Copywriteroffice

Serp data

Request Result Detail

The request result help you to show your API requests results.

Copywriteroffice - Common issues that arise when working from home serp result detail
Keyword Common issues that arise when working from home
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Common+issues+that+arise+when+working+from+home&oq=Common+issues+that+arise+when+working+from+home&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Devicedesktop
Languageen
LocationGB
Search Enginegoogle.co.uk
No. Of Results18160000000
RelatedSearch
challenges of working from home during covidhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Challenges+of+working+from+home+during+COVID&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAgfEAE
what are the challenges of working from homehttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=What+are+the+challenges+of+working+from+home&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAguEAE
working from home challenges and benefitshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Working+from+home+challenges+and+benefits&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAgnEAE
challenges of working from home during lockdownhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Challenges+of+working+from+home+during+lockdown&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAgqEAE
challenges of working from home and how to overcome themhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Challenges+of+working+from+home+and+how+to+overcome+them&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAgpEAE
challenges of working from home pdfhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Challenges+of+working+from+home+PDF&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAgoEAE
work from home challenge ideashttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Work+from+home+challenge+ideas&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAgtEAE
work from home challenges and solutions ppthttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&q=Work+from+home+challenges+and+solutions+ppt&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzL_I_KX1AhVh6uAKHX22D3EQ1QJ6BAggEAE
Result 1
TitleFive common issues faced working from home during lockdown - Blog -
Urlhttps://www.gbscorporate.com/blog/five-common-issues-faced-working-from-home-during-lockdown
Description
Date
Organic Position
H1Five common issues faced working from home during lockdown
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyFive common issues faced working from home during lockdown A home office is a very different environment to its traditional counterpart. With stringent measures in place to keep the most vulnerable people in society safe and protected, the hour train commute or lifeless traffic is a thing of the past; working remotely is something that the vast majority are having to get used to.Although getting to wear your pyjamas during work hours might be a high point for some, the reality of working from home comes with its own unique set of challenges. In this article, we take a look at some of the most common hurdles we’re facing in our new-found working routines; Mental health One of the biggest problems faced by remote-workers is mental health. With the number of people struggling in silence rising, companies need to promote positive mental health amongst employees working remotely and offer support to those in need. Take a look at our Mental Health First Aid Awareness course which can be incorporated into your organisation's health and wellbeing strategy.Managing team members Managing staff remotely is an entirely different skill to managing in person. Having the tools and resources to communicate and track work logs and projects is an integral part of creating an environment that is conducive to productivity and not falling into the downward spiral of micro-management. These don’t have to be complex, but they should allow and promote three key points: transparency, regular communication and team engagement.Staying safe online There’s a reason why millions are invested in IT infrastructure every year, and a big part of that is security. When working remotely or from home, remaining aware of your IT security is essential. Simply changing the default WiFi password on your home network is a simple step to mitigate any security threats; however, there are other ways to better protect yourself, such as in our latest online cybersecurity course.Loneliness Going from a busy office to a home office is a significant change and one that shouldn’t be taken lightly. Whether it’s watercooler chats or going for lunch with a friend or colleague, these times aren’t going to be happening at home and can start to cause a sense of loneliness. Being resilient to change and difficult circumstances is a welcomed trait of employees but not always an innate skill which is why training your employees to understand and practise resilience can reap many benefits.Work-life balance When there’s not a security guard locking up behind you or people around you leaving to go home, you can become disillusioned with time and engrossed in a piece of work causing time to fly by. At home it’s easy to slip into this pattern, so it’s important to maintain a routine. Try to stick to your working day and continue to take short breaks to stay productive. Here at GBS CorporateTraining, we work with businesses to provide solutions that enhance employee experience and helps them overcome challenges. With that in mind, we’ve worked around the clock to design several digitally delivered courses that can be completed 100% online in the safety of your own home. From Managing Remote Workers, Conflict Resolution, Mental Health Awareness and Cyber Security, these courses are delivered by webinar and can help your employees during this difficult time.To discover the full list of courses we are now delivering digitally, please click here. *ISO 9001:2015 relates to GBS Corporate Training's products and services Other Popular Business Courses CMI Management Courses Negotiation Skills Course Problem Solving Training Customer Relationship Management Training Course Selling Skills Training Emotional Intelligence Training Diversity and Inclusion Training Managing Remote Teams Training Mentoring Skills Training Performance Management Training Consulting Skills Courses Facilitation Skills for Trainers Unconscious Bias Training Team Leadership Courses Personal Impact Training Wellbeing and Resilience Training Giving and Receiving Feedback Training Lean Practitioner Training Lean Six Sigma Yellow Belt Training Lean Six Sigma Green belt Training Lean Six Sigma Black belt Training
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • training
  • 18
  • 1
  • home
  • 10
  • 1
  • working
  • 7
  • 1
  • skill
  • 7
  • 1
  • cours
  • 7
  • 1
  • mental health
  • 6
  • 1
  • mental
  • 6
  • 1
  • health
  • 6
  • 1
  • employee
  • 5
  • 1
  • security
  • 5
  • 1
  • training lean
  • 4
  • 1
  • online
  • 4
  • 1
  • person
  • 4
  • 1
  • remotely
  • 4
  • 1
  • work
  • 4
  • 1
  • team
  • 4
  • 1
  • managing
  • 4
  • 1
  • management
  • 4
  • 1
  • lean
  • 4
  • 1
  • training lean sigma
  • 3
  • 1
  • working remotely
  • 3
  • 1
  • skill training
  • 3
  • 1
  • lean sigma
  • 3
  • 1
  • belt training
  • 3
  • 1
  • office
  • 3
  • 1
  • remote
  • 3
  • 1
  • time
  • 3
  • 1
  • sigma
  • 3
  • 1
  • belt
  • 3
  • 1
Result 2
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position1
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 3
TitleWorking from home? 12 challenges and how to overcome them | BetterUp
Urlhttps://www.betterup.com/blog/challenges-of-working-from-home
DescriptionDiscover 12 of the most demanding challenges of working from home and how you can overcome them in 2021
Date17 May 2021
Organic Position2
H1Working from home? 12 challenges and how to overcome them
H2The necessity of working from home in 2020 and 2021
Why is it essential to identify the challenges of remote work?
12 challenges of working from home and how to overcome them
10 tools to help remote workers work more effectively
The pros of working from home
Embracing remote work for the long-term
Erin Eatough, PhD
Read Next
How to handle a lack of motivation at work
How to work from home: A comprehensive guide
Working from home? 25 tips that will help you thrive
Why always working long hours is ruining your productivity
Chronic stress is a chronic problem. Here's how to cope
How to recover from burnout and love your life again
H31. Collaboration and communication
2. Loneliness
3. Not being able to unplug
4. Distractions at home
5. Being in a different time zone than teammates
6. Motivation
7. Taking vacation time
8. Finding reliable wifi
9. Bad habits
10. Time management
11. The “Pajama Mindset”
12. Neglecting your network
Tools to minimize distractions
Project management tools
Team communication and collaboration tools
Video conferencing tools
Accounting and invoicing tools
Time management tools
H2WithAnchorsThe necessity of working from home in 2020 and 2021
Why is it essential to identify the challenges of remote work?
12 challenges of working from home and how to overcome them
10 tools to help remote workers work more effectively
The pros of working from home
Embracing remote work for the long-term
Erin Eatough, PhD
Read Next
How to handle a lack of motivation at work
How to work from home: A comprehensive guide
Working from home? 25 tips that will help you thrive
Why always working long hours is ruining your productivity
Chronic stress is a chronic problem. Here's how to cope
How to recover from burnout and love your life again
BodyWorking from home? 12 challenges and how to overcome them By Erin Eatough, PhD May 17, 2021 - 19 min read Share this article   Jump to section The necessity of working from home in 2020 and 2021 Why is it essential to identify the challenges of remote work? 12 challenges of working from home and how to overcome them 10 tools to help remote workers work more effectively The pros of working from home Embracing remote work for the long-term Working from home has gone from a dream to a reality for many people in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The challenges of working from home have also presented themselves. The way we work has changed forever, and it seems like there’s no going back. We all love doing Zoom meetings in our pajama pants and hanging out with our pets all day. That's a given. But remote work also has its drawbacks. Let's take a look at 12 specific challenges of working from home and how to overcome them. We've included actionable tips and solutions to help you while working remotely. The necessity of working from home in 2020 and 2021. The trend of remote work was already growing before 2020. But when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, it skyrocketed. In 2021, the pandemic continues to affect the way we work. Forty-five percent of remote workers report that they are working from home because of the outbreak. While 46% say their organizations plan on making remote work permanent. (Image Source) In spite of many people now finding themselves forced to work from home, it seems the majority are happy with the change and would like it to continue. In fact, 97% of the remote workforce would like to continue working remotely at least some of the time for the rest of their careers. It seems that the benefits of remote work outweigh the drawbacks for employees. (Image Source) There are drawbacks, though, and you and your team are bound to face them at some point.  Read on to discover how to identify and overcome the most common challenges of working from home. Why is it essential to identify the challenges of remote work? More people working remotely brings a new set of challenges that can negatively impact productivity if not addressed.  Employees have had to adapt to new ways of working. According to Buffer’s 2021 State of Remote Work report: 41% of new remote workers say the biggest change is how they collaborate and communicate with their colleagues. 22% say the biggest change is their location. 20% said their work hours are what has changed the most. (Image Source)  These changes present new problems for both leaders and their teams. It’s important to identify them to prevent or mitigate potential problems. Identifying the challenges of working from home helps you develop strategies to keep yourself and your remote team resilient, motivated, and productive. 12 challenges of working from home and how to overcome them. The image below shows the main challenges remote workers face. As a leader or member of a remote team, you’ve probably come across a few of them already: (Image Source) Let’s take a closer look at each of these challenges — plus a few others we feel are worth addressing — and some possible solutions to each of them. 1. Collaboration and communication. Communication between humans is already hard enough face-to-face, but it’s much harder when working from home. People normally rely on nonverbal communication. This is why communicating effectively is one of the most common challenges you will face when working from home. How to overcome this challenge: Use the best communication technology available to facilitate communication with your team. Zoom, Slack, and Microsoft Teams are all great examples. If you’re a team leader, organize regular meetings to make sure everyone is on the same page. Consider having an open-door policy so your team can approach you to ask questions related to their work or role. Freelancers and entrepreneurs should also maintain frequent contact with clients and vendors to make sure expectations are aligned, and everything runs smoothly. 2. Loneliness. A lack of social interaction causes all of us to feel more isolated and lonely — especially those working from home. Loneliness is bad for your mental and physical well-being and can affect your performance. How to overcome this challenge: Leaders should ensure that remote workers have the tools they need to navigate the challenges of loneliness. If you’re working from home, try to plan social activities outside work that give you the social interaction you need. Do this of course while respecting the COVID-19 safety measures in your local area. Organize regular video calls with friends and family, or try working in a coworking space or library. 3. Not being able to unplug. Working and living in one space can blur the lines between your work and personal life. This can make it difficult to relax and switch off once the day is over, and maintaining a healthy work-life balance becomes a challenge.  How to overcome this challenge: Create a dedicated office space in your home. Better yet, if you're able, go work somewhere else, such as a coffee shop. This can help you create boundaries between your work and private life. 4. Distractions at home. Even the most disciplined and organized remote team members get distracted at home. A pile of dirty dishes or a dusty bookshelf might start calling your name. Then, a 20-minute break turns into two hours. Those who live with family or roommates also face regular, concentration-busting interruptions. How to overcome this challenge: Try to find a quiet space in your home for working and remove all distractions. If possible, close the door and ask your co-inhabitants not to interrupt you, except in case of emergency. 5. Being in a different time zone than teammates. An increasing number of companies are working across multiple time zones. This can make coordinating with intercontinental colleagues a challenge. How to overcome this challenge: Leverage project manager, instant messaging, and file-sharing services to collaborate with international teams. Leaders should encourage teammates to set regular working hours and communicate them to the rest of the team. 6. Motivation. It’s easy to lose motivation when working from home, whether you’re a remote employee or self-employed.  The lack of external inputs and interaction with coworkers can make you lose sight of your long-term career goals. Ultimately, losing motivation.  Then add the stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, and it’s no surprise that remote teams are losing motivation. How to overcome this challenge: Write down your long-term goals. Include goals that relate to your career, finances, and personal aspirations. Revisit them regularly to keep them fresh in your mind. Consider posting them on the wall in your workspace. Make sure your boss is aware of your career goals so they can keep you accountable. Attending industry events and conferences can also be a great motivational boost. 7. Taking vacation time. Taking vacations is essential for your physical and mental well-being. Vacation can actually increase your productivity, mental ability, and efficiency. Unfortunately, many people forget to take breaks when working from home. How to overcome this challenge: If you’re a leader, prioritize organizing your team’s vacations to make sure they take enough breaks and are well-rested. 8. Finding reliable wifi. A poor internet connection or out-of-date technology can cause frustration for everyone. How to overcome this challenge: As a leader, make sure your remote team members have everything they need to connect from home. Make sure this includes access to the latest versions of the apps and software you use. You might even want to consider reimbursing internet costs so your team can invest in the fastest connection available. As a remote worker, it can help to have your personal devices as a backup for your work computer in case it stops working.  Also, identify places with a good WiFi connection near your home that you can go to in case of emergency. 9. Bad habits. If you’ve lost your regular routine as a result of working from home, chances are you may have fallen into some unhealthy habits. Perhaps you graze the contents of your fridge all day, eat your meals at random hours, or forget to exercise. How to overcome this challenge: Set reminders on your phone to get up and move around, take a walk around the block, or a short stretching or breathing break. Make sure your body is nourished by incorporating lots of fresh vegetables and fruit into your diet. Set aside 20-30 minutes per day for gentle exercise such as yoga, walking, or working out. 10. Time management. For many remote workers, managing your own schedule sounds like a dream, but it’s actually a major challenge of working from home. While your working hours may be a little more flexible, you need to have the discipline to manage your time correctly. Without discipline, you run the risk of procrastinating or taking too many naps. How to overcome this challenge: Our brains and bodies work best with routine, so decide on the business hours that work for you and stick to them. You may find it suits you to stick to conventional working hours, or prefer to plan your life to spend more time with your family. 11. The “Pajama Mindset”. While it’s tempting to roll out of bed, down your morning joe, and sit straight down at your desk to work, it’s not advisable. Apart from the obvious hygiene issues, the clothes you wear affect your mindset. When you’re dressed to impress, you feel and behave differently. Also, others perceive you differently. How to overcome this challenge: The way you dress may have changed since before the pandemic, but there’s still no excuse to be a slouch at work. Invest in some smart but comfortable work-from-home clothes that will help you get in the right frame of mind for remote working. 12. Neglecting your network. Networking is an essential way for employees and entrepreneurs to stay connected, relevant, and up-to-date with their industries.  You’re more likely to find your next opportunity through your personal network. As a remote worker, however, it can be easy to lose touch. How to overcome this challenge: Attend industry events online to stay involved in your professional community. Also, don’t underestimate the power of social media for finding and maintaining professional relationships.    10 tools to help remote workers work more effectively. The many apps and software solutions available to remote workers help address the challenges of working from home. Here are 10 of our favorites. Tools to minimize distractions. 1:  Noise-cancelling headphones to block out unwanted noise. 2: Insulation to soundproof your doors and windows. Project management tools. 3: monday.com is a platform that lets you keep all your work in one place, including tasks, files, instant chats, and goals. 4: Trello is a project management tool that helps remote team members collaborate on projects and tasks. Team communication and collaboration tools. 5: Slack is an instant messaging tool that facilitates communication between remote employees. Video conferencing tools. 6: Zoom is a video conferencing app that allows you to organize meetings of up to 40 minutes with their free version. It allows instant chats, screen sharing, and file sharing. 7: GoToMeeting is a slightly more advanced tool that emphasizes security and is designed for businesses. Accounting and invoicing tools. 8: QuickBooks for bookkeeping. 9: Freshbooks for invoicing. Time management tools. 10: Toggl for time tracking and productivity reporting. The pros of working from home. Of course, there are plenty of benefits to working from home. The image below shows some of the biggest benefits remote workers perceive. (Image Source) The greatest benefits of working from home are similar for everyone. Whether you’re a veteran remote worker or have started working remotely since the pandemic. The newer remote workers see not having to commute as the biggest advantage (28%) of working from home. While pre-pandemic remote workers see their flexible schedule (36%) as the most important benefit. Other pros of working from home include: Being able to work from anywhere Spending more time with family Increased productivity Greater work-life balance Less stress Improved mental and physical health Reduced carbon footprint Embracing remote work for the long-term. Remote work — and its challenges and benefits — are here to stay.  Team leaders, remote employees, freelancers, and entrepreneurs should follow the tips in this article to keep up motivation and productivity and reduce the risk of burnout. If you need further support in overcoming the challenges of working from home, get in touch with BetterUp. Discover how one of our expert coaches can help you. Well-being Productivity Published May 17, 2021 Erin Eatough, PhD. Sr. Insights Manager Back to Blog Read Next. Employee Experience 22 min read | May 7, 2021 How to handle a lack of motivation at work. Read More Productivity 20 min read | June 8, 2021 How to work from home: A comprehensive guide. Read More Well-being 27 min read | May 7, 2021 Working from home? 25 tips that will help you thrive. Read More Well-being 15 min read | July 9, 2021 Why always working long hours is ruining your productivity. Read More Well-being 19 min read | October 7, 2021 Chronic stress is a chronic problem. Here's how to cope. Jump to section What is chronic stress? 4 chronic stress symptoms What causes chronic stress? 4 types of chronic stress Chronic stress effects How is chronic stress... Read More Well-being 23 min read | October 25, 2021 How to recover from burnout and love your life again. Jump to section What is burnout? How to recognize burnout 14 tips on how to recover from burnout How long does it take to recover from burnout? 3 types of burnout recovery Read More Stay connected with BetterUp. Get our newsletter, event invites, plus product insights and research. 1200 Folsom St San Francisco, CA 94103 How it Works Coaching For Organizations For Employees For Individuals Business Solutions Growth & Transformation BetterUp Care™ Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging Sales Performance Company News and Press Careers Blog Leadership Team Become a BetterUp Coach Contact Us [email protected] [email protected] Privacy Policy Acceptable Use Policy Consumer Terms and Conditions Enterprise Agreement Data Protection Agreement Trust & Security Cookie Preferences © 2022 BetterUp. All rights reserved
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • working
  • 44
  • 3
  • home
  • 38
  • 3
  • work
  • 35
  • 3
  • remote
  • 35
  • 3
  • challenge
  • 32
  • 3
  • working home
  • 28
  • 3
  • team
  • 21
  • 3
  • 2021
  • 18
  • 3
  • read
  • 17
  • 3
  • overcome
  • 17
  • 3
  • tool
  • 16
  • 3
  • remote worker
  • 14
  • 3
  • worker
  • 14
  • 3
  • overcome challenge
  • 12
  • 3
  • stress
  • 11
  • 3
  • time
  • 11
  • 3
  • chronic stress
  • 10
  • 3
  • remote work
  • 10
  • 3
  • well
  • 10
  • 3
  • challenge working home
  • 9
  • 3
  • min read
  • 9
  • 3
  • challenge working
  • 9
  • 3
  • employee
  • 9
  • 3
  • productivity
  • 9
  • 3
  • chronic
  • 9
  • 3
  • read well
  • 8
  • 3
  • face
  • 8
  • 3
  • burnout
  • 8
  • 3
  • hour
  • 8
  • 3
  • leader
  • 8
  • 3
  • 19
  • 7
  • 3
  • life
  • 7
  • 3
  • motivation
  • 7
  • 3
  • min
  • 7
  • 3
  • pandemic
  • 7
  • 3
  • image
  • 7
  • 3
  • communication
  • 7
  • 3
  • remote team
  • 6
  • 3
  • long
  • 6
  • 3
  • benefit
  • 6
  • 3
  • working home overcome
  • 5
  • 3
  • home overcome
  • 5
  • 3
  • image source
  • 5
  • 3
  • remote employee
  • 4
  • 3
  • management tool
  • 4
  • 3
  • recover burnout
  • 4
  • 3
  • long term
  • 4
  • 3
  • covid 19
  • 4
  • 3
  • working remotely
  • 4
  • 3
  • pro working home
  • 3
  • 3
  • covid 19 pandemic
  • 3
  • 3
  • overcome challenge leader
  • 3
  • 3
  • remote team member
  • 3
  • 3
  • 12 challenge
  • 3
  • 3
  • challenge overcome
  • 3
  • 3
  • jump section
  • 3
  • 3
  • challenge remote
  • 3
  • 3
  • pro working
  • 3
  • 3
  • 19 pandemic
  • 3
  • 3
  • team leader
  • 3
  • 3
  • challenge leader
  • 3
  • 3
  • team member
  • 3
  • 3
  • working hour
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
Title12 Biggest Challenges of Working from Home - How to Overcome Them
Urlhttps://www.moneycrashers.com/challenges-working-home-business-avoid-failure/
DescriptionDespite the many benefits of working from home, there are many unanticipated challenges as well. Find out how you can conquer them in your home business
Date
Organic Position3
H112 Biggest Challenges of Working from Home – How to Overcome Them
H2What do you want to do with money?
What do you want to do with money?
Challenges of Working From Home and How to Overcome Them
Final Word
Related Articles
We answer your toughest questions
H3FEATURED PROMOTION
1. Managing Your Own Schedule & Time
2. Blurred Line Between Personal & Professional Life
3. Distractions
4. Reduced Supervision & Direction
5. Communication & Coordination Challenges
6. Unclear Performance Metrics
7. Social Isolation
8. The “Work in Your PJs” Trap
9. Failing to Run Your Business Like a Business
10. Lax Billing & Invoicing Practices
11. Motivation & Long-Term Vision
12. Failing to Network
FEATURED PROMOTION
Stay financially healthy with our weekly newsletter
FEATURED PROMOTION
What should I know about workers' compensation and COVID-19?
H2WithAnchorsWhat do you want to do with money?
What do you want to do with money?
Challenges of Working From Home and How to Overcome Them
Final Word
Related Articles
We answer your toughest questions
Body12 Biggest Challenges of Working from Home – How to Overcome Them By G. Brian Davis Date September 14, 2021 FEATURED PROMOTION. TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmail Dig Deeper. Careers Additional Resources. 36 Best Ways to Make Money from Home (Legitimate) 29 Best New Bank Account Promotions & Offers - January 2022 14 Best Cash-Back Credit Cards - January 2022 17 Best New Brokerage Account Promotions & Bonus Offers – January 2022 9 Best Stocks to Buy Right Now (January 2022) - Investment Ideas 10 Best Stock Picking Services of January 2022 As millions of workers around the world start telecommuting for the first time due to the COVID-19 pandemic, few know what to expect. They only know the image peddled by all those “Work from home!” ads littering the Internet. I’ve been telecommuting for over 12 years, first as an employee, then later as a freelancer and a virtual business owner. During that time, I’ve lived on three continents as a digital nomad and expat. And as much as I love my lifestyle, it comes with plenty of hidden challenges those sexy ads fail to mention. Managers and executives don’t put “tiresome” workplace policies like dress codes and standard working hours in place because they like to vex their workers. Instead, these policies help employees work efficiently and keep companies profitable. And that work-from-home rhetoric creates misconceptions about what telecommuting is really like — misconceptions that contribute to the high rate of business failure among entrepreneurs and poorer performance among many telecommuting employees. If you’re telecommuting for the first time or thinking about starting, beware of these risks and challenges. The better you recognize them, the easier it is to mitigate them and succeed as a remote worker or small-business owner. Challenges of Working From Home and How to Overcome Them. 1. Managing Your Own Schedule & Time. Sounds appealing, right? No more setting the alarm for 6am. No more sitting in your cubicle all day, your only escape a measly hour for lunch. You can set your own hours and work when you feel like it. Freedom is yours! Except it doesn’t work that way. The concept of “normal business hours” remains in use all across the globe because it works as an efficient time management tool. When you have set hours, you know when you’re supposed to work and when you’re free to pursue other interests or spend time with your family. You can make plans days, weeks, or months in advance because you know when you’re going to be working. Without that structure, many at-home workers find themselves in big trouble. They sleep in, they procrastinate, and they tell themselves they’ll knock it out later on. Suddenly, they look at the clock and realize their kids come home from school soon — and they didn’t do what they’d intended to do. That leaves them with a choice: work through the evening or just procrastinate further. Many conventional employees complain about the structure of a regular schedule. But it actually serves them far better than they realize. How to Avoid Time Management Doom. Set your workdays and hours and stick to them. In most cases, that either means maintaining regular business hours or basing your work hours on the schedule maintained by your spouse or kids. Not only does a conventional schedule make you more productive, but it also allows you to spend time with the people you care about. For example, I work from around 7:30am to 12:30pm, then break for 90 minutes or so for a workout and lunch. I then return to work from around 2pm to 6pm. On Saturday mornings, I usually work for two or three hours as well. But if you do decide to stick with the tried-and-true 9-to-5, you still reap significant remote work benefits. You don’t have to commute to work, so you can sleep in later. Moreover, if you need to run any important errands like doctor’s appointments, you don’t have to request permission. 2. Blurred Line Between Personal & Professional Life. On the other side of the coin, when you work from home, you no longer have a clear geographic division between workspace and personal space. Ideally, your home is a place of relaxation, safety, and security. It’s a place where you subconsciously slip into a calm, easygoing state of mind, putting the stresses of the workday behind you. Working from home punches a hole right through that neat mental division. Many telecommuters complain they feel like they’re never off the job. They always feel a compulsion to check email or get “just one last thing done.” In other words, they have a hard time turning off and relaxing. Ever. How to Avoid Blurred Work-Life Doom. You must set aside a physical space for working, separate from the rest of your home. For many, that means a home office. My business partner maintains a home office with a door that locks and a huge warning sign never to interrupt her when the door’s closed. It took a while, but her family eventually learned to respect the rules. She doesn’t show up at their work to interrupt them, after all. I pay for access to a coworking space and find it worth every penny. It creates a clear division between my work and personal lives, helping to maintain work-life balance. When I do work from home, I set expectations with my wife not to disturb me unless the world is ending. I invested in a pair of outstanding noise-canceling headphones, which block out family noise and keep me firmly entrenched in my work. If you have a spare bedroom, library, den, formal dining room, or other room in your home that sees infrequent use, consider converting it to a home office, even if only temporarily. If possible, close the doors while you work and hang a “Do Not Disturb” sign. You can potentially take the home office tax deduction if you opt to create a dedicated home office. However, the rules have tightened in recent years, so make sure you understand them thoroughly before basing your decision solely on the tax deduction. Ultimately, the clearer the boundaries you draw — both in space and time — between your work life and personal life, the better you can keep the two comfortably distinct. 3. Distractions. Even if you decide on a set schedule and have a dedicated space to work, actually staying productive during your working hours can prove challenging if you’re working from home. Surrounded by your personal belongings and reminders of chores, it’s hard to focus. Distractions like your TV, books, and the laundry start calling to you. Despite planning to work until 12:30 before breaking for lunch, you find an excuse to break early. If your family members also happen to be home, they don’t hesitate to interrupt you at every opportunity. It’s one of the many reasons I avoid working from my home — to remove those distractions and keep a firm barrier between my work life and home life. How to Avoid Distraction Doom. Physically removing yourself into a separate home office helps. But also make sure you remove distractions from your work area. With no TV or books around, you succumb to them less easily. Noise-canceling headphones can help you avoid auditory distractions, such as your kids playing or your spouse watching your favorite show. Set rules with your family not to disturb you while you’re remote working. Tell them to behave as though you were at the office. Then read up on other ways to avoid distraction when working at home because it makes a far more significant challenge than most office workers assume. 4. Reduced Supervision & Direction. People love to gripe about their bosses. But bosses serve a crucial purpose, providing direction and supervision. They not only tell you what you need to do, but they give you feedback about your progress on it. When you work from home, you tend to get less supervision and direction. Your boss (or clients, as the case may be) typically doesn’t give you as much guidance — guidance many remote employees desperately need to stay on track. How to Avoid Directionless Doom. If you work for an employer, remain in close communication with your supervisor. Ask them which projects you should prioritize and when they expect you to reach each milestone. At least once each week, connect with them to discuss your progress, your challenges, and any ideas to address those challenges. Keep them in the loop so they can provide better feedback and direction. If you work for yourself, start with setting broad weekly goals. Then every morning, set three high-priority tasks. You can cycle in smaller tasks like keeping up with email as you get a free five minutes, but keep your eye on the larger high-impact tasks. All of these help you answer the most critical of questions: What’s the most important work I can do today? 5. Communication & Coordination Challenges. It’s hard enough to hold productive in-person meetings to coordinate different team members’ efforts to remain aligned. When everyone works from home, it becomes all the harder to stay on the same page. Human beings rely on nonverbal communication when they speak. But emails, phone calls, and even video calls remove much of the nuance from how we communicate. Just think back to the last time someone misinterpreted an email or text message you sent for a quick example. This problem is so inherent in virtual businesses that an entire industry has sprung up to solve it. Team collaboration and communication tools like Slack exist specifically to make it easier for companies to stay in touch and stay organized. GoToMeeting is another popular choice for companies to stay in touch using video conferencing. How to Avoid Communication Doom. If you’re a boss or supervisor, schedule weekly phone or videoconference meetings with your most important teams. Check each team member’s progress toward their previously agreed-upon deliverables and goals. At the end of each session, set new deliverables and objectives for each individual. Ask each responsible team member to repeat these back to make sure they fully understand them. Team members should similarly confirm their priorities and tasks with their boss or supervisor and colleagues before setting off to complete them. Virtual communication leaves too much room for ambiguity, so verify assignments at the end of any call, conference, or email. The same policy applies to self-employed workers communicating with clients and vendors. For daily communication, use project management and collaboration tools like Slack or nTask to keep track of all communications and ensure all team members remain in the loop using the same platform. These allow for tracked communication threads between two or more people, assignments, file sharing, private messages, and more, replacing email for more consolidated quick communication with no lost messages, spam, or nonwork distractions. 6. Unclear Performance Metrics. By what standards does your boss — even if that’s you — measure your job performance? Mediocre managers often fail to track clear metrics for their team’s performance. In extreme cases, supervisors simply keep an eye on how long their workers physically sit at their desks. When workers telecommute, managers can’t see if they’re physically at their desks. While sitting behind a desk doesn’t qualify as work, lazy managers often let lazy workers skate by as long as they show up to work on time and put in a minimum effort to get a little work done. None of that flies with telecommuting. Managers and workers alike need to get crystal clear on precisely what constitutes success for every single team member. Regardless of their position, every employee should have at least one key performance indicator (KPI) that reflects how well they’re doing their job. For customer service reps, for example, these KPIs could include customer feedback ratings to indicate the quality of their service and the total number of customers served to indicate the quantity. How to Avoid Performance Measurement Doom. If you manage a team, think long and hard about how to measure each of your direct reports’ performances. If you work for a company, ask your manager directly: “What metrics will you use to measure my performance, and what are your expectations?” If your manager doesn’t provide a clear answer, ask them to think about it and get back to you. Without clear expectations and KPIs, neither you nor your employer can know how you perform. And without that knowledge, your job security becomes a matter of whim since you can’t point to hard evidence of your performance. 7. Social Isolation. Sitting at home by yourself all day takes a toll. Humans are social animals. They need interaction with other people. Without a watercooler to swap jokes, stories, and shop talk around occasionally, telecommuters can get lonely. Videoconferencing helps — a little. But Zoom is just not the same as face-to-face interaction. My wife works at a school all day as a counselor. She literally talks to people all day every day, while I get almost no social interaction all day. When I come home from work, I start proposing happy hours or dinners with friends or anything to get out of the house and rub elbows with other people. All she wants to do is put her feet up on the couch. If you don’t get social interaction at work, you need to get it elsewhere. How to Avoid Social Isolation Doom. It helps to simply anticipate this challenge and plan for social interaction outside of work. Normally, that means meeting up with nearby friends or colleagues for lunch, taking classes at the gym, or making dinner or happy hour plans. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it means video calls with friends and family or meeting privately with a friend or two. Consider walks, hikes, or other solo outdoor activities, which offer plenty of ventilation. I find that I don’t mind working alone all day if I can interact with friends at least three or four times a week outside of work. Working at a coworking space or even a coffee shop can also help you feel less isolated (although this may not be an option currently due to the pandemic). 8. The “Work in Your PJs” Trap. I admit it: I work in athletic clothes, mostly because I work out midday, which helps me reset both physically and mentally. But I’ve also built rock-solid routines around my work schedule after a dozen years of telecommuting. And even I put on more professional clothes for important calls — whether they’re videoconferences or not. Your clothes impact not only how others see you, but how you see yourself and how you think and behave. Even athletic clothes are better than your pajamas, however. People love the thought of pajama work, but in reality, it’s a terrible idea. Pajamas and sleep are strongly connected in most people’s minds. Think Pavlov and his dogs — classical conditioning and associations. A 2012 study in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology found that people perform work tasks better when wearing clothes with “symbolic meaning.” For example, doctors did better work while wearing lab coats. It’s also hard to feel clean and fresh in the pajamas you slept in the night before. Hygienic benefits aside, showering and feeling clean improves most people’s professionalism and performance. How to Avoid Dress Code Doom. While you should keep professional clothes in your wardrobe for meetings with clients and vendors, you don’t have to sit at home in a suit all day. You do, however, need a work routine that includes real clothes. Pick out some clothes to work from home in and never worry about what to wear to work again. 9. Failing to Run Your Business Like a Business. If you’re working for yourself and think you can disregard administrative work, think again. You’ll probably end up doing more mundane administrative work than you ever did at your old day job. Ignoring business basics, like paying your bills, preparing your taxes, and invoicing clients, is a surefire way to not only ruin your business but possibly trigger an audit with the IRS in the process. Traditional jobs tend to come with paperwork, such as work reports, time sheets, travel expense reports, and accounts payable requests for freelancers and vendors. Still, each individual worker’s administrative work pales in comparison to the total amount needed to run a business. Beyond administrative work, businesses need systems in place to streamline all repetitive tasks. Otherwise, entrepreneurs spend all their working time on mundane work that doesn’t actually generate revenue and quickly go out of business. How to Avoid Mismanagement Doom. Schedule a certain amount of time each day for administrative tasks. Pay your bills, invoice your clients, order your office supplies, and process your mail during this time. Do it every day at the same time so it becomes part of your routine. Also, set aside at least a few hours of every week for working on your business itself. That could mean hiring and managing virtual assistants, automating your bookkeeping through a platform like Quickbooks, documenting your business systems, and a hundred other steps to make your small business more productive and profitable. 10. Lax Billing & Invoicing Practices. Not getting paid by clients promptly — or at all — can quickly derail your business. When you work as a W-2 employee, you usually take getting paid on time for granted. You don’t have to worry about issues like setting and enforcing clear payment policies. Entrepreneurs and freelancers can’t take getting paid for granted. Instead, they need to create and enforce billing and payment policies. When you send a professional-looking invoice immediately after you complete your job, you make it clear to your client that you expect to be paid, and fast. Include a large bold “Due Date” on all invoices to emphasize this point. Some freelancers even ask new clients for deposits before agreeing to begin work. If a client misses a payment due date, contact them immediately – Quickbooks even has a feature where you can send automatic reminders. Ask when they will deliver payment, and then calmly and politely explain that you cannot do any further work for them until they pay their outstanding balance. Remember, your chances of receiving payment decrease over time, so even if it feels uncomfortable, you need to draw a line in the sand early. When you don’t follow through on demanding payment, clients assume you either don’t care about being paid or you’re a sloppy businessperson who won’t follow up on unpaid bills. Even clients that intend to pay might make your invoices a low priority if they think they can get away with it. Don’t shy away from confrontation over payment because you’re concerned about maintaining a relationship with your client. Like any relationship, if you don’t set boundaries and expectations, it will eventually go sour. You don’t need nonpaying clients. How to Avoid Deadbeat Client Doom. Put your payment policies in writing and, if possible, verbally explain them as well. Immediately after you finish a job or complete a task, send your clients a professional invoice, perhaps through a service like FreshBooks. The invoice should state the date on which payment is due as well as your client’s options for payment. Offer your clients more than one payment option to make it easy for them to pay you. 11. Motivation & Long-Term Vision. When you’re not surrounded by the career-driven energy of ambitious colleagues every day, it’s all too easy to slip into a rut. Telecommuters often get comfortable, earning enough money to get by and losing sight of their long-term career goals. They don’t walk by the corner office every day, don’t chat with co-workers about the new promotion available, and lose sight of all the reminders they could do more challenging and rewarding work. Not everyone feels driven to advance their career and pursue promotions. But when you never leave your house, even those with an inner fire often feel it dim quickly. How to Avoid Motivation Doom. Write out your long-term financial goals and career goals. At least once a quarter, ask your boss about advancement opportunities within your company. You can also listen to motivational and personal development audiobooks (or read the print versions) or attend motivational events and conferences. And most important of all, continue networking in your industry. 12. Failing to Network. Working from home, whether as an entrepreneur or telecommuting employee, makes it easy to disappear into your own little cocoon. Yes, trade shows and industry events can be tedious. And during the COVID-19 pandemic, most are canceling or postponing or going 100% virtual this year. Yet networking remains an essential way to stay relevant for employees and small-business owners alike. If you don’t budget time and money for trade shows, professional association memberships, masterminds, and other industry groups, you lose touch with those holding the power to make your career or business a success. Stay involved in your professional community, stay relevant, and stay top-of-mind so no one forgets who you are. Participate in industry-specific social media groups. Email or reach out through social media to contacts in your industry you haven’t spoken to for a while. Whatever you do, don’t let your relationships grow rusty, despite physical social distance. After all, more people find jobs through their personal networks than any other channel, according to a 2019 study by CivicScience. How to Avoid Networking Doom. Go to at least two trade shows per year and spend 20 to 30 minutes each day keeping up with your industry. Program your newsreader to send you industry news and blog posts. You can also volunteer for professional association committees and projects. Follow networking best practices no matter the discomfort. It takes effort, but clients are impressed by knowledge and commitment, which means more business for you. Final Word. Telecommuting comes with a slew of benefits, from ditching the daily commute to a more flexible work schedule to being able to live and work anywhere in the world. But don’t believe the hype — it still requires work, and with every benefit comes a challenge. That goes doubly for workers whose industries haven’t widely adopted virtual business models but were forced to during the COVID-19 outbreak. Many of my friends are teachers, for example, and every single one is struggling with telecommuting since their schools had no or limited online resources for teaching. Without the structure imposed by a traditional workplace, you need to create your own structure and routines. If you want the freedom to work from anywhere, be prepared for additional responsibilities too. FEATURED PROMOTION. Stock Advisor. Motley Fool Stock Advisor recommendations have an average return of 618%. For $79 (or just $1.52 per week), join more than 1 million members and don't miss their upcoming stock picks. 30 day money-back guarantee. Sign Up TAGS: TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmail Stay financially healthy with our weekly newsletter. G. Brian Davis G. Brian Davis is a real estate investor, personal finance writer, and travel addict mildly obsessed with FIRE. He spends nine months of the year in Abu Dhabi, and splits the rest of the year between his hometown of Baltimore and traveling the world. FEATURED PROMOTION. Discover More Related Articles. Careers Small Business See all Careers How to Prepare to Work From Home in a Telecommuting Job or Business Small Business Running a Virtual Company With Remote Employees - Pros & Cons Careers How to Negotiate a Flexible/Remote Work Schedule With Your Employer Careers Employers Hiring During the Coronavirus Pandemic - Job Opportunities Careers How to Become a Digital Nomad - Travel While Working Remotely Online Related topics We answer your toughest questions. See more questions Insurance What should I know about workers' compensation and COVID-19? . See the full answer »
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 72
  • 4
  • home
  • 35
  • 4
  • business
  • 25
  • 4
  • time
  • 22
  • 4
  • client
  • 19
  • 4
  • working
  • 18
  • 4
  • worker
  • 16
  • 4
  • day
  • 16
  • 4
  • person
  • 15
  • 4
  • avoid
  • 15
  • 4
  • hour
  • 13
  • 4
  • employee
  • 12
  • 4
  • performance
  • 12
  • 4
  • career
  • 12
  • 4
  • telecommuting
  • 12
  • 4
  • doom
  • 12
  • 4
  • communication
  • 11
  • 4
  • team
  • 11
  • 4
  • social
  • 11
  • 4
  • set
  • 11
  • 4
  • job
  • 11
  • 4
  • payment
  • 11
  • 4
  • industry
  • 10
  • 4
  • challenge
  • 10
  • 4
  • schedule
  • 10
  • 4
  • office
  • 10
  • 4
  • stay
  • 10
  • 4
  • member
  • 9
  • 4
  • working home
  • 8
  • 4
  • work home
  • 8
  • 4
  • task
  • 8
  • 4
  • cloth
  • 8
  • 4
  • brian davi
  • 7
  • 4
  • team member
  • 7
  • 4
  • january 2022
  • 6
  • 4
  • home office
  • 6
  • 4
  • administrative work
  • 5
  • 4
  • covid 19
  • 5
  • 4
  • small business
  • 5
  • 4
  • work life
  • 4
  • 4
  • covid 19 pandemic
  • 3
  • 4
  • true
  • 3
  • 4
  • brian
  • 3
  • 4
  • featured promotion
  • 3
  • 4
  • 19 pandemic
  • 3
  • 4
  • virtual business
  • 3
  • 4
  • business owner
  • 3
  • 4
  • set hour
  • 3
  • 4
  • social interaction
  • 3
  • 4
  • work schedule
  • 3
  • 4
  • payment policy
  • 3
  • 4
  • long term
  • 3
  • 4
  • trade show
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
Title9 of the Most Challenging Things About Working Remotely
Urlhttps://www.businessinsider.com/working-remote-challenges-work-from-home-2019-10
DescriptionLoneliness, time management problems, and digital miscommunication are just some of the problems you may face if you work remotely
Date8 Oct 2019
Organic Position4
H19 of the most challenging things about working remotely, according to people who do it
H2Problems with technology may not get resolved as quickly as they would in the office, and can make it difficult to work remotely
It's easy to get distracted when you're working from home, and you may not be as productive as you'd be in a traditional work setting
And the distractions get even worse if you're not good at following a strict schedule
With no coworkers in your living room, socializing with your peers can be a challenge and make remote work pretty lonely
A lack of interaction with coworkers can also make team-building difficult
Working remotely can mean inconsistent pay
Communication with coworkers or clients can easily be misconstrued
Feeling that other people don't really think you are working can be frustrating
And it may be hard to find a healthy work-life balance
H3SEE ALSO: 11 traits you need to be an effective remote worker
DON' MISS: I've worked from home for 9 years — and I've saved $30,500 on lunches, gas, business attire, and coffee
H2WithAnchorsProblems with technology may not get resolved as quickly as they would in the office, and can make it difficult to work remotely
It's easy to get distracted when you're working from home, and you may not be as productive as you'd be in a traditional work setting
And the distractions get even worse if you're not good at following a strict schedule
With no coworkers in your living room, socializing with your peers can be a challenge and make remote work pretty lonely
A lack of interaction with coworkers can also make team-building difficult
Working remotely can mean inconsistent pay
Communication with coworkers or clients can easily be misconstrued
Feeling that other people don't really think you are working can be frustrating
And it may be hard to find a healthy work-life balance
Body9 of the most challenging things about working remotely, according to people who do it Natalia Lusinski 2019-10-08T20:33:00Z Facebook Icon The letter F. Email icon An envelope. It indicates the ability to send an email. Twitter icon A stylized bird with an open mouth, tweeting. Twitter LinkedIn icon The word "in". LinkedIn Fliboard icon A stylized letter F. Flipboard Link icon An image of a chain link. It symobilizes a website link url. Copy Link Creative Nina/Shutterstock Working remotely can seem like a dream come true for many employees sick of their morning commutes — but it can present its own set of challenges. Loneliness, time management problems, and digital miscommunication are just some of the problems you may face if you work from home or have another remote arrangement.Here are nine of the most challenging aspects of working remotely, according to remote workers. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. More and more people are working from home these days — or at least from a local coffee shop or coworking space. Between 2005 and 2017, there was a 159% increase in remote work, according to a recent report by Global Workplace Analytics.But not everyone talks about the challenges of doing so, from a lack of a structured routine to fewer social opportunities for social interaction and rapport-building with coworkers."Many business leaders think that 'going remote' is as simple as sending a worker away from the office, equipped with a laptop and a to-do list," Laurel Farrer, founder of the Remote Work Association and CEO of Distribute Consulting, told Business Insider. "Unfortunately, it's not that simple. In fact, when the correct policies and procedures are not created to support off-site employees, terrible consequences are likely to occur."Related: 11 traits you need to be an effective remote worker She said these may include career stagnancy, isolation, micromanagement, or burnout, and that transparency is the antidote to this problem.We asked people who work remotely to share the most challenging aspects of their work arrangements. Here's what they had to say. Problems with technology may not get resolved as quickly as they would in the office, and can make it difficult to work remotely. Stock-Studio / Shutterstock.com Kate Crowhurst, director of Money Bites, said a downside to working remotely is dealing with technical difficulties."While the flexibility of remote work can be excellent, the challenge comes when your Wi-Fi drops out or your computer doesn't play ball," she told Business Insider in an email. "And then the IT guy on the phone is more concerned with logging a job than getting you back online so you can do your job."Amber Baldwin, travel vlogger and founder of StoryChasing, has worked remotely all over the United States, Mexico, and Canada in her RV. She also said she finds technology can be difficult when working remotely. "Getting a good cell signal for the internet in different countries and areas can be challenging," she told Business Insider. "Sometimes, places I travel to have a terrible cell signal, which means I can't work online. My business is 100% online, so I need to make sure I have a cell signal."She said she's mitigated this challenge by having two hotspots with different networks and attaching a cell booster to her van."As long as there is a cell tower within reach, I can get a signal and work online," she said. It's easy to get distracted when you're working from home, and you may not be as productive as you'd be in a traditional work setting. Allan Rotgers/flickr Without other coworkers around to hold you accountable, you may not be as productive when working from home.Ciara Hautau, lead digital marketing strategist at Fueled, just moved to Sydney in August and is still working for a New York City-based company."There was a period where I'd do anything to work remotely — I love being away from distractions and in the comforts of home," she said. "However, some days feel more motivating than others."She said she's the type of individual that, when she gets home, she turns work off. "However, when you're constantly in the comforts of home, it can feel a little tougher to motivate yourself when you're not around other working individuals," she said.Lindsey Marx, who manages several blogs at BestCompany.com, said she thinks working from home can be distracting."When you work at home, it is much easier to get distracted by kids, pets, and things to do at home, like laundry," she said. "Along with distractions, working from home can make it really easy to be lazy and not as productive as you would be when you are required to focus in the office." Rachel Bodine, a writer for Expert Insurance Reviews, also said a major challenge of working remotely is trying to stay focused while also making sure to take periodic breaks."There are multiple distractions when working from home, from packages being delivered to pets deciding that you should play with them rather than work," she said. "Distractions around the home are easy to give in to, so I've had to learn to take a break every hour or two to get the mail or play with the dog. These breaks help me avoid burnout, especially if I'm working on a difficult project." And the distractions get even worse if you're not good at following a strict schedule. Westend61/Getty In a non-remote work setting, there is likely structure in place, from set office hours to set break and lunch times. But when working remotely, these may not exist. Brett Downes, a specialist in search engine optimization and social media for DFY Links, said he can relate."I struggle to sleep, and, as a result, not get up in the mornings," he told Business Insider. "Not having to be in an office by a certain time allows my body to convince my mind to sleep in all the time."Crowhurst, too, said a lack of routine can leave room for unnecessary distractions because of the lack of structure. "Not having an office routine can mean that it's constantly snack o'clock and you need to resist the temptation to have multiple versions of lunch," she said.Similarly, Baldwin said that one might think that, working remotely, you have a lot of freedom — and in some ways you do — but you can also easily get sidetracked.There are several reasons for this, she said, including friends and family knowing you're home, so they're more inclined to call you, wanting to sleep in, and good weather tempting her to go outside and ditch work."With nobody managing your time but yourself, it's easy to get distracted when these challenges appear in your life," she said. She said she's learned how to get focused by doing things such as sticking to a schedule, not taking personal calls during the middle of the day, setting an alarm clock, and getting up as if she were in an office, and scheduling and blocking her time on a calendar, from work tasks to meals to self-care.Related: I've worked from home for 9 years — and I've saved $30,500 on lunches, gas, business attire, and coffee With no coworkers in your living room, socializing with your peers can be a challenge and make remote work pretty lonely. Noodles and Beef/Flickr "Isolation is the biggest challenge," Downes said. "I used to bounce ideas off my coworkers, but now it is just me, all on my lonesome."To cope with this, Downes said he now goes to a coworking space twice a week and works at a friend's house once a week."This gives me a good mix of social time to add to my work commitments, so I feel more inclusive and get to speak to people in person," he said.Kristine Thorndyke, founder of the online business Test Prep Nerds, said the biggest challenge to working remotely is "the lack of forced interaction you have with people on a day-to-day basis. Thorndyke manages her company from Shanghai, and previously from Medellin, Colombia."Without having an office where you need to share pleasantries with your coworkers, boss, and clients, you need to find alternative methods of socializing with people on your own time," she told Business Insider. "It can be hard, especially for an introvert like me, to muster up the motivation to go out and meet people after a long day of work." A lack of interaction with coworkers can also make team-building difficult. Luis Alvarez/Getty Images The lack of interaction that often comes with remote work can also be a detriment to team-building — something that is built during meetings, lunches, or even water cooler conversations."Remote working is best achieved with at least quarterly face-to-face meetings with your team so that you can share experiences and build strong working relationships," Crowhurst said.Marx also told Business Insider that working remotely makes it much more difficult to create and maintain relationships with coworkers. "You can still message and email them, but it is not the same as having face-to-face interactions with them," she said. Working remotely can mean inconsistent pay. Hero Images/Getty Images Downes said working remotely can also be stressful because of the inconsistent wages that come with freelancing."With my full-time job, I knew that no matter what happened, I would be paid at the end of the month, and it would be enough to cover my bills," he said. "But with freelancing, chasing invoices or payment disputes can result in major money and cash-flow worries." Laurice Wardini, a freelance writer who also runs ClothedUp, a fashion website, agreed."Monthly income is unreliable and always changing," she said. "This goes for workload, as well — some weeks, I'm swamped with too much work, but sometimes, I don't have enough. It's difficult to find that middle ground. Freelancing is also especially difficult because gigs aren't usually long-term, so you need to spend much of your time searching for new opportunities." Communication with coworkers or clients can easily be misconstrued. Strelka Institute/Flickr Hautau said that she keeps in touch with her coworkers through Slack , email, and video chat. But that communication isn't always productive."The only frustration I have around communication is when a coworker is unresponsive on those channels," she said. "When I was in the office, I could simply visit that individual's desk and see them in person. But it's quite difficult to get those direct answers if they're uncommunicative via digital channels."Frances Kuffel said she faces a similar issue. She works from home in Montana and is a freelance writer for clients on the East Coast."You can't, in an email or text, get a sense of a client's appreciation, approbation, approval, or other feelings on job performance," she said.Andy Marthaler, a marketing director at Tradeshow-stuff who works remotely some days, also said he wonders how his written tone comes across to people."The thing that I am always worried about is if my tone is coming across accurately," he said. "When communicating with colleagues in person, my approach is always positive and light-hearted. However, when I am simply typing a quick message, I wonder if I sound too domineering or brash."He said that while he and his coworkers like to joke around at the office, he always has to think twice when he's messaging someone a sarcastic comment."How might they read this," he said. "Do I need to add an emoji or something?" Feeling that other people don't really think you are working can be frustrating. Getty Images Thorndyke said that there still seems to be a bit of a bias against people who work from home, as if they are not actually working. "I think this is because, for many, when they do get a day to 'work from home,' they view it as a day to run errands, do the laundry, get their nails done, and pretty much do everything they can while still 'being available' on email," she said. "It's hard to communicate to these 9-to-5-ers that I work just about as much as they do, but from the comfort of my own home."Tom Nathaniel, founder of LushDollar.com, agreed that not everyone takes working from home seriously."People think you don't work, so they always expect things out of you all times of the day," he said. And it may be hard to find a healthy work-life balance. Nattakorn_Maneerat/Shutterstock Bodine said that one of the biggest challenges she's faced while working remotely is keeping a strict work-life balance."I've found that it can be easy to overwork myself when I work remotely, as working from home can sometimes feel like I never leave work," she said. "To combat this, I make sure I stop working at 5 p.m. every day and ignore the urge to check messages and assignments. Otherwise, I'm tempted to open up my laptop and just do 'five minutes of work,' which quickly turns into an hour."Alberto Navarrete, general manager of Frisco Maids, a house-cleaning service in Dallas, works remotely and said it's easy to overwork yourself."Every hour in a day is a work hour," he told Business Insider in an email. "So if you are behind on a project, you can expend the extra hours in your day. This, after a while, is a dangerous practice, as you start to feel burned out pretty quickly, and you can pass 12 hours of your day working and never leave your living room."To clear his head, he said he's learned to take breaks and go for walks, which helps him focus on work again.Hautau, too, said that when you work from home, it can be hard to set work-life boundaries."Since your home is your office now, you're never technically 'leaving' work unless you turn off all communication platforms," she said. "I've made it a habit that once I'm done with work, I sign out of my email and my Slack — and do the same on my mobile — so I can enjoy a healthy work-life balance."  Newsletter Get a daily selection of our top stories based on your reading preferences. Loading Something is loading. SEE ALSO: 11 traits you need to be an effective remote worker . DON' MISS: I've worked from home for 9 years — and I've saved $30,500 on lunches, gas, business attire, and coffee . More: Features BI-freelancer work from home Working remotely Remote Work Remote Jobs Freelance Jobs Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Deal icon An icon in the shape of a lightning bolt. For you Close icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 44
  • 5
  • working
  • 34
  • 5
  • home
  • 25
  • 5
  • remotely
  • 21
  • 5
  • day
  • 17
  • 5
  • working remotely
  • 14
  • 5
  • remote
  • 14
  • 5
  • person
  • 13
  • 5
  • business
  • 13
  • 5
  • office
  • 11
  • 5
  • face
  • 10
  • 5
  • email
  • 10
  • 5
  • icon
  • 10
  • 5
  • challenge
  • 10
  • 5
  • time
  • 10
  • 5
  • coworker
  • 10
  • 5
  • working home
  • 8
  • 5
  • remote work
  • 8
  • 5
  • told business
  • 8
  • 5
  • business insider
  • 8
  • 5
  • told
  • 8
  • 5
  • insider
  • 8
  • 5
  • difficult
  • 8
  • 5
  • told business insider
  • 7
  • 5
  • work home
  • 7
  • 5
  • work remotely
  • 6
  • 5
  • life
  • 6
  • 5
  • lack
  • 6
  • 5
  • interaction
  • 6
  • 5
  • easy
  • 6
  • 5
  • youre
  • 6
  • 5
  • distraction
  • 6
  • 5
  • ive
  • 6
  • 5
  • hour
  • 6
  • 5
  • online
  • 5
  • 5
  • cell
  • 5
  • 5
  • feel
  • 5
  • 5
  • lunch
  • 5
  • 5
  • day work
  • 4
  • 5
  • work life
  • 4
  • 5
  • remote worker
  • 3
  • 5
  • biggest challenge
  • 3
  • 5
  • hour day
  • 3
  • 5
Result 6
Title6 Biggest Challenges of Working from Home
Urlhttps://firsthand.co/blogs/workplace-issues/challenges-of-working-from-home
DescriptionWorking remotely has its perks. But it also has its disadvantages. Here are six common issues faced by remote workers and tips for coping with them
Date29 Mar 2020
Organic Position5
H16 Biggest Challenges of Working from Home and How to Overcome Them
H2Related Content
Related Articles
H39 Tips for Working from Home with Kids
How to Reduce Coronavirus Anxiety While Working from Home
Working Remotely During Coronavirus? Here's What Companies Need to Do
7 Tips for Working from Home
Hobbies and Interests: Should They Be on Your Resume?
