules to avoid any major penalties or backlash.   Economic Factors. Economic growth indicators, inflation rate, interest rates, exchange rates, fiscal policies, unemployment trends, etc. Understanding the current economic climate is important for marketers in order to have a better grasp of the factors that affect consumer buying power. These factors have a direct impact on how much money people have to spend, as well as the cost of your products or services. By factoring in the economics of your target market when developing your marketing strategy, you can be prepared for any ramifications as a result of an economic downturn.   Social Factors. Cultural aspects, age distribution, career attitudes, health consciousness, population growth rate, social classes, etc. The social environment of a business consists of all that a society believes; its customs, its practices, and the way it behaves. By digging deeper into the social factors surrounding your target audience, a business can learn how a consumer's needs are shaped and what brings them to the market to make a purchase. This knowledge is hugely important when constructing a marketing strategy as it will enable you to pinpoint purchase motivations which you could then incorporate into your campaigns.     Technological Factors. Rate of technological change, technology incentives, spending on research & development, basic infrastructure level, etc. Technology can have a huge impact on businesses on so many levels and can either be an addition that is welcomed or shunned. When developing your marketing strategy, it’s important to be aware and keep up-to-date with all the latest technological advancements that might improve your operations and add value to your customers.  If you fail to do this, then it’s likely that your competitors will already be utilising this technology and providing a better customer experience than you are.  Of course, it’s also important to be aware of the business transformational phase when adopting any new technologies as this can often take time to get to grips with.     Often marketers will extend the PEST analysis to become the ‘PESTEL’ analysis, incorporating  two further factors; ‘Environmental’ and ‘Legal’.   Environmental factors. Climate change, waste disposal, pollution, carbon footprint, CSR (Corporate Sustainability Responsibility), etc.  Environmental factors are more dominant now than they have ever been. Peoples’ awareness is heightened and they’re more educated on environmental matters and the impact that global production and trade can have on the wider environment. Thanks to things like social media and alternative news sources, people are connected more intricately, which means that information is much more advanced and available to concerned consumers.  Consumer awareness of environmental factors means that brands globally have to factor in elements such as sustainability, waste management, recycling procedures, etc, of their production and distribution, which ultimately impacts various aspects of their marketing strategies   Legal factors . Employment legislation, health and safety, trade regulations and restrictions, discrimination laws, etc. Although legal factors often overlap with political factors, the law remains an important aspect of any business in order to facilitate successful and ethical trade. Trading internationally can bring about issues as many countries have their own sets of rules and regulations, however, many countries abide by the same or similar legal regulations. By not considering legal factors when creating your marketing strategy, you run the risk of harming, or even destroying, the entire brand. SWOT Analysis. A SWOT Analysis is a simple, yet powerful, technique used by businesses globally in order to assess and adjust their current position before finalising their strategy.  SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. This established method of analysis is the primary way that businesses position themselves and determine how aligned they are with their vision, goals, growth trajectories, and success benchmarks. Your strengths and weaknesses refer to the internal aspects of your business, which are essentially the things you have control over. Whereas opportunities and threats are generally external elements that you cannot control, like the actions of your competitors or the condition of the wider market. A SWOT analysis can be used for any number of different things such as a marketing project, a sales campaign, a new business case, or even revamping your brand.   Related reading: 4 Tips for Creating a Successful SWOT Analysis   SWOT analysis offers business insights that focus on both internal and external impacting factors. Conducting this type of analysis heightens your chances of success and reduces the likelihood of failure.  So, whether you’re a small tech startup or a Fortune 500 company, SWOT analysis is there to help.  Let’s dive a little deeper into each aspect of the SWOT analysis to understand how each element can benefit you.      . Strengths. Your strengths are the areas that your company excels in; things that you do especially well. Think of your assets, processes, people, communications, content, values, etc. It’s what makes you unique, it’s what makes you thrive, it’s the things that give you an edge over your competitors.    Some strengths are clear to see; if you have a huge following on social media, chances are that you’re doing something right. But do you have a multitude of followers because people love your brand or your product, or is it because you post really funny tweets? It can sometimes be tough to precisely pinpoint your strengths. Asking questions like these will shed some light on the areas where your business really excels, and why: Do you have a clear unique selling point (USP)? I.e., what separates you from your competitors? Do you have strong internal resources? I.e., skilled, knowledgeable, experienced staff, substantial networks, reputation, etc.  What are your assets? I.e., capital, intellectual property, equipment, technology, patents, etc. Do you have a loyal customer base? What are your clear competitive advantages? Is your business adaptable to a changing economic climate or for growing social trends?   Defining your strengths shows you and your team what you’re really good at; where you surpass others; why you deserve your place in the market and continued success. A confident brand means that consumers will see you as strong and trustworthy, meaning that you will likely gain their continued custom. This powerful, self-assured brand personality not only helps to retain current customers but also draws in new ones. When your business is healthy and capable, it strengthens and validates the reasons why your employees work for you, and why your customers made the right decision to do business with you.  At the end of the day, people don’t want to do business with a brand that seems to be powerless or ineffective; it loses a sense of trust that both employees and customers need. When you harness your strengths, have happy employees, and loyal customers, you will accomplish positive word of mouth (WOM), which is essentially free, reliable marketing!  . Weaknesses. Weaknesses refer to the ways in which your company is lacking; factors that are holding the business back, or stifling a project, for example. Essentially, weaknesses are what stands in the way of you reaching your full potential. Some weaknesses are out of your control which is unfortunate, but some are easily fixed. When it comes to brand success, there are usually ways in which you can turn weaknesses into strengths, or at least address and fix the weakness so it’s no longer a factor that lets your competitors gain an advantage over you.   Similar to strengths, it’s not always easy to identify your weaknesses. Your business may be going downhill and perhaps there’s no obvious reason why. That’s why you need to ask yourself these critical questions and shed some light on the elusive issues that are holding you back: Is your company lacking or limited in terms of resources such as money, equipment, or employees, etc.? Is there a clear aspect of the business process that needs improvement? Is your intellectual property outdated? Are your competitors out-doing you, if so, in any particular area? (social media, in-store retail, customer service, etc.) Is your USP unclear, too mainstream, or too niche?   Examining your weaknesses helps you to move that extra step closer to success. Think, hypothetically… your company isn’t doing badly; your profits are steady and you have a healthy team of employees, but you don’t seem to have loyal, returning customers. You conduct a SWOT analysis and something shows up as a solid weakness; you have been receiving negative reviews online. You examine these reviews further and realise that you don’t have a post-purchase care strategy in place. This means that customers are purchasing your products just once and then leaving. And any questions, queries, or complaints that they have remain unanswered, sigh, that’s no good.   Your SWOT analysis has given you the insight that you need in order to add another level to your organisation in terms of legitimate, meaningful, customer care. Just imagine how much stronger your business could be at this point if you had actioned a thorough SWOT analysis that identified your weakness earlier on. Conducting a SWOT analysis alleviates potential blunders and tackles your pain points head-on, offering internal insights that continuously strengthen the brand and advantage your strategies.  . Opportunities. According to Mirriam-Webster, an opportunity is defined as:  A favourable juncture of circumstances A good chance for advancement or progress   Opportunities can come from any angle. They could materialise from within your company; for example, you might have recently gained a strong, growing presence on social media. This growth would give you the opportunity for greater outreach and an active platform for you to develop lasting, genuine relationships, in turn, developing a loyal audience base. Or they could be external factors, such as new trends that relate heavily to your product or service which, of course, you can likely capitalise on.  First, in order to identify any potential opportunities, you should address these questions: Is the market expanding? Are there any growing trends or emerging needs that will encourage people to buy what you’re offering? Are there any upcoming functions or events that your company can take advantage of? Are there any strengths that you can turn into opportunities? Can you initiate or expand upon the press/media coverage of your business?   Identifying and actioning any opportunities that come up for your business, whether they’re internal or external factors, big or small, is integral to the long term development of the brand. Steady growth is great, but without significant growth and positive progress, you run the risk of being left behind, or of your competitors taking that great opportunity that you missed.  SWOT analysis gives you the ability to capitalise on current or upcoming opportunities that you may have otherwise missed. These opportunities could be anything from improving sales, adding an extra, vital element to a campaign, or advancing your company’s long-term goals.  . Threats. Threats include anything that can negatively impact your business. They tend to be external factors such as a changing market or emerging competition. Consider any obstacles that may get in the way of you bringing a product to market, selling, or generally achieving your business goals.  As threats, more often than not, are external factors that you can merely influence or prevent rather than control, it can be difficult to truly identify them. Of course, it’s important to conduct a thorough competitive analysis, as well as internal auditing. But to help you discover any threat that you face or could potentially face in the future, consider these questions:  Is there potential for your weaknesses to leave you open to any outside threats? Are there any changes to current regulations that will affect you?  Are you experiencing any negative press or media coverage? Do you have strong competition in the market? Are your competitors doing anything different to, or better than you? Will you always have enough resources to satisfy your customers for the long term? Are there any technological advancements that could impact your business? Is consumer behaviour changing in a way that will impact you? I.e., are there social trends that conflict with your brand, product, or services?   Investigating potential threats is a fundamental aspect of brand success. Imagine you are a small-to-medium-sized enterprise (SME) that sells furniture at an average price, think middle of the range, you occupy a substantial chunk of the market and a new competitor enters the scene. In order to avoid any negative impacts at the hands of this new brand, you need to identify any threats they may impose on you so that you can alter your behaviour, your business model, your communication practices, or your campaigns in order to stay at the top of your game and maintain your loyal customers.    Threats are a vital factor for your business to examine because they can appear out of nowhere, particularly with the rapidity of modern social changes, the saturation of markets and increased technologies; threats in almost any market are entirely plausible and can happen instantaneously. You need to be prepared, in advance, so that when threats do arise, you already know how to tackle them and continue to reign supreme! Competitor Analysis. Carrying out a competitor analysis for your business is the equivalent of a football team sizing up the other side before a big match. You want to figure out exactly what tricks your competition has up their sleeve so that you’re not blindsided when you come head-to-head.   Related reading: 10 Competitor Analysis Tools You Need In Your Marketing Stack    . What is a Competitor Analysis? Competitor analysis is a strategic method of determining any current or future threats posed by other companies to the prosperity of your business. This analysis considers multiple factors in an attempt to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of a potential competitor and how these compare to your own businesses.    When defining your company’s competitors, you must consider a number of key dimensions, however, you should always start with:  The products a company offers (functions, materials and manufacturing technology)  The customers who they target  After this step, companies who have been identified as similar to your business in one or both of these areas can be split into two main categories:    Direct Competitors . These are companies that meet the same set of customer needs as those you are targeting.  The customer segments that your direct competitors serve are the exact same as yours; their products are manufactured just like yours, serving the same functions, and they aim to market their products using (you guessed it) the exact same channels as you.  For example, if you were the owner of McDonald’s then one of your direct competitors would be Burger King. Indirect Competitors . Just when you thought you had enough on your plate, in walk your indirect competitors. These are companies whose products or services are not the same as yours, but they are targeting the same segments of the population and satisfy the same need as yours. For example, if you were the owner of Pizza Hut then one of your indirect competitors is Subway.  Oftentimes, your indirect competitor’s products or services can even be contradictory to your own. The fast-food industry is indirectly in competition with the diet industry. So, if you are the owner of Pizza Hut, you will also need to monitor Slimming World’s business models to ensure they do not steal away your customers. This is why we often see fast-food chains offering healthier alternatives.     