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Copywriteroffice - How can social media help you manage a pr crisis? serp result detail
Keyword How can social media help you manage a pr crisis?
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=How+can+social+media+help+you+manage+a+pr+crisis%3F&oq=How+can+social+media+help+you+manage+a+pr+crisis%3F&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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what is social media crisis managementhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=What+is+social+media+crisis+management&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgbEAE
social media crisis communication exampleshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Social+media+crisis+communication+examples&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAg0EAE
social media crisis management exampleshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Social+media+crisis+management+examples&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgjEAE
the role of social media in crisis preparedness, response and recoveryhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=The+role+of+social+media+in+crisis+preparedness%2C+response+and+recovery&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgqEAE
social media crisis management pdfhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Social+media+crisis+management+PDF&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgnEAE
what is a social media crisishttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=What+is+a+social+media+crisis&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgkEAE
bad examples of social media crisis managementhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Bad+examples+of+social+media+crisis+management&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgxEAE
social media crisis communication planhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Social+media+crisis+communication+plan&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjS_pGXt6H1AhUP1hoKHZ8sCjcQ1QJ6BAgiEAE
Result 1
TitleCrisis PR | Prevent & Manage PR Crisis | Alder UK
Urlhttps://alder-uk.com/services/crisis-pr/
DescriptionWhen a PR crisis occurs, negative effects come fast. We effectively manage PR crisis communications to protect your reputation and limit the damage caused
Date
Organic Position
H1Utilise our PR crisis management strategies to effectively handle a PR crisis as it arises
H2Crisis PR Management
Get a crisis under control
H3Talk to an expert
Our crisis PR services include:
Media Handling Advice
Communications
Social Media Monitoring
Crisis Planning & Training
Stakeholder Management
Virtual Press Office
Other Services
Litigation PR
Management Advice
News House
Media Training
H2WithAnchorsCrisis PR Management
Get a crisis under control
BodyUtilise our PR crisis management strategies to effectively handle a PR crisis as it arises. No one wants to suffer a PR crisis – these are events which pose substantial reputational and other risks to companies operating in every sector, as well as individuals living and working in the public eye. A PR crisis can strike instantly and if left unattended, can inflict lasting damage or continue to spread unless it is swiftly and carefully extinguished. At Alder, our PR crisis management specialists have years of experience tackling crises of all shapes and sizes, helping organisations to avoid the potentially fatal blow they can deal. Operating in both online and offline spaces, and with contacts spread throughout the UK, Europe and the rest of the world, our experts are available at a moment’s notice to provide trustworthy, crisis management PR guidance. Effective crisis PR management requires cool heads, an instant but well-judged response, and expert damage limitation. Having worked across political, public, non-profit and commercial spheres, we have the knowledge, experience and contacts necessary to react, adapt and achieve positive outcomes in these demanding, pressurised and fast-moving situations. If you’re looking for a discreet, skilled and experienced agency specialising in crisis management PR to provide immediate assistance in crafting a media response, or to manage an ongoing proactive strategy, contact the team at Alder today by emailing us at [email protected] Alternatively, we can be reached by telephone at 020 7692 5675 and our urgent help email address, [email protected], is monitored 24/7 for emergency requests. Our crisis PR services include:. Media Handling Advice. We will explain how journalists will approach a story and give you strategic advice on how to respond. Communications. We will bring consistency to your communications by providing draft statements, Q&As and lines to take. Social Media Monitoring. Our software will keep you on top of breaking stories, enabling you to take swift action if necessary. Crisis Planning & Training. Planning ahead will help you cope with the significant demands a crisis will place on your senior team. Stakeholder Management. Managing the diverse needs of your stakeholders is an essential requirement during any major issue. Virtual Press Office. We can set up a rapid response press office to act as a firewall between you and the media during difficult times. Get a crisis under control. If you’d like more information or need help with an incident, enter your details and an expert will be in touch. If you need urgent help, call us on 020 7692 5675. Other Services. Litigation PR. Have you been accused of a crime? Is your company involved in a commercial dispute? Have allegations of professional negligence been made against you? Or perhaps you are taking legal action and require some well-judged publicity and a watertight communication plan. Learn more Management Advice. Our management advice helps leaders build organisational resilience and enables them to identify and act on the internal problems that can lead to reputational disaster. Learn more News House. Not every organisation has the resources or the need for a full time in-house media operation, and whether you’re facing a crisis or want to take advantage of the many opportunities for building a positive profile, we have the right level of cover for you. Learn more Media Training. How you deal with journalists’ questions can have a major impact on the way your issue is reported, and therefore on your reputation. In the age of 24-hour media, there are no second chances so it is essential to be prepared. Learn more
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Result 2
TitleCrisis Response & Real-time Data | Brandwatch
Urlhttps://www.brandwatch.com/p/crisis-response-realtime-data/
DescriptionWith real-time signals and alerts, never miss a critical mention and ensure you have the tools to steer your teams through these make-or-break moments
Date
Organic Position
H1Get a critical head start when a crisis hits your brand
H2Industry-leading insights and research into crisis management
Power your command center with live data to see trends instantly
Align the entire organization on the right information
Optimize your brand messaging
Measure your share of voice
Hear how some of worlds' biggest brands use real-time data
When it comes to understanding consumers, businesses choose Brandwatch ahead of any other platform
We value your privacy
Crimson Hexagon has merged with Brandwatch. You’re in the right place!
H3
H2WithAnchorsIndustry-leading insights and research into crisis management
Power your command center with live data to see trends instantly
Align the entire organization on the right information
Optimize your brand messaging
Measure your share of voice
Hear how some of worlds' biggest brands use real-time data
When it comes to understanding consumers, businesses choose Brandwatch ahead of any other platform
We value your privacy
Crimson Hexagon has merged with Brandwatch. You’re in the right place!
BodyGet a critical head start when a crisis hits your brand With real-time signals and alerts, never miss a critical mention and ensure you have the tools to steer your teams through these make-or-break moments. See real-time data in action: . When a crisis hits your brand, every second counts. Detect unusual activity or emerging crises and send automatic notifications Share crucial comms across the organization in real-time As used by Industry-leading insights and research into crisis management. When crisis strikes, do you have a plan in place? Blog. Crisis Communication: Preparation and Response Guide Read Now Guide. The Guide to Expert Crisis Management Read Now Guide. The Predictive Trend Spotting Guide Read Now Power your command center with live data to see trends instantly. Empower your team to spot negative mentions as they happen and act quickly on potential crises before they escalate. See real-time data in action Align the entire organization on the right information. Share crucial comms across the organization in real-time and ensure the right people have the right information at all times. Be the single source of truth. See real-time data in action Optimize your brand messaging. Feel confident your brand is aligned with changing consumer perceptions and trends. Measure the impact of your marketing strategies to identify what is and isn’t working. See real-time data in action Measure your share of voice. Uncover new opportunities and brand risks. Measuring customer perceptions and sentiment instantly helps add context to your competitor analysis. See real-time data in action Hear how some of worlds' biggest brands use real-time data. When it comes to understanding consumers, businesses choose Brandwatch ahead of any other platform. Brandwatch is the world’s leading digital consumer intelligence platform, helping over 2200 of the most admired brands and agencies including Unilever, Walmart, Microsoft and L’Oreal to make insightful, data-driven business decisions. We value your privacy . We use cookies to improve your experience and give you personalized content. Do you agree to our cookie policy? No, take me to settings Yes, I agree More info. By using our site you agree to our use of cookies — I Agree Crimson Hexagon has merged with Brandwatch. You’re in the right place! From May 8th, all Crimson Hexagon products are now on the Brandwatch website. You’ll find them under ‘Products’ in the navigation. If you’re an existing customer and you want to know more, your account manager will be happy to help. Understood — continue to Brandwatch Read about the merger
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Result 3
TitleHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Practical Guide for Brands
Urlhttps://blog.hootsuite.com/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionEffective social media crisis management starts long before any issue arises. Learn how to create a plan to mitigate risk—and what to do if it fails and you need to react
Date6 Feb 2019
Organic Position1
H1How to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Practical Guide for Brands
H29 social media crisis management tips for businesses and brands
Wait! Your team needs help on social media
H31. Create a social media policy
2. Secure your accounts
3. Use social listening to identify potential issues
4. Define what counts as a crisis
5. Craft a crisis communication plan
6. Pause all scheduled posts
7. Engage—but don’t argue
8. Communicate internally
9. Learn from the experience
H2WithAnchors9 social media crisis management tips for businesses and brands
Wait! Your team needs help on social media
BodyHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Practical Guide for Brands Effective social media crisis management starts long before any issue arises. Learn how to create a plan to mitigate risk—and what to do if it fails and you need to react. On social media, things can move blazingly fast. Sometimes, it’s an Instagram post of an egg going inexplicably viral. But sometimes, it’s a PR crisis that seems to come out of nowhere. Your best chance to make it through a social media crisis is to prepare ahead of time. Have a solid plan, a list of key stakeholders and responsibilities, and a clear chain of command. Of course, it’s even better if you can prevent a crisis before it begins. In this post, we’ll look at methods for spotting potential issues as they emerge and how to shut a problem down in the early stages. If that doesn’t work, we’ll show you what to do if you end up with a full-blown social media crisis management situation on your hands. (Note: we also have a guide to using social media for crisis and emergency management, if you need help on that front). Bonus: Read the step-by-step social media strategy guide with pro tips on how to grow your social media presence. 9 social media crisis management tips for businesses and brands. 1. Create a social media policy. Some of the worst social media situations start with an employee posting something inappropriate. Fortunately, these are also some of the easiest crises to avoid. The best way to prevent this type of social media crisis is to create a solid social media policy for your company. It should provide clear guidelines for appropriate use, outline expectations for branded accounts, and explain how employees can talk about your the business on their personal channels. The details of your social media policy will vary based on factors like your industry and the size of your company. Here are some subjects all social media policies should include: Copyright guidelines. Don’t assume employees understand how copyright applies online. Provide clear instructions about how to use and credit third-party content. Privacy guidelines. Specify how to interact with customers online, and when a conversation needs to move to a private channel. Confidentiality guidelines. Describe what business information employees are allowed (even encouraged) to share, and what should be kept under wraps. Brand voice guidelines. Do you maintain a formal tone? Can your social team get a little goofy? Lockheed Martin’s social team got a little too casual on social media for World Photo Day 2018. The world’s largest arms producer posted a tweet asking followers to share a photo of one of their products. The now-deleted tweet said: “Do you have an amazing photo of one of our products? Tag us in our pic and we may feature it during our upcoming #WorldPhotoDay celebration on Aug. 19!” This carefree tone from an arms manufacturer would probably have brought in some challenging replies in the best of circumstances. But just a few hours later, CNN broke a news story that a Lockheed Martin bomb has been used on an attack that killed children in Yemen. People seized on the story and started responding to Lockheed Martin’s photo request tweet with CNN’s photo of a bomb fragment from the attack. 2. When Lockheed Martin got shut down hard on #WorldPhotoDay Lockheed Martin is the world’s biggest arms manufacturer, and a top American defence contractor. This tweet received intense backlash. What a surprise ???? pic.twitter.com/traJXp9awz — [email protected] (@PerkyMarketing) October 3, 2018 Lockheed Martin’s response was basically not to respond. They simply deleted the original tweet. The challenge of trying to make a problematic post disappear is that screencaps live on in the many news stories about the blunder. Consider this an example of how not to handle a social media crisis. 2. Secure your accounts. Weak passwords and other social media security risks can quickly expose your brand to a social media crisis. In fact, employees are more likely to cause a cyber security crisis than hackers are. The more people who know your social media account passwords, the more chances there are for a security breach. Don’t share passwords among the various members of your team who need access to your social accounts. I use a centralized system like Hootsuite to control use permissions and grant the appropriate level of access. Centralizing access also allows you to revoke access for employees who leave the company or move to a role that no longer requires them to post on social. When the New York Daily News laid off half its employees, a departing member of the social team started posting strange GIFs to the paper’s Twitter account. Aww, someone deleted the .gif. But —the internet is forever! ???? pic.twitter.com/VHK8vNQgCp — Rebecca I. Allen (@rebeccaallen) July 23, 2018 The Tweets were relatively harmless. A situation like this could quickly turn into a social media crisis, though. What if the rogue employee posted confidential or inflammatory material? A similar situation happened back in 2013, when HMV laid off a large portion of its staff. The company’s Twitter feed was a play-by-play of the mass firings, beginning with “We’re tweeting live from HR where we’re all being fired! Exciting!!” But here’s the key HMV Tweet you can learn from: “Just heard our Marketing Director (he’s staying folks) ask ‘How do I shut down Twitter?’” Hey @hmvtweets – deleting the tweets and ignoring the situation doesn't mean it didn't happen: http://t.co/beiwPaMN #hmvxfactorfiring — Lily Sangster 🍝 (@lilysangster) January 31, 2013 It’s critical to have control of your social channels. Managers to know how to limit or revoke access in a social media crisis management situation. 3. Use social listening to identify potential issues. A good social listening program can help you spot an emerging issue on social media well before it turns into a crisis. Monitoring brand mentions can give you some advanced warning of a surge of social activity. But if you really want to keep an eye out for a potential social media crisis, you should be monitoring social sentiment. Social sentiment is a metric that captures how people feel about your brand. If you see a sudden change, that’s an immediate clue to start digging into your listening streams to see what people are saying about you. A sudden spike in brand mentions is always worth investigating, too. With a tool like Brandwatch, you can set alerts so you’re automatically notified if there are major changes in sentiment or volume of mentions. This gives you advance warning of a crisis while it’s still in the early stages. ZeroFOX is another great software solution for advance warning of a potential crisis. Integrated with your Hootsuite dashboard, it will: send you alerts about dangerous or offensive content targeting your brand malicious links posted on your social channels and scams targeting your business or your customers 4. Define what counts as a crisis. People are going to say rude things about you online. That’s a fact, not a crisis. But if enough people are saying the same negative things about you on social, all at the same time, that might be a crisis—or a potential crisis waiting to explode. What really identifies a social media crisis is a major negative change in the online conversation about your brand. In order to identify a change from the norm, of course, you have to know what the norm is. Your ongoing social listening work should give you a pretty clear idea of what a normal day looks like for your brand. For negative comments to count as a crisis, there also needs to be potential long-term damage to your brand. Even if a large number of people are posting negatively, it may be best to respond through customer service channels. As an organization, you should define how much of a change in sentiment you need to see before you can start thinking about the event as a potential crisis. Once the numbers hit that threshold, review the situation with the appropriate people to decide whether you should implement your crisis communication plan. On that note… Bonus: Read the step-by-step social media strategy guide with pro tips on how to grow your social media presence. Get the free guide right now! 5. Craft a crisis communication plan. A company-wide social media crisis communication plan allows you to respond quickly to any potential issue. Instead of debating how to handle things, or waiting for senior managers to weigh in, you can take action and prevent things from getting out of control. Acting fast is important. More than a quarter of crises spread internationally within just one hour. But it takes companies an average of 21 hours to defend themselves in any kind of meaningful way. That’s nearly a full day for the crisis to make the rounds on the web with no meaningful intervention from your team. On December 23, 2018, a security guard at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Portland called the police on a black hotel guest for “loitering” in the lobby while taking a phone call. The guest posted video of the event to Twitter, sparking a #boycottDoubleTree hashtag. The hotel’s first tweet after the incident was a Happy Holidays post. That post got 403 comments from angry Twitter users, with no response from the hotel. For Christmas this year, I’ll be telling all my friends to avoid your hotel, and to tell their families not to stay there when they visit. Instead of wasting time trying to ignore what happened, why don’t you fire the security guard in question and make some real changes? — Katie (@k8eesteele) December 26, 2018 It took three whole days for the hotel to even acknowledge the incident on Twitter. Yes, it was the holidays. But three days is too long. Your plan should describe the exact steps everyone will take on social media during a crisis—from top executives to the most junior employees. Include a list of who needs to be alerted at each stage of a potential social media crisis. Your social media crisis communication plan should include: Guidelines for identifying the type and magnitude of a crisis. Roles and responsibilities for every department. A communication plan for internal updates. Up-to-date contact information for critical employees. Approval processes for messaging posted on social media. Any pre-approved external messages, images, or information. A link to your social media policy. No matter how well you prepare, the nature of a crisis means you won’t be able to resolve everything with just one or two social media posts. But people expect to hear from you, and it’s important for you to acknowledge the problem right away. Even during holidays, you need to be able to respond quickly in case of an emergency. A couple of humble and informative posts buy you the time to put the rest of your social media crisis communication plan into action. Simply acknowledge that there’s a problem and let people know that more information is coming soon. 6. Pause all scheduled posts. During a social media crisis, scheduled posts will at best make you look goofy. Take, for example, this App Store tweet encouraging followers to download the New York Times cooking app. It’s a perfectly reasonable tweet to send out the day before Thanksgiving. Need some help planning your #Thanksgiving feast? Try the @NYTimes cooking app: https://t.co/zlAMOoUS3R pic.twitter.com/kfWN3H1RPG — App Store (@AppStore) November 21, 2018 One problem: Apple was facing a major outage at the time, and the App Store was down. In this case, Apple just looked a bit silly, and the tweet gave followers more ammunition to complain about the outage. In a worst-case scenario, a scheduled tweet during a crisis could completely derail your crisis management plan. It’s critical for all communication to be planned, consistent, and appropriate in tone. A scheduled post will be none of those things. With a social media scheduler like Hootsuite, pausing your scheduled social media content is as simple as clicking the pause symbol on your organization’s profile and then entering a reason for the suspension. This will keep all posts from being published until you decide it is safe to resume, and warn anyone on your team who tries to schedule new content that a publishing suspension is in effect. 7. Engage—but don’t argue. Once you’ve posted that initial response, it’s time to get key staff working on more in-depth messaging. That might mean a press release, an official statement, or a letter or video from your CEO But since we’re talking about social media, simply issuing statements won’t cut it. You’re going to have to engage with people who may be saying very negative things about you online. Keep it short. Avoid getting pulled into a long discussion of what went wrong. Instead, try to move the conversation to a more personal channel, like private messaging. You could also offer a phone number, email address, or other means of communicating outside of social media. When Johnson & Johnson faced a crisis of allegations about asbestos in its baby powder, the company created a webpage and a Twitter thread specifically addressing the main concerns people were expressing both on and off social media. The social team actively responded to concerned tweets, and referred people to the webpage for consistent information. Hello there. We understand your concerns about the headlines you’ve been seeing, and we want to put your mind at ease – our talc is safe. We are committed to the highest safety and quality standards in every Johnson’s product. Please visit https://t.co/aCzCAGe46R to learn more. — Johnson & Johnson (@JNJNews) December 29, 2018 Of course, some people will simply keep arguing with you until you stop responding. When it’s clear you’re not making progress, acknowledge the concerns and frustrations, but stop taking the bait. Getting pulled into a fight online will not improve the situation. During a social media crisis, people are watching, so you’ve simply got to take the high road. 8. Communicate internally. Communicating internally is a crucial part of your crisis management response. This keeps everyone on the same page and helps to prevent misinformation and the spread of rumors. Make sure everyone in the organization knows exactly what they should (or should not) say about the crisis on social media. Hootsuite Amplify offers an easy way to distribute pre-approved company messaging to all employees that they can share on their own social accounts. 9. Learn from the experience. Once you make it through your first social media crisis, take the time to debrief and examine what happened. Keep a detailed record of everything you did, and how well it worked. This is a good time to get the whole company together to talk about the experience you’ve all been through, and share knowledge and experiences from different teams. Maybe the customer service department had some important insight. Or maybe public relations has some new guidelines that need to be incorporated into your social media plan. Take the time to examine your social media plan. Think about anything you could add that would prevent a similar crisis from occurring in the future. And review your crisis communication plan to look for opportunities to incorporate lessons learned. Use Hootsuite to manage and monitor all your social profiles in one place. From a single dashboard you can see what people are saying about your brand and respond accordingly. Permission, compliance, and security features will also come in handy when handling or mitigating any PR crisis. Try it free today! Get Started Show Comments x Wait! Your team needs help on social media. See how you can save time, work smarter, and improve results. Book a Hootsuite demo that’s tailored to your needs and find out why we’re trusted by big and small companies all over the world. Book Your Free Demo Now No commitment whatsoever
