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Keyword Why is social media crucial to crisis management
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TitleHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Practical Guide for Brands
Urlhttps://blog.hootsuite.com/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionEffective social media crisis management starts long before any issue arises. Learn how to create a plan to mitigate risk—and what to do if it fails and you need to react
Date27 Mar 2020
Organic Position1
H1How to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Practical Guide for Brands
H29 social media crisis management tips for businesses and brands
Wait! Your team needs help on social media
H31. Create a social media policy
2. Secure your accounts
3. Use social listening to identify potential issues
4. Define what counts as a crisis
5. Craft a crisis communication plan
6. Pause all scheduled posts
7. Engage—but don’t argue
8. Communicate internally
9. Learn from the experience
H2WithAnchors9 social media crisis management tips for businesses and brands
Wait! Your team needs help on social media
BodyHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Practical Guide for Brands Effective social media crisis management starts long before any issue arises. Learn how to create a plan to mitigate risk—and what to do if it fails and you need to react. On social media, things can move blazingly fast. Sometimes, it’s an Instagram post of an egg going inexplicably viral. But sometimes, it’s a PR crisis that seems to come out of nowhere. Your best chance to make it through a social media crisis is to prepare ahead of time. Have a solid plan, a list of key stakeholders and responsibilities, and a clear chain of command. Of course, it’s even better if you can prevent a crisis before it begins. In this post, we’ll look at methods for spotting potential issues as they emerge and how to shut a problem down in the early stages. If that doesn’t work, we’ll show you what to do if you end up with a full-blown social media crisis management situation on your hands. (Note: we also have a guide to using social media for crisis and emergency management, if you need help on that front). Bonus: Read the step-by-step social media strategy guide with pro tips on how to grow your social media presence. 9 social media crisis management tips for businesses and brands. 1. Create a social media policy. Some of the worst social media situations start with an employee posting something inappropriate. Fortunately, these are also some of the easiest crises to avoid. The best way to prevent this type of social media crisis is to create a solid social media policy for your company. It should provide clear guidelines for appropriate use, outline expectations for branded accounts, and explain how employees can talk about your the business on their personal channels. The details of your social media policy will vary based on factors like your industry and the size of your company. Here are some subjects all social media policies should include: Copyright guidelines. Don’t assume employees understand how copyright applies online. Provide clear instructions about how to use and credit third-party content. Privacy guidelines. Specify how to interact with customers online, and when a conversation needs to move to a private channel. Confidentiality guidelines. Describe what business information employees are allowed (even encouraged) to share, and what should be kept under wraps. Brand voice guidelines. Do you maintain a formal tone? Can your social team get a little goofy? Lockheed Martin’s social team got a little too casual on social media for World Photo Day 2018. The world’s largest arms producer posted a tweet asking followers to share a photo of one of their products. The now-deleted tweet said: “Do you have an amazing photo of one of our products? Tag us in our pic and we may feature it during our upcoming #WorldPhotoDay celebration on Aug. 19!” This carefree tone from an arms manufacturer would probably have brought in some challenging replies in the best of circumstances. But just a few hours later, CNN broke a news story that a Lockheed Martin bomb has been used on an attack that killed children in Yemen. People seized on the story and started responding to Lockheed Martin’s photo request tweet with CNN’s photo of a bomb fragment from the attack. 2. When Lockheed Martin got shut down hard on #WorldPhotoDay Lockheed Martin is the world’s biggest arms manufacturer, and a top American defence contractor. This tweet received intense backlash. What a surprise ???? pic.twitter.com/traJXp9awz — [email protected] (@PerkyMarketing) October 3, 2018 Lockheed Martin’s response was basically not to respond. They simply deleted the original tweet. The challenge of trying to make a problematic post disappear is that screencaps live on in the many news stories about the blunder. Consider this an example of how not to handle a social media crisis. 2. Secure your accounts. Weak passwords and other social media security risks can quickly expose your brand to a social media crisis. In fact, employees are more likely to cause a cyber security crisis than hackers are. The more people who know your social media account passwords, the more chances there are for a security breach. Don’t share passwords among the various members of your team who need access to your social accounts. I use a centralized system like Hootsuite to control use permissions and grant the appropriate level of access. Centralizing access also allows you to revoke access for employees who leave the company or move to a role that no longer requires them to post on social. When the New York Daily News laid off half its employees, a departing member of the social team started posting strange GIFs to the paper’s Twitter account. Aww, someone deleted the .gif. But —the internet is forever! ???? pic.twitter.com/VHK8vNQgCp — Rebecca I. Allen (@rebeccaallen) July 23, 2018 The Tweets were relatively harmless. A situation like this could quickly turn into a social media crisis, though. What if the rogue employee posted confidential or inflammatory material? A similar situation happened back in 2013, when HMV laid off a large portion of its staff. The company’s Twitter feed was a play-by-play of the mass firings, beginning with “We’re tweeting live from HR where we’re all being fired! Exciting!!” But here’s the key HMV Tweet you can learn from: “Just heard our Marketing Director (he’s staying folks) ask ‘How do I shut down Twitter?’” Hey @hmvtweets – deleting the tweets and ignoring the situation doesn't mean it didn't happen: http://t.co/beiwPaMN #hmvxfactorfiring — Lily Sangster 🍝 (@lilysangster) January 31, 2013 It’s critical to have control of your social channels. Managers to know how to limit or revoke access in a social media crisis management situation. 3. Use social listening to identify potential issues. A good social listening program can help you spot an emerging issue on social media well before it turns into a crisis. Monitoring brand mentions can give you some advanced warning of a surge of social activity. But if you really want to keep an eye out for a potential social media crisis, you should be monitoring social sentiment. Social sentiment is a metric that captures how people feel about your brand. If you see a sudden change, that’s an immediate clue to start digging into your listening streams to see what people are saying about you. A sudden spike in brand mentions is always worth investigating, too. With a tool like Brandwatch, you can set alerts so you’re automatically notified if there are major changes in sentiment or volume of mentions. This gives you advance warning of a crisis while it’s still in the early stages. ZeroFOX is another great software solution for advance warning of a potential crisis. Integrated with your Hootsuite dashboard, it will: send you alerts about dangerous or offensive content targeting your brand malicious links posted on your social channels and scams targeting your business or your customers 4. Define what counts as a crisis. People are going to say rude things about you online. That’s a fact, not a crisis. But if enough people are saying the same negative things about you on social, all at the same time, that might be a crisis—or a potential crisis waiting to explode. What really identifies a social media crisis is a major negative change in the online conversation about your brand. In order to identify a change from the norm, of course, you have to know what the norm is. Your ongoing social listening work should give you a pretty clear idea of what a normal day looks like for your brand. For negative comments to count as a crisis, there also needs to be potential long-term damage to your brand. Even if a large number of people are posting negatively, it may be best to respond through customer service channels. As an organization, you should define how much of a change in sentiment you need to see before you can start thinking about the event as a potential crisis. Once the numbers hit that threshold, review the situation with the appropriate people to decide whether you should implement your crisis communication plan. On that note… Bonus: Read the step-by-step social media strategy guide with pro tips on how to grow your social media presence. Get the free guide right now! 5. Craft a crisis communication plan. A company-wide social media crisis communication plan allows you to respond quickly to any potential issue. Instead of debating how to handle things, or waiting for senior managers to weigh in, you can take action and prevent things from getting out of control. Acting fast is important. More than a quarter of crises spread internationally within just one hour. But it takes companies an average of 21 hours to defend themselves in any kind of meaningful way. That’s nearly a full day for the crisis to make the rounds on the web with no meaningful intervention from your team. On December 23, 2018, a security guard at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Portland called the police on a black hotel guest for “loitering” in the lobby while taking a phone call. The guest posted video of the event to Twitter, sparking a #boycottDoubleTree hashtag. The hotel’s first tweet after the incident was a Happy Holidays post. That post got 403 comments from angry Twitter users, with no response from the hotel. For Christmas this year, I’ll be telling all my friends to avoid your hotel, and to tell their families not to stay there when they visit. Instead of wasting time trying to ignore what happened, why don’t you fire the security guard in question and make some real changes? — Katie (@k8eesteele) December 26, 2018 It took three whole days for the hotel to even acknowledge the incident on Twitter. Yes, it was the holidays. But three days is too long. Your plan should describe the exact steps everyone will take on social media during a crisis—from top executives to the most junior employees. Include a list of who needs to be alerted at each stage of a potential social media crisis. Your social media crisis communication plan should include: Guidelines for identifying the type and magnitude of a crisis. Roles and responsibilities for every department. A communication plan for internal updates. Up-to-date contact information for critical employees. Approval processes for messaging posted on social media. Any pre-approved external messages, images, or information. A link to your social media policy. No matter how well you prepare, the nature of a crisis means you won’t be able to resolve everything with just one or two social media posts. But people expect to hear from you, and it’s important for you to acknowledge the problem right away. Even during holidays, you need to be able to respond quickly in case of an emergency. A couple of humble and informative posts buy you the time to put the rest of your social media crisis communication plan into action. Simply acknowledge that there’s a problem and let people know that more information is coming soon. 6. Pause all scheduled posts. During a social media crisis, scheduled posts will at best make you look goofy. Take, for example, this App Store tweet encouraging followers to download the New York Times cooking app. It’s a perfectly reasonable tweet to send out the day before Thanksgiving. Need some help planning your #Thanksgiving feast? Try the @NYTimes cooking app: https://t.co/zlAMOoUS3R pic.twitter.com/kfWN3H1RPG — App Store (@AppStore) November 21, 2018 One problem: Apple was facing a major outage at the time, and the App Store was down. In this case, Apple just looked a bit silly, and the tweet gave followers more ammunition to complain about the outage. In a worst-case scenario, a scheduled tweet during a crisis could completely derail your crisis management plan. It’s critical for all communication to be planned, consistent, and appropriate in tone. A scheduled post will be none of those things. With a social media scheduler like Hootsuite, pausing your scheduled social media content is as simple as clicking the pause symbol on your organization’s profile and then entering a reason for the suspension. This will keep all posts from being published until you decide it is safe to resume, and warn anyone on your team who tries to schedule new content that a publishing suspension is in effect. 7. Engage—but don’t argue. Once you’ve posted that initial response, it’s time to get key staff working on more in-depth messaging. That might mean a press release, an official statement, or a letter or video from your CEO But since we’re talking about social media, simply issuing statements won’t cut it. You’re going to have to engage with people who may be saying very negative things about you online. Keep it short. Avoid getting pulled into a long discussion of what went wrong. Instead, try to move the conversation to a more personal channel, like private messaging. You could also offer a phone number, email address, or other means of communicating outside of social media. When Johnson & Johnson faced a crisis of allegations about asbestos in its baby powder, the company created a webpage and a Twitter thread specifically addressing the main concerns people were expressing both on and off social media. The social team actively responded to concerned tweets, and referred people to the webpage for consistent information. Hello there. We understand your concerns about the headlines you’ve been seeing, and we want to put your mind at ease – our talc is safe. We are committed to the highest safety and quality standards in every Johnson’s product. Please visit https://t.co/aCzCAGe46R to learn more. — Johnson & Johnson (@JNJNews) December 29, 2018 Of course, some people will simply keep arguing with you until you stop responding. When it’s clear you’re not making progress, acknowledge the concerns and frustrations, but stop taking the bait. Getting pulled into a fight online will not improve the situation. During a social media crisis, people are watching, so you’ve simply got to take the high road. 8. Communicate internally. Communicating internally is a crucial part of your crisis management response. This keeps everyone on the same page and helps to prevent misinformation and the spread of rumors. Make sure everyone in the organization knows exactly what they should (or should not) say about the crisis on social media. Hootsuite Amplify offers an easy way to distribute pre-approved company messaging to all employees that they can share on their own social accounts. 9. Learn from the experience. Once you make it through your first social media crisis, take the time to debrief and examine what happened. Keep a detailed record of everything you did, and how well it worked. This is a good time to get the whole company together to talk about the experience you’ve all been through, and share knowledge and experiences from different teams. Maybe the customer service department had some important insight. Or maybe public relations has some new guidelines that need to be incorporated into your social media plan. Take the time to examine your social media plan. Think about anything you could add that would prevent a similar crisis from occurring in the future. And review your crisis communication plan to look for opportunities to incorporate lessons learned. Use Hootsuite to manage and monitor all your social profiles in one place. From a single dashboard you can see what people are saying about your brand and respond accordingly. Permission, compliance, and security features will also come in handy when handling or mitigating any PR crisis. Try it free today! Get Started Show Comments x Wait! Your team needs help on social media. See how you can save time, work smarter, and improve results. Book a Hootsuite demo that’s tailored to your needs and find out why we’re trusted by big and small companies all over the world. Book Your Free Demo Now No commitment whatsoever
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TitleHow to Effectively Handle Crisis Management Through Social Media
Urlhttps://www.rockdovesolutions.com/blog/how-to-effectively-handle-crisis-management-through-social-media
DescriptionHow can organizations leverage the power of crisis management through social media? Read this article to find out
Date
Organic Position3
H1How to Effectively Handle Crisis Management Through Social Media
H2An Ideal Tool for Crisis Communication
Mistakes to Avoid
H3
H2WithAnchorsAn Ideal Tool for Crisis Communication
Mistakes to Avoid
BodyHow to Effectively Handle Crisis Management Through Social Media Subscribe To Our Blog Share   Social media is the double-edged sword of crisis management. Platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram can be an essential communication tool for effectively managing a crisis—but they can also make a crisis worse than ever if they are not used strategically. For organizations like yours, social media has the power to become one of your most impactful crisis communication tools. However, the nature of the medium means that it has to be handled carefully. Only a strategic approach to social media crisis management will enable you to harness its potential while ensuring it works for you and not against you. Let’s take a closer look at the ways in which organizations can handle crisis management through social media, as well as some key faux pas to avoid when using these tools in a crisis.   An Ideal Tool for Crisis Communication. Having an effective crisis management plan in place can have a huge impact on how well your organization weathers a crisis. We see this play out all the time: for example, how United Airlines handled its reputation crisis after law enforcement officers dragged a passenger off a flight. The way in which an individual or a company communicates with the public, its customers, and other stakeholders after a crisis truly matters. And it could make or break your business. In the past, when a crisis hit your organization, you would first issue a press release. Your crisis management plan would include draft statements that could be tailored to the specific situation. Today, crisis management inevitably involves social media, whether you are a large multi-national corporation or a small hometown business. When a crisis occurs—whether it’s negative publicity, a product recall, or an inaccurate news story going viral—social media should be the first place you turn. Why? The nature of social media makes it ideal for communicating quickly and effectively in our digital age. Communication on social media is near-instantaneous, so it gets your message out right away—much faster than a press release would. Plus, most of your customers are already on social media. An estimated 70 percent of Americans use one or more of the top sites (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and LinkedIn), and most are visiting at least once a day. These platforms give you a chance to take your message directly to the people you’re trying to reach. Social media allows you to quickly and effectively speak directly to your customers. As a result, you’re in a much better position to guide the conversation following a crisis. You’re not playing catch-up, as United was after customers posted cell-phone video of the passenger being removed from his flight. By the time the airline issued a response, it was already seen as the bad guy. However, by “getting out ahead” of a crisis, you have an opportunity to give your side of the story; to issue apologies when necessary; and to help guide the dialogue in a more positive, productive direction.   Mistakes to Avoid. As you plan to harness the potential of social media, however, remember the double-edged sword. The fact that social media is instantaneous, and news travels so quickly, among so many people, also means that the stakes are high. This isn’t like issuing a press release with a typo or misquote and then having to resend it. Once you share information on Facebook, Twitter, and so on, the news is out. You should assume that anything posted on social media can be seen and shared forever. Even if a tweet or post is deleted, it may have already been screen-shotted by countless followers. As you update your crisis management plan to include social media, consider adding a best practices section that helps your team avoid the following common mistakes: Slow or delayed response. News and opinions travel quickly on social media, so you need to be equipped to respond to a crisis immediately. Otherwise, an information vacuum can form and be filled with people’s criticisms and speculation about your company. If your social media team is small, consider investing in monitoring software that can help your team stay on top of negative comments, viral stories, and brand mentions. Public squabbles. They say that everyone is a critic online, which can make it easy for tensions to flare. Coach your team to respond to social media followers in a way that is polite, truthful, and on brand. If someone starts posting inflammatory or outright false statements, it might be time to block the user or reach out to him or her directly. A rule of thumb is to take a conversation “offline,” whether in a private message, email, or phone call, after a few attempts at civil conversation. Being caught unprepared. During your planning efforts, take the time to draft some key social media messages to have on hand when the next crisis hits. You can tweak the content for the specific situation when it occurs, but having at least a framework response will save time and energy when it matters most. Remember—your people are probably going to be stressed when a crisis hits, so predrafting statements that are on brand, calm, and respectful can help strike the right tone for your response. In our fast-moving digital age, organizations of all kinds and in all industries have started to leverage crisis management through social media to encourage a faster, more streamlined crisis response. As companies increasingly rely on mobile technology to optimize their crisis management efforts, consider the ways in which your business could benefit by strategically using social media during your next crisis. Subscribe To Our Blog Previous article: J&J and Tylenol Part 1: What We Can Learn From Their 1982 Crises Next article: Arthur Anderson & Enron: What We Can Learn From Their 2002 Crises Recommended articles In Case of Crisis Goes On The Road Use a Risk Assessment to Prioritize the Issues you Need to Manage Why Institutional Discrimination is Keeping Crisis Managers Awake at Night Three Months In, The Three Most Interesting Crises Of 2021 – So Far Solutions Reputation Risk Management Critical Event Management Security Risk Management Workplace Safety Management Products In Case of Crisis 365 Overview Threat Intelligence & Social Listening Issues & Incident Management Role-based & Actionable Playbooks Microsoft Teams Integration Company About Blog Resources News and Events Careers © 2021 RockDove Solutions, Inc.  Terms of Service Privacy Policy In Case of Crisis 365 is an Issue and Crisis Management Platform.
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Result 4
TitleSocial Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right | Synthesio
Urlhttps://www.synthesio.com/blog/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionIn the fast-paced world of social media, discover how 3 companies approached social media crisis management and remedied high-stake situations
Date19 Nov 2021
Organic Position4
H1Social Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right
H2Social Media Crisis #1: Nike and Zion Williamson
Social Media Crisis #2: Sephora and SZA
Social Media Crisis #3: Gucci’s Balaclava Sweater
What Can Help Your Social Media Crisis Management Strategy?
H3How Did Nike Respond?
How Did Sephora Respond?
How Did Gucci Respond?
About the Author: Carmen Yeung
Related Posts
H2WithAnchorsSocial Media Crisis #1: Nike and Zion Williamson
Social Media Crisis #2: Sephora and SZA
Social Media Crisis #3: Gucci’s Balaclava Sweater
What Can Help Your Social Media Crisis Management Strategy?