Why do you need a competitor analysis? . There are plenty of reasons to carry out a competitor analysis, but number 1 is to ensure that your chosen strategy is strong enough and differentiated enough to beat your competitors. The only way you can be sure of this is if you know how to think like your competitors, how to predict their next move, and top it in your campaigns.  A thorough competitor analysis will give you a keen understanding of the marketplace where you do business, what it takes to succeed in that marketplace, and what actions can lead to failure.  Economically, you will benefit from a clearer pricing structure and an ability to predict market trends, product development possibilities, and develop an understanding of what your customers will be faced with when making their purchasing decisions.  To be on top, you need to be one step ahead of your competition; a competitive analysis will not only help you to understand your current competitors but will also give you the foresight to spot any future competition and adjust your strategy before they become a problem.   “World trade means competition from anywhere; advancing technology encourages cross-industry competition. Consequently, strategic planning must consider who our future competitors will be, not only who is here today.”. Eric Allison How do you carry out a competitor analysis? . There are many different ways to carry out a competitor analysis. But at the end of the day, you will get out of your competitor analysis what you put into it.  Lightly skim the top and you won’t have enough insightful data to action anything useful. Similarly, if you go too deep it’s likely you will be overwhelmed with data and be left unsure of what is important to your strategy.  There are a few things that you should always do before you get stuck in:  Pick 1-3 competitors to focus on  Determine whether they are direct or indirect competitors  Catalogue the products they offer (including pricing, production, distribution and market share)  Smart insights suggest using the RACE acronym to help you stay on track and cover all your bases when completing a competitor analysis. Each letter of the acronym indicates a broad area of analysis where you should focus your attention:   Reach. To begin your analysis, you should be considering all of the avenues from which your competitor draws in traffic or, in other words, their reach.  You will want to consider a number of elements here, from digital aspects like website traffic, backlink profiles, and social media following, to physical presence such as the number of stores and accessibility of these locations. Assess which channels your competitors are using which you may be missing out on, and employ digital tools to fully visualise their reach. The reach of your competitor’s sales team is also an important factor. Do they have multiple store locations? Do they gather leads using inbound tactics or employ lead generation tools for cold outreach, or both? Analysing both the geographic location and digital presence of their sales process will be vital to understanding how your competitors penetrate the global marketplace.    Act. How do your competitor’s offerings force customers to act? Here we must consider the key customer journeys that potential audience members will go on when interacting with your competitors’ brand.  Consider the presence of key touch-points such as landing pages, pop-ups, banners, and offerings used for lead generation. Ask yourself which audience segments these methods appeal to and how the content offered will motivate consumers to act.  Is content used to drive potential customers through the buyer’s journey? If so, what kind of content is used and what quality is it? Does your competitor have a lot of content published or very little? How often do they post to their blog? How long and informative are their blog articles? What is their tone of voice and is their spelling and grammar an issue? These are the sorts of questions you must ask yourself when performing a content audit of your competitor’s resources.   Convert. What barriers and pathways to conversion exist within your competitor’s repertoire? To understand what we mean by barriers, we must consider the experience of first-time website visitors; are they required to ‘sign-up’ before browsing or making a purchase? If a sign-up is required, is it a simple process with social integrations (Facebook, Gmail, etc.) or are there multiple, mandatory fields placed between the customers and conversion? How well is the value proposition of your competitor’s products communicated across their channels? Is communication consistent and persuasive or fragmented and sales-y? Communication is a key part of the conversion process.  Website usability and user experience will be huge factors in this section of your analysis. How does your competitor layout their products - are they separated by function, target segment, pricing, or are they unfiltered, causing complicated breadcrumb trails? Whether the customer can easily navigate your competitor’s resources and successfully process through their checkout is vital knowledge. And what if they don’t complete the purchase? Understanding how your competitors salvage abandoned carts, or whether they don’t bother at all, is key to your competitive advantage.    Related reading: How to Build the Perfect Shopping Cart Abandonment Campaign     Engage. What methods do your competitors use to engage their potential customers? Do they use blogs, guides, white papers, webinars, e-books, templates, etc?  Personalisation is a key indicator of engaging content, so be sure to consider what elements your competitors' content has been personalised to meet their audience’s needs (if they have, in fact, personalised at all).  Does your competitor use email marketing as an engaging tool? If so, how often do they email their contacts, and do they use segmentation to divide their lists for a more engaging experience, or do they send mass-email blasts? How do their sales teams use email to engage leads - are they effective or annoying when it comes to trying to connect?  What level of engagement does your competitor receive back from their followers on social media? Do their posts feature many likes, shares, and comments? If there are comments, are they positive or negative, and does your competitor respond to these comments promptly? Incorporating social listening practices into your analysis can help you find out where and how your competitor is being talked about by consumers online - and you can use that to your advantage.   Related content: [Infographic] 4 Stepping Stones to a Successful Competitor Analysis  . Tips for Competitor Analysis Success:. 1. Stay organised. Create a spreadsheet that will act as a competitor analysis template. Date it, and reuse the template each time you run this analysis. This allows for making easy comparisons over time and will show you changes within your competitor’s approach. 2. Utilise tools to streamline your research process. Many tools exist that will allow you to instantly access data about your competitor in many different areas of their operation. For example, Mention for social listening, Similarweb for traffic, Mailcharts for email marketing, Buzzsumo for content auditing, and Alexa for SEO and keywords analysis, etc.   3. Snoop a little. Tools are great but we must give an honourable mention to the old fashioned way of doing things... Subscribe to your competitor’s blog Follow them on social media Abandon a product in their shopping cart Purchase a product and evaluate the total customer experience By carrying out any, or all, of these activities you will get to see exactly what their customers see, thus, removing all guesswork.   Things to avoid: .   1. Don’t think that your first competitive analysis will last forever. You must repeat this process a lot. Annually? Bi-annually? Quarterly? Per campaign? It’s up to you, but remember that once is not enough. 2. Don’t make assumptions about competitors based on your own bias. Gain data to prove anything you include in your final report. 3. Don’t overdo it. Too many fields, too much research, nit-picking, etc. - decipher the most important details for your company and stick to them.    Budget. Budgeting… it can be super boring, right? But often budgeting only seems like a drag because we don’t really understand it. This is certainly true when it comes to marketing. You might find yourself wondering what it is exactly that you’re budgeting for, or how much you should spend, or the timeframe you should look at.  Well, try not to worry. It can be simple if you look at it like this… Your marketing budget gives you a clear overview of all of the costs associated with your marketing activities, including their execution. A marketing budget is essential for businesses both large and small, and typically includes elements such as:    Traditional advertising: television ads, print media, billboards, etc.  Content creation: guides, videos, blogs, infographics, podcasts, etc.  Branding & design: website design, branded stationery, clothing, logos, etc.  Public Relations (PR) & Media outreach  Digital advertising: paid promotion, social media, ads in podcasts, native ads, etc.    Whilst that’s a lot of elements to factor in, they make up the types of marketing activities that you need to budget for.     Your marketing budget acts as a detailed roadmap that outlines the cost of all marketing actions and tactics that are involved in your strategy, i.e. the cost of everything involved in achieving your goals.  . How Much Should You Spend on Marketing? It’s tough to know how much money to allocate to your marketing strategy, and that’s because every business is different. A marketing strategy budget will be totally different for large companies vs. small businesses; for digital brands vs. brick-and-mortar stores, for the tech industry vs. fashion, etc.   Source: Brafton   Overall your marketing budget depends on factors such as:   Industry Competition Maturity of your product/service Business model, i.e. where does marketing stand in terms of the buyer’s journey: what’s its role in the sales cycle? Your market position Company size Target audience   A marketing budget is based on the predicted cost of your activities, campaigns, and tactical plans that will help you to achieve your business ambitions. As marketing is becoming more and more integral to the success of a company, it’s more than likely that we will see an increase in budgeting. The CMO Survey has spent 10 consecutive years collecting data on the marketing spend of top marketers and how this was expected to change.  According to the 2020 survey, domestic marketing spend has risen by 13% since 2012 and is expected to grow by 7.6% in the next year.   Source: CMO   CMO also reports that B2B Services companies are most likely to spend domestically, noting that 92.7% of their marketing budgets are devoted to domestic markets. This is compared with B2B Product businesses, which report to spending 79.8% in domestic markets.  In 2019, IAB UK reported that spend on digital advertising has increased, with spending on display ads up 13% year-on-year.   Source: IAB UK   This really comes as no surprise: as markets become more saturated, businesses have to do more to reach their target markets. And in order to communicate their prestige over their competitors, their marketing strategies must be on point. That means accurate targeting and meticulous, clever budgeting.  Marketers also need to break through the noise of other ads, which involves either spending more or spending differently. Either way, this generally means increasing the marketing budget to allow for new and creative ways to communicate with a business’s prized audience.    Benefits of a Marketing Strategy Budget. No business can realistically survive, long term, without a budget. It’s set in place so that you know what you’re spending, where, when, and why. Imagine spending all of your money in one sitting on the likes of television advertising - and then realising that most of your target market resides online. Or spending a huge chunk of the business’s cash on digital marketing tools without first evaluating their worth, or whether you need them at all!  A marketing budget provides a financial roadmap that reduces risk and aids in the decision-making process. It also allows you to better determine your ROI for different aspects of your marketing plan.  Accurately estimating expenses is vital for the materialisation and success of your marketing goals. You can also measure your success by comparing actual expenditures against your projected costs. Your marketing budget becomes an important reference for adjusting your plan over time and paves the way for creating new, streamlined strategies. Building Your Brand. If you consider your brand to be made up of just your company logo, colour scheme, and a name, then boy, do I have news for you... A brand is SO much more than that. It’s the entire experience your prospects and customers have with your company, product, or service. Yes, your logo, name, and colour scheme all play their part within this experience, but these are just a few of the creative elements. This wider experience is made up of a number of different aspects, such as: All marketing materials and images, e.g., web design, packaging, logo, graphics, flyers, business cards, etc. Messaging on your website, campaigns, advertisements Communications with your customers How you treat your employees How your employees treat your customers What your customers are saying about you to others     Building your brand involves a few different elements, including positioning, identity, voice, personality, and image. Let’s take a brief look at which each of these involve.  . Brand Positioning. Brand positioning is the unique space a brand occupies in the brain of its customers. It is where your brand is positioned in comparison to the rest of the market. The first step of any branding project is to establish what draws customers to you in the first place. You need to explore, identify, and redefine what makes your company distinctive. Clever positioning is usually the reason why a consumer might choose to purchase a product from a specific brand, even when its competitors are offering something that is basically the same. Positioning your brand is important for a number of reasons, for example: Creates market differentiation Allows you to break through the noise Makes it easier for people to buy from you Enables you to compete on value (not price) Justifies pricing strategies Amplifies your storytelling, copy, and messaging Makes your design more creative Once you have established your brand position, you can then move on to focus on forging a positive identity that your customers want to return to time and time again.    . Brand Identity. According to Hubspot, brand identity is made up of what your brand says, what your values are, how you communicate your product, and what you want people to feel when they interact with you. Essentially, your goal is to create a lasting impression on both your customers and your prospects. Creating your brand identity is the process of shaping that impression.   Distinct from your brand image, your brand identity involves the visible elements of your brand, such as color, design, logo, packaging, photography, uniforms, web design, etc. Basically, anything that represents your brand visually, these are the elements that enable your consumers to identify and distinguish your brand from others. For example, your website might contain some of the best content in comparison to all your competitors. But, if it doesn’t look visually appealing, to begin with, then it’s not going to capture the attention of your audience and all that good content you have created goes to waste.  Having a visually appealing brand design gives your company the competitive advantage of value, unity, recognition, differentiation, and pride. This is your opportunity to make a great first impression, so try to avoid the common branding mistakes. You won’t get the chance to do this again, so investing in your brand identity is vital for success.   