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TitleFive Steps To Effectively Use Social Media For Crisis Management
Urlhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/theyec/2020/03/25/five-steps-to-effectively-use-social-media-for-crisis-management/
DescriptionConsidering the complexities of the ever-changing rules of crisis PR engagement, companies must be proactive and prepared with emergency social media strategies and protocols in advance
Date25 Mar 2020
Organic Position3
H1Five Steps To Effectively Use Social Media For Crisis Management
H2
H3More From Forbes
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BodyFive Steps To Effectively Use Social Media For Crisis ManagementYECCOUNCIL POSTExpertise from Forbes Councils members, operated under license. Opinions expressed are those of the author.| Membership (fee-based)EntrepreneursPOST WRITTEN BYEvan NiermanFounder and CEO of Red Banyan - a strategic PR and crisis communications firm that serves clients around the world.Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to Linkedin Getty Getty Nearly every public relations (PR) crisis that arises will affect an organization’s online strategy in some way. But not all situations require you to engage in the use of social media. This is a unique kind of online and reputation protection PR that calls for a different approach and keen understanding of how different forms of social media can best be used to disseminate information. The increase in significance and use of social media makes it a key element of most crisis management plans. Sending out basic press releases and issuing statements on a company’s website no longer suffice when it comes to meeting the expectations of today’s modern consumers. To be effective in their crisis response, companies must utilize a variety of communications channels, with social media as a top priority. When your company is faced with a crisis, your social media strategy must be adjusted accordingly and as expeditiously as possible. It is essential to avoid mixing crisis updates with other marketing and promotional content that may have been scheduled prior to the incident, as they may no longer be relevant or hold priority. Yet, there are some cases where crisis management is best handled offline without involving social media. For example, if a crisis is minor or internal, it will impact a limited number of stakeholders and is unlikely to gain widespread media attention, and an emergency social media strategy may not be needed. Additionally, bringing an internal crisis to light via social media can often result in keeping the online conversation going, affecting your search engine optimization (SEO) efforts and allowing more negative information to infiltrate your online brand. Thus, unless it is necessary and assuredly beneficial, it is best to avoid this altogether. When developing your crisis PR strategy, it is critical to understand how the information is going to be dispersed. Assign individuals on your team to constantly monitor online conversations during and after any crisis. Educating and aligning members of your team on how to handle these situations and who to report to can help prevent the problem from spreading and leads to easier decision-making in the future. Considering the complexities of the ever-changing rules of crisis PR engagement, companies must be proactive and prepared with emergency social media strategies and protocols in advance. This way, if an unexpected crisis occurs and calls for immediate action, you will be positioned to use social media as a robust tool that can help you move beyond the turmoil. To recap, here are five tips to be more effective at using social media during a PR crisis. 1. Assign roles. Designate individuals responsible for your company’s communications efforts to constantly monitor and engage in online conversations. 2. Make a hashtag for your crisis. When a company is hit with negative PR from a crisis, it is very likely that people will turn to social media to ask questions and gather information on what happened. Creating a hashtag that is simple and intuitive will make it easier for people to find the crisis, ask questions and share your updates. 3. Engage your audience. Engaging the public helps you to maintain control of the conversation, keeping rumors and speculation at bay. Make sure that you respond to questions you receive and refer people to your company website for additional information. Additionally, reach out to reporters and influencers in your industry to keep them up to date on your crisis as it progresses. This is one way of controlling the narrative. 4. Keep the conversation fresh. When responding to people’s comments or questions, do not use dry corporate statements. Such responses could come across as inauthentic, dismissive or detached from the concerns of your stakeholders and the public. This is the time to ensure you are using a conversational tone. Be honest, transparent and compassionate with your audience. 5. Monitor, monitor, monitor. The list reiterates this point because it is particularly crucial. Monitoring your company’s social mentions is generally a good idea, but it is absolutely critical during a PR crisis. Keeping an eye on your mentions will provide information about both the negative and positive things people are saying about your company. The primary goal should always be for your organization to contribute to the conversation and, in doing so, control the narrative of your crisis. Times of crisis are also moments of opportunity. By employing the steps outlined here, you and your organization will be better prepared to weather the storm of any crisis. YECPrintReprints & Permissions
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Title5 Tips for Managing a Social Media Crisis | Social Media Today
Urlhttps://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/5-tips-for-managing-a-social-media-crisis/551770/
DescriptionSocial Media Today
Date2 Apr 2019
Organic Position4
H15 Tips for Managing a Social Media Crisis
H2Company Announcements
H31. Create a Social Media Policy
2. Listen to Catch Issues Early
3. Establish a Crisis Communications Plan
4. Pause Scheduled Posts
5. Acknowledge, but Don’t Argue
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Body5 Tips for Managing a Social Media Crisis Published April 2, 2019 By Lucy Rendler-Kaplan Founder Fabian Irsara via Unsplash Turn on the news, scroll through Twitter or chat with a friend these days, and you're likely to hear about yet another brand or individual suffering yet another social media-induced crisis of some kind. It seems that every day, every hour, there's some other social media disaster. Does this mean that brands are suddenly behaving more poorly, or is this the state of how we live now? We know that the main power of social media is amplification, and that means that both good and bad news are stories more widely shared than ever before. And admit it - when you see a brand suffering the wrath of tweetstorms, it's tough to look away. From tasteless tweets, to images shared on Facebook that never should have even been created, much less posted on our favorite fast-food page, social media crisis management has never been more important. It's now more of a “when” than an “if,” crisis’ are going to happen - and you know what they say, “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” So how can you plan for a crisis you don’t see coming? Here are some tips: 1. Create a Social Media Policy. Make sure you have a documented social media policy. When you have clear guidelines for your employees on what to post - and what to never even consider posting - you lessen the risk of someone going rogue and sending your social media profiles into a tailspin. 2. Listen to Catch Issues Early. Utilize social listening to get ahead of potential issues. Done well and consistently, social listening can help prevent issues from turning into full-blown crises. By listening intently, you can gauge how people are feeling about your brand, and over time, you'll understand the difference between grumblings and a significant change in sentiment towards your business. If you suddenly see a sharp increase in brand mentions, you'll notice that right away as well. 3. Establish a Crisis Communications Plan. Having this before you need it, will enable you to respond quickly, before anything gets out of hand. The key to managing a social media crisis is timeliness - your goal should be to respond within an hour of the crisis being spread. Your social media communication plan should include: How you'll internally communicate what is happening How you'll determine what's actually a crisis and not simply a disgruntled consumer Approval process for what you'll post on social media Pre-approved external messaging A link to your social media policy Who'll do what, and when (per department) No matter how well you plan, don’t expect to resolve the issue with a few well-timed posts. The most important point to keep in mind is that people will be looking to you for a response, and you need to be across it as quickly as possible. As a first point, this can be as simple as acknowledging that there's a problem, and letting people know that more information will be coming soon. 4. Pause Scheduled Posts. Stop any posts you have pre-scheduled. Nothing says, “We don’t care what you think” more than silly memes or posts in the middle of something serious happening. This will only make your brand look tone deaf and insensitive. 5. Acknowledge, but Don’t Argue. Queen Gertrude said it best in Hamlet: "The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” Defending yourself too early, or angrily responding in the moment, will just create doubt of your sincerity. If you've already posted that you'll be responding soon, you have time to create a video or official company statement. In the meantime, keep your responses as short as you can, and try to stay away from getting baited into another tweetstorm of what went wrong. If people persist in trying to get you to engage further before you're ready, look to steer the conversation into direct messages, email or a phone call outside of social media. Keep in mind that more people will now be watching your pages than ever before, and stay on the high road, even if it gets lonely Don’t... Prematurely delete comments that are negative Block anyone who disagrees with, or is unhappy with you Take things personally and lose your brand voice When you’ve come out the other side, learn... What started the crisis? How can we stop that from happening again? What can we do better next time? What worked well this time? Mistakes happen, and more brands will see a social media crisis occur than those who don’t. The key lies in responding quickly, and in a transparent way which shows your customers, and prospective customers, that you truly care about them, and are willing to go the extra mile to prove you are the brand they think you are. These tips will help steer you in the right direction. Follow Lucy Rendler-Kaplan on Twitter post share tweet print email Filed Under: Digital Strategy, Social Marketing Social Media Today news delivered to your inbox. Get the free daily newsletter read by industry experts Editors' pick . Retrieved from Adam Mosseri/Instagram on January 06, 2022 Instagram Launches Initial Test of Algorithm-Free, Reverse Chronological Feed Options In-Stream . Instagram's new, reverse-chronological feed toggle is coming - but is it really a valuable improvement? By Andrew Hutchinson • Jan. 5, 2022 Social Media Today news delivered to your inbox. Get the free daily newsletter read by industry experts Company Announcements. View all | Post a press release Want to share a company announcement with your peers? Share your announcement ➔ Read next Retrieved from Adam Mosseri/Instagram on January 06, 2022 Instagram Launches Initial Test of Algorithm-Free, Reverse Chronological Feed Options In-Stream . Instagram's new, reverse-chronological feed toggle is coming - but is it really a valuable improvement? By Andrew Hutchinson • Jan. 5, 2022 Latest in Digital Strategy Instagram Turns on IG Live Badges by Default for Eligible Creators By Andrew Hutchinson Pinterest Adds 'Profiles' Tab to Search Results to Better Highlight Pin Creators By Andrew Hutchinson Twitter Adds Spaces Replay Stats for Recorded Broadcasts By Andrew Hutchinson © 2022 Industry Dive. All rights reserved. | View our other publications | Privacy policy | Terms of use | Take down policy. We use cookies to optimize your experience on our website and for analytics and advertising purposes. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Learn more Accept
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Result 7
TitleHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis in 9 Simple Steps
Urlhttps://www.convinceandconvert.com/social-media-strategy/dont-be-scared-be-prepared-how-to-manage-a-social-media-crisis/
DescriptionHere are the 9 steps to successfully managing a social media crisis. This is the social media crisis management playbook I hope you never need
Date
Organic Position5
H1Don’t Be Scared, Be Prepared: How to Manage a Social Media Crisis
H2Other Top Articles
13 Words You Never Use When Replying to a Customer
H31. Buy Some Binoculars — Set Up a Listening Program
2. Know What Is and Is Not a Crisis
A social media crisis is a decisive change from the norm
A social media crisis has a potentially material impact on the company overall
A social media crisis can indirectly impact more than one company
3. Use an Internal Alert and Response Flowchart
1. Pause All Outbound Messages
2. Acknowledge An Issue
3. Create a Crisis FAQ Page
4. Start Responding in Social Media
5. Use Visual Signals that Inform
6. Build a Pressure Relief Valve
7. Remember the Response Rule of Two
8. Arm Your Army
9. Learn Your Lessons
Get our best tips. Join the smartest marketers who receive our twice monthly update
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BodyDon’t Be Scared, Be Prepared: How to Manage a Social Media Crisis Authors: Jay Baer Jay Baer is the founder of Convince & Convert, a Hall of Fame keynote speaker and emcee, host of the award-winning Social Pros podcast, and the author of six books including Talk Triggers: The Complete Guide to Creating Customers with Word of Mouth. View All Posts Follow jaybaer Lauren Teague Follow @@LaurenTee Lauren is a digital strategist with extensive social media experience. She has worked with a range of media startups, established non-profits, professional sports leagues, teams, and athletes. Lauren leads social media strategy for C&C and also contributes to the social media strategies, processes and measurement recommendations for our clients. View All Posts Posted Under: Greatest Hits, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Strategy The worst time to start planning for a social media crisis is when you’re in the middle of one. Click To TweetThe worst time to start planning for a crisis is when you’re in the middle of one. Pre-crisis planning is key to successful social media crisis mitigation. This is lifeguard mode, and there are three elements to it.1. Buy Some Binoculars — Set Up a Listening Program. It’s hard to deal with a social media crisis you can’t find. You can most effectively monitor conversations and stay aware of crises with a social media listening tool, but you can also monitor chatter by setting up keyword searches and Google Alerts.Technology is only as good as its operators. You must have a listening protocol in your organization. Who is listening to social? When are they listening? For what are they listening? Who is covering nights and weekends?2. Know What Is and Is Not a Crisis. Somebody sending a mean tweet or two about your company doesn’t constitute a crisis. When the volume of public outcry starts gaining speed like a boulder down a mountain before your company has a chance to gather its druthers, then its time to activate crisis mode.When identifying a crisis, here are three things to watch for:A social media crisis is a decisive change from the norm.Nike and Chick-Fil-A are routinely criticized for company ethics; however, social chatter about that is ongoing and expected. That’s not a crisis. When a markedly different line of criticism occurs, that’s the first marker of a social media crisis.A social media crisis has a potentially material impact on the company overall.Somebody tweeting about how Subway left mustard off his or her sandwich isn’t a crisis. Consistent reports of food poisoning from Subway is. Scope and scale are the second markers of a social media crisis.A social media crisis can indirectly impact more than one company.When weather events occur or breaking news happens, companies are forced into reacting to a crisis situation to which they didn’t contribute. Having a plan in place allows them to be ready to respond when the moments really count. When the company does not know any more than the public about what’s going on, that’s information asymmetry – the third marker of a social media crisis.3. Use an Internal Alert and Response Flowchart. Not all crises have the same response teams. The more acute the issue, the more senior the responder.Create a crisis flowchart that specifies who in your organization should be contacted in different scenarios.Make certain that your front line social media and customer service personnel keep detailed, up-to-date, contact information (including home phones) for all executives.This is also where – depending on the size and complexity of your organization – you may want to work with legal to map out some processes and pre-approved messaging. Crisis role-playing and fire drills are exceptionally useful too.You’ve completed your lifeguard training. Now, what happens when a crisis occurs?Here are the 9 steps to successfully managing a social media crisis.1. Pause All Outbound Messages. If there’s even a hint of a crisis or public storm building, immediately pause all scheduled content queued to post to your social media channels. Notify any social care representatives to shift to monitor-only mode. This can prevent their innocent attempts to respond before the company is ready to make a statement.2. Acknowledge An Issue. Your first response should always be “yes, we realize something has happened” even if you have ZERO answers. This will stem the tide of “hey company, did you know?” messages, and give the response team a chance to activate and gather information.Respond in the place where the crisis first occurs. If it starts on Facebook, post your first response to Facebook then determine where to go next.3. Create a Crisis FAQ Page. Determine where the focal point will be for all communications about the crisis.Create a landing page or microsite on the website, or designate a single social media channel and put all the information about the crisis in one place. This allows you to respond to questions with a link instead of an answer. This saves time and prevents misinterpretation of your responses (especially on Twitter).Update all bio links to point to the crisis FAQ.This Crisis FAQ should include:Acknowledgment of the crisisDetails about the occurrencePhotos and/or videos, if availableHow the company found outWho was alerted when and howSpecific actions taken in responseReal or potential effectsSteps taken to prevent future occurrenceContact information for real people at the companyIt probably goes without saying, but speed matters.What we ask our clients here at Convince & Convert is simple yet difficult. “Can you get a video online from your CEO within 4 hours, any time of the day or night, from anywhere in the world?” If the answer is no, you aren’t fully prepared.4. Start Responding in Social Media. Once the information is collected and a central FAQ hub is designated, it’s time to roll up the sleeves and let people know you’re in for the long haul. Publish to all active social media accounts a post that identifies:A summary of the situationAn immediate call to actionLink to FAQ hub for further updatesRelevant hashtags to help disseminate infoSafety tips or checklists, if applicableEstimated time of interruption or eventUse boosted posts or paid amplification if it’s necessary for the post to reach specific audiences ASAP. Choose a limited duration ad or boost to reach the maximum amount of people in as little time as possible.As the crisis continues, keep updated posts together in social media.Use Twitter threads to connect new posts to old posts and use hashtags consistently to spread the messages broadly. Update existing posts (from the top down) rather than create new posts on Facebook. Use Instagram Stories rather than the main feed to show progress over time.5. Use Visual Signals that Inform. Use visuals and graphics along with words to signal a change in standard operating procedure. These images can be deployed across social media accounts as a secondary way to keep audiences informed. Display names on Twitter and Instagram are easy to change. So are profile and cover images.When tragedy struck on a Southwest Airlines flight after an engine explosion, @SouthwestAir updated all social media profile images to a simple white or gray icon. It was a powerful cue; one that was done in relative silence.6. Build a Pressure Relief Valve. This may be counterintuitive, but you WANT people to vent on a venue you control.Whether it’s your Facebook page, blog, forum or comments section on your Crisis FAQ microsite, you want ire to accumulate on your turf. There are four benefits to this approach:It allows you to keep more of the conversations about the crisis in a single venue, making them easier to track.It’s an early warning detection system for new dimensions of the crisis.It gives your customers an official place to come to your defense (sometimes).When your turf is the conversational boxing ring, you set the rules.If you do not proactively provide a pressure relief valve, complainants will create their own, giving you no recourse or control whatsoever.To their credit, Penn State University used their Facebook wall as a pressure relief valve during the height of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, allowing hundreds of angry comments to be posted. But, because it was on their Facebook page, they could see, find, moderate (as necessary) and answer back. Smart. 7. Remember the Response Rule of Two. Social media crisis management isn’t about winning, it’s about damage control. Some people will be angry enough that you’re not going to convince them of anything.Do not get in an online tit for tat, ever (and certainly not in a crisis scenario). Crisis management is a spectator sport.The Hug Your Haters response rule of two is to respond only twice, publicly. Give the agitator two responses, but no more. This demonstrates to anyone watching that you attempted to engage in a productive, constructive way, but also knew when to walk away.Move conversations that are likely to be resolved to an offline channel (direct message, email, phone) after the second response.8. Arm Your Army. We know where everyone works because it’s listed on their Facebook and Linkedin profiles. If you wanted more information about the Southwest Airlines crisis, would you call their corporate communications department and wait on hold or would you go to Linkedin and find ANYONE at Southwest to whom you had a connection. Bingo!Call centers and waiting on hold are for suckers, and every employee is a potential spokesperson. That’s why it’s imperative that you keep ALL employees informed about the crisis.Whether it’s email, text message, internal blog, Slack or similar, you must keep your employees at least as knowledgeable as the public.9. Learn Your Lessons. After the crisis subsides, and you’ve dried the tears off your laptop, reconstruct and deconstruct the crisis.Document every facet:Make copies of all tweets, status updates, blog comments, etc.Make copies of all emailsAnalyze website traffic patternsAnalyze search volume patternsWhere did the crisis break and when? Where did it spread and how?How did your internal notification work?How did your response protocol work?Did specific customers rise to your defense? (thank them!)Were your employees informed?How did the online crisis intersect with offline coverage (if any)?There you have it. The social media crisis management playbook that I hope you never need. If you’d like to put a customized crisis plan together for your company, let us know. We can help. While You're hereGet our best tips. Join the smartest marketers who receive our twice monthly update. Article ContinuesWhile You're hereOther Top Articles. Convince & Convert Podcast, Social Media Case Studies, Social Media Marketing6 Unforgettable Lessons from Southwest Airlines Social Media Crisis . Jay Baer Convince & Convert Podcast, Digital Marketing4 SEO Tactics That Damage Your Brand’s Reputation . Tony Delmercado Social Media Marketing, Social Media Strategy5 Reputation Management Lessons from Prince, Dell and Beyond . Geoff LivingstonArticle Continues 13 Words You Never Use When Replying to a Customer. Are you throwing gas on your own fire? Too often, we use the wrong words when interacting with customers. Our short eBook spotlights the phrases your customers hate, and how to change them. 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Result 8
TitleFive tips for social media crisis management
Urlhttps://cipr.co.uk/CIPR/Learn_Develop/Training/Blogs/Five_tips_for_social_media_crisis_management.aspx
Description
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Result 9
TitleCan Social Media Help In A PR Crisis?