4 Steps to Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions
Register for Firsthand's MBA Virtual Career Fair
H2WithAnchorsRelated Content
Related Articles
Body6 Biggest Challenges of Working from Home and How to Overcome ThemBy: Nick StephensPublished: Mar 30, 2020Topics: Remote Work       Workplace Issues       Working remotely has its perks. No daily commute in the morning. The flexibility to work when you want to. No strict dress code (unless you have online meetings!). But it also has its disadvantages. It can be hard to stay motivated. You aren’t working alongside your team. And you don’t have colleagues to interact with.Here's a list of some of the most common issues faced by remote workers and tips for coping with them.1. Staying organizedWhen you’re working in the same space you live in, it can be easy to get disorganized. So if you have the space, try working in a different place than where you spend your leisure time. This helps you separate work and play. If this isn’t possible, try to keep your work desk (kitchen table, etc.) organized and tidy. Chanty, an AI-powered Slack alternative, also recommends keeping your computer desktop tidy, spending a small amount of time a day organizing folders, files, and images, and clearing out your trash.  Abbey, an employee from Stack Overflow, an online community for developers., says, when working remotely, “It’s been crucial for me to designate space and time for work, even when I’m living in a place without much room to spare. Even just having a few square feet in the corner that I don’t use for anything else helps a ton with being able to switch ‘work brain’ on and off.”Zapier, an online automation tool, also offers some advice: “If you don't have a dedicated office, even something as simple as putting your laptop out of sight when work has ended can help you avoid the temptation to log back on. Or you can try sectioning off part of a room for work so it feels like a separate space.”2. Managing your time Software developer Hubspot recommends scheduling your day like a normal day in the office to help manage yourself: “To stay on schedule, segment what you'll do and when over the course of the day. If you have an online calendar, create personal events and reminders that tell you when to shift gears and start on new tasks.”There are a host of apps available to help you plan and use your time more efficiently. Trello offers a card-based approach to project management, based on the Kanban method. It allows you to get an overview of your tasks at a glance and helps you to get things done. Asana is a project management app that helps you to get organized and stay on track. ProofHub is another project management tool with task management, schedules and communication. And Evernote helps you to create and organize your notes.  3. Remembering to take regular breaks Without a structure and being in a different environment, you might forget to take regular breaks. Breaks can increase mental wellbeing and productivity. Looking at the data of its productivity app, DeskTime found that the most productive 10 percent of their users did 52 minutes of work, followed by a 17-minute break. The key is working efficiently. Try setting alarms on your phone to help remind you to take breaks. 4. Switching offSpeaking literally and metaphorically here, sometimes it can be hard to see where your work ends and leisure time begins when working remotely. Because you’re working from home, people might expect you to be available to do household chores or engage in long conversations about things unrelated to work. That's why it’s important to set boundaries, letting people know what you can and will respond to or engage in during work hours, and what you can’t or won’t.Having a set finish time could also help you to separate things. And it can help to not check emails or not be available on chat channels until your work is completed. Depending on the communication app you use, you may be able to set your status to “away” or “offline.”5. CollaboratingIn the office it can be easy to ask colleagues for information or updates. You might be in the same room or just a quick walk down the hall away. You don’t have this when you’re working remotely.The good thing is there are lots of tools out there that can help with connecting. Business communication apps such as Chanty and Slack make it easy to talk to your members of your team and organize your correspondence. And if you usually have one-on-one meetings with your manager when you're in the office, it can be even more important to keep them up while you work remotely, making sure to use these meeting times wisely.It can also be helpful to establish guidelines. Saberr, which creates leadership development software, recommends setting out “team norms” or guidelines for communicating remotely such as which communication channels colleagues should be available on and when, and when team meetings are held.6. Socially interactingInteracting with other people is a positive aspect of many jobs. Yes, you’re there to work, but social contact is also important and can help with productivity. Having a feed in your chosen communication app devoted to unrelated to work topics could help.Two ways the recruiting firm HiringThing creates these missed water-cooler moments are: 1) “Week Preview Meetings,” which are Monday meetings where people discuss work plans for the week, and are also allowed to talk about weekend events and other non-work-related things; and 2) “Happy Fun Time,” which includes fun activities curated by a company’s HR team such as answering workplace trivia and posting fun throwback images. The point is to make sure to take the time while you’re working remotely to socially connect with others. This is more important now than ever, with so many people alone, working from home.Nick Stephens is a content writer at Chanty, a simple and AI-powered Slack alternative. Nick is specializing in the digital marketing niche. He has an unhealthy obsession with conversion rates and sales funnels. When he isn’t writing you can find him DJ-ing at festivals and parties.***Related Articles. Hobbies and Interests: Should They Be on Your Resume?4 Steps to Keeping Your New Year’s ResolutionsRegister for Firsthand's MBA Virtual Career FairView MoreRelated Content. 9 Tips for Working from Home with Kids. In the wake of COVID-19, working parents are embarking on a whole new world of juggling their careers with caring for (and homeschooling) their kids—with no help, end date, or escape. Do I sound dramatic?How to Reduce Coronavirus Anxiety While Working from Home. These are difficult times. These are anxious times.Working Remotely During Coronavirus? Here's What Companies Need to Do. The spread of coronavirus is now a global pandemic, according to the World Health Organization. As the number of people who have contracted the virus continues to rise, more employers are doing their part to help mitigate the spread of coronavirus and keep employees safe.7 Tips for Working from Home. When I started my career over 30 years ago, I never would’ve imagined I’d be working remotely from a home office in the mountains out West for an East Coast-based company. Cell phones didn’t exist, the Internet didn’t exist, and personal computers only existed in the imaginations of entrepreneurs like Steve Jobs and Bill Gates.Related Articles. View AllHobbies and Interests: Should They Be on Your Resume?If you’ve ever used a resume template you might have noticed a section for “extracurricular activities” or “hobbies and interests. ” Today we’re going to talk about how to use this to your advantage, as well as what to avoid.4 Steps to Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions. The New Year offers the promise of a fresh start, and due to the toll the pandemic is still taking on us, the ability to start fresh is likely more compelling than ever before. This New Year offers hope for new possibilities—new jobs, new careers, new skills, new growth goals—as we aspire to make meaningful differences in our lives.Register for Firsthand's MBA Virtual Career Fair. On February 11, Firstand wil host an MBA Virtual Career Fair for first- and second-year MBA students looking to prepare for and find internships and full-time positions. You can register for this free fair here, and learn more about it below.Sign up for free
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 19
  • 6
  • working
  • 17
  • 6
  • time
  • 12
  • 6
  • year
  • 10
  • 6
  • career
  • 9
  • 6
  • meeting
  • 8
  • 6
  • remotely
  • 8
  • 6
  • thing
  • 6
  • 6
  • break
  • 6
  • 6
  • home
  • 6
  • 6
  • app
  • 6
  • 6
  • person
  • 6
  • 6
  • working home
  • 5
  • 6
  • working remotely
  • 5
  • 6
  • fair
  • 5
  • 6
  • space
  • 5
  • 6
  • team
  • 5
  • 6
  • help
  • 5
  • 6
  • office
  • 5
  • 6
  • communication
  • 5
  • 6
  • company
  • 4
  • 6
  • online
  • 4
  • 6
  • day
  • 4
  • 6
  • offer
  • 4
  • 6
  • create
  • 4
  • 6
  • management
  • 4
  • 6
  • important
  • 4
  • 6
  • mba
  • 4
  • 6
  • coronaviru
  • 4
  • 6
  • mba virtual career
  • 3
  • 6
  • project management
  • 3
  • 6
  • communication app
  • 3
  • 6
  • mba virtual
  • 3
  • 6
  • virtual career
  • 3
  • 6
  • fun
  • 3
  • 6
  • interest
  • 3
  • 6
  • virtual
  • 3
  • 6
Result 7
Title10 Challenges of Working from Home for Employers (And How to Solve Them) - ViewSonic Library
Urlhttps://www.viewsonic.com/library/business/10-challenges-of-working-from-home-for-employers-and-how-to-solve-them/
DescriptionThe challenges of working from home are different for employers looking to offer WFH options. But for every challenge, there is a solution
Date9 Mar 2021
Organic Position6
H110 Challenges of Working from Home for Employers (And How to Solve Them)
H2Challenge #1: Workers Experiencing Social Isolation
Challenge #2: Productivity Levels Dipping
Challenge #3: Physical Discomfort in a Home Office
Challenge #4: Issues with Teamwork and Collaboration
Challenge #5: Workers Not Having Access to Software
Challenge #6: Security Issues Stemming from Remote Work
Challenge #7: Workers Becoming More Sedentary
Challenge #8: Issues Surrounding Work/Life Balance
Challenge #9: Problems Linked to Understanding Work
Challenge #10: Reluctance to Work from Home Regularly
Final Thoughts
H3Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Solution
Video Conferencing Monitors – 4 Productive Uses for Businesses
Video Conferencing vs Web Conferencing: What’s The Difference?
How to Fundraise on Zoom Part 2: The Pitch + Your Process
H2WithAnchorsChallenge #1: Workers Experiencing Social Isolation
Challenge #2: Productivity Levels Dipping
Challenge #3: Physical Discomfort in a Home Office
Challenge #4: Issues with Teamwork and Collaboration
Challenge #5: Workers Not Having Access to Software
Challenge #6: Security Issues Stemming from Remote Work
Challenge #7: Workers Becoming More Sedentary
Challenge #8: Issues Surrounding Work/Life Balance
Challenge #9: Problems Linked to Understanding Work
Challenge #10: Reluctance to Work from Home Regularly
Final Thoughts
Body10 Challenges of Working from Home for Employers (And How to Solve Them) March 9, 2021 Quick Links Challenge #1: Workers Experiencing Social Isolation Challenge #2: Productivity Levels Dipping Challenge #3: Physical Discomfort in a Home Office Challenge #4: Issues with Teamwork and Collaboration Challenge #5: Workers Not Having Access to Software Challenge #6: Security Issues Stemming from Remote Work Challenge #7: Workers Becoming More Sedentary Challenge #8: Issues Surrounding Work/Life Balance Challenge #9: Problems Linked to Understanding Work Challenge #10: Reluctance to Work from Home Regularly Final Thoughts When contemplating the various challenges of working from home, the focus is often placed on how workers can resolve them, but it is important to understand that employers face a number of challenges that they must find solutions for too. These range from ensuring productivity remains high and collaboration is still possible, right through to making sure employees still feel connected to the organization. Keep reading to find 10 examples of challenges of working from home for employers, along with possible solutions. You can also visit the ViewSonic workplace solutions page to find out more about optimizing the home office workspace. In recent years, much has been made of the various benefits that are associated with home working arrangements, but the challenges of working from home also deserve some attention. After all, telecommuting has fundamentally altered the way many people think about work, and the way work is carried out, and any transformation of this kind will have hurdles that need to be cleared and difficulties that need to be addressed. For this reason, in this article, we will provide 10 examples of challenges that are associated with working from home, and we will also offer realistic solutions for employers and those who are managing remote teams. After all, there are a number of ways in which remote work arrangements can benefit employers. Challenge #1: Workers Experiencing Social Isolation. One of the main advantages of office-based working is the social element that is built into the arrangement. While employers do not want any of this socializing within the workplace to impact productivity, it is clear that interacting with other people on a daily basis is good for workers’ mental health and morale. Solution. Communications technology can assist with this particular issue, providing something akin to typical work-based social interaction. Solutions like Microsoft Teams and Zoom can at least limit the negative impact. Management should work to create a company culture in which employees use online communication tools as much as possible, and not only for business-related conversations. Creating a channel for personal sharing can encourage employees to discuss things such as trips, weekend plans, and social events. It may also be sensible to provide a degree of flexibility so that staff can attend the workplace at times if they feel it will help them. Challenge #2: Productivity Levels Dipping. Although research indicates that productivity among remote workers tends to be high, this will not be the case for each and every remote worker. For employers, a key challenge involves making sure employees maintain the levels of productivity they typically achieve in the workplace, despite them working away from any in-person supervision. Solution. Regular contact with staff can help to keep productivity levels up, especially when combined with clear target setting. When further action is required, performance and activity monitoring software may be able to help employers to identify the remote workers that are not working hard enough, but this needs to be balanced against privacy concerns. Furthermore, ensure employees are equipped with a monitor setup that is conducive to productivity as working from a laptop can be slow and inefficient. For help choosing the right monitor, see our guide on how to choose a computer monitor for business. Challenge #3: Physical Discomfort in a Home Office. When purchasing chairs and desks, many employers prioritize ergonomics. In doing so, you can potentially limit issues associated with physical discomfort, which can lead to a loss of productivity and increased absenteeism. However, remote workers may not have access to good equipment, and this could lead to physical discomfort in the long-term. Solution. Taking the time to educate your workforce about issues related to physical discomfort – including how to sit, how to position their screen, and the importance of light – can be important. For a detailed breakdown of all these factors, read our guide to setting up a productive workspace at home. In many cases, employers may also need to bite the bullet and invest in desks, chairs, and other equipment for their employees to use when working remotely. Challenge #4: Issues with Teamwork and Collaboration. The physical separation of your workforce and the reliance on remote teams can lead to issues with collaboration. At the same time, employees also miss out on the kind of chance encounters that often spark new ideas. These various issues can then potentially have a knock-on effect on creativity and innovation within your organization. Solution. Again, Microsoft Teams and similar software solutions play a key role in remote collaboration, but management will also need to pay careful attention to discussions in order to encourage universal participation. While digital collaboration software is quickly advancing, it is also important that employees be equipped with the right hardware. Monitors that are optimized for video conferencing will go a long way to facilitate more efficient online collaboration between remote team members. Challenge #5: Workers Not Having Access to Software. In an office environment, it is easy to control access to software, and this means you can ensure all employees can use the tools they need to do their job. When managing remote teams, potential issues can develop, with some employees not having access to the right software, or with employees using different versions, leading to compatibility problems. Solution. Cloud-based software solutions like Microsoft Office 365 and Google Workspace can help to provide consistency across the board in terms of the software employees have access to. Platforms such as these provide the kind of comprehensive solution to a centralized communication and information sharing strategy that is vital to the success of remote teams. Challenge #6: Security Issues Stemming from Remote Work. Having a team of workers accessing your network remotely, sometimes from their own devices, potentially opens your organization up to a range of security threats, from viruses, malware, and ransomware, through to phishing and other forms of social engineering. Minimizing any associated risk, therefore, needs to be a top priority. Solution. All computers being used for remote work should have up-to-date virus software installed. A remote-access VPN can be used to encrypt the connection between employees’ devices and the company network. Regular cybersecurity awareness training should also be provided, and a strong password policy should be adopted. In some cases, it may be best to invest in dedicated work computers for employees, rather than allowing them to use their own devices. Challenge #7: Workers Becoming More Sedentary. Concerns about sedentary lifestyles are common in relation to office environments, but they apply to remote work too. After all, when dealing with remote teams, it becomes more difficult to enforce breaks and lunch hours, and the commute to and from the workplace is also removed, which could reduce daily exercise. Solution. Organizations should clearly communicate the importance of taking scheduled lunch breaks and rest breaks. If you get wind of employees who are failing to do so, discuss this with them and re-iterate the associated problems. It may also be worth scheduling a team meeting to discuss the importance of exercise, and sit-stand desks could also help. Challenge #8: Issues Surrounding Work/Life Balance. Work/life balance is among the biggest challenges of working remotely, and it can have consequences for employers. The issues here could involve over-working, where employees spend too much of their time working or thinking about work, but they could equally involve doing too little work, especially if there are distractions at home. In the US, Gartner found that a proper work/life balance is more valued by employees than health benefits. Solution. Monitor how much time your employees are actually spending at work. While overtime can play an important role in some companies, it needs to be balanced against ensuring a proper work/life balance is maintained. When possible, offer access to a physical workplace, too, as this could allow employees to escape home-based distractions. Challenge #9: Problems Linked to Understanding Work. When employees are in the same workplace, ensuring everyone understands the tasks they have been assigned is relatively simple, and management staff and colleagues are typically available to assist anyone who is struggling. When staff are working remotely, it becomes harder to identify those who are having difficulties. Solution. With this particular challenge, constant communication is absolutely critical. Apart from team meetings, also make time to have regular one-on-one meetings with individual employees. You should also encourage employees to ask if they have a problem and take care to avoid making them feel like a nuisance if they do so. In some cases, it can also be helpful to encourage workers to contact their colleagues for remote assistance and support. Challenge #10: Reluctance to Work from Home Regularly. Finally, one issue you may encounter is a reluctance from some employees to work from home regularly. There may be all kinds of reasons behind this reluctance, from distractions at home to being in a long-term habit of going into the workplace. Simply ignoring this issue may cause unhappiness and even lead to people looking for work elsewhere. Solution. The best solution here is to provide choice, where possible. Allow employees to work in the office if they genuinely prefer it, and provide a level of flexibility, so they can change their work arrangements on occasion, in order to break things up. It may also help to offer incentives for working from home, such as flexible start times. Final Thoughts. While managing remote teams can present a number of issues, many of the challenges of working remotely that impact employees can actually be resolved by employers. The main things to prioritize include regular communication, provision of the right equipment, and adopting a degree of flexibility in working arrangements when possible. If you are exploring the possibilities of remote work, you may also be interested in How to Optimize Productivity with Remote Work. You can also visit the ViewSonic workplace solutions page for more insights into remote and hybrid work. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR. Video Conferencing Monitors – 4 Productive Uses for Businesses. Video Conferencing vs Web Conferencing: What’s The Difference? How to Fundraise on Zoom Part 2: The Pitch + Your Process. Privacy Policy
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • challenge
  • 48
  • 7
  • work
  • 27
  • 7
  • employee
  • 25
  • 7
  • remote
  • 22
  • 7
  • worker
  • 20
  • 7
  • issue
  • 20
  • 7
  • working
  • 20
  • 7
  • solution
  • 20
  • 7
  • home
  • 17
  • 7
  • productivity
  • 12
  • 7
  • employer
  • 12
  • 7
  • team
  • 12
  • 7
  • software
  • 10
  • 7
  • remote work
  • 9
  • 7
  • physical
  • 9
  • 7
  • workplace
  • 9
  • 7
  • office
  • 8
  • 7
  • access
  • 8
  • 7
  • physical discomfort
  • 7
  • 7
  • challenge working
  • 7
  • 7
  • remote team
  • 7
  • 7
  • problem
  • 7
  • 7
  • monitor
  • 7
  • 7
  • collaboration
  • 7
  • 7
  • time
  • 7
  • 7
  • challenge worker
  • 6
  • 7
  • working home
  • 6
  • 7
  • social
  • 6
  • 7
  • provide
  • 6
  • 7
  • challenge working home
  • 5
  • 7
  • productivity level
  • 5
  • 7
  • worker access
  • 5
  • 7
  • worklife balance
  • 5
  • 7
  • level
  • 5
  • 7
  • discomfort
  • 5
  • 7
  • worklife
  • 5
  • 7
  • balance
  • 5
  • 7
  • arrangement
  • 5
  • 7
  • communication
  • 5
  • 7
  • remotely
  • 5
  • 7
  • challenge issue
  • 4
  • 7
  • access software
  • 4
  • 7
  • remote worker
  • 4
  • 7
  • working remotely
  • 4
  • 7
  • work home regularly
  • 3
  • 7
  • managing remote team
  • 3
  • 7
  • home office
  • 3
  • 7
  • work home
  • 3
  • 7
  • home regularly
  • 3
  • 7
  • managing remote
  • 3
  • 7
  • solution microsoft
  • 3
  • 7
  • video conferencing
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
Title10 Common Remote Work Challenges (+ Solutions)
Urlhttps://www.ventureharbour.com/remote-work-challenges-solutions/
DescriptionOvercome the biggest remote work challenges for teams and individuals with these proven solutions (that took us years to find)
Date29 Jul 2021
Organic Position7
H110 Common Remote Work Challenges (+ Solutions)
H2The challenges of remote working
What are we looking at in this article?
Remote work challenges for teams
Remote work challenges for individual team members
Make remote working work for you
H3Challenges for remote teams:
Challenges for remote workers:
#1: Managing projects
#2: Remote collaboration
#3: Tracking tasks and productivity
#4: Working from different locations, time zones, etc
#5: Dealing with language and cultural differences
#6: Building/maintaining trust
Hit your growth goals
#7: Maximising productivity
#8: Overcoming distractions
#9: Staying motivated
#10: Unplugging after work
Aaron Brooks
You May Also Like
The Ultimate Guide to Marketing Campaign Planning
How to Run Daily Standups for Marketing Teams
17 Free-to-Paid Upselling Strategies For SaaS Companies
H2WithAnchorsThe challenges of remote working
What are we looking at in this article?
Remote work challenges for teams
Remote work challenges for individual team members
Make remote working work for you
Body10 Common Remote Work Challenges (+ Solutions)MarketingOvercome the biggest remote work challenges for teams and individuals with these proven solutions (that took us years to find).Aaron BrooksUpdated July 29th, 2021No CommentsDisclosure: We sometimes use affiliate links which means we may earn a commission if you buy something through our links. Studies have found remote workers are more productive, healthier and enjoy a more positive work-life balance. The benefits for workers and businesses alike are driving a workplace revolution – one that’s projected to see 50% of the UK workforce working remotely to some extent by 2020.A lot of studies have been conducted on remote working in recent years, listing the benefits for all involved. Remote workers have been found to take fewer days off sick, stay motivated for longer, stay in their jobs for longer and prioritise their freedom over wage increases (saving on travel costs and other expenses helps in this regard, too).Remote working sounds like the business revolution we all need but it’s not something you can simply switch to and hope for the best. As with anything, there are downsides to remote working and a number of challenges to overcome, as well. Thankfully, there are working strategies and tools every business can use to overcome these issues and enjoy the full benefits remote working has to offer.To demonstrate this in this article, we’re looking at 10 remote work challenges and how to overcome them.The challenges of remote working. Despite all the perks remote workers enjoy, there are a number of challenges that arise from working out of the office. According to Buffer’s 2019 State of Remote Work report, the most common problem remote workers have is unplugging after work – an issue 22% of respondents said they experience.Loneliness is the second most common problem (19%) while collaboration (17%), distractions at home (10%), time zones (8%) and staying motivated (8%) are all issues that affect remote workers and the companies they work for.Meanwhile, a separate study conducted by Hubstaff finds the biggest challenges for businesses with remote teams include communication, scheduling, tracking performance and language/cultural barriers. Another challenge it mentions is building and maintaining trust between remote team members – an issue cited in multiple other reports, including this piece published by Workana.What are we looking at in this article?In this article, we’re going to look at ten of the most common remote work challenges and solutions to overcome them. These are based on the challenges we’ve experienced here at Venture Harbour, my own experiences as a remote worker and the challenges listed in numerous studies on remote working.We’ll break these challenges into two categories: challenges for remote teams and challenges for individual remote workers.Challenges for remote teams:. Managing projectsRemote collaborationTracking tasks and productivityWorking from different locations, time zones, etc.Dealing with language and cultural differencesBuilding/maintaining trustChallenges for remote workers:. Maximising productivityOvercoming distractionsStaying motivatedUnplugging after workI’ll also be providing solutions to these problems, based on methods we’ve used here at Venture Harbour and scientific studies related to remote working and productivity.Remote work challenges for teams. First, we’re starting with the most common remote work challenges for teams. These are the issues remote teams often experience in terms of working together effectively from different locations and the challenges team managers trying to get the best out of everyone.#1: Managing projects. Starting right at the top, the biggest challenge with remote working is managing projects when your team is spread out across multiple locations. Whether it’s a mix of in-house and remote staff or an entire team of remote workers, managers are responsible for making sure deadlines are met and targets are hit.Without having a physical presence, communication is more difficult and keeping track of individual tasks is problematic, especially for complex projects and large teams.How to solve this problem. Thankfully, there are tools for just about every challenge a remote team manager could experience. Above all, you’re going to need some project management software to assign tasks and keep track of progress. There are plenty of options available for this and I’ve talked about monday.com as a great option in a couple of articles before:10 Best Productivity Tools for Teams10 Best Remote Work Tools for Distributed TeamsThe great thing about monday.com is that it gives you multiple project views to keep track of progress while its task management system is great. Tasks can be assigned/reassigned and team members can set progress statuses for everyone to see.If you need something more advanced than monday.com, Asana is about as good as it gets in terms of an all-in-one team management platform. It offers a greater depth of team management features, such as advanced permissions and dedicated pages for teams, and the ability to communicate at the task, project and team level.Honestly, either platform is a great choice and there are plenty of other options on the market like Trello designed for teams with less demanding needs.That takes care of the software – now all you need to do is make sure you’ve got the right management in place.#2: Remote collaboration. The most common challenge remote teams report in studies is collaborating from different locations. How can a team of designers work on the same project when they’re spread out across the country or world, for example? When team members are in the same office, they can interact with documents, items, projects and each other without any real limitations.However, remote teams are highly limited and even interacting with the same document poses challenges.The good is that, much like project management software, there are countless collaboration tools designed for all kinds of tasks and teams that will help you break down those remote co-working barriers.How to solve this problem. The first thing you need for remote collaboration is an effective communication channel. Email simply doesn’t cut it for remote team communications. You need something instant, responsive and flexible.Slack has established itself as the go-to communication platform for remote teams – and for good reason. It provides all the basic features you need – instant messaging, availability statuses, notifications, file sharing, group chats, etc. – into an easy-to-use interface that new team members can join with a quick email sign-up.In many ways, Slack is the simplest collaboration tool your team and this is credit to how good a job it does of simplifying communications essentials.For basic document collaboration, Google Drive will have you covered and things start to get a little more niche from here, depending on what you need. For those design teams we mentioned earlier, tools like InVision make collaborative prototyping possible for remote teams.Our design team uses InVision to create and mockups, provide feedback and test interactive demos without any specialist design software. It also helps bridge the gap between our designers and developers by providing the CSS styles and dimensions of any element with a single click.Another great collaborative tool is the team version of Spark, which allows multiple team members to collaborate on emails at the same time. If you’ve used Google Docs to work on documents simultaneously, you’ll get how Spark for teams works.When an email needs input from another team member or anyone is unsure about specific information that needs including, Spark’s collaborative email features mean the correct information always comes from the source – no misunderstandings.This gives you an idea of how niche collaborative tools can be. Whatever collaborative challenges your team faces, there’s almost certainly more than one software option to help you overcome them.#3: Tracking tasks and productivity. Now we’re getting into some of the more complex problems of managing remote teams. To hit big targets, you’ve got to make sure all the smaller tasks are getting completed in a timely manner. Keeping track of the progress multiple remote workers are making on a daily basis can be a daunting prospect.How can you keep track of progress on individual tasks while also keeping a keen eye on project-wide progress? Well, the project management tools we looked at earlier will help you do that in a reactionary sense. In other words, they’ll show you when team members have started tasks and finished them, but you only get this information after these interactions take place.They don’t really give you live feedback or tell you how productive team members are being while they work on tasks.How to solve this problem. To get a more real-time look at team progress, you’ll want a project management tool like Status Hero. The platform prompts team members to provide quick “check-in” details about what they’re currently working on so you can see what everyone’s up to at any given time.Team members can see what everyone else is currently working on, what they got up to yesterday, their availability status and any “blockers” that are getting in the way of completing tasks. This means no interruptions when people are working on something important and a reduction in pointless messages like “Are you available now?” or “Have you started [task] yet?”.In terms of maximising productivity, the first thing you want to know is how long tasks are taking. Toggl has this covered for you by tracking the time it takes to complete tasks, which you can use as benchmarks to maintain and improve turnaround times, as well as pinpoint issues getting int the way of productivity.You can also discover which tasks individual team members are most time-efficient with, allowing you to assign tasks to the most suitable person.RescueTime is another productivity tool that helps you (and individual team members) see where time is being wasted. The software tracks the amount of time spent in apps, revealing how many munites are lost to Twitter or other apps that often kill productivity. It can also do the same for specific websites insides browser apps to reveal which pages are holding up progress.#4: Working from different locations, time zones, etc.One of the greatest freedoms remote working gives businesses is the ability to hire talent from around the world. The downside is, much of this talent can be working in different time zones, which can put your team out of sync. In some cases, parts of your team could be snoozing while other parts are trying to get things done on the other side of the world.Add this to the freedom remote working gives your team members (maybe they have to or prefer to work in the evenings, for example) and there are no guarantees everyone is going to be switched on when you need them.How to solve this problem. The best way to solve this problem is to have a few guidelines in place for your team members. Now, you don’t want to start infringing on the freedoms remote working has to offer but there needs to be some kind fo balance if productivity is going to be achieved.Ideally, you want the key members of your team to have a fairly regular schedule. It doesn’t necessarily matter when they choose to work, as long as they’re consistent so you generally know when they’re next going to be available. Whether they decide to work specific hours every week or schedule availability time for the week ahead, you generally want to know who is going to be available (and when) on a weekly basis.In terms of the tools to make this happen, you’re going to want an integrated calendar for teams that pulls everyone’s schedules into a single place. There are plenty of options available and my personal favourite is Calendar, which also allows team members to set availability times.With the team version of Calendar, managers can see what team members have got coming up and schedule tasks/meetings according to availability – without any of that awful email back-and-forth organisation headache. Even group meetings and collaboration sessions can be set at times suitable for everyone in a matter of clicks.For more immediate availability statuses (when you need something doing now), this is where platforms like Slack and Status Hero prove their worth, once again. With Slack, you can always see who’s available right now and Status Hero gives you greater context by showing you what team members are doing at any given time.This allows team managers to decide whether that task is too important to interrupt.#5: Dealing with language and cultural differences. When you’ve got a remote team of workers from around the world, you’re also likely going to have a rich mix of language and cultural backgrounds coming together on projects. The most obvious result of this is varying levels of English proficiency (or other languages) but there are more subtle cultural differences that also need to be understood.For example, I’ve worked with a number people in Japan and Korea where workplace expectations are wildly different from the UK. People are expected to work long hours, contradicting seniors is frowned upon and, in Japan especially, raising complaints is generally discouraged.I’m generalising, to some extent, but these social conventions are real and they can make certain aspects of collaboration uncomfortable – for example, correcting someone older or considered as a senior. (On the other hand, the work ethic I’ve seen from professionals in Japan and Korea is something to behold.)By having a cultural understanding of the people on your team, you’ll be in a position to recognise which aspects of remote working are more difficult for certain members and help them overcome them.Not all cultural differences are quite so nuanced. Differences in religious beliefs can be more obvious and it’s imperative that these are respected, including religious holidays that may require time off or participation (e.g.: Ramadan). Where things can get tricky is social/political principles, especially if you’ve got team members in countries where human rights, animal rights or anything else are observed in a different way.How to solve this problem. Let’s start with the language aspect first. Above all, everyone needs to understand that language ability is never something someone should be criticised for or made to feel inadequate about. Whoever makes the call to hire team members is ultimately responsible for deciding whether they have the required language skills before bringing them on-board.Native speakers need to be aware that misunderstandings will happen and take whatever possible steps to make them less likely/severe. Patience is crucial and speaking clearly, in simple English, will make it easier for non-native speakers to understand.When it comes to important info, send details to non-native speakers via email. When you talk, people only get one chance to understand everything but they can read text at their own pace, read it multiple times if necessary and use a dictionary for any words they’re not familiar with.The most important thing is for non-native speakers to know they can ask about anything that’s unclear to them without it being held against them.Now, cultural differences are more complex and they can affect remote teams in two key ways:Some cultural differences can impact the way your team works together.Others can potentially cause misunderstandings, offence or disagreements.For example, you’ll often find the level of openness people are comfortable with varies greatly around the world. I’ve already mentioned that complaining is typically frowned upon in Japan and I’ve also experienced a reluctance to say “no” in many other parts of Asia.The good news is, with a relatively basic understanding of workplace culture, you can anticipate these differences and avoid problems. Practically speaking, it’s no different from hiring someone who’s worked in an office their entire life and training them for remote working – it’s all about adapting work practices.The more challenging cultural differences to manage are the ones that have the potential to cause offence. A rogue generalisation about religion, for example, or having a strict vegan working with someone from a country with a less-than-spectacular animal rights record.To avoid potential issues, you may choose to encourage open dialogue about culture, religion, politics, etc. and promote tolerance and understanding across all topics – kind of a there’s no right or wrong philosophy. If that doesn’t work, you may have to discourage all sweeping statements about these topics and keep conversations on more professional subjects.#6: Building/maintaining trust. There are obvious trust issues that can arise among remote teams when you can physically see what people are doing. In some cases, team members may have never met each other face-to-face and this has all kinds of subconscious effects on trust between them.We’ve already looked at a number of tools that can help deal with some of these issues – for example, Status Hero helping team managers understand what team members are working on and project management tools that track progress.However, the are a number of other steps you can take to build and maintain trust across your entire team.How to solve this problem. PukkaTeam is a remote communication tool and the company knows a few things about building trust between distributed teams. In this article, it presents seven tips for building trust and I think every remote team should implement these in their own way:Get to know each other: Here at Venture Harbour, we organise team meetups every month and getaways twice a year to build a social bond between everyone.Be responsive and reliable: When team members are responsive and tasks are completed on time, trust typically remains high. It’s the equivalent of knowing people are there for you when you need them.Promote transparency: Promote transparency at every level and demonstrate the benefits to team members.Get the right collaboration tools: Be strategic in your choice of collaboration tools – which ones promote transparency, allow face-to-face video calls, make people accountable, etc.Create shared goals: When people have shared goals, they have an invested interest in working together and covering each other’s backs.Avoid micromanagement: Check in with team members but avoid micromanagement, as it can reduce incentive.Lead by example: Show your team members that you’re trustworthy and willing to trust them.The funny thing about trust is it takes a leap of faith and this means giving people enough freedom to prove their trustworthiness. It also helps to incentivise team members with shared goals, positive feedback and rewards for hitting targets and any sacrifices they have to make along the way.Hit your growth goals. TrueNorth is the Growth Marketing Platform to focus, align, and track marketing in one place, with everything and everyone working towards your goalVisit TrueNorth.ioRemote work challenges for individual team members. People working from home or on the move face their own unique set of challenges when it comes to getting things done and fitting work into their personal lives.These issues obviously impact the individual but they also have an effect on the team they’re a part of, too.#7: Maximising productivity. I can say from personal experience that poor productivity is the worst thing for remote workers and also one of the most difficult challenges to overcome.The longer it takes to complete tasks, the more they eat into your personal life and the less effective you become as a team member.If you’re am unproductive remote worker, things quickly start to fall apart and working from home (or anywhere else) feels more like a curse than a perk.How to solve this problem. Productivity isn’t only an issue for remote workers and there’s a lot of scientific research going into this topic these days. There are also plenty of tools designed to help businesses, teams and individuals maximise productivity.So let’s take a scientific approach to solving this problem. Here are some key findings from studies that look into the most common productivity killers:Multitasking reduces productivity by up to 40% [source]Humans lose focus on a single task after 5-20 minutes [source, PDF]It takes up to 23 minutes to regain focus after being distracted [source]So, based on those scientific findings, here’s a simple three-step plan to maximising productivity:Avoid multitasking: Set a single goal for each day and focus on achieving that target.Work in short bursts: To keep focus at a higher level and increase motivation with multiple short deadlines.Remove distractions: Stop unnecessary distractions from killing your productivity.If you’re anything like me, though, actually implementing that three-step plan is surprisingly difficult. You have to reprogramme your mind and develop new working habits, otherwise you’ll instinctively revert to multitasking and other bad habits.Thankfully, there’s an app for that.I’m not particularly good at self-discipline but I am good at responding to gentle encouragement and Serene prompts me to set a single goal for the day before I get started. This keeps me focused on a single objective throughout the day so I don’t get caught up in distractions that can wait for another day.It then asks me to break this objective into multiple work sessions for the day and these are the individual tasks that will help me hit my target by the end of the day. Now, what’s really great about this feature is you can set timed work sessions of between 20-60 minutes. These short bursts make it easier to keep focus and take regular, short breaks after each session.Something I’ve also found by using this app is that the timer showing me how much of the session adds this kind of pressure for me to get the task done in time. As soon as the session has passed the half-way margin, I get this burst of incentive to make sure I complete everything before the timer hits zero.So, now, I’m working harder to meet multiple deadlines throughout the day, instead of just plodding my way through tasks. But I’m also taking more breaks and getting more done throughout the day and I feel validated enough by this that I now instinctively ignore anything that might distract from the task at hand.#8: Overcoming distractions. Distractions are another productivity killer that can turn remote working into a nightmare and compromise team progress. Distractions at home were the fourth most common problem reports in Buffer’s 2019 State of Remote Working report and I understand this problem very well.Some will argue that working from home isn’t technically remote working but, as someone who spent years working remotely around the world and now predominantly works from home, I can say this problem is equally common for me in both scenarios.If anything, there are more distractions at home than in a hotel room.How to solve this problem. When I was travelling year-round, my best solution to overcoming distractions was working in cafes. Luckily, most of my time travelling and working were spent in Asia and there are some great cafe cultures over there. Vietnam and South Korea are particularly great for working in cafes. There’s free WiFi everywhere and you can spend hours in a cafe nursing a single drink without seeming like a freeloader (even if it is the case).Also, the coffee rocks in both countries.The problem is cafes also come with their own distractions but they were always the better alternative to hotel rooms. I still find the odd two-hour sessions in a cafe helpful for breaking up the day but I’m now in a position to enjoy my home office.A workspace that helps you focus is the best way to block out distractions – something minimal, tidy and practical. Ideally, this should be a separate room dedicated to work and nothing else. This isn’t somewhere you work and then later sleep or occasionally play guitar.This is where you come to get stuff done and the place you leave when the day’s target has been hit.That takes care of the real-world distractions but you also have the digital distractions to take care of. You know, those quick Twitter checks that turn into an unscheduled break or email notifications that grab your attention and bring progress to a halt.Good news: there’s an app for that, too.In fact, it’s the same app I talked about in the previous section, Serene, which also comes with a website and app blocking feature that allows you to create a list of rogue distraction apps or specific web pages. These are automatically blocked during wor sessions and Serene will also silence your phone to stop those pesky notifications coming through.Another app I use is Daywise, which allows you to schedule notifications, essentially blocking them during unwanted times. More on this app later.#9: Staying motivated. Staying motivated is another common challenge reported by remote workers and I think this essentially comes down to being unsupervised. Without the presence of supervisors and team members, there’s less pressure to get things done and you can also miss out on that group satisfaction of hitting targets as a team.Personally, loneliness is the only problem listed in the Buffer report that I don’t experience as a remote worker but I can imagine how this might also contribute to a lack of motivation.How to solve this problem. If you’re working as part of a remote team, it’s important to talk about motivation with team leaders and colleagues. There’s no shame in some of us having more natural motivation than others. What counts is doing everything you can, collectively, to maximise motivation for everyone.I’ll be the first to admit that my natural motivation is probably weaker than average. If it’s not, then it certainly feels like it when I see how well other remote workers I now appear to naturally maintain levels of motivation.I’ve always envied that.What I will say, though, is the key to overcoming this is finding out what motivates you. If this isn’t naturally installed into you, there are ways to artificially inject some motivation – you just need to find out what works for you.As I said earlier, I respond well to gentle forms of encouragement such as setting short deadlines. I’m not particularly proud to admit it but by creating short work sessions in Serene and seeing that countdown timer, I find myself remotivated every time I look at the clock to see how much time is left (or isn’t).I’m not a particularly competitive person when I’m put up against other people. However, I would say I’m competitive against myself and I can’t stand it when I perform worse at something than I know I should. If it took me 20 minutes to do something yesterday, I’ll be kicking myself if it takes any longer than that to do the same thing today.I think it’s the same feeling I get if I fail to complete a task within a time period I’ve set for myself. I think this is why the timer in Serene works so well for me.#10: Unplugging after work. For me, this is the worst of all the challenges associated with remote working. There’s not much point in working this way if you can’t switch off after the day is done and it’s impossible to maintain productivity if you never feel like you get a genuine break.How to solve this problem. The best way to switch off after work is by getting everything done that you set out to do before the day is over. This is why productivity is so important because it’s you instinctively know that you deserve to switch off when you’ve ticked everything off the day’s list.With this in mind, you can see why it’s so important that you set achievable targets for each day and routinely hit those targets. Otherwise, you constantly feel like you’ve never done enough and it’s hard to switch off when you’re not working.This is another reason it helps to have statuses on apps like Slack and Status Hero so people can see when you are/aren’t available. Making your availability hours known to everyone is important, too. Make people aware that you’re available for work-related issues at specific times and, equally important, make it clear that you’re not available outside of those times.Finally, I mentioned an app called Daywise earlier and now is the time to explain about it in a little more detail. Sadly, it’s only available for Android and I wish I could suggest an alternative for iOS but I’m not aware of one that allows you to schedule notifications in quite the same way.Basically, you set the times that you’re happy to receive notifications and they’ll come in as normal during this schedule. Outside those times, Daywise will prevent notifications from showing and collect them in the background for later.You’ll then get a list of notifications when you’re scheduled time arrives, which you can view in chronological order. Best of all, you can set different schedules for different apps. This means you can use Daywise to block notifications that might distract you while you’re working and then block work-related apps from eating into your personal time.No more after-hours emails interrupting your dinner.Make remote working work for you. Remote working brings a lot of potential benefits to the table but you’re never going to get to a point where you can enjoy these unless you achieve a level of productivity and discipline that helps achieve a work-life balance. There’s not much point in working remotely if your job starts eating into your personal life and vice versa.That divide needs to remain in place and this can be challenging if you work from home or remote locations. We’ve looked at ten of the most common remote work challenges in this article and solutions to overcome them.Now, the rest is up to you. Aaron Brooks. Aaron Brooks is a copywriter & digital strategist specialising in helping agencies & software companies find their voice in a crowded space. You May Also Like. Marketing November 12, 2021 The Ultimate Guide to Marketing Campaign Planning. MarketingMarketing Ops November 3, 2021 How to Run Daily Standups for Marketing Teams. Marketing September 6, 2021 17 Free-to-Paid Upselling Strategies For SaaS Companies. Made with ♥ from across the UKVentures. TrueNorthSereneLeadformlyAutomation InsiderPopular Guides. Startup MarketingEmail Marketing SoftwareMarketing PlanningWebinar SoftwareCompany. AboutBlogCareersContact Privacy Policy  |  Cookie Policy   |  Terms of Use© 2021 Venture Harbour Ltd is a company registered in England and Wales. Company No. 8291791. VAT No. 290356105. Registered office: The Manor House, Howbery Park, Wallingford, OX10 8BA, UK Venture studioCareersOur venturesGrowing venturesGrowth marketing articlesMarketing ops articlesMarketing strategy articlesMarketing acquisition articlesCRO articlesContent marketing articlesAffiliate marketing articlesLead nurturing articlesMarketing tool reviewsA/B testing toolsCRMs (with automation)Email marketing softwareGrowth Marketing SoftwareLanding page buildersLead generation toolsMarketing calendar softwareTransactional email servicesWebinar softwareStudioVenturesBlogCareersAlpha/Beta. Join our exclusive early-adopter Slack community, to help shape the future of our ventures & get early access to new products.Request Access
