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Keyword how long does it take to do a heart transplant procedure
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heart transplant procedure step by stephttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=20&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Heart+transplant+procedure+step+by+step&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPybu97KX1AhXC8OAKHQBHDEMQ1QJ6BAgcEAE
heart transplant surgery survival ratehttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=20&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Heart+transplant+surgery+survival+rate&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPybu97KX1AhXC8OAKHQBHDEMQ1QJ6BAgpEAE
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how long can someone live without a heart transplanthttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=20&hl=en&gl=GB&q=How+long+can+someone+live+without+a+heart+transplant&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPybu97KX1AhXC8OAKHQBHDEMQ1QJ6BAgjEAE
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Result 1
TitleHeart transplant - What happens - NHS
Urlhttps://www.nhs.uk/conditions/heart-transplant/what-happens/
DescriptionRead about what happens during and immediately after a heart transplant operation
Date
Organic Position
H1What happens - Heart transplant
H2After the operation
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H2WithAnchorsAfter the operation
BodyWhat happens - Heart transplant A heart transplant is carried out with you unconscious under general anaesthetic, and normally takes between 4 and 6 hours. You'll be connected to a heart-lung bypass machine, which will take over the functions of the heart and lungs while the transplant is being carried out. A thin, flexible tube called a catheter will also be inserted to drain your bladder during and after the operation. During the procedure: a cut (incision) is made down your chest over your breastbone and the bone is separated, allowing the surgeon to access your heart your heart is removed, leaving behind a section of the right and left atria, the 2 upper chambers of the heart the new heart is connected to the aorta, the main artery from the heart, the pulmonary artery and the remaining part of the atria You'll be taken off the bypass machine when your new heart starts beating. Your breastbone will be closed with metal wires, and the tissues and skin will be closed with stitches. After the operation. Once the transplant is complete, you'll be moved to an intensive care unit (ICU). A machine called a ventilator will assist you with your breathing, and a tube will be inserted into a vein to provide you with fluid and nutrients. These will normally be removed after a few days. You'll also be given pain relief as required. Most people are well enough to move from the ICU and into a hospital ward within a few days. You'll usually be able to leave hospital within 2 or 3 weeks, although you'll need to have regular follow-up appointments and take medicine to help stop your body rejecting your new heart. Find out more about living with a heart transplant Page last reviewed: 30 April 2019 Next review due: 30 April 2022
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TitleHeart transplant - NHS
Urlhttps://www.nhs.uk/conditions/heart-transplant/
DescriptionFind out why heart transplants are carried out, what the procedure involves, what the risks are, and what you can expect while you recover
Date
Organic Position2
H1Overview - Heart transplant
H2Why heart transplants are carried out
What happens during a heart transplant
Recovering from a heart transplant
Risks of a heart transplant
Outlook for heart transplants
NHS Organ Donor Register
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H2WithAnchorsWhy heart transplants are carried out
What happens during a heart transplant
Recovering from a heart transplant
Risks of a heart transplant
Outlook for heart transplants
NHS Organ Donor Register
BodyOverview - Heart transplant A heart transplant is an operation to replace a damaged or failing heart with a healthy heart from a donor who's recently died. It may be recommended when a person's life is at risk because their heart no longer works effectively. Why heart transplants are carried out. A heart transplant may be considered if you have severe heart failure and medical treatments are not helping. Conditions that may eventually require a heart transplant include: coronary heart disease – a build-up of fatty substances in the arteries supplying the heart, which block or interrupt blood flow to the heart cardiomyopathy – where the walls of the heart have become stretched, thickened or stiff congenital heart disease – birth defects that affect the normal workings of the heart If your doctor thinks you might benefit from a heart transplant, you'll need to have an in-depth assessment to check whether you're healthy enough to have one before being placed on a waiting list. Read more about who can have a heart transplant and being on the heart transplant waiting list. What happens during a heart transplant. A heart transplant needs to be carried out as soon as possible after a donor heart becomes available. The procedure is performed under general anaesthetic, where you're asleep. While it's carried out, a heart-lung bypass machine will be used to keep your blood circulating with oxygen-rich blood. A cut is made in the middle of the chest. Your own heart is then removed, and the donor heart is connected to the main arteries and veins. The new heart should then begin beating normally. Find out more about how a heart transplant is performed Recovering from a heart transplant. You'll usually need to stay in hospital for around 2 or 3 weeks after a heart transplant. Most people are able to start returning to many of their normal activities within a few months. Your transplant team can give you advice about how long you may need to avoid certain activities during your recovery. You'll need to have regular check-ups with your transplant team after the transplant. You'll also need to take medicines called immunosuppressants for the rest of your life.  Without these medicines, your body may recognise your new heart as foreign and attack it (rejection). Find out more about recovering from a heart transplant Risks of a heart transplant. A heart transplant is a complex and risky procedure. Possible complications include: the immune system recognising the transplanted heart as foreign and attacking it (rejection) the donated heart failing to work properly (graft failure) narrowing of the arteries supplying the heart (cardiac allograft vasculopathy) side effects from the immunosuppressant medication, such as an increased vulnerability to infections, weight gain and kidney problems Many of these problems are treatable, although sometimes another heart transplant may need to be carried out if possible. Find out more about the risks associated with a heart transplant Outlook for heart transplants. Most people can eventually return to their normal activities after a heart transplant and experience a significant improvement in their symptoms for many years. But it's a major operation and some of the complications can be life threatening. Overall: 80 to 90 in every 100 people will live at least a year 70 to 75 in every 100 people will live at least 5 years 50 in every 100 people will live at least 10 years Some people have survived for more than 25 years after a heart transplant. NHS Organ Donor Register. If you're interested in donating your organs after you die, you can join the NHS Organ Donor Register. Joining the NHS Organ Donor Register is quick and simple, and will only take a few minutes of your time. You can remove yourself from the register at any time and can specify what you're willing to donate. Page last reviewed: 30 April 2019 Next review due: 30 April 2022
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Result 4
TitleHeart Transplant | BHF
Urlhttps://www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport/treatments/heart-transplant
DescriptionA heart transplant is when a diseased heart is replaced by a healthy human heart from a donor. It may be considered if you have severe heart failure
Date
Organic Position3
H1
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BodySkip to main content Close Home > Information & support > Treatments > Heart transplant
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TitleHeart Transplant Surgery: How to Prepare and What to Expect | UPMC
Urlhttps://www.upmc.com/services/transplant/heart/process/surgery
DescriptionWhen a donor heart becomes available, your transplant coordinator will call you. Here's how to prepare for surgery and what to expect during the procedure
Date
Organic Position4
H1Heart Transplant Surgery: Preparation and Procedure
H2Prepping for Your Heart Transplant
Contact the UPMC Heart Transplant Program
H3
H2WithAnchorsPrepping for Your Heart Transplant
Contact the UPMC Heart Transplant Program
BodyHeart Transplant Surgery: Preparation and Procedure When a donor heart becomes available, your transplant coordinator will call you. It's crucial that you get to the hospital right away. We ask people on the heart transplant waiting list to be within four hours of UPMC. Before coming to the hospital for your heart transplant: Do not eat or drink anything. Pack your phone and charger. Bring your medicines. If you have a ventricular assist device (VAD), bring your equipment. Prepping for Your Heart Transplant. When you arrive at UPMC, we will prep you for your heart transplant surgery. The donor team will inspect the heart to make sure it's good for transplant and a match for you. In the meantime — to make sure you're in good health with no active illnesses — you'll: Complete a medical history and physical examination Have blood work Get x-rays Before moving you to the OR, the anesthesiologist will speak with you about what to expect. You'll receive general anesthesia and sleep through the heart transplant procedure. You will also speak to one of the surgical team members to get consent for the transplant to take place. How Long Does Heart Transplant Surgery Take? The amount of time for a heart transplant depends on the complexity of your case and if you need other procedures. If you do not have a VAD, surgery should take three or four hours. If you have a VAD that needs to be removed, or you've had prior chest surgeries, it should take six to eight hours. You may be in the OR longer than the actual procedure because the transplant team must work with the donor site. How Long Do Heart Transplants Last? While the length of survival for a transplanted heart continues to improve, the current median amount of time at our center is nine years, with the longest ever recorded at our center being 36 years and 10 months. Heart Transplant Process: How Does a Heart Transplant Work? During your heart transplant, your surgeon and care team will: Connect you to a heart-lung machine. It does the work of your heart and takes the strain off your lungs. It pumps filtered, oxygen-rich blood into your body so your heart is still during the operation. Remove your diseased heart Replace it with the healthy donor heart How Does a Heart Start Beating After a Transplant? After a donor heart is placed into an open chest, the surgeon attaches it to the surrounding major blood vessels. It should usually start beating once blood flow is restored, but an electric shock can be used to get it started if necessary. How Long Can a Person Be on a Heart Lung Machine? Also called a cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this is what replaces the heart's pumping motion while it is outside of the body. It also adds oxygen to the blood and performs the job of the lungs. The machine can operate for hours. How Long Will I Be in the Hospital After My Heart Transplant Surgery? After your heart transplant, you will: Start taking anti-rejection drugs right away. When your body detects something new, your immune system begins working to fight what it views as a threat. Anti-rejection drugs suppress your immune system's natural response, so your body will accept the new organ. Be in the Cardiothoracic ICU for about three days before moving to a room on the transplant floor. Stay in the hospital for about 10-14 days, but this varies based on how sick you are prior to your transplant. During this time, the heart transplant team will: Watch for rejection, infection, or other problems. Teach you coughing and breathing exercises that you'll need to do often. These help keep your lungs clear and prevent pneumonia. Adjust your medications to find the right mix. Work with you and your caregiver to get ready for taking care of yourself at home. The nutritionist on your care team will also create and review an eating plan for you to follow at home. Before you leave the hospital, make sure you and your caregiver clearly understand: Your medicine schedule The meal plan and nutrition guidelines Any other instructions for at-home care Your follow-up care schedule (blood work, clinic visits, and testing) For people who need more help after heart transplant surgery, we may suggest spending time in inpatient rehab before going home. Please feel free to ask members of your UPMC heart transplant team to explain anything you're unsure of and answer any questions you may have. We're here for you through each stage of your transplant journey. Contact the UPMC Heart Transplant Program. To contact the UPMC Heart Transplant Program, please call 412-648-6202 or toll-free at 844-548-4591. You can also fill out the UPMC Heart Transplant Program contact form to make an appointment or refer a patient. UPMC Patient Portals Your health information, right at your fingertips. Select MyUPMC to access your UPMC health information. For patients of UPMC-affiliated doctors in Central Pa, select UPMC Central Pa Portal. Patients of UPMC Cole should select the UPMC Cole Connect Patient Portal. The portal for all UPMC patients EXCEPT those in Central Pa. Sign in to MyUPMC The portal for UPMC patients in Central Pa. Sign in to UPMC Central PA Portal The portal for UPMC Cole patients. Sign in to UPMC Cole Connect Patient Portal Get help choosing the right patient portal
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Result 6
TitleHeart Transplant Surgery: Procedure, Costs, Life Expectancy, and More
Urlhttps://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/transplants
DescriptionHeart transplant surgery is used to treat the most severe cases of heart disease. We’ll explain the procedure, recovery time, follow-up, and outlook
Date
Organic Position5
H1Heart Transplant Surgery
H2Candidacy for heart transplants
What’s the procedure?