Related content: How to Choose a Domain Name That Assists Your Online Marketing    . Brand Image. While it can be easy to get them confused, your brand image is totally separate from your brand identity. The actual result you achieve from your efforts in building brand identity, be it successful or unsuccessful, is what makes up your brand image. It is the perception that your consumers have about your brand and it tends to develop over time. Consumers often base this upon any experience or interactions they, or their family and friends, may have had with your company. Someone does not need to have purchased a product or service from you in order to form an opinion on your brand image.  On some occasions, when you have a strong brand image, consumers purchase from you simply because they want to be associated with the product or service you offer. Nobody needs a $5,000 Chanel handbag. There are perfectly good, more affordable substitutes that will serve you the same purpose. But Chanel’s target market does not purchase their designer items to serve a purpose, they purchase them because of the exceptional image this leading luxury brand has built. They trust their products to be of the highest quality and owning them makes them feel exclusive.  There are many different advantages to having a strong brand image, such as: Increase in customer recognition Increase in competitive edge The ability to easily introduce new products Improved customer loyalty and retention Enhanced credibility  . Brand Voice. It’s less about what you say, and more about how you say it. Having a clear brand voice is a vital element of your marketing strategy. Your brand voice is the tone, personality, and emotion that is injected into every business communication, be it via email, on your website, press releases, ads, social media, or even on your packaging.  As long as it goes hand in hand with your brand values and persona, your brand voice can be anything you want it to be. Whether it’s empowering, informative, playful, kind, funny, professional, ambitious, quirky, or authentic… the options are endless. Having a consistent and personable brand voice allows you to connect better with your customers, build strong relationships, and increase consumer recollection. With a great brand voice, you can turn any piece of text into more meaningful content that almost feels ‘human-like’. This is key, considering a consumer is 4 times more likely to purchase from a company if they feel they have an emotional connection. The market is saturated with competition, so having a unique and memorable brand voice will enable you to stand out from the crowd.  . Brand Personality. In the same way that people differ in terms of how they communicate or behave, so does your brand. Consider that if your brand was a person, how would you expect them to dress? What sort of car would they drive? How would they speak or act? Asking yourself these sorts of questions will help you establish the human traits of your brand. This is important because your customer may then be able to relate to these traits, therefore building an emotional connection between your brand and your customer.  Let’s take Apple’s brand personality as an example. As a person, Apple would certainly be the ‘cool kid on the block’ with their creative, innovative, and stylish traits.    Related reading: 5 Companies Who Nailed Their Brand Personality   You can communicate brand personality through tone of voice, visuals, customer service policies, and even how you treat your employees. The Five Dimensions of Brand Personality by Jennifer Aaker is a widely used framework to describe and measure the “personality” of a brand in five core dimensions, each divided into a set of facets.     By cleverly establishing your brand position, identity, voice, personality, and image you can gain a definitive edge over your competitors. Just be sure to follow the 5 key rules of branding and be specific, be authoritative, be consistent, be honest, and be relentless.   The Marketing Mix. Think of your marketing strategy as a giant stew bubbling away on a stove. For your stew to be the tasty meal that your dinner guests are expecting, you’re going to need more than just one ingredient, aren’t you? Actually, you’re going to need to mix multiple ingredients to balance out the flavors and make everything work just right. That’s what your marketing mix is, a big shopping list of ingredients that are all essential to reaching your goals.   Related content: [Video] What Are The 7Ps of The Marketing Mix?    . History of the Marketing Mix. The history of the marketing mix is a lot like the concept itself; it's the product of a blend of multiple ideas. It first finds its origins in the 1960s with Neil Borden, who identified 12 variable marketing elements that, if controlled correctly, could return a “profitable business operation.”  Borden was inspired by the words of Culliton, who described business executives as “a mixer of ingredients, who sometimes follows a recipe as he goes along, sometimes adapts a recipe to the ingredients immediately available, and sometimes experiments with or invents ingredients no one else has tried.”     Later, Jerome McCarthy took the 12 elements of Borden ’s marketing mix and streamlined them into 4 high-level categories, which came to be known as The 4Ps. This model came to enjoy widespread recognition as an essential part of marketing theory and is taught to marketing students the world over.    . The 4Ps of the Marketing Mix.   Product . The first element of the marketing mix is the Product, which makes sense as marketing exists to promote the sale of goods. Thus, Product is simply any goods on sale, ranging from physical products like a mobile phone to an experiential product like a ticket to a concert or even a service like window cleaning, for example. Whatever is on offer to the customer can be considered under the category of Product.    Researching the market where your product sits will help you to determine whether it is of niche or mass appeal and which segments of the market will be attracted to it. The quality of your offering is very important, as is your communication and description of it. Misleading consumers with false advertising of goods is not only disreputable, but it’s also illegal.  So, whenever you set out to promote your product, ensure it meets the market demand and meets or exceeds the expectations of your customers. Otherwise, you could be on the receiving end of some bad reviews, or worse!   Place. Place encompasses all things related to the location of your products, where you choose to sell them or distribute them. The Place where your products are sold, housed and distributed can be a physical place like a store or a warehouse, or it can be digital like a website’s e-store, or cloud-based platform. The real value of smart marketing is getting the right offerings, in the right Place, at the right time. So, it’s essential to evaluate the location where you conduct your business; consider your audience - are they offline or online shoppers? There’s zero point in shelling out month-on-month to rent premium space on the high street in a busy city if your target market largely shops online. Research is the key to finding the right location for you and your customers. Remember, always consider what your competitors are doing, forgetting to do so may see them overtake you in certain locations.  Wherever you decide is the right place for you, ensure it’s of the highest standard and a great representation of your brand. If it’s a physical location, your store design must be easily accessible, clean, and aesthetically pleasing, and your staff must be pleasant and helpful to customers. Likewise, if you choose a digital option, be sure to invest in a good user experience (UX) to make sure usability, design, and security are up to scratch.    . Price. Money makes the world go round and, as such, the Price of your products is a big factor in the 4Ps of the Marketing Mix. Price is a primary component of the perceived and actual value of your product - the price must match your customers’ expectations and correlate with your budget.  Price can connote different characteristics of products; a high price tag, in some cases, can imply luxury and exclusivity, but this is largely dependent on the brand’s reputation and promotional styles such as advertising and tone of voice. However, do not purposely over-price your products. This will have a negative impact if your goods do not live up to the price paid for them, if they’re made poorly or break quickly, for example. Similarly, a low price tag suggests a budget item, which can give some customers the impression that your product is of low quality. Thus, it is important to value your product precisely based on its quality, longevity, and how it compares to its competitors.  One factor that will also impact the price of your products or services is supply and demand; how many units of your product exist and how many people actually want it? Supply can either be infinite, like a digital software product or limited and exclusive, like a Tesla car, for example.   Source: Lumen   Promotion . Promotion refers to the marketing tactics that you employ to spread awareness of your products or services. These tactics can be anything from traditional methods like television & radio commercials, billboards, direct mail, and cold-call marketing to more modern, digital methods such as email, social media, digital advertising, content marketing, and beyond.  Researching your target audience and the channels on which you are most likely to reach them is a crucial step in planning your promotional strategy. Different demographic segments of the population will accept and respond to marketing in varying ways, times, and frequencies. Source: Acquire Whatever tactics you choose, your promotional strategy should be omnichannel; this means your promotional communications are consistent across all the channels where your brand interacts with potential and existing customers. Creating a consistent customer experience throughout the entirety of the buyer’s journey is important for your brand’s reputation. Every user touchpoint counts. Related Content: Experiential Marketing: 4 Es to Future-proof Your Strategy  . The 7Ps of the Marketing Mix. As time moves forward, so too do marketing methods and the 4Ps. In the late 1970s, it was widely acknowledged that the 4Ps needed an update, and with that, Booms & Bitner added 3 more Ps to the model.  So, what did they add?   Physical Evidence. Trust is a huge part of whether or not a consumer chooses to purchase a product from your company. That’s why Physical Evidence was added to the marketing mix as it can give your business the credibility needed to encourage trustworthiness among consumers.  The physical evidence that we are referring to here is anything that proves your business is real and operating within the law. After all, no one wants to buy products from a company that seems shifty and is not secure. Physical evidence can range from invoices, order confirmations, and receipts to your physical stores, a social media presence, and a legitimate website.  Keep in mind that customer reviews are incredibly important within the modern market, and many consumers prefer to hear what your previous customers have to say about your products and services over your business's direct promotions. Make positive reviews easily accessible on your website and your social media profiles, and ensure that you reply to all negative reviews in a professional and timely manner.   People . Your business is only as great as the people you choose to represent it; that’s why this P is vital at every level of your business. Everyone from your CEO and sales representatives to your store clerks, warehouse packers, and delivery drivers are a representation of your brand as a whole. Upholding company values such as being committed to customers, conducting roles within healthy & safe guidelines, and working as a team is key from the employee’s side. However, your employees can only do this with adequate training, leadership, recognition, and support from your side. Take care of your employees, and they will become promoters of your company. Modern consumers are more conscious and ethically focused; they have concerns about workers’ rights, a fair living wage, and want companies to provide a safe working environment for their employees.   Processes. What steps are required to deliver your product or service to your customers? Here, you must consider which activities, functions, and tasks must be completed, in what order, and what is required logistically to ensure that employees can complete these processes to a high standard. This may require investment in technologies such as CRM, logistics software, payment systems, etc.  Understanding and consistently evaluating your company processes will allow you to identify roadblocks within your sales funnel and areas where you could streamline to improve your customer service experience.  An awareness of processing trends will help your business maximise your budgets and stay ahead of the competition. Do not be afraid to take risks and innovate with new platforms to ensure that you can deliver the best for your customers while still driving profitability for your business.      The Startup Growth presented an overview example of how a digital marketing agency may formulate their marketing mix in terms of PPC (pay-per-click) services: Product — Pay-per-click advertising services Price — $499 — $1,999 Place — Remote work, website  Promotion — Run ads on Google Ads and send prospects to a custom landing page. People — Google Ads certified resources to work on client accounts. Processes — The steps needed to deliver the PPC service to the customer. Physical evidence — Send brochures, customer testimonials, company reviews, proposals. The marketing mix is a useful guide for any business planning their marketing strategy. Each element is equally important as the next and requires a level of research to ensure the cumulative parts are as effective as possible.   Related reading: What is Marketing Mix Modelling? 3 Benefits & Limitations   Marketing Channels. Digital Marketing. Digital marketing is a vast and extensive topic, so it’s tough to know where to start.  According to Neil Patel, digital marketing is:  “any form of marketing products or services that involves electronic devices.” In this definition, Patel places the initial implementation of digital marketing as far back as 1896, with Guglielmo Marconi, who is said to have invented the radio. However, in the opinion of most industry experts, whilst radio is technically a digital product, it should fall under the category of ‘traditional marketing’.  Another, more commonly accepted definition of digital marketing comes from Hubspot: “Digital marketing is an umbrella term for all of your company's online marketing efforts.” In this definition, they include examples of the primary digital tools and tactics that we know and love such as social media, sponsored advertising, email, push notifications, and content.  But digital marketing encompasses so much more than just these primary methods; each approach in itself has a multitude of forms, functions, and features that help to advance, elevate, and optimise your brand.  Consider the 5 Ds of digital marketing:  Digital devices: smartphones, tablets, desktops, gaming devices, etc. Digital platforms: Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, etc.  Digital media: owned or paid-for communications channels i.e. email, push notifications, in-app messages, search engines, online advertising, etc. Digital data: demographic, geographic, psychographic, or behavioural insights. This information is collected via digital channels such as social media, websites, Google Analytics, etc.   Digital technologies: the martech stack, or marketing technology, that businesses use. This could mean hosting platforms, automation sites, mobile apps, in-store kiosks, etc.   