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • team
  • 81
  • 8
  • remote
  • 66
  • 8
  • working
  • 48
  • 8
  • work
  • 40
  • 8
  • member
  • 29
  • 8
  • task
  • 28
  • 8
  • challenge
  • 27
  • 8
  • time
  • 27
  • 8
  • team member
  • 26
  • 8
  • problem
  • 22
  • 8
  • tool
  • 20
  • 8
  • remote working
  • 18
  • 8
  • day
  • 17
  • 8
  • worker
  • 17
  • 8
  • remote team
  • 16
  • 8
  • person
  • 16
  • 8
  • remote worker
  • 15
  • 8
  • thing
  • 15
  • 8
  • productivity
  • 15
  • 8
  • app
  • 15
  • 8
  • distraction
  • 14
  • 8
  • project
  • 14
  • 8
  • issue
  • 13
  • 8
  • set
  • 12
  • 8
  • marketing
  • 12
  • 8
  • solve problem
  • 11
  • 8
  • common
  • 11
  • 8
  • solve
  • 11
  • 8
  • individual
  • 10
  • 8
  • collaboration
  • 10
  • 8
  • trust
  • 10
  • 8
  • email
  • 10
  • 8
  • progress
  • 9
  • 8
  • notification
  • 9
  • 8
  • important
  • 9
  • 8
  • remote work
  • 8
  • 8
  • work challenge
  • 8
  • 8
  • remote work challenge
  • 6
  • 8
  • native speaker
  • 6
  • 8
  • challenge remote
  • 6
  • 8
  • cultural difference
  • 6
  • 8
  • staying motivated
  • 5
  • 8
  • time zone
  • 5
  • 8
  • challenge team
  • 5
  • 8
  • project management
  • 5
  • 8
  • statu hero
  • 5
  • 8
  • common remote work
  • 4
  • 8
  • common remote
  • 4
  • 8
  • venture harbour
  • 4
  • 8
  • team manager
  • 4
  • 8
  • track progress
  • 4
  • 8
  • collaboration tool
  • 4
  • 8
  • face
  • 4
  • 8
  • work challenge team
  • 3
  • 8
  • challenge remote working
  • 3
  • 8
  • challenge remote team
  • 3
  • 8
  • project management tool
  • 3
  • 8
  • individual team member
  • 3
  • 8
  • freedom remote working
  • 3
  • 8
  • slack statu hero
  • 3
  • 8
  • working remotely
  • 3
  • 8
  • common problem
  • 3
  • 8
  • distraction home
  • 3
  • 8
  • language cultural
  • 3
  • 8
  • individual task
  • 3
  • 8
  • plenty option
  • 3
  • 8
  • management tool
  • 3
  • 8
  • complete task
  • 3
  • 8
  • individual team
  • 3
  • 8
  • freedom remote
  • 3
  • 8
  • slack statu
  • 3
  • 8
  • native
  • 3
  • 8
  • shared goal
  • 3
  • 8
  • working home
  • 3
  • 8
  • work session
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleThe 7 biggest remote work challenges (and how to overcome them)
Urlhttps://zapier.com/blog/remote-work-challenges/
Description
Date18 Mar 2020
Organic Position8
H1The 7 biggest remote work challenges (and how to overcome them)
H2Working too much
Prioritizing work
Interruptions: you gave a family, pets, and/or a doorbell
Loneliness and lack of human interaction
Communication Issues and Being Out of the Loop
Technology hiccups
Bad health habits
Related articles
Improve your productivity automatically. Use Zapier to get your apps working together
H3How to avoid overworking
How to make sure you get the most important work done
How to deal with interruptions at home
How to not feel isolated when working from home
Time zone differences
H2WithAnchorsWorking too much
Prioritizing work
Interruptions: you gave a family, pets, and/or a doorbell
Loneliness and lack of human interaction
Communication Issues and Being Out of the Loop
Technology hiccups
Bad health habits
Related articles
Improve your productivity automatically. Use Zapier to get your apps working together
BodyThe 7 biggest remote work challenges (and how to overcome them)By Melanie Pinola · March 18, 2020No soul-crushing commute. No managers or co-workers hanging over your shoulder. No one stealing your lunch from the office fridge. Remote work is wonderful. But it's not without its challenges.Ask anyone who works remotely as a telecommuter or from home running their own business: It's not all rainbows and unicorns. A report from the United Nations International Labour Organization found that while employees are more productive when they work outside of the conventional office, they're also more vulnerable to working longer hours, a more intense work pace, work-home interference, and, in some cases, greater stress.I asked over four dozen remote workers to share their biggest challenges—and how to overcome them. Whether you're thinking about working remotely or are currently a remote worker, you'll be happier and more productive when you meet these challenges head on.Working too much. One of the reasons many managers don't approve of remote work is they fear employees will slack off without that physical, in-person oversight. But, in fact, the opposite tends to be the reality: remote workers are more likely to _over_work. When your personal life and your work are both under the same roof, it's harder to switch off.Get productivity tips in your inboxSubscribe"When does the work day start? End? Creating a hard line between work/home is tough," says author and coach Jeff Gothelf. And if you work for yourself, he adds that you might be in never-ending sales mode, which can be exhausting.Here at Zapier, we're a 100% remote company. Several members of our team confess they have a hard time remembering to take breaks, stopping work at a reasonable time, and even knowing when is a reasonable time to stop. As someone who has been working from home for over 15 years, I still often feel pulled to go back to my laptop after the day has ended to check up on just one email or finish one small thing—which ends up spiraling into an unintended all-night session."Work is infinite," Conrado Lamas, head of marketing at Signaturit, says. "There is always something to be solved—and when you have an office routine, it's easier to leave what you do at the workplace. When you work from home, your office is where you live. So I'm constantly closing small pending tasks late at night before I go to bed or early in the morning, when I really wanted to be reading the news."How to avoid overworking. You might need to trick yourself to take breaks and set clear start and end times. Otherwise, you risk burnout. A few things that can help:Set appointments on your calendar for the end of the day to get yourself out of your home office. Maybe it's an "appointment" to go to the gym or go grocery shopping or just take a walk around the block. Maybe it's an appointment to read the next chapter of the book you're currently into.Similarly, set up reminders to take breaks. One member of our team has a recurring daily to-do list item to take a walk. I use the clock settings in macOS to announce the time every hour, which helps remind me to stretch and refill my water glass. In Windows, you can use Task Scheduler to set up a similar hourly reminder. Timing your day with the Pomodoro technique can help as well.Be clear with your team on when you're leaving—for example, by making a quick announcement in Slack—and then actually shut down your computer. (I have a bad habit of saying "bye" and then sticking around for another hour.)Create physical boundaries between you and your workspace. The best thing is if you have a dedicated office space so you can shut the office door--or even lock it, as Cody Jones, Director of Partnerships at Zapier, does. Sorry, we're closed. If you don't have a dedicated office, even something as simple as putting your laptop out of sight when work has ended can help you avoid the temptation to log back on. Or you can try sectioning off part of a room for work so it feels like a separate space.Turn off notifications on your phone and computer so you're not pulled back into work after hours.Related: How to avoid burnout in a remote teamPrioritizing work. Remote workers need to be self-motivated experts at time management because we don't have others constantly overlooking our work or managing our time for us. While every worker might find it difficult to stick to a schedule and manage their to-dos, it's especially challenging for remote workers who have more flexible, free-form days as well as managers in a different part of the world.Managing your own work is hard enough. Then there's the constant temptation to watch one episode of your favorite show during your work break, tidy up the kitchen when you're procrastinating on a project, or take your dog for a walk because of their pleading look. All of a sudden, it's evening and you have nothing to show for the day.How to make sure you get the most important work done. Eat the frog. Business consultant and coach Brian Tracy explains: "Mark Twain once said that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you can go through the day with the satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the worse things that is going to happen to you all day long. Your 'frog' is your biggest, most important task, the one you are most likely to procrastinate on if you don’t do something about it." First thing when you start up work, eat that frog.Limit the number of tasks you plan to do each day. Use the Eisenhower matrix to avoid unnecessary time-wasting tasks and know which tasks to do next. Or plan to do just 1 big thing, 3 medium things, and 5 small things per day, the 1-3-5 rule.Install distraction-limiting tools. Try one of these tools to help you stay focused at work.Manage your energy, not your time. As Gregory Ciotti explains on the I Done This Blog, "you improve by pushing your practice, not yourself during low energy." Your energy waxes and wanes during the day, so tackle tasks according to how much of your bandwidth they'll take and how much you'll be able to focus at different times during the day.Related: Master your time: 5 daily scheduling methods to bring more focus to your dayInterruptions: you gave a family, pets, and/or a doorbell. The good news is, when you work from home, you avoid co-workers dropping by your desk and other office interruptions (it's someone's birthday! Let's have cake in the breakroom!). The bad news is you'll likely have to deal with other kinds of interruptions and distractions, whether it's the UPS delivery person needing your signature or in-laws dropping by unannounced.It's especially hard if you have very young kids, who don't understand that they can see you but you're not available to play. Repeatedly saying, "no, I don't have time now" is painful. Brian Cooksey, an engineering manager at Zapier, adds that "finding a good place to take conference calls so that family doesn't interrupt and so that I don't wake a napping baby" can also be an issue.This video perfectly explains the challenge of working from home with kids.How to deal with interruptions at home. There's no way to avoid all interruptions from your family, pets, delivery people, and neighbors. And sometimes they should interrupt you—like if your dog really needs to be let outside or your kid just got hurt. It's important to be clear, though, about the kinds of interruptions that are okay and which ones can wait. Additionally:Set up a kind of signal that lets others know when you're in focus mode. Maybe it's a do not disturb sign on your door or when you put on your headphones. (Or maybe you have to actually lock the door and pretend you're not home.)Explain why it's important for you to avoid interruptions—that they break your concentration and make your work ten times harder.For young kids, getting childcare is a must, unless you plan on working only when they're asleep.Train your kids and significant other to be self-sufficient and occupy themselves. It's frustrating to be interrupted because you're the only person who knows where the scotch tape is.Keep consistent work hours. Simply don't answer calls during work and perhaps even invent meetings if you have to.Escape. If all else fails, try working out of a co-working space, the library, or a coffee shop.Loneliness and lack of human interaction. To a certain extent, your co-workers are your social circle. Sometimes it is hard to explain to others that all your friends are online.Cody JonesIf you don't have family members home with you when you're working, you might have the opposite problem: isolation. Even with internet access and tools like Slack, you might still develop "cabin fever" from being in the same place for too long all by yourself. "It is too easy to get the habit of working from home all day," says CEO of ad tech firm MonetizeMore, Kean Graham, "and then remain in your home for the remainder of that day and sometimes for subsequent days."Perhaps remote work jobs should come with a Warning: you might become a hermit label. "Finding the courage to go out into an unforgiving world and talk to potentially scary human beings" can become a new challenge, editor Michael Crider says.People who work in shared offices experience impromptu "watercooler" moments of interaction and maybe even share meals together or after-work drinks. Remote workers? We often work asynchronously with our teammates and perhaps have only our houseplants to talk to.Side note: It's not that bad. Usually. Well, read this New Yorker spoof on someone who works from home calling 911.How to not feel isolated when working from home. This one's going to take effort, especially if one of the reasons you enjoy working remotely is to get away from being around too many people. It's about striking a balance.Include social breaks in your schedule, if you can, by working a few hours then spending an hour or two doing something social outside of your home, such as lunch with friends, then going back to work, Kean advises. Just going out and grabbing a snack while chatting with the counter person can be rejuvenating.Try working at co-working spaces or coffee shops so you'll at least feel like you're still a part of society. You might just find, as Conrado Lamas has, that you'll make friends with the people who work at and from the coffee shop. Think of it as your second office.Be more intentional about joining local groups or organizations. Find a Meetup, attend networking conferences, or take some classes at your town's recreation center.Communication Issues and Being Out of the Loop. In their book, REMOTE: Office Not Required, Basecamp founders Jason Fried and David Heinemeier explain why communication is paramount for a remote team—and why it's such a challenge:When the bulk of your communication happens via email and the like, it doesn't take much for bad blood to develop unless everyone is making their best effort to the contrary. Small misunderstandings that could have been nipped in the bud with the wink of an eye or a certain tone of voice can quickly snowball into drama.Programmer Bryan Rehbein adds: "As somewhat of an introvert, it can be hard to communicate enough with your colleagues. Remote work needs extra communication."The communication issue is compounded if some of your team works in an office but you don't. You miss all the overheard discussions and cubicle wall meetings, says Peter Smith. You might feel paranoid that others are having meetings and making decisions without you—and you'd probably be right. Unless the company has built a culture of inclusion for remote workers, you might be out of sight and out of mind.The only real solution is to communicate as much as possible—clarifying anything that could be a misunderstanding—and to be proactive in speaking up.Time zone differences. Related to being or feeling out of the loop: those terrible time zones. You might be waking up just when your teammate is going to bed. That means you can't always rely on your fellow team member to be available to answer a pressing question or solve any other immediate need.The solution? Fried and Heinemeier recommend teams have a four-hour overlap:Working remotely, if it is to be successful, usually requires some overlap with the hours your coworkers are putting in...we've found that we need a good four hours of overlap to avoid collaboration delays and feel like a team.That's not a problem if you're in Los Angeles working with someone in New York, but it's more of a challenge if, say, you're in Chicago working with someone in Copenhagen. There was no easy way around it; we just had to compromise. We did it with Copenhagen working from 11am to 7pm (local time) and Chicago working from 8am to 5pm—just enough for the key four hours of intersection.Remote workers need to be flexible when working with others in different time zones. As my teammate Matthew said: "You have to think a bit more about when to send messages to others—and learn not to watch your phone for notifications when you don't plan to work. That's a good part as well, though; you can move your work around when needed, and you can hand off work to others who can finish it up during their day and get it back to you."Related: How to collaborate across time zonesTechnology hiccups. Nothing makes a remote worker shake in fear as much as an internet outage. Or, perhaps, when your computer breaks. Both are your problems to solve.Attorney Elizabeth Potts Weinstein says that she and her husband have worked remotely for years and "by far the biggest challenge is being able to rely on a stable and fast internet connection. We do our research ahead of time, but that doesn't mean that the speed and stability is guaranteed, particularly in developing countries."Many public Wi-Fi hotspots can also be spotty. And even with a decent internet connection, video conferencing apps aren't always reliable, so virtual meetings can be an exercise in frustration.For peace of mind--and to avoid delays in your work—have a backup plan. A mobile hotspot device like a MiFi or a cell phone plan that allows tethering can save you when your internet goes out. A backup computer--or maybe even a tablet--can get you through the day until you can get your computer fixed.Pro Tip: Know what to do if the Wi-Fi login page doesn't open. Bad health habits. Knowledge work tends to be sedentary work—no matter where your office is. However, when you're at home, it's easier to slip into bad habits.For one thing, there's the fridge. As Cody says, "with the refrigerator only 14 steps from my home office and my bedroom a mere 22, the freshman 15 is a real phenomenon when converting from an office job."Or, like me, you might have the opposite problem: without common lunch breaks, I forget to eat.Exercise might also fall by the wayside when you're overworking, and you might forget to go outside enough. (Fellow remote workers: are you getting enough vitamin D?)There's no magic pill for this one either. You just have to be more mindful when working from home about your health habits. You can set reminders for yourself in your calendar or to-do app to eat a salad or do some yoga.Related: Productivity and ergonomics: the best way to organize your desk. Despite the challenges above, remote work is very rewarding—as long as you know what you're getting into and can handle these common issues. If you persevere, you'll enjoy flexibility, autonomy, the chance to work in your best environment, higher productivity—and perhaps also more time for a life outside of work as well.Read more about remote work in our guide to remote work.Title photo by Daveybot via FlickrGet productivity tips delivered straight to your inboxWe’ll email you 1/wk, and never share your information.Melanie PinolaMelanie Pinola is a NY-based writer. Besides trying out new productivity systems, she enjoys cooking, playing video games with her family, and traveling. Follow her at @melaniepinola.tagsRemote workPersonal productivityEntrepreneurshipWorkplace cultureRelated articles. Improve your productivity automatically. Use Zapier to get your apps working together.Sign upSee how it works
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 48
  • 9
  • working
  • 25
  • 9
  • time
  • 21
  • 9
  • remote
  • 21
  • 9
  • worker
  • 18
  • 9
  • day
  • 17
  • 9
  • home
  • 17
  • 9
  • office
  • 16
  • 9
  • youre
  • 16
  • 9
  • thing
  • 13
  • 9
  • avoid
  • 11
  • 9
  • remote worker
  • 10
  • 9
  • hour
  • 10
  • 9
  • dont
  • 10
  • 9
  • team
  • 9
  • 9
  • challenge
  • 9
  • 9
  • break
  • 9
  • 9
  • person
  • 8
  • 9
  • remote work
  • 7
  • 9
  • productivity
  • 7
  • 9
  • plan
  • 7
  • 9
  • interruption
  • 7
  • 9
  • task
  • 7
  • 9
  • computer
  • 6
  • 9
  • youll
  • 6
  • 9
  • hard
  • 6
  • 9
  • feel
  • 6
  • 9
  • bad
  • 6
  • 9
  • working home
  • 5
  • 9
  • back
  • 5
  • 9
  • explain
  • 5
  • 9
  • family
  • 5
  • 9
  • internet
  • 5
  • 9
  • work home
  • 4
  • 9
  • home office
  • 3
  • 9
Result 10
TitleRemote Working: 5 Benefits and Challenges | Blog | escalla
Urlhttps://escalla.co.uk/blog-remote-working-5-benefits-challenges/
DescriptionRemote working is here to stay, but if you’re thinking of introducing working from home there’s a few important things to consider
Date
Organic Position9
H1Remote Working: 5 Benefits and Challenges
H2Insight Benefits and Challenges of working from home
A new way of working
Working from home pros and cons
1. Working Environment
2. Zero Commute – Health, Cost and Environmental Benefits
3. Impact on Working Hours
4. Sickness
5. Isolation and Team Spirit
The New World of Remote Working
Tel: +44 (0)203 941 4100 | e-mail: [email protected]
H3SIGN IN YOUR ACCOUNT TO HAVE ACCESS TO DIFFERENT FEATURES
FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?
H2WithAnchorsInsight Benefits and Challenges of working from home
A new way of working
Working from home pros and cons
1. Working Environment
2. Zero Commute – Health, Cost and Environmental Benefits
3. Impact on Working Hours
4. Sickness
5. Isolation and Team Spirit
The New World of Remote Working
Tel: +44 (0)203 941 4100 | e-mail: [email protected]
BodyRemote Working: 5 Benefits and Challenges A new way of working. Remote working is here to stay. According to some sources, 50% of the UK workforce will working from home or out of office within the next few years.* That’s a huge statistic. But it’s not hard to see why. The benefits of flexible or remote working are clear. And while the idea isn’t a new one, the technology is now available to make it much easier and cheaper to do it successfully. Effective digital leaders know that software like Office 365 is revolutionising online productivity and communication; and technology like 4G/5G and shared public Wi-Fi are providing the power. But if you’re thinking of introducing working from home, or putting together a new remote working policy, there’s a few important things to consider. Firstly, is it even a good idea? Working from home pros and cons. BENEFITS OF REMOTE WORKING Less commuting time. More autonomy. Greater flexibility. Better work–life balance. Higher productivity. Increased motivation. Reduced staff turnover. Reduced need for office space. CHALLENGES OF REMOTE WORKING Can lead to longer working hours. Overlaps between work and personal life. Work intensification. Isolation. Strain on teams. escalla’s head office is planted firmly in central London. But as a company, we actively promote working from home. Most of our head office employees work at least some of the time away from the office. We believe that with today’s technology – oiled by a supportive culture – the benefits of working from home can be felt by employees, and benefit our business. On the surface, the benefits are clear for both employees and employers. But if you’re considering the impact of remote working for your teams, it’s important to first consider a few important points. Here are 5 considerations you should make before creating a remote working policy. 1. Working Environment. When I tell people I work from home, one question crops up more than any other: how do I get anything done? No doubt they craft mental images of pyjamas and background TV box sets. Obviously, creating the right environment is the way productive work ‘gets done’. So a comfortable, distraction-free space to work in is at the top of the list for would-be remote staff. After all, plenty of time and money is spent designing work-friendly offices. Lighting, spacing, temperature, swively chairs. You wouldn’t stick your HR manager in a damp basement. Most employees wouldn’t welcome home visits for their boss. But to get the full working from home benefits, it’s important to at least offer the training and advice to employees for creating comfortable, distraction-free workspaces; as well as to managers on how to manage and support their remote staff well. 2. Zero Commute – Health, Cost and Environmental Benefits. Spending hours travelling to work each day is no good for anyone. Avoiding the daily commute is one of the top benefits of remote working. The health-related, financial and environmental advantages alone make working from home an attractive option. To list a few: Saves employees money (often hundreds of pounds per month). Prevents staff lateness. Allows staff to start work earlier. Improved environmental impact (both locally and globally). Saves the organisation money (can offer flexible working instead of higher wages). Improved equality for those who find it hard to travel. Employees are better rested. Employees are safer (if previously walking/cycling through busy areas). Employees are healthier (if previously sitting in traffic or using public transport). 3. Impact on Working Hours. One of the most common issues reported by remote working is the impact it has on hours. ‘A survey by the Japanese Institute of Labour Policy and Training (JILPT, 2015) of [remote] workers in Japan shows that the issue of the ‘ambiguity of work and [time] off’ was the highest ranked disadvantage of [remote working] among both women (36.4%) and men (39.3%). Likewise, research by the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHLW, 2014), covering employees in 30 Japanese companies, found that 43.5% of respondents find it ‘difficult to draw a line between work and family life’.** Many remote workers find it hard to know when work begins and ends. Continual connectivity to the workplace, especially via smartphones, requires a conscious effort to ‘clock out’. Rather than being able to simply leave the building at the end of the day. Lots of studies have been done around the effect of remote working on hours. Some results vary, especially across demographics. But the consensus is that those who regularly work remotely or from home do more hours per week than office-based staff. It’s not hard to see why this happens. Emails or calls outside your working hours. Contact on days off or annual leave. ’20 minutes’ sending those emails on Saturday can easily turn into an hour or two. The social and family impacts this can have is worth talking about. ‘Right to disconnect’ laws In response, a growing number of organisations are endorsing ‘right to disconnect’ laws. These laws aim to limit the negative effects of continual connectedness to the office by protecting employees’ non-working time. Often termed ‘work without end’, this issue has been the topic of a growing number of studies and national policies. When this continual connectedness happens regularly, weekly hours build up – possibly without employees even realising it. And while this might be good for productivity in the short term, the long-term pressures on workers are either unhealthy or unsustainable. 4. Sickness. Policy surrounding sickness is fairly clear for office-based staff: if you’re well enough to work, come in; if you’re too unwell to work, take the day off. But for staff working from home, the lines are blurring. In many cases, the number of sick days people take when working from home reduces. With the exertion of travelling into the office removed, it’s often possible to sit at home feeling groggy or bunged-up but still churn out a bit of work. Without worrying about dirty looks from neighbouring desks, fearful of catching what you’ve brought with you. This is good for sickness figures. But arguably not so good for both employers or their employees. For employees, working while ill means less chance to get the rest they need to recover quickly. Personally, there’s been times where I’ve been ill during the night, woken up the next morning still feeling terrible but begun working from home. Only to call defeat and crawl back into bed an hour or two later. Equally for employers, while your sick-working staff might be clocked in, there’s no real guarantee of the quality of work they’re able to do. For an organisation setting remote or working from home policy, it’s a real balancing act between looking after employees’ wellbeing, managing the quality of work produced, and being flexible enough accommodate non-incapacitating illnesses. 5. Isolation and Team Spirit. Isolation from your team, and from the general buzz of the office can be another challenge of regularly working from home. For many, having a quiet place to work is great for peace of mind and getting lots done. For me, I’m currently writing this from my private home office; the only sound is a distant tractor and a sliding breeze - freshly squeezed from the wood outside my window. Compare this to our office in Old Street, and you can see why I’m grateful for days at home. But after a while, with only your thoughts and the occasional phone call to break the silence, it’s easy to miss the stimulation of ‘stuff going on’. According to the Eurofound report, one of the biggest issues facing mobile workers is the lack of access to informal information sharing at work. i.e. general chit chat.*** With today’s software, sharing important information is easy. But humanly speaking, there’s a natural reluctance to ask your workmate ‘see anything good on TV last night’ over an email. Things like regular daily meetings / team calls help to give this opportunity. A space to speak freely, outside of the day’s tasks and duties. Not only can it help break the silence, but also keep you connected with your team, to build bonds and maintain a sense of spirit. The New World of Remote Working. With today’s technology and worker preferences, it’s clear that remote working is here to stay. To accommodate this huge shift, it’s important to understand it. To recognise the ‘new world of work’ – made of new possibilities, new standards, and new working relationships. The new world of work is essentially separated from time and physical space. With emphasis now on performance over working time and/or location. It needs a different kind of management, centred on autonomy and self-responsibility for employees. One that requires good access to information, constructive attitudes and trust-based relations. It has been recognised that this new way of working relies on 8 factors to succeed: Exemplary behaviour by management. Autonomy. Flexibility in terms of time and place of work. Availability of information (less hierarchical organisation and access to information at all places), with frequent communication (both bottom up and top down). Accountability for results rather than for working time. Sharing knowledge with colleagues. Online cooperation with colleagues. Development possibilities.*** Remote working aligns with so many recent societal changes, made possible through advancements in technology. With these new freedoms and greater choice, we need to think hard about how the columns of working life are restructured around our rapidly disappearing office walls. In order to create a ‘workplace’ that’s good for both employers and employees of today and the future. Find out how escalla can help your business through change, or adopt the culture and tools to allow remote working. Or get in touch.   Sources: *https://www.hso.co.uk/leased-lines/technology-news/homeworking-news/50-of-uk-workforce-to-work-remotely-by-2020 **http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/---publ/documents/publication/wcms_544138.pdf ***https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/sites/default/files/ef_publication/field_ef_document/ef18050en.pdf Tel: +44 (0)203 941 4100 | e-mail: [email protected] CONTACT US TOP This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Cookie settingsACCEPTPrivacy & Cookies Policy Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may have an effect on your browsing experience. Necessary Necessary Always Enabled Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information. Non-necessary Non-necessary Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website. SAVE & ACCEPT
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • working
  • 46
  • 10
  • work
  • 29
  • 10
  • remote
  • 23
  • 10
  • cooky
  • 19
  • 10
  • remote working
  • 18
  • 10
  • employee
  • 18
  • 10
  • home
  • 18
  • 10
  • office
  • 15
  • 10
  • working home
  • 12
  • 10
  • time
  • 11
  • 10
  • hour
  • 11
  • 10
  • benefit
  • 10
  • 10
  • staff
  • 10
  • 10
  • website
  • 10
  • 10
  • good
  • 9
  • 10
  • policy
  • 8
  • 10
  • day
  • 8
  • 10
  • today
  • 7
  • 10
  • technology
  • 7
  • 10
  • impact
  • 6
  • 10
  • important
  • 6
  • 10
  • team
  • 6
  • 10
  • information
  • 6
  • 10
  • website cooky
  • 5
  • 10
  • hard
  • 5
  • 10
  • worker
  • 5
  • 10
  • working time
  • 4
  • 10
  • non
  • 4
  • 10
  • working hour
  • 4
  • 10
  • space
  • 4
  • 10
  • employer
  • 4
  • 10
  • top
  • 4
  • 10
  • organisation
  • 4
  • 10
  • find
  • 4
  • 10
  • issue
  • 4
  • 10
  • call
  • 4
  • 10
Result 11
Title9 Most Common Work From Home (WFH) Challenges
Urlhttps://www.apty.io/blog/9-work-from-home-challenges
DescriptionWork from home has multiple challenges. Such challenges should be addressed and encountered in order to create a better workplace from the comfort of home
Date23 Apr 2020
Organic Position10
H19 Most Common Work From Home (WFH) Challenges
H2Here are the Top 9 challenges of Work from Home:-
Overcoming challenges of working from home
H3Inability to Find the Right Balance
Unable to Prioritize Work
Difficult to Manage the Time-zone and Cultural Difference
Lack of Communication
Poor Internet Connection
Unable to Socialize
Not Caring for Health
Unwanted Distractions
Difficult to Train Employees
Categories
MOST READ BLOGS
MASTER GUIDE
CASE STUDY
Other
Compare
Company
Resources
Support
Contact Us →
ENTERPRISE ROI MAXIMIZER
SAAS GROWTH CATALYST
Company
Contact Us →
H2WithAnchorsHere are the Top 9 challenges of Work from Home:-
Overcoming challenges of working from home
Body9 Most Common Work From Home (WFH) Challenges By Krishnan Kaushik Last updated on Dec 22, 2021 Since 2005 the number of people who are working from home has drastically increased by 140%. This number is now even more in our newfound world of social distancing. Earlier it was a choice or an option but post this apocalyptic era I assume this how the world will function or at least will prepare itself to embrace Work from home if required. This is not new and is in practice since the dawn of the century. This concept in its early days was adopted by some startups to manage resources and reduce costs. Since it showed great results the same concept was even accepted by some of the corporate but only on a conditional basis. Work from home has many advantages for both individuals and companies. It allows flexible work hours, an uninterrupted environment, avoids commute and makes the home food available right next to your room. For an organization, it helps to save infrastructure costs and allows them to manage resources efficiently. There are many advantages but both the organization and employees have to go through some set of challenges challenges from working at home. In this blog, we will discuss how to overcome these challenges. Here are the Top 9 challenges of Work from Home:-. Inability to Find the Right Balance Unable to Prioritize Work Difficult to Manage the Time-zone and Cultural Difference Lack of Communication Poor Internet Connection Unable to Socialize Not Caring for Health Unwanted Distractions Difficult to Train Employees Inability to Find the Right Balance . Some of you are working from home for a very long time while many of you just exposed to this very recently. The first thing is to keep in mind is that you have to maintain the work-life balance. It’s a known fact that most of the people who work from home lose track of time, they start working more hours than usual and in turn spend less time with their family and damage their schedule. On the other hand, some of the people are in procrastination mode and that eventually results in delays and backlogs of some projects, this not only impacts you but it also impacts your subordinates who are dependent on your work and eventually creates a cascading effect across the organization. Both these extremes are very important to be avoided at any cost. To do so there are some inbuilt desktop and mobile applications that will help you to maintain time and on top of that, you should be disciplined as well. You can create a regular event in your mobile app that will alert you religiously to follow time and start working only when it goes off. Create alarms at regular intervals for small breaks as this will make sure that you are aware of time and it also helps you relax. Use calendars like outlook calendars or Google calender's to create a schedule for projects and to overcome procrastination. When a human being creates a time-bound activity and is regularly reminded of the things that have to be accomplished, it helps them to manage time better and these apps just do that. A balanced life is a must as it helps to focus on your personal life and boost your professional life. “Never get so busy making a living that you forget to make a life. “ - Dolly Parton   Unable to Prioritize Work. We often find folks who have multiple deliverables and as a result, they have to juggle a lot. They usually have to multitask. Such scenarios lead an individual to mess things up at one point. A situation like these has to be managed well not only in work from home setup but also when someone works on the company premises. Assign the importance of the deliverables by consulting all the stakeholders, then assign the priority based on the requirement. The range of priority should vary from highest to lowest. If this practice is inculcated then you could manage your work efficiently. You can use apps like Zoho, Trello or Jira to manage projects and prioritize their importance for your team. “The mark of a great man is one who knows when to set aside the important things in order to accomplish the vital ones.”  - Brandon Sanderson   Difficult to Manage the Time-zone and Cultural Difference. Challenges from working from home is that one of you would have colleagues on the other side of the continent or on a different continent altogether. Working with colleagues who are from different countries or continents gives you exposure to their culture and philosophy. While some people are good at establishing rapport but some are not as it’s not inherent in their nature. But to work in a company where the job needs collaboration requires some kind of connection, adjustment, and understanding. To have that you must take initiative and discuss your professional work with each other over a call via zoom or Microsoft Teams. Learn what has been accomplished by other individuals, check for any dependencies and share your opinions. Overtime know each other at some personal level to create trust and cooperation. Even a regular one-line message about the well being of another person could create better understanding and rapport. Try to learn about the culture and try to cooperate. Of course, you would have some different points of view than the other, so utilize these differences as a strength. “Strength lies in difference and not in the similarities” - Steve Covey Most important of all have empathy towards your colleague. It’s one of the important aspects of remote collaboration. Your colleague from other continents may not be well versed in English, don’t get irritated but rather offer help. If they are stuck at something that you find easy, not necessarily mean easy for them, you should rather think from their perspective and help. Don’t avoid responding to any greetings or queries after seeing the message, it goes across as rude behavior and the person might hesitate to reach out to you again. If you are busy then, in that case, make sure that you let them know and then contact them later. Coming to the second barrier, that is the time difference. This can be avoided by setting up expectations upfront especially with regards to your availability. Working at random work hours could make collaboration difficult and could create mistrust. Make sure you guys have some over-lapping time of some 4 hours as you could reach out to each other for any requirement and discussion. Work on fixed working hours to avoid any confusion and to further streamline the process.   Lack of Communication. Most challenging aspect of working from home is establishing continuous communication. If you are working in an office then it becomes easy to ask any doubt, clarification, and help. But when working from home you cannot easily communicate, even for a confirmation you have to wait for hours. Usually, people say applications like slack and Microsoft teams help to have that continuous channel of communication. Such applications are useful but people tend to be busy and in the process, they forget to reply. The problem, in this case, is not with the application but it is with the people. One way to solve this is by making sure at regular intervals of time that whether you have received any messages or not. Regular meetings can be arranged to check for dependencies and to understand who can potentially reach out to you on that day. Plus you can use absence management software to keep each other in the know of who is available and who's having a day off. Make use of the settings, and let people know when you are busy and when you are not, such options are available in all basic professional communication tools. “Communication is What Makes a Team Strong ” - Brian Mclennan   Poor Internet Connection. Poor internet connection is a generic problem for people who connect from home. This could be because of any reason like poor connectivity, bad weather, spyware and sometimes your mood! Well, to begin with, you can have a good cup of coffee to solve the problem associated with your mood then you should always have a backup dongle, mobile hotspot or a backup wifi network in your premise. Preparing for the worst-case scenario will make your job easy and the work will not get hindered. You can always check the broadband speed before commencing your work as it will give you an idea of how the network would be for the whole day and if it’s poor you can enable all the possible backup in advance. “Always have a backup plan”   Unable to Socialize. If you start working from home over a while you become an addict to a routine that usually does more harm to your personal life than good. Of course, it’s not bad to be in the comfort of your home but detaching yourself from the outside world is. Working from home can be too immersive and one can lose track of time, with the advent of new norms of social distancing things are not looking good as people are isolating themselves. Situations like this have to be avoided as your behavior changes for the worst if such scenarios prevail for long. Humans are social beings and social interaction is one of the important aspects of human life. Eliminating it all of the sudden could have physiological repercussions. What can be done in such scenarios? Connect with your family members over skype and interact with them. This will not only boost your morale but also keep you stable as there is someone with whom you can talk. Visit and help your neighbors in this dire time, there could be elderly people who would need help, you can help them in whichever way possible. Doing such a thing will make you connect with them and help you to feel like a human being. Conduct online event internally for your team, this event should not necessarily be any professional discussion but a rather personal discussion. You can further play some online games to boost the morale of your team and yourself. Engagement like these will break the barriers and will keep your team in proper shape. “Socializing is more positive than being alone, that’s why meetings are so popular. People don’t like being alone. That would be, however, an important skill to learn...” - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi   Not Caring for Health. While working from home most of the time goes by sitting in front of the laptop. Sitting for long hours could result in some side effect, it could impact you’re your posture and make you weak. It’s better to take a break in between and walk in your balcony, terrace or inside your room itself. Other than your work hours, set aside some 15-30 minutes to do some cardio exercise as it will make you feel refreshing. There are some Apps like Daily Cardio Workout, it has many videos that one can follow easily. Mental health is also one of the important factors that you should consider. While you are at home you are still thinking about your office work, you are unable to create a mindset where you can separate both professional and personal life as both are converging in the same place. To find your way out of this misery you can meditate. Apps like Headspace ensure you are focused and immersed within yourself. Meditation helps you to focus on things better and have a clear vision.   Unwanted Distractions. Work from home can give you a peaceful environment without regular disturbance from your colleague as this is the case if you are working from company premises. But here comes a different challenge, you can get distracted by a TV playing right next to your room. Your friends can ping you or even call you. Your better half or significant other could interrupt you with some requirements and most terrifying of all your kid can create chaos amid an important meeting. All these things could happen, in some cases, there could be emergencies but generally, it’s not the case. So, you should let your relatives and kids know when you are busy and in what case they are allowed to interrupt you. Put your phone on silent and avoid the unwanted distractions. Don’t re-schedule any work just because you want to have a fun time watching that one series that you can’t miss. “Starve Your Distraction and Feed Your Focus”   Difficult to Train Employees. Amid this crisis, many organizations are struggling to train their employees on new applications as they are working from home. The small-size organization is relying on video conferencing but the big organization is unable to utilize video –conferencing as it has its own challenges. Organizations are losing money on their investment and unable to make their employees use the new application without proper training as that could lead to improper entry and pseudo data. The better way to do this is by using a solution like the Digital Adoption Platform(DAP). It guides your employees to move from one step to another in any web-based application. Further helps you to optimize the walkthrough as per the roadblocks faced by a set of users. It allows you to customize the walkthroughs for each job function. Training via this method is easy, not only that creating a walkthrough using the Digital Adoption Platform(DAP) can be created in a matter of a few hours. It’s one of the effective and efficient ways to enable training for your employees. “An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage.” – Jack Welch   Overcoming challenges of working from home . The crisis we are in is getting worse and worse as we speak but eventually, things will fall in place. The biggest learning for an organization is to maintain business continuity in whatever way possible. There is a famous saying:- “Prepare for the Worst and Hope for Best”. Some organization that has followed this mantra has leveraged profit even in this scenario while for many organization it was a learning curve to implement that mantra in their DNA. The future looks bright as the new world order will make sure that work from home becomes more proficient and capable. Originally posted on April 23, 2020 Written by Krishnan Kaushik Krishnan is a Marketer and Content Crafter. He has an in-depth understanding of Digital Adoption, Transformation, and Enterprise applications that helps business to generate business outcomes. In his former life, he was an IIoT & Automation engineer. You can find him trying new recipes, riding a bike, and wondering about the most complex object on the face of the earth i.e Human Brain. LinkedIn Twitter Blogs Top 9... 2022 was undoubtedly a year for change. The COVID-19 pandemic... 20 December 2021 - Revanth Periyasamy Top 7... Change management is crucial for an enterprise to succeed and drive... 17 December 2021 - Krishnan Kaushik 4... The increasing popularity of remote work demands employers to find an... 16 December 2021 - Revanth Periyasamy Beginner's... Companies are constantly making changes to their operations in order... 10 December 2021 - Krishnan Kaushik 9-Step... Enterprise digital transformation is no longer a “nice to have”.... 9 December 2021 - Guest Blog How To... The world is slowly returning to normal and the hybrid work model is... 1 December 2021 - Krishnan Kaushik Why... Onboarding processes can overwhelm employees with new and complex... 30 November 2021 - Revanth Periyasamy Supply... COVID-19 has disrupted the global supply chain which has impacted the... 25 November 2021 - Krishnan Kaushik 13 Key... Implementing an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system is a... 19 November 2021 - Guest Blog 8 Ways to... Businesses understand the need for digital improvements but just 7%... 16 November 2021 - Revanth Periyasamy Categories. Blogs (315) Digital Transformation (37) Employee Training (28) Salesforce (26) Change Management (23) Guest Blog (21) Latest Post Apty DAP named 'Easiest to use for Enterprises' & 'Leader in DAP Category' by G2 . December 28, 2021 Top 9 Digital Transformation Trends for 2022 . December 20, 2021 Top 7 Change Management Trends for 2022 . December 17, 2021 MOST READ BLOGS . 19 Ways to Improve Work Performance for your Survival Employee Performance – 3 Key Factors that will Improve it How to Create an Effective Employee Training Plan Resistance to Change: How to Overcome Employee Pushback 5 Questions to Ask About Digital Transformation MASTER GUIDE . Solving Salesforce Implementation Challenges With Apty Solving Clarity PPM Implementation Challenges With Apty CASE STUDY . Airline Case Study Other . Digital Adoption Platform Digital Adoption Solution Terms and Conditions Compare . Why Apty Apty vs Walkme Apty vs Whatfix Apty vs Appcues Company . About Us Pricing Request a Demo Partnership Program Resources . Blog Videos All Support . Knowledge Base → [email protected] Contact Us → . Apty Inc. 6735 Salt Cedar Way, Building 1, Suite 300-1065 Frisco, TX 75034 [email protected] +1-469-505-3505             ENTERPRISE ROI MAXIMIZER . SAAS GROWTH CATALYST . Company . About Us Pricing Request a Demo Partnership Program Contact Us → . Apty Inc. 6735 Salt Cedar Way, Building 1, Suite 300-1065 Frisco, TX 75034 [email protected] +1-469-505-3505             COPYRIGHT © 2020. APTY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. | Privacy Policy
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 27
  • 11
  • home
  • 26
  • 11
  • time
  • 18
  • 11
  • working
  • 18
  • 11
  • 2021
  • 14
  • 11
  • person
  • 14
  • 11
  • working home
  • 13
  • 11
  • december
  • 12
  • 11
  • challenge
  • 12
  • 11
  • organization
  • 12
  • 11
  • employee
  • 12
  • 11
  • top
  • 11
  • 11
  • digital
  • 11
  • 11
  • create
  • 11
  • 11
  • hour
  • 10
  • 11
  • apty
  • 10
  • 11
  • blog
  • 9
  • 11
  • thing
  • 9
  • 11
  • life
  • 9
  • 11
  • krishnan kaushik
  • 8
  • 11
  • december 2021
  • 8
  • 11
  • work home
  • 8
  • 11
  • find
  • 8
  • 11
  • important
  • 8
  • 11
  • application
  • 8
  • 11
  • case
  • 8
  • 11
  • regular
  • 7
  • 11
  • krishnan
  • 7
  • 11
  • manage
  • 7
  • 11
  • company
  • 7
  • 11
  • help
  • 7
  • 11
  • unable
  • 7
  • 11
  • team
  • 7
  • 11
  • communication
  • 6
  • 11
  • change management
  • 5
  • 11
  • digital transformation
  • 5
  • 11
  • digital adoption
  • 5
  • 11
  • 2021 revanth periyasamy
  • 4
  • 11
  • 2021 krishnan kaushik
  • 4
  • 11
  • unwanted distraction
  • 4
  • 11
  • guest blog
  • 4
  • 11
  • 2021 revanth
  • 4
  • 11
  • revanth periyasamy
  • 4
  • 11
  • 2021 krishnan
  • 4
  • 11
  • november 2021
  • 4
  • 11
  • challenge working home
  • 3
  • 11
  • poor internet connection
  • 3
  • 11
  • december 2021 krishnan
  • 3
  • 11
  • work hour
  • 3
  • 11
  • challenge working
  • 3
  • 11
  • manage time
  • 3
  • 11
  • poor internet
  • 3
  • 11
  • internet connection
  • 3
  • 11
  • train employee
  • 3
  • 11
  • start working
  • 3
  • 11
  • personal life
  • 3
  • 11
Result 12
Title7 Challenges of Working From Home & How to Overcome Them in 2022
Urlhttps://www.happeo.com/blog/top-7-remote-work-challenges-and-ways-to-overcome-them
DescriptionRead about the 7 biggest Challenges of Working from Home and get useful tips other companies follow for working better together while apart
Date1 Mar 2021
Organic Position11
H17 challenges of working from home & how to overcome them in 2022
H27 challenges & solutions of working from home
How does a remote work software work?
Challenge #3 Loneliness and lack of interaction
Discover all the features of a remote work software
Want to see how Happeo helps your business
H3Challenge #1 Distractions in home office
Challenge #2 Overworking
Challenge #4 Team collaboration and communication issues
Challenge #5 Lack of motivation during work
Challenge #6 Inefficient time management
Challenge #7 Keeping healthy lifestyle
Work from home is the new normal
8 reasons why remote work is still important in 2022
10 ways how to stay focused while working from home
H2WithAnchors7 challenges & solutions of working from home
How does a remote work software work?