What’s recovery like?
Follow-up after the surgery
What’s the outlook?
H3Read this next
H2WithAnchorsCandidacy for heart transplants
What’s the procedure?
What’s recovery like?
Follow-up after the surgery
What’s the outlook?
BodyHeart Transplant SurgeryMedically reviewed by Elaine K. Luo, M.D. — Written by Erica Roth — Updated on September 17, 2018 What is a heart transplant?A heart transplant is a surgical procedure used to treat the most serious cases of heart disease. This is a treatment option for people who are in the end stages of heart failure. Medication, lifestyle changes, and less invasive procedures haven’t succeeded. People must meet specific criteria to be considered a candidate for the procedure. Candidacy for heart transplants. Heart transplant candidates are those who’ve experienced heart disease or heart failure due to a variety of causes, including:a congenital defectcoronary artery diseasea valve dysfunction or diseasea weakened heart muscle, or cardiomyopathyEven if you have one of these conditions, there are still more factors that are used to determine your candidacy. The following will also be considered:Your age. Most prospective heart recipients must be under 65 years old.Your overall health. Multiple organ failure, cancer, or other serious medical conditions may take you off a transplant list.Your attitude. You must commit to changing your lifestyle. This includes exercising, eating healthy, and quitting smoking if you smoke.If you’re determined to be an ideal candidate for a heart transplant, you’ll be put on a waiting list until a donor heart that matches your blood and tissue type is available.An estimated 2,000 donor hearts become available in the United States each year. Yet, approximately 3,000 people are on a heart transplant waiting list at any given time, according to the University of Michigan. When a heart is found for you, surgery is performed as soon as possible while the organ is still viable. This is usually within four hours. What’s the procedure?Heart transplant surgery lasts for approximately four hours. During that time, you’ll be placed on a heart-lung machine to keep blood circulating throughout your body. Your surgeon will remove your heart, leaving the pulmonary vein openings and the back wall of the left atrium intact. They’ll do this to prepare you to receive the new heart.Once your doctor stitches the donor heart into place and the heart begins beating, you’ll be removed from the heart-lung machine. In most cases, the new heart will begin to beat as soon as blood flow is restored to it. Sometimes an electric shock is required to prompt a heartbeat. What’s recovery like?After your surgery is finished, you’ll be taken to the intensive care unit (ICU). You’ll be constantly monitored, given pain medication, and outfitted with drainage tubes to remove excess fluid from your chest cavity.After the first day or two after the procedure, you’ll most likely be moved from the ICU. However, you’ll remain in the hospital as you continue to heal. Hospital stays range from one to three weeks, based on your individual rate of recovery.You’ll be monitored for infection, and your medication management will begin. Antirejection medications are crucial to ensure that your body doesn’t reject your donor organ. You may be referred to a cardiac rehabilitation unit or center to help you adjust to your new life as a transplant recipientRecovery from a heart transplant can be a long process. For many people, a full recovery can span up to six months. Follow-up after the surgery. Frequent follow-up appointments are crucial to the long-term recovery and management of a heart transplant. Your medical team will perform blood tests, heart biopsies through catheterization, and echocardiograms on a monthly basis for the first year after the operation to ensure that your new heart is functioning properly. Your immunosuppressant medications will be adjusted if needed. You’ll also be asked if you’ve experienced any of the possible signs of rejection, including:feverfatigueshortness of breathweight gain due to fluid retentionreduced urine outputReport any changes in your health to your cardiac team so that your heart function can be monitored if required. Once a year has passed after the transplant, your need for frequent monitoring will decline, but you’ll still need yearly testing.If you’re female and want to start a family, consult your cardiologist. Pregnancy is safe for people who’ve had a heart transplant. However, expectant mothers who have preexisting heart disease or who’ve had a transplant are considered high risk. They may experience a greater chance of pregnancy-related complications and a higher risk of organ rejection. What’s the outlook?Receiving a new heart can improve your quality of life considerably, but you have to take good care of it. In addition to taking daily antirejection medications, you’ll need to follow a heart-healthy diet and lifestyle as prescribed by your doctor. This includes not smoking and exercising on a regular basis if you’re able.Survival rates for people who’ve had a heart transplant vary according to their overall health status, but averages remain high. Rejection is the main cause for a shortened life span. The Mayo Clinic estimates that the overall survival rate in the United States is about 88 percent after one year and 75 percent after five years. Last medically reviewed on February 2, 2018Medically reviewed by Elaine K. Luo, M.D. — Written by Erica Roth — Updated on September 17, 2018Read this next. What Is Pleural Effusion (Fluid in the Chest)?Medically reviewed by Adithya Cattamanchi, M.D.Pleural effusion, also called water on the lung, happens when fluid builds up between your lungs and chest cavity. Learn why this happens and how to…READ MOREOpen-Heart SurgeryMedically reviewed by Elaine K. Luo, M.D.Open-heart surgery is when the chest is cut open and surgery is performed on the muscles, valves, or arteries of the heart. Learn about this complex…READ MOREUnderstanding Postsurgery DepressionMedically reviewed by Timothy J. Legg, PhD, PsyDDepression after surgery is not uncommon. Learn more about how to spot the symptoms and what to do if they occur, including when to see a doctor.READ MOREWhat Causes Low Blood Pressure After Surgery?Medically reviewed by Debra Sullivan, Ph.D., MSN, R.N., CNE, COIAny surgery comes with the potential for certain risks, even if it’s a routine procedure. One such risk is a change in your blood pressure. READ MOREEverything You Need to Know About the PacemakerMedically reviewed by Dr. Payal Kohli, M.D., FACCA pacemaker is implanted under the skin to help manage an irregular heartbeat. Discover who needs a pacemaker, what happens after surgery, and more.READ MOREEchocardiogramMedically reviewed by Dr. Payal Kohli, M.D., FACCAn echocardiogram test uses sound waves to produce live images of your heart. It's used to monitor your heart function. Learn more about what to…READ MORESimple Surgery Reduces Stroke Risk in People with Heart ArrhythmiaExperts say the small appendage can trap blood in the heart chamber and increase the risk of clots.READ MOREFoods to Eat and Avoid After a Heart AttackMedically reviewed by Jillian Kubala, MS, RDAfter a heart attack, your doctor will start you on a treatment plan to prevent a future heart attack or other complication. This will include making…READ MOREHeart Attack Facts, Statistics, and YouMedically reviewed by Dr. Payal Kohli, M.D., FACCA heart attack is unpredictable by nature, but it can be prevented and treated with modern medicine. Read on to learn more about what causes a heart…READ MOREHow Just Half a Tablespoon of Olive Oil a Day Can Improve Heart HealthResearchers say olive oil, as well as certain vegetable oils, are healthier for your heart than animal-based fats.READ MORE
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Result 7
Title8 Things To Know About Heart Transplants > News > Yale Medicine
Urlhttps://www.yalemedicine.org/news/8-things-to-know-about-heart-transplants
DescriptionFor people who are considering a heart transplant or have a loved one who needs one, here are some things to know about getting an organ and other advances in transplant
Date6 Oct 2020
Organic Position6
H18 Things To Know About Heart Transplants
H21. Each patient’s journey is different
2. A practice called ‘donation after cardiac death’ may increase the number of heart transplants
3. Anti-rejection drugs are customized for each patient
4. People can have multiple organ transplants
5. You can survive with a heart from someone who had a serious disease
6. The outlook has improved for transplant survivors
7. Follow-up care makes a difference
8. It takes a community to support a heart transplant patient
H3
H2WithAnchors1. Each patient’s journey is different
2. A practice called ‘donation after cardiac death’ may increase the number of heart transplants
3. Anti-rejection drugs are customized for each patient
4. People can have multiple organ transplants
5. You can survive with a heart from someone who had a serious disease
6. The outlook has improved for transplant survivors
7. Follow-up care makes a difference
8. It takes a community to support a heart transplant patient
Body8 Things To Know About Heart TransplantsBY KATHY KATELLA October 6, 2020New approaches could save more lives.A heart transplant may be the most dramatic surgery done in the operating room. Each step takes great precision, from the quick, careful journey to retrieve the heart to the preparation of the recipient, who may be gravely ill and bedridden. The best part is the outcome soon after the transplant, when the patient goes home and starts returning to his or her life—whether that means getting married, having babies, running in marathons, or simply breathing massive sighs of relief while strolling around the neighborhood without having to periodically stop to catch a breath. This is happening more frequently in Yale Medicine’s Advanced Heart Failure Program, which is one of the fastest-growing, highest volume programs in the country, and one of just a few in the United States willing to push the envelope on accepting donor hearts. Yale Medicine specialists performed 49 heart transplants in 2019, earning a spot among the top 10 programs in the country in volume. This year, the program continued to provide transplants even amid the COVID-19 pandemic. For people who are considering a heart transplant or have a loved one who needs one, here are some things to know about getting an organ and other advances in transplant.1. Each patient’s journey is different. Heart transplants are done in people of all ages, even children. “Heart failure can affect anyone; in fact, it is the number one cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States,” says Tariq Ahmad, MD, MPH, medical director of the Advanced Heart Failure Program. “We've had people in their 20s, 30s, and 40s—and our oldest transplant patient last year was 73 years old. One of our patients later completed a 100-mile bike ride up in Maine, and he's doing incredibly well.” “A routine heart transplant surgery can be performed in less than four hours, while some complex ones may take seven, eight, nine hours—or more, especially if we need to remove a heart pump or clean up scar tissue from previous surgeries,” says Arnar Geirsson, MD, chief of cardiac surgery. “Regardless, the basic procedure remains the same. The patient is given general anesthesia and connected to a bypass machine that takes over the heart’s function. Surgeons make an incision in the chest, divide the breastbone and remove the diseased heart. They sew the donor heart into place and connect it to the remnants of the old heart and the major blood vessels.” One issue is that many people waiting for hearts are critically ill, says Sounok Sen, MD, an advanced heart failure specialist. “Historically, there's this concept that people would be at home waiting for the call that a heart was available, and then they would come in and have a very smooth experience—and that still happens in a lot of cases,” he says. But given today’s shortage of available organs, the sickest patients are prioritized for transplants, so many patients waiting for a heart to become available are already in the hospital on various types of medicine or heart pumps, he says.  2. A practice called ‘donation after cardiac death’ may increase the number of heart transplants. United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), a private, non-profit organization under contract with the federal government to manage the organ transplant system in the U.S., allocates newly available hearts based on such priorities as medical urgency. Patients who are hospitalized or dependent on mechanical assist devices to help their heart function are at the top of the list. About 3,500 people in the U.S. are waiting for a heart, and many will wait more than six months. But some will die before a heart becomes available to them. That’s why one of the greatest breakthroughs in heart transplantation may be the practice of accepting donor hearts that most other programs do not have the expertise to accept. This means that more sick patients who are eligible (based on strict criteria) may be able to receive one. A limited number of programs in the U.S. are starting to do this. Yale Medicine is one of them.  “I remember we said to ourselves as a team: ‘We're going to switch gears now. We can be more aggressive and take some risks,'” says Muhammad Anwer, MD, associate director of the Center for Advanced Heart Failure at Yale New Haven Hospital and a key cardiac surgeon for heart transplantation. “Now all the data that's coming in is showing that the outcomes may be just as good with the more aggressive approach.” The vast majority of hearts used for transplant are retrieved as “donation after brain death,” or DBD. But Yale Medicine’s heart transplant surgeons are participating in a multi-site clinical trial that allows them to offer “donation after cardiac death,” or DCD, which is relatively new in the U.S., as a way to make more donated hearts usable. “During DBD heart transplant, the heart is still beating, allowing for a controlled procurement,” says Christopher Maulion, MD, who is spearheading the DCD program at Yale Medicine. DCD is a more intense process. DCD organs and recipients must meet strict eligibility criteria, and the process of retrieving the heart involves multiple doctors. “When you have a brain death donation, the heart is removed and simply transported on ice,” Dr. Maulion says. When a DCD heart becomes available, however, Drs. Maulion and Anwer, as well as two perfusionists are sent to retrieve it. Once the heart is removed, it is reanimated and preserved in a warm environment with circulating oxygenated blood. Nicknamed “heart in a box,” the technology for transporting a donated heart is called the Transmedics Organ Care System. Only a few transplant centers (those participating in the ongoing clinical trial) are able to use this system to procure and then transplant hearts.  While there is still more to learn, outcomes from DCD heart surgeries are proving to be comparable to those using organs from DBD donors. “DCD is the likely next chapter in cardiac transplantation,” Dr. Maulion says. “By being one of the few centers in the country that can offer DCD heart transplantation, Yale is in the position to offer transplants to more patients who may not have had the opportunity otherwise.” 3. Anti-rejection drugs are customized for each patient. Heart transplants wouldn’t be possible if it weren’t for the drugs that prevent people’s bodies from rejecting the transplanted organ. These drugs have vastly improved in the last 15 to 20 years. “Essentially, people are on two to three medicines for life,” says Dr. Ahmad. The drugs can have adverse effects, including high blood pressure, as well as blood sugar and kidney problems. “So, there’s a trade-off. But we’re very vigilant about monitoring for those types of things.” One notable advance is that doctors can now tailor an immunosuppression strategy for each patient, says Dr. Ahmad. “So, it’s not only just whether or not we have novel drugs. It’s also making sure we have a personalized immunosuppression strategy to match each patient. We’ve taken a personalized approach in terms of looking at what the risk will be for a particular recipient as far as their potentially rejecting the heart, and then tailoring treatment to them.” 4. People can have multiple organ transplants. Yale Medicine doctors have performed almost 10 heart–kidney transplants in the past two years, which is significant for almost any center, says Dr. Sen. “Many patients who have heart failure over time also develop kidney dysfunction,” he says. “Sometimes that can be a limiting factor in terms of being able to get a heart transplant. But we’ve tried to think ‘outside the box’ and be open to multi-organ transplant for certain cases.” Surgeons perform the heart transplant first and the kidney transplant a day or more later. The kidney surgeon must have expertise in performing kidney transplants in patients who are not stable, Dr. Ahmad says, explaining that heart transplant patients who have been in the intensive care unit have more complex needs than those who have been on dialysis and are otherwise healthy.  Heart transplant doctors work closely with Yale Medicine’s kidney transplant specialists on these patients. “Together, we’ve come up with pathways for how to manage patients before and after a heart–kidney transplant,” says Dr. Ahmad. “We are lucky to have some of the world's experts in organ transplantation at Yale, including Richard Formica, MD, president of the American Society of Transplantation and David Mulligan, MD, president of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS).” 5. You can survive with a heart from someone who had a serious disease. Another breakthrough in the past few years is the transplantation of hearts from donors who had hepatitis C, a viral disease that can cause fatal liver problems. “Even though other organ systems for those donors were transplanted, traditionally these hearts would not have been utilized,” says Dr. Sen. There's been a cultural shift around that; hepatitis C is now not viewed as an insurmountable problem. “With the advent of new therapies for hepatitis C that have a 99% or greater cure rate, those organs are now available to individuals who are willing to undergo the treatment afterwards. That has expanded the donor pool quite a bit as well,” he says. 6. The outlook has improved for transplant survivors. Though a successful heart transplant was a major medical milestone, in the early days, patients with these new hearts didn’t live that long. Now many people live for decades, with a median survival of 14 years, according to Dr. Ahmad. The one-year survival rate after a heart transplant at Yale Medicine is 93%, which is higher than the national average, says Dr. Ahmad. He adds that a transplant team’s experience with heart transplant is an important predictor of outcome. “It’s important for patients to know that physicians and surgeons at transplant programs are trained in centers that have lots of experience and large volumes, so they can be comfortable with the entire process, which is very complex,” says Daniel Jacoby, MD, director of the Comprehensive Heart Failure Program. “The need for expertise only begins with the surgery. Transplant patients have complex medical needs, but with the right care, they can do things once considered impossible. For instance, one of our transplant patients recently had a baby—a potentially high-risk and complicated medical situation. Our team has trained at the best programs in the country and brought the best of this experience to Yale. Such a set up only exists at a handful of places in the world. We're lucky to have it here.” 7. Follow-up care makes a difference. One reason patients can now live longer after transplantation is close monitoring and follow-up, especially in the several months after their surgery. “The thing about heart transplant is that you get rid of one disease, but you replace it with another,” Dr. Ahmad says. “Heart transplant patients become immuno-compromised. They can get infections and develop kidney problems.” Follow-up care is most intense in the first six months after a transplant, when doctors see patients frequently, says Dr. Sen. “We adjust their medications and do heart biopsies to make sure there are no signs of rejection,” he says. “After the first six to eight months, the follow-up becomes every three months, every six months, every year.” Some patients may also need to see other sub-specialists, such as infectious disease specialists and nephrologists. Anyone who has a heart transplant is at high risk for COVID-19 complications, so Yale Medicine doctors are in close contact with the 500 or so heart transplant patients they care for at Yale, advising them to be especially careful about taking measures to avoid the virus. “Our patients need to be incredibly careful about social distancing and not going out, especially during the first months following the procedure, because that's when you are most at risk for infections,” Dr. Ahmad says. 8. It takes a community to support a heart transplant patient. “In some ways, when you get a transplant, you become part of the transplant family. We plan to be with our patients all their lives,” says Dr. Ahmad. In the hospital, this team includes cardiologists who work hand-in-glove with the cardiac surgeons, as well as other surgeons, anesthesiologists, transplant coordinators, electrophysiologists, infectious disease specialists, nephrologists, nurses, and social workers. “The team supports patients not just medically, but also mentally, psychologically, and spiritually,” Dr. Jacoby says. Since so much recovery happens at home, it’s helpful to seek care at a transplant center close to home. Patients benefit from being geographically close to family and friends, Dr. Sen says. “The journey after transplant is often an amazing thing. Before the operation patients are very sick. Seven days after the surgery, they're walking out of the hospital, and they feel completely different,” he says. At that point, many patients are happy to have their loved ones around them for support as they get back to the business of living a normal and healthy life. [Read about Yale’s strategic changes in donor heart and recipient selection that, according to a recent study, “may significantly increase the number of heart transplants while maintaining short-term outcomes comparable with more conservative patient selection."]Read more Yale Medicine news [510,2449]{"namedChunks":["modules-news-news-details-components-NewsDetails-newsDetails"]} [6126,2449]{"namedChunks":["modules-news-news-details-components-NewsDetails-newsDetails"]}
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TitleHeart transplant - Mayo Clinic
Urlhttps://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/heart-transplant/about/pac-20384750
Description
Date16 Nov 2019
Organic Position7
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TitleHeart transplant surgery - Organ transplantation - NHS Blood and Transplant
Urlhttps://www.nhsbt.nhs.uk/organ-transplantation/heart/at-the-transplant-centre/heart-transplant-surgery/
DescriptionFind out what happens during a heart transplant operation
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Organic Position8
H1Heart transplant surgery
H2Key points
How is heart transplant surgery performed?