BodySocial Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right Social Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right When negative opinions are shared on social media, corporations can quickly feel the backlash. A single tweet directed at a company can go viral on the Internet in a matter of hours. Overnight, your brand’s health can take massive hits. That’s why adopting effective social media crisis management strategies is crucial for any company. In honor of Social Media Day, which is celebrated nationally and internationally on the 30th of June each year, we’ve taken a look at the best social media crisis management cases we’ve seen so far this year. Social Media Crisis #1: Nike and Zion Williamson. On the 20th of February, Zion Williamson, a star player from Duke University, suffered a knee injury when a malfunctioning Nike shoe fell apart. This accident happened less than a minute into a highly-anticipated game against North Carolina. Media outlets and social media users quickly began talking. ESPN had broadcasted the game nationally. On Twitter, former President Barack Obama, who was watching the game courtside, expressed his well-wishes to Williamson, as did NBA giants like LeBron James. How Did Nike Respond? This accident was so high-profile that Nike stock dropped 1.8% the following day. Nike soon released a statement expressing its concern and well wishes for Williamson. The footwear megabrand reassured the world that its teams were “working to identify the issue.” The following day, Nike sent a team to Durham, North Carolina where the game took place. This team then visited Nike’s manufacturing site in China and returned with numerous suggestions. About a month later, Williamson returned to the court with custom shoes, which he told reporters were “incredible.” He thanked Nike for creating them. A good crisis management strategy is timely, compassionate, and proactive. In this scenario, Nike responded with immediate concern. The company demonstrated its commitment to improvement by sending a team to rectify the situation and create a new pair of shoes. Social Media Crisis #2: Sephora and SZA. In April 2019, hit singer SZA tweeted that a Sephora employee had called security on her to prevent shoplifting. Social media users, primarily on Twitter, were quick to defend SZA. Some called the employee disrespectful, while others accused the employee of racial profiling. How Did Sephora Respond? As the conversation started heating up, Sephora responded directly to SZA’s original tweet. The tweets expressed the company’s apologies and thanked the singer for bringing the problem to their attention. About a month after this social media firestorm, Sephora announced on Facebook that all stores and offices would close for an hour of centralized diversity training. Although it is unclear whether the training session is related to this incident, this is nonetheless a proactive step toward both diversity and crisis management. At its heart, crisis management is about reaching your audience and consumers. When the time calls for it, don’t be afraid to use social media to address your audience. In fact, Sephora’s direct response to SZA’s tweet demonstrated that its team was paying close attention to what people were saying online. Notice how Facebook was the platform of choice for Sephora’s official statement. Sharing on social media platforms humanizes your brand and signals to the world that you are ready for a conversation. The cosmetics and skincare retailer used social media to its advantage as a tool for crisis management.  Social Media Crisis #3: Gucci’s Balaclava Sweater. Early this year, one of Gucci’s sweaters received sudden backlash for its resemblance to blackface. Although the item officially launched months earlier, the crisis arose suddenly on Twitter and spread everywhere. How Did Gucci Respond? Gucci quickly removed the sweater from its website and store shelves. The luxury brand posted an official statement on its Twitter account, apologizing for the offense. The company humbly referred to the incident as a “powerful learning moment.” Gucci’s statement affirmed its dedication to diversity and awareness. About a month after the crisis, it announced its plans to launch global scholarship programs in Ghana, Nigeria, Mexico, New York, and other global locations. Gucci has also created an advisory panel that includes supermodel Naomi Campbell, activists, and academics. The company is now looking for a director of diversity and inclusion. When it comes to sensitive topics like this scenario, a good social media crisis management strategy is especially important. Companies have to demonstrate their dedication to improvement through concrete actions. Consumers have to see that measures for preventing future offenses are underway. Brands also have to make sure that their statements are effectively reaching the public through social media. What Can Help Your Social Media Crisis Management Strategy? Many media firestorms begin on social media platforms, such as Twitter or Facebook. That’s why it’s important to carefully manage what’s being said about your company. Using a social listening tool can help you monitor and minimize the impact of bad press and negative sentiment. Choosing the best way to respond to a crisis involves properly gauging both the social media landscape and media outlet coverage. Learn how to create a social media crisis management plan in 4 easy steps. Book a demo Carmen Yeung2021-11-19T12:16:49-05:0026 June 2019| Share This Story, Choose Your Platform! FacebookTwitterRedditLinkedInTumblrPinterestVkEmail About the Author: Carmen Yeung . As a marketing associate at Synthesio, Carmen creates content related to social intelligence and marketing by making connections between Synthesio's software and real-world applications. She also works to monitor and optimize Synthesio's social platforms. Outside of work, she enjoys reading, dabbling in art, and spending time with family and friends. Related Posts . Why You Need Decision Intelligence to Make Data-Driven Insights Actionable . 6 January 2022 Decoding The Patient Journey With Social Insights . 21 December 2021 Building The Business Case For AI-Enabled Consumer Intelligence . 16 December 2021 We use cookies to give you the best user experience on our website. Please click "OK" to continue, or read our privacy & cookie policy. OK English Go to Top
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TitleFive Steps To Effectively Use Social Media For Crisis Management
Urlhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/theyec/2020/03/25/five-steps-to-effectively-use-social-media-for-crisis-management/
DescriptionConsidering the complexities of the ever-changing rules of crisis PR engagement, companies must be proactive and prepared with emergency social media strategies and protocols in advance
Date25 Mar 2020
Organic Position5
H1Five Steps To Effectively Use Social Media For Crisis Management
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H3More From Forbes
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BodyFive Steps To Effectively Use Social Media For Crisis ManagementYECCOUNCIL POSTExpertise from Forbes Councils members, operated under license. Opinions expressed are those of the author.| Membership (fee-based)EntrepreneursPOST WRITTEN BYEvan NiermanFounder and CEO of Red Banyan - a strategic PR and crisis communications firm that serves clients around the world.Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to Linkedin Getty Getty Nearly every public relations (PR) crisis that arises will affect an organization’s online strategy in some way. But not all situations require you to engage in the use of social media. This is a unique kind of online and reputation protection PR that calls for a different approach and keen understanding of how different forms of social media can best be used to disseminate information. The increase in significance and use of social media makes it a key element of most crisis management plans. Sending out basic press releases and issuing statements on a company’s website no longer suffice when it comes to meeting the expectations of today’s modern consumers. To be effective in their crisis response, companies must utilize a variety of communications channels, with social media as a top priority. When your company is faced with a crisis, your social media strategy must be adjusted accordingly and as expeditiously as possible. It is essential to avoid mixing crisis updates with other marketing and promotional content that may have been scheduled prior to the incident, as they may no longer be relevant or hold priority. Yet, there are some cases where crisis management is best handled offline without involving social media. For example, if a crisis is minor or internal, it will impact a limited number of stakeholders and is unlikely to gain widespread media attention, and an emergency social media strategy may not be needed. Additionally, bringing an internal crisis to light via social media can often result in keeping the online conversation going, affecting your search engine optimization (SEO) efforts and allowing more negative information to infiltrate your online brand. Thus, unless it is necessary and assuredly beneficial, it is best to avoid this altogether. When developing your crisis PR strategy, it is critical to understand how the information is going to be dispersed. Assign individuals on your team to constantly monitor online conversations during and after any crisis. Educating and aligning members of your team on how to handle these situations and who to report to can help prevent the problem from spreading and leads to easier decision-making in the future. Considering the complexities of the ever-changing rules of crisis PR engagement, companies must be proactive and prepared with emergency social media strategies and protocols in advance. This way, if an unexpected crisis occurs and calls for immediate action, you will be positioned to use social media as a robust tool that can help you move beyond the turmoil. To recap, here are five tips to be more effective at using social media during a PR crisis. 1. Assign roles. Designate individuals responsible for your company’s communications efforts to constantly monitor and engage in online conversations. 2. Make a hashtag for your crisis. When a company is hit with negative PR from a crisis, it is very likely that people will turn to social media to ask questions and gather information on what happened. Creating a hashtag that is simple and intuitive will make it easier for people to find the crisis, ask questions and share your updates. 3. Engage your audience. Engaging the public helps you to maintain control of the conversation, keeping rumors and speculation at bay. Make sure that you respond to questions you receive and refer people to your company website for additional information. Additionally, reach out to reporters and influencers in your industry to keep them up to date on your crisis as it progresses. This is one way of controlling the narrative. 4. Keep the conversation fresh. When responding to people’s comments or questions, do not use dry corporate statements. Such responses could come across as inauthentic, dismissive or detached from the concerns of your stakeholders and the public. This is the time to ensure you are using a conversational tone. Be honest, transparent and compassionate with your audience. 5. Monitor, monitor, monitor. The list reiterates this point because it is particularly crucial. Monitoring your company’s social mentions is generally a good idea, but it is absolutely critical during a PR crisis. Keeping an eye on your mentions will provide information about both the negative and positive things people are saying about your company. The primary goal should always be for your organization to contribute to the conversation and, in doing so, control the narrative of your crisis. Times of crisis are also moments of opportunity. By employing the steps outlined here, you and your organization will be better prepared to weather the storm of any crisis. YECPrintReprints & Permissions
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TitleHow to Build a Winning Social Media Crisis Management Plan (2022 Update)
Urlhttps://mention.com/en/blog/social-media-crisis-management-plan/
DescriptionBuild a comprehensive crisis management plan to help you during any social media crisis
Date30 Sept 2021
Organic Position6
H1Build Your Social Media Crisis Management Plan in 10 Steps
H2Before the event
During a crisis
After a social media crisis
What to do in the face of an ugly social media crisis
10. Let the dust settle
And you’re done
H31. Get your crew together
2. Define “a crisis”
3. Identify your key message
4. Create communication guidelines
5. Monitor for updates
6. Get it under control
7. Assess brand impact
8. Reflect on your response
9. Prepare for the long-term
10. Update your crisis management plan
1. Determine whether or not it’s a real social media crisis
2. Pause your scheduled posts
3. Publicly acknowledge what’s going on
4. Create a social crisis action plan
5. Inform your team
6. Work quickly but thoroughly
7. Give your audience frequent updates
8. Individually reply to concerned audience members
9. Post a long-form response on your website
H2WithAnchorsBefore the event
During a crisis
After a social media crisis
What to do in the face of an ugly social media crisis
10. Let the dust settle
And you’re done
BodyBuild Your Social Media Crisis Management Plan in 10 Steps Home Blog Media Monitoring Build Your Social Media Crisis Management Plan in 10 Steps Updated on September 30th 2021 Patrick Whatman | 24 min read A communications crisis can strike at any time. It could be a faulty product, a lousy campaign, or a slip of the tongue from someone higher up. It doesn’t matter the industry you’re in, or how popular you’ve been to this point. Sometimes, it just happens. Whatever the case, you need to be prepared. If you’re going to put out a fire, you need a good hose: So we’ve put together this 10-step crisis management guide to get you ready. Make sure you’ve done everything you need to before disaster strikes. What’s in this post: What you can do before disaster strikesWhat to do during a social crisisSteps you can take once the dust settlesWhat to do if you’re in a crisis right now! We’ve also put these steps into a crisis management workbook. Download and share this with your team, to be sure you’re ready to respond effectively. Before the event. 1. Get your crew together. While every staff member is important, they can’t all be part of your crisis management team. Put together a group of responsible responders, each with their dedicated role. You need a good mix of executive personnel (to enforce decisions), management (to coordinate), and creatives (to craft the right message). Oh, and a lawyer probably helps. As you build your team, answer the following questions: Who will take ownership for the overall strategy - assigning tasks and ensuring the team stays on target?Who is responsible for identifying and monitoring potential crises?Who’s going to inform management and/or key stakeholders?Who will manage social media and respond to questions?And who will be handling messages that come in through other channels?Which executive will act as a spokesperson for the media? Get these roles straightened out while you have time to plan. Next, it’s time to think about what sorts of crisis you might possibly face. 2. Define “a crisis”. You need to decide the kinds of events that will kick your new plan into action. Not every piece of bad news or negative headline should force you to go “code red.” For this, you’ll need a working definition of a crisis. According to Jay Baer, a social media crisis has three characteristics: Information asymmetry: When you don’t know any more than the public about what’s going on.A change from the norm: Everyday criticism of your products is not a crisis. When your products explode at random - that’s a crisis.Serious risk to your company: It seems obvious, but the scope of the issue is important. For something to be a crisis, it needs to have a truly negative effect. With your new team, set benchmarks and find real examples of what qualifies as a crisis. An added benefit of this is that you’ll identify potential weaknesses you otherwise might not have thought about. Since every company is different, it’s a matter of creating a definition that works for you. Once you’ve done that, you can begin thinking about key steps to take during an event. 3. Identify your key message. How you react publicly during a crisis is likely to define your success. You could have a great plan and a smart team, but if the message is wrong you’ve got no chance. You can’t plan your specific response yet since you don’t know what the crisis is. Instead, establish your core values as a company, and your main value proposition to customers. Whatever your response during the tough times, these should be central. Why is this important? Things will be moving at a mile a minute. Despite your best intentions, you can’t monitor everything every spokesperson or social media manager says and posts. What you can ensure is that they convey the most important information. If you remind customers why they came to you in the first place, you have a far better chance of keeping them around. 4. Create communication guidelines. Once you’re clear on the basic message, you need to decide how to deliver it. That means creating guidelines so that anyone writing a social media post knows what’s expected of them. To get ready for a crisis, do the following: Determine rules for communicating with key stakeholders and executives.Set network-specific guidelines for communicating on social media (since you’ll have different content and format considerations for each).Decide on a process for communicating updates via your website and other online company channels not covered by social media.Create guidelines for employees outside of the crisis communications team advising how to respond to inquiries. To ensure you’re even more prepared, craft some basic templates. The first of these should be a brief, general statement of the company’s position. You also need sample answers to the obvious questions you know you’ll receive. This is your best opportunity to set the tone you’ll use as a company. There may be even room for jokes and light-hearted apologies, as long as they suit your usual social media style. By preparing these now, you’re more likely to be effective when a crisis breaks, rather than making the situation worse. 5. Monitor for updates. Or in Jay Baer’s words, "buy some binoculars". Get a monitoring tool that’ll help you figure out what’s being said about you, and where. If you want to monitor a social media crisis, "buy some binoculars." - @JayBaerClick To Tweet If you’re trying to see everything happening on social media without a listening tool, good luck. You’re going to need something that gives you real-time updates and lets you analyze large amounts of data to draw conclusions. Naturally, we suggest Mention. It lets you track social media, forums, blogs, and news, and respond to social media posts directly from the app. Plus, Mention will tip you off if a serious crisis is about to hit. Pulse alerts tell you when your keywords explode online, meaning that everybody is talking about your brand. You’ll be notified first, so you’re able to respond quickly. Find out how monitoring can save your brand in a crisis. Whether or not you use Mention, you need to be clear on three matters: What tool(s) will you use to monitor for brand crises?Who is responsible for the management of the tool?What is the ongoing process for crisis monitoring? Get these straightened out before a problem strikes, and you’ll have a far easier time when you’re caught off-guard. During a crisis. 6. Get it under control. We’ve put together a checklist that’ll help you right the ship. It’s a step-by-step guide to use when the going gets tough. For full instructions, you need the checklist. For now, let’s take a look at the highlights: Pause your scheduled posts. With a mad panic breaking out around you, it’s easy to forget that you’ve got a full social queue. As Charli Day explains, you can’t afford to accidentally post "Happy #ThrowbackThursday — Have a beautiful day" when your product has just caused a serious injury or death.” That’s a pretty extreme example, but still a great point. Publicly acknowledge what’s going on. You’re not going to be able to hide for long - especially on social media. Your best bet is to make clear that you know there’s a problem, and you’re working to fix it. You’ll still get some angry responses, but it should buy you some time. Inform your team. You didn’t put a crack squad together for nothing. Contact them quickly and send them to work. If you respond quickly enough, you may be able to lessen the harm overall. Post a long-form response on your website. You’ll be sending plenty of small, individualized social media responses. But you also need one official place where reporters and blog writers can find your side of the story. Posting this response will also buy you time. When people want answers fast, you’ll have a place to send them while you work on more important matters. One final piece of advice: “do not lose your cool. Ever.” Once the dust settles, it’s time to figure out what went wrong. After a social media crisis. 7. Assess brand impact. This is where your monitoring tool comes in handy again. You should have data showing what a normal business week looks like, to compare with your “crisis week”. You’ll quickly know just how bad things became. From a social media perspective, focus on factors like lost followers, specific complaints, and the amount of negative sentiment around your brand. You’ll also be able to see where your response was most effective. You may have spent countless hours scouring Twitter and responding to individuals, and yet one Facebook post reached more people and was widely shared. These kinds of insights help you understand how badly your reputation was hit, and you’ll be able to plan better for the future. The key questions for this section of your plan are: What will your KPIs for successful crisis management be?How will you measure the negative conversations generated?How will you measure the impact on overall brand sentiment?How will you measure the overall brand impact of this over time? Make sure you have a monitoring tool that lets you do all of this, and anything else you choose to include in your plan. You also need to collect data before a crisis arises, to benchmark against. If you know what a “normal” week looks like, you’ll be able to accurately assess the bad times. 8. Reflect on your response. Once it looks like you’re out of the woods, it’s important to take stock of your response. Hopefully, you had a great plan in place, and everyone knew exactly what was required of them. As part of your plan, make time to regroup after the event, and discuss how it went. Key questions to work through include: What were the strongest aspects of your brand’s crisis plan?Where was the existing strategy unhelpful or less impactful?Are there any processes or templates that need to be revised?Do you need to create any new systems or guidelines? Discuss the different experiences of management, administrative, and customer support staff. Did everyone feel ready to respond, and what other resources would have helped when things got hectic? 9. Prepare for the long-term. Unfortunately, negative news and complaints can linger far longer than a week or two. You need to decide what your response will look like moving forward. It might not be best to act like everything is now fixed. Instead, you may want to be proactive, offering updates and solutions to help customers get through a tough time. These are the big questions to ask yourself: How will you manage or participate in the long-term conversation about this event?Do you need to provide continual updates long-term to any of your audiences? Again, your monitoring tool will be invaluable here. Not only will you hear if things quickly begin to spiral (again), but you’ll be able to show sentiment improving over time, and find positive feedback to share with your community. 10. Update your crisis management plan. The last step is to revisit the first nine steps. This may have been your first chance to test out your crisis management plan, so you need to figure out if it worked. Hopefully, you won’t get another opportunity for some time, so this is the time to make changes. Move through each section of your plan and make any changes that need to be made. Make the necessary fixes to ensure your crisis management plan is as good as it needs to be. So those were our 10 steps to get you prepared. You're all set! But how do you respond if a crisis is already at your door? Our own Brittany Berger walks you through this difficult time: What to do in the face of an ugly social media crisis. No brand wants to find themselves in a social media crisis, but every brand needs to be prepared for. It’s one of those “hope for the best, prepare for the worst” things. Like insurance. You can’t let yourself and your communications team go in denial and pretend it could never happen. One viral, “didn’t think it through” tweet. One screenshotted SnapChat. One employee logging into the wrong account. That’s all it takes to have a crisis on your hands, my friend. And if it happens, you need a game plan, and you need one bad. And here’s what it should include. Want to save a quick list of these steps...just in case? Download the free PDF! 1. Determine whether or not it’s a real social media crisis. First of all, is the situation really a crisis? There’s a big difference between a sticky situation and a full-blown disaster. Sure, both are bad, but there’s a big difference that dictates how your brand needs to react. So you obviously want to make sure the crisis is real and you’re not overreacting. No one likes a drama queen. Ask yourself: will this have a real, lasting impact on our brand? Will it impact business results, or is it just talk? We’ve all seen it: a Facebook friend getting totally outraged and going on a tirade about a brand for something that’s not even a big deal. And we all have that friend who needs a brand to be angry at in order to survive on social media. It’s who they are, and we love them anyway. With how easy it is for people to become keyboard warriors and how quickly something can go viral, not every sticky situation will have an impact. It’s perfectly possible to just move on without going into full-on crisis mode. When things get more serious, however, is when a situation really will drive away customers and have other lasting impacts on your business, your employees, etc. Now, only your brand knows your customers well enough to determine that about a social media disaster. But when people start angry tweeting you on social media, take a look at who they are. Are they your customers, your audience? Basically, who cares? And I don’t mean that like, “Ugh, who cares?” I actually want you to answer that. Are the people angry with your brand actually your target audience or an important audience to you, or are they people outside of your important markets? It’s never nice to piss people off, but if they’re not your audience or customers, it may not be a crisis. 2. Pause your scheduled posts. If something is a crisis, the first thing you wanna do is go into “crisis control” mode. That means not asking people to buy from you when the whole internet is mad at you. Timing is everything, after all. Press “pause” on any campaigns and content you’d planned to put out on social media, and you may want to consider altering your schedule on other online channels, too. The benefit here is two-fold: First of all, as mentioned before, a crisis is not a great time to be marketing and selling. People aren’t happy with you, and people need to be happy to buy. Secondly, this frees up your whole team to focus 100% on getting the crisis under control. It should be your number one priority, not a marketing campaign that will fail if everyone hates you, anyway. 3. Publicly acknowledge what’s going on. Staying in contact with your audiences during a social media crisis is so, so important. Beyond effectively communicating updates, you already need to comfort people by showing them you’re there and you care. As soon as possible, acknowledge your brand’s problem or crisis on social media. Even if you don’t have a solution or real updates yet, put something out that tells your audience that you’re aware of what’s going on. This lets people know that you’ve jumped on the issue quickly and care about solving it, as well as where to go for more updates. At this point, it doesn't need to be anything more than a short post on each important channel. You may want to consider reposting it a time or two within the same time frame to ensure your followers see it. 4. Create a social crisis action plan. Once you’ve checked in with your audience and let them know what’s up, it’s time to go into problem-solving mode. It’s time to put your crisis communications plan into action. Part of being prepared for a crisis means in addition to learning these 10 steps today, you’re also starting to work on them. You need a crisis comms plan long before a crisis happens as it guides your team in responding. If you don’t know where to start, our free crisis communication workbook can help. Basically, you want to decide what steps your team will take during a crisis, which team members will perform each task, and how you’ll communicate with each other and your public. 5. Inform your team. In addition to giving a heads up about the situation to your audience, you also absolutely have to consider any other stakeholders at the company. Executive leadership obviously needs to know what’s going on, as they do with anything big happening to the company. Additionally, they might have to field questions from people about it and should be primed with a response. Any support or customer-facing positions should be pulled into the loop as well. They may have customers and prospects coming to them with questions that they should feel confident in answering. 6. Work quickly but thoroughly. A social media crisis is not the time for perfectionism. You have a fire to put out, and the longer you wait, the more it will breathe and spread. Your social media crisis communication plan should be lean and minimal. Once the crisis is over, you can focus on the lower priority parts of crisis management - now’s the time for high, DEFCON 1-level to-dos. Work quickly by carefully and accurately. The last thing you need to do while dealing with one crisis is to start another crisis! I won’t lie - this is tough. Toeing the line between “fast but effective” and “sloppy and confusing” can be quite the balancing act. 7. Give your audience frequent updates. It’s so important to stay in close touch with your audience in the middle of a social crisis. For one, social media is real-time and your posts “expire” quickly in terms of reach. Someone may not have seen your tweet from a few hours ago, but are online now. But also, keeping them in the loop can help pacify anyone angry or upset. Apologize continuously, let them know what steps you’re taking to remedy the company’s problem, and thank them for their patience. When you don’t have any actual news to update them with, it’s best to keep it short and sweet. If you are providing them with crucial news, it’s best to communicate the essential or most important facts on social, and link to a web page with more information. When it comes to this, it’s better to over-communicate than not share enough, and this lets you have a central location for the more detailed info. 8. Individually reply to concerned audience members. In addition to sending out blanket statements from your company to its whole audience, you’ll also want to address anyone that reaches out directly on social media. Obviously, don’t waste your time engaging with trolls and such, but crisis management tools can help you find people who are legitimately concerned, the customers whose relationships you’re in danger of damaging. If it’s a general angry or concerned tweet, let the user know they’re heard and instruct them on how they can stay updated. If they address something specific, address that topic directly as best you can. And if you can’t answer the question, be honest, don’t just try to sidestep it. And for the love of social media, do NOT use automated or canned responses in a social media crisis. 9. Post a long-form response on your website. Remember that central location I talked about previously? Let’s talk about it a little more. You want one “hub” that people can go to for information so that you don’t have to only give updates 140 characters at a time. This can be a blog post that you update as you have more information or a static page. Add new updates and details as you have them, and it’s a great timeline of the crisis and place to direct social media users to. You can even embed social media posts to let people see all channels in one spot. 10. Let the dust settle. Once you’ve performed steps five through nine, it’s kind of a matter of rinsing and repeating. You’ll go through them with each update you communicate to your audience. Once they’ve done their jobs, it’s time to let the dust settle. Move on, but don’t forget. You don’t want to keep people’s attention on the social media crisis any longer than it needs to be, but you also shouldn’t avoid the topic if someone else brings it up. And you’re done. You now have a crisis plan locked, loaded, and ready to test. Hopefully, you’ll never need to use it. But this way you’re prepared in case disaster strikes. If you want more information for each step of the way, download our free workbook. It’s a detailed walkthrough to help you ask and answer the right questions. With it, you’ll be ready to deal with anything coming your way. Share this post Patrick Whatman Guest Blogger @Mention Be in the know 📥 Sign up for The Mention Memo Get the latest and greatest digital marketing + social media tips every week! Related posts “Battle of the Brands”: WeTransfer vs. Dropbox How Social Listening can Enrich your Clients' Marketing Campaigns Adapting Your Conversion Funnel to the Shifting Mindsets of Consumers in a Post-Covid Landscape How Digital PR Can Help You Build A Brand? Beginner’s Guide to doing Content Curation the Right Way 6 Ways to Utilize Social Media for Financial Institutions
Topics
  • Topic
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  • Position
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  • 75
  • 6
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  • 43
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  • 6
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  • 14
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  • 14
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  • 6
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  • 12
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  • 12
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  • 11
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  • 10
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  • 9
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  • 9
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  • 7
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  • 7
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  • 3
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Result 7
TitleFive tips for social media crisis management
Urlhttps://cipr.co.uk/CIPR/Learn_Develop/Training/Blogs/Five_tips_for_social_media_crisis_management.aspx
Description
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Organic Position7
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Body="https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-MZ37GF3" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> Skip to main content
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Result 8
TitleCRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE SOCIAL MEDIA AGE - Affect
Urlhttp://www.affect.com/downloads/Affect_Social_Media_Crisis_Management_White_Paper.pdf
DescriptionSocial Media Crisis Management ... Being able to anticipate potential threats is crucial to ensuring that your organization is well positioned to manage ...