Challenge #3 Loneliness and lack of interaction
Discover all the features of a remote work software
Want to see how Happeo helps your business
Body7 challenges of working from home & how to overcome them in 2022 Mon, Mar 1, '21 • Intranet Google Workspace Internal Comms Product News Press Releases Working from home is on the rise. In fact, 70% of professionals say that they’re happy with the amount of time that they work from home, as it offers them flexibility. The trend of working from home has risen tremendously in the United States – from 3.4% before the pandemic to 42% working from home full-time mid-pandemic. No matter how hard your employees work, there are bound to be some obstacles and challenges of working from home as shown by a study from Buffer. For 20% of the employees, collaborating remotely is the biggest obstacle, while another 20% see loneliness as the biggest problem, and 18% find it hard to make a clear distinction between working and personal time. Today we’re breaking into detail the seven most common challenges of working from home – stay with us to get ideas on how to overcome them and which remote work tools can benefit your business.    7 challenges & solutions of working from home.   Challenge #1 Distractions in home office . No wonder that when people hear ‘working remotely’, they immediately think of ‘home office’: 80 % of remote employees work from home, while only 7% use coworking spaces and 3% use coffeeshops. When your employees work from home, distractions make it all too easy to get sidetracked. Household chores and family obligations have the biggest potential to take away employees’ focus, while other people are tempted by social media apps. Smartphones and other digital devices might be essential tools for work, but they can also cause some serious distractions. These distractions result in higher levels of stress and decreased productivity.    . Solution 1: Designate a workspace. A designated work area is extremely important to avoid home office distractions. Setting up a home office is a whole process, and we’re here to break it down for you: Organize a dedicated desk in a quiet area in the house. Don’t work from the couch – we know that it has an alluring aura to it, but it’s a trap. Clean up and organize your computer. If you can describe your workstation as a cluttered desktop or a browser with 15+ tabs open, it’s time to organize your computer. Digital minimalism, anyone? Bring items from the office to help create an environment that resembles your usual working spot. Don’t use your home office when you aren’t working – this spot is reserved only for work-related tasks. Solution 2: Invest in home office inventory. One of the best tips to help your employees eliminate distractions at their home office is to ensure they work in an environment that encourages them to give their best. Get to know what they’re missing for a fully equipped home office setting. Provide them with the tools they normally use at the office, and if needed – with ergonomic home office equipment. Make sure that they have a chair suitable for an eight hour working day or an ergonomic mouse pad. By supporting employees with home office inventory you contribute to the creation of a space similar to an actual office, which decreases distractions and boosts productivity.   Solution 3: Finance internet spendings  . Did you know that ONLY 15% of employers cover the internet bill of their remote staff? Now’s your time to shine – take the initiative and cover the monthly internet connection expenses of your employees. This way you’ll make sure that their working process is not interrupted by internet-related issues and they can fully focus on their work.     How does a remote work software work? Watch video  . Challenge #2 Overworking . Remember those 18% from the beginning of this blog that work over-hours? This one’s for them. Since there’s no clear way to unplug at the end of the day, it can be challenging to separate work and personal tasks. Sometimes people find themselves checking and responding to emails late into the night. But when employees work from home too many hours without a break, they get overworked, which can seriously affect motivation or quality of work.  Solution 1: Encourage a healthy work-life balance. One of the best ways to contribute to employees’ work-life balance is to encourage them to take vacation time. Give your workaholics a little push, because sometimes they tend to forget about themselves – only 22% remote workers took three weeks off in 2020, as opposed to the majority of them, who took even less vacation time.  To solve problems associated with overworking, encourage employees to set their working times in their calendars and not work outside of these hours, even if the task is small. This gives workers a chance to take care of themselves and rest as needed. Solution 2: Introduce social breaks . Think of activities that can give your employees a little time to step away from their tasks and freshen up their mind. Our recommended solution is to organize online lunch and coffee sessions – a little creative break can recharge employees and act as a motivation boost.  Solution 3: Set up reminders to take breaks. Remind your employees to take breaks. Set up reminders, or simply install a reminder app like Stretchly or Eye Care 20 20 20.   Challenge #3 Loneliness and lack of interaction. Loneliness can become an issue when working from home long-term. Being away from an office full-time can be isolating, especially when workers are used to casual water cooler talk and spur-of-the-moment conversations among colleagues. As we already mentioned at the beginning, 20% of the employees recognize it as the biggest challenge of working from home. The lack of interaction can harm your company culture, as employees start feeling disconnected. That usually leads to a lack of employee engagement and dissatisfaction. If not addressed on time, it can easily result in an increased turnover rate. Solution 1: Provide a way for employees to socialize . As a manager, you should recognize the importance of human connection and think of ways to let work from home employees reconnect. The answer: a social intranet. It goes a step further than traditional intranet, and besides sharing updates and files, social features enable employees to like, share and comment on posts. To overcome loneliness, teams have developed groups in their social intranet platforms, where people can talk about their favorite sports teams or artists, or share funny content and bond. Creating a group chat for discussing topics unrelated to work is also an option. Solution 2: Virtual conferences . Another tip is letting your employees set aside time and chat with other working professionals. Local networking opportunities and conferences also allow people in the same industry to come together in the same room. The good news: conferences are also available online and can be joined virtually. In case your employees feel disconnected, encourage them to reach out to other professionals in your community – they may be facing similar home office challenges.  Solution 3: Celebrate important events. Everyone loves holidays. And what better way to feel the togetherness and up the spirits than to organize a virtual celebration? There’s no better occasion to get creative with outfits than Halloween, while an online cook along for Thanksgiving or a Christmas get-together would spark joy among workers.   Challenge #4 Team collaboration and communication issues . When working from home, teamwork, collaboration and communication among team members is key. But with so many channels for collaboration available, it can be difficult to choose for the right remote work tool and to make a decision between the many platforms out there. Collaborating and communicating from distance make it difficult for teams to work together on projects and meet their objectives on time.  Solution 1: Provide cloud-based collaboration tools . Rolling out a social intranet is great for employee socialization and communication, but your team also needs robust collaboration tools. Even though employees work from home, the workflow needs to be maintained, and that can be hard if they don’t have the tools to collaborate.  Platforms like Google Workspace provide a safe and seamless way for team collaboration. With Google’s cloud-based productivity apps everyone can work together on documents and presentations, or store and share files on Drive. Besides that, many companies ensure seamless collaboration and communication by choosing a Google intranet software – an intranet that integrates seamlessly with Google Workspace. No internet connection? No problem – Google’s productivity tools offer offline editing.  Solution 2: Establish communication channels to collaborate and communicate easily. Team communication could include a messaging platform such as Slack to talk about issues in real-time. Email can be utilized when a response is not necessary right away. Video calls are a good strategy for brainstorming solutions or when a longer conversation is required. Solution 3: Happeo – a digital workplace platform . Home offices are gaining in popularity as it gives employees a more flexible work environment. Companies are exploring the right technologies so they can properly manage and support teams. Happeo is the leading digital workplace platform that brings together intranet, workplace collaboration, and social networking into one solution.   Discover all the features of a remote work software. Download list   Challenge #5 Lack of motivation during work. No matter your work ethic, it’s normal to feel unmotivated sometimes. It happens to everyone at some point in their career. The trick is not to let a lack of motivation get in the way of staying productive. Organizations should make daily or weekly check-ins a priority and invest in strong communication strategies. Employers should make an effort to understand the concerns that may lead to a lack of motivation in their teams.  Solution 1: Start the day on a positive note. Home office workers can also motivate themselves in a number of small ways. This means participating in any activity that gives you joy. Wake up in the morning a few minutes early and engage in a quick yoga session. Grab a cup of coffee and make breakfast before starting your task list.  Solution 2: Include gamification in your strategy. Another working from home tip is gamification, which is a workplace practice of adding game-like elements to work, like quizzes and competitions offering prizes to players for meeting their professional objectives. The trend helps drive employee motivation and adoption. It’s a great way to introduce updates to employees, especially when they’re doing home office and there’s no one around to help build engagement.   Solution 3: Establish a rewarding system. Everyone loves when their achievements get recognized, be it at the workplace or not – it acts as a great motivator and boosts employee satisfaction, especially in challenging times. Set KPIs and think of how to reward employees when they meet them. Bonuses, gift cards, or professional development coaching in desired direction are always a good surprise.    Challenge #6 Inefficient time management. Time tracking is one of the biggest challenges of working from home, as employees often lose sense of time. Poor time management quickly becomes a problem for both the employee and the employer.  Solution 1: Implement Google Calendar . A regular routine will bring order to the workweek and give enough time for all of your commitments. Google Calendar allows users to block off certain hours for projects and meetings to help with time management.  Home office employees often juggle many responsibilities at once. Google Calendar has useful features that can make managing a busy schedule much easier. Hey, even better – Google Calendar allows home office workers to plan meetings with people in different time zones easily – you can add and change time zones, as well as add world clocks to your calendar. This setting is a life-saver for individuals who travel frequently or if there is a large time difference between team members.  Solution 2: Make a checklist. Write down your to-do list for the week and separate tasks for every day. It’s truly school-like, but the basics never die. Scratching tasks off lists is always satisfying and motivating.   Challenge #7 Keeping healthy lifestyle. A sedentary lifestyle can’t be healthy – sitting in one place for hours plus the temptation to sneak into the cupboards for junk food throughout the day creates another challenge to maintain a healthy work from home workforce. So, how can home office workers stay healthy during work hours? Solution 1: Support healthy eating. If company-paid lunches haven’t been part of your policy, now is the time to incorporate them. It doesn’t have to be every day – pick a day from the week when employees can order a meal from a provided list of restaurants serving healthy food. Establish a certain budget, and encourage them to order a healthy meal – healthy food makes a full difference between a fuzzy and a focused mind. They’ll appreciate the gesture, and feel more connected to an organization that makes their well-being a priority. Plus, that sounds like an occasion for a virtual lunch break :) Solution 2: Facilitate sports activity . Set extra budget aside and invest in a bootcamp program. There are plenty of external companies that are dedicated to organizing those kinds of open-air courses. No need to mention the benefits that come along, such as fit and motivated employees. Go outside and enjoy a freshen-up session with colleagues. Time for team-building!       Want to see how Happeo helps your business. Book demo Work from home is the new normal. Like every big change, switching from office to home office suggests some challenges throughout the process. By investing time and resources to overcome them and following our working from home tips, remote working can quickly become an enjoyable and preferred alternative. If you are interested in unlocking the value of remote work, book a demo with Happeo. We can help you improve employee engagement, internal communications, and even productivity.   Author:. Elena Nikolova Date:. Mon, Mar 1, '21 Read more from this author 8 reasons why remote work is still important in 2022. Mon, Jul 19, '21 Read more 10 ways how to stay focused while working from home. Fri, Jun 25, '21 Read more ✕
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • solution
  • 42
  • 12
  • home
  • 41
  • 12
  • work
  • 37
  • 12
  • employee
  • 35
  • 12
  • time
  • 28
  • 12
  • challenge
  • 25
  • 12
  • working
  • 23
  • 12
  • office
  • 23
  • 12
  • home office
  • 18
  • 12
  • working home
  • 14
  • 12
  • team
  • 13
  • 12
  • google
  • 12
  • 12
  • hour
  • 11
  • 12
  • remote
  • 10
  • 12
  • work home
  • 9
  • 12
  • healthy
  • 9
  • 12
  • distraction
  • 8
  • 12
  • intranet
  • 8
  • 12
  • tool
  • 8
  • 12
  • collaboration
  • 8
  • 12
  • communication
  • 8
  • 12
  • encourage
  • 7
  • 12
  • set
  • 7
  • 12
  • lack
  • 7
  • 12
  • social
  • 7
  • 12
  • break
  • 7
  • 12
  • task
  • 7
  • 12
  • day
  • 7
  • 12
  • worker
  • 7
  • 12
  • challenge working
  • 6
  • 12
  • employee work
  • 6
  • 12
  • remote work
  • 6
  • 12
  • person
  • 6
  • 12
  • motivation
  • 6
  • 12
  • calendar
  • 6
  • 12
  • platform
  • 6
  • 12
  • challenge working home
  • 5
  • 12
  • 21 read
  • 5
  • 12
  • employee work home
  • 4
  • 12
  • lack motivation
  • 4
  • 12
  • google calendar
  • 4
  • 12
  • home office worker
  • 3
  • 12
  • google workspace
  • 3
  • 12
  • healthy work
  • 3
  • 12
  • social intranet
  • 3
  • 12
  • collaboration communication
  • 3
  • 12
  • office worker
  • 3
  • 12
  • time management
  • 3
  • 12
Result 13
Title5 Common Problems Plaguing Remote Workers And What To Do About Them
Urlhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinesscouncil/2021/07/22/5-common-problems-plaguing-remote-workers-and-what-to-do-about-them/
DescriptionWhile some employees take to WFH like ducks to water, others struggle to deal with the drastic and discomfiting change in the environment it represents
Date22 Jul 2021
Organic Position12
H15 Common Problems Plaguing Remote Workers And What To Do About Them
H2
H3More From Forbes
Best Travel Insurance Companies
Best Covid-19 Travel Insurance Plans
H2WithAnchors
Body5 Common Problems Plaguing Remote Workers And What To Do About ThemAlina ClarkForbes Councils MemberForbes Business CouncilCOUNCIL POSTExpertise from Forbes Councils members, operated under license. Opinions expressed are those of the author.| Membership (fee-based)Small BusinessShare to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to LinkedinAlina Clark is a member of Business Journals Leadership Trust and co-founder of CocoDoc, a software development company based in the U.S.  getty Flexible scheduling and working from home have quickly become the new normal for many companies. As of mid-May, 72% of white-collar workers were still working remotely, and many companies have said they plan to continue allowing remote work or hybrid options post-pandemic. At first glance, that ought to be Christmas come early for employees. After all, WFH allows them to work in their pajamas, save hours upon hours of time they'd otherwise spend commuting, and generally not have to deal with overbearing bosses or colleagues breathing over their shoulders all the time.  Unfortunately, I've learned from experience that reality isn't such a rosy picture. While some employees take to WFH like ducks to water, others struggle to deal with the drastic and discomfiting change in the environment it represents. And when employees struggle, their productivity can suffer and the company’s processes can be affected.  Below are some of the common problems my remote team members and I have experienced, and my advice on what to do about them. 1. Mental Health Challenges WFH can mean working in isolation, which is drastically different from the usual bustling office setting. It can put employees off their game, especially the extroverts who feed off each other and need other people around them to be more effective. Moreover, tasks are often performed alone, and there may be more work than usual. Finally, the endless virtual meetings without the usual human connection can add to the pile. All this can cause mental health challenges for remote employees.   MORE FROMFORBES ADVISORBest Travel Insurance Companies. ByAmy DaniseEditorBest Covid-19 Travel Insurance Plans. ByAmy DaniseEditor Solutions: Hold some fun, relaxing and rejuvenating virtual activities and meetings. Consider investing in video tools that allow workers to see each other on their screens (privacy can still be maintained with the right tools). Finally, encourage people to connect and talk about their problems. If an employee develops severe problems, help them seek medical attention.   2. Distractions Galore  Working from home should leave workers with no distractions at all, right? As you’re doubtless aware, the opposite seems to be the case. Many employees who've been working from home report they’re more distracted than ever. They fill up their time with activities like playing video games, listening to music and online shopping. Further, people living with family members or friends have noticed they often pop in to disturb them at the most inopportune moments.   Solutions: Encourage employees to create and stick to a strict schedule of tasks — it will help keep them on track. Have daily productivity check-ins during the middle of the day. This will provide oversight on struggling or distracted employees. Help employees create a quiet WFH office where they are unlikely to be distracted. Some investment in home-office supplies may be necessary.  3. Communication And Collaboration Difficulties  While there are multiple ways to keep in touch with remote workers and enable collaboration between them, many employees may find that they lack the human element. It can be hard to get a feel for people's emotions, general mood or energy over the internet, for example. When meeting with new people, it can be difficult to get a handle on their personalities, which makes breaking the ice difficult. Working on large projects seamlessly and coordinating several teams can be an uphill battle.  Solutions: Focus on clarity when communicating online — using too many words is often better than too few. Set organization-wide communication norms, such as communicating about important tasks or events in a workplace group, and encourage everyone to follow them. Train employees to communicate effectively over the phone or through email. Not all employees are savvy when it comes to emails.    4. Technical Challenges  When employees are working from the office, they typically don’t need to worry about the technical arrangements — namely a computer, internet connection, software and other associated paraphernalia. Everything is usually handled by the company. At home, the reverse may be the case. It can lead to many hiccups, interruptions and — in extreme cases — security breaches. Employees who aren't as tech-savvy will likely have a harder time.  Solutions: Get your technical team to work with every employee and check their setup — in person, if possible. If not possible, a video call should work. Advise employees on what internet connections they should get. Collect and maintain a repository of software tools for employees. Finally, create security protocols for remote employees to follow to prevent data breaches.  5. Work-Life Unbalance Usually, employees who work 9 to 5 can switch off in the evening and go home to relax. The commute home allows them to get out of the work mindset. When you're working from home, that routine is disrupted. The line between work and home is often blurred, which can cause employees to stay in the work mindset indefinitely. Many employees end up overworking, which can cause their productivity to decrease over time. Further, it can hurt their non-work relationships and social life, leading to a lot of unhappiness all around.   Solutions: Support your employees in their quest for work-life balance with fair, balanced WFH policies. Encourage them to take breaks often, for example, and help them create a fixed work schedule that they can follow without overworking. Ask them to switch off their devices after work hours. Teach them how to draw and enforce boundaries.  Be Proactive Don’t wait for employees to come to you with their problems. People often don’t like exposing their vulnerabilities, no matter how good their relationship might be with their manager or supervisor. This applies even in organizations with the most open, welcoming of cultures. By creating and enforcing a considerate, balanced WFH strategy, you can prevent problems from snowballing out of control. With positive action, you can take care of your employees and have them remain in top shape even when they work from home for large stretches of time. Forbes Business Council is the foremost growth and networking organization for business owners and leaders. Do I qualify? Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website. Alina ClarkPrintReprints & Permissions
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • employee
  • 25
  • 13
  • work
  • 19
  • 13
  • home
  • 10
  • 13
  • working
  • 8
  • 13
  • company
  • 7
  • 13
  • solution
  • 6
  • 13
  • problem
  • 6
  • 13
  • remote
  • 6
  • 13
  • wfh
  • 6
  • 13
  • time
  • 6
  • 13
  • person
  • 6
  • 13
  • check
  • 5
  • 13
  • follow
  • 5
  • 13
  • worker
  • 5
  • 13
  • working home
  • 4
  • 13
  • technical
  • 4
  • 13
  • business
  • 4
  • 13
  • member
  • 4
  • 13
  • office
  • 4
  • 13
  • encourage
  • 4
  • 13
  • create
  • 4
  • 13
  • task
  • 3
  • 13
  • finally
  • 3
  • 13
  • meeting
  • 3
  • 13
  • connection
  • 3
  • 13
  • video
  • 3
  • 13
  • tool
  • 3
  • 13
  • distracted
  • 3
  • 13
  • internet
  • 3
  • 13
  • organization
  • 3
  • 13
  • life
  • 3
  • 13
Result 14
TitleRemote workers share their biggest challenges – Clockify Blog
Urlhttps://clockify.me/blog/remote-work/challenges-remote-work/
DescriptionThe stories of 15 remote employees about the challenges of remote work, and the ways they deal with them
Date22 Dec 2021
Organic Position13
H1Remote workers share their biggest challenges
H2Diane Lee, freelancer writer, editor, and author at Dianelee.com.au
Sumit Bansal, founder of Trump Excel
Chris Schalkx, digital marketer at GuestReady
James Rice, Head of Digital Marketing at Picked
Leslie Truex, author, and owner of Work At Home Success
Melissa Smith, virtual assistant at The PVA
Charlie Heck, Head Lady in Charge at Checkmark Creative
Alexandra Tran, Marketing Specialist at Hollingsworth LLC
Hannah L. Miller, content director at Elevate United
Connor Mollison, freelance photographer, content writer and designer at Photographer Glasgow
Hannah Kowalczyk-Harper, freelance writer and social media manager at @MsHannahTweets
Nate Gell, digital nomad and founder of eSkate Hub
Sireesha Narumanchi, career blogger and founder of Crowd Work News
Earl White, co-founder of House Heroes LLC
Jon Hayes, general marketer for Authority Hacker
Conclusion
Free time tracker
H3“The main challenge I face as a remote worker is isolation. When I worked in an office back in Australia, my colleagues were also my friends.”
“Initially, I found myself working all the time as there was no clear distinction between work and home.”
“While the ‘working while travelling’ thing definitely is a lot of fun, I do feel like I’m missing out on all the sights of a new destination when I’m glued to my laptop screen – which often leaves me questioning myself why I paid to fly all the way to somewhere new.”
“If you are the only remote worker in a large in-house team, it can be tricky to integrate yourself in company culture and be visible to management. This can affect long-term prospects if not managed correctly.”
“Many managers and workers haven’t had training in how to communicate and coordinate in a virtual world.”
“The worse it ever was for me was in Bali, December 2017. The time difference was 13 hours ahead and there were times I couldn’t say what day it was – I was working a Monday schedule on a Tuesday.”
“While I love my work-life-balance and with a little planning can indeed set my own schedule, there is a common misconception that if you perform remote work from home, you can do whatever you want.”
“Having to live out of my suitcase is probably the biggest challenge. Luckily I’ve got my packing process down to science – Black dressy flats are always a must if you’re a woman.“
“I live in a tiny house. Yes, the tiny houses like the ones on HGTV. This is a nightmare working environment, especially when my boyfriend is in town.“
“Although I’m naturally an introvert, lack of social interaction has lead to poorer mental health and not as much mental energy.”
“Since my family and friends know my schedule and location are flexible, everybody is urging me to visit them. While I sometimes do this, it isn’t feasible to take every trip.”
“Some days I wake up early, ready to own the day and start work at 8 a.m. I power through the day filled with motivation and before I know it, I’m still working at 8 p.m… ”
“ When I started working from home 8 years ago, the first thing that really hit me was the guilt of not ‘being present’ for my kids, though I was at home.“
“I hadn’t anticipated one of the biggest challenges from working from home was being totally stationary. My back hurt and I gained weight – being productive with aches and pains is difficult.”
“When working from home, you can soon find yourself feeling trapped within your house or apartment and relying heavily on the convenience of having everything you need right next to you.”
Social isolation in general
Being isolated from your colleagues (and management)
Lack of routine and structure
Family, friends, and partner issues
No time to enjoy travels
Miscellaneous travel issues
Health issues
H2WithAnchorsDiane Lee, freelancer writer, editor, and author at Dianelee.com.au
Sumit Bansal, founder of Trump Excel
Chris Schalkx, digital marketer at GuestReady
James Rice, Head of Digital Marketing at Picked
Leslie Truex, author, and owner of Work At Home Success
Melissa Smith, virtual assistant at The PVA
Charlie Heck, Head Lady in Charge at Checkmark Creative
Alexandra Tran, Marketing Specialist at Hollingsworth LLC
Hannah L. Miller, content director at Elevate United
Connor Mollison, freelance photographer, content writer and designer at Photographer Glasgow
Hannah Kowalczyk-Harper, freelance writer and social media manager at @MsHannahTweets
Nate Gell, digital nomad and founder of eSkate Hub
Sireesha Narumanchi, career blogger and founder of Crowd Work News
Earl White, co-founder of House Heroes LLC
Jon Hayes, general marketer for Authority Hacker
Conclusion
Free time tracker
BodyRemote workers share their biggest challenges Marija Kojic Last updated on: December 22, 2021 Remote work is on the rise. But, despite the growing popularity, remote work comes with its fair share of challenges. We’ve asked people to share their biggest challenges of working remotely. Here’s what they told us. Table of Contents Diane Lee, freelancer writer, editor, and author at Dianelee.com.au. “The main challenge I face as a remote worker is isolation. When I worked in an office back in Australia, my colleagues were also my friends.”. Diane Lee is a freelance writer, editor, and author of both fiction and non-fiction books, working in Hanoi, Vietnam – she’s been working remotely for 2 years now. Unless she makes the effort to socialize, she doesn’t – her part-time job, however, helps bring her together with other people: “The main challenge I face as a remote worker is isolation. Although, the benefits are that I can more or less work my own hours (pressing deadlines aside) and from any location, the fact that I work alone (as a sociable person) is something that I’ve had to overcome. When I worked in an office back in Australia, my colleagues were also my friends. We would socialise often, particularly for that great institution of workplaces around the world: Friday night drinks. I’ve found that I now have to build socialising into my daily routine because if I don’t actively seek to socialise, it doesn’t happen. Luckily many of my friends are also freelancers, so we often meet for a morning coffee, lunch or dinner — or even a workout at the gym. I’ve also taken a part-time teaching role so I can balance up the people side of things with  the freelance part of my life. Teaching also helps with cash flow!” Diane’s advice on how to handle: Lack of socialization, feeling lonely – Purposely build socialization into your daily routine. Befriend other freelancers, and go with them to coffee, lunch, dinner or workouts. Get a part-time job that requires you to talk to people. Sumit Bansal, founder of Trump Excel. “Initially, I found  myself working all the time as there was no clear distinction between work and home.”. Sumit Bansal has been working from home with clients as a consultant on Excel related projects, for more than 5 years now. His biggest challenges are juggling different time zones, feeling isolated, and establishing a proper work routine: “Different time zones: Since I work with clients from across the  globe, not being in the same time zone as the client is a major challenge.  There are many simple queries that can be answered right away, but since we are in different time zones, it often leads to a waste of time. Sometimes,  I am compelled to work in the client’s time zone to make sure things are moving along smoothly. Lack of human interaction: Working from home has its share of advantages and disadvantages. While it’s great to not worry about time wasted while traveling or getting ready for work, the downside is the isolation that you can experience. Working remotely gets lonely as you don’t get to meet and interact with people as a part of the job. Lack of a proper routine: While you can limit your working hours when working from an office, it takes a lot of self-discipline to make sure you’re not working all the time when working from home. Initially, I found  myself working all the time as there was no clear distinction between work and home. This had a negative impact on my lifestyle and well-being. Now, I have set up a dedicated workstation in a room and I try to limit the number of hours I spend in that room.” Sumit’s advice on how to handle: Different Time Zones – Try to work in the client’s time zone. Lack of a proper routine – Set up a dedicated workstation, and aim to limit the time you spend in that room. Chris Schalkx, digital marketer at GuestReady. “While the ‘working while travelling’ thing definitely is a lot of fun, I do feel like I’m missing out on all the sights of a new destination when I’m glued to my laptop screen – which often leaves me questioning myself why I paid to fly all the way to somewhere new.”. Chris Schalkx does digital marketing for GuestReady, a global Airbnb management company – he’s one of the few remote workers they employ. He’s based out of Bangkok, and has been working with them (remotely) for a little over a year now. The lack of in-person interactions that comes with remote work is one of his biggest plights: “I’ve never seen any of my colleagues face-to-face, so everyone is simply a Slack avatar or blurry webcam picture for me. As I’m one of the few remote workers, I miss out on office banter and inside jokes – something that’s hard to overcome if all communication is done through email, Slack or Skype. I have a weekly video catch-up with my manager where we discuss results and planning – this helps me to stay on track and keep myself updated about what’s happening in the company.” Apart from working from home in Bangkok, Chris also works ‘on the go’ – he has worked from Mumbai to Taipei and everywhere in between. But, traveling while working isn’t what it’s cracked out to be – his work often stops him from enjoying all the new places and sights he’d want: “While the ‘working while travelling’ thing definitely is a lot of fun, I do feel like I’m missing out on all the sights of a new destination when I’m glued to my laptop screen – which often leaves me questioning myself why I paid to fly all the way to somewhere new. Despite a very relaxed employer and flexible schedule, it’s sometimes difficult to fully enjoy a new destination when there’s a deadline looming in the back of your head.” However, Chris has one proven travel hack that helps him have time for sightseeing: “Since I don’t work full time, I made clear arrangements with the company. My team knows which days I’m working, and which day’s I’m ‘off’ (e.g. I work on Monday, Wednesday and Friday). The ‘off’ days can be used for sightseeing and other fun stuff when I’m travelling.” Chris’ advice on how to handle: Having no time to enjoy travels – make an agreement about your working days and your days off with your company, and use days off for fun travel activities. James Rice, Head of Digital Marketing at Picked. “If you are the only remote worker in a large in-house team, it can be tricky to integrate yourself in company culture and be visible to management. This can affect long-term prospects if not managed correctly.”. James Rice is the remote Head of Digital Marketing at WikiJob – he’s been working remotely for 3 years now. For him, having no set work hours is where the problems begin: “Although this is one of the best reasons to work remotely, it can be a challenge if you find yourself working too much. When you don’t have the physical cut-off of leaving an office, you can find that you work all the time and don’t take breaks as much as you should. It is always good to add some structure to your day and, if you like working late into the evening, give yourself a few hours in the day to yourself.” James also finds that remote workers miss out on the chance to form friendships with their colleagues, and adds loneliness to his list of challenges: “Although some people can relish not having to interact with colleagues on daily basis, it can sometimes be lonely when you are a remote worker. Work colleagues can become lifelong friends and form the basis of a lot of social activities. With modern technology, working remotely doesn’t always have to equal working alone. There are many ways to connect with people both online and face-to-face, and many co-working spaces are now available if you enjoy working alongside others in an office environment.” Another pressing issue is not being able to participate and shape company culture – he believes that this can even affect your prospects in said company: “If you are the only remote worker in a large in-house team, it can be tricky to integrate yourself in company culture and be visible to management. This can affect long-term prospects if not managed correctly. It is important to be included in important team meetings and events, and to feel a part of the team. Getting together in person as regularly as possible or making the most of technology such as video conferencing can make a lot of difference.“ However, James concludes that remote work can bring a number of benefits if managed correctly: “Working remotely is a great way to work. It allows for a better work/life balance, often aids productivity and brings teams of the best people together from different locations. Working remotely can be a huge success if businesses or individuals address potential challenges early and look for solutions.” James’ advice on how to handle: Adding structure to your days – If you plan to work late, save some of the hours during the day for yourself. Loneliness – Try a co-working space, to interact with people online, or in-person. Not being properly integrated into company culture – Try to get together with your colleagues face-to-face as much as possible, and participate in video conferences. Leslie Truex, author, and owner of Work At Home Success. “Many managers and workers haven’t had training in how to communicate and coordinate in a virtual world.”. Leslie Truex is the author of several Work-At-Home books, as well as the owner of the 20-year-old renowned WorkAtHomeSuccess.com. She’s appeared on or been featured in The Daily Buzz, CNN.com, Woman’s World Magazine, Redbook, and a host of other media outlets. She’s been working remotely as a social worker for nearly 18 years, starting as a telecommuter and later switching to contract work. She also works as a freelance writer, along with her own ventures. For her, communication issues, and problematic coordination are the biggest challenges of remote work – issues that she believes mostly stem from inadequate remote management: “For me, the biggest issue that comes up in remote work is communication. A lack of clarity from my home office often means extra work for me because I either didn’t do what my boss had intended and I have to redo it, or we have to go back and forth by email until I’m clear on what is wanted. While this may seem like I’m dense, the reality is many managers don’t know how to communicate in writing or other virtual options exactly what they mean. The other issue is coordination when many people are involved. I’ve been told to deal with something in two different ways depending on the person I’m talking to. I’ve been instructed to take care of something that managers knew needed to be done for months, but I’m assigned it days before it’s due. While tools such as online document storage, project management platforms, video conferencing, etc, have made the potential for coordination and communication easier, many managers and workers haven’t had training in how to communicate and coordinate in a virtual world.” Leslie’s advice on how to handle: Communication and coordination – Make use of video conferences, online storage tools, project management platforms, and similar programs. Provide proper training for both the managers and the workers on the best communication and coordination practices in the virtual world. Melissa Smith, virtual assistant at The PVA. “The worse it ever was for me was in Bali, December 2017. The time difference was 13 hours ahead and there were times I couldn’t say what day it was –  I was working a Monday schedule on a Tuesday.”. Melissa Smith is a virtual assistant at the PVA – she has been featured in several remote working blogs and is part of the author/mentor group for the Remote-how Academy with an individual remote work certification. She’s been working remotely since 2013 – she started her own company in December 2014 and became location independent in 2017. For her, in general, the biggest obstacle of remote work are poor routines: “It is very easy to create a poor routine as a remote worker. This might include overworking, isolation, allowing too many meetings, and not enough face-to-face interaction. Routines are extremely powerful and can be a great attributing factor to success when working remotely. However, breaking a bad routine is often much harder. It takes far more effort and accountability. I found that creating extreme routines like always waking up at 5 a.m. or eating at exactly the same time of day works when I’m traveling alone or at my base home. However, when traveling with friends or other digital nomads, having such extreme routines makes for a disastrous schedule. When I “break” my routine, it’s much harder for me to get back on course. I overcame this challenges by creating routines of habit for a certain time of day. I run and exercise in the morning, as well as answer all my emails and then I edit my written work. In the afternoon, when I crave interaction, I schedule the majority of my calls and consultations. This is also the time I write since I’m more likely to be more creative.” Apart from the general problem of poor routines, Melissa adds that isolation and setting boundaries are the most pressing problems she faces when she works from her own home: “In my very comfortable environment, I don’t have to travel anywhere so it is tempting to work all day and even on weekends. I find myself to be far less active because my surroundings are so familiar. I’ve found that the best way for me to create boundaries is not to be strict with myself regarding how much to work or not work. Having somewhere to go, someone to meet, or a book you can’t wait to read it makes it much easier to stop working. Often, this will solve my issue of isolation as well. Making sure you’re not isolating yourself doesn’t just mean you have to do things with others. I find that sitting in a park reading a book while others walk by, smiling at strangers, or having a casual conversation does wonders for how I feel.” Melissa sometimes lives as a working nomad, and attending meetings while in different time zones is one big problem for her – and disregarding your health to have enough time for work AND sightseeing is another: “There are a lot of benefits to being able to travel. It’s not always problematic to work a later shift or even a graveyard shift. However, the going back and forth is very hard on the mind and body and, again, makes it very hard to create routines. Often, workers will forego sleep in favor of a sightseeing or group activity. Eventually, it will catch up with them. While in the short-term it can be done and done effectively, in the long-term it is not healthy for the worker and ultimately results in a loss for the company. This was something I struggled with a lot during my travels to Asia in late 2017. I learned that, while I have a desire to travel to many places I haven’t before, some are better for vacation and others for working. The idea of “having it all” is attractive, but not realistic. The worse it ever was for me was in Bali, December 2017. The time difference was 13 hours ahead and there were times I couldn’t say what day it was –  I was working a Monday schedule on a Tuesday. I made the decision to stop working and taking on clients – but that’s not an option for everyone. It would have been better If I had known beforehand that this would be a problem, so that I could have made plans accordingly. At the very least, let the person you are meeting with in on your problems, and brainstorm the best times and possible alternatives. You may find the other person will accommodate you, or try to find a more convenient time to meet.” When she compares working from home and working while traveling, Melissa concludes that working from home is more challenging, especially now that she’s experienced travel – but that there are ways around this: “Traveling creates a different sense of urgency and excitement for me. It also presents more opportunities for me to get out of the house which forces me to define my working boundaries much more and stick to them. Creating a new mindset is the best solution – I have to remind myself that my home base is routinely a 1-2 week visit, much like when I travel across the States or to another country. I try to act like a tourist at home now as well. There is always something fun and exciting going on if you look for it. Also, when you want to relax and reflect, I find it much easier to do it from home – so I take time to change my mindset, do nothing and enjoy it.“   Melissa’s advice on how to handle: Poor routines – Stick to extreme routines while at home or traveling alone, but not while traveling in a group. Pick a time of day when you’ll tackle certain tasks – and stick to it. Isolation – Go to the park, sit on a park bench and read a book, or start a casual conversation with someone. Work/private life balance and boundaries – Schedule rewards in the future, to prompt you to stop working. Different time zones – Make plans beforehand, in agreement with your client and company, to find the times that work both for you, and for them. Working from home being less exciting than travel – Find fun new places and activities, and act like a tourist when not working. Charlie Heck, Head Lady in Charge at Checkmark Creative. “While I love my work-life-balance and with a little planning can indeed set my own schedule, there is a common misconception that if you perform remote work from home, you can do whatever you want.”. Charlie Heck has been working remotely for 2 years now – she’s the Head Lady in Charge at Checkmark Creative, a creative marketing boutique. Her greatest obstacle are people who don’t understand that working from home doesn’t give you absolute freedom: “My biggest challenge are friends, family members and new acquaintances that assume I can just pop off from work whenever. This common misconception leads to family strife – I’m the one who can go take care of mom. Call Charlie, she can leave whenever she wants. And awkward friend conversations – Hey, I’m in LA for like a day, can we please hang out? You can just come pick me up, right? While I love my work-life-balance and with a little planning can indeed set my own schedule, there is a common misconception that if you perform remote work from home, you can do whatever you want. Most of us remote workers either have to track our time or complete client projects before we can bill out for our work. We make our own vacation days, sick days, etc. But if we don’t work, a high percentage of us do not get paid. So while the idea of work on a Saturday/Sunday for a fun hangout on Monday/Tuesday is one of the reasons I love what I do, it’s not as simple as do whatever we want, whenever. This is a constant topic of conversation with my freelancer groups.” However, Charlie believes that there are ways to explain to family and friends that she isn’t always available – but also a way to take on some of their proposals: “It’s important to remember that it’s okay to say no sometimes. It’s not my job to educate all my non-remote friends and family but it helps to explain what my day/week looks like and illustrate that most times my projects require my full attention. When I pull up my Asana task list or Google calendar, the look usually changes across their face. So yes, I have a fabulous life, but this is what I have to finish this week. We usually end up compromising and I’ll take the afternoon off. Other times, I just say let’s do it! This is why I built my life this way, after all, I can bust it all out tomorrow! Just make sure your phone is charged and you check your email during this last-minute adventure.” Charlie’s advice on how to handle: You have to work, but your friends, family, and acquaintances don’t understand  – Show them a list of things you have to finish by week’s end. You want to make some time for your friends, family, and acquaintances – Compromise, take an afternoon off and schedule your remaining work for tomorrow. Just remember to keep your phone close to you, and check your email from time to time. Alexandra Tran, Marketing Specialist at Hollingsworth LLC. “Having to live out of my suitcase is probably the biggest challenge. Luckily I’ve got my packing process down to science – Black dressy flats are always a must if you’re a woman.“. Alexandra Tran works as a remote marketing specialist for a logistics company – she’s been working remotely for 2 years now. In general, the delay in responses from co-workers is her biggest issue: “One of the biggest challenges is not being about to directly communicate with my co-workers when I need information. I have to send e-mail/Slack messages and wait for a response. Oftentimes, I have to send multiple reminders and requests to get the information I need.” And, when she works and travels, packing everything she needs is the biggest brain twister: “I usually purchase data on a plane so that I can work while I am traveling. Having to live out of my suitcase is probably the biggest challenge. Luckily I’ve got my packing process down to science. What that means is I usually wear black with a pop of pattern or color. Black dressy flats are always a must if you’re a woman.“ While at home, distractions sometimes get the best of her: “I usually get distracted by my dog and the ability to cook while I am working from home. We use a timing tool to keep track of our hours so that I know when lunch is over.” Just like Melissa, Alexandra also finds remote work from home to be the more challenging option: “I get distracted by chores that take me 5 minutes to do at home. I end up doing 5 small chores and there goes 25 minutes of my lunchtime! I prefer to travel so that I can hang out in a new cafe or restaurant. I also get to explore the city once work is over.” Alexandra Tran’s advice on how to handle: Constant packing for travels – Make a system and stick to it: black, with a pop of color or patterns, is the best choice when it comes to clothes. Distractions – Use a timing tool, to help keep you on track. Hannah L. Miller, content director at Elevate United. “I live in a tiny house. Yes, the tiny houses like the ones on HGTV. This is a nightmare working environment, especially when my boyfriend is in town.“. Hannah L. Miller has been working entirely remotely for the last 6 months, but, in terms of remote days, the numbers stack up to probably 2 years. She works remotely between Ft. Lauderdale and Nashville – and she has experience with both working from home, and working while traveling. For her, travel itself, with all its nuances, is probably the biggest challenge, but being away from her co-workers comes as a close second: “Many planes don’t come with free WiFi and I obviously can’t take calls on an airplane. I try to schedule my flights outside of working hours, but often this is undoable, thus everyone has to rely on my schedule when I’m not traveling. Being face-to-face with my team is also really important. I love working alongside my coworkers (they are like my second family). I actually miss them when I’m traveling outside the office. We have separation anxiety haha.” She considers both traveling while working and working from home to be challenging in their own unique ways – Wi-Fi issues and living in a tiny house are her standout points: “Traveling can be tricky and a bit stressful, especially at airports. You never know if you’ll have reliable Wi-Fi or if someone will reach out to you with a crisis you can’t solve ASAP, because you don’t have service or Wi-Fi. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve got onto a plane and received panicky texts and felt constant anxiety as I’m up in the air, awaiting the problem I’ll have to sort out when I’m back on the ground. At home, I live in a tiny house. Yes, the tiny houses like the ones on HGTV. This is a nightmare working environment, especially when my boyfriend is in town. The house is too small to comfortably fit two people, so you can only imagine what it’s like working beside him as he lounges around or begins working out in his underwear. I wish I was joking, but this is my reality. When asked about whether she and her boyfriend have an agreement for when he can exercise in his underwear, Hannah replies that they make it work: Haha! He doesn’t visit often, but I do have an office in Nashville, which is my home base. When my boyfriend is in town, I can escape his antics and run away to the office to be in solitude. He knows me very well and can tell when I’m getting angry or annoyed, so if I want to work from home and he is there, I tell him to get lost and he knows I need quiet time.” When it comes to her challenges in general, Hannah offers some travel hacks and tricks: “A lot of it comes with experience and being upfront with my team about travel days. I’m a big advocate for open communication. I tell my team when I won’t be available or I’ll be in the air, so that they know not to schedule client calls, etc. I’ve learned how to use a personal hotspot on my phone (had no idea how to do this before) for when airport Wi-Fi is glitchy. I know what airports to avoid. I’ve become awesome at traveling light and only taking a carry on with me, so that I have more of my work day left and I’m not spending it at the airport! There’s a lot of little travel hacks I have for getting in and out of the airport.” Hannah L. Miller’s advice on how to best handle: Communication problems during flights – Explain when you’ll be up in the air, and make prior arrangements with your team accordingly. Unexpected problems when unavailable for calls – Schedule flights outside of working hours, when possible. Glitchy Wi-Fi on planes – Use a personal hotspot on your phone. Miscellaneous airport/travel problems – Travel light, and create an efficient packing system. Avoid airports you know are problematic, as often as you can. Partner problems, and living in a tiny space – make an agreement with your partner about your work schedule, and, if possible, work from the office on occasion. Connor Mollison, freelance photographer, content writer and designer at Photographer Glasgow. “Although I’m naturally an introvert, lack of social interaction has lead to poorer mental health and not as much mental energy.”. Connor Mollison is a freelance photographer, content writer, and designer who performs 99% of his work from home. For him, the lack of a traditional work environment, with structured days and lots of opportunities to socialize, is the key problem: “Two of the biggest challenges for me are lack of structure and lack of social interaction. I’m still relatively new to remote working, having been doing it for the last 2 years, so it has taken some getting used to. Going into the transition, I hadn’t fully prepared myself on what working from home would be like i.e. there’s no social pressure to work and you’re not in a work environment. Lack of structure killed my productivity. I would wake up later if I hadn’t slept as well, would have a much slower start to the day and take far more daydream breaks than I would in an office environment. On the other side of that, I would sometimes overwork or pick up my laptop to work on a few bits when I really should have been winding down for the night. Although naturally an introvert, lack of social interaction has lead to poorer mental health and not as much mental energy. I hadn’t quite realised how important it was before I worked from home. I now make sure to keep in the loop with people and often work in coffee shops to get the interaction.” Connor’s advice on how to handle: Isolation – Work in coffee shops in order to socialize with people. Hannah Kowalczyk-Harper, freelance writer and social media manager at @MsHannahTweets. “Since my family and friends know my schedule and location are flexible, everybody is urging me to visit them. While I sometimes do this, it isn’t feasible to take every trip.”. Hannah Kowalczyk-Harper transitioned into remote work by working part-time at an in-person job and having the rest of her career be freelance. She went 100% remote starting at the 1st of this year. Hannah works remotely as she travels – sometimes she simply travels to visit a friend in another state, and other times it’s to other countries. She spent the beginning of this year in Indonesia and other parts of Asia. The temptations of trip invites are her biggest trial, though she also finds the time she spends in front of the computer a big issue as well: “One of the biggest challenges I face as a remote worker is turning down trip invites. Since my family and friends know my schedule and location are flexible, everybody is urging me to visit them. While I sometimes do this, it isn’t feasible to take every trip because the costs of too many flights add up and I’m less productive when I’m visiting friends. It’s better to stay in locations for several weeks or months at a time. Another challenge is that most remote work involves a lot of computer time and my work is no exception. It’s really important for me to remember to stay physical and in good health. This means taking advantage of workspaces that allow for standing and taking frequent breaks to get my blood circulation flowing. If I’m on a client call that doesn’t require taking notes, you can bet I’m walking around during it. When I need a break from my tasks, I try to do less internet idleness and more squats.” Hannah Kowalczyk-Harper’s advice on how to handle: Flight costs and trip temptations – Stay in one location for a longer period of time, for example, for several months or weeks, to save money and improve productivity. Being stationary – Exercise during activities that don’t require you to sit down. Try standing rather than sitting, whenever you can. Take frequent breaks to help you blood circulation. Nate Gell, digital nomad and founder of eSkate Hub. “Some days I wake up early, ready to own the day and start work at 8 a.m. I power through the day filled with motivation and before I know it, I’m still working at 8 p.m… ”. Nate Gell is a digital nomad and founder of the website eSkate Hub. He’s been working remotely for almost 18 months now, which he views as a relatively short period of time, but still long enough for him to find his rhythm by now. For him, and other remote workers he has spoken to, it’s most problematic to find a daily routine for when to start work and when to finish: “Some days I wake up early, ready to own the day and start work at 8 a.m. I power through the day filled with motivation and before I know it, I’m still working at 8p.m… Other days I get up late or have some errands to run in the morning. I start work later at 10am. Then by 3pm, I’m mentally checked out and need to take the afternoon off to rest.” When asked about how he overcomes these challenges, Nate says that discipline and workouts are the answer for him: “I think the challenge of not working all day mostly comes down to discipline. Although I understand that can be difficult for some, myself included. What I like to do is set myself non-work tasks or activities for the end of the day. The main way I do this is by setting my workout time for 5:30 p.m. A workout is the perfect segway between work mode and relax mode because, after it, all you want to do is chill out. Doing a workout in the evening is great for clearing your mind of all the days ‘busy-ness’ and freeing yourself up for focusing on much needed ‘you time.’ Evening workouts also aid a good night’s sleep which helps you wake up fresh in the morning with the motivation to work hard all day. For those that prefer to workout in the mornings or not at all, here are some other non-work activities you can schedule in to cut your work day off at the knees: take your dog for a walk, organise to see friends after work, call your family, have a Netflix date night with your significant other, spend time on a hobby, meditate… There’s an endless list of things you could do to help you wind down – it’s about finding what is right for you. I think the important thing to remember is that, by taking the time out in the evening to relax and mentally recover, you’ll be far more productive the following day. Nate is another digital nomad who gives precedence to working remotely while traveling, over working from home: “I work remotely both at home and while travelling and it might be strange, but I find that I am much more focused on my work when I am travelling compared to when I am at home. I’ve put it down to the inspiration and motivation I get from being in a brand new and exciting environment, oppose to the stale sights of my home office. It’s definitely the motivation that is the toughest to conquer when I am at home. Home feels mundane, travel feels exciting. That is obviously reflected in my work.” Nate’s advice on how to handle: Having the “freedom” to work the entire day – Find a non-work activity that eases you out of a working mindset. Exercises are a great physical activity to help do that – evening exercises help you sleep better, so you wake up fresh and motivated tomorrow.  You can try meditation, calling your family, taking your pet out for a walk, or anything else you find right for you. Sireesha Narumanchi, career blogger and founder of Crowd Work News . “ When I started working from home 8 years ago, the first thing that really hit me was the guilt of not ‘being present’ for my kids, though I was at home.“. Sireesha Narumanchi has been working in a remote job for over 8 years now – she has struggled and learned to maximize her productivity when working from home. Her biggest problem is establishing an effective work-life balance: “I would say my biggest challenge of working from home was to give my best to work and yet be present for my family. For me, the essence of working  from home is to manage both. When I started working from home 8 years ago, the first thing that really hit me was the guilt of not ‘being present’ for my kids, though I was at home. This is something every remote worker struggles with initially.” Another problem that stems from an unclear work-life balance is trying to work harder than you really can: “I have eventually learned to work in my most effective times and spend time with my family. I strongly believe in the motto, ‘Quality is better than quantity’. I only work when I can work. There is no point working when you cannot focus fully on your task – this is another challenge of working from home. My ideal times of working are early mornings or late nights where I get most of my work done.” She also enjoys traveling, and often works on her travels – she believes good organization is key to an effective work routine during vacations: “One golden rule that you need to follow if you want to be a digital nomad is to be super organized. You should be prepared for all the unplanned things that can happen. For example, I always have an extra set of laptop chargers, multipurpose plugs, power banks etc. ready in my bag. These are the first things I pack when we leave for a vacation. My phone always saves my day when everything else fails when I am out of country. Having the right kind of utility apps can really make a big difference.” Sireesha’s advice on how to handle: Problematic work/life balance – “Quality is better than quantity”, so only work when you can work. Preferably, during the time of the day when you feel that you’re the most effective. Organization – Be a super organized digital nomad and carry an extra set of digital equipment wherever you go. When all else fails – Make use of digital apps, and work on your phone. Earl White, co-founder of House Heroes LLC. “I hadn’t anticipated one of the biggest challenges from working from home was being totally stationary. My back hurt and I gained weight – being productive with aches and pains is difficult.”. Earl White is the co-founder of House Heroes LLC, a real estate investment company in Florida. He works remotely from home, Nutley, NJ – he started working remotely in March 2017, when his son was born. Even though “real estate is local”, he manages marketing, property analysis, networking, and supervising teams from New Jersey. He has a partner and some staff in Florida to cover on-site needs. For Earl, physical problems and team monitoring (which is a big part of his job), are his biggest challenges: “Physical Problems: I was employed in an office setting before working full-time from home. Although my job didn’t require physical labor, I moved around regularly with commuting to work, attending meetings, or even just walking to a local store. I hadn’t anticipated one of the biggest challenges from working from home was being totally stationary. My back hurt and I gained weight. Being productive with aches and pains is  difficult. I resolved the issue by purchasing a standing desk and yoga mat, as well as chair with lumbar support. I also go for a walk before work and after lunch. Team Monitoring: As a founder of my company, I supervise staff daily. Not only do I work remotely, the majority of my team works remotely as well. Our staff was becoming disjointed, unguided, and didn’t understand how their tasks helped the business. There was little opportunity to converse. I began a weekly Google Hangout and signed everyone up for the same project management/task manager program. The first thing I do each morning is review and provide guidance on the questions and yesterday’s work.” Earl’s advice on how to handle: Being stationary and the physical problems that come from it – Try out a standing desk and a yoga mat, and a chair with lumbar support, to help with potential backaches caused by sitting all the time. Gaining weight from all the sitting – Go for a walk before and after lunch, to get some exercise. Team communication issues – Start or join a Google Hangouts group or a similar one. Sign everyone up, or join a project management and/or task management program. Supervising a team remotely – Make it a habit to review and provide guidance for all your team’s questions every morning. Jon Hayes, general marketer for Authority Hacker. “When working from home, you can soon find yourself feeling trapped within your house or apartment and relying heavily on the convenience of having everything you need right next to you.”. Jon Hayes has worked as a general marketer for Authority Hacker for two years now. His job is to oversee a wide selection of marketing initiatives mostly focusing on increasing productivity and efficiency, as well as to produce high-quality content. While working remotely certainly comes with its pros and cons, he likes to think he’s been able to adapt pretty well to such a lifestyle. Yet, having everything at hand’s reach in the comfort of his home takes its toll on how active he is during the day: “For me, the main concern has been creating an active routine. When you consider that traditional office jobs force you to leave the house to commute to work on a daily basis and often encourage you to leave your desk to grab a coffee of get some lunch at regular intervals, when working from home you can soon find yourself feeling trapped within your house or apartment and relying heavily on the convenience of having everything you need right next to you. While it may seem counterproductive at first, little things like deliberately not stocking the fridge and forcing myself outside to get lunch are a great way to improve quality of life and get active throughout the day. It encourages me to get out of the apartment for a while and get some fresh air which is great for productivity! While you can’t deny the convenience of having everything you need right there in front of you, it’s important to remember that a little variety goes a long way in the long term success of remote work.” Jon’s advice on how to handle: Staying indoors all the time – In order to encourage yourself to go outside, don’t stock your fridge: it’ll force you to go outside for lunch and get active. Add in some variety to your daily routine. Conclusion. Remote work offers a number of different challenges to different people: being isolated from the team, social isolation in general, lack of routine and structure, issues with family, partners, and friends, as well as health issues caused by sitting all the time, not having the time to enjoy new places on travels, and other miscellaneous travel issues, seem to be prevalent  in the lives of remote workers. But, the creative minds of our interviewees offers great insights into how you can solve them: Social isolation in general. Missing all office jokes and banter with colleagues, work activities and happenings, as well as Friday night drinks makes one feel isolated – and, eventually, the lack of social interaction may lead to poorer mental health and energy. Also, considering you’re usually just a Slack avatar to them, making friends with colleagues can be difficult – and since you spend a lot of time working, you’ll have less time (and fewer ways) to meet friends and socialize in another way. But, if you make the extra effort through an online communication channel, join a co-working space, or find a group of other remote-workers and freelancers you can go to lunch breaks and coffee with, you’ll get the socialization you need. Another great option, if you feel you don’t have time for proper socialization, is going out to a coffee shop to work, or opting to read a book on a park bench. Sometimes, starting a casual conversation with a stranger, or simply being around other people is sufficient to help you feel better. Being isolated from your colleagues (and management). Apart from reducing your chances of befriending colleagues, remote work can cause difficulties in how you all operate as a team. No face-to-face interaction with colleagues means you have to cooperate via email or any other online means of communication, and probably send multiple reminders and requests – this can lead to a lack of clarity, misunderstandings, delayed responses, and general disorganization. Coordination also becomes difficult – when told to approach a matter in two different ways, by two different people, what are you to do, if you’re not personally there to voice your concerns? In general, there seems to be too many meetings and not enough face-to-face interaction that would clarify a lot of issues. This is where various tools and apps come in handy –  storage and project management tools, as well as video conferences, are the way to start. Making an effort to train the workers and management on the best coordination and communication practices in the virtual world is the next step. Not being able to participate in company culture may lead to you being overlooked by management, which can hurt your job prospects in the long run. To make yourself known and visible to management, participate regularly in the company’s online communication channels. A whole new level of team issues when working remotely is team monitoring – how do you monitor if you’re not physically present on site? Well, one effective solution is to provide guidance and reviews to your team on a regular basis. Lack of routine and structure. When you live where you work, and work where you live, setting work/life balance and boundaries is troublesome – some have issues staying accountable and responsible with their work, others find they work all the time. Time management becomes an issue as well – you have the freedom to decide when you want to work, but this freedom makes it harder to find a routine that works. One great solution is to choose and practice an activity that will signal your body that work time is over – exercising is one great tactic, though you can choose any activity that helps you unwind, and stirs your mind away from work. Another great solution is to use a timing tool to keep you on track – and remind you when it’s time to end one activity and move on to the next. Family, friends, and partner issues. Being at home, but not being present for one’s family is a problem for anyone living with a family. People opt to work remotely so they could tweak their schedules and spend more time with loved ones – but this doesn’t mean they can accomplish this all the time. Family, friends, and partners sometimes ask for your company even when you’re working – and how do you explain that you’re not free to get off work whenever, just because you’re office is at your home? Here, objective proof you have to work stand out as your best options – inform your loved ones of your schedule, and when you’ll be free to socialize with them. You can do this by displaying to-do lists or schedules depicting what you have to accomplish by the end of the day, or week, for tangible proof you do have to work. Alternatively, compromise – re-arrange your schedule, take the afternoon off, and take part in whatever activity your loved ones proposed. In general, the solution is to work only when you can work, and dedicate the rest of your time to your family – opt for quality, rather than quantity, and work only at the times when you feel effective. No time to enjoy travels. People work and travel to be able to enjoy more new places – but the reality of digital nomadism often requires you to work a lot while staying in this new destination, so much that you miss out on many great sights. Also, it’s harder to enjoy your trip if you have a deadline looming over you. Scheduling your travels so that you parse the time you spend there on work-days and days off, is likely to help you balance out your workload and appetites for sightseeing. Another great option is to prolong your stay – several weeks or months staying in one place is bound to leave you with enough time to visit everything you want, and finish your assignments. Time-zone logistics, such as having a double-digit time difference compared with your company and clients, usually calls for many meetings, delayed responses and wasted time. Also, in general, mixing travel and work may put a strain on your mind and body – to such an extent that you’re unsure what day it is. The best solution is to compromise with the client and company, and reschedule meetings for a time that fits everyone. As an alternative, you can opt to work in the client’s time zone. Miscellaneous travel issues. Considering that fun is only half of the work-while-traveling equation, and that you must spend a part of your travels working – you’ll have to find the strengths to turn down trip invites from friends.  If you’re constantly visiting friends and traveling around with them, you’re less productive – though the temptation is understandable. Also, bare in mind that not all locations are equally suitable for you to work there – so, once again, it’s best that you parse your travels into: places where you’ll work and go sightseeing in your free time places you’ll merely go for vacation, and not work at all while there Knowing what to pack is another pressing travel issue – and packing light is key. A few clothing items you can easily mix and match, and enough plugs, charger, and power banks to know you’ll always be able to rely on your mobile phone and/or laptop. No free Wi-Fi and a ban on phones calls in planes takes work emergencies to a whole new level – no one can reach you, or you spend the entire flight in stress-filled panic at how you’ll solve the problem once you land. But, scheduling flights outside of work hours can help you avoid this – and using a hotspot on your phone when airplane Wi-Fi is glitchy can help you fix what you can. As a bonus problem, if you work and travel, and then go back to simply working from home, you may be bored, as it’s the less exciting option of the two. But, you can act as if you’re a tourist, even back home – go visit some nearby sights you never have before, and look up some compelling activities to try out in the neighborhood. Health issues. While working at home, you’ll have everything you need nearby, and won’t have to endure a commute – which means you’ll be totally stationary. And this may cause health issues, like backaches and weight gains. To encourage yourself to get out of the house, don’t leave everything within hand’s reach. Leave the fridge half-empty, to prompt you to go out to buy groceries, or for lunch. Walking is also a great form of exercise to help reduce the risk of weight gain. If a work activity doesn’t require you to sit still in front of your computer (as is the case with client calls), get up, stretch, and move around. Or, alternatively, try a standing desk – yoga mats and a comfortable, ergonomic chair will further improve your potential back issues. While traveling, forgoing sleep in favor of sightseeing and participating in group activities is tempting – but you shouldn’t do it. If you believe a place will be interesting enough that you’ll want to fully enjoy it, don’t let sleep suffer – this is another reason to opt to visit some places during vacation time when you won’t have to work at all. Share post Author: MarijaKojic Marija Kojic is a productivity writer who's always researching about various productivity techniques and time management tips in order to find the best ones to write about. She can often be found testing and writing about apps meant to enhance the workflow of freelancers, remote workers, and regular employees. Appeared in G2 Crowd Learning Hub, The Good Men Project, and Pick the Brain, among other places. Related posts How can we improve the quality of life in today’s notorious 24/7 work culture? Find out more about the importance of work-life quality and how to enhance your quality of life with our hands-on tips…. How to build trust in the remote workplace Has your office gone full remote? Here’s how you can ensure successful communication, trustworthiness, and productivity…. How to start freelancing (even when working full-time) Actionable advice showing how to start freelancing in a particular industry, even when you have a full-time job…. Habits for crafting the perfect remote work day Make the most out of your work from home experience with these simple 10 habits…. 50+ Working from home tips Best practices and working from home tips to help you better manage your team, collaborate remotely, stay and productive…. Who pays for remote work expenses? Who covers the expenses of remote work – the employer or the remote employee? Find out everything about it here…. Free time tracker. Time tracking software used by millions. Clockify is a time tracker and timesheet app that lets you track work hours across projects. FREE FOREVER • UNLIMITED USERS Learn more Download Watch demo (6:07)
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 165
  • 14
  • working
  • 114
  • 14
  • time
  • 96
  • 14
  • home
  • 67
  • 14
  • day
  • 54
  • 14
  • remote
  • 51
  • 14
  • face
  • 35
  • 14
  • remotely
  • 34
  • 14
  • travel
  • 33
  • 14
  • challenge
  • 31
  • 14
  • working home
  • 30
  • 14
  • year
  • 30
  • 14
  • worker
  • 30
  • 14
  • person
  • 30
  • 14
  • advice
  • 29
  • 14
  • advice handle
  • 28
  • 14
  • working remotely
  • 28
  • 14
  • find
  • 28
  • 14
  • friend
  • 24
  • 14
  • team
  • 24
  • 14
  • routine
  • 24
  • 14
  • issue
  • 24
  • 14
  • company
  • 23
  • 14
  • biggest
  • 23
  • 14
  • family
  • 21
  • 14
  • traveling
  • 21
  • 14
  • schedule
  • 21
  • 14
  • problem
  • 20
  • 14
  • remote work
  • 19
  • 14
  • activity
  • 18
  • 14
  • office
  • 18
  • 14
  • biggest challenge
  • 17
  • 14
  • remote worker
  • 17
  • 14
  • lack
  • 17
  • 14
  • great
  • 16
  • 14
  • management
  • 15
  • 14
  • time zone
  • 14
  • 14
  • work home
  • 11
  • 14
  • work remotely
  • 9
  • 14
  • time day
  • 8
  • 14
  • face face
  • 7
  • 14
  • work client
  • 7
  • 14
  • working time
  • 7
  • 14
  • challenge working
  • 7
  • 14
  • work work
  • 7
  • 14
  • wi fi
  • 7
  • 14
  • working space
  • 6
  • 14
  • face interaction
  • 6
  • 14
  • start work
  • 6
  • 14
  • work activity
  • 6
  • 14
  • life balance
  • 6
  • 14
  • family friend
  • 6
  • 14
  • digital nomad
  • 6
  • 14
  • alexandra tran
  • 5
  • 14
  • part time
  • 5
  • 14
  • work travel
  • 5
  • 14
  • miller
  • 5
  • 14
  • company culture
  • 5
  • 14
  • work day
  • 5
  • 14
  • work life
  • 5
  • 14
  • biggest challenge working
  • 4
  • 14
  • remotely year
  • 4
  • 14
  • work life balance
  • 4
  • 14
  • lack social interaction
  • 4
  • 14
  • challenge working home
  • 4
  • 14
  • working day
  • 4
  • 14
  • home challenging
  • 4
  • 14
  • melissa
  • 4
  • 14
  • important remember
  • 4
  • 14
  • kowalczyk harper
  • 4
  • 14
  • present
  • 4
  • 14
  • work hour
  • 4
  • 14
  • daily routine
  • 4
  • 14
  • time spend
  • 4
  • 14
  • full time
  • 4
  • 14
  • long term
  • 4
  • 14
  • work time
  • 4
  • 14
  • virtual world
  • 4
  • 14
  • project management
  • 4
  • 14
  • poor routine
  • 4
  • 14
  • time work
  • 4
  • 14
  • friend family
  • 4
  • 14
  • client call
  • 4
  • 14
  • lack social
  • 4
  • 14
  • social interaction
  • 4
  • 14
  • challenge face remote
  • 3
  • 14
  • face remote worker
  • 3
  • 14
  • client time
  • 3
  • 14
  • remote work home
  • 3
  • 14
  • timing tool track
  • 3
  • 14
  • hannah miller
  • 3
  • 14
  • social interaction lead
  • 3
  • 14
  • interaction lead poorer
  • 3
  • 14
  • lead poorer mental
  • 3
  • 14
  • poorer mental health
  • 3
  • 14
  • hannah kowalczyk harper
  • 3
  • 14
  • quality quantity work
  • 3
  • 14
  • standing desk yoga
  • 3
  • 14
  • desk yoga mat
  • 3
  • 14
  • time working
  • 3
  • 14
  • digital marketing
  • 3
  • 14
  • traveling working
  • 3
  • 14
  • travel hack
  • 3
  • 14
  • time enjoy
  • 3
  • 14
  • visible management
  • 3
  • 14
  • managed correctly
  • 3
  • 14
  • worklife balance
  • 3
  • 14
  • online
  • 3
  • 14
  • video conference
  • 3
  • 14
  • manager worker
  • 3
  • 14
  • she
  • 3
  • 14
  • time difference
  • 3
  • 14
  • extreme routine
  • 3
  • 14
  • day work
  • 3
  • 14
  • stop working
  • 3
  • 14
  • casual conversation
  • 3
  • 14
  • place vacation
  • 3
  • 14
  • act tourist
  • 3
  • 14
  • common misconception
  • 3
  • 14
  • time time
  • 3
  • 14
  • timing tool
  • 3
  • 14
  • tool track
  • 3
  • 14
  • hannah
  • 3
  • 14
  • tiny house
  • 3
  • 14
  • boyfriend town
  • 3
  • 14
  • hotspot phone
  • 3
  • 14
  • interaction lead
  • 3
  • 14
  • lead poorer
  • 3
  • 14
  • poorer mental
  • 3
  • 14
  • mental health
  • 3
  • 14
  • coffee shop
  • 3
  • 14
  • hannah kowalczyk
  • 3
  • 14
  • trip invite
  • 3
  • 14
  • power
  • 3
  • 14
  • spend time
  • 3
  • 14
  • started working
  • 3
  • 14
  • time family
  • 3
  • 14
  • quality quantity
  • 3
  • 14
  • quantity work
  • 3
  • 14
  • totally stationary
  • 3
  • 14
  • physical problem
  • 3
  • 14
  • team monitoring
  • 3
  • 14
  • standing desk
  • 3
  • 14
  • desk yoga
  • 3
  • 14
  • yoga mat
  • 3
  • 14
  • provide guidance
  • 3
  • 14
  • hand
  • 3
  • 14
  • quality life
  • 3
  • 14
  • health issue
  • 3
  • 14
  • travel issue
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
TitleHow To Overcome Your Biggest Work from Home Challenges
Urlhttps://kissflow.com/digital-workplace/remote-work/challenges-and-tips-on-working-from-home/
DescriptionTips to overcome your work from home challenges. With the right strategies and remote tools, get through the challenges and reap benefits
Date3 Dec 2020
Organic Position14
H17 Biggest Work from Home Challenges Faced By Companies (+ Solutions)
H2Here are the top work from home challenges and how you can overcome them
Working from home has its challenges, but it is the future
H31. Collaboration While WFH
2. Employees working from different locations and time zones
3. Building and maintaining trust
4. Creating a culture of remote work
5. Managing remote teams
6. Tracking employee performance
7. Creating a good employee experience
H2WithAnchorsHere are the top work from home challenges and how you can overcome them
Working from home has its challenges, but it is the future
Body7 Biggest Work from Home Challenges Faced By Companies (+ Solutions) Published On December 3, 2020 • Digital Workplace,Remote Work 2020 has been the year of remote work. While there were already some organizations embracing remote work culture, the COVID-19 pandemic forced the majority of employees worldwide to work from home (WFH Meaning). Even though most employers are still unsure about continuing with remote work as lockdown restrictions are lifted in their area, the fact is, remote work is the new normal. It is the business revolution that will greatly impact organizations and workplaces for years to come. Remote employees are healthier, more productive, and they also enjoy a better work-life balance, as compared to their office counterparts. Studies have found that when employees work from home, they take fewer sick days[1], stay in their jobs for longer periods of time, and prioritize freedom over salary hikes. But even with all the incredible benefits, successfully switching to remote work isn’t a small feat. There are many challenges to overcome, but with the right strategies and remote tools, it’s not impossible. Here are the top work from home challenges and how you can overcome them. 1. Collaboration While WFH. Collaboration is the biggest challenge that most remote organizations face. When employees work from the same office, they can interact with each other easily without any limitations. Whether they want to discuss a particular document or clarify a small query, it is as easy as walking over to their colleague’s desk. However, collaborating with remote team members can be incredibly challenging, especially if you don’t have the right tools with you. All employees might not be available online at the same time or they may need a lot of context before resolving even the smallest of queries — all of which can end up taking a big chunk of their valuable time. Moreover, if you still use email most of the time for team communication, it can silo conversations and make it difficult for employees to keep track of everything. How to overcome it: . Eliminate email conversations completely and instead introduce a collaboration tool to streamline remote team communication. You need a tool that is instant, flexible, and responsive. Moreover, the communication tool should already have project management features or integrate closely with your existing project management tool so that employees can easily collaborate and ask queries without having to explain context over and over again. 2. Employees working from different locations and time zones. By offering remote work as a perk, organizations also gain the ability to recruit talented individuals from across the world, without any location constraints. But the downside of this incredible perk is that you end up with a distributed workforce with employees working from different time zones and locations. Add this to the freedom that remote workers need to make their own schedule and you might end up with employees who all work independently at different times of the day. While remote employees may be skilled at working on their own, they still need to collaborate with remote team members to work effectively and contribute to the overall team goals. Also, finding a common time to schedule routine team meetings or 1:1 meetings would become an absolute nightmare for everyone. How to overcome it: . Encourage asynchronous communication for all non-urgent discussions and create guidelines for the same detailing maximum response times so that employees can have smooth conversations despite time zone differences. Synchronous communication should only be reserved for regular remote team meetings and important/urgent conversations. Create a shared calendar with details about every team member’s time zones and working hours to make it easier to schedule meetings. 3. Building and maintaining trust. There are some obvious trust issues which can arise in remote teams that don’t get enough face to face interactions. In fact, over 52 percent of remote employees feel that their team is less trustful of them and often leaves them out of big discussions when they work from home. Many managers also find it difficult to trust their remote team members because, unlike physical offices, they can’t see remote employees working right in front of them. But continuous mistrust from managers can actually end up demotivating employees and make them feel left out which can directly affect their work. How to overcome it:. Trust is a two-way street. If you want employees to trust you, then you need to trust them as well. Organize virtual team building sessions so employees can get to know each other on a personal level and build a social bond Use collaboration tools that promote transparency and accountability so you don’t have to constantly reach out to employees to get status updates While it’s good to check in with team members once in a while, avoid micromanagement Lead by example and show team members that you are willing to trust them in order for them to trust you 4. Creating a culture of remote work. When employees don’t get to have enough face to face interactions with their colleagues, managers, and company leaders, establishing and maintaining company culture can become a big challenge. Remote employers get fewer opportunities in developing a sense of camaraderie with their coworkers and they also have less visibility about the company’s overall missions and values. This can in turn make some employees feel lonely, isolated, and dissatisfied with their roles which will not only decrease employee engagement but also employee retention rate. How to overcome it: . Ask remote employees to come into the office once in a while so they build better relationships with office counterparts and get a better understanding of company culture All office meetings should be held virtually even if only one or two team members are working remotely so as to not leave anyone out Organize virtual team games and activities to create more opportunities for informal interactions Use company-wide communication channels to share details about the company’s mission and values, recognize employees for their great work, and provide regular business updates. ☛ Check Out Best Practices OF Working From Home 5. Managing remote teams. Managing employees working from home is an entirely different ball game that requires a radically different approach to team management. Building a culture of trust, eliminating micromanagement, allowing for more freedom and taking a more agile approach to work is highly important to successfully manage employees working from home. It is a common mistake to assume that managing remote teams is not so different from managing teams working out of the office. This is also the first roadblock managers face when their teams are transitioning to fully remote or hybrid work formats. How to overcome it: . Frequent meetings waste time during work hours when your employees are working from home. Lesser meetings and more personal check-ins are a great way to better manage employees working from home. Conducting weekly standup meetings where teams can discuss ideas, accomplishments and plans is a great way to allocate responsibilities in a way that lets employees own the outcome and perform better. Conduct training sessions for managers in remote work management and bringing them up to speed on how to get teams working from home to perform better. 6. Tracking employee performance . It’s no secret that teams work from home complicates the life of managers in a lot of ways. While most of the challenges are manageable, the one issue that might take up most of a manager’s time is tracking employee performance in remote work models. Most organizations transitioning to remote work typically deploy a variety of tools to cobble up a way to work remotely. The problem is, when work is spread across multiple tools, it becomes that much harder to track employee performance, especially when integrations of work data are few and far between. How to overcome it: . Multiple tools are the bane of remote work. When your employees are working from home, it’s best to invest in a digital workplace platform that puts all of your work in a single window for employees to access easily. Making sure the digital workplace platform you get comes with built-in analytics that tracks employee performance is also key to success with work from home employees. AI tools that automatically track, collate and generate reports on employee performance are an added bonus if the platform you choose provides them. 7. Creating a good employee experience. Most digital workers today prefer good company culture over better pay. This has become an increasingly important factor recently as more hiring processes are taking place online. Employees that prefer a great employee experience will eventually gravitate towards an organization that provides it. So how do you create a great employee experience? It all boils down to the culture your organization has built and how it translates into employee happiness and satisfaction. In times where talent can be hired globally and deployed locally with digital work platforms, this challenge is one that organizations cannot ignore. How to overcome it: . Create exclusive social channels where employees can interact professionally and casually with an ability to reach all levels of the organization. Ensure transparency with a friendly work culture where employee concerns can be voiced and managed without the opacity and hierarchy of a traditional workplace. Pick a digital workplace platform that can help you achieve both of these to create the ideal employee experience. Working from home has its challenges, but it is the future. Despite all the challenges to working from home, remote work is incredibly rewarding for both organizations and employees, as long as you know what you are getting yourself into and how to overcome the most common problems. Once you successfully get through the first few hiccups, you will be able to improve the efficiency, productivity, and work-life balance of your employees. To make your transition to remote work easier and get through the usual challenges, you can implement a unified digital workplace in your organization instead of using more than a dozen SaaS tools for different purposes, which will only add to your problems and make things more confusing. Kissflow is a digital workplace that incorporates all the important components you need to successfully manage a remote workforce including dedicated communication channels, project management, case management, file sharing, access controls, and third-party integration. It is an all-in-one application that allows employees to work closely together even when they are working from home. More Resources. Work From Home Tips Skills For Working Remotely Remote Work Best Practices remote work remote work challenges Work from home This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more.Close
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • employee
  • 49
  • 15
  • work
  • 43
  • 15
  • remote
  • 35
  • 15
  • team
  • 24
  • 15
  • home
  • 20
  • 15
  • working
  • 18
  • 15
  • remote work
  • 16
  • 15
  • time
  • 16
  • 15
  • trust
  • 12
  • 15
  • tool
  • 12
  • 15
  • working home
  • 11
  • 15
  • overcome
  • 11
  • 15
  • challenge
  • 11
  • 15
  • organization
  • 11
  • 15
  • company
  • 10
  • 15
  • employee working
  • 9
  • 15
  • work home
  • 9
  • 15
  • meeting
  • 9
  • 15
  • team member
  • 8
  • 15
  • remote team
  • 8
  • 15
  • member
  • 8
  • 15
  • communication
  • 8
  • 15
  • manager
  • 8
  • 15
  • digital
  • 8
  • 15
  • culture
  • 8
  • 15
  • workplace
  • 7
  • 15
  • office
  • 7
  • 15
  • face
  • 6
  • 15
  • management
  • 6
  • 15
  • create
  • 6
  • 15
  • employee working home
  • 5
  • 15
  • time zone
  • 5
  • 15
  • remote employee
  • 5
  • 15
  • employee performance
  • 5
  • 15
  • digital workplace
  • 5
  • 15
  • managing
  • 5
  • 15
  • great
  • 5
  • 15
  • performance
  • 5
  • 15
  • platform
  • 5
  • 15
  • experience
  • 5
  • 15
  • employee work
  • 4
  • 15
  • employee experience
  • 4
  • 15
  • zone
  • 4
  • 15
  • remote team member
  • 3
  • 15
  • digital workplace platform
  • 3
  • 15
  • home challenge
  • 3
  • 15
  • project management
  • 3
  • 15
  • employee feel
  • 3
  • 15
  • company culture
  • 3
  • 15
  • workplace platform
  • 3
  • 15
Result 16
TitleCommon work-from-home problems and how to address them | Jobstreet.com SG Employer
Urlhttps://www.jobstreet.com.sg/en/cms/employer/common-work-from-home-problems-and-how-to-address-them/
DescriptionWorking from home is an ideal work setup in this pandemic, but there are downsides to this flexible arrangement. Know the common work-from-home woes and how to address each to keep employees happy and thriving
Date
Organic Position15
H1Common work-from-home problems and how to address them
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyCommon work-from-home problems and how to address them Share With more relaxed lockdown restrictions, economic activity across the globe is slowly restarting. Businesses have begun gathering their bearings as shops reopen amidst the new normal. In the wake of retrenchment and downsizing that can help allay financial troubles, employers have also implemented changes in their day-to-day operations. When possible, employees are allowed to work from home as a means to ensure their safety. While such flexible work setup sure has its benefits, there are also downsides. Being online 24/7 takes a toll on employees, and virtual meetings have started to interfere with domestic duties. “Surge capacity”: operating for survival Health concerns, financial instability, anxiety, and overall security are just a few of the things people have had to deal with during the pandemic. These distressing issues have pushed everyone’s “surge capacity” to the limit. Surge capacity is defined by psychologist Ann Masten, PhD, from the University of Minnesota as a “collection of adaptive systems—mental and physical—that humans draw on for short-term survival in acutely stressful situations, such as natural disasters.” It is our ability to adapt to high-stress situations, providing us a “surge” that helps us cope. While our survival mode can tide us over during a temporary, short-term situation, it is a different matter when a harrowing event drags on for an uncertain period of time. According to Masten, the depletion of our surge capacity is likely the reason why many are currently feeling overly fatigued. Employees who work from home are all the more at risk of depleting their surge capacities. Here are common challenges of remote work, plus ways to go about them to ensure your employees do not get burned out. 1. Zoom fatigue Our work and social calendars are now filled with several virtual meetings done via Zoom, Google Meet, or Microsoft Teams. These platforms have now replaced face-to-face interactions, and because everyone is now in front of their computers, it seems easy to schedule back-to-back virtual meetings in one day. The result? Zoom fatigue. Avoid this by scheduling work calls in advance and spacing them out in between. Before calling the team for another virtual huddle, ask first: Does it really call for a meeting? Many check-ins and progress updates can be done via email or through the team’s chat group. You can also explore applications that are tailor-made for virtual collaboration, like Trello, Monday.com, and Slack. 2. Blurred lines between work and home life The work-from-home system has made it more difficult for workers to create a distinction between work and personal life. For employees who are parents, switching between beating deadlines and caring for infants and toddlers can be jarring. The current situation calls for utmost compassion from employers. Be more understanding if a child’s voice can be heard from the background of a Zoom call, or if there are intermittent interruptions due to urgent household tasks. Schedule one-on-one meetings with your employees to individually assess their current needs and unique challenges, then seek ways on how to best address them. You can also look into new arrangements, such as compressed workweeks or a shift in work hours, that allows your employees to attend to their responsibilities at work and at home. 3. Longer working hours Some employers feel the need to compensate for the lack of physical interaction by assigning longer working hours. Conversely, employees may also feel a sense of “guilt” for not being in the office, hence making up for it with more work. This can easily lead to burnout. Implement a strict cut-off time for work among all employees. Consider a flexible working arrangement where work is based on output, not by the hour. This can motivate your staff to finish work at an earlier time, resulting in better productivity. 4. Overall mental well-being is at stake The uncertainties of the pandemic, coupled with the sudden need to shift to a new system at work, can take a toll on your employees’ overall mental health. Show empathy by genuinely asking how they are once in a while outside the context of work. Arrange for virtual socialisation parties where your team can catch up on each other without being burdened by deadlines. Let your employees know that your line is always open for any concern. Look for ways on how you can help boost their morale during this unprecedented time. Communicating with your employees and setting expectations are crucial to an effective remote work setup while ensuring you have their well-being in mind. When your employees thrive, expect better work output and smoother team collaboration—online and offline. If you are currently rebuilding your team, these tips can help you set the tone for a supportive and positive working environment. Attract the right talents that fit your needs and company culture through JobStreet’s Talent Search. It gives you access to a wide database of verified candidates, localised insights, and effortless ways to shortlist potential candidates. As a steadfast partner to employers and candidates, JobStreet has launched the campaign #TogetherAhead, with a specially set up COVID-19 Jobs and Resources Hub to offer guidance to both businesses and individuals through this crucial time. #TogetherAhead, we rise above our challenges. At JobStreet, we believe in bringing you #JobsThatMatter. As a Career Partner, we are committed to helping all jobseekers find passion and purpose in every career choice. And as the number 1 Talent Partner in Asia, we connect employers with the right candidates who truly make a positive and lasting impact on the organisation. Discover Jobs That Matter. Visit JobStreet today. About SEEK Asia SEEK Asia, a combination of two leading brands JobStreet and JobsDB, is the leading job portal and Asia’s preferred destination for candidates and hirers. SEEK Asia’s presence span across 7 countries namely Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines and Vietnam. SEEK Asia is part of the Australian Securities Exchange-listed SEEK Limited Company, the world’s largest job portal by market capitalisation. SEEK Asia attracts over 400 million visits a year. About SEEK Limited SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprising a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK has a global presence (including Australia, New Zealand, China, Hong Kong, South-East Asia, Brazil and Mexico), with exposure to over 2.9 billion people and approximately 27 per cent of global GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 100 company and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies by Forbes. Back to Insights More employment trends . 2021 Job Report: 5 Industries That Face Manpower Shortages Job Report 2021 – The Top 12 Industries That Are Growing in Singapore Chief of Happiness: Employers Are Changing Job Title Meanings From Classic to Cool 5 Ways Remote Work can be Effective for Your Workplace in Singapore Watch JobStreet.com Singapore Jobs That Matter Read a case study View all links Fill up the form and we'll get in touch. Need help? Visit our online Help Centre Have other questions? Find more solutions here Thank you for your interest. Our team will be in touch soon. Close Employer Login. Important security notice We regret to inform that we are currently experiencing some issues with our system and would like to assure all our customers that our technical team is undertaking all necessary measures to rectify the matter. We apologise for any inconvenience that this may have caused. Always make sure that you are on the official website (www.jobstreet.com.sg/employers) and that it is secured before logging in. Please keep your SiVA login details secured and do not respond to any login requests from other suspicious websites and scammers. JobStreet.com will never ask for your login details. If you've encountered something suspicious or are in doubt, kindly contact us. Need Help?
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 23
  • 16
  • employee
  • 13
  • 16
  • seek
  • 12
  • 16
  • asia
  • 10
  • 16
  • home
  • 9
  • 16
  • team
  • 9
  • 16
  • surge
  • 8
  • 16
  • job
  • 8
  • 16
  • work home
  • 7
  • 16
  • meeting
  • 7
  • 16
  • employer
  • 7
  • 16
  • surge capacity
  • 6
  • 16
  • seek asia
  • 6
  • 16
  • time
  • 6
  • 16
  • way
  • 6
  • 16
  • jobstreet
  • 6
  • 16
  • virtual
  • 6
  • 16
  • zoom
  • 5
  • 16
  • capacity
  • 5
  • 16
  • company
  • 5
  • 16
  • candidate
  • 5
  • 16
  • online
  • 4
  • 16
  • security
  • 4
  • 16
  • system
  • 4
  • 16
  • situation
  • 4
  • 16
  • matter
  • 4
  • 16
  • call
  • 4
  • 16
  • hour
  • 4
  • 16
  • working
  • 4
  • 16
  • singapore
  • 4
  • 16
  • login
  • 4
  • 16
  • virtual meeting
  • 3
  • 16
  • remote work
  • 3
  • 16
  • global
  • 3
  • 16
  • top
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
TitleTop 6 Challenges of Working Remotely (and How to Deal) | The Muse
Urlhttps://www.themuse.com/advice/remote-work-challenges
DescriptionRemote work may be more common than it used to be, but it still comes with its challenges. Here are a few common WFH pitfalls and how to sidestep them
Date
Organic Position16
H1Working Remotely? How to Defeat Tech Breakdowns, Office FOMO, and Other Common Challenges
H2Challenge #1: You Have Trouble Managing Your Time
Challenge #2: You Just Can’t. Stop. Working
Challenge #3: Team Communication Feels Fragmented
Challenge #4: Technology Trips You Up
Challenge #5: You’re Literally Not Visible
Challenge #6: You’re Feeling the FOMO
H3
H2WithAnchorsChallenge #1: You Have Trouble Managing Your Time
Challenge #2: You Just Can’t. Stop. Working
Challenge #3: Team Communication Feels Fragmented
Challenge #4: Technology Trips You Up
Challenge #5: You’re Literally Not Visible
Challenge #6: You’re Feeling the FOMO
BodyWorking Remotely? How to Defeat Tech Breakdowns, Office FOMO, and Other Common ChallengesMint Images/Getty Images It’s no secret that working away from the office is increasingly more popular. Six out of 10 companies offer their workers the chance to telecommute (that’s three times higher than it was in 1996!); and 43 percent of all employees work remotely at least some of the time, according to the latest workplace statistics from Gallup. Remote work may be more common than it used to be, but it still comes with its challenges—especially if you’re one of the few WFH’ers at your company and the rest of the team is in the office. Here are a few common remote-work pitfalls and how to sidestep them. Challenge #1: You Have Trouble Managing Your Time. Many remote employees work from home, which means ample distractions (the dishes, the laundry, the un-mowed lawn, maybe your children and spouse)—and it’s all too easy to get sidetracked. Plus, there’s no over-the-shoulder accountability to keep you off Instagram. If you’re ambitious, consider using time tracking software (try TimeCamp or Toggl), which allows you to log time spent on various tasks or categories of tasks. Like a food diary when you’re dieting, just the act of time tracking can make you more aware of where your hours are going. If you really want to dig in, you can look at the data for patterns—do you tend to fall down a Facebook hole when you’ve got a major deadline looming? Do midday conference calls throw off your afternoon rhythm?—and adjust your schedule accordingly. No matter how you manage your minutes, it’s a good idea to build a schedule for yourself that you can stick to—and is transparent to your boss, especially if your hours aren’t 9–5 or within the same time zone. “They [should] know when they can reach you,” says Nancy Halpern, an executive coach with leadership development firm KNH Associates in New York. Challenge #2: You Just Can’t. Stop. Working. With no commute or way to leave the office, it can be hard to separate your work and personal life. “You can check work emails, chat with co-workers on Slack, or do work any time you’re on Wi-Fi,” says Rebecca Safier, founder of remote job board Remote Bliss, who works remotely from Thailand. “As a result, it’s easy to keep working into the night, well past the time you said you’d finish up.” Plus, you might be worried that your boss thinks you’re not working since you’re off-site, so you overcompensate to appear busy. “Unplugging at the end of the day is important,” Safier says. “If you don’t, you’ll feel like you’re on call 24/7. Sign out of your work email, get off Slack, and truly allow yourself to stop working for the day.” Still have trouble detaching? Call in reinforcements! Ask your partner, friend, or co-worker to keep you accountable. Have them ping you at the time you should be off. “My friend Laura also works from home and she’ll text me at 6 p.m. to make sure I’m not working anymore,” says Chandra Turner, CEO of The Talent Fairy, a New York recruiting agency. “I actually feel guilty if I disobey her!” Challenge #3: Team Communication Feels Fragmented. When you’re not in the flow of in-office traffic, you’re going to miss impromptu lunches, coffees, or spontaneous deskside brainstorms. So it can occasionally feel like you’re not getting the full picture or like you’re the last to find out about things. “Sometimes I just need a quick yes or no, or a time frame of when something can get done, and our internal communication tool doesn’t cut it,” says Kim Koga, a solutions engineer at web content management firm Zesto.io. “I could wait hours for what could be a quick response in person.” To address communication gaps, some teams adopt a messaging platform like Slack where everyone—remote and in-office—can chat in real time about issues as they pop up, or use cloud platforms for documents so everyone can collaborate. Video calls are also a good strategy—and leave your camera on, because managers like to see your face. “We’ve used Zoom and Skype just so we can see one another on occasion,” says Kenneth Johnson, a diversity recruiter and career coach at East Coast Executives. “It’s remote, but you do feel connected after those conversations.” Challenge #4: Technology Trips You Up. Office technology is usually business-grade and quick. But your remote internet hookup (or cell signal) may not be as reliable, and that can be a problem. Check that you have the right technology to support connectivity—an extra powerful router, for instance. “It may sound like a small issue, but many remote workers have suffered and failed trying to work from locations where phone coverage and internet speeds cannot meet the requirements of the job,” says Ron Humes, who works remotely for marketing firm Post Modern Marketing. “Make sure to check your service providers and even run necessary tests before settling on your remote location.” Similarly, if your team collaborates on projects or documents, make sure you can tap into a file hosting service so the team can work together on things without version issues. You should have access to the same technology that your team does. And if your team has no collaboration tools? Lobby your boss for them! It’s the 21st century, after all. Challenge #5: You’re Literally Not Visible. Sure, you get to work in whatever you fell asleep in, but you’re also not on your boss’ visual radar every day. That could mean getting passed over for plum projects or even promotions. “In a previous position, my supervisor was inexperienced with managing a remote team,” says Becca Borawski Jenkins, who works remotely for financial site FinanceBuzz from Cortez, Colorado. “His baseline assumption was that remote people weren’t doing any work. It was a challenge to constantly have to explain, prove, and justify what I was doing when I was, in fact, highly productive.” To amp up face time, get out of the house. Try to attend conferences and work from the office occasionally, if commuting in is an option. Show up for team events even when you’re not required—like going away parties, monthly status meetings, or the occasional lunch with co-workers or your boss. “You might also want to investigate some ways of letting your manager know, on a regular basis, what you’re up to, so your accomplishments are never hidden,” Halpern says. “You may want to do video one-on-ones with your manager every week or send them a quick recap at the end of each week to let them know what you’re working on.” Challenge #6: You’re Feeling the FOMO. Being in an office with a group brings with it a certain camaraderie. There are inside jokes, spur-of-the-moment after-work drinks, and spontaneous events (“Girl Scout cookies in the kitchen, now!”). Working remotely can feel like you’re standing outside the circle. “I do sometimes feel that I’m missing out on ‘water cooler talk,’” says Caleb Chen, who works remotely from Houston. “I personally found this surprising, because in my previous office jobs I’ve found water cooler talk distracting. Sometimes, when I’m catching up with my manager via audio, I’ll hear my peers interacting with each other in the background and they always sound so jovial.” There’s no substitute for being in the office full-time, but popping in occasionally and communicating copiously can help you maintain connections and feel like part of the team. “My company pays attention to the need for all employees to interact with each other,” says Lori Lite, a remote worker with Actualize Consulting. “They have annual retreats, team challenges, and cause-related events that give us a chance to connect. We share family vacation photos on Dropbox and include them in our monthly emails.” No matter what the challenges, take heart: Research shows that remote workers are happier and more productive than their in-office counterparts. They report lower stress levels and their carbon footprint is smaller with no commute. Plus, you can work without shoes on.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • challenge
  • 22
  • 17
  • work
  • 21
  • 17
  • remote
  • 18
  • 17
  • office
  • 17
  • 17
  • time
  • 16
  • 17
  • working
  • 12
  • 17
  • team
  • 12
  • 17
  • worker
  • 10
  • 17
  • feel
  • 10
  • 17
  • remotely
  • 7
  • 17
  • manager
  • 6
  • 17
  • work remotely
  • 5
  • 17
  • hour
  • 5
  • 17
  • technology
  • 5
  • 17
  • boss
  • 5
  • 17
  • slack
  • 4
  • 17
  • call
  • 4
  • 17
  • quick
  • 4
  • 17
  • remote worker
  • 3
  • 17
  • common
  • 3
  • 17
  • company
  • 3
  • 17
  • employee
  • 3
  • 17
  • firm
  • 3
  • 17
  • you
  • 3
  • 17
  • check
  • 3
  • 17
  • email
  • 3
  • 17
  • job
  • 3
  • 17
  • day
  • 3
  • 17
  • communication
  • 3
  • 17
  • occasionally
  • 3
  • 17
  • issue
  • 3
  • 17
  • event
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
Title6 of the biggest challenges of working from home (and how to fix them)
Urlhttps://www.teamwork.com/blog/challenges-of-working-from-home/
DescriptionFor many, the world of offices, water cooler talk, and 10-plus co-workers crammed into an office room are gone. But with several companies going remote, there are still challenges to properly run a work-from-home staff
Date26 Mar 2020
Organic Position17
H16 of the biggest challenges of working from home (and how to fix them)
H2Challenges of working from home
2. Communicating with your quaran-team
3. Dealing with housemates (some of whom may be babies or small children)
4. Staying motivated
5. Overworking
6. Feeling isolated
Over to you
Resources to build high-performance teams
H31. Getting distracted by everything
Do what you can
Set up a dedicated workspace (if you can)
Block out the noise
Work in bursts
If at all possible, detach from your phone
Start the day with a standup
Over-communicate at the start
Keep things 'face-to-face'
Go for a coffee with your colleagues
Set boundaries
Consider co-working
Make time for them, too
Take it one day at a time
See how your work contributes to the bigger picture
Stick to a routine
Start tracking your time
Take your breaks
Schedule an evening activity
H2WithAnchorsChallenges of working from home
2. Communicating with your quaran-team
3. Dealing with housemates (some of whom may be babies or small children)
4. Staying motivated
5. Overworking
6. Feeling isolated
Over to you
Resources to build high-performance teams