Heart transplant medicines
Recovery at the transplant centre
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H3How it works
Some things that might happen during your heart transplant surgery
Example of a surgical heart transplant technique
H2WithAnchorsKey points
How is heart transplant surgery performed?
Heart transplant medicines
Recovery at the transplant centre
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BodyHeart transplant surgery Find out what happens during the transplant operation Key points. Heart transplant surgery lasts around 4-6 hours You will be put to sleep under a general anaesthetic while the transplant takes place Donor hearts are transplanted in the same place in your chest as your own heart The operation can be performed a variety of ways, which will depend on your needs and the preference of the transplant surgeon How is heart transplant surgery performed? Donor hearts are transplanted in the same place in your chest as your own heart. This involves the removal of the diseased heart and replacement with the donor heart. How it works. Where the heart is in the body Your heart sits in the middle of your chest, with a slight tilt to the left. It is connected to the body through various arteries and veins, including: The aorta - the main and largest artery in the body Superior vena cava - a large vein that brings blood to the heart from your upper body Inferior vena cava - a large vein that brings blood to the heart from your lower body Pulmonary blood vessels - arteries and veins that connect to your lungs A heart in close up This is a close up of a heart showing the superior vena cava, aorta,  pulmonary artery and pulmonary veins. Arteries and veins run throughout the heart. In general, arteries take oxygenated blood away from the heart, while veins bring deoxygenated blood back to the heart. However, pulmonary blood vessels are the exception. Pulmonary arteries move deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs, and pulmonary veins carry oxygenated blood back to the heart from the lungs. Connecting a donor heart A donor heart is transplanted in the same place as your own heart. Your transplant surgeon will carefully join the donor arteries and veins surrounding the heart with your arteries and veins. Close up of a transplanted heart This shows how a transplanted heart connects to your blood vessels. You can also see the position of pipes from a bypass machine. This machine takes over the function of your heart and lungs during the operation. Some things that might happen during your heart transplant surgery. You will be attached to a heart-lung bypass machine A heart-lung bypass machine will take over the function of the heart and lungs and deliver oxygen to your body while the transplant takes place. Tubes will be inserted into your neck, arms and bladder You will have plastic tubes (lines or catheters) inserted into your neck, arms and bladder. Before the operation, the surgical and anaesthetic teams will explain where the tubes will be placed. What are the tubes for? Small tubes (lines) are inserted into your arms to enable fluid and medications to be given to you during and after the surgery. For most heart transplant operations, you’ll also have a tube inserted into the veins in your neck so that stronger medications can be given, if needed. This also lets the team looking give you extra fluid, if needed. A tube (catheter) will be inserted into your bladder via the urethra. Most heart transplant surgeons will insert a number of large plastic tubes (up to 5) into the area around the heart transplant to drain away any tissue fluid after the surgery. Risks Inserting tubes into you can lead to bleeding, infection, or damage to other structures such as blood vessels or nerves. These complications are very rare. Example of a surgical heart transplant technique . After you have been put to sleep under anaesthetic, the surgery will begin. You will be attached to a heart-lung bypass machine, which takes over the function of the heart and lungs and delivers oxygen to the body. The entire operation takes around 4-6 hours. Read more about the surgical technique Your chest is opened with an incision (cut) in the middle of the breast bone. Your diseased heart will be removed apart from a cuff of the left upper chamber (the left atrium) with the veins from the lungs attached to it. The donated heart is connected to the cuff of the old one, to the veins bringing blood back from the body to the heart, and to the main blood vessels carrying blood to the body (aorta) and lungs (pulmonary artery). You will have a catheter floated through your heart and into the pulmonary artery to monitor function after surgery, and other tubes in your veins to administer medicines that you need. Your urine will be collected via a tube placed in your urinary bladder and a breathing tube will be in your windpipe to allow you to be connected to a ventilator. Once the surgeons are confident that the heart is working well, the heart-lung bypass machine will be removed from the circulation. Your chest will be closed once the bleeding that occurs in all such surgery has settled to the satisfaction of the surgeons. More information. Heart transplant medicines. Get advice on the medicines you might need after a transplant and common side effects. What medicines will you need? Recovery at the transplant centre . What can you expect after heart transplant surgery and when can you go home? What happens after surgery? Go to the next page in this section: Recovery at the transplant centre > Related content. Being admitted to the heart transplant centre Recovery at the transplant centre Taking care of yourself at home Risks from the donated heart Patient and donor stories Medical terms explained. Biopsy This is when a very small piece of tissue is taken for analysis. It is used to diagnose rejection. View all medical terms You may also be interested in. Medical terms explained Receiving a heart Warning signs after a heart transplant
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TitleHeart Transplant | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Urlhttps://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/treatment-tests-and-therapies/heart-transplant
DescriptionA heart transplant is surgery done to remove the diseased heart from a person and replace it with a healthy one from an organ donor
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H1Heart Transplant
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What is a heart transplant?
Why might I need a heart transplant?
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How do I get ready for a heart transplant?
What happens during a heart transplant?
What happens after a heart transplant?
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BodyHeart Transplant Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Share on Pinterest Share via Email Print this Page What is a heart transplant? . A heart transplant is surgery to remove the diseased heart from a person and replace it with a healthy one from an organ donor. To remove the heart from the donor, two or more healthcare providers must declare the donor brain-dead. Before you can be put on a waiting list for a heart transplant, a healthcare provider makes the decision that this is the best treatment choice for your heart failure. A healthcare team also makes sure you are otherwise healthy enough to go through the transplant process. Why might I need a heart transplant? . You may need a heart transplant if your heart is failing and other treatments are not effective. End-stage heart failure is a disease in which the heart muscle is failing severely in its attempt to pump blood through the body. It means other treatments are no longer working. End-stage heart failure is the final stage of heart failure. Despite its name, a diagnosis of heart failure does not mean the heart is about to stop beating. The term failure means the heart muscle is failing to pump blood normally because it is damaged or very weak, or both. Some causes of heart failure include: Heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) Viral infection of the heart muscle High blood pressure Heart valve disease Heart defects present at birth (congenital) Irregular heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) High blood pressure in the lungs ( pulmonary hypertension ) Alcoholism or drug abuse Chronic lung diseases, such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Heart muscle is enlarged, thick, and stiff ( cardiomyopathy ) Low red blood cell count ( anemia ) Your healthcare provider may have other reasons to recommend a heart transplant. What are the risks of a heart transplant? . As with any surgery, complications may occur. Potential risks of a heart transplant may include: Infection Bleeding during or after the surgery Blood clots that can cause heart attack, stroke, or lung problems Breathing problems Kidney failure Coronary allograft vasculopathy (CAV). This is a problem with the blood vessels that carry blood to the heart muscle itself. They become thick and hard. This can cause serious heart muscle damage. Failure of the donor heart Death Your body's immune system may reject the new heart. Rejection is your body's normal reaction to a foreign object or tissue. When you get a new heart, your immune system reacts to what it sees as a foreign threat and attacks the new organ. To allow the transplanted organ to survive in a new body, you will need to take medicines. The medicines will trick the immune system into accepting the transplant and keep it from attacking it. You will need to take the medicines to prevent or treat rejection for the rest of your life. These drugs have side effects too. The side effects will depend on the specific medicines you take. Current or repeated infection that does not get better with treatment Poor blood circulation throughout the body, including the brain Metastatic cancer. This is when cancer has spread from the place it started to one or more other places in the body. Severe health problems that would make you unable to tolerate the surgery Serious health problems other than heart disease that would not get better after transplant Noncompliance with treatment regimen. For instance, not following your healthcare provider's directions, not taking medicines as prescribed, or missing appointments. Drug or alcohol abuse There may be other risks depending on your specific health condition. Be sure to discuss any concerns with your healthcare provider before the surgery. How do I get ready for a heart transplant? . Not everyone is a candidate for heart transplant. Because of the wide range of information needed to know if a person is eligible for transplant, a transplant team will review the evaluation. The team includes a transplant surgeon, a transplant cardiologist (doctor specializing in the treatment of the heart), nurse practitioners or physician assistants, one or more transplant nurses, a social worker, and a psychiatrist or psychologist. Other team members may include a dietitian, a chaplain, hospital administrator, and an anesthesiologist (doctor who uses medicines to keep you asleep during surgery). The transplant evaluation process will include: Psychological and social evaluation. Some psychological and social issues that are involved in organ transplant include stress, financial issues, and support from family or significant others. These factors can greatly affect how you do after the transplant. Blood tests. You will need blood tests to help find a good donor match and help improve the chances that the donor