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Organic Position8
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Result 9
TitleResilience: Crisis Management in the Social Media Age – PublicSonar
Urlhttps://publicsonar.com/blog/resilience-crisis-management-in-the-social-media-age/
Description
Date
Organic Position9
H1Resilience: Crisis Management in the Social Media Age
H2Let's chat and discuss your challenge
Read more
H3Whitepaper: Intelligent Innovation for Public Safety and Emergencies
2021 Data Science and AI: Startups & Scale-ups
Six tips for monitoring social media
SOLUTION
COMPANY
CONTACT
H2WithAnchorsLet's chat and discuss your challenge
Read more
BodyResilience: Crisis Management in the Social Media Age Author: Stanimira Ruseva Type of content: Press PublicSonar was recognised by the Emergency Planning Society for “providing the best information at the point of decision-making”. Below you can read more about what it means to manage a crisis in a digital age. Share on twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin PublicSonar’s solution was recognised by the Journal of Emergency Planning Society for “providing the best information at the point of decision-making”. Below you can read more about crisis management in the social media age. The article, written amidst the Covid-19 uncertainty, elaborates on the importance of effective emergency planning and response. You may ask: “What does it mean to manage a crisis in a digital age?” Well, other than transmitting information between control rooms, coordination centres and operators, it means seeking for innovative ways of connection to those on the ground. In our digital age, this is evermore done via social media. Owing to simplicity, speed or perhaps habit, people intuitively post about incidents on social media. Knowing this, crisis managers logically ask “How do you manoeuvre the plethora of online information?”.   In short, technological innovation is the one that bridges the gap between the vast amount of messages posted online and the need for a real-time comprehensive situational overview. More so, technology is identified as crucial in the crisis “golden hour”. Namely, the time where crucial decisions are made at the beginning of a crisis define the success of the crisis management cycle. At PublicSonar it is our mission to provide the best information at the point of decision-making: real time, comprehensive, and clearly presented. If you are interested in how PublicSonar can provide the best information at the point of decision-making for your organisation, email us at [email protected] You can read the full article about crisis management in the social media age below. Let's chat and discuss your challenge. Gain access to smart insights from publicly available data during emerging risks and disruptions. Read more. Whitepaper: Intelligent Innovation for Public Safety and Emergencies . » 2021 Data Science and AI: Startups & Scale-ups . » Six tips for monitoring social media . » Follow us: SOLUTION. Your challenge Policing Public safety & security Emergency planning & response Mobility & vital Infrastructure Our AI-solution COMPANY. About PublicSonar Resources Careers Contact us FAQ CONTACT. [email protected]+31 624 111 097 Demo © PublicSonar | Privacy Statement & Cookies | Responsible disclosure policy | FAQ  Posting....
Topics
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  • 7
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  • 3
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Result 10
TitleThe Ultimate Guide to Social Media Crisis Management | NetSuite
Urlhttps://www.netsuite.com/portal/resource/articles/business-strategy/social-media-crisis-management.shtml
DescriptionGet a series of steps for preventing social media crises -- and dealing with one, should it occur
Date30 Apr 2020
Organic Position10
H1The Ultimate Guide to Social Media Crisis Management
H2Steps for preventing a social media crisis
Steps to take during and after a social media crisis
Educational Resources
H3Create a social media policy
Secure your social media accounts
Create a social listening program
Be proactive about hashtag campaigns
Don’t capitalize on an external crisis
Define what a crisis is for your business specifically
Have a crisis communication plan in place
Acknowledge that there’s an issue
Pump the brakes on scheduled posts
Pick your battles
Keep your team in the loop
Review the experience, and learn from it
H2WithAnchorsSteps for preventing a social media crisis
Steps to take during and after a social media crisis
Educational Resources
BodyThe Ultimate Guide to Social Media Crisis Management David Luther | Digital Content Strategist April 30, 2020 In short: No brand is immune to a social media crisis, a major issue that impacts a large group of customers and requires a special response to prevent an escalating reaction.There are, however, steps you can take to both prevent a social media crisis and limit the impact, should one occur.If a crisis breaks out, use a small leadership team to triage the situation, execute a brand social media response if required, and keep teams in the loop. No matter the industry, your company is likely to face a social media crisis at some point. It may come in the form of incessant customer Tweets over a service outage, or it could be a poorly timed or insensitive post from your brand. Products might fail on live television, or a retail employee may make insensitive remarks to a customer that end up on Facebook. A solid crisis management plan can prevent and limit the impact of these happenings. Below, we describe steps businesses can take to limit the chances of a minor incident, should one occur, turning into a full-blown social media crisis. Steps for preventing a social media crisis. Proactively establishing social media guidelines for your company can limit the chances of a blowup occurring in the first place. Think of these steps as “pre-crisis mode” and prevention against scrambling in the middle of a crisis. Create a social media policy. Many of the most brand-damaging social media crises come from employees publishing a post that goes awry. A simple way to prevent these mishaps is providing guidance for how employees should post on branded accounts and mention the company on their personal profiles. In an employee handbook or onboarding materials, give detailed descriptions of how your employees should handle customer inquiries that come in through social media and ways to address questionable content like misinformation, leaks or confidential information. You should also outline how employees should: Get approval for company-related posts.Comply with copyright laws on social media.Include or withhold company information on social media profiles.React to PR crises on social media. The method by which you disseminate these rules is up to you, whether it’s via an annual employee training session, a contract for teams to digitally sign, or another way. In that communication, clearly describe the consequences for failing to adhere to the policy. Secure your social media accounts. Weak passwords and limited account security are risks in general, but note that a rogue or former employee is more likely to cause a cybersecurity crisis than a hacker. Limit and track employees’ access to social media accounts, making sure to revoke access for employees leaving the company or moving into an unrelated department. Also, make it clear that employees aren’t allowed to create unauthorized alternate accounts, whether it’s for a company event or an internal team. For example, an employee creates a sales team account to post teambuilding event photos but then forgets about the account. If a customer stumbles across this account, it could lead to confusion and brand image issues. Create a social listening program. Unlike social media monitoring, which looks at engagement metrics and mentions, social listening tries to gauge the ratio of positive/negative sentiment toward your company or one of its activities using metrics like: Brand mentionsIndustry trendsRelevant hashtags You can use social listening to monitor what people are saying about your brand and respond to issues before they develop into crises. Imagine, for example, that your brand posts a photo which other users call out as insensitive. Or perhaps an ad campaign goes viral for the wrong reasons. There are a number of tools that handle social listening. A good place to start is by setting up Google Alerts and keyword searches for your brand and products/services. But those tools only help if you have a system in place for monitoring them. Establish protocols for which member of your team is in charge of social listening, what they’re listening for and when they should be paying special attention to online chatter, such as in the week after launching a new social media campaign. Social media crises don’t observe office hours, so determine which members of the social media team will monitor channels in the evenings and on weekends — especially during high-volume sales and peak service periods — for changes in sentiment and increased mentions. Be proactive about hashtag campaigns. A catchy hashtag can be a great way to bring your social audience together and get visibility for your content, but be careful when choosing them. Make sure the phrasing can’t be misinterpreted or misconstrued. Keep the hashtag’s context narrow to limit the “creativity” users might have if they’re looking to complain or troll. McDonald’s released the #McDStories campaign hoping to get heartwarming pictures of kids with Happy Meals — instead, it developed into a bashtag. Similarly, make sure you understand the context behind hashtags before you start using them. Get a grasp on why a hashtag is trending before firing off a tweet in an attempt to join the conversation. Baked goods company Entenmanns’ ill-timed use of #notguilty during a major 2011 court case could have been avoided with a bit of research. Don’t capitalize on an external crisis. Simply put, don’t risk sounding tone deaf during a crisis that doesn’t pertain to your company. It may be tempting to sound off on evolving situations and trends quickly, but steer clear of controversial or sensitive topics unless there’s a good reason not to. For example, Kenneth Cole attempted to use the trending #cairo during the Arab Spring to sell shoes from its spring collection. Given the insensitivity, it didn’t go over well. Posts don’t have to be openly promotional to rile up social media users. Bing created a campaign to donate $1 to victims of major earthquakes in Japan for every retweet its post received. When users perceived it as a marketing grab for followers, Bing donated a full $100,000 and apologized. This isn’t to say that brands shouldn’t communicate at all during a crisis — just make sure your posts are brand-appropriate and non-promotional. For example, gaming hardware company Razer created a relevant poster whose proceeds go directly to fighting COVID-19, an effort that was well-received on Instagram. Define what a crisis is for your business specifically. At your business, not every issue is a crisis. Consider a one-off issue like an isolated outage or unpleasant service call that a customer takes to social media. You don’t need to go into crisis mode over an incident that can be resolved by contacting the customer directly. It’s important for social teams to be vigilant, however, because what seems like an isolated event can be the first indicator of an impending crisis — a major issue that impacts a large group of customers and requires a special response to prevent an escalating reaction. For example, a single customer mocking a hashtag or commenting on the insensitivity of ad copy might fit the definition of an issue, not a social media crisis. Multiple customers pointing out the issue may indicate an incipient crisis. Have a crisis communication plan in place. A social media crisis can spiral out of control within a matter of hours, and having a crisis communication plan allows companies to resolve it as soon as possible. A social media crisis response team doesn’t need to involve your entire company. Decide, in times of non-crisis, which members of the social team, management and leadership need to be involved to take action quickly. While building this team, consider these responsibilities:Looking out for and monitoring crisesActively managing social media and answering questionsGuiding the overall strategy and updating key leadershipResponding to questions from other channels such as email and handling media requests It’s important to remember that time is of the essence in a social media crisis. A tweet or two won’t resolve everything, but having a comprehensive plan that allows your organization to respond decisively lets users know that the crisis is at least acknowledged. Steps to take during and after a social media crisis. Even the largest, best-prepared companies may find themselves in hot water on social media sometimes. These steps will help mitigate a social media crisis once it’s begun. Acknowledge that there’s an issue. When customers or clients are upset or confused, they want to know that companies are aware of both the crisis (an app outage, for example) and the impact it has on them (i.e. the inability to post photos on the app). Even if your team doesn’t have all of the answers, simply acknowledging that they know about the problem can quell feelings of uncertainty. It will also help your team prevent any additional social media users from asking if your company is aware of the problem. Pump the brakes on scheduled posts. As soon as your team senses a crisis brewing, it should pause social media activity while it takes stock of the situation. Many brands use software to schedule posts in advance, and failing to stop these from running can make businesses seem tone deaf or even make a social media crisis worse. For example, don’t Tweet about your retailer’s one-day shipping guarantee when Twitter users are barraging the brand with complaints about shipping delays. For the most part, you can just delay these scheduled posts until a later time. Each and every post during a crisis should be considered and appropriate for the situation, and it’s important to vet these posts to make sure they’re aligned with crisis communication plans. Pick your battles. It’s usually safest to not reply to negative comments and posts publicly, but if you do, limit it to one or two responses to show the public that you’re responding. You’re more likely to resolve issues in private channels in which there’s no audience to fuel a performative back-and-forth between customer and brand. Remember, you won’t be able to please everyone, and in many cases, negative social media users just seek to vent or be heard. Learn to recognize when it’s best to ignore their comments so you can focus time and energy on more constructive communication. Keep your team in the loop. Once management and the social team have a grasp of the scope and scale of the social media crisis, let the rest of the company know what’s happening and how to communicate during the crisis. The idea is to avoid your team finding out about the issue from a sudden series of posts from upset customers or clients. Send them a quick message detailing: What’s happening (i.e. customers are commenting on your brand’s latest post, saying it’s insensitive)Where it’s happening (i.e. Instagram)If the team should take any action (i.e. whether they should direct-message the disgruntled customers on Instagram) This is also when you’ll want to share any preapproved messaging and let the company at large know how it should direct customer complaints from other channels — remember, many customers view social media as a customer service channel. Review the experience, and learn from it. When the crisis has abated, it’s time to circle up with the social team and leadership to discuss the crisis from start to finish. Even with a solid plan in place, the fact that the company’s gone through a social media crisis indicates that there’s room for improvement. Examine where the breakdown happened and how processes can improve, seeking input from team members. Remember, it’s also an opportunity to review which mitigation steps worked, whether they involved customer service representatives, putting out a timely statement, or another tactic. Use those learnings to tweak your social media crisis communications plan, then rest assured that you’re better-prepared to handle any future issues. Trending Articles Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A): Practices, Roles, Responsibilities, and Functions Inventory Cycle Counting 101: Best Practices & Benefits What Is Material Requirements Planning (MRP)? 50 Critical ERP Statistics: 2020 Market Trends, Data and Analysis Educational Resources. Business Solutions Glossary of Terms   Chat Sales Chat How is your business adapting to change? Start chat Top
Topics
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  • Tf
  • Position
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  • 49
  • 10
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  • 43
  • 10
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  • 38
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  • 21
  • 10
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  • member
  • 4
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  • 4
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  • social media user
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  • 3
  • 10
Result 11
TitleHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis in 9 Simple Steps
Urlhttps://www.convinceandconvert.com/social-media-strategy/dont-be-scared-be-prepared-how-to-manage-a-social-media-crisis/
DescriptionHere are the 9 steps to successfully managing a social media crisis. This is the social media crisis management playbook I hope you never need
Date
Organic Position11
H1Don’t Be Scared, Be Prepared: How to Manage a Social Media Crisis
H2Other Top Articles
13 Words You Never Use When Replying to a Customer
H31. Buy Some Binoculars — Set Up a Listening Program
2. Know What Is and Is Not a Crisis
A social media crisis is a decisive change from the norm
A social media crisis has a potentially material impact on the company overall
A social media crisis can indirectly impact more than one company
3. Use an Internal Alert and Response Flowchart
1. Pause All Outbound Messages
2. Acknowledge An Issue
3. Create a Crisis FAQ Page
4. Start Responding in Social Media
5. Use Visual Signals that Inform
6. Build a Pressure Relief Valve
7. Remember the Response Rule of Two
8. Arm Your Army
9. Learn Your Lessons
Get our best tips. Join the smartest marketers who receive our twice monthly update
H2WithAnchorsOther Top Articles
13 Words You Never Use When Replying to a Customer
BodyDon’t Be Scared, Be Prepared: How to Manage a Social Media Crisis Authors: Jay Baer Jay Baer is the founder of Convince & Convert, a Hall of Fame keynote speaker and emcee, host of the award-winning Social Pros podcast, and the author of six books including Talk Triggers: The Complete Guide to Creating Customers with Word of Mouth. View All Posts Follow jaybaer Lauren Teague Follow @@LaurenTee Lauren is a digital strategist with extensive social media experience. She has worked with a range of media startups, established non-profits, professional sports leagues, teams, and athletes. Lauren leads social media strategy for C&C and also contributes to the social media strategies, processes and measurement recommendations for our clients. View All Posts Posted Under: Greatest Hits, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Strategy The worst time to start planning for a social media crisis is when you’re in the middle of one. Click To TweetThe worst time to start planning for a crisis is when you’re in the middle of one. Pre-crisis planning is key to successful social media crisis mitigation. This is lifeguard mode, and there are three elements to it.1. Buy Some Binoculars — Set Up a Listening Program. It’s hard to deal with a social media crisis you can’t find. You can most effectively monitor conversations and stay aware of crises with a social media listening tool, but you can also monitor chatter by setting up keyword searches and Google Alerts.Technology is only as good as its operators. You must have a listening protocol in your organization. Who is listening to social? When are they listening? For what are they listening? Who is covering nights and weekends?2. Know What Is and Is Not a Crisis. Somebody sending a mean tweet or two about your company doesn’t constitute a crisis. When the volume of public outcry starts gaining speed like a boulder down a mountain before your company has a chance to gather its druthers, then its time to activate crisis mode.When identifying a crisis, here are three things to watch for:A social media crisis is a decisive change from the norm.Nike and Chick-Fil-A are routinely criticized for company ethics; however, social chatter about that is ongoing and expected. That’s not a crisis. When a markedly different line of criticism occurs, that’s the first marker of a social media crisis.A social media crisis has a potentially material impact on the company overall.Somebody tweeting about how Subway left mustard off his or her sandwich isn’t a crisis. Consistent reports of food poisoning from Subway is. Scope and scale are the second markers of a social media crisis.A social media crisis can indirectly impact more than one company.When weather events occur or breaking news happens, companies are forced into reacting to a crisis situation to which they didn’t contribute. Having a plan in place allows them to be ready to respond when the moments really count. When the company does not know any more than the public about what’s going on, that’s information asymmetry – the third marker of a social media crisis.3. Use an Internal Alert and Response Flowchart. Not all crises have the same response teams. The more acute the issue, the more senior the responder.Create a crisis flowchart that specifies who in your organization should be contacted in different scenarios.Make certain that your front line social media and customer service personnel keep detailed, up-to-date, contact information (including home phones) for all executives.This is also where – depending on the size and complexity of your organization – you may want to work with legal to map out some processes and pre-approved messaging. Crisis role-playing and fire drills are exceptionally useful too.You’ve completed your lifeguard training. Now, what happens when a crisis occurs?Here are the 9 steps to successfully managing a social media crisis.1. Pause All Outbound Messages. If there’s even a hint of a crisis or public storm building, immediately pause all scheduled content queued to post to your social media channels. Notify any social care representatives to shift to monitor-only mode. This can prevent their innocent attempts to respond before the company is ready to make a statement.2. Acknowledge An Issue. Your first response should always be “yes, we realize something has happened” even if you have ZERO answers. This will stem the tide of “hey company, did you know?” messages, and give the response team a chance to activate and gather information.Respond in the place where the crisis first occurs. If it starts on Facebook, post your first response to Facebook then determine where to go next.3. Create a Crisis FAQ Page. Determine where the focal point will be for all communications about the crisis.Create a landing page or microsite on the website, or designate a single social media channel and put all the information about the crisis in one place. This allows you to respond to questions with a link instead of an answer. This saves time and prevents misinterpretation of your responses (especially on Twitter).Update all bio links to point to the crisis FAQ.This Crisis FAQ should include:Acknowledgment of the crisisDetails about the occurrencePhotos and/or videos, if availableHow the company found outWho was alerted when and howSpecific actions taken in responseReal or potential effectsSteps taken to prevent future occurrenceContact information for real people at the companyIt probably goes without saying, but speed matters.What we ask our clients here at Convince & Convert is simple yet difficult. “Can you get a video online from your CEO within 4 hours, any time of the day or night, from anywhere in the world?” If the answer is no, you aren’t fully prepared.4. Start Responding in Social Media. Once the information is collected and a central FAQ hub is designated, it’s time to roll up the sleeves and let people know you’re in for the long haul. Publish to all active social media accounts a post that identifies:A summary of the situationAn immediate call to actionLink to FAQ hub for further updatesRelevant hashtags to help disseminate infoSafety tips or checklists, if applicableEstimated time of interruption or eventUse boosted posts or paid amplification if it’s necessary for the post to reach specific audiences ASAP. Choose a limited duration ad or boost to reach the maximum amount of people in as little time as possible.As the crisis continues, keep updated posts together in social media.Use Twitter threads to connect new posts to old posts and use hashtags consistently to spread the messages broadly. Update existing posts (from the top down) rather than create new posts on Facebook. Use Instagram Stories rather than the main feed to show progress over time.5. Use Visual Signals that Inform. Use visuals and graphics along with words to signal a change in standard operating procedure. These images can be deployed across social media accounts as a secondary way to keep audiences informed. Display names on Twitter and Instagram are easy to change. So are profile and cover images.When tragedy struck on a Southwest Airlines flight after an engine explosion, @SouthwestAir updated all social media profile images to a simple white or gray icon. It was a powerful cue; one that was done in relative silence.6. Build a Pressure Relief Valve. This may be counterintuitive, but you WANT people to vent on a venue you control.Whether it’s your Facebook page, blog, forum or comments section on your Crisis FAQ microsite, you want ire to accumulate on your turf. There are four benefits to this approach:It allows you to keep more of the conversations about the crisis in a single venue, making them easier to track.It’s an early warning detection system for new dimensions of the crisis.It gives your customers an official place to come to your defense (sometimes).When your turf is the conversational boxing ring, you set the rules.If you do not proactively provide a pressure relief valve, complainants will create their own, giving you no recourse or control whatsoever.To their credit, Penn State University used their Facebook wall as a pressure relief valve during the height of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, allowing hundreds of angry comments to be posted. But, because it was on their Facebook page, they could see, find, moderate (as necessary) and answer back. Smart. 7. Remember the Response Rule of Two. Social media crisis management isn’t about winning, it’s about damage control. Some people will be angry enough that you’re not going to convince them of anything.Do not get in an online tit for tat, ever (and certainly not in a crisis scenario). Crisis management is a spectator sport.The Hug Your Haters response rule of two is to respond only twice, publicly. Give the agitator two responses, but no more. This demonstrates to anyone watching that you attempted to engage in a productive, constructive way, but also knew when to walk away.Move conversations that are likely to be resolved to an offline channel (direct message, email, phone) after the second response.8. Arm Your Army. We know where everyone works because it’s listed on their Facebook and Linkedin profiles. If you wanted more information about the Southwest Airlines crisis, would you call their corporate communications department and wait on hold or would you go to Linkedin and find ANYONE at Southwest to whom you had a connection. Bingo!Call centers and waiting on hold are for suckers, and every employee is a potential spokesperson. That’s why it’s imperative that you keep ALL employees informed about the crisis.Whether it’s email, text message, internal blog, Slack or similar, you must keep your employees at least as knowledgeable as the public.9. Learn Your Lessons. After the crisis subsides, and you’ve dried the tears off your laptop, reconstruct and deconstruct the crisis.Document every facet:Make copies of all tweets, status updates, blog comments, etc.Make copies of all emailsAnalyze website traffic patternsAnalyze search volume patternsWhere did the crisis break and when? Where did it spread and how?How did your internal notification work?How did your response protocol work?Did specific customers rise to your defense? (thank them!)Were your employees informed?How did the online crisis intersect with offline coverage (if any)?There you have it. The social media crisis management playbook that I hope you never need. If you’d like to put a customized crisis plan together for your company, let us know. We can help. While You're hereGet our best tips. Join the smartest marketers who receive our twice monthly update. Article ContinuesWhile You're hereOther Top Articles. Convince & Convert Podcast, Social Media Case Studies, Social Media Marketing6 Unforgettable Lessons from Southwest Airlines Social Media Crisis . Jay Baer Convince & Convert Podcast, Digital Marketing4 SEO Tactics That Damage Your Brand’s Reputation . Tony Delmercado Social Media Marketing, Social Media Strategy5 Reputation Management Lessons from Prince, Dell and Beyond . Geoff LivingstonArticle Continues 13 Words You Never Use When Replying to a Customer. Are you throwing gas on your own fire? Too often, we use the wrong words when interacting with customers. Our short eBook spotlights the phrases your customers hate, and how to change them. 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Result 12
TitleHow to Build a Social Media Crisis Management Strategy | Sprout Social
Urlhttps://sproutsocial.com/insights/guides/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionThis comprehensive guide to social media crisis management provides actionable best practices to prepare your plan, empower your team and weather any storm
Date31 Mar 2020
Organic Position12
H1From Crisis to Connection: How to Build a Social Media Crisis Management Strategy
H2Send us an email
Download Guide
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BodyFrom Crisis to Connection: How to Build a Social Media Crisis Management Strategy Download Guide Crises of all kinds could hit your brand at any moment. In the past, communications leaders worried about fairly standard scenarios—those affecting your brand’s reputation, operations, leadership or employees. But as we’ve all learned lately, there’s no established template for social media crisis management when the crisis is a global pandemic. Planning for the worst, and being able to adapt quickly no matter what you’re facing, has become critical—and social media plays a major role in your crisis management efforts. In fact, companies that respond well to a brand crisis see a 20% increase in value on average; those that respond poorly see a 30% decrease (Source: Pentland Analytics). This comprehensive guide to social media crisis management will give you actionable best practices to: Develop a social media communications plan for the current coronavirus pandemic Create content that directly speaks to your customers’ needs during a crisis Prepare an evergreen crisis communications plan so you’re ready when needed Set up your social media operations to see your team through a crisis scenario Use social media to make actionable recommendations on business next steps And more! Crisis management is no easy task but as a social media professional, you already have the empathy, communication skills and adaptability that are crucial during a crisis. Now get the industry best practices you need to develop a plan that will empower your team, foster connection with your audience and help your brand weather any storm. Recommended for you . View all Recommended for youRecommended for youCategories Marketing Disciplines Social Media Analytics 8 top business intelligence tools to help you make more informed decisions . Published on October 14, 2021 • Reading time 6 minutes Categories Marketing Disciplines How to run a successful email marketing campaign: A step-by-step guide . Published on August 4, 2021 • Reading time 13 minutes Categories Marketing Disciplines Social Media Publishing How to put together a marketing tech stack that scales your business ASAP . Published on July 7, 2021 • Reading time 7 minutes Categories Leveling Up Marketing Disciplines The complete guide to B2B SEO . Published on July 1, 2021 • Reading time 9 minutes Now on slide Now on slide Now on slide Now on slide Build and grow stronger relationships on social . Sprout Social helps you understand and reach your audience, engage your community and measure performance with the only all-in-one social media management platform built for connection. Try Sprout For Free
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Title3 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media - PR Consultancy
Urlhttps://prconsultancy.org/3-great-examples-of-crisis-management-on-social-media/
Description
Date29 Apr 2021
Organic Position13
H13 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media
H2
H3PR CONSULTANCY
Everything You Should Know About Push Notifications in 2021
How Can Public Relations Fuel Successful Content Marketing
What is Brand Awareness and How to Measure It?