So why has digital become such a dominant tactic in modern marketing? Simply, because of the relentless growth and prominence of the internet. According to Statista, the number of internet users in 2009 was around 1.7 billion, that number increased to 4.13 billion in 2019. To put it into perspective, that’s an increase in internet usage of more than 142.9% in the past 10 years.     Research by Oberlo found that there are over 4.33 billion active internet users worldwide (in 2020). That’s around 55% of the total population. At this point in time, having an online presence is essential for any brand looking to see continued growth. Consumers now expect and rely on it; so having a website, a digital ad strategy, or even just a social media profile establishes to current and prospective consumers that, if nothing else, your brand is legitimate. But digital marketing methods aren’t solely there to convince people that you exist; they offer variety and creativity in your strategy, they help you to monitor and manage the success and ROI of your campaigns, they help you to experiment, to discover new tactics, and bring you closer to achieving your goals.   The best digital marketers have a clear picture of how each digital marketing campaign supports their overarching goals. Source: Hubspot   So let’s take a look at the primary aspects of digital marketing and their benefits.     Email. Businesses use email marketing to communicate with their audiences. The function of email communication stretches further than simply product promotion. The types of emails that a business might focus on within their strategy include the likes of:  Discounts, gifts & sales  Onboarding emails for new customers Relevant news about the brand Events Offers for members of loyalty programs Follow-up emails, e.g. for a contact who downloaded a piece of content Blog subscription newsletters     Related reading: How To Build The Perfect Onboarding Campaign   Email marketing is super efficient because it enables you to easily segment your audience, meaning that you connect with the right people, in the right place, at the right time, and in the right way.     You can fully personalise emails by creating specific lists, automating messages based on time, contact details, or contact behaviours, and you have the freedom and ability to design emails that are creative and on-brand.     Retaining engagement and offering information via email is a great way to remind your customers of your presence, of your value, and it encourages loyalty. And email marketing is shown to be one of the most popular and effective tools for growing your brand.   Related reading: How to Decrease Inactive Users with Email Marketing    . Mobile. A primary component of digital marketing is mobile marketing. Mobile is a form of digital marketing that focuses on connecting with users via their smartphones and tablets, and typically consists of targeted ads and messages that appear on a user’s device. When it comes to design, customisation, personalisation, formats, and functions, the options for general mobile marketing are varied and vast.   Research by RescueTime found that the average person spends 3 hours and 15 minutes on their smartphone every day. And the top 20% of smartphone users’ daily screen time is in excess of over 4 hours.     But what does this mean for marketers? Does it change anything? There’s one keyword that springs to mind: optimisation. Yes, that’s right. Do you have a website that’s designed for desktop users? You better optimise it for mobile. Have you just created a digital ad? You better make sure it’s mobile-friendly. Do you post images on social media? You better optimise… Ok, you get the picture. As smartphone usage accounts for 69% of the time people spend consuming digital data (in the U.S. alone), optimising your digital marketing strategy is vital.      We live in a digital age; today peoples’ mobile phone bills are mostly priced based on data usage, and free wifi access is almost guaranteed. This means that mobile phone usage is now such an integral and normalised part of society, like driving your car to work, making lunch, going for a walk, or listening to music, that if you’re not targeting mobile phone users, you’re truly missing out.   Source: Statista   With the number of smartphone users worldwide set to increase in the coming years, mobile marketing shows no signs of slowing down, so be sure to optimise in the right way and make mobile a key player in your marketing strategy.   .  . Social Media. Social media marketing sees brands using social networking platforms as an outreach tool with the primary focus being to connect with current consumers and prospects. Social media has become a fundamental feature for brands in recent years. Its leading function is no longer just content sharing with the aim of generating traffic. It has evolved to become much, much more.   Source: Statista   Let’s assume that Statista’s data gathering and predicted outcome is correct and that, by the end of 2020, there will be 3.08 billion social media users worldwide, that number creeping up ever-so unsubtly. That means that in the past 10 years, social media usage has seen an increase of over 215%.     Social media has matured in recent years to the point where it’s no longer just a place where people host images or scatter random thoughts. These platforms now contain real, usable data; valuable information that brands can utilise in order to provide their audiences with content, messages, knowledge, and insights that are meaningful and highly personalised.     Brands can use social media analytics to focus on areas that specifically interest them and the market segments that they aim to target, i.e. using social listening for relevant mentions, tracking behavioural tendencies such as engagement rates, clicks, reach, and generally gathering specific nuggets of information that are used to make informed decisions and bespoke communications.   71% of consumers who have had a positive experience with a brand on social media are likely to recommend the brand to their friends and family . Source: Lyfemarketing   Social media has also paved the way for a whole new avenue of advertising. Due to the wealth and variety of data that social media enables businesses to gather and analyse, advertising can be automated, optimised, and highly targeted based on demographic, geographic, psychographic, and behavioural information. Like many forms of digital advertising, social media typically utilises a PPC method to increase traffic to websites, boost brand awareness, or promote specific products and services.  It’s incredibly uncommon to find a successful brand that does not utilise social media. That’s why social media marketing should have a firm and consistent place in your marketing strategy.     . Content Marketing. When it comes to reaching prospects, the traditional ‘hard sell’ just doesn’t cut it anymore. People no longer want to be pushed, prodded, and treated like nothing more than a sale. They want things that are meaningful, valuable, and relevant to them. That’s why content marketing has become a prominent and favoured approach for marketers globally. But what is it? According to the Content Marketing Institute: “Content marketing is a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly-defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.” Essentially, instead of pitching your products or services, you create and present content that is useful, educational, entertaining, enlightening or simply helps consumers to deal with an issue.  Content marketing comes in many forms: Blogs Infographics Videos Guides Podcasts And more! Including the likes of white pages, books, and webinars. Ultimately, one of the most important things to consider when including content marketing into your strategy is relevancy; is this content relevant to your current and prospective audience? For example, if your target audience doesn’t really reside online, then you should look for different avenues to reach them.   Related reading: How to Create an Effective Content Marketing Strategy (7 Steps) Content marketing is a great way to promote your brand and your offerings in a way that gives something back to your audience. Additionally, if your content marketing is to a high enough standard, you will have the highly sought-after position of being a ‘thought leader’ in your industry.   SEO. SEO stands for Search Engine Optimisation. SEO is the process of optimising aspects of your website and content in order to increase the quality and quantity of targeted traffic your website receives. Quality: you want the people who are coming to your site to be relevant - there’s no use attracting a huge number of viewers if they’re not going to purchase your product, enquire about your services or find value in your content. Quantity: once you have the right people coming to your website, you want to continuously increase the number of unique page views you receive from the search engine results pages (SERPs).    How does SEO work? First, consider the ‘search engine’ aspect of SEO. When you search for something on Google, Bing, Yahoo!, or any others, the search engine uses an algorithm to crawl the internet in order to find what it thinks is the ‘best’ result for what you’re looking for.  According to Backlinko, websites and web pages are ranked by Google based on these 3 main factors:   1. Relevancy . This relates to the keywords that are used in your search. The search engine will rapidly explore the internet to find a piece of content that closely relates to your keywords. For example, if you type in ‘the essential guide to market segmentation’ you might just see this as your result: But if you look just underneath your search, you will see that Google has produced 62,800,000 results in 0.32 seconds. So search engines don’t display results based solely on relevancy; this is where our 2 other primary factors come in.   2. Authority. Search engines determine the authority of a website or piece of content based on authoritative indicators such as reviews, affiliate programs, and backlinks, i.e. the number of other pages that link back to that page.     Typically, the more backlinks a page has, the higher it will rank in Google.   3. Usefulness. Content can’t just be relevant or authoritative, it must also have a use. If your content is not seen to be useful then, unfortunately, Google won’t want to rank it highly. But what does ‘usefulness’ actually mean? According to Google’s long-term Staff Software Engineer, Ryan Moulton, there has to be “a balance between popularity and quality”.  For example, if you search ‘how to get rid of the invasive plant species Japanese Knotweed’, there will likely be two different results that appear: one might be an academic article that describes the plant and its ecological effects using scientific jargon which most people won’t understand. Another result might come from ‘wikiHow’, a Wikipedia-style community that creates ‘how-to’ guides using simple descriptions and helpful images.  The scientific article will rank highly in Google due to its high-quality content and the number of backlinks it has within the text. However, the wikiHow result will also rank highly as the content is organised into clear sections, full of keywords, and because of its ‘user signals’ or behavioural patterns.  That’s just the search engine part. Optimisation comes into play from the side of the website host, and there are a number of key areas to take into account when it comes to optimising your website or web page:  Keywords: If you’re writing a blog, you need to make sure that you optimise it by using the right keywords in these areas: Title tag Meta description URL Headings & subheadings Alt text You can use the likes of Google Keyword Planner to help you learn the average number of monthly searches for your keywords, the competition these keywords see on Google Search, and much more.  Internal links, or backlinks: ensure that your piece of content contains links to other areas or content in your website. Be mobile-friendly: according to Statista, in April 2020, over 98% of active user accounts on Facebook accessed the social network via any kind of mobile phone; those using only mobile phones accounted for 78%, and a mere 1.8% went to those using a laptop or desktop computer.   Content: your content has to be relevant, valuable, useful, and, as discussed above, authoritative. It also has to focus on the intent of your current and prospective audience; what do they want to know and how can you help them?   Of course, as with most digital marketing practices, SEO is constantly evolving. From Google’s algorithm updates to the increase of use in digital voice assistants, SEO is a vitally integral part of your digital marketing strategy.   Paid Advertising. The digitalisation of most businesses, and the amount of current consumers and prospects that now reside online, means that paid, digital advertising has flourished. There are typically 5 main types of paid ads: Display, Search, Native Advertising, Social Media, and Remarketing. And almost all of them use the ‘pay-per-click’ (PPC) approach.  We’re going to explore a brief rundown of each common aspect, (bar social media as it’s been discussed previously) and the benefits involved with each one.     Display. Display advertising refers to digital advertisements that use text, imagery, gifs, video, or any kind of rich media. The aim of display ads is to raise brand awareness and to encourage potential leads to ‘click’ by being prominent on a web page and visually enticing, just like this: The aesthetic nature of display ads demands attention from viewers and therefore encourages a target audience to take action, i.e. click-through to a blog post, make a purchase, or subscribe to a newsletter, for example.    The average CTR (clickthrough rate) for display ads, across all industries, is 0.35% . Source: Hubspot   Display ads usually appear when people are consuming content. Take the likes of Forbes: if you click on an article by Forbes, you will notice an eye-catching banner ad at the top of the page. You will also notice the little square branded image alongside the article and the video that’s initially at the top right-hand side of the page but moves down to the bottom left when you scroll down.  For some readers, this might be a little overwhelming - an excess of visual stimulation, which will encourage them to exit the page. However, for many readers, these aesthetically prominent ads prompt the desired result - a hasty click.  . Search. When it comes to understanding search ads, the clue is in the name: search ads occur on a search engine results page (SERP). This means that they appear whenever someone actively enquires about a topic, looks for solutions, or searches for a brand, their products, or services via a search engine.  Despite having a little ‘Ad’ label on them, search ads typically look like organic search results. Here’s an example that you will likely be very familiar with:     But what do search ads depend on? Take Google Ads, for example. The ads that are featured on a SERP are based on a number of key components: your keywords, your Quality Score, your Ad Rank, and how high your bid is per click. Unlike display ads, the average CTR for a search ad (across all industries) is 1.91%. Compared to display ads, that’s an increase of over 440%! Search ads are typically more successful than display ads because of one key factor: relevance. They relate directly to whatever the person has searched for, capturing the intent of the potential consumer.     Remarketing . Remarketing is a term that’s thrown about a lot today. Often confused with retargeting, remarketing is a promotional technique that aims to re-engage consumers who have shown an interest in a product or service somewhere on the internet.  Remarketing is made possible through data collection; browser cookies, user IDs, and mobile advertiser IDs. They’re implemented when people visit your site, use an app, or interact with your brand on social media. Remarketing is essentially a way of ‘following’ consumers with hyper-targeted, personalised ads.       