heart will not be rejected. Diagnostic tests. You will need tests to assess your lungs as well as your overall health. These tests may include X-rays, ultrasound procedures, CT scan, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), and dental exams. Women may get a Pap test, gynecology evaluation, and a mammogram. Other preparations. You will get several vaccines to decrease the chances of developing infections that can affect the transplanted heart. The transplant team will consider all the information from interviews, your health history, the findings from your physical exam, and your diagnostic test results when deciding if you are eligible for a heart transplant. Once you have been accepted as a transplant candidate, you will be placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing list. When a donor organ becomes available, candidates are selected based on the severity of their condition, body size, and blood type. If the heart is to be yours, you will need to go to the hospital right away so you can get ready for the transplant. (Most hearts must be transplanted within 4 hours after they’ve been removed from the donor.) These things will need to be done before the transplant: Your healthcare provider will explain the procedure and let you ask questions. You will be asked to sign a consent form that gives your permission to do the surgery. Read the form carefully and ask questions if anything is unclear. You should not eat or drink anything (fast) as soon as you have been told that a heart has become available. You may be given medicine to help you relax (sedative). Based on your health condition, your healthcare provider may request other specific preparation. What happens during a heart transplant? . A heart transplant requires open heart surgery and a stay in a hospital. Procedures may vary depending on your condition and your healthcare provider's practice. Generally, a heart transplant follows this process: You will be asked to remove any jewelry or other objects that may interfere with the procedure. You will change into a hospital gown. A healthcare professional will start an intravenous (IV) line in your hand or arm to inject medicine and to give IV fluids. Additional catheters will be put in blood vessels in your neck and wrist to monitor the status of your heart and blood pressure, and to take blood samples. Other sites for the additional catheters include the under the collarbone and the groin. A soft, flexible tube (Foley catheter) will be put into your bladder to drain urine. A tube will be put through your mouth or nose into your stomach to drain stomach fluids. If there is a lot of hair on your chest, it may be shaved. Heart transplant surgery will be done while you are in a deep asleep (under general anesthesia). Once you are asleep, a breathing tube will be put through your mouth into your lungs. The tube will be attached to a machine (ventilator) that will breathe for you during the surgery. The anesthesiologist will watch your heart rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygen level during the surgery. The skin over your chest will be cleaned with an antiseptic solution. The surgeon will make a cut (incision) down the center of your chest from just below the Adam's apple to just above the navel. The surgeon will cut the breastbone (sternum) in half. He or she will separate the two halves of the breastbone and spread them apart to reach your heart. The surgeon will put tubes into your chest so that your blood can be pumped through your body by a heart-lung (cardiopulmonary bypass) machine while your heart is stopped and replaced. Once the blood has been completely diverted into the bypass machine and is being pumped by the machine, your doctor will remove the diseased heart. The surgeon will sew the donor heart into place. Once your new heart is in place, he or she will connect the blood vessels carefully so there are no leaks. When your new heart is fully connected, the blood circulating through the bypass machine will be allowed back into the heart and the tubes to the machine are removed. Your surgeon will shock the heart with small paddles to restart the heartbeat. Once your new heart starts to beat, the healthcare team will watch the heart to see how it’s working and make sure there are no leaks. Wires for pacing may be put into the heart. Your surgeon can attach these wires to a pacemaker outside your body for a short time to pace your new heart, if needed, during the initial recovery period. The surgeon will rejoin the sternum and sew it together with small wires. The surgeon will sew the skin over the sternum back together. He or she will use sutures or surgical staples to close the incision. Tubes will be put into your chest to drain blood and other fluids from around the heart. These tubes will be connected to a suction device to drain fluids away from the heart as it heals. A sterile bandage or dressing will be applied. What happens after a heart transplant? . In the hospital . After the surgery, someone will take you to the recovery room or the intensive care unit (ICU) and monitor you closely for several days. A nurse will connect you to machines that will display your electrocardiogram (ECG) tracing, blood pressure, other pressure readings, breathing rate, and your oxygen level. Heart transplant surgery requires a hospital stay of 7 to 14 days, or even longer. You will have a tube in your throat that connects to a breathing machine (ventilator) until you are stable enough to breathe on your own. The breathing tube may stay in for a few hours up to several days, depending on your case. As you recover and start to breathe on your own, the breathing machine will be adjusted to allow you to take over more of the breathing. When you are able to breathe completely on your own and are able to cough, your doctor will remove the breathing tube. After the breathing tube is out, a nurse will help you cough and take deep breaths every 2 hours. This will be uncomfortable due to soreness, but it is extremely important that you do this to keep mucus from collecting in your lungs and possibly causing pneumonia. Your nurse will show you how to hug a pillow tightly against your chest while coughing to help ease the discomfort. You may get pain medicine as needed, either by a nurse, or by giving it yourself by pushing a button attached to a device connected to your IV line. You may have a thin, plastic tube that goes through your nose and into your stomach to remove air that you swallow. The tube will be taken out when your bowels are working normally. You will not be able to eat or drink until the tube is removed. Blood samples will be taken often to monitor your new heart, as well as other body functions. These include your lungs, kidneys, liver, and blood system. You may be on special IV medicines to help your blood pressure and your heart, and to control any problems with bleeding. As your condition stabilizes, your doctor will gradually decrease, then stop, these medicines. If you have pacing wires in your heart, he or she will remove those too. Once your doctor removes the breathing and stomach tubes and you are stable, you may start to drink liquids. You can gradually add more solid foods as you can handle them. Your healthcare team will closely watch your anti-rejection (immunosuppression) medicines to make sure you are getting the right dose and the best combination of medicines. Nurses, respiratory therapists, and physical therapists will work with you as you begin physical therapy and breathing exercises. When your healthcare provider decides you are ready, you will be moved from the ICU to a private room on a surgical unit or transplant unit. Your recovery will continue there. You can gradually increase your activity as you get out of bed and walk around for longer periods. You can eat solid foods as tolerated. Nurses, pharmacists, dietitians, physical therapists, and other members of the transplant team will teach you what you will need to do to take care of yourself when you go home. Your healthcare team will arrange for you to go home and schedule a follow-up visit with your healthcare provider. At home . Once you are home, it will be important to keep the surgical area clean and dry. Your doctor will give you specific bathing instructions. During a follow-up visit, your doctor will remove the sutures or surgical staples, if they were not removed before leaving the hospital. Do not drive until your healthcare provider tells you it's OK. Other activity restrictions may apply. You will need frequent follow-up visits after transplant. These visits may include blood tests, chest X-rays, and biopsy. In a biopsy, your doctor uses a thin needle to remove tissue from the heart so he or she can examine it under a microscope. The transplant team will explain the schedule for these visits and tests. The rehab program will continue for many months. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following: Fever, chills, or both. These may be a sign of infection or rejection. Redness, swelling, bleeding, or drainage from the incision site or any of the catheter sites Increase in pain around the incision site Trouble breathing Excessive fatigue Low blood pressure Your healthcare provider may give you other instructions after the procedure, depending on your own case. To allow the transplanted heart to survive in your body, you will need to take medicines for the rest of your life to fight rejection. Each person may react differently to medicines, and side effects can be serious. Your healthcare provider will tailor medicine plans to meet your needs. You may get several anti-rejection medicines at first. The doses of these medicines may change often, depending on your response. Because anti-rejection medicines affect the immune system, you will be at higher risk for infections. It's important to keep a balance between preventing rejection and making you very susceptible to infection. Some of the infections you will be especially susceptible to include oral yeast infection (thrush), herpes , and respiratory viruses. You should avoid contact with crowds and anyone who has an infection for the first few months after your surgery. Regular dental care also is important. Your healthcare provider or dentist may prescribe antibiotics before any dental work to help prevent infections. To watch for signs of rejection, you will likely get routine right heart biopsies. A biopsy is typically done once a week in the early period after a transplant, then gradually changed to monthly or longer intervals. The biopsy procedures may eventually stop. The right heart biopsy procedure may be done as an outpatient or as an inpatient if you are already in the hospital. The procedure involves a right heart catheterization. A special catheter is threaded through a vein in your neck or groin and into the right atrium of your heart. Your doctor takes 4 to 6 tiny tissue samples through the catheter and checks them for signs of rejection. If your doctor finds signs of rejection, he or she may adjust your anti-rejection medicine. The biopsy procedure has its own instructions and risks, and your healthcare provider will discuss these with you. Related. 6 Myths Keeping You from Becoming an Organ Donor Hand and Arm Transplant Behind Hand and Arm Transplants Can I Get a Liver Transplant if I Have This Pre-Existing Condition? Request an Appointment. Find a Doctor Find a Doctor See More Related. Living Organ Donation 6 Myths Keeping You from Becoming an Organ Donor Transplant Hand and Arm Transplant Hand and arm transplant Behind Hand and Arm Transplants Related Topics.