Urlhttps://www.social-republic.co.uk/blog/can-social-media-help-in-a-pr-crisis/
DescriptionIn this blog we outline how social media can help in a PR crisis. Read more. ... Social media allows your brand to control the narrative.
Date21 Apr 2021
Organic Position7
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TitleHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Step-by-step Guide - Later Blog
Urlhttps://later.com/blog/social-media-crisis/
DescriptionIs your brand prepared to manage a crisis on social media? To help, we're sharing how to manage your brand’s social media during a crisis
Date4 Aug 2021
Organic Position8
H1How to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Step-by-step Guide
H25 Steps to Manage Social Media During a Crisis
Stay on top of the biggest social media marketing trends!
RELATED ARTICLES
H3Step #1: Create a Social Media Crisis Policy
Step #2: Pause All Campaigns and Scheduled Posts
Step #4: Workshop Your Response
Step #5: Create Actionable Steps to Address the Problem
Lindsay Ashcraft
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H2WithAnchors5 Steps to Manage Social Media During a Crisis
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BodyHow to Manage a Social Media Crisis: A Step-by-step GuideBy Lindsay Ashcraft•Published August 4, 2021•5 minute readIs your brand prepared to manage a crisis on social media? A "crisis" can be any event that negatively impacts your brand’s reputation — and when they hit, you often have little to no warning.Share SubscribeStay on top of the biggest social media marketing trends!Is your brand prepared to manage a crisis on social media?A "crisis" can be any event that negatively impacts your brand’s reputation — and when they hit, you often have little to no warning.And with social media moving at lightning speed, effective crisis management can be the difference between a few negative comments and a viral boycott.5 Steps to Manage Social Media During a Crisis . Create a Social Media Crisis PolicyPause All Campaigns and Scheduled PostsAssess the Impact (aka read the room)Formulate a Timely ResponseCreate Actionable Steps to Address the ProblemStep #1: Create a Social Media Crisis Policy. Before you create your social media crisis policy, it's important to identify what qualifies as a crisis.For example, you won’t need a full-blown response every time a disgruntled customer tags you, but it’s vital to recognize a problem before it escalates too far.Brainstorm with your team to discuss when something should be flagged as a potential crisis and escalated to the relevant decision makers.Make sure to identify who those decision makers will be well in advance. It’s key to choose those who have experience working in communications, as they’ll be responsible for crafting a response strategy.By confirming this in advance, you'll save precious time when implementing your action plan.For example, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the world was adjusting to lockdown, the Later social team worked closely with our PR Manager to draft a statement acknowledging how this was not “business as usual.” View this post on Instagram A post shared by Later: Visual Social Marketing (@latermedia)We then refocused our social strategy to better serve our audience during a period of uncertainty.When sensitive issues arise, it can also help to have a revised approval process in place. Knowing what this sign-off process looks like in advance can save you valuable time, and will make sure nothing slips through the net.Step #2: Pause All Campaigns and Scheduled Posts . When a potential crisis has been flagged, pause all advertising campaigns and scheduled posts (temporarily) until you are ready to reply.There’s nothing worse than appearing insensitive or salesy when the moment calls for a more tactful response.Plus, it’s better to be a little late to the party with the right message, than find yourself sharing pre-scheduled content that further fuels a negative reaction from your audience.TIP: Manage all your social media posts (Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, and TikTok!) from Later's easy-to-use dashboard. It's free! Step #3: Read the Room and Assess the ImpactThe best thing you can do during a crisis is to take a quick beat to “read the room.”If it’s a larger scale event, such as a global or cultural movement, take the time to observe what’s being said online.If it’s an internal situation, take stock of the scenario, consider all the possible implications, and revisit any previous communications (if applicable) that you can you learn from.While a timely response is vital, you don’t want to miss the mark on your first message -- it’s what most people will remember.TIP: Set up social listening so you can stay on top of conversations about your brand and address issues before they escalate. Later’s Conversations feature lets you monitor what customers are saying -- right from your desktop.Step #4: Workshop Your Response. Once you’ve had a moment to assess the situation, you can start workshopping a timely response.While it’s important not to rush and regret, you typically want to respond within 24 hours."During sensitive times it's more important than ever to respond to comments and DMs from your community. It can be a make-or-break moment of trust for your audience that they will remember forever." - Mel Mckechnie, Manager of Social Media at LaterWhen approaching conversations on your social channels, check your mindset. The key is to listen and let your audience know that you value their opinions and appreciate their feedback.It may feel natural to take a defensive stance, but this can often do more harm than good --  generating more criticism and negativity.Step #5: Create Actionable Steps to Address the Problem. You’ve dealt with the crisis and things are settling down on social media -- panic over.But now it’s time for the follow-through.Successful crisis management means being transparent with your audience and actively communicating changes within your company.This means going beyond an apology or shifting content for the week -- you’ll need to dig deeper.Most people don’t expect a brand to change overnight, but savvy audiences are increasingly demanding accountability from the brands they support or purchase from.Managing any type of crisis on social media can be stressful. But being prepared with the right action plan means you can respond swiftly and get back your peace of mind.Take the time to solidify your crisis plan today so your brand is ready for whatever comes tomorrow.Sign up for the Later newsletter and stay up to date on all the best social media practices -- delivered straight to your inbox.    ABOUT THE AUTHORLindsay Ashcraft. Lindsay is a Social Media Coordinator at Later based in Northern California. You can usually find her wandering around farmers markets or scheming up her next trip. Follow her adventures: @lindsay.ashcraft.Stay on top of the biggest social media marketing trends!RELATED ARTICLES. Category Instagram•10 min readThe Best Time to Post on Instagram in 2022, According to 35 Million Posts. By Jillian WarrenCategory Instagram•16 min readThe Ultimate Guide to Scheduling Instagram Posts. By Benjamin ChaconCategory Instagram•13 min readThis is How the Instagram Algorithm Works in 2022. 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Result 11
Title[Updated] 11 steps for PR Crisis Management - Talkwalker
Urlhttps://www.talkwalker.com/blog/pr-crisis-management
DescriptionPR crisis management guide - you can’t avoid a crisis, but you can minimize the damage. Here’s how to handle - avoidance tactics, free templates, brand examples
Date
Organic Position9
H111 steps for PR Crisis Management
H2Table of contents
What is a PR crisis?
When is a crisis a crisis?
What's consumer sentiment?
Which PR crises demand action?
COVID-19 crisis communication
How to avoid a PR crisis
11 steps to manage a PR crisis
PR crisis management tools
What not to do in a crisis!
Takeway
H3PR crisis level 1
PR crisis level 2
PR crisis level 3
We’re confused
We’re scared
We’re angry
We’re reacting
Implement rules for content
Always expect the unexpected
More haste, less speed
Prepare for a crisis
Build a crisis response team
Create your PR crisis management plan
Create holding statement templates
Communication & intelligence analysis
Identify influencers & brand ambassadors
Get the facts before you speak
Accept responsibility & apologize
Write your PR crisis messages
Choose your channels of distribution
Post-crisis review
Talkwalker Alerts | Supercharged Google Alerts
Virality Maps | Watch a PR crisis spread
Influencer Network | Find influencers that impact
Video Analytics | Protect your logo
Image recognition | Protect your reputation
H2WithAnchorsTable of contents
What is a PR crisis?
When is a crisis a crisis?
What's consumer sentiment?
Which PR crises demand action?
COVID-19 crisis communication
How to avoid a PR crisis
11 steps to manage a PR crisis
PR crisis management tools
What not to do in a crisis!
Takeway
Body11 steps for PR Crisis Management By Meg - November 02, 2021 Do you get a buzz from PR crisis management? I do, but don’t tell! Panic gets you nowhere, while balance keeps your brand on track. Diffuse the situation, and potentially you can turn a minus into a plus. My 11 steps for handling a PR crisis, walks you through before, during, and after a crisis. Ready to save your brand? Get Your Free PR Crisis eBookDownload my free PR Crisis Management eBook. Real-life PR crisis examples, expert advice, crisis tools, and templates to help you navigate a crisis.Every company should be prepared for the inevitable public relations crisis - data breach, executive scandal, negative review, failed event, badly planned marketing campaign. Yep, it happens to us all. Hit by a PR crisis, you’ll need a fast and carefully crafted response. We’re talking damage limitation, folks. It’s about protecting your brand reputation.You’ll need a PR crisis communication plan and team in place, BEFORE you need them. That’s not to say that when it happens, there’s nothing else to do.A crisis will be a surprise. How you plan to respond, really can't be. You’ll need holding statements, trained spokespeople, social media monitoring, crisis alerts, role play, and more.BTW, this PR guide has been updated with some pointers on tackling crisis communication during the COVID-19 pandemic.Let’s get you locked and loaded...Table of contents. What is a PR crisis? When is a crisis a crisis? What's consumer sentiment? Which PR crises demand action? COVID-19 crisis communication How to avoid a PR crisis 11 steps to manage a PR crisis PR crisis management tools What not to do in a crisis! PR crisis eBook What is a PR crisis?The definition of a PR crisis?An organization or an individual receiving negative, humiliating, damaging publicity.PR crises are serious. Disruptive. Damaging. The growing popularity of social media means that a crisis can go viral, in an instant.Trying to stop a crisis going viral online, is akin to herding kittens.Taco Bell underestimated the power of social media when a video was posted of an employee calling the police when a deaf man tried to order food at a drive-thru. The video has received over 1.7M views, and 14K+ comments. Needless to say, the majority are negative. It was shared 27K+ times, with the number still rising.The video was posted by the mother of the victim.The employee has since been fired and staff were retrained.Let’s take a look at the sentiment during the first month after it was posted...Quick Search sentiment analysis. Ouch!For brands, the potential for crises has increased. No longer restricted to a natural disaster or a corporate scandal. In this digital age - where, let’s face it, we’re online all the time - brands have to contend with fake news, cyberattacks, defamatory rumors, hackers.We’re online. We share our outrage.How on earth can a brand predict and control a PR crisis?I Want My Free PR Crisis eBook now!Don't wait until it's too late, my free PR crisis management eBook will help you control a crisis and diminish its power.When is a crisis a crisis?Not every issue is a crisis…Before panic sets in, ask yourself... Will this issue critically affect my company’s workflow or send the board into a frenzy? Will our bottom line be disrupted? Will our brand's reputation be damaged - stakeholders, customers, prospects, industry? You might think that any of the above would constitute a PR disaster. But, you’d ride them, if they occurred separately. Even a couple of them hitting simultaneously, would be manageable. All three?PR CRISIS!Before we talk about a full-blown crisis, let’s take a step back. Overreacting will only heighten a potential issue.Not every issue is a crisis…A negative review, a mocking social media post. These aren’t crises. Annoying, certainly. Reacting to them too strongly, can increase the potential for reputational damage. It can turn them into a PR crisis.To determine the appropriate response, you need to categorize issues. Social media listening will help you recognize an issue that could explode into a PR crisis.What's consumer sentiment?Look. Listen. Learn.How do consumers currently feel about your brand?If you can’t answer this question, how will you know if sentiment is shifting? Establish the average volume threshold of negative mentions for your brand with sentiment analysis tools. If you see a shift towards negativity, consider it a warning. You could be heading into a PR crisis situation.Don’t stop monitoring. Running sentiment analysis during a crisis will determine how your customers, influencers, prospects, and your industry are reacting. How they’re reacting will carry significant weight and if negative, could harm your brand. Targeted responses would work well.Having a comprehensive consumer intelligence strategy will help you understand how customers feel at every touchpoint in their journey.Which PR crises demand action?There are three levels of PR crises that would require a swift and well-planned response from you...PR crisis level 1. Level 1 has the potential to become a damaging PR crisis. Your brand will struggle to walk away unscathed. Product recall - defective and/or unsafe goods Workplace harassment - intimidating, offensive, abusive, discriminating behavior Corporate impropriety - deception, theft, fraud, negligence, corruption, poor customer service You’ll face negative media mentions across the board - press, social media, news channels, tv, and radio. Your response has to be multichannel. Post your apology and explanation on your website, across social media, press, and broadcast.PR crisis management plan? No question.PR crisis level 2. Less scary, but don’t ignore level 2. Customer complaints and criticisms can be dealt with quickly, before they become a major crisis. Depending on where the comments appeared, you can determine whether the issue can be handled one-to-one or publicly.Monitor with social listening to catch early and respond quickly.PR crisis level 3. If one of your competitors or related industries experiences a crisis, it could tarnish your brand reputation. By association.The solution is competitive intelligence. You’re already monitoring your social media channels - I hope - so monitor those of your competitors too. If you get a sniff of a potential issue, post a statement fast. Put distance between your brand and this looming crisis.Track your competitors - listen to the chatter.Download Your Free PR Crisis eBookCOVID-19 crisis communication. This guide is constantly updated with new insights and analysis, so it would be remiss of me to ignore the COVID-19 pandemic and the effect it had on crisis communication...None of us saw COVID-19 coming, how devastating it would be, and the fact that we’ll likely be living with the consequences for years to come.Since the pandemic was declared in March 2020, we’ve witnessed a heartbreaking death toll, unemployment, civil unrest, increased fake news, vaccine controversy, businesses going under. We’ve suffered lockdowns, restrictions, isolation, quarantines, endless tests..Crisis communication has become an essential part of every business strategy. From your local brick and mortar store, to major brands.People are reacting quickly, often angry and aggressive. Add social media to the mix, and monitoring your social media accounts is essential. Brands should use social listening software to monitor online conversations so they can identify potential explosive situations, and respond quickly to avoid a reputation damaging PR crisis.Anyone else feel as though we’re sitting on a powder keg?Crisis PR experts are in high demand as brands look to enterprise risk management strategies, damage limitation, and reputation management. Crisis communication has always been a must, but I’m going to highlight why now in particular, the need is growing…We’re confused. One day we’re going to work, socialising with mates, and seeing our families. The next… we’re stuck at home, talking to our boss, work colleagues, friends, and family via our computers. Ordering our weekly shop online. Endlessly streaming movies to fill the hours. Jumping on social media to find out the latest news, air our grievances, or learn new dance routines.PR experts should create clear messaging that helps us cope with the confusion surrounding us. Share relevant information and news updates that clarify the current status. We’re scared. Global unemployment skyrocketed during the pandemic. With it estimated to exceed 200 million in 2022. Sat at home, worrying about our future, we’ve used social media as a platform on which to vent our fears. With brands fighting online fires every day, it’s down to public relations specialists to help us deal with heightened emotions. Offering support and comfort where they can.We’re angry. Worn down by lockdowns, working from home, shopping for food online. Restrictions lifted. Restrictions reinforced. Wear a mask. Don’t wear a mask. Our moods are boiling over. Crisis communication teams should manage online conversations and take the heat out of them. Listen to what we’re asking for and meet our demands. Make our lives simpler. We’re reacting. Moving online during the pandemic has changed consumer behavior. We expect more from brands. Personalization, easy purchasing, home delivery… a better customer experience.If we see brands failing to meet our demands - our expectations - we’ll voice our frustration. Loudly, on social media. To protect their online reputation, brands need their crisis response team to take control of negative conversations and turn the sentiment around.How to avoid a PR crisis. You can’t. However, you can minimize the damage and manage a PR crisis if you identify risks early. There are things you can look out for that if caught early, can be dealt with.Implement rules for content. Social media messages, blog posts, press releases, interviews, etc. Nothing should be released that hasn’t been checked and approved. Nothing.Establish guidelines for everything you post. Social media guidelines will help your brand avoid blunders. They need to be flexible, to allow for changes. These social best practices will guide your team, your company voice, the language you use. Guidelines will give context to your social media strategy. A social media policy is stricter. Your team should follow the policy, no question. A comprehensive policy will help you avoid legal issues and security problems. It’ll explain how your team should behave online. It’ll protect your brand’s reputation. You're gonna love me. I have two handy checklists to help you out, Social media messaging checklist, and Social media checklist. Use together, and you'll be able to find your tone of voice, write punchy messages that resonate with your audience, and analyze results. Proof, and proof againYou’re not just looking for spelling mistakes. You’re checking for leaks of company information and inappropriate content that will offend. Your PR crisis management social media plan should protect against anything that could potentially rock the boat.Don’t be offensive!How many times have you seen brands overstepping the mark with their messaging? It’s quite simple. Involve other people and ask their opinion? If you’re in any doubt. Pull it.Remember this? . @hm, have you lost your damned minds?!?!?! pic.twitter.com/EYuCXLZtv3 — Charles M. Blow (@CharlesMBlow) January 8, 2018Who in their right mind… BTW - Charles is a New York Times columnist with 494K followers!Lose the fat fingers! Black Friday **** Need copy and link**** — McDonald's (@McDonaldsCorp) November 24, 2017The tweet remained up for several hours, without further enlightenment.McDonald’s tried to dig itself out of a hole. Failing miserably when Wendy’s jumped onboard! When the tweets are as broken as the ice cream machine. https://t.co/esdndK1iFm — Wendy's (@Wendys) November 24, 2017Wendy’s wiped the smile off Ronald’s face.Don’t be stupid!The CEO of PepsiCo - parent company of Doritos - claimed that women “don’t like to crunch too loudly in public. They don’t lick their fingers generously, and they don’t like to pour the little broken pieces and the flavor into their mouth.” Hello, have we met?Worth pointing out that the PepsiCo CEO is a WOMAN!Fair play to Doritos. The brand killed this ridiculous product suggestion. We already have Doritos for women — they’re called Doritos, and they’re loved by millions. — Doritos (@Doritos) February 6, 2018But, not without a heap of well-deserved ridiculing.These muted handbag snacks never saw the light of day.Always expect the unexpected. The unpredictability of a PR crisis makes it difficult to be prepared. Would you have seen these coming?Unpredictable management behaviorThe CEO’s increasingly erratic behavior peaked, with a pot and whisky fueled interview, ONLINE. It went viral. OF COURSE. Stocks plummeted. Key executives quit.Stone me, Musk pulled a blinder!I’ll remind you at this point that what you don’t want to go viral… WILL GO VIRAL!Twitter CEO, Jack Dorsey, once said that Elon Musk is the most exciting and influential leader on Twitter. We decided to investigate, and published Tesla’s marketing strategy shows that it’s time for CEOs to get social. Take a look and learn how a social media superstar rocks his Twitter account.Fries and ratsFries and a rat with your burger?No joke. A burger restaurant in Delaware introduced a new special to its menu. One eagle-eyed customer caught the product launch on video and posted it online, where it was shared, again, and again, and again.Just... eewwwwww!More haste, less speed. Yes, time is of the essence. But, don’t rush in with your eyes closed. You’ll go smack into the first obstacle you come across.Shut up!Take a breath!React emotionally and too quickly, and you’ll make the situation worse.Most companies - probs all - will face a PR crisis at some point - it’s kinda inevitable. From bad reviews to a management scandal, a negative situation will have a powerful