The goal of remarketing is to record the items that users have viewed and interacted with, and then promote that product or service, using market segmentation and targeting, on external channels like news sites, search engines, or social media, for example. Research from Moz showed that remarketing improved their conversion rates by 51%, and increased their average site visit duration by a massive 300%!    Ultimately, the purpose of remarketing is to drive highly targeted consumers back to your website and towards the point of conversion. And, when done correctly, it really works.      Native Advertising. Native advertising is a form of paid, digital advertising where the ad itself is embedded amongst content and blends in with the design of the page on which it sits. The aim of native advertising is to really look like natural content, and be as non-intrusive as possible, whilst still enticing the consumer. One of the greats of native advertising is Instagram, take a look at this example:       Native ads epitomise the ‘soft sell’, that’s evident in the ad pictured above. It’s relevant to the user and blends in with the design of the platform where it’s located. This ad is almost indistinguishable from a normal post on Instagram, the only clue that indicates that this post is a paid advertisement is the addition of the word ‘sponsored’, featured under the brand name or username, where a user’s location would be (or it would simply be left blank).     Consumers look at native ads 53% more than display ads. Native ads create an 18% increase in purchase intent, and the visual engagement with native ads is the same, and even slightly higher than the original editorial content. Source: Outbrain   Research shows that the average CTR for native ads is between 0.8% and 1%, that’s over 50% higher than the average CTR for standard display ads. A lot of native advertising is based on remarketing, which is one of the reasons why they see more interaction than the likes of display ads: they’re relevant. It’s this level of personalisation that entices your prospective audience and retains your current, loyal consumers.   . Push Notifications . Push notifications are short messages that are delivered to a user’s device via an app or website. They can be media-rich and also contain a CTA (call-to-action) which aims to prompt the user into making an action like revisiting the app or accessing a particular product, for example.       Most brands now use push notifications. If you have an app on your mobile phone, chances are that, as soon as you initially enter the app, you are told that the app would like to send you push notifications. Essentially, push notifications are here to stay. But with the huge array of apps flooding the market, it’s important for brands to make their push notifications something special and avoid the dreaded opt-out. This means they must have a great design, offer valuable content, and the messages must be relevant to the user.    Traditional Marketing. Traditional marketing essentially refers to any kind of marketing that doesn't reside online. This means television, radio, print media, direct mail, and referrals. Similar to digital marketing, traditional marketing is broad and each aspect encompasses a number of different and specific features.  For example, if you include television marketing in your strategy, the methods and intricacies of TV marketing will be entirely different from the likes of, say, print marketing.  Contrary to what some may think, traditional and digital marketing aren’t mutually exclusive; many brands incorporate both forms of promotion in their strategies in order to broaden their horizons and ensure that they are seen in at least one place. It’s true that most businesses will use some form of market segmentation, meaning that they will know whether or not their target audience is mostly online, offline, or a mix of both. But in order to be heard amongst the huge array of promotions and advertisements that are present in our lives, experimenting with a variety of marketing methods is not a bad thing.     Source: IPA Touchpoints, Zenith   So let’s take a look at each of the most typical forms of traditional marketing and their benefits.   Print Media. Print media refers to newspapers and magazines. It’s one of the earliest forms of traditional marketing, dating back to the 15th century. In 1440, Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press, and with that, the production and distribution of news pages en-masse became possible.  Mass production is the type of print media we’re familiar with. However, if you want to take it back even further, evidence of printing techniques have been recorded as early as 3000 B.C.E, in ancient Mesopotamia, where clay tablets were used to imprint symbols and images that elicited meaning. The same technique was used to create one of the most ancient epic stories known to literature, The Epic of Gilgamesh.   Source: ResearchGate   But back to the present day. Print newspapers are seeing a decline in ad revenue, and it’s clear to see why; digital advertising is often cheaper and, with impressive algorithms and analytics available at the click of a button, it also offers a lot more in return, such as an extensive reach and the ability to accurately analyse the effect of your hard-earned cash.   Source: Enders Analysis   That being said, print is most certainly not dead. Many newspapers and magazines are deciding to include digital in their strategies, offering both print media and digital copies of their content. But print alone still has the ability to positively impact your marketing efforts. Research shows that newspaper ads are viewed for 2.5 times longer than the average digital ad. This is because they’re far less in-your-face; people sitting down to read a newspaper or magazine are physically engaging with the product in their hands.  Furthermore, ads in newspapers and magazines are static, meaning that they don’t move around the page and vie for attention - this gives the consumer the power to decide whether or not they wish to engage with this ad.  General Manager for Ebiquity Paris, Nathalie Taboch, has said that people don’t perceive ‘tangible ads (TV, print or poster campaigns) the same way as digital ones’. Digital ads offer instant, snackable content whereas tangible ads call on the imagination thus creating a deeper imprint in the reader’s memory.  . Broadcast . Broadcast marketing is the process of utilising television and radio (two well-known classics) for promotion in your marketing strategy in order to increase viewers and listeners. Whilst no one can deny the proliferation of digital marketing, TV, and radio built the foundations of promotion as we know it today, and they’re still a fundamental aspect of many marketing strategies.  That’s partly because television and radio do not exist separately from the online world - sure, people still use regular television sets and radios still reside in kitchens or cars, for example, but they’re also online. Recent studies have shown that that 80% of people still watch programs on a traditional TV set, 35% watch on a laptop, and 29% on a tablet, but that these figures vary by demographic.  That being said, research from Statista shows that the number of TV households increased by 1.83% from 2017 to 2018.   Source: Statista   In order to successfully market using TV and radio, brands often collect and analyse demographic data and corresponding viewing data from their audiences. Similar to any kind of market segmentation research, the data is collected via focus groups, surveys, interviews, etc.  Brands today can still successfully utilise broadcast media in their strategies and see real, valuable results. Unlike many marketing methods, broadcast marketing not only uses traditional promotional techniques like product placement in TV shows and movies, traditional commercials, and endorsements by radio personalities, but it’s breaking into new media venues such as Netflix. Being consistent by maintaining a presence on TV and/or radio, whilst also broadening horizons and branching out into new venues can have a significant impact on the success of brand's endeavours.    Direct Mail. As a marketing tactic, direct mail is still widely used. Direct mail doesn’t refer to just one method,  it encompasses a variety of materials including postcards, flyers, sales letters, newsletters, and catalogs.  Direct mail is generally targeted as the information is sent to specific individuals or market segments. It lets you communicate your message on a more personal, one-to-one basis and also allows your brand to control who receives the message, as well as when and where they receive it - unlike digital messages, such as email and push notifications, which can be more easily distributed, either accidentally or on purpose, to people who they’re not intended for.    Source: Marketing Charts   That being said, when it comes to direct mail, ‘spam’ is most definitely still a thing - almost all of us will receive a brochure or catalog through our letterboxes that we did not sign up for; have no interest in, and, frankly, the content gets put straight into the recycling box. Not only is this bad for the consumer, who now has to get rid of something they never wanted or considered in the first place, but the money spent by the brand to design, print, and distribute the product has all been for nothing. Additionally, it can be far more difficult to analyse the success of direct mail compared to email, for example. Nevertheless, with accurate segmentation and targeting, direct mail can be highly personalised, and tailored, and therefore be very valuable, to consumers which, in turn, is beneficial to the brand. It can also greatly increase ROI, brand awareness, and peoples’ affinity towards a brand.   Referral. Lastly, we come to referrals. Or 'word of mouth' (WOM) marketing - which we briefly touched on earlier in this article. WOM marketing relies on customers to spread the good word of the brand and its products and services. This could mean a positive comment about a new range of gym shoes, or an artist on Spotify, or it could take the form of User Generated Content (UGC).  Whilst this is essentially free advertising, WOM is a marketing tactic that bears an array of pros and cons.  Known to be one of the most powerful forms of promotion, WOM is considered as being far more effective than traditional media. In fact, 92% of consumers trust recommendations from their friends and family over traditional media. It’s true that people can make referrals of their own accord, but some brands do what’s known as ‘seeding’, where a kind of ‘buzz’ is created and consumers are encouraged or influenced to positively reference a company. This could come out of a promotion, social media campaign, or a celebrity endorsement, for example.   70% of marketers said they have used or plan to use consumers to disseminate product-related content. Source: Outbrain   Referral marketing seems great, right? It’s well trusted, it costs practically nothing from a business point of view, however, it should not be solely relied upon. The thing about WOM marketing is you don’t really have much control over it. Sure, you can push out a campaign that speaks highly of your product, and you can put money towards great promotions to spur positive reactions but, at the end of the day, free speech is free speech, and with the unparalleled power of social media and review sites, it would be foolish for a brand to center their entire marketing strategy, and place all of their trust, in referral marketing.   That being said, as social creatures, we naturally share our experiences, especially when it comes to new purchases. So, for example, if a friend recommends a specific brand of hiking boots, you will likely take their recommendation over a TV advert from a large corporation. That’s also one of the reasons why brands are beginning to opt for a human-centered approach to marketing; if you know the brand well enough, as if they were a friend with real purpose, hopes and values, then you will undoubtedly begin to place trust in what they say and do - thus enhancing the cycle of positive referral marketing.   Marketing Automation. Incorporating marketing automation into your marketing strategy can bring more leads, conversions, and sales, all with less work. According to Marketo, 76% of companies that implement marketing automation generate a return on their investment within the first year. Not only that, but 44% of them see a return within just six months.   80% of marketers report an increase in leads due to automation. Source: Invespcro There are many great marketing automation platforms out there, and choosing the one that’s right for you will depend on what exactly you want to achieve. But generally speaking, most platforms are designed to help marketers capture leads, develop relationships, and move prospects further down the sales funnel in bulk.  Marketers commonly employ automation for use in their email marketing campaigns, social media scheduling, lead nurturing, multi-channel marketing, and online advertising. Just imagine setting up an automated email marketing campaign whereby all actions are automatically triggered and executed. Now, instead of spending your day manually completing day-to-day tasks, you can focus your energy on driving strategy.   Related reading: How to Boost Your ROI with Email Marketing Automation   By no means does marketing automation turn your brand into a robot. It simply allows you to scale your efforts in order to build relationships with multiple prospects across multiple channels, providing them with high quality, consistent experiences. Plus, with proper segmentation, an automation tool will ensure that you are providing relevant content, to the right prospect, in the right place, and at the right time.  Check out the graphic below to get an overview of the benefits that having a marketing automation strategy in place would bring to your overall business, marketing, and sales team:   Source: VentureHarbour   Marketing Automation & Machine Learning. With marketing automation, marketers have found easy ways to carry out repetitive tasks. However, the introduction of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) has taken this to a whole new level thanks to predictive analytics and personalisation engines. With AI, marketing automation is now more human.  .   Machine learning involves algorithms that can leverage data to make decisions for itself, as well as being able to continually learn without any human input and adjust actions based on that learning. How smart it becomes depends largely on the amount of data the machine is provided. Here are a few examples of where AI can be applied effectively in marketing: The use of Natural Language Generation to scale your content To better understand who your customers really are Enhance customer satisfaction around the experience, not the channel Provide analytics that helps with getting more out of your visual content Automatically create a list of prospects and define who is the best one   With marketing tools that support AI in place, you can get even more out of your automation strategy and help to shorten the entire sales cycle as you motivate your target audience to take the desired action sooner. An AI-enabled marketer can reach every customer at the right time, knows the best audience for every campaign, and delivers the perfect content for every customer.   Customer Retention. After a long and arduous journey, you have reached the peak of marketing strategy - the sale. You have followed each step to the letter and guess what, it’s worked! You’ve bagged a customer- actually, it's more than likely that you’ve bagged many customers (go you). But your story doesn’t end here!  The biggest mistake that you can make as a marketer is believing that the point of sale is the end of your relationship with a customer. In fact, the sale is just the beginning… Play your cards right and you could nurture one sale into a life-long, loyal, and profitable, brand-customer relationship.  It’s time to think about your customer retention strategy...   