PR CONSULTANCY
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Body3 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media April 29, 2021 A company can feel the backlash of a crisis on social media long after the drama dissipates. All it takes is someone writing something negative and the post can get a massive number of shares within minutes. Hence, knowing the essentials of social media crisis management is crucial for any organization that wants to hold its own. Below, we’ll discuss 3 practical examples of how other companies have chosen to tackle the matter and outline the key takeaways of their approach: 1. The Gucci Sweater With Questionable Design The people at Gucci are no strangers to feeling the heat any time a design doesn’t turn out as intended. A textbook example of this is the so-called ‘blackface’ design of a black sweater. Mind that the drama did not start following the launch of the item; rather, it came months later. Nevertheless, it was quite severe. In fact, people posted across every social media channel to share their thoughts. And it’s not good for business. Gucci was quick to act in response. To prevent their brand from taking any further damage, they proceeded to remove the sweater from the store shelves, followed by an apology posted on their official Twitter account. In it, they marked the event as a “powerful learning moment”. In the eyes of their customers, this came across as an act of respect and humility. But that’s not the end of the story. Once the dust had finally settled, the company portrayed itself in a more than positive light by announcing plans to launch global scholarship platforms all across the globe. 2. The Malfunctioning Nike Shoe Everyone remembers how Duke University’s Zion Williamson sustained a knee injury due to a Nike shoe falling apart mid-game. And to make matters worse, this unfortunate event took place in the early moments of a highly-anticipated match that was broadcasted on national tv. It goes without saying that every social media channel exploded, and everyone found out about it. This time around, people were respectful and wished Zion a swift recovery. Nonetheless, the fact that it was a shoe made by Nike was strapped onto it either way. And it goes to show that people’s trust in the brand took a hit shortly thereafter – the company’s stock sank by 1.8% the very next day. Nike took the proactive approach by sending the best wishes to Williamson in its official statement. At the same time, the company representatives attempted to alleviate people’s concerns by stating they are working to identify the issue. And so they did. A day after the incident, Nike dispatched a team of investigators to the stadium where the game took place. Later, the team visited Nike’s factory in China. Reportedly, they came back with numerous suggestions that the company used to craft a special pair of shoes for Williamson. He thanked them for the kind gesture, and the issue was resolved. As you can see, swift movement is key, and so is being thoughtful. By designing a new pair of shoes just for him, the company demonstrated its ongoing commitment to improvement. 3. The Sephora Shoplifting Accusation In 2019, SZA, the hit singer, tweeted on social media how one of the Sephora employees accused her of attempting to steal from the store and called security to prevent the alleged shoplifting attempt. Being the star that she is, a whole crew of loyal fans jumped in to defend her. Sandy – the employee who made the premature move – was not so lucky. Several remarks were being thrown her way, with some being as mild as to mark her as “disrespectful”, while others accused her of committing the ungraceful act of racial profiling. The company officials tweeted the apology directly to SZA and thanked her for bringing the matter to their attention. They assured her that complaints such as these were to be addressed immediately and that they are already working on resolving the issue. About a month following the incident, an announcement went live on Sephora’s official profile that announced its stores would be closing for one hour’s worth of centralized diversity training. While it wasn’t explicitly stated this was in any way related to the incident itself, the move came across as an example of proactive crisis management. Once again, the lesson is clear: when the time comes, don’t shy away from using social media to address your customers’ concerns. At the end of the day, people want to feel heard. Being ready to discuss an issue like this signals the humanity of your brand and tells the world that you’re always willing and ready to learn and improve things as needed. Conclusion A company should take a proactive approach to resolve matters such as these and have a strategy when the time comes to respond. At the same time, it’s important to keep in the loop about what’s going on on social media in the first place so you’ll be the first to know. People also read See all Everything You Should Know About Push Notifications in 2021 . Read More December 30, 2021 How Can Public Relations Fuel Successful Content Marketing . Read More March 18, 2021 What is Brand Awareness and How to Measure It? . Read More December 18, 2020 Give your brand theproper throne Contact us Write us 60 Leadenhall St, London 777 3rd AvenueMidtown East, New York City, NY Menu PR CONSULTANCY. Content Marketing for Business Growth Copyright © 2020, All rights reserved PR CONSULTANCY. Content Marketing for Business Growth Home About us Blog Contact us
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Result 14
TitleSocial Media Crisis Management 101 - Juicer Social
Urlhttps://www.juicer.io/blog/crisis-management-101-for-social-media-managers
DescriptionWhen disaster strikes, will your team be prepared? Learn the essential social media crisis management best practices to get your company through a social crisis
Date7 Jan 2021
Organic Position14
H1Social Media Crisis Management 101 for Businesses
H2The Juicer Blog
Posted January 7th, 2021 by Alison in #social media management tips (121)
What Is Crisis Management?
Why is Social Media Crisis Management Important For Businesses?
Basic Social Media Crisis Plan Steps to Ensure You’re Prepared:
Rebound Campaigns:
Timeliness for Social Media Managers During a Crisis
How to Prepare for Crisis Management: Team Roles and Responsibilities
Dos and Don’ts for Social Media Managers
H3Blog Categories
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Frontline Interactions:
Written Statements, Speeches, and Video Messaging:
H2WithAnchorsThe Juicer Blog
Posted January 7th, 2021 by Alison in #social media management tips (121)
What Is Crisis Management?
Why is Social Media Crisis Management Important For Businesses?
Basic Social Media Crisis Plan Steps to Ensure You’re Prepared:
Rebound Campaigns:
Timeliness for Social Media Managers During a Crisis
How to Prepare for Crisis Management: Team Roles and Responsibilities
Dos and Don’ts for Social Media Managers
BodySocial Media Crisis Management 101 for BusinessesBlog HomePosted January 7th, 2021 by Alison in #social media management tips (121). What Is Crisis Management? It’s a typical day at work, everything is running smoothly, you’re checking off your tasks for the day like the boss social media manager you are, when suddenly crisis strikes. Campaigns and initiatives are thrown at the window and each and every employee’s sole focus now is surviving the crisis, protecting the brand, and making it out alive (and with a job). Would your team have a crisis management plan and know what to do? These days, word travels fast, and whether it’s a series of bad reviews, a company-wide misstep, natural disasters, or unwarranted trash talk from another entity, these crises can cause extreme damage to a business. It’s not even a matter of if, but when, a situation might arise. Luckily, there are social media crisis management plans you can have in place to ensure a better chance of success. Whether you're a small business, a big corporation or even a political campaign, it’s important to be ready before disaster strikes. Businesses need to have a social media crisis management plan in place so that when disaster strikes, the organization is well-equipped to handle it. The core of crisis management revolves around communications. This means that it’s important for the entire company to be briefed and on-board with whatever plan an organization chooses to follow. Why is Social Media Crisis Management Important For Businesses? As a social media manager, or someone on a communications or marketing team within a brand, you might not think crisis management pertains to you. However, many might argue that these areas are the most crucial to making it out of a crisis successfully. If a company is large enough to have their own crisis management department, most of those individuals tend to come from PR, advertising, or marketing backgrounds. This is because they are more likely to be trained in understanding target markets and demographics, are heavily involved with disseminating company messages, and have participated in extensive research regarding the psychology behind communications (a set of data that many CEO’s aren’t as up-to-date on). As a social media manager, you’re on the front lines of communication efforts with individual customers regularly. How you choose to manage communications in the midst of a social media crisis reflects upon the entire organization. Over the years, as social media has become a standard for companies around the globe, we’ve seen both good and bad social media crisis management examples during difficult and controversial periods. Here’s one of the good social media crisis examples: Starbucks The Starbucks incident in Philadelphia involving Donte Robinson and Rashon Nelson in April 2018. This example is sparked from a situation that developed at a Philadelphia Starbucks establishment. The two men involved, Robinson and Nelson were business partners and had arrived early at the Starbucks prior to a meeting on April 12. The men were waiting for a colleague before ordering. The Starbucks employee asked the men to leave because they hadn’t ordered anything yet. The men refused, and the employee decided to call the police to have the men removed from the store. The men refused again once police arrived and were eventually arrested and removed from the property. Witnesses commented that the men’s associate arrived as the arrest was being made. Others in the Starbucks store immediately began documenting the situation and sharing on social media. Many questioned why the two black men had this experience while white individuals who’d been in the same situation had never been challenged in this way. The action of offense taken by the Starbucks employee, plus the magnification of the event on social media resulted in a social media crisis management situation on a national scale On April 14th, Starbucks released a primary statement via social media, apologizing to the two men and promising to review Starbucks’ policies and efforts to prevent a similar situation from happening again. In a follow- up video message by Starbucks CEO, Kevin Johnson, he expresses heartfelt concern, apology, and promise to be better, "In fact, I think the focus of fixing this -- I own it. This is a management issue and I am accountable to ensure we address the policy, and the practice and the training that led to this outcome." Later, Starbucks would announce a company-wide afternoon shutdown where all employees participated in a “racial-bias” training as part of the company’s efforts to better educate their team on this matter. Here are a few reasons why Starbucks handled this social media crisis management situation well: - Immediate apology and acceptance of responsibility regarding the situation. Straightforward and to the point, Starbucks did not try to shift any of the blame. - Humanization and connection by way of a video message helped the public feel the sincerity and seriousness with which Starbucks was handling the issue. - High level transparency regarding the situation and the steps being taken. - Starbucks displayed deeper thought and conversation into why the issue occurred and actionable ways to work towards improvement moving forward. And here is a bad example of social media crisis management: United Airlines The United Airlines, Flight 3411 incident involving Dr. David Dao in April 2017: This social media crisis example revolves around a situation that took place on a United Airlines flight. The flight had been overbooked, and 4 passengers were needed to be re-booked on a different flight in order to allow 4 United employees on board to make it to their next shift. When no volunteers stepped forward, United chose 4 passengers. All complied except for Dr. David Dao, who said he needed to make it home that evening in order to attend to patients the following day. Dao, who had already boarded the plane, was ultimately forcefully removed by law enforcement. Videos show the scene as he was pulled from his seat, resulting in a fall where he hit and bloodied his head. Later the footage shows him being dragged, limp, from the aircraft. Many passengers filmed the incident and immediately shared to social media, tagging United with their complaints about Dao’s treatment. These posts gained traction very quickly amongst social users and news outlets. The first official statement made my United came late Sunday night after videos of the incident appeared on social media beginning around 7:30pm: “Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville was overbooked. After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate. We apologize for the overbook situation. Further details on the removed customer should be directed to authorities.” From that moment onwards, the public began an increasingly aggressive response to United and their social media posts, demanding answers, creating memes, and “trolling” unrelated posts. The United social media team, however, responded with nearly identical, non-committal responses. Here is an example: By this point, there was no mistaking that United should have been in the midst of the very definition of social media crisis management. However, it wasn’t until a little after noon on Monday (the day following) that an additional statement from United’s CEO was released: These communications, along with nearly all those that came after contained a few similar themes: little to no responsibility accepted, lack of direct and sincere apology, lack of humanization, blame placed on passenger. It wasn’t until after the news had already become viral on social media that an additional, more direct statement was made by United’s CEO. This occurred on Tuesday, April 11th. Munoz was later even called to testify to Congress about the matter. Eventually, David Dao and United reached a settlement and several security guards were fired. Competing airlines used this to their advantage, making clever remarks on social media about how such an event would never happen within their companies and making further promises to better accommodate passengers. Here are a few reasons why United failed in this social media crisis management situation: - The team started out on the right foot, by asking those who shared the videos on social media for more information about the situation and reassuring passengers that they were looking into it. However, those were the last signs of human sensitivity and care United displayed until after the incident became viral on social media. - United expressed total rejection of blame and responsibility for any part of the incident. In fact, they blamed it all on Dao. - United only expressed sincere apology and responsibility once they realized the world was watching (and that the world was not pleased), which makes it more challenging to establish trust that their apology is real. - Minimal action taken as a company to prove a bettering of training or process after the settlement was reached. Basic Social Media Crisis Plan Steps to Ensure You’re Prepared:. Ideally, all social media managers and crisis management teams will handle social media crisis situations like Starbucks and not like United Airlines, right? You’d be surprised how quickly plans can take a turn for the worst without careful preparation, training, and strategy. We’ve rounded up a few foundational crisis management strategies to ensure your team is prepared. Frontline Interactions:. Beyond in-person interactions, exchanges on social media, via a chat box, and the company’s “help” email are the most personal interactions your company has with customers. This is where we most often find out about previously unknown crises and continue to communicate with customers as the situation plays out. In the initial discovery stages, the crisis managers should ask for more information and direct users off social media to send an email instead. Later on, once the official strategy and acceptable statements for this medium have been decided on, engaging with as many users as possible is important. This shows company initiative and effort towards keeping the public in the loop. It’s imperative that these communications remain human and compassionate, yet neutral while working to gather as much information as possible. Written Statements, Speeches, and Video Messaging:. Releasing a statement is a crucial crisis management step to set a standard of acknowledgment, transparency, and intended action. While several written statements will be produced throughout the situation, creating a video message or taped speech can really help the public connect with the company in a more human way. The strategy behind these statements is adjusted based on the level of fault the company is at: - At fault: If the crisis being managed is indisputably the business’ fault, this statement must express immediately an acceptance of responsibility for the situation, a promise to make corrections for the immediate damage, and a reassurance that measures will be taken to prevent further issues or change a policy altogether. - Not at fault: If the instance in question is a crisis brought on by outside forces and the company is not at fault, an apology for the inconveniences the customers may have faced is appropriate. Beyond that, additional effort on behalf of the company to support customers during a difficult time goes a long way. - Somewhere in between: The final situation is a gray zone where the company is one of several players at fault, or could have done more to prevent damage. This zone is a precarious one where many companies fail to accurately assess their involvement - or perceived involvement - and mishandle the crisis. It’s important to accept responsibility for what was actually done and respond with compassion and action, whether it was 5% or 99% the business’ fault. Rebound Campaigns:. Once the initial storm has passed, the next step of a crisis management strategy should involve a “rebound campaign”, or the beginning efforts to recover from the damage from the crisis. Depending on the situation, this can involve several tactics: - Company-wide trainings, activities, charitable giving, etc. relating to the incident. - Announcement of policy changes and additions - New ongoing initiatives or charitable foundation - Commercials/video series - Print ads - Digital ads - Interactive event marketing Timeliness for Social Media Managers During a Crisis. One of the most essential qualities to master within a crisis management plan is timeliness. No matter the type or severity of crises, someone; customers, news reporters, the world, will be demanding answers and statements. While it is important to take the needed time to ensure communications are accurate and strategic, waiting too long to respond can increase feelings of mistrust or neglect amongst the public. Often during a crisis, the business is alerted first via customers through social media or other direct messaging, like an email. The social media, customer relations, or other frontline communicators should be punctual in seeing and responding to these messages, then forwarding the information on to the team. If the crisis indeed is a company-wide one, rather than a routine customer complaint or something similar, it’s important to make a public statement. Releasing an initial public statement in 24 hours or less following a company crisis is ideal, while 48 hours is sometimes necessary if there are certain legal stipulations or details that must be confirmed prior to release. As more information comes to light, and company decisions are being made in regards to managing the crisis, additional communications should be shared as quickly as reasonably possible with the public. Making timeliness a priority during the entire crisis management process is critical to maintaining the brand’s strength and transparency. How to Prepare for Crisis Management: Team Roles and Responsibilities. During the typical day-to-day at your office, you’ll most likely have team members in charge of different areas, platforms, or types of communications. Many offices also have a range of autonomy for which team members are able to share certain communications without approval based on the brand guidelines. When a crisis strikes, however, it’s important that the entire company knows that the chain of command, roles and responsibilities, and types of communication allowed will shift. If your company has a designated crisis management team, chain of command for communications automatically will shift to the head of that team. In other scenarios, it will shift to the head of marketing or communications, or to a small group or 2 or 3 executives in related roles. These individuals are the keepers of the crisis management plan and should follow it accordingly. Within the communications and marketing departments, day-to-day activities should halt immediately and crisis management mode should begin. Depending on the situation, this may look something like this: Lower Level Associates (Social Media Assistants or Coordinators, Marketing Coordinators, PR Coordinators, etc.) - Cease communication with the public via company accounts immediately. - Ensure that automatically scheduled posts and communications are paused until the crisis has passed. - Wait to engage in communication until the guidelines have been released by upper-level executives. - Once guidelines have been released, follow them exactly, without deviation. - Respond to your assigned area (sometimes based on social media platform, type of comments, etc.) - Work accurately and efficiently. - Keep note of any concerning findings or new developments and report them to leaders immediately. Mid-Level Managers (Social Media Managers, Marketing Managers, PR Managers, etc.) - Ensure all employees on the team have ceased company communication to the public and paused future scheduled posts. - Gather as much information regarding crisis situation as possible. - Work with upper-level executives to ensure guidelines are reviewed, proofread, and cover all bases. - Distribute and explain guidelines to employees - Assign employees to individual tasks and areas of focus - Once guidelines have been released, follow them exactly, without deviation. - Work accurately and efficiently. - Keep note of any concerning findings or new developments and report them to leaders immediately. Upper-Level Managers/Executives - Analyze crisis situation and confirm details with the legal team, law enforcement, or any other related officials - Adjust crisis guidelines to reflect the situation accordingly. - Work with upper-level executives to ensure guidelines are reviewed, proofread, and cover all bases. - Once guidelines have been released, follow them exactly, without deviation. - Work accurately and efficiently. - Prepare to make statements, participate in interviews, or any other engagements as needed. Dos and Don’ts for Social Media Managers. Ultimately, each crisis situation will entail different approaches for management and recovery. However, we’ve learned that the heart of good crisis management revolves around the same primary qualities: transparency, compassion, trust, and action. No matter what your business decides as its core crisis management plan, keep these general dos and dont’s in mind for a higher chance of success (or in some cases, less damage) when managing company crises. Do: - Establish a plan well in advance of any crises. - Make sure the roles and responsibilities of every department are well-defined. - Have leadership and annexed branches of the company sign off and agree to follow the plan as directed. - Admit fault for actual wrongs the company has made. - Apologize sincerely. - Present an intermediary solution and the promise of a long-term one (if needed). - Be timely when communicating with the press and public. Don’t: - Ignore problems or potential crises - Assume that executive leadership is experienced in crisis management. - Make excuses for confirmed faults of the company. - Release an insincere apology. - Deviate from the established crisis management plan unless agreed upon by the team. - Rush communications - Send out any communications that haven’t been proofread and reviewed by at least 2 other crisis management team members. Juicer uses cookies to offer you a better experience. By continuing to use this site, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with our Cookie Policy. Accept cookies
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  • 14
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  • 14
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  • 14
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  • 14
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  • 14
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Result 15
TitleThe Impact of Social Media on Crisis Management - Proof Strategies
Urlhttps://www.getproofusa.com/the-impact-of-social-media-on-crisis-management/
Description
Date
Organic Position15
H1The Impact of Social Media on Crisis Management
H2
H31. What Constitutes a Crisis Has Changed
2. How People Express Dissatisfaction Has Changed
3. How People Obtain Information Has Changed
4. The Speed of Information Has Changed
5. Who People Trust Has Changed Real
6. Social Media and Traditional Media are Co-Dependents
7. Response Expectations Have Changed
8. Access Has Changed
9. The Spotlight is On How You Handle the Crisis
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BodyThe Impact of Social Media on Crisis Management Traditional crisis management follows the strategy of “owning your story”; that is, moving quickly to maintain control over how the story of an issue or incident is shared and interpreted and, by doing so, shape how external audiences assess the performance of the organization. In a social media world, it is very difficult to retain control of your own story and attempts to do so via traditional methods (controlling information access, deliberate and formal response protocols, etc.) can be counterproductive. Social media has created a communication context where the most effective and valued communications have changed. People now value authenticity, human-ness, accessibility, dialogue, and engagement. The value speed, and as such, a new approach to crisis communications is required. Here’s what’s been changing: 1. What Constitutes a Crisis Has Changed. The once-trivial is important. A single irate customer can get a large audience quickly. For example, e.g., David Carroll’s complaint about United Airlines’ handling of his luggage (“United breaks guitars”) became an Internet and traditional news sensation. 2. How People Express Dissatisfaction Has Changed. Web and social media provide consumers, activists, pranksters, competitors and others with many options for venting complaints or concerns. Some examples: Twitter – easy and rapid dissemination of commentary or information; hash tags can link a problem to your brand instantly, e.g., #dellfail. Facebook – in 2008, Ontario teens staged a massive and almost overnight Facebook-based protest against proposed changes to driver’s license laws that forced the government to abandon its proposals. Web sites and blogs – an individual or organization can post a web site or blog or Facebook page that is as accessible as your official web site or blog(s). With effective search strategies they can ensure people searching for your organization or relevant topics get pointed to their site first. Fake Sites – opposition groups or individuals can create web sites that appear to be an official site of your organization by copying graphics, using cleverly selected links, and so forth. Discussion groups – there are many thousands of discussion groups and forums online. They can be fan sites (generally positive about your organization), critical sites (coalescing complaints and criticism), or neutral (such as a general topic discussion forums). Official commentary and discussion channels – if your organization has channels for the public to comment or interact with your organization (e.g., Facebook page) they can easily become channels for complaint or criticism. 3. How People Obtain Information Has Changed. Stories can break from many directions well before traditional media engage or are able to assess and report. Traditional media also respond to stories or ideas that are moving quickly in interest in the social media world in order to capitalize on their popularity. Search tools, especially Google, define how the majority of people, including journalists, begin to find news and information. Third-party sources have emerged as go-to sources for information in specific categories, e.g., TripAdvisor for real-people commentary on travel experiences. 4. The Speed of Information Has Changed. With Internet and social media channels, information – truth, rumor and speculation – moves far more rapidly, in hours and minutes, not days. Consider the example of the bed bugs and the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF.) Just a few weeks in advance of the Festival, a patron tweeted she thought she was bitten by bed bugs at the theatre that would host all TIFF press screenings. Her post was retweeted by hundreds and stories ran in influential outlets like Movieline.com and The Hollywood Reporter. Even though both Cineplex, the theatre owner, and TIFF organizers responded almost immediately to her posting, the story spread like wildfire. In a crisis, organizations must move to a response strategy immediately and be diligent in chasing down and responding to spreading stories. 5. Who People Trust Has Changed Real. People are able to talk about organizations, brands, services, experiences and products with other real people in discussion groups, in comment feeds, on Facebook, on Twitter, and other social media platforms. These connections have authenticity and therefore are often afforded high trust levels even if the content is inaccurate or subjective. In addition, new “experts” have emerged as a result of social media, e.g., popular mommy bloggers dispense and aggregate advice on child-raising, health, food and myriad other issues. 6. Social Media and Traditional Media are Co-Dependents. Traditional media (i.e., professional journalists) turn to social media for story ideas, background information and commentary. Social media content producers use traditional media to provide credibility to their content and to spread the story, e.g., Wikileaks provided leaked U.S. military documents to traditional media outlets around the world in advance under embargo to ensure high-impact, reach and credibility. 7. Response Expectations Have Changed. Consumers, social media and traditional media now expect immediate responses from organizations. Today’s news cycle is measured in minutes, not hours. Social media vehicles facilitate rapid amplification of a message. You can see the grassfire effect on channels like Twitter when an item is repeatedly retweeted. Even as you are responding to the initial posting, hundreds of others could be spreading the original post to their networks. 8. Access Has Changed. Where once confidential memos, draft proposals, and off-the-cuff comments were generally protected from public exposure, now such items can be made public with the single click of the Send button. Leaked internal e-mails have become a particularly devastating source of embarrassment or worse for organizations. Where once investigative reporters needed to dig through the garbage for incriminating materials, they can now “digitally dumpster dive” through searches for comments, memos, documents and messages that have been put in the digital domain. 9. The Spotlight is On How You Handle the Crisis. As noted in a story by The New York Times Magazine (The Back Story, Upfront, July 25, 2010), the public and media are increasingly interested in the behind-the-scenes aspects of news and developments, e.g., the orgy of interest in the Conan O’Brien/NBC/Jay Leno tussle over “The Tonight Show” that included debates about compensation packages, contracts terms, etc.; and during the BP Gulf Oil Crisis, interest in Tony Hayward’s effectiveness as a spokesperson rivalled or exceeded interest in the clean-up strategy. Organizations need to recognize that media and others will not only be engaged in the content of the crisis, but will also be monitoring and assessing how the crisis is being handled – is the response appropriate? Are spokespeople compelling? Are the communications working? It is typical now for the media to run stories rating the effectiveness of an organization’s crisis response, often by comparing it to past crises (e.g., Johnson & Johnson and Tylenol), and including commentary from third party experts. While many of the core principles of crisis management remain valid, there are new crisis management principals to be considered. To read more on this topic, download our free guide: Understanding Crisis Management in a Social Media World.  Want more? Check out these additional resources:. Media Relations Guide: How to Get Placed in Top Tier Publications How to Build a Media List Long-Lead Media Pitching: How to Plan Ahead Why Media Monitoring Tools Should Be Part of Your PR Strategy   Share Article. Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on pinterest GET PROOF™ Contact . 202.296.20021140 3rd Street, NE Suite #317Washington, DC 20002 Sign up for DC Communicators . 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Topics
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  • Tf
  • Position
  • media
  • 28
  • 15
  • social media
  • 15
  • 15
  • crisi
  • 15
  • 15
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  • 15
  • 15
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  • 14
  • 15
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  • 14
  • 15
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  • 12
  • 15
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  • 10
  • 15
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  • 9
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  • 9
  • 15
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  • 8
  • 15
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  • 7
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  • 7
  • 15
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  • 7
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  • 7
  • 15
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  • 6
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 5
  • 15
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  • 4
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  • 4
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  • 4
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  • 3
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  • 3
  • 15
Result 16
TitleManaging the 'unmanageable' Social media in a crisis - Deloitte
Urlhttps://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/uk/Documents/corporate-finance/deloitte-uk-managing-the-unmanageable.pdf
Descriptionsensing, agile governance and critical communications, can help ... A question we are asked often is “how has social media changed crisis communication?