impact on your brand’s reputation.You’ll make mistakes. You won’t be perfect. But you must be human. You must be honorable. Here are the steps you need to take to ride a PR crisis, and potentially turn a negative into a positive.11 steps to manage a PR crisis. Your PR crisis management plan can be divided into three stages… Before During After The first and third, last forever. The second... feels like it lasts forever.Forever monitor. Forever listen. Forever learn.Download Your Free PR Crisis Management eBookPrepare for a crisis. Should you plan for something you don’t want to happen?Yes. Yes. Yes.With your PR crisis plan in place, you and your team will save time, confusion, and stress. When time is of the essence, you can’t afford to waste it. Trying to find the CEO’s mobile number, unable to post on social media because the community manager is on holiday and no one knows the credentials...You see where I’m coming from?Handling a social media crisisYou need to establish a social media crisis protocol in your PR crisis communication plan.Scheduling social media content makes life easier. In the event of a PR crisis, be sensitive to the situation. Are those planned social posts appropriate? Clear your social calendar and restrict to messages addressing the crisis. Post human responses to your audience’s comments.Don’t lose your cool. Getting angry or defensive won’t with social media crisis management.Build a crisis response team. A mishandled crisis is often caused by a leader going rogue, thinking they can deal with the situation without involving their team.If that’s you, listen to me. You will make things worse. You will be blamed. Your brand will suffer. Up to you.Build a crisis PR response team and listen to it. Make it diverse. Why? Because your audience is diverse - different races, genders, ages, perspectives, politics, etc.Run your crisis response messages past the team.Danny in accounts thinks the message is a winner. Sam in IT can’t relate to it. Steve in sales has scheduled a meeting with HR. Chris in operations hasn’t got a clue.A diverse team will give you different perspectives. Could your messages be misinterpreted? Will they fuel the crisis fire? What works for some, may offend or baffle others.I would suggest you run all future communication by the team - marketing campaigns, press releases, posts, etc. - using them like a focus group to provide feedback.Your PR crisis response team strategy should include... List in order of priority, who should be notified when a crisis strikes. This will depend on the level of severity. Don’t start passing all negative tweets to your CEO. You’ll soon regret it. Ideally, your CEO should lead your crisis team, along with your head of PR and legal. Depending on the nature of the crisis, you’ll need people with knowledge related to the current crisis. Establish a chain of command and an approval process - CEO, marketing manager, legal, HR, etc. Before a crisis strikes, nominate who will speak on behalf of your company - your media spokesperson. Reacting quickly and speaking with one voice is critical, as multiple voices will confuse and possibly exacerbate the situation. Who is responsible for communication? Your marketing team and public relations specialists should be involved - social media messages, press releases, blog posts, etc. Depending on the type of crisis, all comms should be passed by your CEO, legal team, HR. Nominate and train your spokespeopleYour PR crisis response team should be made up of approved and trained team members. Assigning a person for each channel of communication may be the best way. You might have a great CEO - team leader, knowledgeable, trustworthy - who’s terrible on TV.Your spokespeople must have... Skills that fitOnline comms? Good spelling would be an asset. On camera? Being camera shy isn’t going to work. Level of authorityThe nature of the crisis will dictate the level of authority required. National disaster, loss of life - demands your CEO at the helm. Along with external communicators - TV, public meetings, radio, press - you’ll need someone internally to update the team. Appropriate trainingThis is about being prepared, ready to respond. This isn’t a marketing opportunity. It’s about protecting your reputation. Ensure your spokespeople are fully up to speed. Create your PR crisis management plan. When a crisis hits, you’ll be flooded with requests for information. To show that you’re in control of the situation, you have to be ready. This is when your crisis communication plan will come into its own. It should contain: A checklist of what needs to be done - it’s easy to miss steps when everyone’s running around like headless chickens Contact details of key people - aaargh… the head of support is on holiday and I don’t have the deputy’s mobile number Who you gonna call? Experts, friendly journalists, influencers, lawyers Draft messages - templates for press releases, social media posts, interview Q&As, etc. To draw up a dummy-plan, brainstorm with your PR crisis team. Get feedback from customer-facing teams - support, product, sales, legal, etc. Discuss all possible crises that could hit.Yes, some are hard to predict, or admit to... “Our product is perfect in every way. A product recall is never going to happen.”If you can’t be brutally honest, we may as well stop now.Some potential crisis situations are easy to predict - mass redundancies, buying out a competitor, a firing at C-level - yikes!Brainstorming brings benefits... You might discover a potential crisis can be resolved before it hits, by changing an existing process Responses can be written, giving you have a head start if/when a real PR crisis strikes During PR risk management - listen, identify, review, respond. Role playSimulate potential crisis situations and practice, practice, practice your response.Depending on your industry, some crises are easier to predict. For instance, the food industry would be wise to consider food poisoning, rodent infestation, severed thumb in packaged food. Okay, that last one is probs not on your list of predictions. But, you see where I’m coming from.With your list of potential crises, demonstrate how you’ll tackle them. Messaging, media responses, interviews, press releases. Your communication templates can then be customized to fit future crisis situations.Create holding statement templates. You can’t write messages to deal with a crisis, before it strikes. But, holding statements can be created to cover predicted crises. These will also provide templates that can be adapted to fit unpredicted crises.For instance, an airline hit by a natural disaster. Without facts, official messages should be restricted. But a holding statement could be issued…“We’ve implemented our crisis response plan, which prioritizes the safety of our passengers and team. Additional details will be posted on our website and social channels as soon as possible.”Review your holding statements regularly. Update and add new ones, where necessary.Communication & intelligence analysis. If you want to be alerted to early warning signs of possible PR issues, you have to be listening. Make a list of key things to monitor - your brand, trending topics, key personnel, influencers, hashtags, products, competitors, industry news.Communication channelsWe’ve moved on from sending a fax. Phew!Today, we’ve got multiple phone numbers and email addresses. We send text and instant messages. Then there’s social media. It’s the fastest and most efficient way to communicate with your audience.If you’re not using social media as part of your marketing strategy - seriously?!! - you should be. In this day and age, when a crisis strikes it strikes BIG on social. If you’re not there, you've already lost control.I remind you of my herding kittens reference. Choose your comms channels before a crisis situation hits. Remember, we use multiple channels. Some people favor email, but not everyone. Maybe a text message, but it might be ignored until later. Not everyone lives on social media. Multiple, will catch more.Intelligence gatheringYou must monitor what’s being said about you so you can identify - catch a negative trend - and respond. This will include social media, the press, review sites, blog posts, employees, customers, influencers, competitors, etc.During a crisis, monitoring feedback will help you modify your response strategy.A monitoring system isn’t just for a crisis situation. A good social listening strategy will not only identify negative trends, it will catch positive user-generated content, product feedback, audience sentiment, trending topics, etc. Social data crucial to creating your marketing and communication strategy and messaging.Identify influencers & brand ambassadors. These guys aren’t only useful for marketing campaigns and product launches, they’re also great for swaying opinion during a crisis. The nature of the crisis will determine which individuals you should approach.Get the facts before you speak. I know, everyone is panicking. Everyone wants action, answers. You have to remain calm. Follow your crisis procedure. Don’t speak until you have all the facts.Keep it factual. Never speculate. Always apologize.Accept responsibility & apologize. Acknowledge your mistake, say sorry, and take responsibility. Make it genuine, sensitive, human. Be honest. Be vulnerable.Don’t be scared to apologize. It’s the right thing to do and will quickly change the dynamic of the situation.Always tell the truthIf you hide your mistakes, you’ll be found out. Your brand reputation and value will be damaged. Your brand equity will be reduced. Be transparent. Consumers buy from companies that they trust. That they believe in.If you deny a negative situation, dismiss the issue, blame others - you’ll make things so much worse when the truth comes out. And it will.Tell people what you’re going to do to rectify the situation, and how you’ll avoid it happening again.Write your PR crisis messages. With all the facts at your fingertips, you can frame your crisis response. Find the most transparent and genuine way to tackle the situation.What happened. What you’ll do to solve it. What you’ll do in the future. This is where the role of PR in crisis management becomes clear.Be open, be honestThe sooner you communicate your apology, explanation, and solution, the sooner people will stop trashing your brand.Don’t make false promisesThis will make the situation worse. Always respect the facts. There are people out there that could know more than you do. The media, for instance.Be reactiveWhen Starbucks faced a PR crisis - two black men waiting for a business meeting in a Philadelphia branch - the brand acted immediately. All 8,000 US branches were closed for staff training. The CEO published a statement of apology and the social media team addressed online comments. @Starbucks The police were called because these men hadn’t ordered anything. They were waiting for a friend to show up, who did as they were taken out in handcuffs for doing nothing. All the other white ppl are wondering why it’s never happened to us when we do the same thing. pic.twitter.com/0U4Pzs55Ci — Melissa DePino (@missydepino) April 12, 2018Fast reaction to a crisis that should never have occurred.EmpathizeIt’s not all about maintaining the value of your stock. Yes, ensuring your business survives is YOUR priority. But for those hit by the crisis - the general public, your employees - less so.Don’t flood with messagesThree to four is more than enough, and adapt them according to which channel you’re going to post on. For instance, a tweet would contain a link to your website statement.Provide clarityPeople have to understand what's happened and what they need to do. Don’t panic them. Show that you acknowledge that there's a crisis, explain what you’re going to do to avoid future incidents.Choose your channels of distribution. This will depend on your usual corporate positioning and overall communications. The channels that work best for your brand when talking to your audience - blog, social media, TV, press, etc. Take into account the different characteristics of each. Social media involves conversation - be ready to talk and control your messages Press releases broadcast globally and are readily picked-up by agencies Blog posts give you greater control, plus you’re talking with your company voice Television needs experience, training, and an agreed script - great for talking to a wider audience Social media is awesome! We have a voice, a loud voice. We can enthuse, complain, discuss, share. This freedom of expression scares some brands. They’re reticent. They hold back. They ignore.Unfortunately, consumers don’t care whether brands are there or not. If they’re going to complain, they will. This means that brands have to monitor and be prepared to jump onboard. Post messages and respond to comments. Have a presence.Post-crisis review. Monitor. Update. Analyze. Learn.Your messages are out there. Being read. Being ignored. Being commented on. You need to continue monitoring the situation.Is the PR crisis still a crisis?It can take time for things to return to normal. It could also start up again. You have to be ready if asked, to give more statements, interviews, another press release, answers on social.How’s your brand reputation, following the PR crisis?Use sentiment analysis to find out how consumers feel about what happened, your response, the current situation.Getting hit by a PR crisis is devastating. However, every cloud has a silver lining. You’ll learn from the experience. Whether it’s avoiding future crises, tackling issues, improvements to company operations, better products. After the crisis, answer these questions... How did your team manage the PR crisis situation? What needs to be improved in your crisis plan? What should be changed to avoid it happening again? How will you recover your credibility, repair your reputation? PR crisis management tools . Your crisis team is on red alert. Your crisis plan is set in stone. Your messaging is ready to go. But... none of this matters if you don't have the best crisis management tools at hand.When a PR crisis hits - we're all vulnerable - it'll do more than bruise your brand reputation. Potentially, a crisis can be devastating, causing long-term damage, if not total destruction.You need to choose your crisis tools wisely. Ones that provide the following features - and more - under one roof... Real-time alerts - use Talkwalker Alerts to be notified of negative comments, but for a PR crisis you'll need a more powerful analytics tool - such as Talkwalker. Image recognition - 80% of pictures shared online with a visible brand, don't mention in the content. Our AI-powered image recognition finds these posts so you can protect your logo and trademark against misuse. Video analytics - 80% of all online traffic in 2021 will consist of video. Video marketing drives huge engagement, and marketers say they get 66% more qualified leads per year. While 90% of consumers say that watching a video helps them decide which brand to buy. Our AI-powered visual analytics will find up to 3x the number of brand mentions. Sentiment analysis - or opinion mining, shows you how consumers feel about your brand, product, campaign, or event - positive, negative or neutral. Our sentiment analysis technology captures customer sentiment with up to an average 90% accuracy, understanding the meaning of full sentences, and determining customer attitudes and contextual reactions in tweets, posts, and articles. It even understands sarcasm and irony. Support for multiple languages - the world is talking about your brand. Talkwalker’s conversational intelligence platform supports 187 languages, so you can find where consumers are, how they’re communicating, and what they’re saying. Talkwalker Alerts | Supercharged Google Alerts . Talkwalker Alerts is a free tool - similar to Google Alerts, but way more efficient - that tracks online mentions and tweets, so you’re notified immediately if any of your keywords or phrases are found.It'll hunt down negative comments so you can catch them before they go viral and damage your brand reputation. You’ll receive alerts of mentions from news feeds, blogs, forums, and Twitter.We currently deliver 700,000+ Talkwalker Alerts to 600,000+ inboxes every day.You can set up an alert in 10 seconds - enter keyword, language, frequency, and result type.Use Talkwalker Alerts to search for your brand, products, keywords, key personnel, competitors, industry news.Social media dramatically changed marketing. We’re connected instantly and constantly. When a brand makes a mistake, it goes viral before you can say,“I should've used social listening.”Virality Maps | Watch a PR crisis spread. Take a look at Talkwalker's virality map in action...Talkwalker virality map - how an article about plastic particles in bottled water,spread across traditional and new media.As consumers using social media, we expect an instant response to a support question. Personalized messages. We expect brands to listen to the voice of the customer.With all of us meeting up online, sharing our opinions, complaints, praise, frustrations, the arrival of artificial intelligence was timely.AI brings the ability to identify, listen, and analyze heaps of social data. This gives brands the power to protect their reputation, manage a crisis, target their communication. Talkwalker’s AI Engine can find patterns in social media communication and identify the sentiment behind it. This data will alert your crisis response team to any oncoming storm, so action can be taken immediately.Using a conversational intelligence platform will bring a new level of insight enabling you to protect and enhance your brand reputation.Influencer Network | Find influencers that impact. You’ll even be able to find influencers to champion your cause. Use Talkwalker's Influencer Network feature to identify the right influencers that'll make an impact and support your brand during a PR crisis.Talkwalker's Influencer Network shows that in January 2021, doctors and medical professionals formed the bulk of influencers supporting COVID-19 vaccinations.Video Analytics | Protect your logo. Use Talkwalker's video recognition to find all the videos that include your logo. Even those that don't mention your brand in the content. Find counterfeit products and logo abuse, and protect your reputation.Protect your brand's reputation with visual analytics.Use video recognition to find mentions of your brand being used in a negative way.Image recognition | Protect your reputation. We’re talking about shared posts that show your product, but don’t name your brand in the content.Negative content going viral is bad. Negative visual content is even worse. Why? Because content with visuals is 40x more likely to be shared than other types of content. Image recognition is crucial if you want to identify crisis triggers and protect your brand's reputation. Find them with visual listening...Talkwalker's image recognition feature finds brand mentions, whether the brand is included in the content or not.Over a 30-day period, the DHL logo was detected close to 10,000 times. What not to do in a crisis!Okay, I’ve told you what you should do. Here’s a list of what you should avoid...Don't be an ostrichYou can’t pretend it’s not happeningAvoid a knee-jerk reaction Pause Take a breath Don’t attack Don’t react to false rumors about your brand Don’t blame others Don’t respond negatively Put emotions on the back burner “NO COMMENT!”No, no, no. You’re not an actor being hounded by the paparazzi. No comment won’t hold water.Being unable to answer a question is damning in a PR crisis. It makes you look guilty, unprepared. Often arrogant.I’m not suggesting you make something up. That’s even worse. Be honest. Admit you don’t have sufficient information to respond. That you’ll issue an update as soon as possible.Don't respond too quickly or too slowlyIt’s all in the timing. Don’t give a response before you have all the facts. You’re gonna look pretty stupid if you have to retract earlier statements. Delaying a response will give the impression that you don’t care that much. It’s a fine line.Don't pick the scabPeople move on. Another crisis comes along and suddenly you’re no longer making headlines. Everyday business must continue. You have a brand to market, a product to sell.Takeway. Be prepared. “It won’t happen” is shortsighted, naive, pure fantasy.A PR crisis need not be a disaster. You can even win plaudits for how you respond, and it can help drive necessary change and improvements to your working methods.Remember... be ready, respond, reflect.Download your free copy of our PR Crisis eBook, you’ll learn how to... Minimize the danger of being hit by a PR crisis Create a rapid-response crisis team of trained personnel Build a crisis communication plan Plus free crisis management templates. Your crisis communication roadmap, crisis plan checklist, and crisis management tools... Meg Meg is a member of the Talkwalker content team. Walking to the beat of a different drum, she swears that she’s only wearing black until a darker colour is invented. She may dramatize, she may exaggerate, she’s always brutally honest, but she’s never ever ever sarcastic! She hates writing about herself in the third person, but was persuaded by a small, blue Yeti. You may also like Definitive guide to PR measurement Try the best crisis management tools How to create your PR strategy Products Platform Customer Intelligence Market Intelligence Social Intelligence Social Listening Quick Search Social Content Ratings® Solutions Brand management Campaign strategy Competitive intelligence Content marketing Customer experience Market research Trend analysis Services Talkwalker Activate Customers Customer stories Resources Blog Reports Marketing Essentials Webinars Digital Excellence Center Market Pulse Newsletter About Us Our story Life @ Talkwalker Careers Partners Newsroom Press releases Contact Us Must read The Forrester New Wave™: AI-Enabled Consumer Intelligence Platforms Social Media Listening Guide How to measure share of voice Definitive guide to PR measurement Consumer Intelligence Guide How to create a social media report The social media trends to watch Copyright © 2022 Talkwalker Inc. 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Result 12
TitleSocial Media Crisis - How to Take Control with our Top Tips - Igniyte
Urlhttps://www.igniyte.co.uk/blog/top-tips-for-taking-control-of-a-social-media-crisis/
DescriptionA social media crisis can really impact on your business and company reputation. Here are our top tips for taking control of a social media crisis
Date29 Jan 2020
Organic Position10
H1Top tips for taking control of a social media crisis
H2What is a crisis?
Preparing for a social media crisis
How to manage a social media crisis
When the dust has settled – what happens after the social media crisis
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a crisis?