Body6 of the biggest challenges of working from home (and how to fix them) Posted By: Deirdre Scully / March 26th, 2020 These are unprecedented times. And as more businesses across the world continue to pivot around COVID-19, the organizational challenges of working from home only grow.For many people, this means working remotely for the first time — and getting used to the challenges of working from home is going to be a bit of an adjustment. But even people who are used to working remotely are finding it hard right now. Because this is different. The usual advice for remote workers — things like getting out to meet a friend for coffee or joining a co-working space in your community — doesn’t exactly fly right now.  Instead, we’re tasked with finding new ways to stay connected, remain productive, and keep things moving. Powerful remote work software for wherever you are. Keep work moving from anywhere with Teamwork's flexible remote work software. Easily manage remote teams with better visibility on tasks and projects. Try Teamwork for free Challenges of working from home. Whether you’re new to remote working or have been WFH for years, we're providing six of the biggest challenges of working from home during these uncertain times. At the same time, we'll provide a few simple ideas on how to combat them.Getting distracted by everythingCommunicating with your quaran-teamDealing with housemates (some of whom may be babies or small children)Staying motivatedOverworkingFeeling isolated How Exposure Ninja manages a remote team using Teamwork. Find out how Exposure Ninja used software from Teamwork to ditch the office and work from anywhere in the world! Learn more 1. Getting distracted by everything. Adjusting to a new workspace can be challenging — especially when that workspace involves kids, pets, TV, couches, snacks, or any combination of the above.Without the structured office environment to help you to feel like you’re in “work mode”, it can be challenging to get in the zone and resist the siren song of, for example, watching a quick episode of your favorite series, or getting into bed and thinking you can work from there. (Remember: just because you can doesn’t mean you should.)And let’s be completely real here: we’re not just talking about the usual distractions like Netflix and Facebook. Right now, many of us are distracted by ongoing developments in the news, anxiety about the situation, and concern for loved ones. So it’s pretty unsurprising that it’s hard to be productive and focus on work right now. But here's what you can actually do:Do what you can. It’s natural to be distracted right now, and no matter what Twitter keeps telling you, you do not need to be Shakespeare-level productive. Instead, focus on what you can do: maybe that means pivoting from more intensive things like strategic long-term planning to simple-but-still-fundamental admin tasks that require less brain-power.Set up a dedicated workspace (if you can). The ideal situation for working from home is a room where you can go solely to do your work. This helps you to associate that space with working, and it means you can keep the rest of your living space for unwinding in the evening (without your work laptop glaring at you from the corner). Needless to say, however, that kind of space is not something that’s available to everyone — but even dedicating a desk or a specific area to be your “office” can help you to get in the zone and start to develop a good routine.Block out the noise. Noisy neighbors? Kids watching cartoons? If you’re finding it hard to focus because of background noise constantly pulling your attention, don’t underestimate the soothing potential of a set of headphones and some white noise. (Try Rainy Mood or a playlist of instrumental music.)Work in bursts. If sitting down to focus for a whole day feels impossible, start small. Try the Pomodoro technique: set a timer for 25 minutes and work solidly and without interruption for the full time. (25 minutes is nothing! You can do it!) Then, take a 5-minute break. Repeat. Instead of sitting down at your desk and wondering how you’re going to make it through 8 full hours, you can remind yourself that you only need to keep your focus for 25 minutes — and knowing that there’s an end to your current “sprint” will help to make it feel more manageable.(Trying to avoid procrastination? These tips might help too.) If at all possible, detach from your phone. This one is more general life advice, but it goes for work as well: try to limit checking the news to once or twice a day, at scheduled times. Set a timer for how long you’re going to spend catching up on any new headlines. Don’t refresh your newsfeed in between your scheduled times, and once your timer goes off, put your phone away and try to focus on something else. While obviously keeping up to date with developments is important, it’s just as important to safeguard your own mental health from anxiety overload. (On the other hand, some good uses of your phone include: calling a loved one to check in;  using Google AR to place animals all around your room, and then sending screenshots to your friends.)2. Communicating with your quaran-team . One of the biggest challenges of working remotely is getting the team communication right.Communication can be complicated at the best of times, but when you’re not in the same physical space, you have to consciously communicate things you probably never even considered before. Here’s what you can do:Start the day with a standup. Setting a recurring daily meeting for your team is a good way to quickly check in every morning and set goals for the day. Ask each team member to give a quick update on what they were working on yesterday and what they’ll be working on today, to keep everyone informed about priorities and projects across the team. Having a scheduled daily meeting also gives team members a chance to raise any issues they’re having, and lets you keep a bit of human contact.Over-communicate at the start. When you’re getting started, err on the side of over-communication, not under-communication. Keep in touch throughout the day using an instant messaging platform like Teamwork Chat, Troop Messenger or Slack. Use it to let your team know when you’re going offline, breaking for lunch, or finishing up for the day, so they know when you’re available. Statuses in Teamwork Chat are great for this — you can even add a little emoji to brighten up your “AFK for lunch” message. You can also make use of Reactions to quickly let people know you’ve read their message without needing to craft a reply.Keep things 'face-to-face'. Virtually, that is. Using video calls for meetings is the closest you can get to being in the same room, and allows you to have a full conversation (complete with tone, facial expressions, and gestures) instead of hashing things out over text. Video calls are great whenever possible, but they’re an absolute must if you feel like there’s any tension brewing or issues arising that need to be addressed. Being able to see each other is a good reminder that there’s another real human on the other side of that screen.You could say that working from home in isolation isn't normal and it's certainly not how most of us are used to working. Making the extra effort to keep things fun while working remotely can also help boost productivity. ‘Let’s jump on quickly’ with Teamwork Chat video calls. Video Calls in Teamwork Chat give you a quick way to hop on 1-to-1 or group video calls, without having to switch to another app. Not only can you now make video calls, but you can also share your screen when you need to present to your team or get feedback on design. Learn more Go for a coffee with your colleagues. You might not be able to all go out for a coffee. However, you can schedule some short video calls or Google Hangouts to serve as coffee breaks or lunch breaks.Not only does this give you a chance to show off your latest baking projects or that 6-hour ramen you made for lunch, but it can also help to make things feel a bit more normal, keep up the personal connection with your team members, and give everyone time to talk about things other than work.3. Dealing with housemates (some of whom may be babies or small children). Whether you live with family or roommates, one of the biggest challenges of working from home is peacefully co-existing with the other people in your shared space.It can be hard for others — especially kids, but also grownups who aren’t familiar with remote working — to understand that just because you’re at home all day doesn’t mean you’re available.And like we mentioned above, not everyone has the option to set up a home office and close the door to get some space, so you might need to compromise in order to find a way of working that works for you all. Here’s what you can do:Set boundaries. Be clear about when you’re working and when you’re free. Most of the time, your housemates probably don’t even realize they’re interrupting and messing up your flow. In addition to telling them your working hours upfront, you could also agree on a visual cue, like “headphones on means I’m in deep focus”. (Alternatively, stick a Post-It on your forehead that simply says “Please come back later”.)Consider co-working. If your housemates are working from home too, you could try taking a “co-working” approach. Or, if you’d prefer to consciously un-co-work, designate different “spots” in the house to be your assigned desks.Make time for them, too. Maybe you make a point of sharing lunch together every day, or maybe you just promise to switch off from work fully at 5pm and do something together in the evening instead. Whoever you live with, take care of each other.4. Staying motivated. Staying motivated is more than just not getting distracted. Distraction is short-term. It’s the loss of concentration that prevents you from focusing on what you need to focus on and can prevent you from making progress with your tasks.On the other hand, staying motivated is more of a long-term, ongoing thing. It’s keeping the faith that the work you’re doing is worthwhile.It’s important to feel like your work is meaningful. But truthfully, it’s hard to focus on work right now. It can be difficult to zoom out and look at the long-term company or career goals when things are stressful and uncertain at the moment. We get it! We feel it too. But work can also help you to keep busy, return a sense of normalcy and control, and (hopefully) give you a fulfilling project to dedicate your attention to. Here’s what you can do:Take it one day at a time. Set yourself tasks and milestones so you can remind yourself of what you’ve achieved each day, as well as what you’re working towards in the long-term. Breaking things down into discrete units of work is helpful in making things feel more manageable, and marking each task as completed will give you a boost and a sense of accomplishment. Task management template. No matter what you’re working on, keep your tasks moving and get more done with our task management template in Teamwork. Try our task management template See how your work contributes to the bigger picture. Understanding how the things you’re doing are helping your team — and ultimately your company — to hit its targets is a good way to feel connected and stay on track. 5. Overworking. People often think that remote working is all about sitting at home eating snacks, watching TV, and not actually doing much work. But we’ve found that rather than underworking, one of the major challenges of working remotely is not overworking.When you’re working from home, there’s a tendency to throw yourself into it — especially now, when work can provide some much-needed distraction. Whether it’s putting in a few extra hours to get something over the line, or checking your email before bed and accidentally spending 30 minutes writing a response that definitely could have waited until the morning, before you know it, you’ve spent most of your day on work, and haven’t properly managed to switch off and unwind.And while getting lost in an absorbing task every now and then is great, this is a marathon, not a sprint. So if you’re finding yourself consistently overworking, it’s time to pace yourself so you can avoid burnout down the line. Here’s what you can do:Stick to a routine. Set times for the beginning and end of your workday and stick to them. It can be hard to push back on a task that comes in at 4:59pm when you all know that you have nowhere else to be, but it’s good practice to draw a line under each day and fully switch off from work once it’s time to clock out. Tomorrow is another day.Start tracking your time. If you haven’t already been tracking your time, now is a great time to start. Logging time on tasks in your remote work software is a really useful way to see the breakdown of where your time is actually being spent every day — and it can help to remind you of all the things you’ve actually been working on and accomplishing if your days working from home all start to blend into one.Take your breaks. Breaks are there for a reason: they help you to stay focused and productive. So make sure you still take your lunch break — and any other breaks you would have had if you were in the office — throughout the day. If you can, get up and walk away from your (makeshift) desk and do something completely different.Schedule an evening activity. Having a scheduled activity for the end of each workday can be really helpful in ensuring you finish up on time, and signaling that it’s time to switch off “work mode”. Whatever it is — a 6pm run, an important daily meeting with your cat that you simply cannot miss — you can even put it as an actual event in your calendar so your team knows you’ll be unavailable. 6. Feeling isolated. A lot of us are feeling isolated right now because, well, we are.  But while we may not be able to meet people face to face, there are still ways to stay connected. If you’re feeling isolated, at work, or in your personal life, reach out to the people around you. And likewise, go the extra mile to look out for others where you can: check in with your teammates and see how they’re doing, touch base with family and friends, and take care of the people around you.We might be alone, but we’re in this together.Over to you. What are some of the biggest challenges of working from home for you right now? Any remote working tips to share with other Teamworkers? Let us know in the comments or use #keepworkgoing on social (distancing) media to share your advice. Resources to build high-performance teams . Related resources . Create a personalized Gantt chart Customizable resource management solutions Team management software Tailored project collaboration software Project time tracking software Like our blog? . Subscribe today and get all of our new blog posts delivered straight to your inbox. Subscribed! . You're now subscribed and will be getting high performance blog posts. Get started with Teamwork. Start working together beautifully. See how Teamwork can help your team with our 30-day free trial. Try Teamwork for free Join a webinar Get in touch
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • working
  • 38
  • 18
  • work
  • 29
  • 18
  • time
  • 24
  • 18
  • team
  • 18
  • 18
  • thing
  • 17
  • 18
  • day
  • 17
  • 18
  • home
  • 15
  • 18
  • teamwork
  • 14
  • 18
  • working home
  • 12
  • 18
  • task
  • 12
  • 18
  • feel
  • 11
  • 18
  • remote
  • 10
  • 18
  • challenge working
  • 9
  • 18
  • person
  • 9
  • 18
  • challenge
  • 9
  • 18
  • focu
  • 9
  • 18
  • set
  • 8
  • 18
  • challenge working home
  • 7
  • 18
  • working remotely
  • 7
  • 18
  • video call
  • 7
  • 18
  • minute
  • 7
  • 18
  • project
  • 7
  • 18
  • software
  • 7
  • 18
  • video
  • 7
  • 18
  • call
  • 7
  • 18
  • teamwork chat
  • 6
  • 18
  • biggest challenge
  • 6
  • 18
  • hard
  • 6
  • 18
  • space
  • 6
  • 18
  • start
  • 6
  • 18
  • good
  • 6
  • 18
  • break
  • 6
  • 18
  • give
  • 6
  • 18
  • lunch
  • 6
  • 18
  • biggest challenge working
  • 5
  • 18
  • feeling isolated
  • 5
  • 18
  • term
  • 5
  • 18
  • switch
  • 5
  • 18
  • management
  • 5
  • 18
  • 25 minute
  • 4
  • 18
  • communication
  • 4
  • 18
  • remote working
  • 4
  • 18
  • long term
  • 4
  • 18
  • remote work software
  • 3
  • 18
  • doesn
  • 3
  • 18
  • coffee
  • 3
  • 18
  • task management template
  • 3
  • 18
  • remote work
  • 3
  • 18
  • work software
  • 3
  • 18
  • feel work
  • 3
  • 18
  • daily meeting
  • 3
  • 18
  • team member
  • 3
  • 18
  • switch work
  • 3
  • 18
  • staying motivated
  • 3
  • 18
  • task management
  • 3
  • 18
  • management template
  • 3
  • 18
Result 19
TitleCommon issues that arise with remote working. - NPIT
Urlhttps://npit.co.uk/common-issues-that-arise-with-remote-working/
DescriptionWith technology making Remote Working easier than ever, many people are taking advantage of the opportunity
Date
Organic Position18
H1Common issues that arise with remote working
H2Home network and infrastructure
Security
Problems with technology or devices
Communication and lack of access to information
Data loss
How NPIT can help
Subscribe to our newsletter
H3With technology making Remote Working easier than ever, many people are taking advantage of the opportunity. In this post, we will discuss some common issues that arise when employees work remotely. We also see how technology can be used to help curb these problems
H2WithAnchorsHome network and infrastructure
Security
Problems with technology or devices
Communication and lack of access to information
Data loss
How NPIT can help
Subscribe to our newsletter
BodyCommon issues that arise with remote working. Einat Aronberg With technology making Remote Working easier than ever, many people are taking advantage of the opportunity. In this post, we will discuss some common issues that arise when employees work remotely. We also see how technology can be used to help curb these problems. Home network and infrastructure. The devices you work from remotely are not necessarily designed to withstand everything you need to run to carry out your role. Also, your bandwidth, the transmission capacity of your computer network, could be insufficient for the tasks you undertake day-to-day. Combined with other possible limitations and configurations you may need to compute, these could sound like a remote working nightmare. Luckily for you, we have a solution. With the completion of an IT audit, you know if your and your employee’s personal devices are compliant. This includes with software and other systems you may be required to use as a part of your day-to-day. Additionally, the audit also checks if your device’s hardware is up to date. Security. Being online is paramount to most of our remote working lives. Whether you’re attending a video call, sending emails, or making work-related purchases, the internet is enabling that. This means extreme importance must be placed on protecting your personal information, passwords, and anti-virus. As a way of staying safe and secure online, we suggest installing trusted, well-represented anti-virus software and using a VPN. VPN stands for ‘Virtual Private Network’. VPN protects you when using a public network by extending the private network across it. This way you can make connections hazard-free. This is especially important if you have employees who enjoy working in public spaces. Another great way to ensure your team is safe on the internet is by holding regular training. This could be on recognising and preventing phishing attacks. “Phishing” is the act in which someone emails you pretending to be a reputable company. These companies aim to convince you to tell them personal information. Learn more about protecting your staff from phishing attacks. Problems with technology or devices. When you are in an office environment, you’ll find your office equipment to be up to date and correctly set up. When working remotely, there is no guarantee that you can say the same about your staff’s remote devices. This can cause a stir and affect the way your employees work. Thankfully, with the use of Teams or Splashtop, your IT team can access these devices and fix the issues remotely. As well as this, they can also perform a device overview. The overview allows them to check if the device and its functions are up to date and running as they should be. Communication and lack of access to information. When you are working remotely, communication is key to keeping employees engaged. A solid comms plan helps to ensure that teams are on the same page in regards to targets and tasks. Comms have had to increase and improve over the past 18 months. This is especially true when it comes to bridging the gap that comes with working together while sitting apart. The ability to video call, share documents, screen share and record are just a few things that have made it possible to continue working cohesively. We recommend Teams as a way to have all these features instead of using multiple software. Teams allows you to connect with colleagues and customers, share documents, create mass calendar events, call requests and even more. Data loss. Folders, images, documents and various other data types can be misplaced, unsaved, not backed up or accidentally deleted. This can all be very frustrating, especially when what you were working on could prove crucial to your company. We suggest saving your various data types to a shared folder. Shared folders are great! Firstly they allow other members to see your work by linking it to them – as long as they have permissions to view those specific folders. Secondly, documents can be saved automatically. So once you save a document, all further changes are automatically saved from then on. Cloud solutions, such as MS Teams, is our recommendation for you. MS teams allow you to share documents and other files instantly, without having to download them first. They also allow for multiple saves. Consequently, should an issue occur or the file become corrupt in some way, there is always a backup safe somewhere online. MS Teams can be accessed via PC/Mac as well as mobile devices which makes this technology fit for all. How NPIT can help. At No Problem IT, we go above and beyond to keep businesses running smoothly whether in the office or working remotely. How NPIT can support you. •Run a complete health check of your systems and devices. We would assess their compatibility for remote working and whether the security and software is up-to-date. •Provide a check list of what you need to do to set up remote working. •Install the necessary software to enable remote working. •If your systems are out-of-date or not compatible with remote working, NPIT can recommend possible alternatives. From maintaining your IT Infrastructure to helping you stay secure, we have you covered. Let’s get the conversation started! Contact us today. Prev Next You might also like: What to consider when migrating to MS 365 Microsoft will be releasing Windows 11 by the end of 2021 Managing Data Backup and Recovery in Microsoft 365 How to: Prepare staff for returning to the office Say hello to Hybrid Windows for a hybrid world with the Windows 365 Cloud PC. Cloud Based Services Cybersecurity Disaster Recovery / Business Continuity GDPR IT Support Services Microsoft 365 NPIT Company News Remote Working VoIP and Telephony Web Design and Development Subscribe to our newsletter. Get the latest articles on all things data, product, and growth deleivered straight to your inbox. Contact Us No Problem Managed IT Services Ltd 169 Hamilton Road London SE27 9SW United Kingdom Tel: 020 3358 8000 Email: [email protected] IT ServicesSecure Remote Working Disaster Recovery and Data Backup VoIP Telephony Internet Service Provider IT Management and Support Contracts Cybersecurity and Email Spam Filter Hardware Supply Bespoke Web Design & Ecommerce Microsoft 365 Services Cyber Essentials Certification Our CompanyAbout Blog Why Choose NPIT? Our Pricing Contact Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Privacy Policy • Terms of Business • Disclaimer © Copyright No Problem Managed IT Services Ltd. All rights reserved. Small Business IT Support Specialists, South London. Site by No Problem Web Design
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • working
  • 17
  • 19
  • remote
  • 12
  • 19
  • device
  • 11
  • 19
  • remote working
  • 10
  • 19
  • date
  • 9
  • 19
  • team
  • 9
  • 19
  • day
  • 8
  • 19
  • software
  • 7
  • 19
  • employee
  • 6
  • 19
  • remotely
  • 6
  • 19
  • problem
  • 6
  • 19
  • document
  • 6
  • 19
  • data
  • 6
  • 19
  • service
  • 6
  • 19
  • work
  • 5
  • 19
  • network
  • 5
  • 19
  • npit
  • 5
  • 19
  • 365
  • 5
  • 19
  • issue
  • 4
  • 19
  • technology
  • 4
  • 19
  • check
  • 4
  • 19
  • email
  • 4
  • 19
  • company
  • 4
  • 19
  • office
  • 4
  • 19
  • share
  • 4
  • 19
  • folder
  • 4
  • 19
  • m
  • 4
  • 19
  • business
  • 4
  • 19
  • support
  • 4
  • 19
  • microsoft
  • 4
  • 19
  • working remotely
  • 3
  • 19
  • share document
  • 3
  • 19
  • m team
  • 3
  • 19
  • microsoft 365
  • 3
  • 19
  • web design
  • 3
  • 19
  • design
  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
TitleCommon Work-From-Home Challenges and Tips to Overcome Them
Urlhttps://www.naukri.com/blog/common-work-from-home-challenges-and-tips-to-overcome-them-covid-article3/
DescriptionWork-from-home is now the new normal. In this blog, we will help you with some useful tips on how you can overcome some common remote working challenges
Date3 Jul 2020
Organic Position19
H1Common Work-From-Home Challenges and Tips to Overcome Them
H21. Managing distractions
2. Unplugging after work hours
3. Communicating and collaborating with team members
4. Managing productivity
5. Facing technology issues
H3
H2WithAnchors1. Managing distractions
2. Unplugging after work hours
3. Communicating and collaborating with team members
4. Managing productivity
5. Facing technology issues
BodyCommon Work-From-Home Challenges and Tips to Overcome Them Swati Srivastava | Covid-19 Resources | 03 Jul 2020 Work-from-home is now the new normal. During these times, jobseekers are more interested in finding work-from-home jobs to keep their future secure and find relevant job opportunities. Although remote working has its own benefits such as no commuting time, more work hours at hand, etc., there are some common challenges also that come along with it. In this blog, we will help you with some useful tips on how you can overcome some common remote working challenges. Common challenges of remote working and ways to overcome them: 1. Managing distractions. Working-from-home often involves a lot of struggles in keeping the distractions away. These distractions could be anything- kids at home, friends on call, TV or phone calls. These distractions not only reduce work productivity but also the overall quality of work delivered. With self-discipline, there are simple ways you can successfully manage these distractions. Tips to overcome The best way to manage distractions at home is to find a separate and dedicated workspace for yourself. This helps you to focus on work and gives an indication to kids at home that you are busy and should not be disturbed during your work hours. One thing that only you can control is managing your time between productive and unproductive activities during a day. For example, limit your distractions such as checking your social media profiles more often and chatting on the phone with relatives or friends. Plan your work accordingly and take out time for personal work during scheduled breaks only. 2. Unplugging after work hours. This is one of the biggest challenges of remote working that many employees struggle to manage. Clearly speaking, there is no advantage of working from home if you cannot manage your work-life balance and find it a challenge to unplug after work hours. Many employees fear to say no to their managers for unusual demands of delivering work at odd timings. Switching off from work at the end of the day is equally important as logging at the right office timings. Tips to overcome The best way to save you from any guilt feeling at the time of switching off at the end of work hours is to create an achievable ‘to-do’ list of work. Include the key tasks that you are expected to deliver during the day and follow it strictly. By the end of the work hours, make sure you have delivered your work planned for the day. This way there will be no hesitation in winding up your work and you can get time to spend the rest of the day with your family. At the same time, is it also imperative that you set the expectation clear that you are not available after a certain time and would appreciate it if the other person understands this. Of course, there should not be an issue if there is a genuine and urgent work requirement. However, if it becomes a regular practice, you need to set the expectations with your manager. 3. Communicating and collaborating with team members. Effective communication is one of the biggest requirements for the smooth flow of work when working remotely. Most of the time, employees find it difficult to collaborate with their team members and feel isolated. The situation becomes more challenging when you are working with a team on a common project that requires several discussions and involvement from everyone located distantly. Of course, working in the office gives you more opportunities to interact efficiently, but there are ways to make it work in case of remote working also. Tips to overcome Several effective and flexible tools offer smooth communication options. Therefore, the first step should be to set an effective communication channel like Microsoft Teams, Zoom or any other channel for conducting your daily meetings and conversations. For collaborating documents and key projects, Google Drive provides an easy option to share with each other. 4. Managing productivity. Without the presence of a supervisor, many employees find it a challenge to maintain their work productivity. Low productivity is not your fault as many factors make it happen without your knowledge. Therefore, it is important to understand the key factors that hamper your productivity at work. For example, multitasking to meet several project timelines is a common reason for lower productivity. Tips to overcome Multi-tasking divides your focus between different tasks and therefore, requires more time to complete a single task. If you have several tasks to do, prioritize them and pick up the next one only after completing the first one. This helps you to focus on one thing and boost overall productivity. The next way to overcome this challenge is to work in a short burst and avoid long hours of sitting. Taking short breaks helps you to get energized and increases work productivity. 5. Facing technology issues. Working remotely also includes challenges that are most of the time not in your hands. Some of them are technology or Internet connectivity issues that refrain you from a smooth flow of work. It becomes more important for a company to ensure that the team has right tools and techniques to work remotely. Tips to overcome Choose tools, software, and broadband connection that enables you to use it adequately during work hours. Understand how you can embrace the technology and ask for required training from your manager if required. Remote working can become more complicated than it seems if you do not know the ways to cope up with them. Hope these tips will help you to overcome these common work-from-home challenges and allow a smooth workflow. Covid-19 Resources Career Advice Naukri's Official Blog — Common Work-From-Home Challenges and Tips to Overcome Them Share this
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 35
  • 20
  • home
  • 14
  • 20
  • working
  • 13
  • 20
  • overcome
  • 12
  • 20
  • challenge
  • 11
  • 20
  • time
  • 11
  • 20
  • tip overcome
  • 9
  • 20
  • productivity
  • 9
  • 20
  • tip
  • 9
  • 20
  • distraction
  • 8
  • 20
  • common
  • 8
  • 20
  • hour
  • 8
  • 20
  • work hour
  • 7
  • 20
  • remote working
  • 6
  • 20
  • remote
  • 6
  • 20
  • find
  • 5
  • 20
  • day
  • 5
  • 20
  • team
  • 5
  • 20
  • common work
  • 4
  • 20
  • home challenge
  • 4
  • 20
  • work productivity
  • 4
  • 20
  • way
  • 4
  • 20
  • manage
  • 4
  • 20
  • employee
  • 4
  • 20
  • task
  • 4
  • 20
  • smooth
  • 4
  • 20
  • work home
  • 3
  • 20
  • key
  • 3
  • 20
  • set
  • 3
  • 20
  • understand
  • 3
  • 20
  • issue
  • 3
  • 20
  • effective
  • 3
  • 20
  • communication
  • 3
  • 20
  • remotely
  • 3
  • 20
  • project
  • 3
  • 20
  • tool
  • 3
  • 20
  • technology
  • 3
  • 20
Result 21
TitleThe remote-working challenge: ‘There are huge issues’
Urlhttps://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/the-remote-working-challenge-there-are-huge-issues-1.4615771
DescriptionMaking it work for everyone brings both challenges and opportunities
Date10 Jul 2021
Organic Position20
H1The remote-working challenge: ‘There are huge issues’
H2Update Payment Details
H3
H2WithAnchorsUpdate Payment Details
BodyThe remote-working challenge: ‘There are huge issues’ Jennifer O'Connell Jul 10, 2021 14 min read Hyperbole about remote working has given way to an understanding that making it work for everyone brings challenges and opportunities Since the 1970s, management gurus and scientists have been forecasting that some time in the future – they usually predicted it would happen within a decade or so – we would stop moving people to offices where the work is, and start moving the office work to where the people were. The march of technology, changing lifestyle needs, and concern for the climate would make it inevitable, the predictions went. In the end, the technology made it possible, but it took a pandemic to make the global experiment in remote working happen. The experience of Covid-19 answered the question of whether, in an emergency, remote working can work. But it didn’t necessarily solve the problem of how to make it work sustainably. Sixteen months on, the early hyperbole about the remote working revolution has given way to a dawning understanding of the challenges and opportunities involved. Employees who swore that they would never set foot in an office again have begun to consider the long-term benefits, but also the difficulties, of merging their home life and their work life. Employers are weighing up how to manage a remote or hybrid workforce, give everyone an equal shot at career progression, and look after their employees’ health and wellbeing from a distance, without leaving both sides feeling burnt out and exhausted – and all the while making sure the work still gets done. “The narrative has been so pervasive over the last while that remote working has been super; it’s completely effective; the Government is rolling out supports for it; it’s where everybody is going. You’ll be able to choose where you want to live, so you can now buy somewhere that you couldn’t afford previously,” says Maeve McElwee, director of employer relations at Ibec. “But employers are kind of saying, ‘Well, that’s not really the case. They are becoming more concerned about this sense that it’s a free for all, and you’ll be able to have whatever you want [but] we’re not going to be able to achieve that.” Maeve McElwee, director of employer relations at Ibec believes health and safety is an area that is likely to prove a significant issue for employers The emerging new ways of working put the onus on employers to reinvent ways of “communicating, motivating, monitoring, paying, promoting,” says Tony Dundon, professor of HRM and Employee Relations at the University of Limerick. “How do you communicate? How do you have a performance appraisal? How do you monitor someone? How do you make sure the health and safety is right?” All of this goes some way to explaining why we are where we are: less than two months away from the mooted date for return to the office, Delta and other variants allowing, and most people still have no idea what the new ways of working will look like for them. “The logistics of how we navigate this are real and impactful. Not only on individuals, but on companies and the future relationship [between organisations and] customers.” He suggests a title for this article: “The nightmare of sustainable remote working.” Illustration: Fuchsia MacAree From an employees’ perspective “WFH (Working From Home) has the potential to reduce commute time, provide more flexible working hours, increase job satisfaction, and improve work-life balance,” a recent study by the University of Chicago entitled Work from home & productivity: evidence from personnel & analytics data on IT professionals noted. That’s the theory, but it doesn’t always work out like that. The researchers tracked the activity of more than 10,000 employees at an Asian services company between April 2019 and August 2020 and found that they were working 30 per cent more hours than they were before the pandemic, and 18 per cent more unpaid overtime hours. But there was no corresponding increase in their workload, and their overall productivity per hour went down by 20 per cent. Employees with children, predictably perhaps, were most affected – they worked 20 minutes per day more than those without. More surprisingly, the employees had less focus time than before the pandemic, and a lot more meetings. “Time spent on co-ordination activities and meetings increased, but uninterrupted work hours shrank considerably. Employees also spent less time networking, and received less coaching and 1:1 meetings with supervisors,” the report found. There’s been this narrative that employees are getting a taste for remote and home working, and I’m not sure that’s true. A lot of people who thought it was great in the beginning now want to be back in the office In theory, remote and more flexible working solutions offer enormous benefits to employees: they allow them to work from anywhere, at the times that suit them. But in practice, Prof Dundon suggests, what some are finding is that their working day is “disrupted and fragmented. People working remotely might have degrees of flexibility about when they work and when they complete the tasks.” When work is fragmented, it “tends to disrupt the efficiency and productivity”. The working day gets longer – but it doesn’t mean that more work is getting done. This is compounded by the problem of “digital presenteeism”, or the pressure to be seen to be online and available for work. “There’s been this narrative that employees are getting a taste for remote and home working, and I’m not sure that’s true. A lot of people who thought it was great in the beginning now want to be back in the office,” says Prof Dundon. McElwee adds that “while there’s a very large narrative around the fact that we will all choose how we want to work and that there’s a free choice around this, actually there isn’t . . . If it doesn’t work for the business, it doesn’t work. I think we need to start to roll back a little bit the narrative that people can choose how and where they want to work.” Employers’ perspective. Only a few big companies have so far divulged their vision for the return to the office, or the future of remote or hybrid working. These include Twitter, which was early out of the traps in May 2020 with an email from founder Jack Dorsey telling staff they could work from home “forever” if they wished. Facebook offices at Grand Canal Square in Dublin. The company said it would allow employees to work from anywhere once the pandemic was over. Photograph: Cyril Byrne Facebook has also said it will allow employees to work from anywhere once the pandemic is over. It said staff could move from the US to Canada or from Europe, the Middle East or Africa to anywhere in the UK and, by next January, workers could permanently move between seven countries in Europe, including Ireland – though they will be paid according to local rates. “I’ve found that working remotely has given me more space for long-term thinking and helped me spend more time with my family,” said chief executive Mark Zuckerberg. Google recently said that in places where its offices are open, 60 per cent have voluntarily chosen to go back. In the future, it estimates that 60 per cent will work on a hybrid 3/2 basis, where employees spend three days in the office “and two days wherever they work best”. Employees will not get to choose which days to come in. About 20 per cent of the workforce will be allowed to transfer to new locations, and 20 per cent will work entirely remotely, but “your compensation will be adjusted according to your new location”. Other big tech multinationals are less convinced. Reed Hastings, the Netflix co-chief executive told the Wall Street Journal last year that “not being able to get together in person, particularly internationally, is a pure negative”. Here, many employers are still scrambling to figure out what the new ways of working will look like. “There’s probably as many different solutions and options and considerations as there are businesses looking at them at the moment,” says McElwee. Among Irish businesses, “there’s a huge willingness to embrace this, and see the opportunities that it can bring. HR teams in particular, who are at the coalface of having to implement it, are beginning to really understand the complexity of it now. It’s not straightforward. There are huge issues – everything from health and safety, to data security, cybersecurity to equality. There are big costs, big time factors, lots of management retraining.” Does the hybrid model work?Most experts believe only a few companies will remain fully remote post-pandemic. But demanding employees return to the office full time carries its own risks – the ever-present unknowns about the virus; the possibility that employees will simply leave and find a job that offers more flexibility. That means most may plump for some kind of Google-style hybrid model. McElwee predicts that, one year from now, many companies who can do it will have arrived at a model where employees spend 60 per cent of the time in the office and 40 per cent remotely. Some experts like the 25/25 model, developed by an Indian multinational employing 480,000 people, in which 25 per cent of the workforce is in the office at any one time, and an individual employee needs to be in the office only 25 percent of the time. And many support a “remote-first” model for hybrid working, in which everyone – including those who are physically in the building – behaves as though they are remote, and attends meetings via Zoom. How do you find childcare two days a week, if those days differ each week? “If you’re going to try hybrid, then try and co-ordinate it so that even if half your team are in the office, and the other half are at home, you never go into a meeting room. If you’re having a meeting or a stand-up or something with your team, everybody is on Zoom,” suggests Hélène Haughey, chief operations officers at Nearform, the Waterford-headquartered software company, which has been fully remote for a decade. Hélène Haughey, chief operations officers at Nearform, a Waterford-headquartered software company, which has been fully remote for a decade Haughey has previous experience of hybrid working and is not a fan. “My own experience of it wasn’t good. I was the afterthought in a hybrid model. So people would all be in the office having a meeting, and then they would go, ‘Oh, we forgot to dial Hélène in’. If the people in the office are the ones that are getting all the benefits and the perks of the out-of-hours and spontaneous meetings, and the people at home are feeling left out, [there’s a risk] you’re starting to create two cultures in your company.” Her colleague Ger O’Shaughnessy, head of propositions for Nearform, points out some of the other logistical considerations to the hybrid model. “How big is your office, if everyone’s in Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and no one’s in Monday and Friday?” Childcare is another issue, he adds. “How do you find childcare two days a week, if those days differ each week?” On top of this is the challenge of how to maintain a positive culture and ensure the same career progression opportunities for everyone in a hybrid workforce. Dr Deirdre O’Shea, a senior lecturer in the Department of Work and Employment Studies at the Kemmy Business School in Limerick says that “we know from passing before the pandemic that people were somewhat disadvantaged if they worked remotely, compared to people who were present in the office, purely because those in the office were more visible. If we move even to a hybrid model, or to a fully remote model, there is the problem of managers and decision-makers not necessarily seeing all the work that people are doing, and then it just becomes much harder to recognise that and reward that,” she says. “Career progression is going to be a major issue down the line. How to make that transparent and understandable” will need to be determined, suggests Prof Dundon. Mind the gap. Studies showed that even where both partners in the household were working remotely during the pandemic, “women tended to do a lot more, both in the house, and also then working longer hours in their job remotely,” says Prof Dundon. He worries that a move to hybrid working could inadvertently widen the gender gap, as women opt for flexibility and end up with even more of the domestic burden at home, while their partners spend more time in the office – and benefit from better promotional opportunities. “It’s a very interesting time in terms of gender relations. [It’s important] that if those sort of conversations are happening, that they’re not disadvantaging women and taking them out of the workforce,” says Dr O’Shea. Younger workers, particularly those on precarious contracts, also risk being marginalised in this conversation. They may have less influence in negotiating flexible working arrangements that suit them. They’re also less likely to have a housing arrangement that allows for a suitable, dedicated workspace. And they may be conscious that they’re missing out on mentorship and learning while they’re working remotely. But, Prof Dundon says, “the employer is not excluded from the obligations. They have to look after their staff. If they end up extremely stressed because of the pressures of being in a precarious housing market and working from home, that employer, I would predict, is likely to bear some responsibility in that.” Employers could afford to overlook some of these issues when they were dealing with an emergency response such as a pandemic. But the conversation now has switched to what work will look like in the longer-term, and all of these are issues that need to be addressed. “All of the equality legislation remains the same. Employers are going to have to be very conscious of the demographic within the office. So who’s coming in? Is it all your young employees? Is that all your more mature senior managers? Is it all the men? Is it older women? There are all kinds of equality implications,” says McElwee. Making it work. There’s one key element to creating a successful remote or hybrid model, Haughey believes. “Trust. Trust your employees that they’re working at home. Give them the flexibility on their working hours, so long as the work is getting done.” Don’t check up, but do check in, she adds. “Do a 10-minute call in the morning and a 10-minute call in the evening as a team.” Managers should plan to “over-communicate” with teams, suggests Haughey. “Make sure that you are over-communicating with them, and have the proper tools in place that you can communicate effectively. In the tech industry, it’s easy to say use Slack and Zoom”, but every company should look at how technology can help ensure the lines of communication stay open. One of the big challenges concerning companies is how to keep company culture alive without spontaneous chats around the kettle, or Friday night drinks. For this, Nearform uses Slack to create “virtual watercooler” moments. “We have a Wellness group on Slack, a Show Your Pet group, a gardening group and a Show Your Desk group. Because we’re fully remote, we have people working across Europe. We have people, whether you like it or not, showing us the sunny beach that they’re working at today. We mute those channels,” she laughs. In pre-pandemic times, the team would get together once or twice a year at client locations when a new project kicked off. Health and safety. Health and safety is an area that hasn’t had much consideration but is likely to prove a significant issue for employers, suggest both McElwee and Prof Dundon. “It wouldn’t be unfeasible to anticipate a whole wave of claims and litigation,” similar to the wave of claims over repetitive strain injuries (RSI) that emerged in the 1980s and 1990s, when employers failed to foresee the need to ensure ergonomic workspaces. “So you can think of all the parallels now working from home remotely.” McElwee suggests there may be some difficulties for employers in trying to carry out remote health and safety audits. “What’s your right [as an employer] to ask, who do you live with? Are you working out of your bedroom? Can you share with me your broadband status?” Nearform’s approach is to do a remote health and safety check as part of the onboarding process with every new employee. “For every new person who joins, we have our health and safety inspector take a call with them as part of their onboarding. They look at their home office and make sure that they are set up correctly,” says Haughey. Last year, the company introduced a fund to enable employees to purchase any equipment they might need. Widening inequality. Underlying all of these discussion is the uneasy knowledge that these challenges affected only one privileged segment of the workforce. Professionals in desk jobs might be thrilled or dismayed to be unmoored from a daily commute to the glass box in the city. But at least they have options. You can’t build houses or deliver parcels or look after sick people from the safety of your spare bedroom. “It’s a really small cohort of the labour force” that can even have a discussion about remote working, says McElwee. “About two-thirds of our labour force has to go out to work.” Ultimately, she says, we should think about this time not so much as a remote-working revolution, but a steady transition towards more flexible ways of working. Whatever the new ways of working ultimately look like, they will involve “more flexibility around start and finish times to avoid commute. Or recognising that people have a particular caring responsibility that falls in the middle of the day. Or that someone wants to take a sabbatical to work on some educational piece, or wants time off to train for the Olympics,” she says. “The one common thread for employers at the moment is that they’re saying this is a test-it-and-try-it. They’re trying to say to people you’ve got to live with us a little bit through this and work with us. What we go with in the beginning isn’t necessarily going to be what the final iteration will look like.” Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber. SUBSCRIBE GO BACK The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment. Comment Sign In Thank you You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In. Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards. Screen Name Selection Hello . Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards. Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber. SUBSCRIBE Forgot Password Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password. Sign In For the best site experience please enable JavaScript in your browser settings Update Payment Details. Unfortunately USERNAME we were unable to process your last payment. Please update your payment details to keep enjoying your Irish Times subscription. Update Payment Details Not Now
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • working
  • 39
  • 21
  • work
  • 36
  • 21
  • office
  • 26
  • 21
  • person
  • 25
  • 21
  • remote
  • 25
  • 21
  • employee
  • 24
  • 21
  • time
  • 24
  • 21
  • employer
  • 20
  • 21
  • hybrid
  • 15
  • 21
  • home
  • 13
  • 21
  • company
  • 13
  • 21
  • day
  • 12
  • 21
  • model
  • 11
  • 21
  • hour
  • 10
  • 21
  • safety
  • 10
  • 21
  • remotely
  • 10
  • 21
  • pandemic
  • 10
  • 21
  • cent
  • 10
  • 21
  • health safety
  • 9
  • 21
  • remote working
  • 9
  • 21
  • health
  • 9
  • 21
  • mcelwee
  • 9
  • 21
  • dundon
  • 8
  • 21
  • issue
  • 8
  • 21
  • meeting
  • 8
  • 21
  • prof dundon
  • 7
  • 21
  • team
  • 7
  • 21
  • suggest
  • 7
  • 21
  • irish
  • 7
  • 21
  • hybrid model
  • 6
  • 21
  • irish time
  • 6
  • 21
  • prof
  • 6
  • 21
  • big
  • 6
  • 21
  • haughey
  • 6
  • 21
  • comment
  • 6
  • 21
  • way working
  • 5
  • 21
  • fully remote
  • 5
  • 21
  • person office
  • 4
  • 21
  • career progression
  • 4
  • 21
  • working home
  • 4
  • 21
  • working remotely
  • 4
  • 21
  • hybrid working
  • 4
  • 21
  • update payment detail
  • 3
  • 21
  • making work
  • 3
  • 21
  • remote hybrid
  • 3
  • 21
  • return office
  • 3
  • 21
  • flexible working
  • 3
  • 21
  • 20 cent
  • 3
  • 21
  • employee work
  • 3
  • 21
  • 60 cent
  • 3
  • 21
  • update payment
  • 3
  • 21
  • payment detail
  • 3
  • 21
Result 22
TitleAddressing Common Work-From-Home Issues to Keep Employees Motivated
Urlhttps://www.jobstreet.com.my/en/cms/employer/laws-of-attraction/inspirations/addressing-common-work-from-home-issues-to-keep-employees-motivated/
DescriptionHere are common work-from-home problems that lower productivity and put employees at risk of burnout. Plus, tips on what to do to avoid them
Date
Organic Position21
H1Addressing Common Work-From-Home Issues to Keep Employees Motivated
H2
H3Running on constant survival mode
Common work-from-home problems
H2WithAnchors
BodyAddressing Common Work-From-Home Issues to Keep Employees Motivated Share In a span of several months, the pandemic has forced businesses to make significant changes to how they operate—being able to adapt is crucial to survival. However, change, though necessary, is not easy because it comes with its own set of challenges. Amongst strategies to keep organisations afloat, such as retrenchment, downsizing, and expanding online presence and delivery channels, employers have also opted to allow their staff to work from home to keep everyone safe. Though this arrangement has its benefits, it also has its downsides. According to the latest JobStreet COVID-19 Job Report, 50% of employees who have been allowed to work from home have experienced longer workdays. Having to juggle household and family duties alongside work responsibilities on a daily basis also proved to be exhausting. Added to this is the constant pressure to be accessible online 24/7. All this can take a toll on an employee who works from home. Running on constant survival mode . Everyone now lives with a level of uncertainty—health, financial stability, and overall security are very real worries brought about by COVID-19. In a pandemic that has lasted for almost a full year (and with no end yet in sight), it comes as no surprise that many have now reached the limit of their “surge capacity.” According to Ann Masten, Ph.D., from the University of Minnesota, surge capacity is the “collection of adaptive systems—mental and physical—that humans draw on for short-term survival in acutely stressful situations, such as natural disasters.” Surge capacity allows us to cope, manage, and face extreme adversity. However, this, too, has a limit. We can only rely on survival mode for a short time. When surge capacity runs out and there is not enough time to replenish it, many are left feeling overly fatigued and exhausted, says Masten. Common work-from-home problems. Given the situation work-from-home employees now find themselves in, they are all the more at risk of reaching the limit of their surge capacities, which can then lead to burnout. Here are three common problems that arise from a WFH setup—and what employers like you can do to avoid them. 1. Blurred work-life balance Workdays typically start with employees clocking in at the office and ends when they leave the building. When your staff works from home, however, it is more difficult to draw the line between official work and homelife. Employees are often expected to be virtually connected to the office for most of the day and even outside office hours. Being “on” all the time gets in the way of much-needed rest. Switching between domestic duties and office work can also be disorienting. To avoid this, take a proactive approach. Try to be understanding toward interruptions or unexpected breaks where employees attend to home duties like chores or childcare. For instance, allow a few more minutes of lunch break for parents as they prepare meals for their family. Set new directives specifically to promote work-life balance. For instance, no meetings, emails, and business calls after 6PM unless they are for urgent matters. You may also look into possible work arrangements that allow for better work-life distinction, such as compressed workweeks. And, more importantly, open a dialogue with your employees to see how the company can support their homelives while helping them stay motivated and productive at work. 2. Longer working hours Some employers feel the need to require longer working hours to compensate for the lack of physical interaction and presence at the office. Moreover, with lockdown restrictions, employees are stuck at home with little to no excuse not to be away from work. This leads to an unspoken expectation that employees should continue working even if it is past 6PM. On the other hand, some employees may feel a sense of “guilt” as they work from home. Hence, they choose to put in additional work hours. This can be especially true for those who have experienced less responsibility as tasks are restricted to those that can be done remotely. Note, however, that longer work hours can easily lead to burnout. As a countermeasure, consider implementing a strict cut-off time for everyone to follow. Remind those in managerial positions to refrain from overloading their team members with tasks that require working beyond office hours. Encourage employees to finish work at an earlier time. See if an output-based work arrangement is suited and beneficial to your company as well. 3. Meeting fatigue Without the option of face-to-face conversations, there is little choice but to turn to virtual meetings conducted through video calling applications like Zoom, Google Meet, or Microsoft Teams. The platforms serve as convenient replacements for in-person meetings, so much so that people now find themselves running from one virtual meeting to the next in just half a day. However, excessive meetings can be draining on everyone. Avoid unnecessary check-ins; instead, see if these can be done via email or through a chat group. Remember that sometimes, hours-long meetings can be counterproductive, whether they are done in person or in front of a computer. It is also best to avoid surprise meetings, so make sure to schedule them in advance. Also, consider project management tools like Asana, Monday.com, and Trello. These can effectively get team members on the same page quickly, consequently lessening the need for meetings. 4. Possible harm to overall mental well-being These are difficult times for everyone. Sudden changes in work systems and arrangements can add to the list of hurdles and stressors on employees of all ranks. When all these pile up, it can take a toll on an individual’s mental well-being. Keeping company morale up is more important than ever. Check in on how well your employees are coping and see if they have concerns that can be addressed. Plan virtual socialisation parties specifically for unwinding (leave work talk behind!). Open communication, reasonable expectations, and patience and understanding from both you and your employees can go a long way in a remote work setup. There is no need to sacrifice either productivity or employee well-being—they go hand in hand in work environments that give everyone ample space to thrive despite the challenges. A supportive and positive organisation will find it easy to acquire new talents even amidst the pandemic. Utilise JobStreet’s Talent Search to find the right candidate for #JobsThatMatter in your company. Visit the COVID-19 Jobs and Resources Hub for more insights. At JobStreet, we believe in bringing you #JobsThatMatter. As a Career Partner, we are committed to helping all jobseekers find passion and purpose in every career choice. And as the number 1 Talent Partner in Asia, we connect employers with the right candidates who truly make a positive and lasting impact on the organisation. Discover Jobs That Matter. Visit JobStreet today. About SEEK Asia SEEK Asia, a combination of two leading brands JobStreet and JobsDB, is the leading job portal and Asia’s preferred destination for candidates and hirers. SEEK Asia’s presence span across 7 countries namely Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines and Vietnam. SEEK Asia is part of the Australian Securities Exchange-listed SEEK Limited Company, the world’s largest job portal by market capitalisation. SEEK Asia attracts over 400 million visits a year. About SEEK Limited SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprising a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK has a global presence (including Australia, New Zealand, China, Hong Kong, South-East Asia, Brazil and Mexico), with exposure to over 2.9 billion people and approximately 27 per cent of global GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 100 company and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies by Forbes. Back to Inspiration More inspirations How to Create Job Opportunities for PR Specialists in Malaysia The COVID-19 Jobs and Resource Hub: A Dedicated Resource Centre to Support Your Business and Career What Global Jobseekers Really Look For in Companies in 2021 How To Eliminate Bias In Job Ads Menu Laws of Attraction Homepage Laws of Attraction Data Lab Employer Insights Recruitment Tips & Tricks Customer Experience Products & Services Popular Posts Laws of Attraction Insights Recruitment Tips & Tricks Customer Experience Products & Services Most Viewed Laws of Attraction Insights Recruitment Tips & Tricks Customer Experience Products & Services We are here to answer any question you might have on Laws of Attraction. Ready to attract your next hire? Contact Us Fill up the form and we'll get in touch. Need help? Visit our online Help Center Have other questions? Find more solutions here Fill up the form and we'll get in touch. Need help? Visit our online Help Centre Have other questions? Find more solutions here Thank you for your interest. Our team will be in touch soon. Close Employer Login. Important security notice We regret to inform that we are currently experiencing some issues with our system and would like to assure all our customers that our technical team is undertaking all necessary measures to rectify the matter. We apologise for any inconvenience that this may have caused. Always make sure that you are on the official website (www.jobstreet.com.my/employers) and that it is secured before logging in. Please keep your SiVA login details secured and do not respond to any login requests from other suspicious websites and scammers. JobStreet.com will never ask for your login details. If you've encountered something suspicious or are in doubt, kindly contact us. Need Help?