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TitleTransplant Process | Heart Transplant
Urlhttps://my.clevelandclinic.org/departments/transplant/programs/heart/process
DescriptionTransplant Process | Heart Transplant
Date1 May 2019
Organic Position10
H1Transplant Process
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BodyTransplant Process Phone 216.445.1844 Contact Us A heart transplant is only done when it is absolutely necessary and likely to have long-term success. The process of getting accepted into Cleveland Clinic’s heart transplant program involves several steps to ensure the best possible outcomes for every patient. Step 1: Referral to the program There are two ways to be referred to Cleveland Clinic’s heart transplant program – by your doctor or you can refer yourself. To start the referral process, call the pre-transplant office at: 216.444.8351 or toll-free 800.223.2273 ext. 48351. Step 2: Transplant Evaluation Every patient interested in a heart transplant must have a comprehensive evaluation. The evaluation is done to find out exactly how advanced your heart disease is and to create the best plan of care for you. The evaluation takes 3 to 4 days and includes tests and procedures, meeting the members of the transplant team and getting information about all possible medical and surgical treatment options, including heart transplant. The team members will talk to you about many aspects of heart transplantation, including: How patients are selected for the heart transplant program Your support system and any issues that may affect your ability to be selected for a transplant Financial responsibilities associated with a transplant The importance of following your plan of care before and after your transplant Tests that you may have during your evaluation include: Blood tests Chest X-ray Urine test EKG Echocardiogram (echo) Cardiac stress test CT scan MRI Right heart catheterization Biopsy Ultrasound Pulmonary function test Endoscopy General health screening Psychosocial evaluation You will get detailed information about your evaluation and the testing after they are scheduled. After you complete your evaluation, your test results and other information will be reviewed by a committee to determine if you are a good candidate for a heart transplant and in need of one at this time. If you are accepted into Cleveland Clinic’s heart transplant program, your information will be forwarded to the Ohio Solid Organ Transplant Consortium (OSOTC) for approval. Your insurance company must also approve the transplant. After you are fully approved for a transplant, you will be placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) national waiting list. Step 3: Waiting for transplant Being placed on the UNOS waiting list does not guarantee you will get a heart transplant. It is critical that you follow your plan of care and do not miss any follow-up appointments. The organs used for transplant are based on criteria from UNOS and include: How sick you are How long you have been waiting for a transplant Your height and weight Your blood type Step 4: Getting a transplant The heart transplant national allocation system is based on medical urgency and currently has 6 active tiers. The first 3 tiers are the most urgent and usually require hospitalization and life support while the other tiers are for more stable patients. Details of each tier are below.  Status 1 Venous-arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (VA ECMO) Surgically implanted, non-endovascular Biventricular assist device (Bi-VAD) Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) with ventricular arrhythmias Status 2 Surgically implanted, non-endovascular left ventricular assist device (LVAD) Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) Ventricular arrhythmias requiring electrical cardioversion despite IV antiarrhythmics MCS with device malfunction/failure Total artificial heart, Bi-VAD, right ventricular assist device, or ventricular assist device for single ventricle pts. Percutaneous endovascular MCS Status 3 Outpatient LVAD for 30 days Multiple inotropes or single high-dose inotrope with hemodynamic monitoring VA ECMO after 7 days; percutaneous endovascular MCS or IABP after 14 days Surgically implanted, non-endovascular LVAD after 14 days (hospitalized) MCS with one of the following: device infection hemolysis pump thrombosis right heart failure mucosal bleeding aortic insufficiency Status 4 Outpatient LVAD Inotropes without hemodynamic monitoring Retransplant Diagnosis of one of the following: Congenital heart disease Ischemic heart disease with intractable angina Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Restrictive cardiomyopathy Mucosal bleeding Amyloidosis Status 5 On the waitlist for at least one other organ at the same hospital Status 6 All remaining active candidates Step 5: After your transplant Your recovery in the hospital You will stay in the hospital about 12 days after your heart transplant. Your stay may be shorter or longer, depending on how quickly you recover. Your recovery starts in a cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU), where you will be closely monitored around the clock. You will complete your recovery on a special heart transplant patient recovery floor. Your recovery after you leave the hospital The goal of your recovery is to have an active life; however you will need to limit some activities as you continue your recovery at home. Your doctor will talk to you about these restrictions and when you will be able to get back to a normal routine. You will have regular follow-up appointments, testing and biopsies to check for any signs of organ rejection, infection or other problems. If you do have a problem, you may need to have more frequent visits or be admitted to the hospital for treatment or surgery. Following your plan of care The success of your transplant depends very heavily on how well you follow your plan of care. This includes: Taking all medications exactly as prescribed Keeping all follow-up appointments Having blood tests or other tests on time Following your recommended diet and fluid guidelines Following your activity guidelines Following all other medical advice and instructions from your transplant team Contacting your post-transplant coordinator right away is you have any issues or concerns Preventing infection Your risk of infection and cancer are higher after a heart transplant because one of the medications you need to take weakens your immune system. It is important to avoid being around people who have an infection and to call your doctor right away if you have any signs of infection. Your doctor will talk to you about what these signs and symptoms are. Heart Transplant Rejection Organ rejection is one of the risks of a heart transplant procedure. It is possible that your body will reject your new heart right away or over time. Regular biopsies and follow-up visits help your transplant team know if there are any signs of organ rejection. Your doctor will talk to you about the different types of rejection and the appropriate treatments for each. If your new heart is not expected to work, you may be placed back on the waiting list for a new heart. Phone 216.445.1844 Contact Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Pinterest Snapchat
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TitleHeart Transplantation Procedure - Health Encyclopedia - University of Rochester Medical Center
Urlhttps://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=92&contentid=P07974
Description
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Body/www.googletagmanager.com/ns.htmlid=GTM-W2QNSJ" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden" title="GTM">
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TitleExperience a Heart Transplant in 360° | Heart Transplant | UT Southwestern Medical Center
Urlhttps://utswmed.org/conditions-treatments/heart-transplant/experience-heart-transplant-360/
DescriptionExperience a Heart Transplant in 360°
Date
Organic Position12
H1Experience a Heart Transplant in 360°
H2Our Surgeons
What to Expect During a Heart Transplant
H3UT Southwestern 360° Heart Transplant
Matthias Peltz, M.D
John Murala, M.D
Heart Transplant Program Video
The gift of a new heart
H2WithAnchorsOur Surgeons
What to Expect During a Heart Transplant
BodyExperience a Heart Transplant in 360° Appointment New Patient Appointment or 214-645-5505 Appointment New Patient Appointment or 214-645-5505 Explore Heart Transplant The first human-to-human heart transplant electrified the world in December 1967. But now 50 years later, the activities involved in a heart transplant procedure are still a mystery to most people. Now, UT Southwestern is offering an unprecedented 360˚ view.Join us for a remarkable experience and witness a heart transplant as it’s never been seen outside the operating room before – from the delivery of the donated heart to the initial surgical incision to the final close. UT Southwestern 360° Heart Transplant. A breathtaking view of a lifesaving procedure. Witness medical history with UT Southwestern.This video is graphic in nature. Viewer discretion is advised.Best viewed on the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Firefox. 3D features on iPhone require the Vimeo app. “About 3,000 people have a heart transplant every year. It’s never routine, and time is usually of the essence. But it’s always exciting to see that first heartbeat again from the donor heart.” Our Surgeons. Our team’s specialized skills and training enable us to treat even the most complex cases of heart failure, including patients with other serious medical conditions and those in need of a simultaneous heart-lung or heart-kidney transplantation. We are one of the few medical centers in Texas that have performed a heart-liver transplant, a complicated procedure in which a newly implanted heart must withstand the stress of a liver transplant and the toxins released from the donor organ. UT Southwestern accepts many patients who have been turned away by other centers. Matthias Peltz, M.D. Dr. Peltz, Associate Professor of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery and Surgical Director of Cardiac Transplantation at UT Southwestern, is a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon and treats patients with surgical heart disease. He is especially interested in coronary artery bypass grafting and heart transplantation. Meet Dr. Peltz John Murala, M.D. Dr. Murala, Assistant Professor of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, is a fellowship-trained cardiothoracic surgeon specializing in heart transplant surgery, lung transplant surgery, adult congenital heart surgery, and advanced cardiac therapies. He also specializes in Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) or artificial lung support. Meet Dr. Murala Our team carefully coordinates the heart transplant surgery. The process involves removing the heart from the donor, preparing it for implant, and suturing the new organ into the recipient. Heart Transplant Program Video. As a leading transplant center in North Texas, we have the experience and expertise that lead to excellent patient outcomes. Our three-year survival rate surpasses the national average for heart transplantation. Learn about our Heart Transplant Program What to Expect During a Heart Transplant. The goal of heart transplantation is to both prolong and improve quality of life. After a thorough evaluation, if our multidisciplinary team believes that a heart transplant is a patient’s best treatment option – and the patient wishes to pursue this option – his or her name is added to the national United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) waiting list. Wait times can range from days to months.When a suitable donor is found, most patients are in the operating room within hours. Time is of the essence.After transplant, extensive after care is needed to provide the best outcome. Our transplant team provides patients with extended medical management, care, and support.Learn more about the heart transplant process. The gift of a new heart. Gary Thomas’ heart was only functioning at 8 percent when he was placed on a transplant list. One year later, after undergoing a heart transplant that was filmed in 360 degree format and broadcast around the world, Thomas is thankful for his second chance at life.
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TitleWhen Your Child Needs a Heart Transplant (for Parents) - Nemours KidsHealth
Urlhttps://kidshealth.org/en/parents/heart-transplant.html
DescriptionIf your child needs a heart transplant, you're probably feeling lots of emotions. Fortunately, many kids who undergo heart transplants go on to live normal, healthy lives
Date
Organic Position13
H1When Your Child Needs a Heart Transplant
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H3What Is a Heart Transplant?
What Happens Before a Heart Transplant?
What Happens During Heart Transplant Surgery?
What Happens After Heart Transplant Surgery?
What Problems Can Happen?
Looking Ahead
How Can I Help My Child?