Preparing for a social media crisis
How to manage a social media crisis
When the dust has settled – what happens after the social media crisis
BodyTop tips for taking control of a social media crisis Author Claire Beaumont Published January 29, 2020 Filed to Blog Social media has meant that businesses can expose their brand and products to wider audiences in a more authentic and relatable way. Building awareness of an organisation and its public perception has never been easier. But it is now easier to become involved in a crisis that can destroy your reputation as quickly as it built. What is a crisis? . A crisis is a negative event that is outside your normal operational pattern. It can have a negative, and long-term impact on your brand reputation. 90% of crises overlap onto social media platforms. Social media has meant that stakeholders can now communicate with a brand or company. It has changed their expectations of how they expect a company to respond. Stakeholders can see each other’s ideas and experiences and social media allows them to share their feedback publicly.  Stakeholders are more aware and they have access to more information and they have higher expectations than ever before. Whether it is environmental, political or ethical, organisations are under more pressure to not make mistakes. A crisis could start via any of these channels, and not necessarily on an owned social media platform, like Facebook or Twitter.  A statement by a spokesperson. An article in the media. Social media influencers. Online trolls. Industry competitors. How you manage customer service enquiries.  Preparing for a social media crisis. Preparing for a social media crisis is the best form of defense. And being aware of your digital footprint will help reduce the fallout from any social media disaster. Here are our top tips for preparing for a crisis.    Use a social listening tool. Listening tools like Brandwatch and Oracle will give you an insight into your brand perception. You can check spikes in negative sentiment in real-time that could indicate a problem and allow you to address any issues before it escalates. Put in place a staff social media policy. A comprehensive policy will set guidelines and expectations for your staff using social media platforms. This should cover all expectations and guidelines for members of staff that use social media channels in a personal or professional capacity. Have a crisis management plan and response strategy in place. You will need to act quickly in a crisis before you lose control of your social channels. Your plan will include guidelines on responses, staff responsibilities, and internal & external communications. More than a quarter of crises will go international within an hour due to the lack of a comprehensive social media crisis plan. Set community guidelines. Having set guidelines that visitors should accept. These will allow some control over the content they post, and the behaviors they exhibit. Managing users that breach community guidelines is easier as you have a clear policy.  Have a shutdown process. On very rare occasions an organisation will have to make the decision whether to leave their channels open or looking at the possibility of closing them temporarily. Shutting down one or more platforms is not a decision that should be undertaken lightly. Simulate your strategy. By testing your social media crisis plan against different scenarios it will prepare staff.  Adjustments to your strategy should be undertaken if needed.     How to manage a social media crisis. How digital marketers and social media managers handle a crisis can be the difference between unrepairable damage to your reputation, and your reputation remaining salvageable. Use social media crisis management to determine if it is really a crisis – stakeholders can ask tough questions and sometimes these can escalate into a discussion. It is important to define what your organisation deems to be a crisis to reduce the chances of an overreaction. Assess the situation. How many users have left comments? What is the sentiment like – is it negative? Are there key influencers involved?  Is it in the media? Knowing your current situation will help plan for a resolution. Communicate internally and externally.  You should update all all external stakeholders regularly with transparent information containing factual information. Communicating with internal staff will ensure everyone is on the same page and reduces the opportunity for misinformation to spread. Deploy goodwill ambassadors. If you have brand advocates or influencers you can call upon to help manage a crisis. Users may trust them more and they are able to amplify your core statements further. You should brief brand advocates on the crisis and communications strategy before any deployment. Know when to pause a conversation. Conversations during a social media crisis and responses to any official statements can become heated and involve many emotions. Do not get involved with conversations or arguments that take you away from your crisis strategy, stick to the facts available. Leave comments alone. Removing negative comments is seen as a form of censorship and gives the impression you have something to hide. Only delete content that breaches your company and platform community guidelines. Silence. may not be the best policy when it comes to a social media crisis. Be timely with replies and updates. Most of all, be honest and sincere with your responses but stick to facts and never respond with emotion. Know your spokesperson. Spokespersons are direct messengers of your company. Ensure your public spokesperson is able to keep to facts and not bring the company further into disrepute. When the dust has settled – what happens after the social media crisis. Now is a good time to review how your crisis management strategy and the performance of your crisis management team.  Here are some questions you may want to ask to ensure your future strategy is as bulletproof as can be: Did the strategy work? What went right, and what went wrong? What did we learn? Do we need additional steps in the process? What was the feedback from each department, do they tell the same story? Use this time to have a debrief to discuss the experience. Involve all stakeholders and your crisis management team. Consider any extra steps that you should include within your strategy and what would improve it. Take this time to make sure you have a good social media strategy in place.  Online Reputation Crisis Management: A Case Study Our Head of PR, Claire Beaumont is an expert in social media crisis management. If you are in the midst of a crisis, don’t hesitate to get in touch. You can reach her in complete confidence on 0203 542 8686 or email [email protected]    Claire BeaumontAn experienced digital PR, marketing and social media marketing strategist, Claire leads PR strategy and delivery at Igniyte across multiple countries and sectors. With 16 years’ experience in marketing, communications and PR, she seamlessly directs all elements of B2B and B2C online PR to gain high-ranking positive coverage for our clients in regional, national, international and specialist online media – and she helps ensure that any risks are managed and mitigated. Previous Article What drives company reputation in 2020? January 20, 2020 Next Article Roz Sheldon talks to World Trademark Review about Extinction Rebellion February 13, 2020 Get in Touch All fields marked with * are required Speak with Simon our online reputation management expert, in complete confidence. 0203 542 8686 [email protected] Get in Touch All fields marked with * are required Get in touch with Niki today, in complete confidence. 0203 542 8686 [email protected] Contact us
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Result 13
Title3 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media
Urlhttps://www.mojomedialabs.com/blog/3-great-examples-of-crisis-management-on-social-media
DescriptionOver the years we've seen the good, the bad, and the ugly examples of crisis management through social media
Date
Organic Position11
H13 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media
H2SOUTHWEST
RED CROSS
JC PENNEY
Stephanie Fisher
H3Get Updates
Featured Articles
Categories
H2WithAnchorsSOUTHWEST
RED CROSS
JC PENNEY
Stephanie Fisher
Body3 Great Examples of Crisis Management on Social Media August 10, 2016 •Stephanie Fisher Social Media Update: Check out our part 2 post for more great examples of crisis management (or lack thereof) right here. In recent years the game has changed for crisis management. The public has certain expectations for a company's response to a PR disaster or potential crisis. Those expectations include things like swift response, open and honest communication, and open dialogue through social media. Never before have people been able to reach out directly to a brand so easily as they now can through platforms like Twitter and Facebook. Over the years we've seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of crisis management through social media. Here I wanted to highlight 3 examples of big brands who successfully handled true disasters and potential crises through deft use of social media.    SOUTHWEST. The Southwest Flight 345 that landed nose first at LaGuardia is an example of a big brand who knew exactly how to handle a crisis through social media. Quick response time and open, honest communication on Facebook and Twitter were key in helping the brand control the story and maintain good faith with its customers. Here are a few other examples of their Facebook and Twitter posts just minutes after the accident, promising updates (which they followed up immediately with statements and information): Most of the comments from fans included notes of support and appreciation for Southwest's open communication and quick response.   Southwest has a long history of responding appropriately to crises through social media, and the crisis planning of their communication and PR team is evident.    Lesson learned: Have a PR plan in place, including social media response, with clear roles and scripts for those who need to respond immediately to a crisis.  RED CROSS. Sometimes social media can be the cause of a PR crisis. Just take this Twitter snafu that the American Red Cross quickly handled back in 2011. This is every marketer and social media monkey's worst nightmare: accidentally firing off a personal tweet on the company's Twitter account. This kind of thing can happen easily when one is using Hootsuite on a mobile phone, for example (which is exactly what happened here). Red Cross responded brilliantly. The rogue tweet from @RedCross went like this: “Ryan found two more 4 bottle packs of Dogfish Head’s Midas Touch beer… when we drink we do it right #gettngslizzerd” You can imagine how a tweet of this nature would make an honorable humanitarian organization look bad. How did Red Cross respond? With transparency, humor and good grace. Now, deleting a tweet isn't always the best idea since a) if you have a big audience who notices these things, it can look shady when you delete things and b) anything "deleted" can surface to haunt you later, especially on social media. But, Red Cross did the right thing by acknowledging that the tweet went out, they deleted it, and explaining with humor that it was all a mistake. It never turned into a major crisis.  They didn't stop there, though. Red Cross went beyond that response and turned a potentially harmful tweet into an opportunity for engagement. They took to their corporate blog to explain the situation, show their humanity, and engage with fans and followers. The employee who made the mistake 'fessed up to it on her personal Twitter account in the same manner, with humility and humor. Lesson learned: Be careful using Hootsuite! And, be honest with your fans/followers when you flub-up. Social media folks are very forgiving, as long as you don't use dishonest tactics to hide your mistakes. That is the ultimate no-no when handling crises through social media (or offline too, for that matter!)   JC PENNEY. Sometimes a small issue can come out of nowhere, and initially seem harmless and unworthy of response. Thus is the case with the JC Penney Teapot that looked like Hitler. Did you hear about this one? A user on the social bookmarking site Reddit posted a remark about JC Penney's new teapot baring a slight resemblance to Adolf Hitler. The remark didn't remain isolated to Reddit for long, and JC Penney was forced to response after The Telegraph ran with the non-story: Although this wasn't a crisis, JC Penney wisely chose to respond while not taking itself too seriously. They realized that a small issue like this could quickly turn into a social media PR crisis if handled improperly. @jcpenney responded to hundreds of tweets about the evil teapot with a standard, light-hearted message:   The whole debacle turned out to be a pretty good thing for JC Penney. The teapot sold like gangbusters. Lesson learned: Be sensitive to the power of social media. Even a small issue like a silly comment or an unintentional coincidence that gets picked up by others on social media can quickly snowball into a PR crisis. Address even small complaints from your fans or others with grace and good sense. What crisis management moments have your company responded to through social media engagement? How did it turn out? Share your thoughts and stories in the comments below!   Stephanie Fisher. Steph leads our client delivery team and is obsessed with delivering quality work, creating an efficiency machine, and mastering the tools and disciplines to achieve success for our heroes. At home, she loves listening to true crime podcasts, playing with her daughters and two pugs, and singing in a local rock band with her husband. Share This: Get Updates. Featured Articles. Categories. Account-Based Marketing (43) Branding (10) Company Culture (25) Content Marketing (43) Customer Experience (10) Customer Personas (7) Digital Marketing (51) Email Marketing (13) growth marketing (7) HubSpot (17) Inbound Marketing (55) manufacturing (1) Marketing Automation (1) Marketing Technology (27) Mojo News (27) nonprofits (2) podcast (6) Professional Development (14) ROE Powers ROI (30) rowe (6) Sales Enablement (24) SEO (36) Social Media (25) storybrand (3) Technology (2) Website (3) Website Development (53) See all
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Result 14
TitleHow to Build a Winning Social Media Crisis Management Plan (2022 Update)
Urlhttps://mention.com/en/blog/social-media-crisis-management-plan/
DescriptionBuild a comprehensive crisis management plan to help you during any social media crisis
Date
Organic Position12
H1Build Your Social Media Crisis Management Plan in 10 Steps
H2Before the event
During a crisis
After a social media crisis
What to do in the face of an ugly social media crisis
10. Let the dust settle
And you’re done
H31. Get your crew together
2. Define “a crisis”
3. Identify your key message
4. Create communication guidelines
5. Monitor for updates
6. Get it under control
7. Assess brand impact
8. Reflect on your response
9. Prepare for the long-term
10. Update your crisis management plan
1. Determine whether or not it’s a real social media crisis
2. Pause your scheduled posts
3. Publicly acknowledge what’s going on
4. Create a social crisis action plan
5. Inform your team
6. Work quickly but thoroughly
7. Give your audience frequent updates
8. Individually reply to concerned audience members
9. Post a long-form response on your website
H2WithAnchorsBefore the event
During a crisis
After a social media crisis
What to do in the face of an ugly social media crisis
10. Let the dust settle
And you’re done
BodyBuild Your Social Media Crisis Management Plan in 10 Steps Home Blog Media Monitoring Build Your Social Media Crisis Management Plan in 10 Steps Updated on September 30th 2021 Patrick Whatman | 24 min read A communications crisis can strike at any time. It could be a faulty product, a lousy campaign, or a slip of the tongue from someone higher up. It doesn’t matter the industry you’re in, or how popular you’ve been to this point. Sometimes, it just happens. Whatever the case, you need to be prepared. If you’re going to put out a fire, you need a good hose: So we’ve put together this 10-step crisis management guide to get you ready. Make sure you’ve done everything you need to before disaster strikes. What’s in this post: What you can do before disaster strikesWhat to do during a social crisisSteps you can take once the dust settlesWhat to do if you’re in a crisis right now! We’ve also put these steps into a crisis management workbook. Download and share this with your team, to be sure you’re ready to respond effectively. Before the event. 1. Get your crew together. While every staff member is important, they can’t all be part of your crisis management team. Put together a group of responsible responders, each with their dedicated role. You need a good mix of executive personnel (to enforce decisions), management (to coordinate), and creatives (to craft the right message). Oh, and a lawyer probably helps. As you build your team, answer the following questions: Who will take ownership for the overall strategy - assigning tasks and ensuring the team stays on target?Who is responsible for identifying and monitoring potential crises?Who’s going to inform management and/or key stakeholders?Who will manage social media and respond to questions?And who will be handling messages that come in through other channels?Which executive will act as a spokesperson for the media? Get these roles straightened out while you have time to plan. Next, it’s time to think about what sorts of crisis you might possibly face. 2. Define “a crisis”. You need to decide the kinds of events that will kick your new plan into action. Not every piece of bad news or negative headline should force you to go “code red.” For this, you’ll need a working definition of a crisis. According to Jay Baer, a social media crisis has three characteristics: Information asymmetry: When you don’t know any more than the public about what’s going on.A change from the norm: Everyday criticism of your products is not a crisis. When your products explode at random - that’s a crisis.Serious risk to your company: It seems obvious, but the scope of the issue is important. For something to be a crisis, it needs to have a truly negative effect. With your new team, set benchmarks and find real examples of what qualifies as a crisis. An added benefit of this is that you’ll identify potential weaknesses you otherwise might not have thought about. Since every company is different, it’s a matter of creating a definition that works for you. Once you’ve done that, you can begin thinking about key steps to take during an event. 3. Identify your key message. How you react publicly during a crisis is likely to define your success. You could have a great plan and a smart team, but if the message is wrong you’ve got no chance. You can’t plan your specific response yet since you don’t know what the crisis is. Instead, establish your core values as a company, and your main value proposition to customers. Whatever your response during the tough times, these should be central. Why is this important? Things will be moving at a mile a minute. Despite your best intentions, you can’t monitor everything every spokesperson or social media manager says and posts. What you can ensure is that they convey the most important information. If you remind customers why they came to you in the first place, you have a far better chance of keeping them around. 4. Create communication guidelines. Once you’re clear on the basic message, you need to decide how to deliver it. That means creating guidelines so that anyone writing a social media post knows what’s expected of them. To get ready for a crisis, do the following: Determine rules for communicating with key stakeholders and executives.Set network-specific guidelines for communicating on social media (since you’ll have different content and format considerations for each).Decide on a process for communicating updates via your website and other online company channels not covered by social media.Create guidelines for employees outside of the crisis communications team advising how to respond to inquiries. To ensure you’re even more prepared, craft some basic templates. The first of these should be a brief, general statement of the company’s position. You also need sample answers to the obvious questions you know you’ll receive. This is your best opportunity to set the tone you’ll use as a company. There may be even room for jokes and light-hearted apologies, as long as they suit your usual social media style. By preparing these now, you’re more likely to be effective when a crisis breaks, rather than making the situation worse. 5. Monitor for updates. Or in Jay Baer’s words, "buy some binoculars". Get a monitoring tool that’ll help you figure out what’s being said about you, and where. If you want to monitor a social media crisis, "buy some binoculars." - @JayBaerClick To Tweet If you’re trying to see everything happening on social media without a listening tool, good luck. You’re going to need something that gives you real-time updates and lets you analyze large amounts of data to draw conclusions. Naturally, we suggest Mention. It lets you track social media, forums, blogs, and news, and respond to social media posts directly from the app. Plus, Mention will tip you off if a serious crisis is about to hit. Pulse alerts tell you when your keywords explode online, meaning that everybody is talking about your brand. You’ll be notified first, so you’re able to respond quickly. Find out how monitoring can save your brand in a crisis. Whether or not you use Mention, you need to be clear on three matters: What tool(s) will you use to monitor for brand crises?Who is responsible for the management of the tool?What is the ongoing process for crisis monitoring? Get these straightened out before a problem strikes, and you’ll have a far easier time when you’re caught off-guard. During a crisis. 6. Get it under control. We’ve put together a checklist that’ll help you right the ship. It’s a step-by-step guide to use when the going gets tough. For full instructions, you need the checklist. For now, let’s take a look at the highlights: Pause your scheduled posts. With a mad panic breaking out around you, it’s easy to forget that you’ve got a full social queue. As Charli Day explains, you can’t afford to accidentally post "Happy #ThrowbackThursday — Have a beautiful day" when your product has just caused a serious injury or death.” That’s a pretty extreme example, but still a great point. Publicly acknowledge what’s going on. You’re not going to be able to hide for long - especially on social media. Your best bet is to make clear that you know there’s a problem, and you’re working to fix it. You’ll still get some angry responses, but it should buy you some time. Inform your team. You didn’t put a crack squad together for nothing. Contact them quickly and send them to work. If you respond quickly enough, you may be able to lessen the harm overall. Post a long-form response on your website. You’ll be sending plenty of small, individualized social media responses. But you also need one official place where reporters and blog writers can find your side of the story. Posting this response will also buy you time. When people want answers fast, you’ll have a place to send them while you work on more important matters. One final piece of advice: “do not lose your cool. Ever.” Once the dust settles, it’s time to figure out what went wrong. After a social media crisis. 7. Assess brand impact. This is where your monitoring tool comes in handy again. You should have data showing what a normal business week looks like, to compare with your “crisis week”. You’ll quickly know just how bad things became. From a social media perspective, focus on factors like lost followers, specific complaints, and the amount of negative sentiment around your brand. You’ll also be able to see where your response was most effective. You may have spent countless hours scouring Twitter and responding to individuals, and yet one Facebook post reached more people and was widely shared. These kinds of insights help you understand how badly your reputation was hit, and you’ll be able to plan better for the future. The key questions for this section of your plan are: What will your KPIs for successful crisis management be?How will you measure the negative conversations generated?How will you measure the impact on overall brand sentiment?How will you measure the overall brand impact of this over time? Make sure you have a monitoring tool that lets you do all of this, and anything else you choose to include in your plan. You also need to collect data before a crisis arises, to benchmark against. If you know what a “normal” week looks like, you’ll be able to accurately assess the bad times. 8. Reflect on your response. Once it looks like you’re out of the woods, it’s important to take stock of your response. Hopefully, you had a great plan in place, and everyone knew exactly what was required of them. As part of your plan, make time to regroup after the event, and discuss how it went. Key questions to work through include: What were the strongest aspects of your brand’s crisis plan?Where was the existing strategy unhelpful or less impactful?Are there any processes or templates that need to be revised?Do you need to create any new systems or guidelines? Discuss the different experiences of management, administrative, and customer support staff. Did everyone feel ready to respond, and what other resources would have helped when things got hectic? 