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 28
  • 22
  • employee
  • 18
  • 22
  • home
  • 12
  • 22
  • meeting
  • 11
  • 22
  • seek
  • 11
  • 22
  • time
  • 10
  • 22
  • asia
  • 10
  • 22
  • company
  • 10
  • 22
  • hour
  • 8
  • 22
  • job
  • 8
  • 22
  • work home
  • 7
  • 22
  • person
  • 7
  • 22
  • employer
  • 7
  • 22
  • find
  • 7
  • 22
  • mental
  • 6
  • 22
  • seek asia
  • 6
  • 22
  • jobstreet
  • 6
  • 22
  • life
  • 6
  • 22
  • office
  • 6
  • 22
  • surge capacity
  • 5
  • 22
  • law attraction
  • 5
  • 22
  • avoid
  • 5
  • 22
  • online
  • 5
  • 22
  • surge
  • 5
  • 22
  • capacity
  • 5
  • 22
  • team
  • 5
  • 22
  • visit
  • 5
  • 22
  • law
  • 5
  • 22
  • attraction
  • 5
  • 22
  • covid 19
  • 4
  • 22
  • security
  • 4
  • 22
  • working
  • 4
  • 22
  • insight
  • 4
  • 22
  • global
  • 4
  • 22
  • customer
  • 4
  • 22
  • login
  • 4
  • 22
  • covid 19 job
  • 3
  • 22
  • insight recruitment tip
  • 3
  • 22
  • recruitment tip trick
  • 3
  • 22
  • tip trick customer
  • 3
  • 22
  • trick customer experience
  • 3
  • 22
  • customer experience product
  • 3
  • 22
  • experience product service
  • 3
  • 22
  • 19 job
  • 3
  • 22
  • work life
  • 3
  • 22
  • insight recruitment
  • 3
  • 22
  • recruitment tip
  • 3
  • 22
  • tip trick
  • 3
  • 22
  • trick customer
  • 3
  • 22
  • customer experience
  • 3
  • 22
  • experience product
  • 3
  • 22
  • product service
  • 3
  • 22
Result 23
TitleAdvantages and disadvantages of employees working at home | nibusinessinfo.co.uk
Urlhttps://www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/advantages-and-disadvantages-employees-working-home
DescriptionKey advantages and disadvantages of home working - from productivity boosts to problems monitoring performance
Date
Organic Position22
H1Employees working from home
H2Latest advice and support straight to your inbox Sign Up
Advantages and disadvantages of employees working at home
H3Advantages of employees working from home
Disadvantages of employees working from home
Hybrid working approach
H2WithAnchorsLatest advice and support straight to your inbox Sign Up
Advantages and disadvantages of employees working at home
BodyEmployees working from home Advantages and disadvantages of employees working at home. Guide Home working opens up a new range of possibilities for the way businesses can work and structure themselves. With the outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, home working has given some employers the flexibility they need to continue their business operations while prioritising staff and customer health and wellbeing as part of their public health responsibility. Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, working from home was on the increase as many employers identified the benefits that it can bring to their business and the improved work-life balance for their employees. Even if you don't think working from home would be beneficial for your business, employees with 26 weeks service have a statutory right to request flexible-working arrangements such as home working and you, as an employer, have to seriously consider such requests. Advantages of employees working from home. With increasing numbers of employees working at home - or using home as a working base for at least part of the week - it's clear there are a number of benefits for business, such as: Flexibility and agility - home working enables more agility and flexibility in working arrangements. With employees no longer tied to an office, they may be better placed and more willing to work flexible hours such as earlier or later in the day or even at weekends. This may help you meet certain business needs eg if you are trading with customers residing in a different time zone. Improved employee retention - home working can help retain employees as the flexibility of home working can help them meet childcare needs, reduce their commute and enable them to fit their work around their personal life. Being allowed to work from home, staff will also feel increased levels of trust from their employer, which can contribute greatly to staff loyalty. Attract new talent - home working can be offered as an incentive to come and work for you helping you to attract new talent to your business. Even just offering the option to work from home will give you an advantage in the job market over competitors that don't offer home working as an option to their staff. Increased productivity - due to fewer interruptions, which would normally occur in an office environment. By contrast, working from home allows for a quieter environment that can facilitate more focused work. You may also find that some employees may wish to increase their paid contractual hours as they save time that was previously spent commuting to and from the workplace. Increased staff motivation - by working from home staff will feel more trusted by their employer as the working relationship isn't as closely monitored and employees are allowed a degree of autonomy to get on with their work. Staff will also be happier developing a home working routine that suits them better and this can contribute towards them feeling more motivated to give their best. Improved staff health and wellbeing - working from home eliminates the need for a commute to work that can be stressful to your employees. Time savings such as this also enables staff to get extra health benefits such as additional sleep, spending more time with family, exercising or preparing healthier meals. Financial benefits - savings on office space, office supplies, utility bills and other facilities. Staff may also be able to take advantage of the tax relief available from HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) for working from home - see claim tax relief for your job expenses - working from home. Convenience - you may have staff that do a lot of visits to customer locations and are therefore not regularly in the office. Allowing them to base themselves from home may be more convenient and leads to further time and costs savings. Better work/life balance - working from home can help employees improve their work-life balance eg staff that would have had to commute will now be able to use that time for themselves giving the basis for a better work-life balance. Staff are also able to fit in household chores around their working day giving them more free time in the evenings eg loading or unloading the dishwasher or preparing dinner on their lunchbreak. Technology makes it easier - the internet has made it possible for staff to be continually connected to the office. Tools such as Skype have made communication between colleagues and teams much easier and at times can lead to more efficient and effective meetings. Less sickness absences – staff are more likely to feel happier and more energised working from home and therefore less chance of their immune system being negatively impacted by burnout. Also the fact that employees are working in isolation there is less chance of infections spreading as would be the case within an office environment. Disadvantages of employees working from home. Though there are some disadvantages to employees working from home, most of these relate to those working from home for all, as opposed to part, of their working week: Working from home doesn't suit everyone - working from home might not be suited to everyone's personality or ability. Some employees might prefer the routine and structure that working in an office environment provides them. Some staff may prefer personal interaction with colleagues and also find face-to-face guidance with their manager extremely beneficial in helping them complete tasks and achieve their goals. You also need to be mindful of employees with a disability. Working from home may have a negative impact on the support they need to do their job. Working from home may also not fit in with everyone's home-life eg some people may have young children that may be unaware of boundaries and cause interruptions during the working day. Others may not have the physical space required to create a suitable dedicated working area. Staff feeling isolated - individuals working from home may feel a disconnect from their colleagues and organisation as a whole that an office environment naturally allows. To address this issue employers could ensure that communication is more regular. So by scheduling quick catch-ups by phone or regular team meetings through other technologies like Skype, staff are given more opportunity to feel involved and part of the team. More informal and social catch-ups would also help counteract any feelings of isolation. Difficulty monitoring performance - there could be difficulty managing home workers and monitoring their performance. Different personalities may also respond to monitoring with varying degrees of positivity. You could look at setting goals and targets with workers that are easily measured so that if their targets aren't being met you can identify and remedy any performance issues at an early stage. See managing staff performance and effectively manage employees who work from home. Home distractions - although home working removes the distractions that may occur in the office if a worker doesn't have a suitably quiet dedicated working space at home they may get easily distracted by household noises or other members of their household. Potential burnout - where an office provides a clear physical distinction between work and home life, working at home can lead to staff struggling to differentiate between work-life and home-life. This may lead to employees finding it difficult to know how to switch off from work leading to longer hours, increased stress and inevitable burnout. Employers should encourage their staff to take regular breaks and remind them of the importance to take their leave. Cost of working from home - initial costs of training and providing suitable equipment such as laptops, mobile phones and other IT equipment. You will also have to consider adaptations to meet health and safety standards. Problems with staff development - you may find that not having staff in close physical proximity leads to difficulty in maintaining staff development and upgrading skills. However you could encourage staff to take the opportunity to learn new skills through online events and courses. To get started search for events on our Events Finder. Information security risk - information security problems could be more likely to occur when staff are working from home. There is increase risk with laptops being taken home and the need for staff to access servers remotely. Employers should ensure they put measures in place to protect company data by installing encryption software and remote-wipe apps if mobile devices provided by you go missing. Virtual private networks also encrypt your data and provide secure access to a remote computer over the internet. This helps keep your files and data secure yet accessible by to your staff. See IT security and risks. Negative impact on mental health - the switch to working from home may have a negative impact on your worker’s mental health if they are unable to find a routine that works for them, are struggling to separate work and home life or are feeling isolated. To help you can encourage your employees to develop a working routine, set up a dedicated work space and set boundaries for other household members. Create more opportunities for staff to stay connected by communicating through regular chats and team catch-ups. Eating healthily and taking regular exercise can also help improve mental health especially when woven into a regular routine. See 7 simple tips to tackle working from home from the NHS. Decreased staff morale - it can be harder to maintain team spirit when employees are working at home on their own. Not all jobs suit home working - working from home suits some jobs better than others. Equally, working from home suits some personality types but not others. Some people may prefer colleague contact by face-to-face communication. Poor broadband speeds - you should be mindful that depending on where your staff live they may be not be able to access broadband speeds that enable them to do their job effectively eg rural broadband is often very slow.  The coronavirus pandemic has given some employers, who may not have otherwise considered working from home an option for staff, a practical insight into how it affects their business and employees. It has enabled employers to have first-hand experience of the advantages and disadvantages of home working. This experience can be very beneficial in helping employers determine working practices that will benefit their business. For further information see the Labour Relation Agency's (LRA) practical guide to working from home: COVID-19 and beyond. Hybrid working approach. A shift towards home working doesn't mean employees have to work only at home. Often splitting time between home and the workplace is the most productive solution and you may want the home worker to attend meetings to keep them fully involved and informed. For further guidance see the LRA's practical guide to hybrid working. Printer-friendly version LRA Workplace Information Service 03300 555 300 Actions Practical LRA guide to working from home: COVID-19 and beyond Practical LRA guide to hybrid working Flexible working: the right to request and duty to consider - LRA guidance Also on this site Flexible working: the law and best practice Use your home as a workplace Inform and consult your employees Know how much holiday to give your staff Workforce testing for coronavirus Developed with: Guides Find guides by sector Creative industries Food and drink Manufacturing Property management Retail Construction Tourism Transport Find guides by theme Starting a business Before you start your business Considering starting a business Start-up business ideas Start your business Local support for start-ups Choose your business structure Name your business Find money to start your business Business planning Choose and set up your workplace Family business Mentoring and business networks Running your start-up business Manage business finances Understand Tax and VAT when self-employed Hire staff Hire professional services Sales and marketing for start-ups IT for start-ups Protect your business ideas Grow your start-up business Trade with other countries Take steps to grow your business Finance Find local finance Northern Ireland business support finder Raising finance Choose the right finance options Borrowing finance for your business Shares and equity finance Grants and government support How to attract investment Managing finance Expert financial advice Financial planning and accounts Manage your cashflow Improve your cashflow and business performance Managing suppliers and payments Debt recovery Business banking Insurance Financial difficulty Managing financial difficulty Taxes Business tax Self Assessment VAT National Insurance Corporation Tax Construction Industry Scheme Capital Gains Tax Stamp and property taxes Tax reliefs and allowances Tax help Self-employed and tax Setting up as self-employed and tax Help and support for the self-employed PAYE and payroll PAYE and payroll for employers Keeping records for business Record-keeping Excise duties Alcohol duties Fuel Duty Tobacco Products Duty Gambling duties Industry-specific taxes Air Passenger Duty Aggregates Levy Climate Change levy Insurance Premium Tax Landfill Tax Complying with European law Contact or deal with HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) Paying HMRC HMRC complaints and appeals Dealing with HMRC Companies House returns, accounts and other responsibilities Starting a company or partnership Running a company or partnership Company registration for overseas and European companies Companies House annual returns and accounts Filing company information using Companies House WebFiling Companies House forms Find company information using Companies House WebCHeck Companies House complaints and appeals Business changes Making changes to your business Selling, closing or restarting your business Selling or closing your business Closing a company or partnership Restarting a company Accountants and tax advisers Accountants and tax advisers - HMRC services and content Tax agent authorisation Online tax services for accountants and tax advisers Help and support for accountants and tax advisers News and communications for accountants and tax advisers Compliance checks for accountants and tax advisers Appeals and penalties for accountants and tax advisers Tax agents and advisers forms, manuals and reference material Working with HMRC - joint initiatives Money Laundering Regulations Employment and skills HR documents and templates Recruitment Advertise a job Taking on staff Contract types and employer responsibilities Employment checks Employment agencies Employment documents and policies Staff documents and employment policies Pay, pensions and minimum wage Staff pay Workplace pensions National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage Manage people Working time Engaging with staff Staff health and wellbeing Staff motivation Equality and diversity Redundancy, restructures and change Trade unions Holidays, statutory leave and time off Holiday, other leave and sickness Maternity, paternity, adoption and parental leave Performance, training and development Staff performance Staff training and development Employer support programmes Resolve conflict and staff leaving Problems at work Dismissals and staff leaving Health and safety Health and safety basics Protecting your business Health and safety made simple Make your business safer Managing the welfare of people Safer ways of working Efficiency and environment Environmental action to improve your business Environmental obligations and support Environmental performance of your business Environmental business tax benefits Reduce, reuse, recycle your business waste Reducing business waste Reuse and recycle business waste Preventing pollution Hazardous substances and waste Resource efficiency Saving energy and cutting costs Saving water and cutting costs Process and resource efficiency Packaging and the environment Reducing your environmental impact Generating energy for your business Carbon emissions and climate change Business transport and the environment Environmental guidance by business sector Chemical industry Construction and building trades Electrical and electronic equipment manufacturing Engineering and metalworking Food and drink production Furniture manufacturing Metal production and processing Offices, retail and hospitality Paper and cardboard manufacturing Printing industry Waste and recycling industry Business premises and rates Choosing the right business property Choosing business property Buy business property Commercial property finder Rent business property Use your home as a workplace Rates for non-domestic properties Business rates Property management and costs Security, fire and flood protection for business property Insurance for business property Tax breaks and finance for business property Adapting and improving your property Make your property more efficient Disabled access and facilities in business premises Innovation and R&D Product and service development Developing products and services Research and development Design and business innovation Use innovation in your business Design for business success Intellectual property Intellectual property for business Patents, trade marks, copyright and design Sales and marketing Marketing your business Market strategy and planning Traditional marketing Digital marketing Social media Branding and design Know your customers Market research Understanding the local market Keeping your customers Maximise your sales Selling Selling online Selling and the law Selling overseas Pricing Tender for contracts IT IT basics Introduction to IT Choosing suppliers Software and technology solutions Software and business applications Communications Getting online Create and manage a website E-commerce Security and data protection Data protection and legal issues IT security and risks Exporting and importing Basics of importing and exporting Importing and exporting basics Tax and international trade Starting out in international trade Choosing a market Doing business in the EU Trading with countries outside the EU Procedures and licences Export Control Organisation Classifying your goods Importing controlled goods Import and export procedures Customs IT systems Sector overviews and regulations Service industries Manufactured goods Food and agriculture Natural resources and chemicals Moving your goods Transport options for moving your goods Taking lorries abroad Transporting dangerous goods Freight forwarding Customs declarations National Clearance Hub Grow your business Prepare for growth Assessing current performance Planning business growth Strategies for growth Growth through product and service development Growth through sales Growth through technology Growth through strategic sourcing Growth through strategic partnering Growth through international trade Tendering for contracts Finance and logistics How to grow your business Financing growth Managing growth Leading staff through growth Manage business risks Buy or sell a business Acquiring a business Considering buying a business Buying a business Franchising Business acquisitions and mergers Selling your business Considering selling a business Selling your business Floating on the stock market Capital Gains Tax when selling your business Exiting and transferring your business Businesses in difficulty Transferring your business Resources My New Business Northern Ireland business support finder Sample templates, forms, letters, policies and checklists Licence finder Find a case study Do it online News Events
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 84
  • 23
  • working
  • 66
  • 23
  • home
  • 64
  • 23
  • staff
  • 46
  • 23
  • working home
  • 32
  • 23
  • tax
  • 29
  • 23
  • employee
  • 25
  • 23
  • work
  • 21
  • 23
  • property
  • 16
  • 23
  • home working
  • 15
  • 23
  • employer
  • 15
  • 23
  • company
  • 15
  • 23
  • start
  • 12
  • 23
  • health
  • 12
  • 23
  • office
  • 12
  • 23
  • growth
  • 12
  • 23
  • time
  • 11
  • 23
  • support
  • 10
  • 23
  • performance
  • 10
  • 23
  • find
  • 10
  • 23
  • finance
  • 10
  • 23
  • selling
  • 10
  • 23
  • life
  • 9
  • 23
  • service
  • 9
  • 23
  • employee working
  • 8
  • 23
  • guide
  • 8
  • 23
  • environment
  • 8
  • 23
  • adviser
  • 8
  • 23
  • employee working home
  • 7
  • 23
  • accountant tax adviser
  • 7
  • 23
  • accountant tax
  • 7
  • 23
  • tax adviser
  • 7
  • 23
  • business property
  • 7
  • 23
  • development
  • 7
  • 23
  • duty
  • 7
  • 23
  • industry
  • 7
  • 23
  • trade
  • 7
  • 23
  • accountant
  • 7
  • 23
  • start business
  • 6
  • 23
  • work home
  • 6
  • 23
  • company house
  • 6
  • 23
  • mental health
  • 4
  • 23
  • work life
  • 4
  • 23
  • office environment
  • 4
  • 23
  • face
  • 4
  • 23
  • home life
  • 4
  • 23
  • health safety
  • 4
  • 23
  • business selling
  • 4
  • 23
  • selling business
  • 4
  • 23
  • disadvantage employee working
  • 3
  • 23
  • work life balance
  • 3
  • 23
  • disadvantage employee
  • 3
  • 23
  • covid 19
  • 3
  • 23
  • health wellbeing
  • 3
  • 23
  • life balance
  • 3
  • 23
  • flexible working
  • 3
  • 23
  • home staff
  • 3
  • 23
  • staff feel
  • 3
  • 23
  • tax relief
  • 3
  • 23
  • negative impact
  • 3
  • 23
  • catch up
  • 3
  • 23
  • security risk
  • 3
  • 23
  • hybrid working
  • 3
  • 23
  • home workplace
  • 3
  • 23
  • start up
  • 3
  • 23
  • employed
  • 3
  • 23
  • grow business
  • 3
  • 23
  • company partnership
  • 3
  • 23
  • business waste
  • 3
  • 23
  • product service
  • 3
  • 23
  • international trade
  • 3
  • 23
Result 24
Title7 Everyday Remote Work Challenges (With Tips to Overcome Them)
Urlhttps://www.proofhub.com/articles/remote-work-challenges
DescriptionGet a good headstart as a remote worker by learning the 7 most common remote work challenges and the ways to deal with them. Start reading now!
Date
Organic Position23
H17 Everyday Remote Work Challenges (With Tips to Overcome Them)
H2Common Challenges Associated With Remote Working
Conclusion
So, let’s start delivering projects!
H3Crumbling Team Communication
Burnouts due to Overworking
Coping with a Ton of Distractions
Loneliness Triggered Due to Lack of Human Interaction
Staying motivated in a barren environment
Low Visibility or Lack of Recognition
Bearing Technical Difficulties
H2WithAnchorsCommon Challenges Associated With Remote Working
Conclusion
So, let’s start delivering projects!
Body7 Everyday Remote Work Challenges (With Tips to Overcome Them) Sandeep Kashyap [https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/ea5965337fd1a6ec05fbbfe07e827df6?s=42&d=mm&r=g]Sandeep KashyapArticles, Remote Work shareRemote work has always been a popular work arrangement for professionals all over the world.  Many people wished they would get a chance to work remotely, they would not let this opportunity slip away.According to the Buffer’s State of Remote Work report, 99% of the people who participated in the survey were interested in working remotely.As the Covid-19 pandemic allowed many of us to work from home, I must say that remote working is just too hard to resist, especially when you want to spend more time with your loved ones.You can also enjoy several other benefits of remote work. No hassles of commuting, no need to be stressed out while deciding the attire for your meeting with a client, no more munching on unhealthy food at the office cafeteria, to name a few.However, I just want to put into your consciousness that just like anything, remote working also has some challenges associated with it. But with the right techniques and tools, you can overcome these challenges to emerge as a happy and productive remote worker.Through this article, I am going to share with you the most common WFH or remote work challenges along with actionable tips to overcome them.Worried about your performance as a remote worker? Start using Proofhub to manage all your work efficiently!Table of ContentsCommon Challenges Associated With Remote WorkingCrumbling Team CommunicationBurnouts due to OverworkingCoping with a Ton of Distractions Loneliness Triggered Due to Lack of Human InteractionStaying motivated in a barren environment Low Visibility or Lack of Recognition Bearing Technical DifficultiesConclusionCommon Challenges Associated With Remote Working. Common Challenges Associated With Remote Working [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Common Challenges Associated With Remote Working [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Common-Challenges-Associated-With-Remote-Working.jpg]Crumbling Team Communication. Your communication with the team is the foremost thing that will get a mighty blow when you are working remotely. Things are bound to get more disappointing for you when a part of your team is working from the office.What happens in this scenario is that you might miss being a part of the unplanned meetings and brainstorming sessions.At times, it is likely that you may feel left out and the fear of being the last one to know about things affects your performance at work.How to Overcome?The best way to curtail this issue is to step up your communication with the team, which is possible using robust communication tools.An instant messaging or chat tool that supports the exchange of messages in real-time would do the trick for you. However, it is advisable to have video calls with your teammates from time to time, which will strengthen your bond with them.   Also, you need to put some extra efforts to push your team to share every important piece of work-related information with you in a timely manner.Burnouts due to Overworking. One of the biggest challenges when you work remotely, especially from your home is unplugging yourself from work.While there’s no visible boundary that separates your work from personal life, it can be difficult to leave your work desk as soon as the clock crosses the last minute of your work hours.As a result, you tend to overwork and ultimately end up getting exhausted almost every day at work. And this can put an adverse effect on both your physical and mental health.How to Overcome?The simplest trick to get over this situation is to create a physical boundary between your leisure space and your workspace. You can create a home office or dedicate a specific corner or room in your house for your office work.Leaving all the devices that you solely use for work within the office space after work hours will make you less worried about the pending work.You should stay clear with your manager and teammates about your availability and let them know the time when you stop working.Coping with a Ton of Distractions . Working remotely means that you need to tackle a swarm of distractions almost every day. And to be clear, it’s nearly impossible to make all the distractions just go away.When you are working from home, a significant number of distractions can arise from the part of your family. Your children invade your office space after coming back from school , your father discussing news with you multiple times a day, and so on.These distractions are just the tip of the iceberg – there’s  plenty more.FYI – If you have kids at home then you can follow certain tips to avoid getting distracted by them. How to Overcome?While eradicating every distraction is impractical, you can still bring down the number of distractions by making some arrangements.For instance, choosing a workspace, where the number of daily footfalls of your family members is quite low is one effective way to avoid some distractions.Another way of limiting distractions is to let your family and friends know that you would not like to get disturbed during your work hours that are from 9 – 5 or something like that. Also, just make it clear to them that you will not be able to address any trivial matters while you are busy with your work.Loneliness Triggered Due to Lack of Human Interaction. Working from an isolated space that restricts social interaction can be problematic, especially if you are a people person.There may be instances where you feel the urge to have a beer with your colleagues after a long day or throw a small after-office party for your co-workers. Sadly, nothing of this sort is going to happen when you are miles away from your office buddies and working from home.Also, you cannot be part of the watercooler talks and joint chat sessions during coffee breaks. As a result, you might feel lonely and trapped inside your unlively workplace.How to Overcome?Even if you do not interact with people too often, you need to balance your work life and social life.The easiest thing to do this is to have social interactions with your family and friends every now and then. However, if that’s not possible to do, you can take social breaks with your colleagues over unofficial chat and video conference sessions.You can also give a try working from a co-working space or a cafe for a couple of times a week. You may find people with whom you can socialize and get the dose of human interaction that you’ve been missing while working from home.Staying motivated in a barren environment . As a remote worker, it is common to work in an environment where no one is pushing you to take your daily tasks more seriously. Also, it’s not quite possible for your manager to supervise your work and manage your time.So, you always need to motivate yourself and manage your work in accordance with the time constraints. Otherwise, you will find yourself procrastinating for the most part of the day and losing track of your deadlines.Unlike the office, you will not be surrounded by people who are working and at the same time, acting as a motivating factor for you to get busy with your duties.How to Overcome?To motivate yourself, you need to set goals for yourself daily and prepare to-do lists to stay updated about your tasks for the day. A project management software would be the ideal option to manage all your tasks from a single place.It’s also a good idea to reserve the most difficult tasks for specific hours of the day when you are most productive.You should also need to initiate a loop of trying and identifying things that help you to get motivated and give your best at work.Streamline your work and get an aerial view of all your tasks with ProofHub’s integrated Kanban boards and Gantt charts. Try the PM software for free now!  Low Visibility or Lack of Recognition . Another remote work challenge that you are most likely to experience is you being partially visible to your employer or manager.Many managers develop this perception of remote workers doing little to make a project successful. Consequently, remote workers have to work on projects that are of minor importance. And even, if they perform exceptionally well, remote workers are in the last of the queue to get a promotion.This kind of low visibility and lack of recognition will not only limit your potential but also demotivate you and affect your performance.How to Overcome?The most important thing that you need to do in such a situation is to make people acknowledge your presence and contribution.If possible, you should make regular visits to your office and even work from the office a few times every month. Also, you need to make yourself physically present at the conferences and office parties to let others know that you are an active member of your organization.Additionally, while working from a remote location, you must communicate with your manager the tasks that you have been working on. It’s always preferable to stay in touch with your manager or supervisor to make sure that your accomplishments never go unnoticed.Bearing Technical Difficulties. While you are at the office, firstly the chances of a power or internet outage are too low, and even if there’s a technology failure, no one’s going to blame you. Moreover, you are not responsible to find the solution to any technical difficulty that has occurred.However, things take a U-turn when you are working remotely. Whether your internet connection is not working properly or your system is behaving in an erratic way, you’ll have to take charge to make things right.How to Overcome?Before making a transition to remote work, you first need to assess what you need on the technical front to support your work.You might also need to check if your current internet connection is ideal for the job or you need an upgrade.It’s important to have a tech expert on your side whom you can call whenever you are facing a technical difficulty that you are unable to resolve on your own.Plan, organize, and deliver your projects from any place and using any device. Give ProofHub a try!Conclusion. No doubt, remote working comes with several benefits and it can be more rewarding than any other work arrangement. However, you need to beat the common remote work challenges that I’ve mentioned in this write-up. If you believe in yourself and really want to get along with remote work, then it will not be that difficult to get over these challenges.Before you start conquering your remote work challenges, don’t forget to share this article with people in your social circle who you think will find it useful. Sandeep Kashyap [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==] Sandeep Kashyap [https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/ea5965337fd1a6ec05fbbfe07e827df6?s=120&d=mm&r=g] Sandeep KashyapSandeep Kashyap is the Founder and CEO of ProofHub — a leading project management and collaboration software. He’s one person always on a lookout for innovative ideas about filling the communication gap between groups, teams, and organizations. You’ll find him saying, "Let’s go!" instead of "Go!" many times a day. That’s what makes him write about leadership in a way people are inspired to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more. [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/themes/ph4.1/images/buzz/email-icon.svg]Subscribe to ProofHubGet the latest posts delivered right to your inbox. Related articles Celebrate valentine with your team [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Celebrate valentine with your team [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Let’s-choose-the-perfect-color-to-celebrate-Valentine’s-with-the-team-370x240.jpeg] Let’s choose the perfect color to celebrate Val...“Your employees are the real superheroes in disguise. –...8 min read How To Become A Project Manager [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]How To Become A Project Manager [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/How-To-Become-A-Project-Manager-in-2020-370x240.gif] “How To Become A Project Manager in 2022” ̵...“How to become a project manager?” Many people approach me with thi...28 min read Nick's work life balance comic strip [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Nick's work life balance comic strip [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/111-370x240.jpg] Work Life BalanceRelatable, anyone?! 👨🏻‍💻🕝🕓🕢🕘 . . . . . #worklifebalance #worklife #...1 min readSo, let’s start delivering projects!No installationNo credit cardNo chaosProductHomeHow it WorksFeaturesPricingAll Features ListHappy CustomersProduct UpdatesSystem StatusResourcesProofHub Buzz ProofHub Blog Use CasesProject management software guideSupportRequest DemoContact SupportHelp CenterVideosComparisonProofHub vs Asana ProofHub vs BasecampProofHub vs WrikeProofHub vs TrelloProofHub vs TeamworkTerms & PoliciesTerms of Service Privacy PolicyRefund PolicySecurity InformationDownload Apps Apple store [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/themes/ph4.1/images/mobile-app-icons/footer-applestore-btn.png] Play store [https://www.proofhub.com/wp-content/themes/ph4.1/images/mobile-app-icons/footer-playstore-btn.png]© ProofHub
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 35
  • 24
  • remote
  • 26
  • 24
  • working
  • 23
  • 24
  • office
  • 13
  • 24
  • challenge
  • 13
  • 24
  • team
  • 12
  • 24
  • time
  • 12
  • 24
  • remote work
  • 11
  • 24
  • manager
  • 11
  • 24
  • project
  • 11
  • 24
  • person
  • 11
  • 24
  • thing
  • 9
  • 24
  • distraction
  • 9
  • 24
  • proofhub
  • 8
  • 24
  • day
  • 8
  • 24
  • project manager
  • 7
  • 24
  • worker
  • 7
  • 24
  • httpswwwproofhubcomwp
  • 7
  • 24
  • remote working
  • 6
  • 24
  • low
  • 6
  • 24
  • task
  • 6
  • 24
  • remote work challenge
  • 5
  • 24
  • celebrate valentine
  • 5
  • 24
  • work challenge
  • 5
  • 24
  • remote worker
  • 5
  • 24
  • remotely
  • 5
  • 24
  • home
  • 5
  • 24
  • common
  • 5
  • 24
  • lack
  • 5
  • 24
  • technical
  • 5
  • 24
  • dataimagegifbase64r0lgodlhaqabaaaaach5baekaaealaaaaaabaaeaaaictaeaow
  • 5
  • 24
  • communication
  • 5
  • 24
  • part
  • 5
  • 24
  • life
  • 5
  • 24
  • space
  • 5
  • 24
  • social
  • 5
  • 24
  • find
  • 5
  • 24
  • low visibility
  • 4
  • 24
  • challenge remote
  • 4
  • 24
  • work life
  • 4
  • 24
  • low visibility lack
  • 3
  • 24
  • visibility lack recognition
  • 3
  • 24
  • challenge remote working
  • 3
  • 24
  • how project manager
  • 3
  • 24
  • sandeep kashyap
  • 3
  • 24
  • visibility lack
  • 3
  • 24
  • lack recognition
  • 3
  • 24
  • working remotely
  • 3
  • 24
  • technical difficulty
  • 3
  • 24
  • how project
  • 3
  • 24
Result 25
TitleWhy Working From Home Doesn’t Work for Many Employees | Time
Urlhttps://time.com/6088110/remote-work-structured-hybrid-research/
DescriptionResearch shows that working from home doesn’t work for many workers. Employers must tackle the problem with a new model, writes Mimi Nguyen
Date13 Aug 2021
Organic Position24
H1Research Shows Working From Home Doesn’t Work. Here’s How Employers Should Tackle the Problem
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyResearch Shows Working From Home Doesn’t Work. Here’s How Employers Should Tackle the Problem Getty Images Ideas By Mimi Nguyen August 13, 2021 4:18 PM EDT Nguyen is R&D lead at Mana Search, co-founder of Mana Labs, a PhD fellow at Imperial College London, and Innovation Lecturer at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. We followed the science on COVID-19. Now, as the end of the pandemic draws closer, it’s time to follow the science on working from home. The verdict is clear: For many jobs—particularly collaborative, high skill level, high-value roles—working from home simply doesn’t work, and we shouldn’t confuse a temporary abnormal with a new normal. The pandemic will not be ‘the death of the office,’ as some have suggested, but working from home also won’t become entirely a thing of the past. Many workers wouldn’t want it that way because they enjoy the freedom and flexibility it gives them. The solution for the future is a structured hybrid model, acknowledging that working from home doesn’t work long-term for most jobs, while still giving workers flexibility. One way to do that would be to allocate time slots—perhaps specific days—of in-office working for all employees to maintain workplace productivity and collaboration, while also allowing working from home to continue outside those hours. Professor Tom Eisenmann of Harvard Business School told me in March that, because remote work is going to become a much bigger part of our lives, we need to solve the problem of maintaining a culture when people are “scattered all over the world.” That problem explains why it took a pandemic for working from home to become mainstream, despite it being an old idea. As long ago as 1970, Alvin Toffler predicted a shift to working from home, as opposed to working in offices and factories. Half a century later, his prediction came true. Before the pandemic, 20% of workers did all or most of their work from home, an analysis by the Pew Research Center found. That figure rose to more than 70% during the pandemic, the analysis—based on 5,858 U.S. adults—found. Read more: The Coronavirus Is Making Us See That It’s Hard to Make Remote Work Actually Work For some, remote work leads to increased productivity, as well as job satisfaction, particularly for those working in technical jobs that require minimal teamwork. In certain industries, this has been the case for some time. Stack Overflow, a New York-based community website for computer programmers, found in 2017 that 53% of 64,000 developers surveyed ranked remote work as one of their five most-valued work benefits. But the science tells us that workers like them are in a minority and, however topical their case is, we should be cautious about applying such a drastic change across our economies. Since before the pandemic began I have been assessing multi-disciplinary collaboration in a work-from-home environment for my PhD research at Imperial College, London. Individuals employed on creative projects in virtual teams reported feeling more like a ‘worker’, and less like a member of a family. One respondent said of employers: “They don’t see how early you show up in front of your computer…They don’t see how hard I’m working.” But more damaging than the effects of working from home on individuals, is what it does to teams. Remote work often breaks the mechanisms that allow a team to work together creatively. Studies have found that the best creative work occurs when a team is in a state of flow, or focuses its collective attention on a single problem together, known as ‘team flow’. But remote work makes it harder to keep everyone engaged in solving that problem. In my study, many respondents said it was hard to gauge when a team member had zoned out during a Zoom call. Read more: How to Work from Home Without Burning Out There is currently no digital technology that can reliably create ‘flow’ remotely, and we shouldn’t pretend there is. If it did exist, it wouldn’t have taken the necessity of pandemic restrictions for us to work remotely—managers and employees would have already embraced it. There’s other evidence that points to this problem. Utah-based virtual whiteboard app Lucidspark found that 75% of 1,000 respondents surveyed in September last year said collaboration was the thing that suffered most when working remotely. HR departments are now paying the price for this isolation and lack of collaboration, with 2021 already being called the year of the ‘Great Resignation.’ The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that the annual quit rate was 25.5% in 2020 and millions of workers have resigned in 2021. If employers want to hang on to their staff, they need to find ways to maintain the work-life balance employees enjoyed while working from home. This needs to happen while reintegrating them back into the office, since it is clear from my research that fully autonomous working from home across all industries is neither desirable nor sustainable. That’s why we need to carve out a third way, where teams that thrive on collaboration are given mandatory times each week when everyone is expected to be in the office. This structured hybrid model is different to hybrid working, whereby employees can come and go to the office as they please. By combining flexible hours with time slots for compulsory office attendance, we can grant the freedom that white-collar workers have enjoyed so much over the pandemic. It would also prevent the rise of a two-tier model, where those who are present in the office get ahead, while those who prefer to work from home get left behind. This doesn’t mean a return to the misery of daily commutes. Structured hybrid work could allow workers to travel outside of peak times—removing much of the pain of commuting—as long as they are present for the compulsory time slot for collective in-office working. The evidence is clear that, for the majority of workers in most industries, working from home doesn’t work. But we can still take the lessons we have learned about what today’s—and tomorrow’s—employees want, and make that part of the new normal in offices post-pandemic. More Must-Read Stories From TIME Shonda Rhimes Already Knows What You're Going to Watch Next How Donald Trump Turned Jan. 6 into a Windfall Why 2022 Is the Year We Learn to Live With COVID-19 Public Schools Are Struggling to Retain Black Teachers. These Ex-Teachers Explain Why CDC Director Rochelle Walensky Faces a Surging Virus—And a Crisis of Trust How Addictive Social Media Algorithms Could Finally Face a Reckoning in 2022 The Supreme Court Could Let Religious Schools Take Taxpayer Money. Former Students Say That's a Mistake Contact us at [email protected] TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary on events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of TIME editors. SHARE THIS STORY Read More From TIME You May Also Like Read Next Big Tech Is Coming to Small Towns, but at What Cost? Next Up: Editor's Pick The Secret History of the Shadow Campaign That Saved the 2020 Election EDIT POST You have reached your limit of 4 free articles. Paywall-Icons-Devices Unlimited access to TIME.com Paywall-Icons-Newsletter Inside TIME newsletter, twice weekly Paywall-Icons-DigitalMagazine Access to the TIME Digital Magazine Subscribe Now Already a print subscriber? Go here to link your subscription. Need help? Visit our Help Center. Purchased TIMEPieces? Go here to connect your wallet. Subscribe Now
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 23
  • 25
  • working
  • 19
  • 25
  • home
  • 17
  • 25
  • office
  • 13
  • 25
  • time
  • 13
  • 25
  • working home
  • 12
  • 25
  • pandemic
  • 10
  • 25
  • worker
  • 9
  • 25
  • remote work
  • 7
  • 25
  • team
  • 7
  • 25
  • employee
  • 6
  • 25
  • problem
  • 6
  • 25
  • remote
  • 6
  • 25
  • job
  • 5
  • 25
  • collaboration
  • 5
  • 25
  • found
  • 5
  • 25
  • read
  • 5
  • 25
  • time slot
  • 4
  • 25
  • work home
  • 4
  • 25
  • long
  • 4
  • 25
  • slot
  • 4
  • 25
  • research
  • 4
  • 25
  • hybrid
  • 4
  • 25
  • working home work
  • 3
  • 25
  • home work
  • 3
  • 25
  • structured hybrid
  • 3
  • 25
  • paywall icon
  • 3
  • 25
  • model
  • 3
  • 25
  • school
  • 3
  • 25
  • based
  • 3
  • 25
  • hard
  • 3
  • 25
  • industry
  • 3
  • 25
  • respondent
  • 3
  • 25
  • flow
  • 3
  • 25
  • remotely
  • 3
  • 25
  • year
  • 3
  • 25
  • paywall
  • 3
  • 25
  • icon
  • 3
  • 25
Result 26
TitleLewis Silkin - Coronavirus FAQs for employers on working from home
Urlhttps://www.lewissilkin.com/en/insights/coronavirus-faqs-for-employers-on-working-from-home
DescriptionLewis Silkin - Coronavirus FAQs for employers on working from home
Date10 Dec 2021
Organic Position25
H1Coronavirus - FAQs for employers on working from home
H2These FAQs look at the considerations for employers whose staff are working from home during the pandemic
Related items
H3Should office-based employees in England work from home?
Health and safety
Provision of equipment and expenses
Data protection and confidentiality
Amending employment documentation
Employee benefits
Diversity and inclusion
Employment
Covid 19 - Coronavirus
Occupational Health & Safety
H2WithAnchorsThese FAQs look at the considerations for employers whose staff are working from home during the pandemic
Related items
BodyCoronavirus - FAQs for employers on working from home 10 December 2021 These FAQs look at the considerations for employers whose staff are working from home during the pandemic. As part of the government’s move to Plan B in England in light of the new Omicron variant, anyone who can work from home is being advised to do so from Monday 13 December. These FAQs look at the various considerations that employers need to bear in mind in relation to employees working from home. Should office-based employees in England work from home? Anyone who can work from home is being advised to do so from Monday 13 December. The Cabinet Office guidance says that anyone who cannot work from home should continue to go into work - for example, to access equipment necessary for their role or where their role must be completed in person. The guidance also advises employers to consider if home working may be inappropriate for employees with mental or physical health difficulties, or for those with a particularly challenging home working environment. This is guidance rather than law. It will not be an offence to continue to work from the office even if that work could have been carried out from home. However, employers will need to consider their underlying health and safety obligations. Employers will also need to decide what, if any, gateways to put in place – for example, asking employees to make a declaration that they need to work in the office. Health and safety. Do employers have health and safety duties to homeworkers? Yes. Employers owe a duty to take steps that are reasonably necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of all their employees, and provide and maintain a safe system of work - including for employees working from home. This extends to safeguarding mental health and wellbeing. The UK’s workplace health and safety regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), has updated its homeworking guidance to take account of working arrangements during the  Covid-19 pandemic. Acas has also published guidance on working from home which can be accessed here. Do employers need to carry out a risk assessment for those working from home? The short answer is yes.  However, the exact nature of the assessment will depend on the type of work which is being undertaken at home. Under the Health and Safety Act 1974 and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, employers have a general duty to conduct a risk assessment of all the work activities carried out by their employees. This involves identifying any hazards and assessing associated risks.  Employers must take measures to remove any hazards or, where this is not reasonably practicable, to minimise the associated risks. There are also specific obligations in relation to the use of display screen equipment (see below). The duty of care which employers owe to employees also apply to those working from home. In these challenging times, however, employers are unlikely to be required to approach things in the usual way. At the very least, however, employers ought to help employees assess and adapt their working environment during the period of homeworking by asking them to undertake a basic homeworking risk assessment. This would highlight whether there are any risks which arise from the type of work which is carried out from home, whether it can be done safely and whether any measures ought to be put in place to protect employees from any risks identified.  For employees whose work is largely on computers and the telephone those risks are likely to include feelings of isolation, a lack of supervision, physical issues arising from prolonged use of display screen equipment and working long hours and/or inadequate breaks from work.  Measures to minimise the impact of these risks might include: Checking that each employee feels the work they are being asked to do at home can be done safely. Providing guidance and information to employees to help them review their working environment. Putting in place mechanisms to enable employees to raise any specific health and safety concerns Ensuring adequate supervision of junior or less experienced staff members, including new joiners. Keeping in touch with lone workers, including those working from home, and ensuring regular contact to make sure they are healthy and safe. There will always be greater risks for lone workers with no direct supervision, or anyone to help them if things go wrong. This is especially important for new joiners who may struggle to feel integrated. Establishing clear expectations on both sides in relation to communications, working hours, availability and so on. Ensuring employees have avenues to report mental wellbeing issues and schedule regular check-ins with homeworkers. There are likely to be increased (or different) levels of stress caused by homeworking – relating to isolation, blurred boundaries between home and work life, increased exposure to family life (which will not always be happy). Employers need to consider how they work and stress levels are monitored. We have produced a helpful guide to wellbeing while working from home and Acas has produced guidance on spotting and handling mental health in the context of homeworking and furlough. Are there particular obligations where employees are using laptops and computers at home? The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 contain specific obligations in relation to display screen equipment (DSE). Employers must: Identify risks for individuals who regularly use DSE, including laptops used for prolonged periods, as a significant part of their usual work. (HSE guidance suggests this means daily usage for continuous periods of an hour or more) Reduce the risks identified to the lowest extent reasonably practicable. Provide adequate training and information to employees. HSE guidance on protecting homeworkers states that there is no increased risk from DSE for those working from home temporarily, so employers are not expected to undertake a full home workstation assessment. Nonetheless, employers should provide guidance and information on health and safety risks arising from homeworking and to ask employees to assess risk in general terms (including in relation to DSE related problems). The HSE provides a useful checklist which can be given to the employee. Employers should keep the situation under review and have regular discussions with workers to assess whether any additional steps are needed, since the adverse effects of homeworking with a sub-optimal set up will increase the longer the period of homeworking continues. For employees working from home on a long-term basis, the risks of using DSE must be controlled by them doing a workplace assessment at home. Given that many employees will have been working at home for over a year, it is prudent to provide guidance and support to employees so that they can undertake a workstation assessment. Certainly, those employers moving to a model of hybrid working, with permanent remote working for some for the long-term, regardless of the pandemic, will need to carry out a suitable risk assessment. What health and safety duties do companies (or “end-users”) have towards temporary or agency workers carrying out work for them at home? The situation has become more complex in relation to temporary or agency workers during the pandemic, where they are working under the control of the end-user but not at the end-user’s premises. In short, agency workers should be provided with the same level of health and safety protection as employees. Broadly speaking, the end-user has responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of the agency worker while the individual is working under their control, while the intermediary (e.g. the agency) has the duty to ensure that the end-user has taken steps to ensure the health and safety of the workers.  Where there are multiple intermediaries (e.g. agencies or umbrella companies) involved in an engagement, or the possibility of multiple workplaces, the parties should agree who will take responsibility for which actions. End-users are encouraged to engage in active communication with all parties to ensure no-one’s health and safety is compromised. Provision of equipment and expenses. Do employers need to provide homeworkers with equipment to use at home? There is no general legal obligation on employers to provide the equipment necessary for homeworking. In guidance issued during the first lockdown, the government encouraged employers to take every step possible to facilitate their employees working from home, including providing suitable IT and equipment to enable remote working. Some employers developed systems to allow employees to take equipment from the office to satisfy this shorter-term need. As the pandemic progressed, some employers have been providing a (generally fixed sum) budget to employees to buy necessary work equipment for working at home, so long as receipts are provided. Employers should provide equipment or flexibility for employees who are identified as being at risk. In circumstances where equipment is specifically needed to address health and safety concerns, employers are liable to fund the cost of that equipment (and possibly have a role in selecting it). Disabled employees may be entitled to auxiliary aids as a reasonable adjustment under the Equality Act 2020. If such an aid is reasonably needed, the employer needs to make sure it is provided – at its expense – to the individual when working from home. Employers and employees should review their respective insurance policies to ensure work equipment used at home is covered. There is no income tax or NICs charge where an employer provides office equipment for employees working from home under a formal homeworking arrangement if certain conditions are satisfied, including that the property remains the employers and that there is no significant private use of the equipment. HMRC has updated its tax rules for employers who cover the expense of providing or reimbursing the cost of homeworking equipment for employees working at home due to coronavirus, in particular a temporary exemption has been introduced to allow employers to reimburse home office equipment free of income tax and NICs until 5 April 2022. Detailed guidance can be found here and here. Who is responsible for paying any additional homeworking expenses? Employees will be using their own heating, lighting, broadband and sometime phone lines while working from home but it will be challenging to quantify the amount used for work purposes. Employers are not legally required to reimburse employees for such costs, but they may find themselves under pressure to allow for employees to reclaim some of these expenses. Employers that decide to meet (a proportion of) these costs should review expenses policies to cover this. If an employer decides to reimburse employees for the additional costs which the employee incurs while working at home under a formal working arrangement, the employer may pay up to £6 per week free of income tax and NICs without the need to see receipts or records of expenditure.  If the employer decides to pay more than the £6 per week it will need to either: (i) show that it is reimbursing the actual costs incurred by the employee; or (ii) ensure that the excess above £6 per week is subject to income tax and NICs. The exemption is only available for additional costs and, for example, would not include internet/broadband charges which the employee was paying for prior to working from home under a formal arrangement. Is there any tax relief available to employees in relation to office equipment and additional expenses? In so far as an employee’s employer does not reimburse the additional expenses incurred by the employee as a result of working from home, the employee may be able to claim tax relief from HMRC  - see here. Up to £6 per week can be claimed without evidence of the expenditure.  