What is Customer Retention? Customer retention is a process of dedicating resources to ensure first-time customers return to your business to make repeat purchases, continue their subscription, upgrade their service package, etc.  The ability of a company to retain its customers is measured over a predetermined period of time, i.e. monthly, quarterly, yearly, etc. Depending on what industry you operate within and the goods or services you offer, the tactics which your business deploys to retain customers will be different.  Ultimately, the goal of customer retention is to maximise the lifetime value and profitability of each customer.   Calculating Customer Retention. If, as a business, you’re totally new to the concept of customer retention, then the first step you need to take is to calculate your current customer retention rate. Now, this does require a small level of mathematical calculation… But never fear, there’s no need for you to be a whiz kid - it’s fairly simple and you’re always allowed to use a calculator to help you! Phew... To calculate your current retention rate, first pick a time period which you will define retention by. Then, follow the formula below: This is not the only metric that you should be tracking, however; when it comes to customer retention, there are 2 more key metrics which you need to pay attention to, especially if you’re working in retail or e-commerce industries.    1. Purchase Frequency: determine how often your customers are returning to your business  # of Orders Placed / # Unique Customers    2. Average Order Value: determine how much money customers are spending in your store per transaction Total Revenue Earned / # Orders Placed  .  . When and why is customer retention important?   97% of companies say retention is a priority. Source: Brightback   The level of customer retention activity your business performs will vary depending on where your business is in its lifecycle. For example, a brand new company with no current customers will be 100% focused on their acquisition strategy, but as they begin to gain traction and win customers it would be foolish not to optimise their strategy - and their budget - toward retention. Source: Shopify There are 3 main reasons why retention is an important factor for any business with customers:    1. Retention saves money . On day one in business school, you learn that it’s cheaper to retain an existing customer than gain a new one - in fact, in some industries, it can cost up to 30 times more to acquire a new customer. Customer acquisition is expensive and competitive; you have to spend a lot of money to even get your products in front of your customers. For example, Facebook digital advertising costs $0.97 CPC (Cost-Per-Click), and $7.19 CPM (Cost-Per-1000-Impressions). Pure and simple, focusing time and effort on your customer retention strategy will use your budget more efficiently and effectively.    2. Retention increases profitability . It’s commonly cited that even a 5% increase in retention rates can increase the profitability of your company by 25% to 95%. With those kinds of numbers, you really can’t afford to ignore retention tactics any longer.  There are several reasons why returning customers drive profitability:  Returning customers are 3 to 10 times more likely to make repeat purchases because of a build-up of trust - that is, if their previous experience with your brand was positive.  The average cost-per-spend of a returning customer will increase across their customer-lifetime. Loyal customers are more likely to respond well to upselling and cross-selling.    3. Retention encourages referrals . A big focus of your retention activities will be creating an enjoyable experience for your customer. Each touchpoint they have with your business should be easy, from when they first browse your website or store to when they make a purchase, then during onboarding and beyond.    Related reading: 6 Reasons Why Your Business Needs Customer Onboarding   Enjoyable experiences are important to customer retention for two reasons, the first being obvious: they make your customers want to return to your business for repeat purchases. The second reason is more nuanced; enjoyable experiences create emotional connections, they make us happy, loyal, and, well… chatty with our friends and family. This is great in terms of WOM, as SDL reports that 58% of consumers who experience a consistent and positive brand experience share it on social media.  . GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation).   What is GDPR? As of May 2018, all marketing communications need to comply with GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). This means that you can no longer freely collect the information of any Tom-Dick-and-Harry that visits (or doesn’t visit) your website and contact them with content that they don’t want or need.  To put it technically: GDPR impacts the way we store, access, record, and control data. Any data collection must be transparent, meaning that the data subjects must be aware that their data is being collected, have open access to view what data is held on them, and remove the data controllers right to it at any time. This focus on data accountability means that data centralisation becomes imperative - no more silos of data on random spreadsheets and lost documents! Unifying all your data on a CRM system is a must to comply with these regulations.  GDPR also restricted the amount of data you can ask any, one user for in order to qualify them as a lead - this is known as data minimisation. The data you collect must be adequate, relevant, and limited to what is necessary.  .   How does this impact your customer retention? . GDPR was enacted to give consumers back the control of their personal data and the privacy which they felt had been lost. As a result of the publicity surrounding GDPR and the mass scramble felt by brands to bring their practices in line with the regulations, consumers became acutely aware of their new rights. So, flaunting the new GDPR rules will not sit right with customers today and could not only lose their custom but could see you reported and hit with a hefty fine!  . Analysing your Marketing Strategy Performance. The final step after planning and implementing a marketing strategy is to measure its results. In this day and age, we have the huge advantage of having access to a wide variety of customer data and analytics that we can use to analyse marketing strategy performance and assist any future decisions.  Previously, marketers had been taking a shot in the dark. It was simply impossible (unless you point-blank asked) to be sure where any of your leads came from. If you were simultaneously running both a billboard campaign alongside a radio advertisement, it was likely that you would never know which pulled in more leads than the other.Related reading: How to be a Data-Driven Marketer: 8 Key Steps However, digital marketing is now ‘the norm’, as well as being one of the quickest ways to reach out to huge numbers of your target market at the same time through the likes of PPC marketing, Google Ads, and various other search engines and social platforms. It’s likely that most of the platforms you use will have tools already built in that allow for easy data capture and analysis. For example, with Google Ads, you get quick access to all marketing analytics such as how many people have seen your ads, clicked on them, visited your website, and even called you. By having a clear overview of how your ads are performing you can tweak or pause them at any time you like.     Why Are Marketing Analytics Important? Keeping a close eye on your key performance indicators (KPIs) is an important part of your overall strategy as it allows marketers to be much more efficient and make better use of their marketing budget. Plus, it’s likely that your competitors are already leveraging their marketing analytics to learn and advance their business, so you need to be doing the same to prevent falling behind.   Businesses that use data to inform marketing and sales decisions see a 15-20% increase in marketing ROI. Source: McKinsey & Company     The Most Important KPIs Marketers Need To Measure. In order to get the most out of your marketing analytics, you need to make sure you choose the right KPIs to measure. Tracking the wrong KPIs won’t drive any actionable results and will only be a huge waste of your time and resources. When it comes to evaluating the success of your marketing strategy you need to choose the KPIs that are most in-line with your business goals.  To get you started, here are 5 KPIs that every marketer should be measuring: Sales Revenue Your number one KPI. This involves whether or not the sales you make are exceeding the cost of your marketing strategy. Cost Per Conversion (CPC) How much is it costing you on average to generate one lead as a result of your marketing efforts? For example, if you spend $100 on Google Ads and generate 10 leads, your CPC is $10. Audience Behaviours  This metric involves tracking all website activity, including how many visitors your website received, where they came from, the pages they viewed, bounce rate, etc.  Form Conversion Rates The true test of your content marketing efforts is by looking at how many leads it generates as a result. How are the forms on your landing pages performing? What is the percentage of reputable MQLs (marketing qualified leads)? Social Media Reach How many leads are you getting from social media networks such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.? What sort of posts generate the most engagement?    These 5 KPIs are just a skim off the surface when it comes to the true potential of marketing analytics. With data behind you, any decision you make as a result has a much higher chance of success in comparison to guesswork. Investing time into your analytics strategy will allow you to prove that your efforts are delivering high-quality leads that convert into sales. Conclusion. Pulling together a successful marketing strategy plan won’t just happen overnight. There are a number of factors that we have touched on throughout this guide that must be considered. From establishing your target audience, right through to developing strategies for customer retention and marketing strategy analysis, the entire process will require extensive research, planning, patience, creativity, and passion.  As we discussed at the beginning, your marketing strategy should be repeatable, and scalable in order to have the best chances of success. With a company-wide strategy in place, everyone remains on the same page as to the steps that need to be taken to reach the pre-defined goals and objectives of the organisation. As a marketer, you can focus your efforts on ways to improve the strategy and make it work, rather than worry each month about what the strategy is going to be.  A marketing strategy plan will help you to develop an edge over your competitors as it will highlight each and every step you need to take to improve your business. It also provides you with the opportunity to build a tight-knit relationship with your customers, giving you insight into different ways to adapt your product or service to better meet their needs.  Every marketing strategy is different. However, the overall purpose of any great strategy is to map out the steps you're going to take to achieve your desired goals. Put the hard work in and you’ll be well on your way to reaping the rewards.     Get Started With Hurree Whether you want to understand your audience behaviour or send campaigns across multiple platforms based on that behaviour, Hurree has a solution for you.         Product   Why Hurree? Cross-Platform  Analytics Dashboard Plug & Play Integrations Smart Insights FAQS         Resources   Blog   Ebooks   Infographics   Videos   Podcasts   Market Segmentation   Market Strategy   Data Integration   Push Notifications   Company   About Us   Contact Us   Hurree Brand   Careers   Become a Partner     
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Title17 Powerful Marketing Strategies That You Should Steal in 2022
Urlhttps://www.engagebay.com/blog/powerful-marketing-strategies/
DescriptionDiscover the best marketing strategies of all time. We have explained 17 proven marketing strategies and shared tips to implement them
Date14 Jul 2021
Organic Position27
H117 Powerful Marketing Strategies To Grow Business Faster
H2Powerful Marketing Strategies To Grow Your Business Faster
Conclusion
H3#1. Set a Goal and a Budget
#2. Build Your Influence
#3. Champion One Social Channel
#4. Build Rapport through Email
#5. Blog Strategically
#6. Conduct Research That Impacts Your SEO
#7. Teach Others
#8. Survey, Listen, and Learn
#9. Reexamine Your Landing Pages
#10. Stand for Something
#11. Leverage Social Media Advertising
#12. Leverage Google’s Local Offerings
#13. Prioritize Retention
#14. Woo Your Audience
#15. Explore Partnerships
#16. Enable Your Audience to Get to Know, Like and Trust You
#17. Promote a Free Consultation
engagebay-crm
#18. Bonus Strategy: Write a Column
Vinay Koshy
H2WithAnchorsPowerful Marketing Strategies To Grow Your Business Faster
Conclusion
Body17 Powerful Marketing Strategies To Grow Business FasterBy Vinay Koshy / Leave a Comment / Marketing / July 14, 2021 January 7, 2022 The best marketing strategies of all time are always about the basics of human behavior. After all, if you’re not able to understand the psyche of your potential customers, no amount of ad spend can save your business. Marketing is the most important part of growing a business—and if you’re looking for marketing strategies that are truly powerful, there are two things you should know: “What” are the best marketing strategies; and, “How” these marketing strategies work best. In this blog post, we have listed and explained 17 highly effective marketing strategies that the greatest of brands have used to improve their bottom line. We have also shared easy tips for you to execute these marketing strategies for your business. These marketing tactics really just speak to the fundamentals of good human relationships, and factor in the latest technological aids for marketing your brand. Read on. Table of Contents Powerful Marketing Strategies To Grow Your Business Faster. All small businesses want a low-budget marketing plan. The problem, however, is determining which of the successful small business marketing strategies offer the highest ROI. That’s why we are sharing a list of high-ROI marketing strategies that you can and should steal from the industry today. #1. Set a Goal and a Budget. Every business needs a direction. Every marketing campaign needs to start with a goal and a budget. This is perhaps the only free marketing strategy in the world. Without a goal and a budget, it becomes exceptionally difficult to determine whether or not your campaign was successful. Plus, according to CoSchedule’s roundup of 2018 marketing statistics, marketers that set goals for their campaigns are 429% more likely to report success. As Forbes contributor Jayson DeMers says, this makes sense because: “Goal-setting eliminates subjective perceptions of reality, making success objectively measurable. In that context, success isn’t a vague idea; it becomes demonstrable.” Let’s take a look at a few tips for setting your marketing campaign goal and budget: Choose 1-5 KPIs to measure. The most popular KPIs to measure include qualified leads, traffic, and direct revenue. Set a realistic budget. The U.S. Small Business Administration recommends that you spend 7-8% of total revenue on your marketing campaigns. Focus on the process, not the goal. Once your goal is set, create a process for achieving it and use your KPIs to measure and continually improve that process. #2. Build Your Influence. The most successful marketing campaigns help you achieve the highest ROI. Once you build your influence, you can use many more powerful marketing strategies. With influencer marketing delivering ROI as high as $6.50 for every $1 spent, it’s quickly become one of the most effective marketing strategies for a small business. This explains why influencers are finding their way into many social media promotional strategies