9. Prepare for the long-term. Unfortunately, negative news and complaints can linger far longer than a week or two. You need to decide what your response will look like moving forward. It might not be best to act like everything is now fixed. Instead, you may want to be proactive, offering updates and solutions to help customers get through a tough time. These are the big questions to ask yourself: How will you manage or participate in the long-term conversation about this event?Do you need to provide continual updates long-term to any of your audiences? Again, your monitoring tool will be invaluable here. Not only will you hear if things quickly begin to spiral (again), but you’ll be able to show sentiment improving over time, and find positive feedback to share with your community. 10. Update your crisis management plan. The last step is to revisit the first nine steps. This may have been your first chance to test out your crisis management plan, so you need to figure out if it worked. Hopefully, you won’t get another opportunity for some time, so this is the time to make changes. Move through each section of your plan and make any changes that need to be made. Make the necessary fixes to ensure your crisis management plan is as good as it needs to be. So those were our 10 steps to get you prepared. You're all set! But how do you respond if a crisis is already at your door? Our own Brittany Berger walks you through this difficult time: What to do in the face of an ugly social media crisis. No brand wants to find themselves in a social media crisis, but every brand needs to be prepared for. It’s one of those “hope for the best, prepare for the worst” things. Like insurance. You can’t let yourself and your communications team go in denial and pretend it could never happen. One viral, “didn’t think it through” tweet. One screenshotted SnapChat. One employee logging into the wrong account. That’s all it takes to have a crisis on your hands, my friend. And if it happens, you need a game plan, and you need one bad. And here’s what it should include. Want to save a quick list of these steps...just in case? Download the free PDF! 1. Determine whether or not it’s a real social media crisis. First of all, is the situation really a crisis? There’s a big difference between a sticky situation and a full-blown disaster. Sure, both are bad, but there’s a big difference that dictates how your brand needs to react. So you obviously want to make sure the crisis is real and you’re not overreacting. No one likes a drama queen. Ask yourself: will this have a real, lasting impact on our brand? Will it impact business results, or is it just talk? We’ve all seen it: a Facebook friend getting totally outraged and going on a tirade about a brand for something that’s not even a big deal. And we all have that friend who needs a brand to be angry at in order to survive on social media. It’s who they are, and we love them anyway. With how easy it is for people to become keyboard warriors and how quickly something can go viral, not every sticky situation will have an impact. It’s perfectly possible to just move on without going into full-on crisis mode. When things get more serious, however, is when a situation really will drive away customers and have other lasting impacts on your business, your employees, etc. Now, only your brand knows your customers well enough to determine that about a social media disaster. But when people start angry tweeting you on social media, take a look at who they are. Are they your customers, your audience? Basically, who cares? And I don’t mean that like, “Ugh, who cares?” I actually want you to answer that. Are the people angry with your brand actually your target audience or an important audience to you, or are they people outside of your important markets? It’s never nice to piss people off, but if they’re not your audience or customers, it may not be a crisis. 2. Pause your scheduled posts. If something is a crisis, the first thing you wanna do is go into “crisis control” mode. That means not asking people to buy from you when the whole internet is mad at you. Timing is everything, after all. Press “pause” on any campaigns and content you’d planned to put out on social media, and you may want to consider altering your schedule on other online channels, too. The benefit here is two-fold: First of all, as mentioned before, a crisis is not a great time to be marketing and selling. People aren’t happy with you, and people need to be happy to buy. Secondly, this frees up your whole team to focus 100% on getting the crisis under control. It should be your number one priority, not a marketing campaign that will fail if everyone hates you, anyway. 3. Publicly acknowledge what’s going on. Staying in contact with your audiences during a social media crisis is so, so important. Beyond effectively communicating updates, you already need to comfort people by showing them you’re there and you care. As soon as possible, acknowledge your brand’s problem or crisis on social media. Even if you don’t have a solution or real updates yet, put something out that tells your audience that you’re aware of what’s going on. This lets people know that you’ve jumped on the issue quickly and care about solving it, as well as where to go for more updates. At this point, it doesn't need to be anything more than a short post on each important channel. You may want to consider reposting it a time or two within the same time frame to ensure your followers see it. 4. Create a social crisis action plan. Once you’ve checked in with your audience and let them know what’s up, it’s time to go into problem-solving mode. It’s time to put your crisis communications plan into action. Part of being prepared for a crisis means in addition to learning these 10 steps today, you’re also starting to work on them. You need a crisis comms plan long before a crisis happens as it guides your team in responding. If you don’t know where to start, our free crisis communication workbook can help. Basically, you want to decide what steps your team will take during a crisis, which team members will perform each task, and how you’ll communicate with each other and your public. 5. Inform your team. In addition to giving a heads up about the situation to your audience, you also absolutely have to consider any other stakeholders at the company. Executive leadership obviously needs to know what’s going on, as they do with anything big happening to the company. Additionally, they might have to field questions from people about it and should be primed with a response. Any support or customer-facing positions should be pulled into the loop as well. They may have customers and prospects coming to them with questions that they should feel confident in answering. 6. Work quickly but thoroughly. A social media crisis is not the time for perfectionism. You have a fire to put out, and the longer you wait, the more it will breathe and spread. Your social media crisis communication plan should be lean and minimal. Once the crisis is over, you can focus on the lower priority parts of crisis management - now’s the time for high, DEFCON 1-level to-dos. Work quickly by carefully and accurately. The last thing you need to do while dealing with one crisis is to start another crisis! I won’t lie - this is tough. Toeing the line between “fast but effective” and “sloppy and confusing” can be quite the balancing act. 7. Give your audience frequent updates. It’s so important to stay in close touch with your audience in the middle of a social crisis. For one, social media is real-time and your posts “expire” quickly in terms of reach. Someone may not have seen your tweet from a few hours ago, but are online now. But also, keeping them in the loop can help pacify anyone angry or upset. Apologize continuously, let them know what steps you’re taking to remedy the company’s problem, and thank them for their patience. When you don’t have any actual news to update them with, it’s best to keep it short and sweet. If you are providing them with crucial news, it’s best to communicate the essential or most important facts on social, and link to a web page with more information. When it comes to this, it’s better to over-communicate than not share enough, and this lets you have a central location for the more detailed info. 8. Individually reply to concerned audience members. In addition to sending out blanket statements from your company to its whole audience, you’ll also want to address anyone that reaches out directly on social media. Obviously, don’t waste your time engaging with trolls and such, but crisis management tools can help you find people who are legitimately concerned, the customers whose relationships you’re in danger of damaging. If it’s a general angry or concerned tweet, let the user know they’re heard and instruct them on how they can stay updated. If they address something specific, address that topic directly as best you can. And if you can’t answer the question, be honest, don’t just try to sidestep it. And for the love of social media, do NOT use automated or canned responses in a social media crisis. 9. Post a long-form response on your website. Remember that central location I talked about previously? Let’s talk about it a little more. You want one “hub” that people can go to for information so that you don’t have to only give updates 140 characters at a time. This can be a blog post that you update as you have more information or a static page. Add new updates and details as you have them, and it’s a great timeline of the crisis and place to direct social media users to. You can even embed social media posts to let people see all channels in one spot. 10. Let the dust settle. Once you’ve performed steps five through nine, it’s kind of a matter of rinsing and repeating. You’ll go through them with each update you communicate to your audience. Once they’ve done their jobs, it’s time to let the dust settle. Move on, but don’t forget. You don’t want to keep people’s attention on the social media crisis any longer than it needs to be, but you also shouldn’t avoid the topic if someone else brings it up. And you’re done. You now have a crisis plan locked, loaded, and ready to test. Hopefully, you’ll never need to use it. But this way you’re prepared in case disaster strikes. If you want more information for each step of the way, download our free workbook. It’s a detailed walkthrough to help you ask and answer the right questions. With it, you’ll be ready to deal with anything coming your way. Share this post Patrick Whatman Guest Blogger @Mention Be in the know 📥 Sign up for The Mention Memo Get the latest and greatest digital marketing + social media tips every week! Related posts “Battle of the Brands”: WeTransfer vs. Dropbox How Social Listening can Enrich your Clients' Marketing Campaigns Adapting Your Conversion Funnel to the Shifting Mindsets of Consumers in a Post-Covid Landscape How Digital PR Can Help You Build A Brand? Beginner’s Guide to doing Content Curation the Right Way 6 Ways to Utilize Social Media for Financial Institutions
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Result 15
TitleHow to Build a Solid Crisis Management Plan | Emplifi
Urlhttps://emplifi.io/resources/blog/crisis-management-guide
DescriptionLearn how crisis management helps you respond effectively to any threat. Prevent the damage a crisis can inflict on your organization & stakeholders
Date12 Jul 2021
Organic Position13
H1What you need to know to build a solid crisis management plan
H2What is crisis management?
Drafting a crisis management plan
Crafting successful crisis management strategies
Crisis management examples
The takeaway
H3What constitutes a crisis?
Not all crises are created equal
Resolution of sensitive topics or negative sentiment
1. Detect
2. Identify
3. Consider
4. Respond
HBO
Nike
H2WithAnchorsWhat is crisis management?
Drafting a crisis management plan
Crafting successful crisis management strategies
Crisis management examples
The takeaway
BodyWhat you need to know to build a solid crisis management planYou have a social media crisis on your hands. Do you know what to do next?If your answer is not a confident “Yes”, then it’s time to update, review, or maybe even create a crisis management plan that can help your business sail as smoothly as possible when the waters get choppy.To achieve that, you have to think through the possible situations that might come up and have plans to follow if (or when) they arise. In this article, we discuss several strategies for preparing for and dealing with a crisis so that you can feel ready and able to tackle whatever challenges might come your way, and minimize crises while it is still early.What is crisis management?When a business crisis arises, either due to something the company itself did or because of external factors like hacks or things outside of the company’s control, the situation needs to be handled and addressed immediately by the company. Put simply, that is what crisis management is about. Although, it goes much deeper.For one thing, one of the most important steps to crisis management is preparing ahead of time, well before anything has even gone wrong. Knowing that you need to have a plan is critical, because trying to react in the middle of a business crisis might just make things worse. Let’s look at some of the questions to answer and the steps to take to draft a crisis management plan.Drafting a crisis management plan. These are some of the critical components that should be addressed when determining your social media crisis management plan:What constitutes a crisis?Your company’s Facebook page has received 10 negative user posts in 30 minutes; is that a crisis?This is where context matters, and your social media management team is the frontline for determining the next steps. If all of those comments are about something completely different, it’s worth monitoring but probably not something that needs to be quickly flagged and elevated.However, if they are all about the same issue or product failure, or they are all reactions after recently seeing your company in the news, then you could have something bigger on your hands.Remember, a social media manager is also a reputation manager. If your business handles customer service through social media, then a big part of their role is the day-to-day reputation management that will help customers and potential customers feel good about your company when they search for you.However, social media managers are not always crisis managers. As such, the task of solving bigger issues does not rest on their shoulders alone. Part of your plan needs to spell out situations that are (and are not) a crisis. This will help your social media management team know when they are expected to bring things to management’s attention, and when they should move forward as they normally would with their review management efforts.Not all crises are created equal. Related to the above point, not every crisis requires all hands on deck. Within your plan, have different action plans for various levels of crises.For example, if there are a lot of negative comments about a specific product, perhaps a company statement about that product is required. However, that does not necessarily mean that the whole C-suite needs to be notified.The bigger the crisis, the more time and human capital is necessary to address it. As such, it is ideal to have plans for crises of different scales, such as ones that require fewer people for smaller issues, so that not everyone is pulled in when they do not necessarily need to be.Many social media crises arise because there was a failure to successfully resolve social media issues. While not the same as a full-blown business crisis, social media crises should be taken seriously.Avoid turning a social media issue into a social media crisisSet guidelines for when a social media issue has evolved into a social media crisis. Spend sufficient time training your social media management team on what constitutes a crisis and inform them of the necessary steps for resolving the issue.Resolution of sensitive topics or negative sentiment. Determine what topics your brand defines as sensitive, and which are considered negative sentiment.Sensitive issues and negative sentiment posts will inevitably occur on a regular basis. Determine required actions for each type of sensitive topic and user posts with negative sentiment. Recommendation: if possible, move the conversation off your Facebook Page or Twitter Profile. Inquire about the issue, respond amiably and if possible resolve the issue.If a user is irrationally posting negative sentiment – not valid criticisms or concerns – then you have the option of reporting or blocking the user. However, keep in mind that blocking users sometimes brings more attention and negative sentiment toward your brand.Crafting successful crisis management strategies. When a crisis happens to your brand, you need to know how to react. A mishandled crisis can destroy your reputation, and can even end up circulating in the news.Ensure you have a workable plan ready for dealing with crisis situations. These steps will help:1. Detect. Before you can even begin to work on an issue, you have to know that there is an issue in the first place. To effectively manage your social media presence, you have to be tuned into the chatter surrounding your brand. Dealing with everyday complaints or posts with negative sentiment is a part of your regular reputation management. However, make sure that you are taking the time to look at the big-picture view to see if there is something bigger on the horizon.An audience analysis tool like the one available as part of the Emplifi Social Marketing Cloud can help detect potential crises at the early stage while there are still some preventative measures to take.2. Identify. Identify what led to the problem. Who was involved? What happened and when did it happen?Once you have a clear and objective view of the problem, it’s time to look into steps to fix it. Make sure that you not only have control of the situation, but that each involved team in your organization is synced on how to deal with the situation and potential future crises like it.3. Consider. We’ll call these the four Ts:Tone – What should be the tone of your response? Make sure that it aligns both with your company’s tone in general, but also with the appropriate tone demanded by the situation. If you can be lighthearted about the incident, be lighthearted. If it’s a serious issue, communicate in a serious tone.Timeliness – How long ago did the incident happen? Make sure you are reacting as quickly as you can without tripping over your own feet in an effort to correct your mistake. This is why it is so important to be efficient in how you take apart the problem and prepare your communication strategy.Thoroughness – What networks are you covering? This is not like posting content; you do not need to be everywhere, drawing even more attention to a problem you would like to have people accept and move past. Consider how the story is spreading, and address it in the same way.Transparency – In almost every situation, transparency is best. That means not only should your response acknowledge any mistake your brand made, but it also should show that you are trying to deal with it honestly. This means openly broadcasting all of the steps that you are taking to fix it and make sure it does not happen again.4. Respond. Now, it’s time to respond. Ensure your team has their social media posts ready on all appropriate channels, then send them out. Be prepared to continually deal with further feedback – also, alert your PR team to your communications strategy so that news reports only include the official positioning. It is highly useful to be using a CMS tool here, to make sure that you are controlling the conversation to the fullest extent.Once you have developed a plan, make sure to circulate it within your organization. Everyone in marketing, PR, and sales should read it. You could even try running scenarios with your team to test your preparation. With a good crisis plan in place and the proper training, your team can safely avoid a potential social media catastrophe.Crisis management examples. Sometimes things get out of your control. They can get ugly. Posts meant to be internal going public, while others may be read as unintentionally insensitive or misleading, for example. Most often, a real-life brand image crisis carries over onto social media, where it can catch fire and spread quickly.Here, we look at a couple of high-profile crises and how the companies involved handled the situation.HBO. On June 17, 2021, thousands of people received a bizarre email from HBO Max with the subject line “Integration Test Email #1” that contained just one line: “This template is used by integration tests only.”Clearly, this wasn’t supposed to be seen externally. HBO Max sent an explanation tweet acknowledging the mistake and stating that yes, believe it or not, it was in fact caused by an intern who the company is helping learn from the incident.We mistakenly sent out an empty test email to a portion of our HBO Max mailing list this evening. We apologize for the inconvenience, and as the jokes pile in, yes, it was the intern. No, really. And we’re helping them through it. ❤️— HBOMaxHelp (@HBOMaxHelp) June 18, 2021 This was a minor incident, and by staying light-hearted about everything, HBO helped engender a lot of positive responses. Many people, including some well-known celebrities, started sharing their own mistakes and mishaps in tweets directed to the intern.Some even pointed out that by discovering the hole in the integration system, the intern actually helped the company by bringing it to their attention.Nike. The brand of shoes a basketball player wears is a big-money decision, especially for high-profile players. Usually, just getting a player to wear your brand is the bulk of the work from the shoe brand side. However, Nike had a crisis on its hands in 2019 when the highest-profile college player in the country, Zion Williamson, broke through his Nike shoe during the most-anticipated game of the season.It was such a large incident that Nike’s stock fell 1.8% the following day. Clearly, the company needed to be proactive and do something to avoid continuing to be mocked by Twitter trolls all day.In response, Nike put on a full-court press, sending teams to North Carolina – where the game had taken place – and even to Nike’s manufacturing site in China, where they helped develop a custom shoe for Zion Williamson.From its initial concern to detailing the steps it was taking to fix the issue, Nike was open and up-front on social media about its response. The result was that Nike overcame the crisis and kept Williamson committed to the company as he released his own signature Nike shoe in April 2021.The takeaway. Taking the first steps and drafting a social media issue and crisis management plan is a large step in developing your overall social media strategy. However, the work does not end there. The social media world is constantly changing and evolving, which means that your social media strategy, including your issue and crisis management plans, needs to adapt to these changes. Make sure that your social media management team is regularly analyzing key metrics about how they are resolving social media issues and deterring potential crises. From these analytical reports, there should be regular meetings to discuss any changes or amendments to optimize the effectiveness of your social media management plans.Want to see how Emplifi can help your brand identify and address social media crises? Schedule a demo today to speak with one of our Emplifi experts.By: Emplifi - the leading unified CX platformARTICLE PUBLISHED: JULY 12, 2021 Emplifi CX CloudSocial Marketing CloudSocial Commerce CloudService CloudKnowledgeResourcesCustomer StoriesCompanyAbout usTrust CenterLeadershipMedia & PressCareersContact us Emplifi LearningPrivacy PolicyTerms of use© 2020-2022 Emplifi Inc. All rights reserved. Emplifi™ and Empathy, amplified.™ are trademarks of Emplifi Inc. All product names and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
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Result 16
TitleHow to manage a social media crisis? | Brand24 Blog
Urlhttps://brand24.com/blog/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionSocial media crisis management will help you survive a crisis and navigate toward calm waters. Take a look!
Date1 Jul 2020
Organic Position14
H1How to manage social media crisis?
H2How to manage social media crisis? If you are present on social media, a crisis will hit you, sooner or later. That doesn’t mean that your company has to suffer the consequences of a social media crisis. With a robust social media crisis management plan you can came out of the crisis unscathed. But to achieve this, you need to be prepared
What is a social media crisis?
Stages of social media crisis management
Social media crisis management plan
How to effectively manage a social media crisis?
H31. Secure your social media accounts
2. Monitor what people say about your company
3. Establish social media guidelines
4. Design a crisis communication plan
5. Stop scheduled posts
6. Respond on social media
7. Communicate with your employees
8. Evaluate your social media crisis response
H2WithAnchorsHow to manage social media crisis? If you are present on social media, a crisis will hit you, sooner or later. That doesn’t mean that your company has to suffer the consequences of a social media crisis. With a robust social media crisis management plan you can came out of the crisis unscathed. But to achieve this, you need to be prepared
What is a social media crisis?
Stages of social media crisis management
Social media crisis management plan
How to effectively manage a social media crisis?