Date
Organic Position16
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H2
H3
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Result 17
TitleThe Importance of Social Media Management in Times of Crisis - Make It Happen
Urlhttps://makeit-happen.online/2020/03/31/the-importance-of-social-media-management-in-times-of-crisis/
Description
Date31 Mar 2020
Organic Position17
H1The Importance of Social Media Management in Times of Crisis
H2Subscribe To Our Newsletter
You have Successfully Subscribed!
H3Pin It on Pinterest
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BodyThe Importance of Social Media Management in Times of Crisis by Orzala Quddusi | Mar 31, 2020 | Social Media How to's, Social Media Marketing facebook linkedin twitter Pinterest We can’t always predict when a crisis is going to happen, or how hard it will hit business owners. Some business owners might not have ever planned for a pandemic that would close businesses doors globally. If there is anything that we can learn from this, it’s to make a plan for the future and crisis-proof our businesses. Social media is such an important communication tool now more than ever, and many business owners are turning to social media looking for support in these unprecedented times. It is for this reason, that social media posts need to have an extra layer of value, empathy and care for your customers. Here are some strategies to manage and create a valuable social media presence: Listen first, then respond Prepare for changes in your customers behaviours. As people are asked to self-isolate, stay home, avoid going to parks and recreation centres there will be a number of behaviour changes in your customers. The first thing to do is listen to what people need and want. People will turn to social media to ask questions, get advice and seek support. If you business can help in any way, this is when you step in and offer your guidance and support. Pivot your social media strategy to provide the most value for your customers at this time If you have not taken a step back to pause and reflect on your current social media plan, now is the time to do that. The first step would be to pause your scheduled content because it may not be relevant to what is happening around you. Furthermore, it’s important to make changes and pivot your business to support your customers’ needs at this time. Creating flexible payment plans for your services Building out an eCommerce platform Live streaming and online courses Be sensitive and communicate with your customers  In times of crisis, It’s almost always better to over-communicate than under-communicate. Let your customers know what it happening with your business, whether you are closing your doors, changing your hours or moving things to a virtual platform. In addition, strive to make your message clear, relevant and mindful. Now is the time to really “check in” with your customers and see how they are doing, and what you can do to help them.  Understand that each customer may be handling this situation in different ways, and it’s important to reassure them that you are there for them. Spreading some joy When it comes to building long-lasting relationships with your customers, it’s important to show empathy in times of crisis. There is so much negativity on the news that it can be extremely overwhelming. Think about the content you are posting and how it can change someone’s day. Find little ways to delight and put a smile on your customer’s face. For example, you can do this through sharing a quote or a personal act of kindness. During this time there are many questions that arise around how to move forward with business. If you need to chat or brainstorms about managing your social media or creating a new strategy, contact us! Recent Posts. 7 Signs That You Need a Social Media Manager Social Media Spring Clean! Everything You Need to Navigate Social Media as an Introvert 6 Tips on Content Batching Social Media Content Calendar 101 Archives. Archives Select Month May 2021 March 2021 February 2021 January 2021 December 2020 November 2020 September 2020 August 2020 July 2020 June 2020 May 2020 April 2020 March 2020 February 2020 January 2020 December 2019 November 2019 October 2019 December 2018 August 2018 May 2018 April 2018 March 2018 November 2017 October 2017 September 2017 November 2015 October 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 Subscribe To Our Newsletter. Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team. You have Successfully Subscribed! Pin It on Pinterest. Share This facebook linkedin twitter Pinterest
Topics
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  • Tf
  • Position
  • social media
  • 15
  • 17
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  • 15
  • 17
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  • 15
  • 17
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  • 15
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  • 12
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  • 9
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  • 9
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  • 8
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  • 7
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  • 5
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  • 5
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  • 4
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  • 4
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  • 4
  • 17
  • march
  • 4
  • 17
  • december
  • 4
  • 17
  • time crisi
  • 3
  • 17
  • business owner
  • 3
  • 17
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 17
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  • 3
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  • april
  • 3
  • 17
  • 2019
  • 3
  • 17
  • october
  • 3
  • 17
  • 2017
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleHow to Build a Solid Crisis Management Plan | Emplifi
Urlhttps://emplifi.io/resources/blog/crisis-management-guide
DescriptionLearn how crisis management helps you respond effectively to any threat. Prevent the damage a crisis can inflict on your organization & stakeholders
Date12 Jul 2021
Organic Position18
H1What you need to know to build a solid crisis management plan
H2What is crisis management?
Drafting a crisis management plan
Crafting successful crisis management strategies
Crisis management examples
The takeaway
H3What constitutes a crisis?
Not all crises are created equal
Resolution of sensitive topics or negative sentiment
1. Detect
2. Identify
3. Consider
4. Respond
HBO
Nike
H2WithAnchorsWhat is crisis management?
Drafting a crisis management plan
Crafting successful crisis management strategies
Crisis management examples
The takeaway
BodyWhat you need to know to build a solid crisis management planYou have a social media crisis on your hands. Do you know what to do next?If your answer is not a confident “Yes”, then it’s time to update, review, or maybe even create a crisis management plan that can help your business sail as smoothly as possible when the waters get choppy.To achieve that, you have to think through the possible situations that might come up and have plans to follow if (or when) they arise. In this article, we discuss several strategies for preparing for and dealing with a crisis so that you can feel ready and able to tackle whatever challenges might come your way, and minimize crises while it is still early.What is crisis management?When a business crisis arises, either due to something the company itself did or because of external factors like hacks or things outside of the company’s control, the situation needs to be handled and addressed immediately by the company. Put simply, that is what crisis management is about. Although, it goes much deeper.For one thing, one of the most important steps to crisis management is preparing ahead of time, well before anything has even gone wrong. Knowing that you need to have a plan is critical, because trying to react in the middle of a business crisis might just make things worse. Let’s look at some of the questions to answer and the steps to take to draft a crisis management plan.Drafting a crisis management plan. These are some of the critical components that should be addressed when determining your social media crisis management plan:What constitutes a crisis?Your company’s Facebook page has received 10 negative user posts in 30 minutes; is that a crisis?This is where context matters, and your social media management team is the frontline for determining the next steps. If all of those comments are about something completely different, it’s worth monitoring but probably not something that needs to be quickly flagged and elevated.However, if they are all about the same issue or product failure, or they are all reactions after recently seeing your company in the news, then you could have something bigger on your hands.Remember, a social media manager is also a reputation manager. If your business handles customer service through social media, then a big part of their role is the day-to-day reputation management that will help customers and potential customers feel good about your company when they search for you.However, social media managers are not always crisis managers. As such, the task of solving bigger issues does not rest on their shoulders alone. Part of your plan needs to spell out situations that are (and are not) a crisis. This will help your social media management team know when they are expected to bring things to management’s attention, and when they should move forward as they normally would with their review management efforts.Not all crises are created equal. Related to the above point, not every crisis requires all hands on deck. Within your plan, have different action plans for various levels of crises.For example, if there are a lot of negative comments about a specific product, perhaps a company statement about that product is required. However, that does not necessarily mean that the whole C-suite needs to be notified.The bigger the crisis, the more time and human capital is necessary to address it. As such, it is ideal to have plans for crises of different scales, such as ones that require fewer people for smaller issues, so that not everyone is pulled in when they do not necessarily need to be.Many social media crises arise because there was a failure to successfully resolve social media issues. While not the same as a full-blown business crisis, social media crises should be taken seriously.Avoid turning a social media issue into a social media crisisSet guidelines for when a social media issue has evolved into a social media crisis. Spend sufficient time training your social media management team on what constitutes a crisis and inform them of the necessary steps for resolving the issue.Resolution of sensitive topics or negative sentiment. Determine what topics your brand defines as sensitive, and which are considered negative sentiment.Sensitive issues and negative sentiment posts will inevitably occur on a regular basis. Determine required actions for each type of sensitive topic and user posts with negative sentiment. Recommendation: if possible, move the conversation off your Facebook Page or Twitter Profile. Inquire about the issue, respond amiably and if possible resolve the issue.If a user is irrationally posting negative sentiment – not valid criticisms or concerns – then you have the option of reporting or blocking the user. However, keep in mind that blocking users sometimes brings more attention and negative sentiment toward your brand.Crafting successful crisis management strategies. When a crisis happens to your brand, you need to know how to react. A mishandled crisis can destroy your reputation, and can even end up circulating in the news.Ensure you have a workable plan ready for dealing with crisis situations. These steps will help:1. Detect. Before you can even begin to work on an issue, you have to know that there is an issue in the first place. To effectively manage your social media presence, you have to be tuned into the chatter surrounding your brand. Dealing with everyday complaints or posts with negative sentiment is a part of your regular reputation management. However, make sure that you are taking the time to look at the big-picture view to see if there is something bigger on the horizon.An audience analysis tool like the one available as part of the Emplifi Social Marketing Cloud can help detect potential crises at the early stage while there are still some preventative measures to take.2. Identify. Identify what led to the problem. Who was involved? What happened and when did it happen?Once you have a clear and objective view of the problem, it’s time to look into steps to fix it. Make sure that you not only have control of the situation, but that each involved team in your organization is synced on how to deal with the situation and potential future crises like it.3. Consider. We’ll call these the four Ts:Tone – What should be the tone of your response? Make sure that it aligns both with your company’s tone in general, but also with the appropriate tone demanded by the situation. If you can be lighthearted about the incident, be lighthearted. If it’s a serious issue, communicate in a serious tone.Timeliness – How long ago did the incident happen? Make sure you are reacting as quickly as you can without tripping over your own feet in an effort to correct your mistake. This is why it is so important to be efficient in how you take apart the problem and prepare your communication strategy.Thoroughness – What networks are you covering? This is not like posting content; you do not need to be everywhere, drawing even more attention to a problem you would like to have people accept and move past. Consider how the story is spreading, and address it in the same way.Transparency – In almost every situation, transparency is best. That means not only should your response acknowledge any mistake your brand made, but it also should show that you are trying to deal with it honestly. This means openly broadcasting all of the steps that you are taking to fix it and make sure it does not happen again.4. Respond. Now, it’s time to respond. Ensure your team has their social media posts ready on all appropriate channels, then send them out. Be prepared to continually deal with further feedback – also, alert your PR team to your communications strategy so that news reports only include the official positioning. It is highly useful to be using a CMS tool here, to make sure that you are controlling the conversation to the fullest extent.Once you have developed a plan, make sure to circulate it within your organization. Everyone in marketing, PR, and sales should read it. You could even try running scenarios with your team to test your preparation. With a good crisis plan in place and the proper training, your team can safely avoid a potential social media catastrophe.Crisis management examples. Sometimes things get out of your control. They can get ugly. Posts meant to be internal going public, while others may be read as unintentionally insensitive or misleading, for example. Most often, a real-life brand image crisis carries over onto social media, where it can catch fire and spread quickly.Here, we look at a couple of high-profile crises and how the companies involved handled the situation.HBO. On June 17, 2021, thousands of people received a bizarre email from HBO Max with the subject line “Integration Test Email #1” that contained just one line: “This template is used by integration tests only.”Clearly, this wasn’t supposed to be seen externally. HBO Max sent an explanation tweet acknowledging the mistake and stating that yes, believe it or not, it was in fact caused by an intern who the company is helping learn from the incident.We mistakenly sent out an empty test email to a portion of our HBO Max mailing list this evening. We apologize for the inconvenience, and as the jokes pile in, yes, it was the intern. No, really. And we’re helping them through it. ❤️— HBOMaxHelp (@HBOMaxHelp) June 18, 2021 This was a minor incident, and by staying light-hearted about everything, HBO helped engender a lot of positive responses. Many people, including some well-known celebrities, started sharing their own mistakes and mishaps in tweets directed to the intern.Some even pointed out that by discovering the hole in the integration system, the intern actually helped the company by bringing it to their attention.Nike. The brand of shoes a basketball player wears is a big-money decision, especially for high-profile players. Usually, just getting a player to wear your brand is the bulk of the work from the shoe brand side. However, Nike had a crisis on its hands in 2019 when the highest-profile college player in the country, Zion Williamson, broke through his Nike shoe during the most-anticipated game of the season.It was such a large incident that Nike’s stock fell 1.8% the following day. Clearly, the company needed to be proactive and do something to avoid continuing to be mocked by Twitter trolls all day.In response, Nike put on a full-court press, sending teams to North Carolina – where the game had taken place – and even to Nike’s manufacturing site in China, where they helped develop a custom shoe for Zion Williamson.From its initial concern to detailing the steps it was taking to fix the issue, Nike was open and up-front on social media about its response. The result was that Nike overcame the crisis and kept Williamson committed to the company as he released his own signature Nike shoe in April 2021.The takeaway. Taking the first steps and drafting a social media issue and crisis management plan is a large step in developing your overall social media strategy. However, the work does not end there. The social media world is constantly changing and evolving, which means that your social media strategy, including your issue and crisis management plans, needs to adapt to these changes. Make sure that your social media management team is regularly analyzing key metrics about how they are resolving social media issues and deterring potential crises. From these analytical reports, there should be regular meetings to discuss any changes or amendments to optimize the effectiveness of your social media management plans.Want to see how Emplifi can help your brand identify and address social media crises? Schedule a demo today to speak with one of our Emplifi experts.By: Emplifi - the leading unified CX platformARTICLE PUBLISHED: JULY 12, 2021 Emplifi CX CloudSocial Marketing CloudSocial Commerce CloudService CloudKnowledgeResourcesCustomer StoriesCompanyAbout usTrust CenterLeadershipMedia & PressCareersContact us Emplifi LearningPrivacy PolicyTerms of use© 2020-2022 Emplifi Inc. All rights reserved. Emplifi™ and Empathy, amplified.™ are trademarks of Emplifi Inc. All product names and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • crisi
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  • 18
  • social
  • 29
  • 18
  • social media
  • 28
  • 18
  • media
  • 28
  • 18
  • management
  • 21
  • 18
  • company
  • 16
  • 18
  • issue
  • 15
  • 18
  • plan
  • 13
  • 18
  • crisi management
  • 10
  • 18
  • nike
  • 10
  • 18
  • cris
  • 10
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  • step
  • 10
  • 18
  • team
  • 10
  • 18
  • negative
  • 9
  • 18
  • brand
  • 9
  • 18
  • emplifi
  • 9
  • 18
  • situation
  • 8
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  • time
  • 7
  • 18
  • negative sentiment
  • 6
  • 18
  • shoe
  • 6
  • 18
  • post
  • 6
  • 18
  • sentiment
  • 6
  • 18
  • social media management
  • 5
  • 18
  • social media issue
  • 5
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  • media management
  • 5
  • 18
  • media issue
  • 5
  • 18
  • test
  • 5
  • 18
  • business
  • 5
  • 18
  • strategy
  • 5
  • 18
  • thing
  • 5
  • 18
  • user
  • 5
  • 18
  • potential
  • 5
  • 18
  • response
  • 5
  • 18
  • crisi management plan
  • 4
  • 18
  • media management team
  • 4
  • 18
  • management plan
  • 4
  • 18
  • management team
  • 4
  • 18
  • incident
  • 4
  • 18
  • mistake
  • 4
  • 18
  • hbo
  • 4
  • 18
  • player
  • 4
  • 18
  • social media crisi
  • 3
  • 18
  • social media cris
  • 3
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  • media crisi
  • 3
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  • business crisi
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  • media cris
  • 3
  • 18
  • hbo max
  • 3
  • 18
Result 19
TitleFive steps to social media success in a crisis | PublicAffairsAsia
Urlhttps://publicaffairsasia.com/five-steps-to-social-media-success-in-a-crisis/
Description
Date
Organic Position19
H1Five steps to social media success in a crisis
H2Ben Overlander examines how has social media has transformed changed crisis communication? He suggests five new principles for thinking about social media in a crisis and concludes that communication professionals are in a better position to manage reputations than they might think
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H3@PAAGoldStandard
H2WithAnchorsBen Overlander examines how has social media has transformed changed crisis communication? He suggests five new principles for thinking about social media in a crisis and concludes that communication professionals are in a better position to manage reputations than they might think
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BodyFive steps to social media success in a crisis - - Ben Overlander examines how has social media has transformed changed crisis communication?  He suggests five new principles for thinking about social media in a crisis and concludes that communication professionals are in a better position to manage reputations than they might think. Too many capable and experienced communication professionals still talk about social media with a discernible fear in their voice. Smart individuals, who have successfully managed the reputations of global organisations against a backdrop of challenging issues, suddenly appear less confident when talking about social media. The biggest concern of communication directors, according to a recent survey by the UK’s Chartered Institute of Public Relations, was the ‘changing social and digital landscape’; and just 12 per cent of communication practitioners with more than 21 years’ experience said they felt confident in their social and digital media management skills. This nervousness is hardly surprising: it seems as though every week a new article is published or a marketing email lands in my inbox asking, “Are you doing enough to manage social media in a crisis?” Self-inflicted social media crises are well publicised and everyone has a favourite corporate #fail. This disproportionate focus on social media gives the impression that an organisation’s post-crisis reputation will be determined by how effectively it uses YouTube, Facebook, Instagram or Periscope. That may be helpful to those wanting to sell special social media crisis solutions, but organisations need to take it with a pinch of salt. The truth is a lot simpler: social media has, of course, changed the tactics and context in which reputations are managed but the principles of effective crisis communication remain the same. Timescales have been radically altered, ‘ordinary’ people can more easily contribute to the way we think about an organisation and there is a new expectation of openness, transparency and engagement. But, fundamentally, social media is just another communication channel which can be used successfully – and simply – to support the wider crisis communication response. The five principles below should install confidence in business and communication leaders; they are in a better position to use social media in a crisis than they might think. 1. Social media may not form any part of your crisis response Effective crisis communication is about saying the right messages to the right people at the right time. It is about seizing the initiative and taking control of the narrative, explaining what has gone wrong, how you feel about it and, crucially, what you are doing to make things better. Social media may well form a key part of an organisation’s crisis response, allowing it to do all those things. Germanwings and its parent company Lufthansa, for example, used Twitter and Facebook effectively following the tragic plane crash in the French Alps in March 2015. They published key updates at regular points throughout the crisis, including a statement on Twitter from its Chairman and CEO within an hour of the crash. Both brands immediately recoloured their logos black and removed all marketing references which would have looked highly insensitive in the circumstances. In the first 24 hours, Germanwings and Lufthansa published a total of 26 tweets, in English and German to more than 200,000 followers. This swift and comprehensive response on social media formed part of a wider communication effort which undoubtedly helped form a sympathetic environment for the airlines over the following weeks. Germanwings’ decision to use social media was the right one for them in this crisis because its stakeholders had turned to Twitter and Facebook for key information. Within the first 60 minutes, 60,000 tweets were posted referencing #Germanwings and the number grew to 500,000 after six hours. Crises by their very nature, however, are unique, complex and fast-moving. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach or communications playbook for how to respond. Each crisis will require a communication strategy tailored to the particular incident or issue, and a bespoke tactical plan for how to engage with key audiences. Often that will involve at least an element of social media, but there are exceptional circumstances where it might not. A few years ago I was working with an oil and gas company which had a large number of staff living and working in Algeria. News came in that terrorists had attacked a nearby gas installation owned by another multinational, taking hundreds of workers hostage in a tragic situation in which 39 foreign workers ultimately lost their lives. The company I was working with immediately mobilised its crisis management team and decided to take proactive action: evacuating all non-essential personnel, shutting down its assets safely and protecting relationships with local and regional governments. This was a major operation involving chartering planes, flying affected family members across the globe and the chief executive regularly addressing staff. Throughout those tense and uncertain days I advised the team that nothing should be communicated on social media. Social media is not an effective channel for communicating difficult or emotive news. Conventional crisis communication channels such as phone calls, meetings or town halls are able to convey empathy, concern and two-way communication in a way that Facebook and Twitter never can. In the hostage situation described above, employees would much rather have heard from their bosses directly, than having to turn to social media to find the latest information about their organisation. There may also be occasions when having a presence on social media is counter-productive, provoking an outspoken lobby group intent on causing harm to your organisation’s reputation. If very few stakeholders are likely to get their information through Twitter, Facebook or other digital channels, using social media in a crisis may do more harm than good. 2. Organisations that succeed on social media in ‘peace-time’ may be more likely to fail in a crisis Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn, WhatsApp and YouTube provide opportunities for organisations to connect with their stakeholders in ways that were impossible to conceive of only a few years ago. Colourful, creative and engaging platforms continue to transform customers’ relationships with a company and drive sales. The significance of these channels should not be underestimated: Coke has over 90 million ‘likes’ on Facebook; Nike has over 15.5 million followers on Instagram; Burberry has over 4.5 million followers on Google+. But, having a strong digital presence during ‘peace-time’ does not necessarily translate to being able to use social media to protect reputation in a crisis. A major crisis will generate interest and scrutiny in an organisation that is far beyond its usual stakeholder groups. Organisations that ordinarily use social media well must not be complacent; their current approach may not be fit for purpose in a crisis. Twitter accounts, for example, are often run by marketing or customer service teams with relatively junior members of staff writing and approving content. Light-hearted posts or marketing campaigns scheduled weeks in advance with little thought for how they could impact the wider corporate reputation. In the wrong circumstances, these practices could prove explosive, igniting a low-level and contained issue into a major reputational headache in front of a large online community. Organisations that want to build on the strong foundations of their social and digital footprint, need to have developed plans for how they will use social media as part of a wider crisis communication response. The first step is to have a clear trigger point where responsibility for social media moves away from marketing and into the corporate affairs team. Guidelines outlining who would be responsible for drafting and approving content, how offensive posts would be handled and the monitoring systems used, all need to be agreed in advance of a crisis. 3. Inform, don’t debate Whilst social media has changed corporate communication from primarily ‘top down information provision’ to a ‘conversation’ that is harder to control, this does not have to be the case in crisis communication. In most instances, social media should be used to disseminate new information and amplify messages, not to engage in conversation or debate. Choosing to have a dialogue on Twitter, for example, where communication is public and restricted to 140 characters is dangerous and ill-advised. Once you have started responding to comments, it is difficult to stop without that generating its own reputational challenge. Twitter is a channel that is naturally confrontational, making it unsuitable for nuanced debate. Journalists from traditional media will gleefully report on any Twitter arguments to keep the story and the crisis alive. On the occasions where dialogue is necessary with social media users, efforts should be made to take these conversations offline. UK telecommunications provider O2’s response to a service outage in October 2012 won many plaudits for its light-hearted and human response. But, part of its success was because its unusual approach was able to surprise and amuse its only mildly annoyed customers. Much more common is the experience of Protein World in response to its “Beach Ready” London advertisements in May 2015. These adverts provoked a strong reaction in the UK from many who felt they encouraged an unhealthy body image, and potential eating disorders, amongst young women. The company’s response, first from its corporate Twitter account and then from its CEO, escalated the issue and pushed it into mainstream media. One tweet read: “Why make your insecurities [about being fat] our problem? ;)”; another followed: “We are a nation of sympathisers for fatties #doesnthelpanyone”. London Underground stepped in and banned the adverts across its entire transport network; days later, Protein World deleted all of its offensive tweets. 4. Listen hard, ignore much At its essence, social media is a channel for a series of conversations conducted publicly. The beauty for communications professionals is that it allows you to listen into what previously closed groups are saying about your organisation in real-time: What do they think about you? What do they know about the incident/issue? What do they expect you to do? An adept communicator will bring an understanding of the outside world into an organisation’s wider decision making during times of crisis. Scanning social media channels, and using the right listening tools and software to identify trends can be useful preparation before a crisis management team meeting. Likewise, monitoring social media throughout a crisis can allow you to listen and track what is happening externally, whether sentiment is being moved by your online and offline activities and whether there are new issues the organisation should respond to. Caution must, of course, be taken because the narrow world of Twitter and Instagram does not equate to the wider offline world. Many commentators have suggested that contributors on Twitter, for example, tend to be more anti-establishment and left wing than the general population.This may mean that online conversation is more critical of large business than wider offline audiences. Social media undoubtedly generates huge volumes of comment during a high profile crisis, particularly if it involves perceived wrong-doing resulting in loss of life and environmental damage. To gain valuable insight from social media, it is essential to distinguish key issues from background noise. Not all social media users are made equal; skilled communicators should ask “will the online activity happening now have any tangible or material impact on our organisation in the long-term?” Simply put, does it really matter – and why – if my organisation is trending on Twitter? 5. Protect your CEO, get them on social media Traditional media in a crisis will often spend as long focusing on the behaviour and actions of a chief executive officer as much as the organisation’s entire response. The experiences of Tony Hayward (chief executive of BP during the Gulf of Mexico blowout), Fred Goodwin (chief executive of Royal Bank of Scotland during the financial crisis) and George Entwistle (director general of the BBC during the fall out of an abuse scandal involving one of its former stars, Jimmy Savile) show how difficult it is to communicate on your own terms in a crisis, rather than be framed by commentators. Seeking greater exposure for an organisation’s under-fire chief executive may seem counter intuitive. But social media allows the chief executive to bypass traditional media, connecting directly with key audiences. A chief executive who shows empathy and emotion for those affected by an incident, can create a major change in the perception of an entire organisation. Those who are on Twitter, or contribute to regular to-camera YouTube videos, show stakeholders their organisation is not a faceless corporate building, but made up of real people genuinely affected by an incident trying to do the right thing. Tony Fernandes, CEO of AirAsia, showed a quite different side of his character in the aftermath of flight QZ8501, which crashed off Indonesia killing all 162 passengers in December 2014. In ordinary times, Fernandes is an avid user of Twitter, tweeting several times a day about the airline or Queens Park Rangers, the English Premier League football club he runs. In the wake of the crash, Fernandes did not go silent and leave it to AirAsia’s communications team to take the lead. Instead, he continued to update followers on recovery efforts, expressed personal concern about victims’ families, and rallied AirAsia staff morale. Heading off allegations that AirAsia was not providing sufficient information on the crash, he tweeted: “As I have said we never hide. All will come out at right time. Focus is finding all guests and looking after families.” In another message, he tweeted about travelling to Indonesia to retrieve the body of a flight attendant and escort the body back to her hometown. “I’m arriving in Surabaya to take Nisa home,” he wrote. “I cannot describe how I feel. There are no words.” Conclusion Few of the above points should come as a surprise to experienced communicators. They are all consistent with crisis communication best practice. But the expectations around social media are such that often organisations find themselves engaging on public platforms in ways that do not necessarily help the wider communication effort. Companies must not feel pressurised into taking a cookie-cutter approach to social media that some commentators might want them to believe. Organisations need to think through their corporate character and the needs and expectations of their key audiences. Then they can ask themselves the right question: “how has social media changed the way we think about crisis management in our organisation?” Ben Overlander is an associate director with Regester Larkin Limited and an expert in issues and crisis management with a particular focus on media relations.  He has worked in a number of high-profile press offices and has supported many organisations through live issues.  He can be contacted on M:  +44 (0)7584 215 231 or at [email protected] . business Crisis Digital Environment Indonesia Management Public relations Report Social Media women Related Posts Follow on Twitter:. @PAAGoldStandard. Congratulations to @NorthHead! https://t.co/KXUf25dcX0343 days ago WELL DONE! https://t.co/EkbfRJT1Y6345 days ago The winner of the 2020 Gold Standard Award for In-House Team of the Year, sponsored by @Csacrisiscom is The Communi… https://t.co/PDeSbbETHd345 days ago The winners of The Gold Standard Awards for Professional Excellence, sponsored by @PRProspect_ are Charlotte Bilney… https://t.co/9KlxxKfxSC345 days ago Senator Dean Smith: Policy-Maker of the Year. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHGLHIRB3rw About PublicAffairsAsia. PublicAffairsAsia is the network for senior government relations, corporate affairs and corporate communications professionals operating across the Asia Pacific region. We offer cutting edge insight through events, intelligence, publications training and awards. We also connect corporations to their stakeholders in a variety of ways. © 2019 Public Affairs Asia Ltd. Hong Kong SAR | All rights reserved. | Email: [email protected] |
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • media
  • 48
  • 19
  • social
  • 47
  • 19
  • social media
  • 44
  • 19
  • crisi
  • 40
  • 19
  • organisation
  • 33
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  • communication
  • 27
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  • twitter
  • 17
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  • response
  • 12
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  • media crisi
  • 9
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  • wider
  • 9
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  • corporate
  • 9
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  • crisi communication
  • 8
  • 19
  • reputation
  • 8
  • 19
  • issue
  • 8
  • 19
  • channel
  • 8
  • 19
  • time
  • 8
  • 19
  • social media crisi
  • 7
  • 19
  • chief executive
  • 7
  • 19
  • company
  • 7
  • 19
  • key
  • 7
  • 19
  • team
  • 7
  • 19
  • chief
  • 7
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  • executive
  • 7
  • 19
  • day
  • 7
  • 19
  • digital
  • 6
  • 19
  • management
  • 6
  • 19
  • facebook
  • 6
  • 19
  • stakeholder
  • 6
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  • information
  • 6
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  • ago
  • 6
  • 19
  • year
  • 5
  • 19
  • marketing
  • 5
  • 19
  • part
  • 5
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  • conversation
  • 5
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  • world
  • 5
  • 19
  • communication professional
  • 4
  • 19
  • crisi management
  • 4
  • 19
  • day ago
  • 4
  • 19
  • social media changed
  • 3
  • 19
  • social digital
  • 3
  • 19
  • media changed
  • 3
  • 19
  • twitter facebook
  • 3
  • 19
  • key audience
  • 3
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  • traditional media
  • 3
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Result 20
Title11 ways to avoid a social media crisis - Our Social Times - Social Media for Business
Urlhttps://oursocialtimes.com/11-ways-avoid-social-media-crisis/
DescriptionFull-blown social media crises can do huge damage to a brand's reputation, so protect yourself by following our 11 steps to avoiding a social media crisis
Date
Organic Position20
H111 ways to avoid a social media crisis
H2
H3Full-blown social media crises can do huge damage to a brand's reputation, so protect yourself by following our 11 steps to avoiding a social media crisis.
Use monitoring tools
Set rules for customers
Create clear internal guidelines
Roles and responsibilities
Train staff
Do your research
Beware of the bots
Act quickly
Scenario testing
Be truthful from the start
Use common sense
H2WithAnchors
Body11 ways to avoid a social media crisis Full-blown social media crises can do huge damage to a brand's reputation, so protect yourself by following our 11 steps to avoiding a social media crisis. . By admin The days of a genuine social media crisis have thankfully become less frequent. Brands recognise the need to become more savvy and have tightened up their operations. They now seek professional help to advise them on strategy, use powerful monitoring tools and equip their staff with the necessary skills. However, it would be naïve to suggest that brands have become immune to social media fails. They do still happen, but you can limit your chances of stumbling into a social media crisis by following a few basic rules… Use monitoring tools. There is such a wealth of social media monitoring tools available today that it’s almost bordering on neglect not to use one. Brands use monitoring tools for several reasons: To manage their own social media channels To engage in relevant conversations (marketing) To capture/respond to queries/complaints (customer service) To monitor industry trends, competitor analysis etc. (e.g. topics of conversation, sentiment etc.) There are powerful enterprise-level tools such as Brandwatch and Sysomos, which pack a range of sophisticated features, but there is also a wide range of free and low-cost tools. See our recent review of the best free social media monitoring tools. Set rules for customers. It’s all about the rules. If customers don’t know what they can and can’t do when engaging with your brand then they’re well within their rights to kick up a fuss when you put them right after the event. Make it crystal clear why Facebook posts might be deleted, or when a Tweet replied to with a formal response. Citigroup’s Twitter customer policy is fairly long and most customers probably won’t read it. But if a customer reacted angrily to having their bank account details stolen, City are covered. Here’s part of their policy: ‘Remember: Anything you post on Twitter is public. It is very important that you do not disclose any information that you consider private and confidential in your Tweets or Retweets. Citi will never ask you to include your account number, account access information or other personal or financial information in a Tweet. If Customer Service needs more information, they will either send you a direct message (DM) asking for your phone number or ask you to contact them directly.’ You can see the policy in full here. Create clear internal guidelines. If you don’t have a set of in-house guidelines for your staff, then you can’t really blame them if an innocent human error damages your brand. Staff need to be fully aware of what’s expected of them across the board: Personal accounts: Are staff members allowed to associate themselves with the brand when posting to their personal accounts? Do they need a disclaimer? Sensitive information: You might think it’s common sense not to share company information with the general public, but what kind of information is okay for the public domain? Customer data is an obvious no-no, but things like new staff hires and office parties sit in a grey area and need to be clarified. Copyright: A thorny issue and one that could get your brand into a lot of trouble. Copyright laws can be incredibly complex, so a clear policy written in plain English is crucial. Tone of voice: Most brands these days encourage regular discourse with their customers. But are staff members aware of how that discourse should be written? Draw up tone of voice guidelines – there’s a great one here. Firefighting: If you have a crisis management policy then make sure all relevant staff members are aware of exactly what their role is in the event of a crisis. Roles and responsibilities. The growth of social media as a customer service tool has left many brands with an org chart dilemma. The marketing team might run the social media post calendar and customer services might deal with customer queries, but who deals with a crisis? This is where your PR team, legal people, tech support, marketing and customer support teams might need to get involved. Having a clear crisis management plan will help staff members know exactly who deals with what when the time comes. Train staff. You’ve got your social media guidelines locked and loaded, but are you confident all staff members are comfortable with the technical side of running social accounts? In July this year a staffer with the US Justice Department, no less, accidentally used his employer’s Twitter account to describe CNN as ‘the biggest troll of them all’ – adding ‘lmao’ for good measure. “A staffer in the public affairs office erroneously used the official Department of Justice Twitter handle to post a tweet that was intended for a personal account,” a Justice Department official said. The tweet was quickly deleted and the staff member had their account access revoked, but the embarrassing damage was done. Do your research. What should have been a feel-good seasonal post from Coca-Cola turned into a PR backfire. Posting a festive message to Russian social media network VK, the drinks giant sent out a map of Russia but decided not to include Crimea. The territory was annexed by Moscow in 2014, and its absence created a barrage of criticism in Russia. Coke quickly apologised and re-posted the map – this time including Crimea. Problem solved? Not quite. Crimea is a disputed territory between Russia and Ukraine, and users in the latter nation quickly called for a boycott of Coca-Cola after seeing the amended map. The moral of the story is: do your research. And if you still aren’t sure, then your idea is probably a non-starter. Beware of the bots. This year has seen some significant progress in the field of social media bots. Sensing an opportunity, Microsoft created a Twitter bot as a way of demonstrating their AI capabilities. The account – Tay Tweets – was designed to become smarter the more it engaged with users. However, Twitter being Twitter, the account was bombarded by trolls and Tay quickly developed some dubious views, insisting the Holocaust was ‘made up’ and that 9/11 was an ‘inside job’. Microsoft responded by deleting all offensive tweets and apologising for the “unintended offensive and hurtful tweets”. They learned their lesson, and Tay is now a protected account. Act quickly. A Brandwatch study in 2015 found that just 11.2% of brands respond to customer queries within an hour. This certainly applied to Domino’s Pizza in an infamous example from several years ago. Staff at a branch in South Carolina filmed themselves tampering with food about to go out for delivery.The video surfaced on a Friday but Domino’s didn’t pick up on it until the following Monday. In the absence of weekend monitoring and a crisis plan, the company missed the opportunity to deal with the crisis right from the start and were left to deal with the pretty ugly fall-out. Scenario testing. If you’re in a highly regulated industry, you should definitely carry out scenario testing. If you’re a pharmaceutical, for example, what should you do if someone complains of serious illness caused by one of your drugs on Facebook? Who will see it, who can they call? Do they have your PR manager’s mobile phone number? Do they take it offline? By testing a range of key scenarios you can identify weaknesses and fix them before they turn into a crisis. Be truthful from the start. One UK local authority bore the brunt of a Facebook campaign to get a new speed camera removed from a busy road. Thousands of people joined the campaign before the authority finally posted a response explaining the reasons behind their decision. As Luke Brynley-Jones of OST Marketing says: “The local authority had statistical evidence to say that the camera would save lives. If they had published that evidence on Facebook on the first day they could have avoided the crisis.” Use common sense. This category wouldn’t have made it in were it not for a recent social media video campaign that appeared to be trying to make commercial gain out of one of the worst tragedies in human history. A mattress store in San Antonio, United States, created a video ad on the eve of 9/11 promoting what they described distastefully as a ‘twin towers’ sale. In the video a female Miracle Mattress employee enthusiastically talked up their “twin price” deal, before two male employees both fell dramatically into two stacks of mattresses. The campaign predictably attracted widespread outrage, with more than 3,000 people posting negative reviews on the company’s Facebook page. The owner of the chain issued a statement apologising, but it failed to douse the flames and he later opted to close the store “indefinitely”. Now you’ve read this article you won’t ever have to take the same drastic measures… I found this helpful I did not find this helpful In this articleCase StudiesCustomer experienceFeaturedReputation ManagementSocial Customer ServiceSocial Media CrisisSocial Media Monitoring
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Result 21
TitleSocial Media Crisis Management: Tips and Examples
Urlhttps://napoleoncat.com/blog/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionLearn how you can prepare your team for a social media crisis and find out how social media crisis management best practices can help you…
Date24 Mar 2020
Organic Position21
H1Social Media Crisis Management: Tips and Examples
H2What is social media crisis management?
Why should you get ready for a social media crisis in advance?
1. Know your target audience
2. Use quick replies
3. Prepare a crisis communication plan
4. Listen to your fans on social media
5. Provide solutions in a timely manner
Keep track of customer feedback
6. Handle negative comments
7. Encourage followers to share feedback
Conclusion
Stats on Social Media Usage in COVID-19 Hotspots: February vs. March 2020
How to Manage a Crisis in Social Media: Best Practices From NGOs
Social Media Strategy: What Can We Unlearn From Fyre Festival?
Sign up for 14-day free trial
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat is social media crisis management?
Why should you get ready for a social media crisis in advance?
1. Know your target audience
2. Use quick replies
3. Prepare a crisis communication plan
4. Listen to your fans on social media
5. Provide solutions in a timely manner
Keep track of customer feedback
6. Handle negative comments
7. Encourage followers to share feedback
Conclusion
Stats on Social Media Usage in COVID-19 Hotspots: February vs. March 2020
How to Manage a Crisis in Social Media: Best Practices From NGOs
Social Media Strategy: What Can We Unlearn From Fyre Festival?