used by small businesses. To create a successful influencer marketing campaign, Entrepreneur contributor Murray Newlands recommends the following steps: Select your KPIs Focus on the social media channels where your target market is most present Find a credible influencer Plan your publishing schedule Consistently improve and measure your outcomes #3. Champion One Social Channel. With the undeniable potential of social media marketing as a small business marketing strategy, it can be tempting to try and find success on as many social platforms as possible. But, as marketing guru Neil Patel tells us, it’s best to focus on one social channel at a time: “Jumping in head first and attempting to manage, say, four or five different channels can be overwhelming, and you’re unlikely to kill it at any strategy. Even if you’re a savvy marketer, you simply can’t devote the necessary time to extract the full potential of any single channel.” To become a champion of one social channel, the team at Social Media Marketo recommends a 12-step process: Image Source #4. Build Rapport through Email. With 59% of marketers claiming that email is their most effective marketing channel for revenue generation, this is one strategy that you don’t want to ignore. If you haven’t started building your email list, Social Triggers founder Derek Halpern recommends a few tips for getting started: Create a long-term content strategy to drive organic traffic to your website Create multiple opt-in offers Utilize an email list popup form Add a banner with an invitation to subscribe to your email list to your business signature. You can use tools like Designhill email signature generator to create a professional email sign-off with links, banners, and call-to-actions. For more details, check out this article on how to get more results from every email you send. #5. Blog Strategically. When done correctly, starting a blog is one of the absolute best ways to drive targeted traffic to your website. In fact, marketers that effectively utilize blogs tend to get 67% more leads than those that do not. But that’s only if you’re doing it right. To succeed with blogging, you should: Find your niche. Choosing a niche is one of the hardest, but most important, considerations before you start a blog. Focus on quality over quantity. One long-form, comprehensive post (1,500+ words) is worth 5x a brief, non-informative post. Develop a promotion strategy before writing. Many expert content marketers recommend spending 20% of your time on content creation and 80% on promotion. Create evergreen content. When you create evergreen content (and update that content when necessary), your content assets compound their impact over time. Use photo editing tools like Instasize to curate your content. #6. Conduct Research That Impacts Your SEO. With 70-80% of modern-day consumers ignoring ads altogether, ranking for targeted keywords has never been more important. To rank in SERPs for keywords that can drive high-quality leads, there are a few simple tips that you should follow: Focus on low-competition, long-tail keywords. If you own a wedding business, you’re not going to compete with David’s Bridal for the keyword “wedding dress.” Instead, you should focus your efforts on low-competition, long-tail keywords that are relevant to your audience. Utilize tools like SEMRush or KWFinder. While it may be tempting to use Google’s Keyword Planner, it’s been proven that they hide many low-competition keywords in an effort to increase ad spend. Tools like SEMRush and/or KWFinder make it incredibly easy to find high-ROI keywords that can drive high-quality leads to your website. #7. Teach Others. As Forbes contributor Brian Sutter says, “Teach, don’t sell…” “The idea of teaching instead of selling seems to turn marketing on its head, and yet it’s at the core of content marketing. ‘Teach, don’t sell’ is exactly what makes content marketing different from advertising.” This is a concept that far too many modern-day marketers misunderstand. And it’s why many businesses struggle to differentiate their message through content marketing. To ensure you’re teaching your audience the right way, Sutter recommends that you: Don’t include CTAs that ask readers to buy something in every piece of content Focus on your customer and what they want to know, not what you want to tell them Be generous with the content you offer #8. Survey, Listen, and Learn. Marketing research plays a crucial role in the success of your small business marketing strategies. After all, if you don’t know the audience you’re marketing to, it’s going to be difficult to communicate with them effectively. One of the best ways to perform market research is through the use of surveys. To get the most out of this strategy, Survey Monkey recommends that you: Define your objective for the research Set timelines Segment your audience to determine who receives which survey Use proven tools that allow you to collect and analyze data #9. Reexamine Your Landing Pages. One small business marketing strategy that can have an immediate impact on conversions is the focus of your landing pages. While most conversion experts are quick to recommend that you should always start your marketing campaign with a dedicated landing page, many fail to mention the importance of focusing on a single goal. For your landing page to succeed, your focus should be on getting your readers to take a single action. After all, if you have 20 links on your landing page, your attention ratio is 5%. With one link, that ratio is 100%. This simple act of focusing on getting your readers to take one action on each page can do wonders for your conversion rates. If you aren’t using landing pages to help sell your products or services, you could be missing out on countless potential customers. #10. Stand for Something. A recent McCann study found that 42% of American consumers believe that brands and companies are less truthful today than they were two decades ago. Translation: Almost half of all consumers don’t trust modern-day businesses. With this in mind, standing for something that’s important to both you and your target audience can become a huge differentiation factor. Take for example the ALS ice bucket challenge that went viral and raised $220 million for the ALS Association. Here are a few ways you can do it: Sponsor a charitable event Join forces with your employees and customers for a fundraising event Donate your product/service to a charity event #11. Leverage Social Media Advertising. Social media has certainly changed the game as far as how modern-day marketing works. But while many small businesses focus their efforts on the free and low-cost marketing opportunities that social media platforms offer, ads have also proven effective to drive ROI. Unsurprisingly, Facebook dominates in the world of social media advertising, as over 93% of marketers use some form of Facebook ads. To get the most out of your Facebook ad campaign, there are a few things you’ll want to focus on: Ensure that you’re creating an attractive offer Track the right KPIs Utilize attractive images and/or videos Set clear, measurable goals #12. Leverage Google’s Local Offerings. As a small business, local SEO can make or break your business. And while determining the driving forces behind which local businesses rank highest in Google is still somewhat of a mystery, the below graphic from Moz breaks it down in an easy-to-understand way: By focusing on optimizing local SEO for the above factors, you can quickly position yourself for success in the SERPs. #13. Prioritize Retention. It’s hard to debate the importance of customer retention to the long-term success of your small business. The probability of selling to an existing customer is approximately 65% and that for selling to a new customer is about 10-15%. To ensure that more of your customers are continuing to purchase from you, growth marketer Sujan Patel recommends that you focus on improving your onboarding process. To do it, Patel says that you should: Establish the point where you’re losing customers and focus your efforts there first Define your customers’ definition of success and help them achieve it Help your customers achieve quick wins Create evergreen resources #14. Woo Your Audience. Storytelling is a powerful tool for any marketer. It can drive up the conversion rates by as much as 400%. While it can be difficult to measure, there’s little doubt that storytelling can be an effective way to market your business and attract a loyal following. To do that, Forbes contributor Mike Kappel recommends 5 Essential Tips for Business Storytelling: Determine the parameters (who, what, when, where) Be completely authentic Determine the outcome Be consistent Allow customers to become part of the story #15. Explore Partnerships. Exploring and utilizing partnerships with other small businesses can boost the revenue potential of your business exponentially. As Entrepreneur contributor Web Smith points out: “You can survive alone, but you’ll only really thrive when you plug into the community around you.” To develop effective partnerships, Smith recommends that you: Be upfront about your business Ask the right questions Focus on partnership opportunities that can be mutually beneficial #16. Enable Your Audience to Get to Know, Like and Trust You. Webinars have become a go-to marketing strategy for tech businesses with a good digital presence. However, small businesses that are not so tech-savvy are missing out. With webinars being noted as among the top 5 most successful marketing strategies, you need to take advantage of this trend. Amy Porterfield uses webinars as a critical component to building her customer base. She says webinars help her audience get to know, like, and trust her. To borrow from Forbes Contributor Ashley Stahl, a webinar host should: Focus on creating amazing content Choose a time that’s convenient for your target audience Prepare, prepare, prepare #17. Promote a Free Consultation. While it will undoubtedly vary by industry, the conversion rate of offering free consultations makes it one of the most effective small business marketing strategies trending today. In fact, in some cases, even medical businesses have seen conversion rates as high as 75% when they offer free consultations. Let’s take a look at a few tips to raise the likelihood of turning a lead into a customer through your free consultation: Focus on helping the customer and creating a quick win for them Ask targeted questions Show them why and how you can help them A free demo goes a long way in clarifying the customer’s doubts and building trust. . #18. Bonus Strategy: Write a Column. Writing a column for well-known publications that share your target audience is a great way to drive traffic to your website and generate brand recognition. Josh Steimle for example writes for publications like Forbes which has served to provide great leads for his business. This tactic, which is also known as guest posting, can also help you develop partnerships with businesses and website owners that share your target market. To succeed with this strategy, Copyblogger recommends that you: Focus on the needs of the editor and column you intend to write for Create amazing content Become a go-to resource Don’t be overly promotional — focus on providing value instead How did you like our blog post? Would you like to read more such content? Digital Agency Network has 14 tips for effective digital marketing agency growth. 👉👉Get FREE lifetime access (up to 15 users) to EngageBay – the simplest and powerful All-in-One marketing software for growing companies from here.  Conclusion. In this blog post, we have shared with you 17 (actually, 18) of the best marketing strategies of all time. We sincerely hope that you have enjoyed reading and learning from them. Do you know any other marketing strategy not listed here that has proven to work for businesses? If YES, do let us know about it in the comments section below. Also, please share this post with your colleagues and friends who might find these marketing strategies helpful too. If you need a free marketing software, remember that EngageBay is designed for novice marketers and small businesses. This all-in-one email marketing, landing page builder, and customer support software is free to use for a small number of contacts, and super affordable when you scale. p.s. We have a lot of great blogs. Take a look: Lead Scoring Model to Close More Deals in an Efficient Way 25 Best Email Subject Lines To Boost Open Rates in 2020 8 HubSpot Alternatives You Should Switch To In 2020 What Is a CRM Database and How To Use It The Best Way 7 Fundamental CRM Metrics That You Should Be Measuring For Success 10 Best Trigger Email Marketing Campaigns Revealed in 2020 Vinay Koshy. Vinay Koshy is a market research and SEO consultant. He writes for EngageBay about marketing strategies that really work, and the best tools in marketing automation today. 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  • marketing
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  • business
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  • strategy
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  • marketing strategy
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  • email
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  • content
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  • customer
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  • focu
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  • small business
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  • small
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  • recommend
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  • social
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  • marketer
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  • crm
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  • keyword
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  • goal
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  • campaign
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  • free
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  • blog
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  • success
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  • create
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  • integration
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  • business marketing
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  • landing
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  • small business marketing
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  • business marketing strategy
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  • modern day
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  • kpi measure
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  • email marketing
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  • forbe contributor
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  • conversion rate
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  • free consultation
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  • powerful marketing strategy
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  • powerful marketing
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  • vinay koshy
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  • blog post
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  • effective marketing
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Result 29
TitleHow to Promote Your Brand Effectively for your Business
Urlhttps://www.coxblue.com/how-to-promote-your-brand-effectively/
DescriptionBranding is about fostering an identity for your company. It won't happen overnight, but promote your brand correctly and it will ensure long-term success
Date
Organic Position28
H1How to Promote Your Brand Effectively
H2How To Promote Your Brand
H3Have a powerful brand presence physically
Your brand must appeal to people intellectually
Promote your brand content on social media
Don’t Over-Promote
Prove that your brand is here to stay
Read next article ..