BodyHow to manage social media crisis? Marta July 1, 2020 ・ 8 min read How to manage social media crisis? If you are present on social media, a crisis will hit you, sooner or later. That doesn’t mean that your company has to suffer the consequences of a social media crisis. With a robust social media crisis management plan you can came out of the crisis unscathed. But to achieve this, you need to be prepared. Social media crisis management should be an integral part of your business strategy. Hopefully, you want have to use it. But the best policy is to prepare ahead of time. We prepared these social media crisis management tips! This article will help you prepare a solid crisis response, so you will know what to do before, during, and after the social media crisis. Here’s what’s ahead of us today: What is a social media crisis? Stages of social media crisis management Social media crisis management plan 1. Secure your social media accounts 2. Monitor what people say about your company 3. Establish social media guidelines 4. Design a crisis communication plan 5. Stop scheduled posts 6. Respond on social media 7. Communicate with your employees 8. Evaluate your social media crisis response How to effectively manage a social media crisis? What is a social media crisis? Before we delve into the nitty-gritty of social media crisis management, let’s take a step back and answer one very important question — what is a social media crisis? Not every negative comment is a social media crisis. You can’t please everyone and people will voice their opinions online. Some of them will be critical towards your company or product. That’s nothing a seasoned social media manager can’t handle. But a surge of negative comments can be an early indicator of a social media crisis. To know when to react you need to spot any out of the ordinary behaviour. To be able to set benchmarks, you need to monitor and your social media channels. Once you know what to expect, you can easily spot the spikes in engagement or negative mentions. A higher than usual number of negative comments is not the only sign of a social media crisis. You should also take into account the potential damage to your business. What constitutes a social media crisis? A social media crisis is an event that could have a negative impact on your business’s bottom line. Stages of social media crisis management. Social media crisis management starts well before you spot a sudden growth in the number of negative mentions. You can safely assume that a social media crisis will hit your company sooner or later. How should you start your social media crisis management process? There are three stages of social media crisis management: Before the social media crisis.During the social media crisisAfter the social media crisis. To protect your brand reputation, you should implement social media crisis management into your social media strategy. Social media crisis management plan. Without further ado, let’s take a closer look at the bulletproof social media crisis management tips. We divided the tips into three categories, so you know what to do before, during, and after the crisis. Let’s take a look! The first steps describe what you should do before a social media crisis. 1. Secure your social media accounts. Many social media crises start with hostile takeover — either by an employee who left the company and want to take some sort of revenge or by simply sharing the password with some third parties. There are a couple of actions you can take to minimise the chances of social media crisis. First of all, minimise the number of people that have password to your social media accounts. Centralised password system will allow you to implement strong passwords and revoke the access of the employees who no longer need it. Secondly, always set up a two-factor authentication system. This will give you greater control over who tries to login oto your social media accounts. 2. Monitor what people say about your company. To prevent a social media crisis from escalating and reaching brand new audiences you need to nip every potential crisis in the bud. In today’s always online world, you need to know what is happening around your brand almost immediately. To monitor your brand effectively, you need a social listening tool. We’ll base our examples on Brand24, because it’s one of the most robust and affordable media monitoring tools on the market. First, you need to set up a trial account. In the project creation wizard, enter the keywords you’d like to monitor online. Think about: the name of your brand, product, or serviceyour branded hashtagyour campaign hashtagthe name of your CEO or other well-known employeesterm strictly related to your industry You might wonder why should you monitor phrases related to industry? Isn’t it a bit of a stretch? The problem is, your competitor’s crisis can affect your business. That’s why, you should keep your finger on the pulse and check what is going on with other companies. Once you set up a project, a media monitoring tool will start collecting public online mentions containing your keyword. Thanks to media monitoring, you will be able to: know about any negative sentiment around your brand in an instance which makes it easy to prevent crisis from escalatingprepare benchmarks to easily spot sudden spikes in the volume of mentionsmanage your hashtags marketing campaigns — it might not seem like a social media crisis management issue, but you have to know how your campaign is performing Track your social media mentions! Try for free (no credit card required). 3. Establish social media guidelines. Your weakest link in during the social media crisis might be one of your employees. The good news is, it’s relatively easy to protect yourself against rough employees. To prevent your employees from starting a social media crisis, it’s a good idea to create a social media guide. Add all the do’s and don’ts to the guideline. Of course, the specifics will vary according to your business niche, but it’s generally a good idea to add the following rules: Copyright. That’s an absolute basic, no matter what kind of company you run. Every employee with access to your social media accounts should know how to use and credit content.Privacy. Some interactions with your audience should take place in an open space, while other should be move to private messages. Make sure everyone knows the difference.Brand voice. Is your company’s voice formal or informal? Do you joke around? Make sure everyone knows how to post.Brand style. Social media are visuals platforms. Make sure that all your posts, stories, and movies are aligned together. 4. Design a crisis communication plan. Before a social media crisis hits, you should prepare a crisis communication plan. Having a crisis communication plan in place will ensure that you will act fast and efficient. Your social media crisis response team will know how to act and won’t have to wait for C-level decisions. A crisis communication plan should detailed who is responsible for what. Everyone in the company, from the C-level to the most junior employees should know what to do. Remember to prepare two means of communication — internal and external one. Your employees should know what is going on and receive regular company updates. On the other hand, you should also include external communication guidelines. First, draft messages you could post on your official channels. Secondly, develop an approval process for your official communication. You might wonder why should you prepare draft messages. You never know what type of crisis will hit you. But you can be certain it will hit you. And once you have to deal with a full blown social media crisis, you will have to act fast. Crisis communication plan will ensure that people will know what to do. Once you are prepare to manage the crisis, you can focus on what to do during the social media crisis. 5. Stop scheduled posts. Your social media manager probably has fully booked social media calendar. But once a social media crisis hits your brand, it’s time to stop all scheduled posts. Scheduled communication will make you look a bit silly and might further damage your brand. Some pre-scheduled social media posts can hinder all your crisis management efforts. Once you start implementing social media crisis communication plan, stop all scheduled posts. 6. Respond on social media. Social media crisis management starts with crisis communication. The plan should contain a detailed response to the crisis. Once you post the first message and acknowledge the social media crisis, it’s time to engage on social media. There are a couple of rules you should follow: be present on social media. Once a social media crisis hits it’s not a good idea to hide. Brace yourself and respond to comments and questions.never get emotional. Many Internet users will express a lot of negative comments. You should answer them calmly and try to resolve any heated discussion in private messagesdon’t defend your position at all cost. Some people will argue with you just for the sake of the argument. If you see that the discussion is going nowhere, simply state your position clearly and stop answering. 7. Communicate with your employees. It’s vital that your employees know exactly what is going on. A social media crisis can damage your brand reputation and negatively affect your bottom line. One thing you don’t need during a social media crisis is gossip among your employees. Make sure everyone is on the same page. Every employee should know what they can and cannot say about the crisis. This will help you contain the spread of misinformation and rumours. Hopefully, these tips will help you survive a social media crisis. But social media crisis management doesn’t stop here. There is still one step ahead of you — the post-social media crisis management. 8. Evaluate your social media crisis response. Learn from experience. Once you stave off the social media crisis, debrief your team and examine what happened. Note everything you have done and determine the effects of your actions. Speak with members of all teams and identify the strong and weak points of your social media crisis response. Other departments can share interesting insights you can implement into your social media crisis management plan. How to effectively manage a social media crisis? The good news is, social media crisis can give you a chance to build a stronger brand. To effectively manage a social media crisis you need to be prepared and don’t panic once a crisis hits. Remember about pre-social media crisis management phase. Preparing for a social media crisis will save you some time in the first phase. You can use this time to prepare for the second phase of social media crisis management. Stay calm during the crisis and engage with your followers. Present your side of the story and try to resolve the most heated discussions in private communication. At the end, evaluate your crisis management approach. There are aspects of your communication you can improve to prepare better for the next social media crisis. HANDPICKED RELATED CONTENT Guide to successful crisis managementThe golden rules of PR crisis managementHow to increase your reach on Instagram? Marta ・ Content Manager at Brand24. An avid reader and amateur baker. Passionate about mountains, travelling, and jazz. It's easy to get started And it's free, no commitment, no credit card, for 14 days Try Brand24 Free Related articles How to measure social media reach? Tom 7 min read The ultimate guide to brand awareness Marta 17 min read 11 social media KPIs that will help you succeed Marta 10 min read Manage a social media crisis Prepare for a social media crisis and track what people say about your brand on social media!
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Result 17
Title10 Steps to Managing a PR or Social Media Crisis
Urlhttps://www.meltwater.com/en/blog/10-steps-to-managing-a-pr-or-social-media-crisis
DescriptionDon't let a social media crisis get out of hand. Here's a step by step guide to effectively manage a crisis [free Infographic]
Date29 Apr 2020
Organic Position15
H110 Steps to Managing a PR or Social Media Crisis
H2How to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis
Interested in learning how Meltwater can help you? Fill out the form to learn more
H3Step 1: Use Social Listening & Media Monitoring to Create Alerts
Step 2: Form a Cross-Departmental Crisis Response Team
Step 3: Establish a Crisis Chain of Command
Step 4: Create Several Response Templates
Step 5: Do a Practice Run
H2WithAnchorsHow to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis
Interested in learning how Meltwater can help you? Fill out the form to learn more
Body10 Steps to Managing a PR or Social Media CrisisChristine NielsenApr 29, 20203 min. readPR & CommunicationsSocial MediaShare ArticleRequest a demoChristine NielsenApr 29, 2020Request a demoNearly one in four brands don't have a set crisis communication plan in place. And considering 80% of customers use social media to engage with a brand during a crisis, not having a plan in place could be more detrimental than you think as a tweetstorm roles in.In the digital communication landscape, it's crucial to have a process in place to know how and when to communicate during a crisis properly. What's even more important? Taking the proper steps before the crisis hits; You could call it a pre-plan plan. Now, let's go through the five steps to take to prepare for a social media crisis. (All of these steps, are outlined in the infographic below). How to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis . Step 1: Use Social Listening & Media Monitoring to Create Alerts. You can't manage a crisis if you don't know one is happening. By using a social media listening or media monitoring platform to monitor conversations around your brand, your team can prevent a negative tweet from becoming a full-blown crisis. Not only can these tools give you some advanced warning, but they can also help you capture brand sentiment, a leading indicator. Need help identifying potential social media crises? Download our crisis management eBook for more tips on how social listening & media monitoring can help you spot a disaster waiting to happen. Step 2: Form a Cross-Departmental Crisis Response Team. Identify the key individuals who will serve as the spokespeople, liaisons, and decision-makers when a crisis hits. Your social media crisis response team will likely include individuals from all different rungs on the hierarchical ladder.It would be best if you aimed to create a cross-departmental unit with members from your marketing, sales, customer service, and executive leadership teams. Then once a crisis has occurred, you can more easily distribute information to your entire organization. Step 3: Establish a Crisis Chain of Command. When the time comes to alert your crisis response team of a real issue, there should be a transparent escalation process already outlined. This document should include the contact information for each member of the crisis response team. Remember, not every negative mention or review will require the attention of your crisis response team, so it's essential to discuss with your team what defines a crisis at your organization.Step 4: Create Several Response Templates. Accurate and timely communication is key during a crisis. So, when an emergency arises, you don't want to be scrambling to create a press release template or drafting a tweet. Prepare the communications materials you believe you could need ahead of time. This is why it's important to discuss with your team what constitutes a crisis for your organization. Based on the outcome of those conversations, you can begin drafting communications material for each of the predetermined scenarios.Step 5: Do a Practice Run. Think of this step like a fire drill in elementary school. Test out how quickly your crisis response team can assemble and whether or not the escalation procedures worked. By taking this step, you'll be able to identify—and correct—any issues that may arise. By taking these steps ahead of time, your organization will be better equipped to handle a crisis. Music to any communications professional's ears. Now, what steps should you take during a PR or social media crisis? This easy-to-follow checklist covers the how-tos when managing a PR or social media crisis, broken down step by step. What steps match your teams' current plan?PR & CommunicationsSocial MediaInterested in learning how Meltwater can help you? Fill out the form to learn more. Loading...
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TitleSocial Media Crisis Plan: When Things Go Wrong | Sprout Social
Urlhttps://sproutsocial.com/insights/social-media-crisis-plan/
DescriptionFrom upset customers to global crises and beyond, there's a lot that can go wrong on social media. Our guide to social media crisis management can help
Date31 Mar 2020
Organic Position16
H1Social media crisis plan: What to do when things go wrong
H2Send us an email
What constitutes a social media “crisis?”
How to respond to a social media crisis
How to avoid another social media crisis
What does your social media crisis management plan look like?
Resources for you
Recommended for you
Build and grow stronger relationships on social
H3Send us an email
Insensitive or out-of-touch comments
Product fails and customer criticism
Employee errors and bad behavior gone viral
Site outages and broken links
Real-world crises, global events and tragedies
React quickly and swiftly
Stop automated posts and take control of your account(s)
Assess and apologize if necessary
Don’t panic
Determine who can speak for your brand
Double-check your brand voice
Set up social listening
[Toolkit] Unlock Social Media Success in 2022
The 2021 Content Benchmarks Report
Instagram for Brands: How To Build A Creative, Engaging, High-Impact Strategy
How to Find Content Inspiration for Your Social Strategy [Free Worksheet]
Contents may be hot: Behind the handle with Social Media Tea
Call it what you want, Taylor Swift is a model community manager
10 Community management tools to engage with your audience
Successful events start with social
H2WithAnchorsSend us an email
What constitutes a social media “crisis?”
How to respond to a social media crisis
How to avoid another social media crisis
What does your social media crisis management plan look like?
Resources for you
Recommended for you
Build and grow stronger relationships on social
BodySocial media crisis plan: What to do when things go wrongWritten byby Brent BarnhartPublished on March 31, 2020 • Reading time 9 minutes If you’ve never had to respond to a social media crisis, consider yourself lucky. The reality, though? Businesses both big and small need a crisis plan. Because social media meltdowns, pile-ons and controversies aren’t just reserved for the biggest companies anymore. Recent engagement statistics highlight just how quickly social media moves for modern companies. When you’re always dealing with a flood of @mentions, messages and updates, it’s clear how mistakes can get made and spiral out of control. Meanwhile, the ongoing coronavirus pandemic highlights the need for a social media crisis management plan. Brands must be more mindful than ever of customer empathy and how they carry themselves during troubled times. This guide breaks down the basics of handling a social media crisis and tips to prevent problems in the future. What constitutes a social media “crisis?”. Hey, fair question. In short, a crisis represents any social media activity that potentially hurts your brand’s reputation or ability to do business. Bear in mind that a “crisis” is much more than just a single negative comment or customer complaint. Indicators of a crisis could be anything from a flurry of negative comments to an outright boycott of your products. Also, note that not all crises are totally within your control as a marketer.  They can happen no matter how careful your brand is with its messaging. How so? Let’s look at some social media crisis examples below. Insensitive or out-of-touch comments. Perhaps the most common–and preventable–type of crisis that comes from saying something offensive or insensitive. We see such snafus often from celebrities. Chalk it up to a lack of self-awareness or not having a second opinion to say “Hey, maybe you shouldn’t post this.” Consider the recent backlash from Vanessa Hudgens’ insensitive comments on Instagram Live regarding the COVID-19 crisis. Note that Hudgens is among one of the most-followed celebrities on Instagram with over 38 million followers. Questioning the effectiveness of shelter-in-place orders and playfully commenting “Like, people are going to die” was both out-of-touch and irresponsible, to say the least. Hudgens has since walked back her comments and “apologized,” although damage to her reputation has certainly been done based on the replies. pic.twitter.com/Mjw6qJ5bET — Vanessa Hudgens (@VanessaHudgens) March 17, 2020 Errors in judgment aren’t just restricted to celebrities. For example, the Indian branch of Dutch airline KLM had to apologize for a now-deleted insensitive tweet regarding the fatality rates on airplanes based on where passengers are sitting during a flight. The fact that the back seats on a plane are technically the safest may not be offensive on its own. However, presenting death rates as a “fun fact” with a #TriviaTuesday hashtag is definitely in poor taste. We would like to sincerely apologise for a recent update. The post was based on a publically available aviation fact, and isn't a @KLM opinion. It was never our intention to hurt anyone's sentiments. The post has since been deleted. — KLM India (@KLMIndia) July 17, 2019 Product fails and customer criticism. Social media and community managers serve as the sort of mouthpiece for their respective brands online. And if a product you’re putting out doesn’t deliver or results in bad press, you’re going to be taking the brunt of the criticism. As highlighted by Refinery29, a number of beauty influencers and YouTubers took to social media in 2020 to speak out against DevaCurl products after previously promoting them to followers and fans. Plus, a corresponding Facebook Group with more than 59,000 members cited hair damage and loss from using DevaCurl. This controversy highlights the big-picture impact of social media crisis management. For example, front-page Google results for “DevaCurl” include coverage of the controversy as well as the video noted above. DevaCurl has publicly addressed the allegations against their products, but the visibility of the issue won’t disappear immediately. We’ve been working non-stop to get to the bottom of what’s happening with some members of our community. We promised to keep you updated when we had news, and today we’re sharing new information that we’ve never made public before. Click here: https://t.co/9lXJZIJKo1 #DevaFacts pic.twitter.com/guNxkbccBd — DevaCurl (@DevaCurl) February 29, 2020 Employee errors and bad behavior gone viral. As noted earlier, sometimes a crisis occurs due to something completely beyond a social manager or marketing department’s control. For example, Cynet Systems had to completely delete their job-centric Twitter account and apologize for a job posting on LinkedIn seeking a “preferably Caucasian” candidate in 2019. Regardless of who was responsible for the listing itself, the brand apologized but was understandably dragged on Twitter for the error. Uh, hey @cynetjobs – what's with this? Your job listing for a mid-senior level business development position's top qualification is "Preferably Caucasian" How could you POSSIBLY think that's okay? pic.twitter.com/DPWzpgXqqE — Helena (@misshelenasue) April 27, 2019 Another example comes from Walmart in 2017 in which an image went viral depicting a “back to school” promo in front of a store’s firearm display. Regardless of the origin of the photo and whether it was some sort of prank or staged incident, their social team was pressed to respond. What’s in this pic would never be acceptable in our stores. We regret this situation & are looking into how it could have happened. -Danny — Walmart (@Walmart) August 9, 2017 Site outages and broken links. Although there’s sort of a gray area on what sort of outages constitute a “crisis,” they can definitely become bigger problems if you aren’t paying attention. Let’s say you’re in the midst of a product launch and your site goes down. Or maybe you’re promoting an irresistible offer to your customers and your links are broken. If so, an explosion of @mentions and complaints could very well come your way. Thanks for choosing us for dinner! We’re aware that our site is down and it’s the only way to claim our Family Meal deal. We appreciate your patience as we get the site back on track. — Panda Express (@PandaExpress) March 21, 2020 The good news is that these sorts of crises are the easiest, granted you’re equipped to respond and fix the issue in a timely manner that satisfies customers’ needs.. Real-world crises, global events and tragedies. To say that we live in unprecedented times is an understatement. These days brands need to be prepared for anything. The real-time crisis management efforts we’re seeing from companies in response to COVID-19 is proof of that. With all the news around COVID-19, our usual social content just doesn’t feel relevant. Starting today, we're using social to support you by sharing resources and starting new conversations around remote work and open communication to help (even just a little) during this time. — Sprout Social (@SproutSocial) March 13, 2020 From pandemics to tragedies and beyond, brands need to be aware of current events and respond in a way that’s tasteful and not insensitive. In some cases, that might mean putting your social marketing on pause or shifting focus. In other cases, it may be the best channel for communicating with customers. Right now social media is crucial for many of the businesses that had to temporarily shut their doors because of COVID-19 There’s no better way to stay top-of-mind in an unobtrusive way — Matthew Kobach (@mkobach) March 24, 2020 How to respond to a social media crisis. Listen: we’re not trying to freak you out or scare your marketing team. Businesses today need to be proactive. Given the constantly “on” nature of businesses today and the unpredictable nature of life itself, it pays to be prepared. Now that we know what common crises are out there, let’s talk about what it takes to respond to one when it does occur. React quickly and swiftly. A response time of 12 hours is considered the norm when it comes to questions and concerns on social media. However, social media crisis management means responding as quickly as possible. The sooner you’re able to react and quell any sort of controversy, the better. Whether that means deleting a post or issuing an apology depends on the situation. Either the way, it all starts with keeping a keen eye on your notifications and @mentions to keep a negative feedback loop from forming. This doesn’t mean staring at your social feeds 24/7, thankfully. For example, social media engagement tools like Sprout can notify you of engagement spikes and spot a potential crisis before