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BodyWhen Your Child Needs a Heart Transplant Reviewed by: Easton Kernich, MSN, NP-C Heart Transplant Program at Nemours Children's Health Listen Play Stop   Volume   mp3 Settings Close Player Larger text sizeLarge text sizeRegular text size Print en español Si su hijo necesita un trasplante de corazón What Is a Heart Transplant? A heart transplant is a surgery in which doctors remove a person's sick heart and replace it with a healthy donor heart. Transplants are done when a child's heart does not work well and he or she won't survive without a new one. Doctors sometimes call this heart failure, or end-stage pediatric heart disease. They usually first try to treat heart failure with medicine, surgery, or other procedures. If those don't work, a child might need a heart transplant. Transplanted hearts come from organ donors who have agreed (or their guardians have agreed) to donate their organs when they die. They choose to donate the organs because they want to help someone else who is sick. Many kids who have heart transplants go on to live normal, healthy lives after they recover from surgery. They will take medicines for the rest of their lives to prevent the body from rejecting the heart. Rejecting means that the body's immune cells attack the new heart because they sense that it's foreign. What Happens Before a Heart Transplant? If your child needs a heart transplant, your doctor will refer you to a transplant center. There, you'll meet the members of the transplant team, which usually includes: surgeons cardiologists (heart doctors) a transplant coordinator nurses dietitians psychologists social workers The health care team will check to make sure that your child is healthy enough to have surgery and take the medicines needed after it. The team will do tests such as: blood tests: to determine blood type an echocardiogram: a test in which sound waves make an image of the heart an electrocardiogram (also known as an ECG or EKG): a test that records the electrical activity of the heart and can help find arrhythmias and heart muscle damage cardiac catheterization: a procedure in which a thin, plastic tube called a catheteris put into a blood vessel and then threaded through to the heart so doctors can view the heart and its chambers The doctor also might do a biopsy, removing a tiny piece of tissue from the heart to examine under a microscope. The transplant evaluation lets the team learn as much about your child as possible. But it's also a time for you and your child to learn about what will happen before, during, and after the transplant. The transplant team is there to provide information and support. Be sure to ask if you don't understand something. If the transplant team decides your child is a good candidate, the next step is to find a heart. Your child's name will go on an organ waiting list. This list has the names of everyone who is waiting for a heart or other organs. Your child might have to wait to find a heart that is a good match. The need for new hearts is far greater than the number donated, so this can take a long time. You'll stay in close touch with the doctors and the rest of the health care team. Make sure they know how to reach you at all times. When a heart is available, you'll need to move quickly. Keep a bag packed and be ready to go to the transplant hospital at a moment's notice. While you wait for a transplant, keep your child as healthy as possible. That way, he or she will be ready for transplant surgery when the time comes. Help your child: eat healthy foods take all medicines as directed keep all medical appointments Tell your doctor and the transplant center right away if is any change in your child's health. What Happens During Heart Transplant Surgery? When you get to the hospital, the transplant team will prepare your child for surgery. They may run a few tests to be sure that the new heart is a good match. Then, your child goes to an operating room. In the operating room, your child will get anesthesia to sleep through the operation. The surgeon makes an incision (cut) in the chest and removes the sick heart. The new heart is placed in the chest, and the surgeon connects it by sewing its blood vessels to the blood vessels in your child's body. So that doctors can check heart function, the incision might not be closed right away. Most heart transplant surgeries last between 4 and 6 hours. Someone on the transplant team will keep you informed about how the surgery is going while you wait. p What Happens After Heart Transplant Surgery? After heart transplant surgery, your child be in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU). You can visit your child there for brief periods. Your child will get medicine for pain. He or she will stay asleep on the ventilator with a breathing tube in place until the doctors know that the new heart is working well. This may take a few days. How long your child will be in the CICU depends on his or her condition. Generally, the stay is 7 to 10 days. When ready, your child will be transferred to the general cardiac ward. The transplant team will continue to care for and closely watch your child. Most children stay in the hospital at least 3 to 4 weeks after surgery. During this time, kids and their families learn how to care for the new heart. Be sure you understand the doctors' instructions because your child will need to follow them carefully. In the weeks after your child goes home, you'll return to the hospital many times so that the doctors can make sure that everything is going well. What Problems Can Happen? One of the most common problems after transplant surgery is rejection. Rejection happens because the body doesn't recognize the new heart and doesn't know that it is helpful. So the immune system tries to attack it. Medicines (called immunosuppressants, or anti-rejection medicines) help to control this reaction. In a sense, they trick the body into accepting the new heart. Taking them can make your child more likely to get infections, especially in the days right after surgery. So keep your child away from sick people, and have everyone at home wash their hands well and often. The risk of rejection is greatest in the first few weeks after transplant surgery. But the body never completely accepts the new heart. So anti-rejection medicines are taken for life. Usually, the amount of immunosuppressants taken is reduced as the body gets used to the new heart. Rarely, the body refuses to accept the new organ and another transplant is needed. Looking Ahead. Many kids who have heart transplants live normal, healthy lives after they recover from surgery. Some feel better than they ever have before. It's very important for you and your child to do everything possible to keep the new heart healthy. Make sure that your child takes all medicines as directed, and encourage him or her to get plenty of rest, exercise regularly, and eat well. Also, watch your child for signs of infection or rejection, including: fever tiredness trouble breathing vomiting weight gain poor appetite Call your doctor right away if these or any other problems happen. Your child will have regular checkups so doctors can watch for problems. At first, these visits might happen weekly. You'll go less often over time. Eventually, checkups might be needed only once or twice a year. How Can I Help My Child? Having a serious condition can be hard for kids. Surgery and immunosuppressant therapy can add to the stress. Talk to your child about these changes and how you will work them into your routine. Make sure to find time to do fun things together with family and friends. For teens, immunosuppressant therapy can be a challenge. These medicines can cause: more acne weight gain These side effects are a major reason why teens are at risk for not taking their medicines after a transplant. This can be dangerous and even lead to rejection of the new heart. So be sure to talk about the importance of taking all medicines as directed. To help: Be there for your child to talk to. If your child needs more support, make an appointment with a therapist or counselor. Find a support group. They're a great way for kids and teens to relieve stress and connect with others who are going through similar challenges. Online resources include Transplant Living. Get support for yourself too. It can be a huge relief to talk about your feelings with other people who know what you're going through. Ask the transplant care team if they know of support groups for families. Reviewed by: Easton Kernich, MSN, NP-C Date reviewed: November 2018 /content/kidshealth/misc/medicalcodes/parents/articles/heart-transplant
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TitleHeart Transplant Surgery | Stanford Health Care
Urlhttps://stanfordhealthcare.org/medical-treatments/h/heart-transplant/what-to-expect/surgery.html
DescriptionLearn all about the heart transplant surgery process, beginning after a donor heart becomes available
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BodyTransplant Surgery. As soon as a donor heart becomes available you will be contacted by the transplant surgeon. Once you arrive at the hospital you will have an IV placed, blood drawn, and receive a chest x-ray. The surgeon and an anesthesiologist will see you and take your medical history. The surgeon will review the surgical procedure and the risks of the operation with you and your family. There is usually several hours of wait time between notification of donor availability and the actual procedure. Once it is time for your operation, a team of anesthesiologists will take you to the operating room where you will have additional special IVs placed. You will then be given medications to put you to sleep. A breathing tube will be placed into your airway to help you breathe and a urinary catheter will be placed to drain your bladder during the surgery. As the surgery begins an incision will be made in the midline of your chest. A heart-lung bypass machine will take over the work of the heart and lungs. While this is occurring another team of surgeons will travel to the donor's hospital. Once there, the team will examine the donor's heart to make absolutely certain that it is a suitable match. Once the donor team arrives with your new heart the diseased heart will be removed and replaced with the healthy donor organ. The operation usually lasts between five and six hours, but can last longer if you have had previous open-heart surgery or have a left ventricular assist device in place. Previous Section Next Section Home Close Doctors Clinics & Locations Conditions & Treatments Clinical Trials MyHealth Login Patients & Visitors Billing Insurance Financial Assistance Medical Records Contact Us Video Visits Get a Second Opinion COVID-19 Resource Center Healthcare Professionals Referring Physicians Nursing Allied Healthcare About Us Quality & Safety Careers Newsroom Make a Donation Stanford Health Care Now Close
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TitleFAQ: Heart Transplant | Patient Education | UCSF Health
Urlhttps://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/faq-heart-transplant
DescriptionFind answers to common questions about heart transplants, from how to know if you need a transplant to how long the waiting list might be
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H2How do I know if I need a transplant?
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Can my family stay with me?
What will my scars look like?
What medications will I take after the transplant surgery?
When can I drive?
When can I return to work?
How long does it take to fully recover?
Will my insurance pay for the transplant and follow-up care?
Is there a support group for patients going through transplant?
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Recommended reading
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H2WithAnchorsHow do I know if I need a transplant?
How will a transplant change my life?
Is the evaluation very difficult?
How long is the waiting list?
What happens when an organ is available?
Is the surgery very complicated?
How long will I be hospitalized after the transplant?
Do I have to stay near the hospital after the transplant?
Will I have pain after the surgery?
Can my family stay with me?
What will my scars look like?
What medications will I take after the transplant surgery?
When can I drive?
When can I return to work?
How long does it take to fully recover?
Will my insurance pay for the transplant and follow-up care?
Is there a support group for patients going through transplant?