H2WithAnchorsHow To Promote Your Brand
BodyHow to Promote Your Brand Effectively by Amy Atwood How To Promote Your Brand. You must promote your brand, if you want your enterprise to stand out in the business world, distinguishing itself from its competitors and carving out a niche in the industry, you need to have a cohesive plan for branding your business. Branding is a difficult, multi-faceted endeavor – it requires careful planning and a lot of introspective thought about what makes your business special and what separates it from its rivals. Branding is all about fostering an identity for your company. That won’t happen overnight, but you can take careful steps to devise a strategy that will help you create an image for your enterprise in the long run. Here are a few tips on how to promote your brand. Have a powerful brand presence physically. If you want to build up your reputation in the world, the first step is to make sure people see you. Have a location that’s prominent and easy to find. Advertise in places people will see. Make sure that your company and your employees are present at important events where there are opportunities to promote your enterprise. No one can promote a brand by being invisible, so make sure to get out there and let yourself and your business be seen and heard. Your brand must appeal to people intellectually. Entrepreneur Magazine notes that if you want to broaden your appeal as a small business, it’s best to appeal to people on an intellectual level. Think about specific questions people might have about your business and how you can provide logical honest answers. Ask yourself questions like the following: What sets you apart from your competitors? How does the community perceive you Do you have unique opinions and ideas to share with the world? Consumers today are smart, and they want to be treated with respect. Win people’s brains in addition to their hearts. Promote your brand content on social media. Social media is obviously a great tool for branding your business. In addition to using the sites for straightforward promotional messages, you can also utilize social media for promoting interesting content that might not have a hard sell, but still has something interesting to say about your industry. If your social media accounts share information that’s relevant and compelling, people will follow you, and in turn, more people will become loyal to your business. This is a very slow process, but over time, it works. Don’t Over-Promote. While it’s important to be active on social media to establish your brand, there is such a thing as being too involved. First of all, you don’t want to spam people by promoting too much content. Being overwhelmed with information will turn people off, and you don’t want to be known for promoting yourself too much. Secondly, while you personally want to be very active as the leader of your small business, you might also want to let the marketing wing of your company handle the job for themselves. You might be in charge, but you are only one person, and it’s good to share the spotlight when possible. Prove that your brand is here to stay. In order to brand your business effectively, you want to prove that you have staying power. Think about your business and where it’s headed in the future. What are you doing to embrace future trends in the business world? Will people still identify with your brand in five years? What about in 10, or 20? Your promotional message should be one of the long-term potentials. Your goal is not only to service customers’ needs now but also to earn their loyalty for the long haul. Branding is a long, arduous process, but if you promote your brand effectively, the results can be incredible. About Latest Posts Amy AtwoodAmy has over 10 years of experience in the Telecommunications industry and has held various positions in retail, call center sales, operations, project management, and corporate communications. She is currently a Marketing Manager with the Cox Corp. Marketing Team, responsible for ideating, creating and implementing marketing programs and campaigns to build brand awareness and drive demand across multiple sales channels. Latest posts by Amy Atwood (see all) Black Friday and the importance of branding - December 2, 2013 Brand Identity Is Crucial For Small Business Success - November 21, 2013 Branding your business to foster consumer trust - October 25, 2013 Read next article ... The basics of video conference interviews If you want to use digital interviews during your next recruitment drive, keep these tips in mind.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • brand
  • 15
  • 29
  • business
  • 14
  • 29
  • person
  • 13
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  • promote
  • 9
  • 29
  • promote brand
  • 7
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  • branding
  • 7
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  • social media
  • 5
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  • social
  • 5
  • 29
  • media
  • 5
  • 29
  • 2013
  • 4
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  • world
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  • long
  • 4
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  • marketing
  • 4
  • 29
  • branding business
  • 3
  • 29
  • small business
  • 3
  • 29
  • effectively
  • 3
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  • amy
  • 3
  • 29
  • enterprise
  • 3
  • 29
  • industry
  • 3
  • 29
  • company
  • 3
  • 29
  • appeal
  • 3
  • 29
  • small
  • 3
  • 29
  • share
  • 3
  • 29
  • content
  • 3
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  • promoting
  • 3
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Result 30
TitleInstagram Marketing: 10 Powerful Tips With Examples [2021]
Urlhttps://neilpatel.com/blog/instagram-marketing-tips/
DescriptionLooking to up your Instagram marketing game? ... A business profile allows you to create and publish Instagram ads without needing to use Facebook's ...
Date
Organic Position29
H1
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H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
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Result 31
TitleUnderstanding your market - Business Resource Centre
Urlhttps://www.lloydsbank.com/business/resource-centre/business-guides/understanding-your-market.html
DescriptionKnowing your customer and their needs along with the business landscape is essential for building up your business. See how to conduct informal and formal research to get the answers you need
Date
Organic Position30
H1Understanding your market
H2On this page
1. Why undertake market research?
2. Improving your market awareness
3. Informal research
4. Formal research
5. Useful links
Making the most of social media
Writing your business plan
Start-up success
Important legal information
H3Levels of market research
Understanding your customers
Understanding the market
Understanding your competitors
Run surveys
Collect feedback
Be on the look-out for problems
Turning a negative into a positive
Monitor sales records
Look at your data
The economy
The population
Other research relating to your market
H2WithAnchorsOn this page
1. Why undertake market research?
2. Improving your market awareness
3. Informal research
4. Formal research
5. Useful links
Making the most of social media
Writing your business plan
Start-up success
Important legal information
BodyUnderstanding your market Understanding your market - both your customers and your competitors – is essential if you're going to build a successful business. Finding out what your customers really want will help you improve your products and services to meet their needs. And by discovering how your competitors work, you can find ways to improve on their service to give your business an advantage. On this page.   1. Why undertake market research? 2. Improving your market awareness 3. Informal research 4. Formal research 5. Useful links 1. Why undertake market research? 2. Improving your market awareness 3. Informal research 4. Formal research 5. Useful links 1. Why undertake market research? Many businesses don’t realise that digital market research activity can increase your annual turnover by over a quarter.1 Carrying out market research will: Give you the information you need to plan Reduce the risk of making the wrong decision Identify potential new openings Help improve your marketing, selling points and create effective advertising Give you ideas for product and service development Help you better understand the competition you face Inform your business plan. Whatever your business, you'll need to know: Is there a demand for your product or service? What would people be willing to pay for it? Can you make it for them or provide it to them at that price? Is your price competitive? Levels of market research. You can carry out three levels of market research: 1. Market awareness. This involves online research, reading newspapers and other publications, speaking to friends and colleagues, talking with your competitors' customers/clients, analysing your competitors' business approach, analysing sales, and noting what's happening in your business, e.g. how many online and offline customers you have.2 2. Ongoing informal research. This includes surveys – for example asking customers and prospects for their feedback on a regular basis. 3. Formal research. This research would be carefully planned and carried out, probably by a professional, to support a big, new investment. The researcher would have a clear brief, budget and timescale. Back to top Back to top 2. Improving your market awareness. Understanding your customers. To know what customers want, it's important to collect all the relevant information and insights you can. Carry out your research by phone, email or face-to-face meetings. There are data protection laws regarding making unsolicited calls, so make sure you are not breaking them, visit The Information Commissioner's Office for more information. Understanding the market. You need to understand how business is done in your industry, the ways products are sold and delivered, and what discounts and credit arrangements are offered by other suppliers. Understanding your competitors. To learn as much as you can about your competitors: Study trade websites, newspapers and the business sections of local papers Look at trade directories as soon as they're published, and note any changes Try out competitors services as a mystery shopper Have a talk with your competitors' customers* Chat with your competitors – although they're your rivals, they're also your industry colleagues* Research your main competitors at Companies House. Back to top Back to top 3. Informal research. Carry out ongoing informal research as your business develops to keep your business fresh. Run surveys. Ask your customers for their views occasionally by post or email, or on your website if you are able to. There are many free online surveys which are a great way to collect feedback. Collecting customers’ email addresses at the point of sale will also help you with your research. You can then ask your customers for their views occasionally by post or email. It's important to keep surveys short and anonymous. Offering possible prizes can encourage people to take part. But this means your promotion becomes a prize draw which is then governed by Gambling Commission rules. And it's important to note that collecting information from participants may be subject to government rules on data protection. You can check by visiting GOV.UK for more information. If you are going to promote your survey, then you need to make sure you are following Advertising Standard Authority rules too. Collect feedback. Talk with your customers and prospects – whoever in your business deals with customers should use every opportunity to gently ask them for feedback. Also talk with retailers and distributors. You should set up a system for recording and capturing feedback – this could help you improve your services. Even if your business grows rapidly, always deal with a few customers yourself to keep your eye on the ball. You can also keep a watchful eye on social media about your business and your competitors. There are social listening tools that allow you to track what is being said about your brand and the sentiment behind those conversations. Its aim is to look deeper than just the number of times you get mentioned. If you are getting a lot of positive or negative engagement it is worth trying to delve into what is prompting that. Your customers will be sharing a lot of information about what they like or they don’t like and this can help deepen your understanding about your offering and help you adjust your strategy. Be on the look-out for problems. Watch for even the smallest signs of dissatisfaction – people will often stop buying/using your service rather than complain. Try asking customers what their ideal would be, e.g. 'If you could change one thing about our product/service, what would it be?' Then work towards delivering it. Don’t forget internal sources can help you with this. Asking sales staff what objections are raised most frequently in the selling process or understanding what questions customer service employees get asked most often can give pointers. These can all provide useful insights and identify gaps or weaknesses for your business. Sometimes solving these issues can be as simple as adding a little more information on your website about a product or additional details about service, refunds or delivery and so on. Complaints to the business are also a good source of understanding what has gone wrong. Customers today expect to be able to share feedback about a business wherever and whenever they want to. It might be through social media, via review sites, or by adding comments to your own website, where that is possible. Some customers also use social media as a public forum for complaints, in the hope that their issue will be addressed promptly, rather than using the normal channels. Many customers say they consult these types of reviews when making purchase decisions and most consumers say that a negative online review has caused them to avoid a business. Turning a negative into a positive. While there’s no fun in reading criticism of your hard work, there are lots of ways you can turn negative comment into a positive. You can use comments to improve your business, and to update your frequently asked questions (FAQs) section on your website. Best of all, people who complain but have their comments handled satisfactorily often end up becoming extra-positive advocates of your business. See more about how to deal with negative reviews See more on making the most of social media Monitor sales records. Structure your accounts so that you can compare year on year, month on month. Look for seasonal trends, or a product in long-term decline, and try to evaluate the reasons for them. Look at your data. Review what you’ve learned from all your research at a fixed time each month. Discuss it with your key staff and see if you can draw conclusions and agree on what actions to take. Back to top Back to top 4. Formal research. If you're writing a business plan or have an idea for a new product or service, consider doing some formal market research or employing a professional to carry it out for you. This research should be carefully planned and carried out. This will usually be done by a professional, to support a big business idea. The researcher should have a clear idea of what you want to find out, together with the budget and timescale. The British Library Business and IP Centre and its National Network may also be able to help. You can get access to: Ask an Expert sessions Information Clinics Free industry guides A variety or research services Things you might want to think about in your research: The economy. Economic research can help you allow for a recession or boom in the future. Focus on trends that affect your industry. The population. You may find statistics on the population, spending power and consumption patterns helpful in identifying which areas of your market to target. Other research relating to your market. Find facts and figures particular to your market – temperature statistics if you sell air conditioning, or statistics on industrial production if you sell industrial machinery. Back to top Back to top 5. Useful links. The Market Research Society Companies House Financial Conduct Authority Competition Markets Authority British Library Business and IP Centre Office for National Statistics (ONS) Business Statistics   1 Lloyds Bank Digital Index 2 Please bear in mind your obligations under competition laws. For further information please refer to the following websites: the Financial Conduct Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority   Back to top Back to top Making the most of social media . See how you can maximise social media to connect with your customers, build brand loyalty and promote your products and services. More about social mediaabout making the most of social media Writing your business plan . What to consider and include when writing your business plan. Read more about writing a business planabout Writing your business plan Start-up success . Check out our five tips to start-up success. Read more about start-up successabout Start-up success Important legal information. Lloyds Bank is a trading name of Lloyds Bank plc, Bank of Scotland plc, Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets plc and Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets Wertpapierhandelsbank GmbH. Lloyds Bank plc. Registered Office: 25 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7HN. Registered in England and Wales no. 2065. Bank of Scotland plc. Registered Office: The Mound, Edinburgh EH1 1YZ. Registered in Scotland no. SC327000. Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets plc. Registered office 25 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7HN. Registered in England and Wales no. 10399850. Authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under registration number 119278, 169628 and 763256 respectively. Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets Wertpapierhandelsbank GmbH is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets plc. Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets Wertpapierhandelsbank GmbH has its registered office at Thurn-und-Taxis Platz 6, 60313 Frankfurt, Germany. The company is registered with the Amtsgericht Frankfurt am Main, HRB 111650. Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets Wertpapierhandelsbank GmbH is supervised by the Bundesanstalt für Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht. Eligible deposits with us are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). We are covered by the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). Please note that due to FSCS and FOS eligibility criteria not all business customers will be covered. While all reasonable care has been taken to ensure that the information provided is correct, no liability is accepted by Lloyds Bank for any loss or damage caused to any person relying on any statement or omission. This is for information only and should not be relied upon as offering advice for any set of circumstances. Specific advice should always be sought in each instance.
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