Sign up for 14-day free trial
BodySocial Media Crisis Management: Tips and Examples 24 March 2020 Val Razo Back in December 2019, when the new disease COVID-19 appeared in China, no one could have predicted that the coronavirus outbreak would become a pandemic and affect businesses of all sizes and shapes around the globe. Today, almost all businesses expect to face related issues, so having a social media crisis management plan is not optional these days. But the coronavirus outbreak is, of course, not the only reason why a social media crisis can occur and hit your company. With more than 3.8 billion social media users worldwide,  modern customers share their customer experiences—both good and bad—across various social media channels. Not only do people want to help other customers make the right purchase decisions – they also want to help businesses become better.  Case in point: On April 30, 2019 singer SZA tweeted that one Sephora employee suspected her of shoplifting and called security on her. Not only did the Tweet get 71k likes and 9.5k retweets, but social media users also started spreading the news on their profiles, calling the employee disrespectful or accusing them of racial profiling. SZA The next day Sephora replied to SZA’s, demonstrating that they pay close attention to what people were saying online. Showing that they were ready to start a conversation and make things right helped to save the brand’s reputation.  The bottom line? Brands must be active on social media platforms to establish connections with customers and followers, and prevent potential crises. Seeing how useful social platforms are for businesses, it’s no wonder that the popularity of social media marketing continues to rise. The trend is visible across platforms. According to the Social Media Marketing Industry Report, Facebook (97%), Instagram (78%), Twitter (57%), YouTube (54%), and LinkedIn (46%) are the most popular networks for businesses to have a social media account. So, whether you’re a business owner, a marketer, or a social media manager, it’s important to know everything about social media crisis management and be ready to answer high volumes of comments and messages, meeting the users’ expectations regarding response times and customer service standards. What is social media crisis management? According to the Institute for Public Relations, crisis management is a process designed to prevent or lessen the damage a crisis can inflict on an organization.  When it comes to crisis management on social media, it’s important for businesses to plan ahead, because critical situations go viral faster on social channels than in traditional media. In other words, this means your social media strategy should include readily available solutions for when a crisis happens. Why should you get ready for a social media crisis in advance? For many reasons, crisis planning is important. For example, it helps you: Educate your team members: Whether you have a team of in-house social media managers or you hire freelance social media moderators, it’s important to tell your employees how to detect a crisis in its early stages and react, swiftly solving customer requests. Having a social media crisis plan keeps everyone on the same page and allows you to make up pre-approved replies for all employees who represent your company on social media channels.Deliver timely customer service: When it takes days or weeks to get a response from a company, people lose interest in the brand. In fact, 37% of people who call out brands on social media expect to get a response in under 30 minutes. When you’re ready for a social media crisis, your team knows how to answer common questions and is able to provide customer service faster.Protect your brand reputation: Although it’s difficult to predict a social media crisis, you can protect your brand reputation once issues happen. How? Identify your company’s core values and principles in advance. It’s a great way to build your brand’s tone of voice and create a communication guide that can save your brand reputation when worst comes to worst.   Choose a relevant social media management tool: In both everyday and crisis communications, your company must be ready to keep track of all the direct messages, mentions, and comments you receive. When preparing for a social media crisis ahead of time, choose a social media management tool that will help you with all the above while suiting your needs, wants, and budget. NapoleonCat, for example, will help you manage multiple social media accounts and handle any volume of comments and messages in real-time, from just one place.  So, do you want to master social media crisis management? We’ve gathered 7 proven tips and examples that will help you spot potential issues in advance and solve problems fast.  Let’s dive in! 1. Know your target audience. No matter what your business niche is, identifying and understanding your target audience is crucial for success. In fact, dissatisfied customers typically tell up to 20 other people about their experience, so you need to know your target audience from A to Z to avoid missing the mark when addressing your potential customers’ pain points.  What’s more, knowing your target audience will help  you meet their expectations, which in turn is an important element of avoiding public social media crises.  Luckily, the majority of social media channels have audience insights that can help you understand your fans and their preferences. But if you want to go the extra mile, you can use an external tool like NapoleonCat to get in-depth data on audience analytics for multiple accounts across social media platforms. Analyze the location and engagement patterns of your audience with NapoleonCat Pro tip: To understand your target audience better, publish interactive content that encourages your social media followers to share their thoughts on your business. Instagram Story stickers are great for this purpose! 2. Use quick replies. When it comes to social media crisis management, quick responses are key. They help ease the worried minds of customers, and can ultimately save your brand’s reputation. If your followers ask the same questions often, you can use quick replies to create a list of canned responses that will help you avoid manually typing out the same response again and again to different people, effectively saving your team a lot of time. Facebook Messenger, Twitter, and Instagram have in-app quick reply features, but you can also manage all comments and direct messages from various platforms in one place with NapoleonCat. The tool’s Saved Replies functionality allows you to create pre-approved answers to common inquiries and send them directly from the tool’s customer service solution, the Social Inbox. See how it works: In short, NapoleonCat helps you: Answer customers directly from the Social Inbox and categorize interactions: assign sentiment, tag messages and users, add internal notesUse the Automoderation feature to save time dealing with common questions and generic comments quickly – and improve your response ratesWork on issues as a team; every social media comment or message is a ticket that you can assign to a team member with internal notes or send to a supervisor with a review request.  Pro tip: When creating a list of quick replies, use your FAQ page as a point of reference or analyze your business’s Google Q&A section. Both can help you understand what common questions your customers ask often.  3. Prepare a crisis communication plan. To ensure that all team members who handle direct messages and comments can solve customer complaints in compliance with your voice and strategy, it’s important to create a social media crisis management plan that works well for your company. A crisis communication plan explains how to handle issues and it allows team members to take action and prevent things from getting out of control without spending too much time on figuring out solutions. But where should you start?  When it comes to working on a crisis plan, you need to identify five steps that may occur and get ready for each of them in advance: Demand Metric Having a crisis communication plan is vital, but even with a solid strategy in place, your team may still need advice from time to time. If you use NapoleonCat, you can easily work with other team members on individual issues, i.e. you can assign the ticket to a team member, add a comment, tag the message, and mark its sentiment. Plus, there’s the “send to consult” feature that allows NapoleonCat users to ask other team members for advice. NapoleonCat teamwork solutions Pro tip: To help your team members resolve issues effectively and efficiently, it’s a good idea to create an ebook for internal use that includes a set of guidelines and prepares your team for an emergency or unexpected event. 4. Listen to your fans on social media. As mentioned before, modern consumers are not shy to share their customer experiences and express their thoughts on the products or services they use. Given the popularity of social media platforms, it’s easy for customers to share their thoughts on social media accounts without interrupting their daily online routines. Thus, people often comment on brands’ social media posts to raise issues.  Here’s what it can look like: Made.com However, monitoring social accounts might not be enough to avert a crisis. 96% of those who discuss your brand online don’t follow you on social media. This means you need to use social listening tools to catch the early signs of dissatisfaction posted across the web. An effective social listening strategy should include live monitoring of social media feeds for trending topics, competitor activity, and company mentions. All of these can help you learn more about negative customer experiences and start working on issues before they turn into crises and go viral on social media.  Pro tip: To keep track of brand mentions, use social listening tools and hire freelance moderators who can monitor social media accounts 24/7, even during the holidays. 5. Provide solutions in a timely manner. The variety of businesses on the market increases customer demands. Today, modern customers have neither the time nor the desire to wait for solutions to their problems. Not only do dissatisfied customers quickly lose interest in your brand, but their complaints also turn off other potential customers from choosing your company. Simply put, urgent comment moderation matters. Let’s take Whole Foods Market, for example. When Whole Foods announced its Cheese Nights series on social media, the company couldn’t have predicted it would attract dissatisfied customers who flocked to share their negative customer experiences in the comment section: Whole Foods Market The bottom line? Collecting customer feedback isn’t enough to make your customers happy; people want your brand to consider their thoughts and make adjustments based on the feedback. In fact, GetVoIP found that customers are 97% more likely to be loyal to your company if you implement customer feedback.  Keep track of customer feedback. Deliver timely responses to customers in social media. Manage unlimited Facebook, Instagram, Twitter LinkedIn, and Google My Business pages in a single inbox. Try NapoleonCat free for 14 days. No credit card required. 6. Handle negative comments. No matter how good your product is, it’s nearly impossible to keep all customers satisfied. And since most modern consumers are active on social media, they often share negative comments on theirs or your profiles to help others make the right purchase decisions. At first blush, it might seem tempting to ignore, hide, or delete negative comments. However, it can ruin your brand reputation and turn a fairly benign social media complaint into a disaster. In fact, when customers post negative opinions online, they want to be heard, so it’s important to handle negative comments with empathy. Here’s how Dunkin’ deals with issues on Twitter: Dunkin’ Not only did Dunkin’ apologize for the inconvenience, but the company also provided a solution to the problem. This approach helps to turn a dissatisfied customer into a happy one and show other people that you take care of your patrons. Sometimes companies provoke negative comments without realizing it. It’s no secret that most social media marketers create and plan content in advance. However, such an approach can affect your business negatively if you don’t keep up to date with current events and global news.  For example, the currently unfolding COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the best time to be snarky or sarcastic, promote your flights or trips, or share posts on how to attract local customers to your restaurant. Posting such content would showcase ignorance and likely turn your following against you. Thus, it’s important to revise your calendar of scheduled posts to avoid unwittingly posting insensitive content. Pro tip: To encourage your dissatisfied customers to give your product a second try, it’s a good idea to offer gift certificates that help increase brand loyalty and trust. 7. Encourage followers to share feedback. There’s no better way to get ready for a social media crisis than teeking track of whether your customers are satisfied or dissatisfied with your product or service, and having an understanding of their general experiences with your company. In other words, it’s important to encourage followers to share their feedback with you. And social media are the perfect setting to do so – when people follow you on social, 96% of them are more likely to join the conversation with your brand.  For example, Mac Campus Store decided to share a customer survey on their social media profiles and invite followers to participate for a chance to win a $50 gift card.  Mac Campus Store Here’s how M&Ms uses social media polls to gather customer feedback on their favorite flavors: M&M’s With engaging, popping visuals, you can attract more engagements and thus organically spread the word about your poll. If you don’t have an in-house team of designers, many graphic design tools are available to help you get the job done. Pro tip: Use interactive features like polls to make it more interesting for your fans to share their thoughts and see real-time results. Conclusion. From negative comments to defamatory images, social media crises come in various shapes and forms. You never know when the next social media crisis will strike as crisis-related behaviors most often happen spontaneously.  That’s why getting ready in advance is a must and social media crisis management strategies really matter. With a proper response plan that will allow you to solve any potential issue with ease, you can save your brand reputation and stay ahead of your competitors. Share this article on: AUTHOR Val Razo Freelance SMM consultant Over the last 5 years, Val Razo has worked with big brands like UNIQA, HIPP, and Royal Canin. Today, she is a freelance SMM consultant who helps small and medium businesses. In her spare time, Val loves traveling, painting, and learning Spanish. More posts Read more. 7 April 2020 Stats on Social Media Usage in COVID-19 Hotspots: February vs. March 2020. Earlier this year, a global pandemic hit unexpectedly, changing the lives of... 25 March 2020 How to Manage a Crisis in Social Media: Best Practices From NGOs. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, social media has been filling up with... 31 January 2019 Social Media Strategy: What Can We Unlearn From Fyre Festival? In recent weeks, memes and snarky comments on the spectacular failure of... Sign up for 14-day free trial. × We use cookies so we can better understand how NapoleonCat’s website and application is being used, provide more personalised experience and marketing communication. Read our privacy policy to learn more. By continuing to use this site, you consent to this policy.
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Result 22
TitleHow to Create a Social Media Crisis Management Plan [Free Template]
Urlhttps://blog.hubspot.com/service/social-media-crisis-management
DescriptionFrom negative comments to natural disasters, it’s important to have a proper response plan for your social media channels. HubSpot's Social Media Crisis Management Plan will help you solve tough problems quickly while avoiding damages to your company's reputation
Date28 Jul 2021
Organic Position22
H1How to Create a Social Media Crisis Management Plan [Free Template]
H2What is a social media crisis?
Social Media Crisis Management
Social Media Crisis Management Plan
Social Media Crisis Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Plan Template
H3Benefits of Social Media Crisis Management
1. Identify the source of the problem
2. Categorize the issue as a crisis or problem
3. Use an internal flowchart to execute actions
1. Undermining of Customers
2. Inappropriate Marketing Messages
3. Distasteful Comments From an Executive
1. National Cowboy Museum - Social Media Security Guard
2. Sephora - Racial Profiling
3. American Red Cross - #GettngSlizzerd
4. JC Penney - Kettle Conundrum
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Download for Later
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a social media crisis?
Social Media Crisis Management
Social Media Crisis Management Plan
Social Media Crisis Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Plan Template
BodyHow to Create a Social Media Crisis Management Plan [Free Template] Written by Clint Fontanella @ClontFont Follow Along with HubSpot's Free Social Media Customer Service TemplateDownload Now Nowadays, community managers and customer service professionals have to deal with business crises over social media. These problems could include nasty comments, unhappy customers, delivery issues, a marketing faux pas, or a global pandemic — all problems that arise frequently and deserve reasonable and empathetic responses. When these complex situations occur, how do you categorize them? How do you determine the point of escalation with each scenario? When should you get help from a manager or another team member — and who should you even reach out to? If you're working on a customer service team, you need to know the right answers to these questions, so you can communicate with customers during a time of crisis. Download the Template for Free What is a social media crisis? A social media crisis could include nasty comments from customers on social media, unhappy customers voicing their concerns, delivery issues, perhaps a social media marketing faux pas, or even the global pandemic and how your company posted about it online. Social Media Crisis Management. Whether a crisis occurs online or off, you can expect there to be a social media response from your customers. In fact, studies show that 80% of customers will use social media to engage with a brand. Social media is becoming the preferred method of communication because it empowers consumers with the ability to post a review instantly on your account for all of your followers to see. If your brand makes a mistake, customers will be quick to take to their phones to tweet or post about the issue. When left unchecked, these comments can quickly compound and escalate a simple problem into an alarming crisis. To that point, 37% of consumers who use social media to complain or question brands expect to get a response in under 30 minutes. This is why it's important to be prepared and have a plan in place. Benefits of Social Media Crisis Management. The good news is that social media can be a powerful tool for managing a business crisis: Social media allows you to communicate with nearly your entire customer base over one or two platforms. Your company can quickly broadcast a message and get ahead of a crisis when needed. Social media allows you to speak directly with customers using direct messaging or commenting. If one customer has an issue, your customer service team can respond to them instantly through a private or public message. If the customer posts publicly on your timeline, an effective response from your customer service team can serve as a positive example of your team's credibility. The next section will break down how your business can come up with a contingency plan for a crisis and integrate it into your customer service team. Social Media Crisis Management Plan. When it comes to managing a crisis, having a social media plan in place can be essential to your team's success. If you're not sure where to start, take a look at this outline which details every component that you should include in your crisis management plan. 1. Identify the source of the problem. The first step to crafting a social media crisis response is to identify the problem and locate where it originated. Not every social media crisis will start from an online source. Often something that happens in popular culture or in news events will result in a social media uproar. Finding out what caused the crisis can help you determine not only the correct response but also the appropriate channels to distribute it through. If the problem does occur offline, you'll also want to look at the current status of your social media accounts. Has there been a response? Even if there isn't one yet, you have to expect there's going to be one. If customers are already posting on your timelines, then: Assess the damage that's been made thus far. Look at which social media accounts it's affecting. Try to identify any trends in the comments. Evaluating the situation before taking action will ensure that you're creating a long-term plan to handle the crisis. 2. Categorize the issue as a crisis or problem. The next step in handling a social media crisis is to determine the severity of the issue. Is it a problem? Or, is it a crisis? You may think that's semantics, but there's a key difference between a problem and a crisis that determines the response that you'll want to deliver. A problem is a minor customer service issue that can be resolved using standard service tactics. Your company may solve this with a coupon or discount that's sent to a customer who writes an unhappy comment or post. In comparison, crises affect larger audiences and require a special response from your business to prevent escalation. It's important not to mislabel a problem as a crisis as this can result in negative attention being brought to your brand. Social media is a public forum and users will be able to watch your company make a formal apology to a seemingly minor issue. If you're unsure if it's a crisis or not, begin with your standard customer service approach but be prepared to escalate the issue to a crisis if needed. 3. Use an internal flowchart to execute actions. Once you have established the right course of action to take, the next step is to execute your prepared game plan. Since crises tend to escalate, it helps if your team plans a flowchart for what to do if a crisis becomes more severe. We've included one example of what this can look like using the image below. Image Source As you can see, standard responses using just the customer service rep and manager are at the lower end of the scale. As the crisis intensifies, additional measures are taken to ensure an appropriate response is delivered. Businesses executives can use this flowchart during the crisis as a guide to monitoring the status of the situation. One component missing from this flowchart is the action of pausing or editing future content. Note: As a crisis escalates, you may need to adjust your publishing schedule to demonstrate a complete focus on the issue. Consider pausing scheduled posts, ads, and marketing emails to show your customers that you're truly devoted to resolving the crisis. It's important to keep in mind that this plan will vary depending on the crisis you're faced with. Some situations will require you to take different steps to produce the most effective response. Before we can start planning to handle a social media crisis, we first need to know what it looks like. In the next section, we'll highlight a few examples of notable social media crises that affected real-life businesses this year. Social Media Crisis Examples. Social media crises are often unexpected and can occur at any moment. Brands big and small are both susceptible to these types of crises that can significantly impact their business's reputation. Here are a few examples of real-life social media crises that can help you become more familiar with these types of situations. 1. Undermining of Customers. A U.S.-based rideshare company caused an uproar with its customers when it took advantage of a cultural movement that it was supporting by tweeting a message to promote its discounts. Consumers immediately recognized this as an attempt to undermine the social campaign and decided to boycott the company on social media. To make matters worse, the company's direct competitor took an opposing stance by donating money to the same cause. This sparked the creation of a viral hashtag that bashed the company and resulted in increased usage of the competitor's service. Image Source 2. Inappropriate Marketing Messages. A popular clothing brand found itself in trouble with customers when it accidentally tweeted an inappropriate message following the Boston Marathon. The email's subject line was titled "Congrats on surviving the Boston Marathon," which inadvertently echoed the tragic events that occurred in 2013. Twitter users quickly criticized the company for its poor choice of wording and lack of social awareness. The company immediately deleted the Tweet once it learned of the situation that it had caused. Image Source 3. Distasteful Comments From an Executive. One highly successful social media app received significant criticism when its CEO dismissed the idea of expanding its business into Spain and India. The executive called these countries "poor" and went on to talk about how his free app was designed exclusively for wealthy people. This resulted in an immediate backlash as users from both countries and elsewhere began uninstalling the app in protest. They also left thousands of one-star reviews on the app's listing pages as well as started a boycott on competing social media channels. Image Source Successful social media crisis management begins with coming up with a strategy that proactively prepares for potential problems. Social Media Crisis Management Examples. 1. National Cowboy Museum - Social Media Security Guard. When COVID-19 plunged the world into quarantine in March 2020, the National Cowboy Museum was forced to close its doors. Ticket sales screeched to a halt, and the security team spent its time monitoring empty halls. To give these essential employees a bit more to do, the museum decided to hand the keys to its Twitter account over to the head of security, Tim the Cowboy. Image Source As you can see from his first tweet, Tim wasn't too familiar with the social media platform, which led to a series of wholesome and lighthearted follow-up tweets, like this one below. Image Source Why It Worked. In a time of uncertainty, Tim's content was exactly what the world needed. He gave us something to smile about as an escape from what was going on with the rest of the world. And, let's be honest, most of us probably haven't visited — or even knew of — the National Cowboy Museum before Tim the Cowboy. Before March 2020, the museum had just under 10 thousand Twitter followers. Now, over 300 thousand people follow the museum's account. 2. Sephora - Racial Profiling. When a celebrity mentions your brand on social media, it can bring a lot of attention to your products and services. But, if this influencer says negative things about your company, that can quickly stir up a crisis that damages your brand's reputation. Take Sephora, for example, when the musician, SZA, tweeted at the company to report an instance of racial profiling. Image Source Twitter users flocked to her defense, calling out Sephora for other examples of discrimination and showing their support SZA's remarks. Here's one response to SZA's tweet: Image Source Sephora acted quickly, though, and publicly reached out to SZA to apologize. The company also closed its stores to conduct mandatory diversity training so it could educate its employees and prevent issues like this from happening in the future. Below is Sephora's response to SZA. Image Source Why It Worked. No matter how you slice it, this situation doesn't make Sephora look great. But, when posed with an unexpected crisis, the company responded quickly and took meaningful strides to reconcile the issue. It not only issued a public apology to those that were hurt, but it also showed an investment in preventing the problem from occurring again. 3. American Red Cross - #GettngSlizzerd. The American Red Cross turned some heads back in 2011 when it tweeted this message late one Tuesday night. Image Source Clearly, this was an off-brand tweet for the company and it quickly grabbed the attention of its social media following. While the American Red Cross knew it had to delete the tweet, the social media team decided to have a little fun with the spotlight and tweeted this follow-up message. Image Source Why It Worked. Rather than taking themselves too seriously, the American Red Cross embraced the moment and playfully poked fun at its mistake. This approach not only went over well with the brand's target audience, but it also got the attention of other companies as well. Both Hootsuite and Dogfish Head Brewery responded to the American Red Cross's tweet and even made donations to the company as well. Image Source This is a great example of a company taking advantage of a timely opportunity and preventing a small social media crisis from turning into a big one. 4. JC Penney - Kettle Conundrum. In 2013, retailer, JC Penney, added a new tea kettle to its product line. Problem was, the kettle resembled an infamous political leader of the 1940's — we'll let you connect the dots below. Image Source This was clearly an oversight by JC Penney's marketing team as Twitter users quickly started to question the inspiration behind the product's design. In response, the company decided to get ahead of the issue and sent a transparent message to each of its followers fully admitting its mistake. Image Source Why It Worked. In the end, most people forgave the mishap and realized JC Penney did have much control over the product's design. While the ad could have certainly repositioned the angle of the product to make it look more like an innocent tea kettle, there was no malicious intent on behalf of the company. If you truly want to be prepared for every possible crisis then it helps to have an entire playbook that outlines the response to every possible situation. You may think that'll take forever, but below is a free template you can use to create your crisis plans. Social Media Crisis Management Plan Template. From negative comments to natural disasters, it's important to have a proper response plan for your social media channels. This guide will help you solve tough problems quickly while avoiding damages to your company's reputation. In this free PDF guide and Excel template, you'll learn: How to become an expert problem solver The differences between a problem and a crisis What to do when a problem becomes a crisis How to create your very own crisis management plan When it comes to a social media crisis, it's important to respond as quickly as you can. Owning responsibility for the action, apologizing, and perhaps poking fun at yourself (if appropriate), can help your customer service teams respond to incoming inquiries as quickly and effectively as possible. Editor's note: This post was originally published in May 2015 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.   Originally published Jul 28, 2021 11:15:00 AM, updated July 29 2021 Topics: Crisis Management Don't forget to share this post! Related Articles. 10 Crisis Plan Communication Examples (and How to Write Your Own) . Service  | 16 min read What Is Contingency Planning? [+ Examples] . Service  | 7 min read How To Create a Business Continuity Plan For Crisis Management [+ Template] . Service  | 15 min read Expand Offer Customer Service Metrics Calculator Get it now Get it now Download for Later.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • crisi
  • 49
  • 22
  • social
  • 46
  • 22
  • social media
  • 44
  • 22
  • media
  • 44
  • 22
  • customer
  • 28
  • 22
  • company
  • 21
  • 22
  • source
  • 19
  • 22
  • service
  • 18
  • 22
  • problem
  • 18
  • 22
  • image source
  • 17
  • 22
  • plan
  • 17
  • 22
  • response
  • 17
  • 22
  • social media crisi
  • 16
  • 22
  • media crisi
  • 16
  • 22
  • image
  • 15
  • 22
  • issue
  • 13
  • 22
  • example
  • 12
  • 22
  • team
  • 12
  • 22
  • crisi management
  • 11
  • 22
  • customer service
  • 11
  • 22
  • brand
  • 11
  • 22
  • management
  • 11
  • 22
  • quickly
  • 11
  • 22
  • situation
  • 9
  • 22
  • tweet
  • 9
  • 22
  • message
  • 9
  • 22
  • business
  • 8
  • 22
  • media crisi management
  • 7
  • 22
  • sephora
  • 7
  • 22
  • cris
  • 7
  • 22
  • comment
  • 7
  • 22
  • post
  • 7
  • 22
  • management plan
  • 6
  • 22
  • american red
  • 6
  • 22
  • free
  • 6
  • 22
  • template
  • 6
  • 22
  • youre
  • 6
  • 22
  • museum
  • 6
  • 22
  • crisi management plan
  • 5
  • 22
  • customer service team
  • 5
  • 22
  • jc penney
  • 5
  • 22
  • service team
  • 5
  • 22
  • problem crisi
  • 5
  • 22
  • red
  • 5
  • 22
  • image source worked
  • 4
  • 22
  • american red cross
  • 4
  • 22
  • national cowboy
  • 4
  • 22
  • min read
  • 4
  • 22
  • source worked
  • 4
  • 22
  • red cross
  • 4
  • 22
  • crisi social media
  • 3
  • 22
  • brand social media
  • 3
  • 22
  • social media cris
  • 3
  • 22
  • national cowboy museum
  • 3
  • 22
  • plan social media
  • 3
  • 22
  • crisi social
  • 3
  • 22
  • response customer
  • 3
  • 22
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  • 3
  • 22
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  • 3
  • 22
  • crisi determine
  • 3
  • 22
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  • 3
  • 22
  • twitter user
  • 3
  • 22
  • cowboy museum
  • 3
  • 22
  • plan social
  • 3
  • 22
Result 23
TitleCrisis Communications and Social Media - TRACE ...
Urlhttps://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1003&context=ccisymposium
DescriptionVital to successful crisis management is strategic and effective crisis communications. Without it the health and safety of its stakeholders and the reputation ...
Dateby WS Holmes · 2011 · Cited by 24
Organic Position23
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 24
Titlesocial media and crisis management: a review and analysis of ...
Urlhttp://euljss.eul.edu.tr/article-6.pdf
DescriptionThe key search phrases that were used to access the articles included; crisis communication, social media and crisis management, public relations and social ...
Dateby M ÇALIŞMALARIN · Cited by 17
Organic Position24
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 25
TitleCrisis Management on Social Media: A framework*
Urlhttps://sites.les.univr.it/eisic/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/20-EISIC-Bullini-Orlandi-Fraticelli-Negri.pdf
Descriptionby LB Orlandi — in-depth interviews with key Informants (internal and external to the Company) designated to the task of “social media crisis management”, linked in a ...