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Recommended reading
BodyFAQ: Heart Transplant Related Conditions Heart Transplant Heart Failure How do I know if I need a transplant? How will a transplant change my life? Is the evaluation very difficult? How long is the waiting list? What happens when an organ is available? Is the surgery very complicated? How long will I be hospitalized after the transplant? Do I have to stay near the hospital after the transplant? Will I have pain after the surgery? Can my family stay with me? What will my scars look like? What medications will I take after the transplant surgery? When can I drive? When can I return to work? How long does it take to fully recover? Will my insurance pay for the transplant and follow-up care? Is there a support group for patients going through transplant? How do I know if I need a transplant? Some patients with severe heart disease may benefit from transplantation. Your cardiologist or pulmonary medicine specialist may refer you to a transplant center for an evaluation. The purpose of the evaluation is two-fold: To determine the severity of your disease and whether there are any more conventional treatments To determine whether you would be able to survive the transplant operation and have a good long-term result afterwards How will a transplant change my life? A successful transplant will dramatically improve your symptoms of heart disease. Many transplant recipients can perform the same physical activities and enjoy the same quality of life as those without transplants. All transplant recipients, however, are committed to daily drug treatment and close medical supervision for the rest of their lives. Is the evaluation very difficult? The transplant evaluation is very thorough. In addition to specific heart assessment, tests are performed to determine the function of all the major organ systems, screen for infectious diseases and cancer, and try and predict how well you and your family will cope with the rigors of the transplant regimen. Many of the tests, even the complex ones, are fairly standardized and can be performed in your local community. Some tests may require you to be briefly admitted to a hospital. Every potential candidate must make at least one outpatient visit to UCSF Medical Center to meet with the transplant doctors, coordinators and social worker. Typically, most of the evaluation can be completed within a week or two. The transplant team meets weekly to discuss patient evaluations and make decisions on appropriate treatment. Patients who are felt to be good candidates for transplantation are then put on a national waiting list. How long is the waiting list? Unfortunately, the waiting times for heart transplants are long – often more than six months. Each patient on our waiting list returns for an outpatient visit to our transplant clinic every two to three months, or more frequently if necessary. While many patients can wait at home, sometimes it is necessary for patients to be admitted to the hospital in order to remain in satisfactory condition until transplantation. What happens when an organ is available? When the transplant team decides that a potential donor is suitable for one of our recipients, we contact the patient as soon as possible. Since it is not possible to predict when a suitable organ will become available and there is a limited amount of time to recover the organs successfully, it is very important that we be able to locate recipients quickly and get them into the hospital in a timely fashion. Is the surgery very complicated? This depends on each patient's specific situation. During the evaluation interview, the transplant surgeon will review the details of the surgical procedure, the risks of the procedure and the expected recovery after surgery. How long will I be hospitalized after the transplant? This depends on your specific situation. Although patients can recover sufficiently after heart transplantation to be discharged within 10 days, it is more typical for patients to be hospitalized for two weeks or more. Do I have to stay near the hospital after the transplant? We require all patients to be within 30 minutes driving distance of the transplant center for the first six weeks post discharge. The frequency of follow-up visits and lab tests during this interval can be a problem for patients who live far away. The social worker can help you locate suitable guest housing in the area. Will I have pain after the surgery? Generally, most patients do not report a lot of pain after heart transplant surgery. The incision does cause pain or discomfort when you cough. We will give you pain medication and specific instructions to lessen the pain. Can my family stay with me? Your family can accompany you until you go into the transplant surgery. While you are in the intensive care unit, family members may not stay in your room. If you need assistance finding guest housing, a social worker will help you. We have very open visiting hours and encourage family members to spend time with you. However, in order to protect you from infection, anyone who is ill – with a cold or flu, for example – should not visit. What will my scars look like? The scar is down the center of the chest. It starts at the noch, or top of the sternal bone, just under your neck, and ends just past the end of the sternal bone. Initially the scar is more prominent. Over time, it will fade to a very light, thin line. What medications will I take after the transplant surgery? You will be on three main immunosuppressive, or anti-rejection, medications after your heart transplant. Along with the immunosuppressive medications you will need to take several medications that help protect your body from infection. When can I drive? After heart transplantation, you can drive when your sternum, or breastbone, is fully healed. This takes about six weeks. When can I return to work? You may return to work two to three months after the transplant surgery. How long does it take to fully recover? It generally takes three to six months to fully recover from heart transplant surgery. However, age and previous medical problems may cause a longer recovery period. Will my insurance pay for the transplant and follow-up care? We have a financial counselor who will verify your insurance coverage. We will obtain authorization for your transplant and follow-up care. Is there a support group for patients going through transplant? We have support groups for patients on the waiting list as well as for after the transplant. You will be notified of the support group meetings and the topic each month. UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your provider. Related clinics . Heart Transplant Program 400 Parnassus Ave., Fifth Floor San Francisco, CA 94143 (415) 353-4145 Thursdays, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Recommended reading . How the Heart Works The heart is muscular and hollow, constantly pumping blood to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the body and is comprised of four compartments. Learn more. Share. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Email Link Copy Link
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TitleHeart Transplant - St Vincent's Heart Health
Urlhttps://www.svhhearthealth.com.au/procedures/procedures-treatments/heart-transplant
DescriptionInformation about heart transplant, including how to prepare and what happens during and after the surgery
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TitleHeart Transplant: What to Expect at Home
Urlhttps://myhealth.alberta.ca/Health/aftercareinformation/pages/conditions.aspx?hwid=abk5351
Description
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TitleHeart transplant surgery | Heart and Stroke Foundation
Urlhttps://www.heartandstroke.ca/heart-disease/treatments/surgery-and-other-procedures/heart-transplant-surgery
DescriptionLearn more about the risks, outlook, preparation, and what to expect from heart transplant surgery
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H1Heart transplant surgery
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BodyHeart transplant surgery Share Facebook Twitter Email Print What is heart transplant surgery? Heart transplant surgery is the removal of a failing heart and pre-existing hardware (such as an implantable cardio defibrillator or pacemakers) and its replacement by a donor heart. Why is it done? Heart transplant is used to treat severe, end-stage heart failure. This heart failure may be the result of damage to the heart from: Coronary artery disease, such as a heart attack. Severe, untreated hypertension (hypertensive heart disease). Heart valve problems. Infections, such as viruses. Alcohol and illicit drug use. Inherited heart disease. Congenital heart disease (a malformation of the heart a person is born with). Unknown (idiopathic). For severely ill patients, a mechanical heart (mechanical assist device) may be used temporarily while waiting for a donor heart. What is done? During the operation: A bypass machine will be used to pump blood to the rest of your body. Most of the old, failing heart will be removed. The posterior walls of both upper chambers (atria) are left in place and the new heart is attached to this remaining tissue. The blood vessels leading in and out of the heart are also attached to the new heart. (As a precaution, pacing wires may be placed on the surface of the heart, which can be connected to an external pacemaker, if necessary. Prior to discharge, these wires will be removed.) The new heart is then shocked so it will start beating and the chest is closed. What can you expect? Before the operation Once it is determined that you require a new heart, you will be evaluated to determine whether you are a good candidate for heart transplant. If you are, your name will be put on the heart transplant waiting list. Your position on the list will depend upon how ill you are, and may be moved up over time if your health changes. Once on the waiting list, you will receive a pager so you can be contacted immediately when a suitable heart becomes available. Since the donor heart has to be transplanted within hours of donation, you may want to stay prepared by making a travel plan ahead and packing a suitcase with your medication for a hospital stay. Preparation for surgery includes: blood work an electrocardiogram (ECG) a chest X-ray a urine sample an intravenous line for measuring pressure in the lung arteries. During the operation A transplant is conducted under a general anesthetic so you will be asleep throughout the procedure. Once you are sedated, the surgeons will place: a tube down your windpipe, which will be connected to a breathing machine called a respirator to support your breathing during the surgery. a tube into your stomach to stop liquid and air from collecting in your stomach so you will not feel sick and bloated when you wake up. a tube into your bladder to collect urine. The surgery usually takes about 3 to 5 hours, but it can vary. After the operation When you awaken, you will be in the intensive care unit (ICU) or cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU). Once you are awake and able to breathe adequately, you will be detached from the ventilator and the tube down your windpipe will be removed. Pain medication will be given to you, either intravenously or as pills. As you recover, you will be transferred to a step-down unit and then to a regular room. You can expect to stay in the hospital at least two to three weeks after surgery. Drugs to suppress your immune system (immunosuppressive therapy) will be administered to prevent your body from rejecting the donor heart. A rehabilitation program will be designed to help your recovery. At home Upon returning home, you should watch for possible signs of infection, such as:  fever sore throat shortness of breath coughing cold sores flu-like symptoms or feeling unwell redness, swelling or drainage from your incision. Possible signs of rejection of the donor heart include: shortness of breath weight gain fever fatigue. Most patients continue to receive follow-up care for several months after they return home. Cardiac rehabilitation Cardiac rehab is a personalised program of exercise, education and counselling to help you recover from heart disease. Rehab will help you regain your strength and reduce your risk of having other problems in the future. Talk to your doctor about rehab. Lifestyle changes can help Healthy choices can help you manage heart disease. Get practical tips and advice from Heart & Stroke experts on how to get healthy. Learn how to: Eat well Get moving Maintain a healthy weight Stop smoking Manage your stress    Talk to your healthcare provider about the lifestyle changes that will benefit you the most. Related information It’s normal to feel worried or afraid after a diagnosis of heart disease. Find someone you can turn to for emotional support like a family member, friend, doctor, mental health worker or support group. Talking about your emotions and feelings could be an important part of your journey to recovery.  The recovery & support  section is full of practical advice and tips to support you on your recovery journey. Find peer support resources here. Download or order our free book Living Well With Heart Diseases. Join our community of survivors by signing up for our recovery newsletter. You will get the latest research news, information, tips and strategies to help you manage your recovery.  To find useful services to help you on your journey with heart disease, see the Heart & Stroke services and resources listing.  
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