To claim tax relief, the employee must show that the additional expenses were incurred wholly, exclusively and necessarily in the performance of the employment - this includes showing that the employee did not have a choice between working at home or at the employer’s premises. HMRC has confirmed that employees who are working at home on a regular basis for all or part of their time as a result of Covid-19 will satisfy this test for tax years 2020-21 and 2021-22 provided that the employer has decided that the employee should work from home. If the employee incurs costs on office equipment which are not reimbursed by the employer, the  employee is unlikely to be able to obtain tax relief for those expenses unless they can show that they had to buy the equipment in order to do their job see here. A laptop or printer may fall within this category, but office furniture is unlikely to do so. Data protection and confidentiality. How should we manage the increased risk to data protection and confidentiality created by homeworking? Information security and confidentiality are more difficult to manage where employees are hosting calls and meetings at home with others in earshot, or without the usual office systems in place for securing devices and documents. However, the normal duties to protect employer and client confidential information apply even when employees are working from home. Employers should set out employees’ responsibilities in their homeworking policy (see below) and ensure that employees have adequate means of protecting information. For example, employers should be satisfied of the security of devices and software employees are using (e.g. the security levels of video-calling software and services). Care should be taken in choosing a secure platform that complies with your security requirements. The Information Commissioner’s Office has produced guidance on the data protection aspects of working from home. It’s hard to know what employees are doing when they work from home – can we monitor them? One of the issues which was traditionally raised by employers about homeworking was how best to monitor productivity or quality of output and enable effective supervision. Some employers, out of concern that employees are not managing to “switch off”, might also wish to know what hours employees are working. Even when employees are working from home, employers still need to comply with duties to ensure rest breaks and other working time obligations. Some employers have adopted technology such as “lone worker apps” through which employees check-in on the app at the beginning of the day and check out at the end of each day. Employers can monitor employees’ work activities, but the level of monitoring needs to be proportionate and reasonable – discussed further below. What does an employer need to take into account when considering monitoring? There is no statutory right to privacy in the UK, but this does not mean that an employer has unrestricted monitoring rights. Inappropriate and disproportionate monitoring could lead to claims involving the employees’ right to respect for private life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (incorporated into UK law by the Human Rights Act 1998). Employees also have data protection rights and can potentially claim that excessive monitoring amounts to a breach of the duty of mutual trust and confidence implied into all employment contracts – this may give qualifying employees a claim for unfair constructive dismissal. In relation to data protection, the Information Commissioner’s Office’s employment practices code contains good practice guidance for employers in this area. In summary, employers should: Complete a privacy impact assessment setting out the purposes of the monitoring, the adverse impact on data subjects, the mitigation and its justification. Inform employees of the monitoring that is being undertaken, and the reasons why it has been adopted. If sensitive data is being processed, ensure that a legal basis for such processing is being met. Limit the number of people who have access to the software and ensure that they are properly trained in confidentiality and data security. Not use covert monitoring except in the most extreme circumstances (e.g. where criminal activity or similar is suspected). Employers will need to weigh the perceived benefits to the business of monitoring, with the potential impact on morale, employee relations and mental health, which may ultimately lead to a deterioration in productivity. For a more in-depth discussion of these issues, please see our article. Amending employment documentation. Should we amend existing employee’s contracts to reflect homeworking status? Until the pandemic, homeworking was generally considered to be a non-standard, flexible working arrangement, where the “default” work location was the employer’s premises. Of course, employees have been working from home during the pandemic out of necessity rather than by choice, and the formalised flexible working request regime has to some extent fallen by the wayside (at least temporarily). Employers may, however, wish to think about whether home working (or other flexible) arrangements need to be formalised in certain cases. Full or partial homeworking may have become a preference for some employees and employers are managing requests for permanent change. Many employers are also considering reducing the office footprint in the longer-term and moving towards hybrid working, enabling employees to split their time between working from home and working in the office To claim the tax and NICs exemptions and reliefs there needs to be a formal home working arrangement in place between the employer and employee under which the employee must work at home regularly, so it is good to record this in writing. Where contracts are amended to reflect the employee’s home as the place of work, employers will need to retain some flexibility to deal with some of the practicalities. For example, requiring employees to attend the office (for training, appraisals or disciplinary issues) and dealing with how expenses for travel to and from the office should be met. If an employee moves house, this may mean higher travel expense claims or a practical barrier to attending work at the office so employers could consider placing limits on how far an employee can move from a particular location. Employers may also want to retain the flexibility to alter the arrangement temporarily and consider making agreement to homeworking conditional on certain conditions being met, such as satisfactory performance being maintained. For now, employers may decide to keep homeworking under review until a more comprehensive return to the office is possible and/or hybrid models of working are implemented. If so, you should continue to make clear that homeworking is, for the moment, a response to an exceptional situation, and that once a more comprehensive return to the office is anticipated, employees may make flexible working requests if they wish to work from home on a more permanent basis. These can be considered on a case-by case-basis. For more on this topic, please see our article. Some employers have received requests from employees asking if they can work from “home” for an extended period overseas. Employers need to consider a variety of issues (including tax, social security, immigration and employment implications) before agreeing to any such request where “home” is not the UK. You can find out more on these issues in our Inbrief here. What is the position for new starters who begin employment as homeworkers? While recruitment activity slowed down in many businesses during the pandemic, it did not stopped completely. Employers may wish to consider whether new recruits should be employed on a “working from home” basis from the outset, rather than stating a work location in the contract which they will not attend for some time to come. Location clauses included in contracts can be drafted to state that the work should be performed from home initially, with a move to the office once it is safe and appropriate to do so. Additional obligations could also be included in contracts for new starters regarding access to an internet connection and other communication methods. Employers may also need to provide equipment (e.g. laptop, mobile phone) to individuals who would not normally be provided with these in their job role. Should we amend existing policies or handbooks? Many employers are currently reviewing how existing sickness, data and IT, disciplinary and grievance and benefits policies are impacted by a shift to homeworking. Regarding sickness and absence policies, it a criminal offence, where an employer is aware that a worker is required to self-isolate, to allow the employee to attend work. In view of the range of circumstances in which employees may be absent from work due to the pandemic, it would be prudent to amend policies to allow for these potential temporary homeworking and Covid-related absences. Regarding data and IT, it would be sensible to address data and information security issues related to working remotely, together with any need to address monitoring or other new ways in which personal data is being processed due to use of remote-working software. Regarding disciplinary and grievance policies, employees working from home may no longer be able to attend in-person meetings for disciplinary and grievance procedures and the normal timelines for dealing with issues may need to be altered accordingly. Policies should be updated to ensure a fair procedure for both office workers and homeworkers. From a tax perspective, it is generally important to show that the employee is not making significant private use of the office equipment.  Provisions regarding private use of office equipment should therefore be included in policies setting out the circumstances in which private use is permitted and warning employees about potential disciplinary consequences if the policy is not followed.  Mobile phones are exempt from this rule – one mobile phone may be provided to an employee for private use by the employee (or a combination of business and private use) without any tax and NICs charge. As mentioned above, many employers are either updating or implementing (non-contractual) homeworking policies, which draw together many of the areas mentioned above into a single document. Employers should keep their homeworking policies under review and update them as the businesses experience of homeworking develops. For organisations contemplating a shift to hybrid working, they will need to consider introducing a hybrid working policy. We have created an inbrief on hybrid working arrangements setting out issues employers should consider here. ACAS has also published new advice on hybrid working. Employee benefits. How could homeworking impact employee benefits? Some benefits have been used by employees in ways that are specific to their office location and may need to be reconsidered. Homeworkers are unlikely to be using their commuter season tickets, which may have been purchased via an employer loan, and in many cases, employees will already have claimed refunds where possible depending on the provider. Loan arrangements should be discussed and reviewed with the employee directly. Other benefits may be specific to an office location – for example, subsidised or on-site childcare, gym membership, food. There may be alternative ways of helping employees in the longer term while they work from home, such as supporting them to access their tax-free childcare entitlement, providing occasional food vouchers or reimbursing the cost of attendance at local fitness classes as opposed to a city-centre gym. The provision of such alternative benefits may result in an income tax and/or NICs liability so employer would need to bear this in mind and seek appropriate advice. Diversity and inclusion . How do we ensure that homeworking doesn’t disadvantage certain groups? Homeworking may have its advantages for many employees, but employers should be cautious about whether homeworking has the practical effect of disadvantaging certain groups. This may, for example, occur because of a lack of access to internet in rural areas, shared accommodation, disability, caring responsibilities, financial issues or other individual circumstances. Diversity and inclusion policies extend to homeworking and employers should invite and encourage employees to make any disadvantages known in order that reasonable steps can be taken to remove or reduce them. As mentioned above, disabled employees may be entitled to auxiliary aids as a reasonable adjustment under the Equality Act 2010. If such an aid is reasonably needed, the employer needs to make sure it is provided – at its expense – to the individual when working from home.   Share article LinkedInLinkedIn TwitterTwitter FacebookFacebook Related items. Employment. Employment is a central focus of our business, with over 150 lawyers in our team. Our practice is the most highly nominated European firm in research conducted by Who’s Who Legal. We have also received global recognition from Who's Who Legal who this year have named us "Law Firm of the Year for Labour, Employment & Pensions". View more Covid 19 - Coronavirus. Our advice on responding to the coronavirus outbreak. View more Occupational Health & Safety. Our Occupational Health and Safety group handles a wide range of workplace health and safety issues. We devise and implement health and safety strategies, advise businesses on their legal obligations, conduct audits and risk assessments and protect businesses through comprehensive policies, procedures and training. View more Back To Top
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • employee
  • 96
  • 26
  • employer
  • 84
  • 26
  • home
  • 62
  • 26
  • working
  • 60
  • 26
  • work
  • 37
  • 26
  • homeworking
  • 32
  • 26
  • working home
  • 31
  • 26
  • office
  • 30
  • 26
  • health
  • 27
  • 26
  • equipment
  • 25
  • 26
  • health safety
  • 22
  • 26
  • safety
  • 21
  • 26
  • risk
  • 20
  • 26
  • policy
  • 17
  • 26
  • tax
  • 16
  • 26
  • guidance
  • 15
  • 26
  • ensure
  • 14
  • 26
  • employee working
  • 13
  • 26
  • expense
  • 13
  • 26
  • employee working home
  • 12
  • 26
  • issue
  • 12
  • 26
  • data
  • 12
  • 26
  • work home
  • 11
  • 26
  • arrangement
  • 11
  • 26
  • worker
  • 11
  • 26
  • employment
  • 10
  • 26
  • assessment
  • 10
  • 26
  • monitoring
  • 10
  • 26
  • pandemic
  • 9
  • 26
  • relation
  • 9
  • 26
  • duty
  • 9
  • 26
  • information
  • 9
  • 26
  • cost
  • 9
  • 26
  • including
  • 8
  • 26
  • additional
  • 8
  • 26
  • end user
  • 7
  • 26
  • tax nic
  • 7
  • 26
  • home employer
  • 6
  • 26
  • working arrangement
  • 6
  • 26
  • employee work
  • 6
  • 26
  • hybrid working
  • 6
  • 26
  • office equipment
  • 6
  • 26
  • home working
  • 5
  • 26
  • employer decide
  • 5
  • 26
  • risk assessment
  • 5
  • 26
  • employer provide
  • 5
  • 26
  • income tax
  • 5
  • 26
  • data protection
  • 5
  • 26
  • display screen equipment
  • 4
  • 26
  • working home employer
  • 4
  • 26
  • income tax nic
  • 4
  • 26
  • employee work home
  • 4
  • 26
  • covid 19
  • 4
  • 26
  • employer employee
  • 4
  • 26
  • employee employer
  • 4
  • 26
  • mobile phone
  • 4
  • 26
  • display screen
  • 4
  • 26
  • screen equipment
  • 4
  • 26
  • agency worker
  • 4
  • 26
  • week
  • 4
  • 26
  • tax relief
  • 4
  • 26
  • employer provide equipment
  • 3
  • 26
  • working home formal
  • 3
  • 26
  • working environment
  • 3
  • 26
  • work office
  • 3
  • 26
  • obligation employer
  • 3
  • 26
  • mental health
  • 3
  • 26
  • lone worker
  • 3
  • 26
  • home employee
  • 3
  • 26
  • remote working
  • 3
  • 26
  • premis
  • 3
  • 26
  • individual working
  • 3
  • 26
  • provide equipment
  • 3
  • 26
  • home formal
  • 3
  • 26
  • additional expense
  • 3
  • 26
  • claim tax
  • 3
  • 26
  • homeworking policy
  • 3
  • 26
  • flexible working
  • 3
  • 26
  • disciplinary grievance
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
Title7 simple tips to tackle working from home - Every Mind Matters - NHS
Urlhttps://www.nhs.uk/every-mind-matters/coronavirus/simple-tips-to-tackle-working-from-home/
DescriptionRead our 7 simple tips to help you manage working from home and look after your mental wellbeing during the coronavirus outbreak
Date
Organic Position26
H17 simple tips to tackle working from home
H21. Set and stick to a routine
2. Make a dedicated workspace
3. Give yourself a break
4. Stay connected
5. Set boundaries
6. Think longer term
7. Be kind to yourself
Further support and advice
H3If you do not live in England
Looking after children and young people during COVID-19
Coping with money worries and job uncertainty
Mental wellbeing while staying at home
H2WithAnchors1. Set and stick to a routine
2. Make a dedicated workspace
3. Give yourself a break
4. Stay connected
5. Set boundaries
6. Think longer term
7. Be kind to yourself
Further support and advice
Body7 simple tips to tackle working from home The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has meant big life changes for us all, including adjusting to new ways of working. While some of us have returned to our normal workplace, many are still working from home or going through a phased return.Working from home does have perks that some of us enjoy (bye bye commute!), but for many among us, changes like these have been challenging too.Feeling stress, lack of motivation, anxiety and uncertainty is completely normal. Alongside this, many of us might be worried about future job prospects or the best way to juggle work with our personal and family life.These simple tips can help you feel more productive and motivated, and take care of your mental health while working from home. 1. Set and stick to a routine. Without steady schedules, the lines between work and personal time can get blurred and be stressful to get right.Follow your normal sleep and work patterns if you can, and stay consistent.Get up at the same time, eat breakfast and get out of your pyjamas. Try scheduling in your "commute time" and spend it exercising, reading or listening to music before logging in.Most importantly, when your workday stops, stop working. Shut down, stop checking emails and focus on your home life. And at the end of the day, try to get to bed at your usual time. 2. Make a dedicated workspace. If you can, find a quiet space away from people and distractions like the TV (or the kitchen, when you feel snacky).Get everything you need in one place, before you start work – chargers, pens, paper and anything else – and shut the door if you can. Even in a small or shared space, try to designate an area for work.Lastly, get comfortable. While it might be tempting to sit on the sofa, it's much better to sit at a desk or table. Use the NHS guidelines to set up your workspace correctly, as much as you possibly can.If you do not have office furniture like an adjustable chair, try using things like cushions to support you in your chair, or a box as a footrest. How to set up your workspace correctly 3. Give yourself a break. Making time for breaks is important to help manage feelings of stress.Try to take lunch and regular screen breaks, and give yourself time to concentrate on something else so you feel more focused when you return. Even just 5 to 10 minutes of short breaks each hour can really help your productivity too.If possible, spend time outdoors when you can. Regular time in green space is great for your mental health.Set a time to go for a walk, run or bike ride for some fresh air, or a coffee. Better Health: Home workout videos 4. Stay connected. While working from home has its benefits, you may also feel more isolated. But there are lots of ways to stay in touch with those who matter – boosting their mental wellbeing as well as our own.In and out of work, human interaction matters so schedule video calls and pick up the phone instead of emailing. If you're struggling with working at home, speak to your colleagues or manager about your concerns.And remember, your colleagues probably feel the same as you. Ask how they're doing and whether there are ways you can support each other.Make time to socialise virtually – schedule in a digital coffee break or Friday online get-together. 5. Set boundaries. Setting boundaries with other members of your household is key to mental wellbeing while working at home.You can be more flexible when working from home, so enjoy it. But it can also be difficult if there are other distractions to deal with, like children at home, who may think you are on holiday and want to spend time with you.Have a discussion about your needs, especially with family. Remind them that you still have work to do and need quiet time to do it, and share your schedule.Similarly, set boundaries with work. It's easier to stay logged on when your home is your office, but try to switch off when the work day is over, and enjoy time with family at home. 6. Think longer term. You may be continuing to work from home for a while, so think about ways you could improve how you work while at home. If you have a room that's warmer or has a window that lets in a lot of light, could you work there instead?Try to explore how you work with others. Are there different ways to talk online or new software you could use? 7. Be kind to yourself. Remember, this is an unusual situation and things will not feel normal.Be kind to yourself and acknowledge that you might not be as productive as you usually would be. Be realistic about what you can achieve given the circumstances, and relax when your work is done. Further support and advice. If you feel low or are struggling with feelings of isolation, there is support and advice available. Find out more in our tips if you are worried about COVID-19.For more advice on how to look after your own mental health and supporting colleagues while working from home, visit Mental Health at Work.If you do not live in England. Additional country-specific COVID-19 guidance is available for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Looking after children and young people during COVID-19. Coping with money worries and job uncertainty. Mental wellbeing while staying at home.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • home
  • 18
  • 27
  • time
  • 14
  • 27
  • work
  • 13
  • 27
  • working
  • 10
  • 27
  • working home
  • 8
  • 27
  • set
  • 8
  • 27
  • feel
  • 7
  • 27
  • mental
  • 7
  • 27
  • stay
  • 5
  • 27
  • way
  • 5
  • 27
  • break
  • 5
  • 27
  • covid
  • 4
  • 27
  • health
  • 4
  • 27
  • support
  • 4
  • 27
  • covid 19
  • 3
  • 27
  • mental health
  • 3
  • 27
  • mental wellbeing
  • 3
  • 27
  • tip
  • 3
  • 27
  • 19
  • 3
  • 27
  • normal
  • 3
  • 27
  • enjoy
  • 3
  • 27
  • family
  • 3
  • 27
  • schedule
  • 3
  • 27
  • spend
  • 3
  • 27
  • stop
  • 3
  • 27
  • workspace
  • 3
  • 27
  • space
  • 3
  • 27
  • wellbeing
  • 3
  • 27
  • colleague
  • 3
  • 27
  • boundary
  • 3
  • 27
  • advice
  • 3
  • 27
Result 28
TitleWe Work Remotely | How To Keep Your Mental Health in Check When You Work From Home
Urlhttps://weworkremotely.com/how-to-keep-your-mental-health-in-check-when-you-work-from-home
DescriptionTake steps to improve your mental health when you work from home and you’ll shrug off the anxiety, depression, and loneliness many remote workers face
Date
Organic Position27
H1Sign in to WWR
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodySign in to WWRForgot your password? How To Keep Your Mental Health in Check When You Work From Home Working RemotelyTake steps to improve your mental health when you work from home and you’ll shrug off the anxiety, depression, and loneliness many remote workers face.[Work From Home; Stay Happy]Have you noticed a change in your mental health now that you work from home?Do you feel more stressed out despite not having a commute? Are you battling feelings of isolation even though you can clock in wherever you want?Work from home jobs can challenge your mental health. It can turn normally optimistic, productive worker bees into tired, unmotivated, irritable toads.So before you hit rock bottom, learn how to spot the signs of declining mental health so you can address your next steps.What are the Psychological Effects of Working from Home?Here are the three most commonly reported issues that remote workers and digital nomads face:LONELINESS AND ISOLATIONYou could spend days not talking to anyone when you don’t have to go anywhere to work. Although you bypass distracting coworkers, you do miss the social aspect of chatting and venting about work and life when you’re remote. This camaraderie doesn’t translate the same way over Slack.[Freelancer Isolation]This disconnectivity from your coworkers and the rest of the world may make you feel lonely and isolated. And loneliness is associated with higher rates of depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms like random pain[*].ANXIETY, STRESS, AND PRESSUREWorking from home anxiety takes on many forms, including:Pressure to hustle 24/7. Have to find work and then create it? You probably squeeze in work whenever you can. But without time to disconnect and unplug, you risk burning out. [Always On Mindset]The boundary between work and home life blurs for people who work in the same place they sleep. You may feel pressure to be on when you should be off.Stress from wearing multiple hats. Working from home requires time management, invoicing skills, marketing, IT troubleshooting, customer service, and much more. Switching between these hats multiple times a day will wear out anyone.DEPRESSIONWork from home depression can happen when you feel stuck. Without career milestones like a new nameplate on your desk or a fancy corner office, you may not feel as if you’re achieving as much as your peers.The anxiety, stress, and loneliness of working from home can lead to depression or make it worse.[Your Friend Sadness]Depression isn’t just feeling down. The Mayo Clinic says symptoms of depression include[*]:Angry outbursts, irritability, or frustration (even over small matters)Loss of interest or happiness in activities such as sex or hobbiesSleep disturbances, including insomnia and sleeping too muchTiredness and lack of energy, so even small tasks take extra effortIncreased cravings for foodAnxiety, agitation, and restlessnessTrouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions, and remembering thingsUnexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headachesOften wanting to stay at home rather than going out to socialize or do new activitiesThe good news is your mental health doesn’t have to suffer when you work from home.How to Take Care of Your Mental Health When You Work From HomeTaking care of your mental health is just as important as physical activity and eating nourishing food.First things first: it’s okay not to be okay.Honor exactly where you are, wherever that may be.Second, know it’s in your power to enjoy a happy brain by making a few adjustments:#1. CREATE A ROUTINE AND STICK TO THE SCHEDULEGet to work whenever you want? Over 40% of people say their flexible schedule is the best part of working remotely[*].But it’s how you organize those hours in your day that makes all the difference.Do you have a daily schedule or set routine you follow?When you organize your tasks and outline your goals, you mentally prepare yourself for what to expect during the day. Then it’s easier to work towards achieving the goals you set out, rather than vaguely meandering towards them.This scheduling also prevents tasks not on your to-do list (like falling down a Reddit rabbit hole) from creeping into your day.It’s important to schedule analog breaks. Set aside time to escape all forms of digital screens. Give your eyes, neck, shoulders, and back a much-needed rest![Disconnect]Schedule fun activities just like work tasks. All work and no play stresses all remote workers out. When you have scheduled time for fun, you have permission to break from work. Focus on hobbies, self-care, and anything else that makes you happy for a few minutes every day.#2. UPGRADE YOUR HOME OFFICEOne survey shows 84% of remote workers get their business done from home[*]. But do you actually like working in your home office?[Upgrade Your Work Space]If you don’t have a dedicated workspace, make that priority number one. Bonus points if you have an office with a door you can close to mentally and physically separate work and home life.Next, outfit your home office like you want to be the next Twitch star.Buy new or check second-hand shops and Craigslist for a:Wide desk. Support for your wrists, arms, and elbows will keep carpal tunnel away while you use your mouse and keyboard[*]. Comfortable, ergonomic chair that supports your back. Long work hours require a supportive chair for your back, neck, and spine. Look for strong lumbar support for the curve of your lower back.Dope sound system (and other creature comforts). Without coworkers to annoy, you can blast your Spotify focus playlists and get in the zone. Get a wireless mouse and keyboard for the ultimate tether-free work life. #3. GET UP AND MOVE![Start Exercising]Fight the urge to stay sedentary and schedule active time to get your heart pumping.Go for a walk or bike ride, stretch or do yoga, practice a hip-hop dance video on YouTube — whatever floats your boat.Exercising 20 to 30 minutes daily can significantly lower anxiety levels[*]. You’ll also boost endorphins and serotonin to flood your brain with happiness.Plus, working out distracts your noggin from work problems so you can actually take a break.#4. LEAVE YOUR HOUSE FOR THE WONDER OF NATUREEcotherapy treats anxiety, stress, and depression with time in nature. Studies show outdoor walks may help lower blood pressure and stress hormones[*].Dr. Jason Strauss from Harvard-affiliated Cambridge Health Alliance says[*]:"Having something pleasant to focus on like trees and greenery helps distract your mind from negative thinking, so your thoughts become less filled with worry."Try exercising in nature to accomplish two tasks in one trek. Or organize a group hike to add a social layer to your outdoor time.#5. WORK AROUND OTHER HUMANS[Find Other Like Minds]Get out of your (now killer) home office and venture into society to interact with (gasp) other people. You’ll combat feelings of isolation and loneliness. Plus, studies show that ambient noise may boost creative thinking[*].Coworking spaces are cropping up in big and small cities all over the world. You can work with like-minded people in a modern space for a small price.Schedule work dates. Know other freelancers in your circle? Meet up at your local coffee shop, library, or brewery and work alongside each other. #6. MAKE TIME FOR YOUR FAVORITE PEOPLE[Find Your Support System]Support from your peers is just as effective as cognitive behavior therapy when you’re down[*]. So carve out time each week to spend with your core group of friends and family members who lift you up (not bring you down). #7. START SAYING "NO"[Say No More]You may want to take on as much work as you can, but there’s only so much you can complete in a day. Know your limitations, set boundaries based on your schedule and workload, and don’t extend yourself beyond them.Be assertive yet courteous and your clients will still respect you. Improve Your Mental Health When You Work From Home and You’ll Never Go Back To Traditional JobsFollow these tips and you’ll protect your mental health from the loneliness, anxiety, and depression many remote workers have a hard time dealing with.Reach out to someone you trust, speak to your doctor, or find a mental health professional if you’re struggling with depression or anxiety. You’re not alone. And remember, tomorrow is always a fresh start.← Back to Blog
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • work
  • 28
  • 28
  • home
  • 17
  • 28
  • time
  • 12
  • 28
  • health
  • 12
  • 28
  • mental health
  • 11
  • 28
  • mental
  • 11
  • 28
  • anxiety
  • 8
  • 28
  • depression
  • 8
  • 28
  • task
  • 7
  • 28
  • back
  • 7
  • 28
  • working
  • 7
  • 28
  • remote
  • 6
  • 28
  • worker
  • 6
  • 28
  • work home
  • 5
  • 28
  • remote worker
  • 5
  • 28
  • loneliness
  • 5
  • 28
  • feel
  • 5
  • 28
  • day
  • 5
  • 28
  • stress
  • 5
  • 28
  • schedule
  • 5
  • 28
  • mental health work
  • 4
  • 28
  • health work
  • 4
  • 28
  • life
  • 4
  • 28
  • care
  • 4
  • 28
  • person
  • 4
  • 28
  • office
  • 4
  • 28
  • small
  • 4
  • 28
  • set
  • 4
  • 28
  • support
  • 4
  • 28
  • working home
  • 3
  • 28
  • coworker
  • 3
  • 28
  • activity
  • 3
  • 28
  • organize
  • 3
  • 28
  • focu
  • 3
  • 28
  • show
  • 3
  • 28
  • lower
  • 3
  • 28
Result 29
TitleWhat are the Work From Home Challenges organisations are facing?
Urlhttps://www.dqindia.com/what-are-the-work-from-home-challenges-organisation-is-facing/
DescriptionIt is work from home productivity challenges another shade that employers have to focus on. Employers need to create an engaging and competitive environment
Date8 Oct 2020
Organic Position28
H1
H2
H3Related Posts
Leave a Reply Cancel reply
H2WithAnchors
BodyLatest news WazirX Cofounder talks about NFTs, competitive market and pitfalls ECIL Recruitment 2022 for Engineers: 150 New Apprentice Vacancies Announced, Stipend up to Rs 9000 NHPC Recruitment 2022: Applications Invited for 66 New Apprentice Vacancies IT Leader’s Five Resolutions for the new year How NASSCOM CoE Employs DeepTech to Solve Real World Problems Time for a reset: How Crayon is leading the way to a new digital future HAL Recruitment 2022 for Engineers: 150 New Apprentice Vacancies Announced, Stipend up to Rs 9000 Why are Deposit rates escalating? What are the consequences? Technology predictions 2022: Three ways technology will change over the next year HPCL Recruitment 2022 for Engineers: Applications Invited for Various Apprentice Vacancies, Salary Rs 25,000 Social Media Author: DQINDIA Online - October 8, 2020 Share Tweet Linkedin No comments What are the work from home challenges organisations are facing? Overall, the way people have been thinking about work from home has turned out to be completely opposite. It is indeed a new challenge for companies and employees, but it can betackled with the right approach and tools. Are you facing the problem of low work from home productivity? Then, you can easily make the work from home work for you. With the help of the right technology and approach, you can grow your business while working from home. Let’s learn how? With the wave of work from the home structure, the companies are now dealing with a new pandemic “work from productivity challenges.” The businesses might have made a road map to work from home for the entire 2020, but they are still scrambling to overcome working from home challenges and benefits their organizations. Now, if work from home is a battle for the companies, it is not a smooth ride for employees also. The challenges of working from home for employees have been a wild ride where they have lost a blurred line between their personal and professional life. Overall, the way people have been thinking about work from home has turned out to be completely opposite. It is indeed a new challenge for companies and employees, but it can betackled with the right approach and tools. Thus, if you have loaded up yourself with the remote employee efficiency and monitoring tools, you are ready to fight with the WFH monster. Striving Work From Home Challenges and Solutions The list of work from home challenges for companies has been increasing every other  – from latency in deliveries to low productivity of employees – the challenges of both the employees and employers are gigantic. However, if you want to derail the WFH challenges, you don’t need to do much as below; you will find solutions for all the challenges. Time Management Challenges When employees don’t have to wake up early, get ready, and travel all the way to the office, they have so much spare time – this was employees’ thoughts four months back. But, now they have realized without the proper timeline, their productivity and efficiency have deflated dramatically. This has surged the problem of “work from home productivity challenges” for the companies. Employees aren’t trained to schedule their own time table, and they definitely don’t have the discipline to avoid all the distractions present in their home. The malfunction of timing has affected the performance of employees, which has eventually reduced their productivity. Now, this monstrous issue can be handled with an easy solution. Companies should set a work timetable for the employees, the way they used to do before pandemics, but with the little twist of virtual tools. Companies can use the attendance tool to measure employees’ attendance in real-time and allot them weekly or monthly work with strict deadlines. Now, employees know they have to complete a certain task in a given timeframe, and if they got delay, the software would automatically indicate them. So, when they have a tool to monitor their timely attendance and work schedule, they won’t feel out of focus and productivity won’t suffer much. Distraction Challenges The huge challenge of working from home for employees could be avoiding distractions. Yep, when employees are working from home, they have thousands of distractions to deal with. From a play station to playing with your dog, being an employee, you have many distractions lying around the home. For God’s sake, if you are women, you have some extra distractions laying your way as your kids are out of the school. All these home distractions can be a challenge for both the employees and employers. To overcome the challenge of distraction, employees and employers both have to play their part. Employees have to make a work corner in their homes where they don’t hear or see any distractions. Plus, they should complete all their domestic chores before starting the workday. Once an employee has logged into his or her company dashboard, they should stay focused and work with 100% dedication. Employers need to set fixed working hours for the employees and don’t force them to work overtime. Moreover, to calculate the exact working hours of an employee, the monitoring software will be very helpful. The software will automatically record the time when employees are working or taking a break. This way, both employees and employers will know the exact working hours to avoid any conflicts. Moreover, employees can work to increase their working hours when they see low numbers, which reduces managers’ work. Supervision Challenges Now, this situation falls under the working from home challenges and benefits category. When employees are working from home, they have the liberty to work without any directions and supervision. It allows them to solve problems on their own and improve their analytical thinking abilities. However, all the employees aren’t the same. Some employees need constant monitoring and supervision; otherwise, they will make wrong decisions that will eventually impact the reputation of a company. Thus, remote workers need to be monitored but ghostly. Desktop monitoring software can be the perfect ghost monitoring solution. It will be recording all the employees’ activities and sending periodic screenshots to the employers so that they can monitor their activities. Moreover, this won’t disturb the employee in any way so he can work as per his will. Furthermore, the software will generate a performance report based on regular monitoring. Employers can share this report with the employees so that they can analyze their mistakes and make efforts to avoid them. This will reduce the task of managers to provide frequent feedback to the employees. It is a win-win solution for remote task forces. Communication Challenges It’s hard enough to hold productive in-person meetings to coordinate different team members’ efforts to remain aligned. This work from home challenges for companies has created numerous problems. Miscommunication or partial communication can slow down decision-making and take the business for a few years. It has been shared by numerous businesses that they aren’t able to make decisions swiftly in the WFH setup due to miscommunication. It has become a challenge for companies to align the entire team together to make timely decisions. To solve the problem of inadequate communication channels, companies have a great solution in monitoring software. The software has a dedicated communication monitoring system through which employees can communicate with other employees and employers. Moreover, all the communication conducted through a centralized system is recorded so that future references can be drawn. On the top, when an employee makes a sales call to the potential clients, the call recording will be shared with the employer and other concerns employees so that a proper sales pitch can be prepared. Additionally, employers can schedule regular meetings with the entire team so that they can brainstorm new ideas and formulate new strategies. Your employees will feel connected when you are properly communicating with them, and the decision-making process can improve. Performance Metrics Challenges The measurement of performance metrics has been very challenging remotely. Employees frequently complain that employers aren’t using the right system to measure their performance. Mostly, employers just keep records of employees working hours to evaluate their performance, which is the wrong parameter. That’s because the working speed of each person is different – one person can complete the same task within one hour, whereas others might take 2-3 hours to complete it. Now, measuring employees on the parameters of time will wrong. Thus, employers should let the performance measurement task in the hands of automated software. The software will analyze the performance of an employee on numerous grounds and prepare a comprehensive performance report that can be analyzed in the graphic format for the quick interpretation. When employees know that performance report is automatically generated by the software without involvement of the personal basis, they can’t question the reliability of the report. For the correct reporting and analysis of the performance, the automated performance evaluating software is very useful. Motivation Challenges When employees aren’t surrounded by the professionals and working under career-driven energy, they will start to feel demotivated. Employees start to lose their vision as they don’t have so many people around them to drive inspiration from. Moreover, social distancing and isolation will negatively impact the productivity of the employees. It is work from home productivity challenges another shade that employers have to focus on. Employers need to create an engaging and competitive environment in the organization. Even your team is working remotely, but still, you can offer them promotions and bonuses. Companies should create a reward system in the organization so that employees feel motivated and keep on track. When you allot work to the employees, you can set bars for early completion or quality work. Suppose one of your employees has submitted work before due date throughout the month; you can appreciate that employee by giving a bonus or other type of reward. This will motivate your entire to work efficiently so that they can get the reward too. Working From Home Work In spite of the several works from home challenges for companies, this setup has numerous benefits also. Thus, when the remote work setup is implemented perfectly with the support of adequate software, the real benefits of the work from home setup can be driven.  DQINDIA Online | DATAQUEST By Udit Agarwal, Founder and CEO, TrackOlap Posted by: DQINDIA Online View more posts Facebook Tweet Linkedin Pinterest What are the work from home challenges organisations are facing? 0 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 0 user reviews. IISc Launches Online Course in Computational Data Science for Students and Professionals in Partnership with TalentSprint Major barriers in Data Governance Related Posts. Social Media July 20, 2021 2 Saving smart with WhatsApp OTP services. Recently, telecom operators in India have announced a total hike of 100% in the messaging… Read more Share Tweet Facebook Social Media July 12, 2021 Twitter India MD Manish Maheshwari Controversy Summed Up. The tiff between Twitter India and Delhi Police has been in the limelight for about… Read more Share Tweet Facebook Social Media June 23, 2021 When social media becomes anti-social. “Social media is not a media. The key is to listen, engage, and build relationships.”… Read more Share Tweet Facebook Leave a Reply Cancel reply.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • employee
  • 50
  • 29
  • work
  • 34
  • 29
  • home
  • 28
  • 29
  • challenge
  • 27
  • 29
  • working
  • 17
  • 29
  • work home
  • 16
  • 29
  • company
  • 15
  • 29
  • employer
  • 15
  • 29
  • performance
  • 12
  • 29
  • software
  • 12
  • 29
  • hour
  • 11
  • 29
  • productivity
  • 9
  • 29
  • distraction
  • 9
  • 29
  • home challenge
  • 8
  • 29
  • working home
  • 8
  • 29
  • social
  • 8
  • 29
  • monitoring
  • 8
  • 29
  • challenge company
  • 7
  • 29
  • person
  • 7
  • 29
  • time
  • 7
  • 29
  • media
  • 7
  • 29
  • work home challenge
  • 6
  • 29
  • social media
  • 6
  • 29
  • problem
  • 6
  • 29
  • tool
  • 6
  • 29
  • solution
  • 6
  • 29
  • employee employer
  • 5
  • 29
  • working hour
  • 5
  • 29
  • 2022
  • 5
  • 29
  • share
  • 5
  • 29
  • tweet
  • 5
  • 29
  • task
  • 5
  • 29
  • decision
  • 5
  • 29
  • report
  • 5
  • 29
  • communication
  • 5
  • 29
  • read share
  • 4
  • 29
  • recruitment 2022
  • 4
  • 29
  • apprentice vacancy
  • 4
  • 29
  • share tweet
  • 4
  • 29
  • challenge employee
  • 4
  • 29
  • employee working
  • 4
  • 29
  • employee work
  • 4
  • 29
  • setup
  • 4
  • 29
  • system
  • 4
  • 29
  • facebook
  • 4
  • 29
  • recruitment 2022 engineer
  • 3
  • 29
  • challenge company employee
  • 3
  • 29
  • work home productivity
  • 3
  • 29
  • home challenge company
  • 3
  • 29
  • read share tweet
  • 3
  • 29
  • share tweet facebook
  • 3
  • 29
  • 2022 engineer
  • 3
  • 29
  • dqindia online
  • 3
  • 29
  • company employee
  • 3
  • 29
  • home productivity
  • 3
  • 29
  • productivity challenge
  • 3
  • 29
  • monitoring software
  • 3
  • 29
  • performance report
  • 3
  • 29
  • tweet facebook
  • 3
  • 29
Result 30
Title5 big challenges of working from home and how to overcome them
Urlhttps://www.hrkatha.com/special/employee-benefits-and-engagement/5-big-challenges-of-working-from-home-and-how-to-overcome-them/
Description
Date8 May 2020
Organic Position29
H15 big challenges of working from home and how to overcome them
H2
H3Role of technology in boosting employee engagement
Six must-have employee benefits for remote workers
7 Employee Engagement Strategies to Adopt Post Lockdown Period
The undeniable link between employee benefits & engagement
5 Employee Benefits Your Workforce Actually Wants
How Ugam keeps employees engaged with its unique formal and informal activities
New HR strategies with the help of nine coaching virtues
The number one question that resolves any challenge!
Powering performance with qualified leadership
Communicate like LORDS: One small word to give your communication skills..
Walmart to expand InHome service in the US, hire 3,000+ drivers
Laid off McDonald’s union workers reinstated
US vaccine mandates: Supreme Court to hear cases
2022 to begin with WFH for many US-based companies
Minimum wage to go up in many of US states in..
EY’s Neetu Sidana takes charge as director-HR at Mazars
Almond Solutions offers unlimited leaves to employees
SEBI to hire 120 in 4 months
Ninjacart announces ESOP buyback worth 100 crore for staff
“A CEO needs to acknowledge the silent majority who create the company’s fortunes” S..
“If CEO is the father of an organisation, CHRO is the mother,” Pankaj Lochan
Binding multi-faceted employees with Titan Values
50% cut in paid leave for COVID-positive staff at Walmart
700 fired at Mayo Clinic for not meeting vaccination deadline
Assam government makes first weekend of 2022 long by 2 days..
How to up productivity during festive months
How to increase effective salaries with no additional cost
Productivity linked bonus approved for railway employees by union cabinet
How professional development can ensure employee engagement
Employee engagement: Is the road smooth?
H2WithAnchors
Body5 big challenges of working from home and how to overcome them Although millions of employees are telecommuting now, few know what to expect. By Braja Deepon Roy - May 8, 2020 0 62811 Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp Linkedin Email The COVID-19 pandemic has brought many new challenges to our professional and personal lives. Employees around the world are in a crisis, as businesses are suddenly distant. Since the majority of the global workforce is not used to working from home, this sudden change has led to many problems. They are adjusting their seats to meet their organisational needs amidst everything that is happening around the world. Until now, remote working was seen more as a perk or luxury that companies provided to meet the needs of the employees and vice versa. But now, it has taken centre stage in our work culture. If you introspect, you will realise that nothing much has changed in terms of work (for those whom work from home is feasible). Employees doing their jobs from their homes have accepted the realities. But this sudden shift in work culture has brought some new challenges with it. Let us discuss the five significant challenges of working from home, and how to overcome them. 1. Flow of communication When you work from home, transparency is compromised. You no longer have the freedom to go and check with your co-workers, discuss a project over impromptu coffee breaks, or have in-person or group meetings. Communication is one of the most critical aspects of a work culture. It keeps every team member updated and helps maintain a healthy workflow. For managers, it becomes difficult to keep everyone on the same page. It is pretty challenging to put everything together when communication is compromised. How to overcome: To keep everyone on the same page, conducting regular team meetings is crucial. Video conferencing tools, such as Zoom, and chat tools, such as Slack can help bridge the communication gap between team members and build cognitive and emotional trust. Also, to maintain a workflow among team members, a project-management system, such as Asana or Trello is a great option. Related: How To Overcome the Communication Barriers for Remote Employees 2. Distractions at work Although it provides flexibility, work from home can bring with it a lot of distractions — the hustle and bustle of a household, a television playing in the background or kids sneaking around. Even constant notifications on your phone can distract you and affect your work from home productivity. It becomes difficult to work efficiently in a personal setting. Your household chores keep calling you, and you need to set a mental alarm to put everything in place. How to overcome: First and foremost, keep your priorities intact. Put your workstation in a distraction-free space with little or no noise if possible. Create a to-do list to meet your personal and professional goals. Do not overlap them. 3. Lack of motivation Working in isolation is challenging. The office work environment gives acknowledgment, which is rewarding and motivating. When you work from home, you have to function on your intrinsic motivation. The engagement level, thus, can degrade if employees’ needs are not taken care of. Lack of motivation not only affects work but also has a detrimental impact on mental health. How to overcome: To boost employee motivation and keep them engaged, you may have to take a slightly different approach for your remote employees. Keep the communication thread going with your team. Provide discounted or free online courses for them to develop their skills and expertise. Offer them tips for mental health or maybe have a group chat session every week, where everyone can put forward their concerns. Related: Tips to Keep Employees Engaged and Motivated when they are Working-From-Home 4. Technology hiccups You do not have your office administrator to fix your systems or internet connection when you are working from home. That becomes an added responsibility. Many public WiFi hotspots can also be spotty. It is painful when you do not have a fast and stable connection. Also, video conferencing tools are not always reliable and can often leave you frustrated in a meeting. How to overcome: For your peace of mind and to avoid delays in your work, always have a back-up plan. Keep a spare laptop for emergencies. Don’t rely on a single communication tool. When your WiFi hotspot is unstable, you can always rely on your mobile data connection. Related: 17 Must-Have Tools for Remote Workers 5. Work-life balance Working from home removes the traditional method of functioning; you no longer make the commute for work or finish your daily task at a definite period. You become more aware of the needs and duties that you have at your home. Managing kids or doing household chores also adds to your priority list. To balance everything effectively can be a tricky job and a time-consuming one. How to overcome: Keep your priorities straight. One of the crucial aspects here is time management. Divide your work, both personal and professional. Have specific timings to finish your tasks. Do not procrastinate and complete the most vital work during your most productive hours and track your progress. Despite the above challenges, working from home can be very rewarding. It gives you enough flexibility and time to keep you going. Value our content... contribute towards our growth. Even a small contribution a month would be of great help for us. Since five years, we have been serving the industry through daily news and stories. Our content is free for all and we plan to keep it that way. Support HRKatha. Pay Here (All it takes is a minute) RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR. Employee Benefits and Engagement Role of technology in boosting employee engagement. Employee Benefits and Engagement Six must-have employee benefits for remote workers. Employee Benefits and Engagement 7 Employee Engagement Strategies to Adopt Post Lockdown Period. Employee Benefits and Engagement The undeniable link between employee benefits & engagement. Employee Benefits and Engagement 5 Employee Benefits Your Workforce Actually Wants. Employee Benefits and Engagement How Ugam keeps employees engaged with its unique formal and informal activities. Coaching and Training New HR strategies with the help of nine coaching virtues. Guest Writer - December 29, 2021 0 I see coaching as a brand new mindset supporting all areas of business life, including human resources. This mindset brings a new perspective and... The number one question that resolves any challenge! Guest Writer - December 20, 2021 Powering performance with qualified leadership. Guest Writer - December 13, 2021 Communicate like LORDS: One small word to give your communication skills... Guest Writer - December 6, 2021 Global HR News Walmart to expand InHome service in the US, hire 3,000+ drivers. HRK News Bureau - January 6, 2022 0 Walmart is gearing to enhance its home delivery facility, for which it needs more drivers in its already 100-strong fleet. It plans to hire... Laid off McDonald’s union workers reinstated. HRK News Bureau - January 5, 2022 US vaccine mandates: Supreme Court to hear cases. HRK News Bureau - January 4, 2022 2022 to begin with WFH for many US-based companies. HRK News Bureau - January 3, 2022 Minimum wage to go up in many of US states in... HRK News Bureau - January 3, 2022 Latest. EY’s Neetu Sidana takes charge as director-HR at Mazars. HRK News Bureau - January 6, 2022 1 Neetu Sidana has been hired as the director-HR at Mazars, an auditing and advisory firm, which has a presence in over 90 countries and... Almond Solutions offers unlimited leaves to employees. HRK News Bureau - January 6, 2022 0 Almond Solutions, a marketing technology firm, has announced unlimited leaves for all its employees. The Company which employs close to 100 people, wants to... SEBI to hire 120 in 4 months. HRK News Bureau - January 6, 2022 0 In preparation for the Life Insurance Corporation of India’s (LIC) initial public offering (IPO), the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) is expanding... Ninjacart announces ESOP buyback worth 100 crore for staff. HRK News Bureau - January 4, 2022 0 Ninjacart, an agriculture supply-chain platform, has announced employee stock options plan (ESOP) buyback plan for its employees, which is worth Rs 100 crore. Both... DIALOGUE. “A CEO needs to acknowledge the silent majority who create the company’s fortunes” S... Prajjal Saha | HRKatha - November 18, 2021 1 Q. RPG is a diversified group with businesses spread across sectors and domains. however, its brands have a strong individual identity unlike other business... “If CEO is the father of an organisation, CHRO is the mother,” Pankaj Lochan. Prajjal Saha | HRKatha - June 16, 2021 9 Q. You have been shuttling between HR and manufacturing roles. Was it a well-thought out strategy or did you just go with the flow... Binding multi-faceted employees with Titan Values. Kartikay Kashyap | HRKatha - September 21, 2020 0 Titan has different sets of employees for different functions and verticals, ranging from the shopfloor to the retail stores. How do you bring in... EDITOR'S PICKS. 50% cut in paid leave for COVID-positive staff at Walmart. HRK News Bureau - January 7, 2022 700 fired at Mayo Clinic for not meeting vaccination deadline. HRK News Bureau - January 7, 2022 Assam government makes first weekend of 2022 long by 2 days... HRK News Bureau - January 7, 2022 POPULAR POSTS. How to up productivity during festive months. Kartikay Kashyap | HRKatha - October 15, 2018 How to increase effective salaries with no additional cost. Partha Neog - September 7, 2018 Productivity linked bonus approved for railway employees by union cabinet. HRK News Bureau - October 15, 2018 POPULAR CATEGORY. News2572Trends855Movement739Hiring & Firing724Compensation & Benefits684Research440Global HR News336Recruitment253Industry News249 © 2021 India's most read website on Human Resources, Jobs & Career. MORE STORIES How professional development can ensure employee engagement. Liji Narayan | HRKatha - October 4, 2019 Employee engagement: Is the road smooth? Liji Narayan | HRKatha - October 11, 2019 Edit with Live CSS
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • 2022
  • 36
  • 30
  • employee
  • 35
  • 30
  • bureau january
  • 24
  • 30
  • january
  • 24
  • 30
  • work
  • 19
  • 30
  • engagement
  • 16
  • 30
  • home
  • 16
  • 30
  • news
  • 15
  • 30
  • hrk news bureau
  • 13
  • 30
  • hrk news
  • 13
  • 30
  • news bureau
  • 13
  • 30
  • 2021
  • 13
  • 30
  • hrk
  • 13
  • 30
  • bureau
  • 13
  • 30
  • news bureau january
  • 12
  • 30
  • january 2022
  • 12
  • 30
  • employee benefit
  • 11
  • 30
  • benefit engagement
  • 10
  • 30
  • overcome
  • 9
  • 30
  • working
  • 9
  • 30
  • benefit
  • 9
  • 30
  • communication
  • 8
  • 30
  • employee benefit engagement
  • 7
  • 30
  • hrkatha
  • 7
  • 30
  • working home
  • 6
  • 30
  • plan
  • 6
  • 30
  • challenge
  • 6
  • 30
  • hr
  • 6
  • 30
  • employee engagement
  • 5
  • 30
  • writer december
  • 5
  • 30
  • work home
  • 5
  • 30
  • december
  • 5
  • 30
  • october
  • 5
  • 30
  • remote
  • 5
  • 30
  • team
  • 5
  • 30
  • tool
  • 5
  • 30
  • guest writer december
  • 4
  • 30
  • 2020
  • 4
  • 30
  • hrkatha october
  • 4
  • 30
  • guest writer
  • 4
  • 30
  • meeting
  • 4
  • 30
  • put
  • 4
  • 30
  • related
  • 4
  • 30
  • motivation
  • 4
  • 30
  • guest
  • 4
  • 30
  • writer
  • 4
  • 30
  • 100
  • 4
  • 30
  • challenge working home
  • 3
  • 30
  • challenge working
  • 3
  • 30
  • work culture
  • 3
  • 30
  • team member
  • 3
  • 30
Result 31
TitleCoronavirus: Coping with the challenges of working from home – Mental Health At Work
Urlhttps://www.mentalhealthatwork.org.uk/toolkit/coronavirus-coping-with-the-challenges-of-working-from-home/
DescriptionAs the pandemic continues, many are homeworking again or never stopped. We've collected some tips, from helping vulnerable colleagues to managing anxiety
Date
Organic Position30
H1Coronavirus: Coping with the challenges of working from home
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyCoronavirus: Coping with the challenges of working from home When we originally published this toolkit, the first paragraph mentioned being past the peak of infection and looking ahead to coming out of lockdown in the near future. It’s fair to say there have been a lot of twists and turns since then, and a lot of emotional pressures. What we do know now is that we were wrong to imagine the way ahead was predictable. Homeworking is definitely on the cards for many of us, for quite some time more – and you might be finding that the time away from the office hasn’t got any easier. Even if you worked from home before, you might not have spent such a long time away from your colleagues. And as and when restrictions are eased, it will be a long time before everything returns to normal, if they ever do – and you may still be required to work from home more often. In one sense, we’re all in it together. But in another sense, it’s different for everyone. Having additional responsibilities, such as childcare, or losing out on chances to socialise might be starting to affect you, even if you were coping fine before. If you’re the manager of a team, you might be worried about how your staff are getting along, especially if you know they live alone or are a carer. It’s important that you keep checking in with your staff while you’re apart – just because they were okay a few weeks ago, their circumstances might have changed, and they might need different support now. So, as life at home continues for some and starts back up again for others, we’ve updated this collection of resources to help you and those around you. It includes tips on staying focused, keeping your anxiety levels low, and supporting colleagues who might be having a harder time due to social isolation. Whatever your situation – take care. Share Linkedin Facebook Twitter Email Resources in this toolkit:. Resources Coronavirus and your wellbeing. Web page This short guide from Mind explores some of the worries and difficulties you might experience due to the coronavirus pandemic, and some ways to ensure your mental health is protected. Free By: Mind View resource Read more Resources Building your wellbeing and helping you cope. Web page You might be feeling anxious, lonely or even depressed as a result of the lockdown. This website offers ways to help you cope with these feelings in a variety of healthy, calming ways. Free By: 4MentalHealth View resource Read more Quick Resources Focus. PDF 2 0 You might find yourself experiencing new distractions when working from home that you don't normally deal with in the office. This short PDF guide offers some tips on staying focused on your important tasks. Free By: Unilever View resource Read more Resources COVID-19: Domestic abuse toolkit for employers. Web page 2 0 For some people, working outside of the home can be a short-term escape from an abusive situation. Working from home means they won't have that opportunity. This toolkit explores what employers should look out for if they are worried their staff may be experiencing a domestic abuse situation, and how to help. Free By: Business in the Community View resource Read more Resources Working well from home under self-quarantine for coronavirus. Web page 2 0 While some people have been able to return to their usual workplaces, some people are still working from home. This guide can help you you to maintain a healthy routine, stay productive at work and feel connected to your colleagues even if you're not able to go into work in person. Free By: Leapers View resource Read more Resources COVID-19: supporting carers in the workplace. Web page 2 0 Carers may be under additional pressures due to the social distancing rules. Business in the Community have created this guide to help employers to provide the right support for their working carers and ensure their wellbeing. Free By: Business in the Community View resource Read more Resources Samaritans helpline. Web page 3 0 Loneliness, anxiety or other feelings caused by the lockdown can be difficult to deal with. The Samaritans are available 24 hours a day to listen to anyone experiencing distress. Free By: Samaritans View resource Read more Resources Working from home: a wellness action plan. PDF A wellness action plan (WAP) is a useful tool to help us identify what keeps us well and what impacts our mental health. This revised WAP has been modified to support you when you’re working from home during the COVID-19 outbreak. Free By: Mind View resource Read more Resources Balancing home schooling and working. Web page 3 0 While most schools have reopened, it's possible some will need to close to control the spread of the coronavirus over the coming months. If this affects you, this guide can help you to manage working from home while ensuring your children stay healthy, entertained, and up-to-date with schoolwork. Free By: NHS England and NHS Improvement View resource Read more Resources Performance Energy: help maintain your wellbeing through COVID-19. PDF 2 0 Sadly, we've all had to make changes to the way we spend time with our friends and family. It's possible we won't be able to return to normal for several months. It's normal to feel anxious or stressed out because of this, and this guide can help you find ways to cope. Free By: Bupa Foundation View resource Read more
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • resource
  • 22
  • 31
  • page
  • 17
  • 31
  • home
  • 14
  • 31
  • web page
  • 12
  • 31
  • working
  • 11
  • 31
  • view resource read
  • 10
  • 31
  • working home
  • 10
  • 31
  • view resource
  • 10
  • 31
  • resource read
  • 10
  • 31
  • free
  • 10
  • 31
  • view
  • 10
  • 31
  • read
  • 10
  • 31
  • resource read resource
  • 8
  • 31
  • read resource
  • 8
  • 31
  • pdf
  • 8
  • 31
  • person
  • 8
  • 31
  • web
  • 7
  • 31
  • carer
  • 6
  • 31
  • time
  • 6
  • 31
  • guide
  • 6
  • 31
  • coronaviru
  • 5
  • 31
  • covid 19
  • 4
  • 31
  • toolkit
  • 4
  • 31
  • wellbeing
  • 4
  • 31
  • way
  • 4
  • 31
  • covid
  • 4
  • 31
  • 19
  • 4
  • 31
  • business community
  • 3
  • 31
  • situation
  • 3
  • 31
  • short
  • 3
  • 31
  • mind
  • 3
  • 31
  • cope
  • 3
  • 31
  • feeling
  • 3
  • 31
  • healthy
  • 3
  • 31
  • experiencing
  • 3
  • 31
  • employer
  • 3
  • 31
  • business
  • 3
  • 31
  • community
  • 3
  • 31
  • samaritan
  • 3
  • 31