Date
Organic Position25
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 26
TitleSocial Media Crisis Management | Target Internet
Urlhttps://www.targetinternet.com/social-media-crisis-management/
Description
Date
Organic Position26
H1Social Media Crisis Management Effectively Implementing a Social Media Policy
H2Culture and Process
How to Avoid a Social Media Disaster
Social Media Crisis Management Plan
Conclusions
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H3Panel Sign Off
Social Policy
Disaster Prediction
Social Listening
Staff Training
On-Going Monitoring
Clear Responsibilities
Response Tracking
Escalation Process
Crisis Management Team
Speed of Response
Not Responding
Monitoring Reaction
Holding Patterns
Post Crisis Debrief and Social Policy Update
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How to Avoid a Social Media Disaster
Social Media Crisis Management Plan
Conclusions
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BodySocial Media Crisis Management Effectively Implementing a Social Media Policy   Loading... Blog Posts, Reports, Digital Strategy/ Social MediaThis article gives you a step by step guide to managing a social media crisis should one occur, but also looks a at structured approached to avoid them happening in the first place.The Internet is awash with social media disaster stories, and blog posts titled “10 [insert over-the-top adjective her] social media fails” are almost certain to get lots of attention online. But why do we like to see other people’s disasters so much?   Beyond the amusement value of some of the incredibly dumb things that people do, it’s generally because the audience wants to learn how not to repeat the mistake. Figure one shows a word cloud (the bigger the word, the more times it was mentioned), showing the words and phrases that were mentioned online relating to social media disasters (this was created using the fantastic https://www.brandwatch.com tool, which monitors over 90 million online sources such as social platforms, blogs and news sites).Fig 1: Word cloud of phrases mentioned online connected to social media disasters.So, many of us are searching how to manage a social crisis, but it also seems that lots of us are searching for ways to avoid these things happening in the first place. Lets break this down a little further: Fig 2: Words used in association with social media disasters.Culture and Process. So it’s pretty clear that not only do we need to try and avoid social media disasters, but we also need a realistic view that they do happen, and no level of preparation will allow you to avoid them completely. It’s important to make it clear in your organisation from the outset, that although you can minimise problems occurring and you can fix them as quickly as possible, you can’t avoid them happening altogether. The world is a chaotic place and no one can predict the future, but we can implement processes that deal with the most common patterns in which problems occur and processes that avoid us making most common mistakes in the first place. We also need a culture that understands that building and iterating processes is essential and accepts that complete control is impossible. Culture is an important point to mention here as well, because, as we can infer from the data below, the fear of social disasters is significant. Social media managers and marketers are very concerned about the impact these disasters can have on their companies, but very importantly also on their careers. Fig 3 shows the number of mentions of avoiding, surviving and preparing for social media disasters, and the spikes in mentions are not disasters happening and getting coverage, but rather a new article being published giving some form of guidance.Fig 3: Peaks in interest caused by new articles being published giving advice on the topic.How to Avoid a Social Media Disaster. They key to avoiding social media disasters is process. Below I’ll outline a series of steps that should be taken to allow social media to be carried out in the most risk mitigated way possible. For some small and agile organisations, some of these steps may be overkill, but in any large organisation a ‘belt and braces’ approach can pay dividends in the long term. Also, always bear in mind that social media itself is not normally the cause of a social disaster, its more often to do with customer service or product problems, so make sure these teams are involved.Panel Sign Off. Before anyone in the organisation is able to start and undertake any social campaigns or activity, they must go through due diligence. This basically involves clearly documenting a series of answers to questions related to that activity. This would include, but not necessarily be limited to:What are the objectives of the activity?How will you resource the activity?What are the current topics of conversation in the topic area?What are our competitors doing in the area?Who are the influencers in the topic area?Do we have the appropriate tools in place for managing the activity?What happens if something goes wrong?What does going wrong look like?Have we brainstormed all of the possible disaster situations (see disaster prediction below)?Do we have an escalation policy and crisis management team?It is also worth building a dialled down version of this process into any project of any type across the organisation, so we are always asking the question “What are the social media risks?” and “What could go wrong?” Once these questions have been answered, they are then reviewed by representatives from relevant parts of the organisation. This normally includes representatives from marketing as well as legal/compliance. If the questions are not answered satisfactorily, the proposal is not accepted and must be revised and submitted again. If they are answered satisfactorily, the proposal is accepted and the team can go forwards and implement their plan, on the condition they do it within the bounds of the social media policy. This may sound laborious, but it does have an advantage for those wanting to implement their social plans. Once they have sign off, and as long as they adhere to the social policy, they don’t need sign off for every post, tweet or response going forwards.Social Policy. Many social media policies simply list what we shouldn’t do. They are lists of rules that either live in a draw or on an intranet and are infrequently used. Although these policies should outline things we shouldn’t do, they should also be a regularly updated guide to what we should do. By giving examples of things like tone of voice and example of tweets that have been successful, a social media policy becomes useful and far more likely to be used. For examples of a wide range of other organisations policies, take a look at: http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies/Disaster Prediction. A very simple and effective part of your social process should be a brainstorming session. Get together as many people as you can comfortably fit in a meeting room (pubs also work well in this scenario as the relaxed atmosphere leads to the right kind of thinking) and make sure you have a mix of roles, ages and seniorities if at all possible. Don’t have too many senior people or anyone that others wont speak freely in front of. You then ask everyone to brainstorm anything that could possibly go wrong with the social activity. Could the hashtag be hijacked and used for something else? Could the campaign be manipulated to look like something else? Is it just a dumb idea that people will laugh at? You need to let people be completely free to come up with pretty out there ideas. The next stage is to filter what you have come up with. You then put the whole list to an anonymous vote, allowing people to indicate if the risks identified are possible or simply ludicrous. Any deemed to be completely unlikely are discarded. Those that remain, then have responses planned for them. If someone hijacks your hashtag, what do you do? Stop using it? Respond? In each case you need a planned mechanism to either fix or contain the problem (more on this in the managing a crisis section).Social Listening. Every social project should start with a listening project. This will allow you to understand what the popular themes of content are, who the influencers are and should also help you to identify any potential risks. You can also look at what your competitors are up to and set some expectations of the level of engagement you’d like to achieve. You’ll need a decent social listening/monitoring tool – we use https://www.brandwatch.com and I highly recommend it. You start by creating a set of words that you want to look at, and the better tools give you a query builder to do this. You can see an example query below, that monitors a whole range of words, but also excludes some word combinations.Fig 4: Building a query for social media listeningStaff Training. All staff should be trained in your social media policy, and this should form part of your induction. They should then get updates on a regular basis to either update their knowledge or to just remind them of the key issues. This way people know what is expected of them, what they should and shouldn’t do, and what the processes and tools available are.On-Going Monitoring. Once you start a campaign or any social activity, you then need ongoing social media monitoring tools. This will allow you to gauge the reaction to your efforts, monitor your competitors easily, identify influencers and most importantly for our purposes identify any issues very quickly. The better tools will automatically create alerts for you that flag up any change that is statistically significant without you needing to look for it.Fig 5: Email alerts for topics that are growing quickly (screenshot of Brandwatch’s ‘Signals’ system)Clear Responsibilities. You need to clarify from the outset who is in charge of monitoring and reporting on social media. What happens when they are not around? Who takes over? Who is responsible for dealing with customer complaints that come in via social? How quickly should they be responded to? How quickly should your internal legal or compliance team turn things around? All of these activities and more need to be clearly documented and expectations for different roles and teams made clear. Very often internal Service Level Agreements (SLA’s) are a good idea in large organisations, so that different departments and teams are clear on what the expectations are.Response Tracking      . Once you start getting responses to your social activity, you will need to respond to many of these (whether negative or positive). The more successful you become at social media, the more responses you’ll get, and this is when you will need a tool to help you. It’s important that you track things like complaints and you respond to compliments, and make sure they are assigned to the right person and tracked through to completion There are range of tools available but two of my favourites are Hootsuite (for managing social media) and Conversocial (for customer service at scale).Escalation Process. Once something is identified as a potential issue it is essential there are clear guidelines of what happens next. Who needs to be told? Via what channel? How quickly? It’s no good sending me an email on Friday afternoon if I’m not checking my emails until Monday morning. There needs to be a clear process for flagging up potential issues to the right people, and a fall back process for when they are not available. We also need to define what a problem looks like and who is responsible for deciding when something is becoming a problem.Crisis Management Team. Once we’ve decided something is becoming an issue (and it’s sensible to be pretty cautious in your approach. Better to escalate something that blows over than ignoring something that explodes into a crisis!), we need to have a nominated crisis management team. This team will be removed from their day to day roles and put onto dealing with the issue head on. Therefore we also need to plan what will happen to their normal workloads.Social Media Crisis Management Plan . This is the process that should be initiated once things have been handed to the crisis management team.Speed of Response. Most social media disasters happen because organisations are paralysed by fear and a lack of planned responses. It can then take too long for a response to be signed off and things escalate. Our aim is to respond to any issue as quickly as possible in a measured way. We therefore need to answer these questions as quickly as possible:Do we have any pre-planed responses from our disaster prediction process? If so, are they fully suitable? If so, have they been signed off for usage?If we have no pre-planned response we need to create a response. Normally an honest and open tone is appropriate, not a corporate ‘don’t admit any liability’ tone. Taking responsibility where an issue is our fault is desirable and suggesting a resolution. Always be cautious if the resolution will be seen as insufficient for the problem that has occurred. Best to make a gesture of good will than be seen as uncaring.Once the response is created we need sign off ASAP. The crisis team should have immediate access and prioritisation of their requests to the person that is able to sign off the response.Not Responding. Bear in mind that sometimes, no response can be the best response! If a serial complainer is complaining again, even though you’ve responded positively previously, you may make a decision to ignore the complaint/comment. Audiences are quick to identify serial complainers and often, if you respond, you simply give them a platform from to which to escalate things further. However ignoring a complaint or comment should only be done as a conscious decision and still requires sign off.An alternative approach to not responding at all, is to respond via a third party. For example if we previously identified advocates, that is people that are positively inclined toward us and are likely to say positive things, we may ask them to join the conversation. Telling people what to say on your behalf can backfire, so we are simply asking them to join the conversation. Always remember though, that an overzealous advocate can also make things worse, so it’s important you trust how this individual will act.Monitoring Reaction. Once the response is issued, we need to see how the audience reacts. Very often involving advocates at this stage can also help as they can amplify and share our response. Be prepared for your response to either get no traction or to not get the desired impact. In this case we loop back to preparing further responses and involving advocates again.Holding Patterns. Very often, particularly in large organisations or when dealing with legally sensitive issues, we can’t issue a full response immediately. In these cases it is essential to issue a holding response and to set expectations. For example we may say that we are aware of the issue and that while we carry out some internal investigation, we can’t respond in full, but that we will issue a full response by a defined deadline. These kind of holding responses can help to minimise rumor and escalation before our final response. It makes sense to always have a holding response prepared and signed off in advance so these can be issued as quickly as possible. Holding responses should be carefully crafted so they are not seen as admissions of guilt or cause any other forms of further escalation. It’s worth putting your holding response through a disaster prediction process as discussed earlier as well.Post Crisis Debrief and Social Policy Update . Once the disaster has been averted or passed, we then need to make sure it doesn’t happen again. The crisis team should de-brief the relevant teams and then amend the social media policy to add additional advice and learnings. All staff should then be briefed/trained on the change.Conclusions. The majority of social disasters can be avoided by following a series of processes that we have identified, but bear in mind, the majority of social disaster are not caused by social activity. Normally social disasters are caused by issues like customer service or product faults. Therefore the responsibility for preventing disasters lies across the organisation and all staff need awareness and training.When social disasters do occur, we need well prepared crisis management teams and processes to minimise the damage and give a response as quickly as possible. Good luck!  get your free membership now - absolutely no credit card required. 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Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • social
  • 48
  • 26
  • media
  • 28
  • 26
  • social media
  • 27
  • 26
  • response
  • 26
  • 26
  • disaster
  • 25
  • 26
  • process
  • 16
  • 26
  • person
  • 14
  • 26
  • issue
  • 14
  • 26
  • crisi
  • 13
  • 26
  • policy
  • 12
  • 26
  • team
  • 12
  • 26
  • thing
  • 11
  • 26
  • organisation
  • 11
  • 26
  • word
  • 10
  • 26
  • tool
  • 10
  • 26
  • quickly
  • 10
  • 26
  • marketing
  • 8
  • 26
  • social media disaster
  • 7
  • 26
  • media disaster
  • 7
  • 26
  • management
  • 7
  • 26
  • digital
  • 7
  • 26
  • avoid
  • 7
  • 26
  • start
  • 7
  • 26
  • activity
  • 7
  • 26
  • respond
  • 7
  • 26
  • social media policy
  • 6
  • 26
  • crisi management
  • 6
  • 26
  • media policy
  • 6
  • 26
  • social disaster
  • 6
  • 26
  • free
  • 6
  • 26
  • online
  • 6
  • 26
  • clear
  • 6
  • 26
  • problem
  • 6
  • 26
  • sign
  • 6
  • 26
  • example
  • 6
  • 26
  • holding response
  • 5
  • 26
  • digital marketing
  • 5
  • 26
  • question
  • 5
  • 26
  • holding
  • 5
  • 26
  • fig
  • 4
  • 26
  • social activity
  • 4
  • 26
  • media crisi
  • 3
  • 26
  • large organisation
  • 3
  • 26
  • bear mind
  • 3
  • 26
  • customer service
  • 3
  • 26
  • disaster prediction
  • 3
  • 26
  • management team
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
TitleHow to Weather a Social Media Storm - Candor
Urlhttps://candorpr.com/social-media-crisis-management/
Description
Date
Organic Position27
H1How to Weather a Social Media Storm
H2Our Most Recent Posts
H3Set a Game Plan
Stop the Content Conveyor Belt
Start Listening ASAP
Choose Battles Wisely
Focus on Brand Values
8 Digital Marketing Trends for 2022 — And How to Implement Them Now
Media Training Helps You Win the Big Game
From Burnout to Balance: Navigating Employee Wellness in 2021
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BodyHow to Weather a Social Media Storm When a brand makes a mistake on social media, the retweets & shares immediately come flooding in — but a social media crisis strategy can help businesses stay afloat while effectively weathering the storm. We’ve all seen social media crises go viral — that’s the nature of the medium. From Dove’s controversial “Transformation” campaign to Chase Bank’s tone-deaf #MoneyMotivation tweet, social users are quick to pounce on marketing mistakes. That’s why it’s so important for brands to have a social media crisis management strategy in place. . In a 2019 survey, consumers said they were more likely to share news of a brand’s crisis on social media than they were face-to-face, and more than half of respondents expected brands to respond to a crisis within an hour. By closely paying attention to what others are saying and responding accordingly, a crisis can be much easier to handle. . Social channels can make or break a business. The next time a crisis hits, use these tips to leverage social media to your advantage. .     . Set a Game Plan. Who’s going to answer social media questions? How will the company respond? Should comments come from the company’s profile page or from an employee? What type of content needs to be flagged? What happens if a decision-maker isn’t available? Who will monitor comments outside of normal business hours? . These are only a few questions every digital team should answer before delving into their social crisis strategy. Having a hierarchy of communication, especially for agencies serving a client, helps improve response time and increase efficiency. Stop the Content Conveyor Belt . Pumping the brakes on scheduled content during a crisis can help salvage reputations and stop businesses from looking insensitive. . Take Apple’s 2018 Twitter misstep. The App Store Twitter profile published a Thanksgiving-themed post urging users to download the New York Times’ cooking app. However, the call to action fell on frustrated ears — at the time, the App Store was experiencing connection issues. Suspending campaigns will aid in concocting relevant communication and lead to better brand awareness. Sprout Social’s channels did just this during the COVID-19 outbreak to move more resourceful content to the forefront of feeds.    . Start Listening ASAP. One of the most essential components of social media crisis management is social listening/monitoring. In dire situations, brands may be tempted to shut down commenting sections on their platforms, delete posts or disable their profiles all together — but this usually does more harm than good. Instead, by observing and listening to audiences, social media teams can find the root of the problem and react accordingly. . Take Nike’s public social media crisis last year. When Duke basketball star Zion Williamson literally blew out of his shoe mid-game, backlash was rampant on social media and lead to a 1.8% drop in stock valuation. The very next day, social audiences everywhere saw Nike’s response: the shoe conglomerate wished Williamson a speedy recovery and posted updates of their ongoing research to fix the faulty shoe. . With social media listening tools, brands can effectively track comments, find related posts and efficiently handle online feedback in a timely manner — and build trust with audiences. . Choose Battles Wisely. The size of both the crisis and company dictate the feedback volume. No matter the amount of comments, one wrong response could lead to a much bigger problem. Responding to every comment is certainly out of the question and could open a brand up to more scrutiny. And remember, a business page is not a personal account — so don’t get personal with replies. . When it comes to responding to comments, transparency is always best. It’s okay to delete profane or offensive comments, but getting trigger-happy with the delete button could anger audiences. It’s beneficial to create standard responses if a business needs to quickly respond to feedback.  Crafting standard replies allows audiences to see your brand listening while your team develops an overall response to the crisis. . Responses should always parallel long-term strategy; although a speedy response is important, so is maintaining brand reputation — responding reactively or impulsively never turns out well. .     . Focus on Brand Values. In the end, leaning into what a company stands for will kickstart the healing process. If needed, go back to square one to rediscover founding principles. When these values are pinpointed, start creating content from there. Audiences will respond. Interested in learning how Candor can help manage your business’s reputation during a social media crisis? Contact us to discuss how our digital team can serve you best. Garrett Davis . Garrett specializes in social media strategy, content creation, brand development and digital targeting. He’s known for delving deep into clients’ worlds and producing clever, eye-catching posts to lend authenticity to brands. Our Most Recent Posts. 8 Digital Marketing Trends for 2022 — And How to Implement Them Now. December 28, 2021 / By Alex Joseph Guess what? Vertical videos, influencer marketing and TikTok aren’t going anywhere. READ MORE Media Training Helps You Win the Big Game. November 12, 2021 / By Adam Brooks Most people don’t get to experience the thrill – or anxiety – of performing in front of thousands of screaming fans. But many have a chance to shine, especially when they step in front of the media. READ MORE From Burnout to Balance: Navigating Employee Wellness in 2021. 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TitleThe role of social media in crisis preparedness, response, and ...
Urlhttps://www.oecd.org/governance/risk/The%20role%20of%20Social%20media%20in%20crisis%20preparedness,%20response%20and%20recovery.pdf
Descriptionby JCC RPO — preparedness, crisis response and crisis recovery, and describes some of the key considerations for social media to be used effectively during the crisis ...
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Title3 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media
Urlhttps://www.mojomedialabs.com/blog/3-great-examples-of-crisis-management-on-social-media
DescriptionOver the years we've seen the good, the bad, and the ugly examples of crisis management through social media
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H13 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media
H2SOUTHWEST
RED CROSS
JC PENNEY
Stephanie Fisher
H3Get Updates
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H2WithAnchorsSOUTHWEST
RED CROSS
JC PENNEY
Stephanie Fisher
Body3 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media August 10, 2016 •Stephanie Fisher Social Media Update: Check out our part 2 post for more great examples of crisis management (or lack thereof) right here. In recent years the game has changed for crisis management. The public has certain expectations for a company's response to a PR disaster or potential crisis. Those expectations include things like swift response, open and honest communication, and open dialogue through social media. Never before have people been able to reach out directly to a brand so easily as they now can through platforms like Twitter and Facebook. Over the years we've seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of crisis management through social media. Here I wanted to highlight 3 examples of big brands who successfully handled true disasters and potential crises through deft use of social media.    SOUTHWEST. The Southwest Flight 345 that landed nose first at LaGuardia is an example of a big brand who knew exactly how to handle a crisis through social media. Quick response time and open, honest communication on Facebook and Twitter were key in helping the brand control the story and maintain good faith with its customers. Here are a few other examples of their Facebook and Twitter posts just minutes after the accident, promising updates (which they followed up immediately with statements and information): Most of the comments from fans included notes of support and appreciation for Southwest's open communication and quick response.   Southwest has a long history of responding appropriately to crises through social media, and the crisis planning of their communication and PR team is evident.    Lesson learned: Have a PR plan in place, including social media response, with clear roles and scripts for those who need to respond immediately to a crisis.  RED CROSS. Sometimes social media can be the cause of a PR crisis. Just take this Twitter snafu that the American Red Cross quickly handled back in 2011. This is every marketer and social media monkey's worst nightmare: accidentally firing off a personal tweet on the company's Twitter account. This kind of thing can happen easily when one is using Hootsuite on a mobile phone, for example (which is exactly what happened here). Red Cross responded brilliantly. The rogue tweet from @RedCross went like this: “Ryan found two more 4 bottle packs of Dogfish Head’s Midas Touch beer… when we drink we do it right #gettngslizzerd” You can imagine how a tweet of this nature would make an honorable humanitarian organization look bad. How did Red Cross respond? With transparency, humor and good grace. Now, deleting a tweet isn't always the best idea since a) if you have a big audience who notices these things, it can look shady when you delete things and b) anything "deleted" can surface to haunt you later, especially on social media. But, Red Cross did the right thing by acknowledging that the tweet went out, they deleted it, and explaining with humor that it was all a mistake. It never turned into a major crisis.  They didn't stop there, though. Red Cross went beyond that response and turned a potentially harmful tweet into an opportunity for engagement. They took to their corporate blog to explain the situation, show their humanity, and engage with fans and followers. The employee who made the mistake 'fessed up to it on her personal Twitter account in the same manner, with humility and humor. Lesson learned: Be careful using Hootsuite! And, be honest with your fans/followers when you flub-up. Social media folks are very forgiving, as long as you don't use dishonest tactics to hide your mistakes. That is the ultimate no-no when handling crises through social media (or offline too, for that matter!)   JC PENNEY. Sometimes a small issue can come out of nowhere, and initially seem harmless and unworthy of response. Thus is the case with the JC Penney Teapot that looked like Hitler. Did you hear about this one? A user on the social bookmarking site Reddit posted a remark about JC Penney's new teapot baring a slight resemblance to Adolf Hitler. The remark didn't remain isolated to Reddit for long, and JC Penney was forced to response after The Telegraph ran with the non-story: Although this wasn't a crisis, JC Penney wisely chose to respond while not taking itself too seriously. They realized that a small issue like this could quickly turn into a social media PR crisis if handled improperly. @jcpenney responded to hundreds of tweets about the evil teapot with a standard, light-hearted message:   The whole debacle turned out to be a pretty good thing for JC Penney. The teapot sold like gangbusters. Lesson learned: Be sensitive to the power of social media. Even a small issue like a silly comment or an unintentional coincidence that gets picked up by others on social media can quickly snowball into a PR crisis. Address even small complaints from your fans or others with grace and good sense. What crisis management moments have your company responded to through social media engagement? How did it turn out? Share your thoughts and stories in the comments below!   Stephanie Fisher. Steph leads our client delivery team and is obsessed with delivering quality work, creating an efficiency machine, and mastering the tools and disciplines to achieve success for our heroes. At home, she loves listening to true crime podcasts, playing with her daughters and two pugs, and singing in a local rock band with her husband. Share This: Get Updates. Featured Articles. Categories. Account-Based Marketing (43) Branding (10) Company Culture (25) Content Marketing (43) Customer Experience (10) Customer Personas (7) Digital Marketing (51) Email Marketing (13) growth marketing (7) HubSpot (17) Inbound Marketing (55) manufacturing (1) Marketing Automation (1) Marketing Technology (27) Mojo News (27) nonprofits (2) podcast (6) Professional Development (14) ROE Powers ROI (30) rowe (6) Sales Enablement (24) SEO (36) Social Media (25) storybrand (3) Technology (2) Website (3) Website Development (53) See all
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