it has a chance to snowball. Stop automated posts and take control of your account(s). Another smart move is halting your automated posts during a crisis, at least temporarily. For example, restaurants and venues in areas with shelter-in-place orders obviously shouldn’t be advertising sit-down meals and parties. Such posts feel out-of-place and insensitive during a crisis when people are focused on their well-being versus buying. If you’re managing your social accounts in Sprout, hitting the proverbial pause button can be done in a single click. The ability to pull this sort of emergency lever is especially useful if you’re juggling multiple clients or accounts. Assess and apologize if necessary. If you find yourself in social media crisis management mode, it’s only natural to want to get things “back to normal” as quickly as possible. But if there’s one aspect of a crisis that you shouldn’t rush, it’s an apology. In fact, a half-hearted apology can actually do more damage in a situation where your customers were truly hurt. What makes a “good” public apology is up for debate, but the example below from Lady Gaga is generally considered to be a strong one. A long-form, heartfelt explanation to your followers is much more meaningful than the 140-character equivalent of “Sorry you were offended.” I stand by anyone who has ever been the victim of sexual assault: pic.twitter.com/67sz4WpV3i — Lady Gaga (@ladygaga) January 10, 2019 Don’t panic. Here’s some good news: rarely is there a social media crisis that no brand can recover from. Accidents and mistakes happen. They’re often beyond our control. Look no further than marketers’ response to COVID-19 as a shining example. Both marketing teams and customers alike are taking to social media to share their experiences and come together during an uncertain time. There’s perhaps no better place to provide public support and reassure your customers that you’re there for them. Wow. Over 165 members of our customer community are joining our Zoom video call tomorrow to connect with each other and talk about how they are handling the current challenges both personally & professionally. If you are a customer & want to join, please DM us for the details. — CrowdRiff (@CrowdRiff) March 24, 2020 How to avoid another social media crisis. To wrap things up, let’s discuss some pointers for avoiding another potential crisis in the future. Below are some quick measures to keep from stepping into crisis territory. Determine who can speak for your brand. Establishing a social media policy means having a set of checks and balances and place. For example, who’s allowed to speak on behalf of your brand? Do you have your posts and comments go through approvals (think: client-side or a marketing team)? By keeping your brand’s messaging limited to a select few, you’re less likely to post insensitive content. This creates a sense of accountability for your social marketing if something does go wrong. Double-check your brand voice. Piggybacking on the tip above, your brand voice determines how you speak to customers. For example, do you prefer to take a humorous tone? Formal? Snarky? There is no “right” answer here. What matters is having a defined style guide so that your customer interactions are always “on-brand” and non-confrontational. This also makes it easier to help new hires understand how to talk to your customers via social. Set up social listening. Finally, you should always have a pulse on how people feel about your business. Social listening can help you monitor conversations and the sentiment around your brand, whether it be positive or negative. This can help you spot the beginnings of a crisis and potential issues that your customers might have before they blow up. What does your social media crisis management plan look like? Managing a social media crisis doesn’t have to be a nightmare. Are they stressful? Absolutely. That said, crises come with the territory of having a social presence. Whether it’s the unpredictable or something out of your hands, brands today need to be equipped to respond. With the right social media tools and a crisis action plan, you can carry yourself with peace of mind. And if you haven’t already, make sure to check out our social media crisis management guide for more tips on being prepared! Resources for you . [Toolkit] Unlock Social Media Success in 2022 . The 2021 Content Benchmarks Report . Instagram for Brands: How To Build A Creative, Engaging, High-Impact Strategy . How to Find Content Inspiration for Your Social Strategy [Free Worksheet] . Recommended for you . View all Recommended for youRecommended for youCategories Community Management Marketing Disciplines Contents may be hot: Behind the handle with Social Media Tea . Published on October 12, 2021 • Reading time 15 minutes Categories Community Management Call it what you want, Taylor Swift is a model community manager . Published on September 24, 2021 • Reading time 3 minutes Categories Community Management Social Media Engagement 10 Community management tools to engage with your audience . Published on August 17, 2021 • Reading time 6 minutes Categories Community Management Marketing Disciplines Successful events start with social . Published on August 10, 2021 • Reading time 5 minutes Now on slide Now on slide Now on slide Now on slide Build and grow stronger relationships on social . Sprout Social helps you understand and reach your audience, engage your community and measure performance with the only all-in-one social media management platform built for connection. Try Sprout For Free
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Result 19
TitleHow to Effectively Handle Crisis Management Through Social Media
Urlhttps://www.rockdovesolutions.com/blog/how-to-effectively-handle-crisis-management-through-social-media
DescriptionHow can organizations leverage the power of crisis management through social media? Read this article to find out
Date
Organic Position17
H1How to Effectively Handle Crisis Management Through Social Media
H2An Ideal Tool for Crisis Communication
Mistakes to Avoid
H3
H2WithAnchorsAn Ideal Tool for Crisis Communication
Mistakes to Avoid
BodyHow to Effectively Handle Crisis Management Through Social Media Subscribe To Our Blog Share   Social media is the double-edged sword of crisis management. Platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram can be an essential communication tool for effectively managing a crisis—but they can also make a crisis worse than ever if they are not used strategically. For organizations like yours, social media has the power to become one of your most impactful crisis communication tools. However, the nature of the medium means that it has to be handled carefully. Only a strategic approach to social media crisis management will enable you to harness its potential while ensuring it works for you and not against you. Let’s take a closer look at the ways in which organizations can handle crisis management through social media, as well as some key faux pas to avoid when using these tools in a crisis.   An Ideal Tool for Crisis Communication. Having an effective crisis management plan in place can have a huge impact on how well your organization weathers a crisis. We see this play out all the time: for example, how United Airlines handled its reputation crisis after law enforcement officers dragged a passenger off a flight. The way in which an individual or a company communicates with the public, its customers, and other stakeholders after a crisis truly matters. And it could make or break your business. In the past, when a crisis hit your organization, you would first issue a press release. Your crisis management plan would include draft statements that could be tailored to the specific situation. Today, crisis management inevitably involves social media, whether you are a large multi-national corporation or a small hometown business. When a crisis occurs—whether it’s negative publicity, a product recall, or an inaccurate news story going viral—social media should be the first place you turn. Why? The nature of social media makes it ideal for communicating quickly and effectively in our digital age. Communication on social media is near-instantaneous, so it gets your message out right away—much faster than a press release would. Plus, most of your customers are already on social media. An estimated 70 percent of Americans use one or more of the top sites (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and LinkedIn), and most are visiting at least once a day. These platforms give you a chance to take your message directly to the people you’re trying to reach. Social media allows you to quickly and effectively speak directly to your customers. As a result, you’re in a much better position to guide the conversation following a crisis. You’re not playing catch-up, as United was after customers posted cell-phone video of the passenger being removed from his flight. By the time the airline issued a response, it was already seen as the bad guy. However, by “getting out ahead” of a crisis, you have an opportunity to give your side of the story; to issue apologies when necessary; and to help guide the dialogue in a more positive, productive direction.   Mistakes to Avoid. As you plan to harness the potential of social media, however, remember the double-edged sword. The fact that social media is instantaneous, and news travels so quickly, among so many people, also means that the stakes are high. This isn’t like issuing a press release with a typo or misquote and then having to resend it. Once you share information on Facebook, Twitter, and so on, the news is out. You should assume that anything posted on social media can be seen and shared forever. Even if a tweet or post is deleted, it may have already been screen-shotted by countless followers. As you update your crisis management plan to include social media, consider adding a best practices section that helps your team avoid the following common mistakes: Slow or delayed response. News and opinions travel quickly on social media, so you need to be equipped to respond to a crisis immediately. Otherwise, an information vacuum can form and be filled with people’s criticisms and speculation about your company. If your social media team is small, consider investing in monitoring software that can help your team stay on top of negative comments, viral stories, and brand mentions. Public squabbles. They say that everyone is a critic online, which can make it easy for tensions to flare. Coach your team to respond to social media followers in a way that is polite, truthful, and on brand. If someone starts posting inflammatory or outright false statements, it might be time to block the user or reach out to him or her directly. A rule of thumb is to take a conversation “offline,” whether in a private message, email, or phone call, after a few attempts at civil conversation. Being caught unprepared. During your planning efforts, take the time to draft some key social media messages to have on hand when the next crisis hits. You can tweak the content for the specific situation when it occurs, but having at least a framework response will save time and energy when it matters most. Remember—your people are probably going to be stressed when a crisis hits, so predrafting statements that are on brand, calm, and respectful can help strike the right tone for your response. In our fast-moving digital age, organizations of all kinds and in all industries have started to leverage crisis management through social media to encourage a faster, more streamlined crisis response. As companies increasingly rely on mobile technology to optimize their crisis management efforts, consider the ways in which your business could benefit by strategically using social media during your next crisis. Subscribe To Our Blog Previous article: J&J and Tylenol Part 1: What We Can Learn From Their 1982 Crises Next article: Arthur Anderson & Enron: What We Can Learn From Their 2002 Crises Recommended articles In Case of Crisis Goes On The Road Use a Risk Assessment to Prioritize the Issues you Need to Manage Why Institutional Discrimination is Keeping Crisis Managers Awake at Night Three Months In, The Three Most Interesting Crises Of 2021 – So Far Solutions Reputation Risk Management Critical Event Management Security Risk Management Workplace Safety Management Products In Case of Crisis 365 Overview Threat Intelligence & Social Listening Issues & Incident Management Role-based & Actionable Playbooks Microsoft Teams Integration Company About Blog Resources News and Events Careers © 2021 RockDove Solutions, Inc.  Terms of Service Privacy Policy In Case of Crisis 365 is an Issue and Crisis Management Platform.
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Result 20
TitleHow To Stay Calm During A Social Media Crisis [Examples]
Urlhttps://www.spiralytics.com/blog/crisis-management-for-social-media/
DescriptionAre you prepared to deal with possible PR crises? We've listed down the top Social Media Crises Management Plan from popular brands. Read more here
Date25 Feb 2019
Organic Position18
H1Social Media Crisis Management Examples (and Lessons)
H2Multi-Channel Crisis
Emerging Crisis
Industry-Adjacent Crisis
Misinformation and Fake News
Social Media Activism
Handling Celebrities and Influencers
Dealing with Crisis
H3H&M
IHOP
ABS-CBN News
Burberry
Cebu Pacific
Jojo Maman Bebe
Olive Garden
Mandalay Bay
MAC
NutriAsia
Cosmopolitan Magazine Philippines
Recent Posts
Frustrated about your business blog's performance?
H2WithAnchorsMulti-Channel Crisis
Emerging Crisis
Industry-Adjacent Crisis
Misinformation and Fake News
Social Media Activism
Handling Celebrities and Influencers
Dealing with Crisis
BodySocial Media Crisis Management Examples (and Lessons) Jayzel Florendo February 25, 2019 Share this blog post. At Spiralytics, our social media and online PR experts help you build a strong and positive digital presence and cultivate a thriving brand community that supports your goals. Contact us today! All companies should be prepared and ready to deal with possible PR crises, because they can damage a brands image and reputation.  No matter how big a company is or how popular they are, complaints are inevitable. At some point in time, you’ll eventually come across bashers or customers who aren’t pleased with their experience. For starters, you’ll need a social media crisis management plan to avoid making any issues bigger. But you should first be able to identify the crisis. Here are a few examples of social media crises and how you can deal with them: Multi-Channel Crisis. A multi-channel crisis is when the public is affected by what your brand posts. It could be that they are offended by or disagree with what you’ve published. One of the most dangerous crises a brand can experience is a multi-channel crisis because it can go viral immediately and attract a huge amount of negative publicity in a short span of time if left unchecked.   H&M. An example of multi-channel crisis is an incident that happened in January 2018, with the clothing retailer H&M. A black child was modelling a hooded top with the words “Coolest Monkey in the Jungle.” The public was outraged by this, and many people were deeply offended. Even celebrities were reacting and tweeting about how they would refuse to work with the brand in the future. H&M ended up taking down the image and publicly apologizing about the incident. Brands should be sensitive, considerate and careful when advertising and promoting their products or services, so as not to discriminate against minority groups. This particular example really made H&M’s audience rethink whether they should continue patronizing the brand. In this kind of crisis, you should acknowledge the situation by apologizing to the public immediately. It’s always better to release a concise message before other influencers, journalists or media get in the way. Own up to what you did and assure everyone that it won’t happen again. Let them know you will make sure all upcoming content will be evaluated thoroughly to avoid these types of situations. Make sure you are open for further questions. Be prepared to answer the who, what, where, when and why after you’ve released your statement. IHOP. Another brand that took advertising to the next level is IHOP. They flipped from IHOP to IHOB, literally from pancakes to burgers, as part of their 60th anniversary and new product introduction campaign. IHOP is known for being a house of pancakes, so when they decided to release the IHOB announcement teaser, people proceeded to fill in the lines on what it is about. Here is what the brand released in social media: For 60 pancakin’ years, we’ve been IHOP. Now, we’re flippin’ our name to IHOb. Find out what it could b on 6.11.18. #IHOb pic.twitter.com/evSxKV3QmT — IHOP (@IHOP) June 4, 2018 The internet reacted in different ways, some thought that it was humorous, and some took it seriously. Brands like Wendy’s, Netflix, and Burger King even joined the trend. Not really afraid of the burgers from a place that decided pancakes were too hard. — Wendy’s (@Wendys) June 11, 2018 brb changing my name to Netflib — Netflix (@netflix) June 11, 2018 These are all funny, but some users failed to notice the small note in their announcement that it’s only a temporary change, which resulted in receiving negative feedback from its patrons. Marketers said that this stunt was a risk for the company. Thankfully, IHOP handled it well by humorously interacting with users, which aligns with their brand and social media personality. They even created a “bancake list” for users who are against the IHOB stunt; you could only be removed from the list when you tweeted something nice. The blan was to get beople talking about our new burgers. And it worked. Look at us, two silly pancakes talkin’ about burgers. — IHOP (@IHOP) July 9, 2018 After officially launching the new burgers online, they eventually went back to the original IHOP name, and according to the brand, the campaign worked great since they got users to talk about the new offering. ABS-CBN News. A known media outlet in the Philippines mistakenly published a draft-card announcing a city-wide lockdown prior to the press conference of the president. The post alarmed the citizen caused panic; the media outlet immediately took down the post and released a statement regarding the matter. During a nation-wide crisis, news outlets and publications must be wary of the information that they publish online. News publications are one of the first sources of information and are trusted by the general public. Sure, it is best to have graphics and copy on standby, but mistakenly clicking the publish button is definitely something that could be avoided. Immediate resolution to the issue must be put into place as soon as possible to avoid further miscommunication and harm to the brand’s credibility. Burberry. Working in fashion means that you must have good fashion industry knowledge and, of course, know the names of celebrities walking down the red carpet. In 2017, the British luxury fashion house Burberry committed a mistake of confusing Dev Patel for Riz Ahmed, creating a buzz online.  Burberry confused Riz Ahmed for Dev Patel and everyone’s pretty done with this https://t.co/RpKnEEvR77 pic.twitter.com/AEaJsNZ8i4 — BuzzFeed (@BuzzFeed) February 13, 2017 Burberry promptly deleted the post and replaced it with the correct image. Despite acting swiftly, fans were able to pick up the mistake and called out the brand. Different news publications were able to get a hold of Burberry’s spokesperson and said:  “We apologise unreservedly for the incorrectly titled pictures of Dev Patel and Riz Ahmed posted late last night. This was a mistake that should not have happened and was corrected immediately. We have apologised directly to Dev and Riz. We are checking our processes to make sure this doesn’t happen again.” – Burberry Spokesperson Mistakes like this must be avoided at all costs. Sure, real-time publishing is essential to events like this, but make sure to polish your process to prevent unnecessary slips. Emerging Crisis. An emerging crisis can and must be anticipated and be minimized at an early stage. Prospects who have no previous experience with your brand may be turned off. Existing customers, on the other hand, who had a positive experience with you in the past, may even question if they should repurchase or use your service again. Not addressing their concerns is like giving them a push to try your competitors’ products rather than encouraging them to stay loyal to your brand.  Cebu Pacific. Complaints by customers are nearly always expressed on social media. Brands must watch out for these so that the issues don’t escalate quickly, or at all. This means you need to monitor your social media accounts as well as check for any brand mentions several times a day. It’s a good idea to create a script or discuss how you can reply to customer queries and complaints. This way, you’ll know what to do and can act swiftly when the situation arises, preventing the issue from spreading further. Remember that posts can easily be shared or retweeted for more people to see, so time is of the essence. In an emerging crisis, prospects who have no previous experience with your brand may be turned off. Existing customers, on the other hand, who had a positive experience with you in the past, may even question if they should repurchase or use your service again. Not addressing their concerns is like giving them a push to try your competitors’ products rather than encouraging them to stay loyal to your brand. Industry-Adjacent Crisis. An Industry-Adjacent crisis occurs when a vendor or competitor is experiencing a social media crisis. Monitoring this kind of situation gives you a head start on how to deal with a similar potential disaster in the future. Jojo Maman Bebe. One case of this would be the UK-based baby clothes retailer, JoJo Maman Bebe. Their products were too pricey for most of their customers, so a group emerged on social media called JoJo Maman Bebe Pre-Loved Buy and Sell. The group gained more than 20,000 followers, which bothered the original brand. The Pre-Loved Buy and Sell group were selling the same products, but for a cheaper price. The original brand released an angry statement against the group complaining about why customers would buy second-hand goods. This statement was written by the brand accountant. It was said to be “incredibly rude,” “snotty,” and was even called an “epic PR fail.”   Brands should be aware that personal messages should not be released in the name of the company. The brand itself should address the situation rather than individual employees. Also, employees, no matter how high or low up in the corporate ladder, represent the brand. Ranting about issues on their personal social media accounts is unprofessional and potentially harmful to the organization’s image. It can seem as if the brand is hiding from and evading the situation. This should have been dealt with in a better manner by approaching the owner of the group and settling things between them. You should generally avoid anything that can spark criticism about the way you handle things. Misinformation and Fake News. Getting fake news from various sources is inevitable. Especially in the age of social media, a post can go viral in one just one click. Hence, we must all be responsible in sharing information online and be accountable enough to debunk rumors or fake news. Here are some examples and how to fix it with the correct information. Olive Garden. A popular casual dining restaurant in the United States was allegedly donating funds to a presidential candidate in 2019, upsetting most of its loyal customers. Twitter users took it up a notch by making #BoycottOliveGarden be one of the trending topics on the micro-blogging website, creating more buzz about the issue. The restaurant was quick to debunk the rumor by responding directly to several users using the same script. We don’t know where this information came from, but it is incorrect. Our company does not donate to presidential candidates. — Olive Garden (@olivegarden) August 26, 2019 The restaurant could have handled it differently by posting a statement addressing the rumors, preferably coming from one of the high-ranking executives of Olive Garden. Using that tactic would probably have ended the whole issue in just one post. Mandalay Bay. Some people might post fake news to spark attention (or tension). The old school troll will do whatever it takes to gain more followers or likes. They want to be famous so they might try to post irrelevant, spam, abusive, or threatening content to further their agenda. Avoid trolls at all costs. Delete their posts and block them right away. Engaging with them is basically fanning the flames, so ignore them and don’t allow them to spread their negativity. Of course, you should always do a little digging through each case to find out the truth before deeming anyone a troll. Choosing the wrong situation to expose a troll might just backfire and make the situation worse. Social Media Activism. MAC. A more difficult crisis to deal with are activists. You can get two types of activists, the single cause activists and the larger groups. Single cause activists aim to make changes in the community. Similar to trolls, they leave comments in Facebook groups. Depending on the situation, you can decide if you should reply to their post or ignore them entirely. But first, do some research on the person behind the comment or post. In 2015, Pamela Anderson (a member of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and a former MAC spokesperson) wrote a letter to tell MAC to remove their products from the Chinese Market. China is known to test products on animals in cruel ways, which end up harming them. The letter was released online for everyone to see, where many activists who were against animal testing made their anger known. But MAC dealt with this situation by explaining that it was required by the law in China that products must be tested on animals. China requires animal testing and MAC must comply to their laws. However, they assured everyone that they themselves are against animal testing. The larger groups of activists can be a bigger threat to your brand. They come prepared and have everything planned out, making it hard to defend against them (but not impossible). So, the best way to overcome them is to talk to them “offline” to find out what your brand can do to help their cause or at least appease them. There may be a reason why they’re targeting you in the first place, so it’s best to be socially responsible. NutriAsia. A popular brand well-known in the Philippines called NutriAsia, had an alarming issue in 2018. Probationary employees rallied and spoke up about how they were being mistreated (underpaid and forced to work extra hours). However, when they asked to become regularized employees, they were refused. As the issue spread on social media, activists tried slamming NutriAsia. One of the groups, Karapatan, released a statement saying: “The workers’ assertion and strike is just. We call on everyone to stand in solidarity with the workers of NutriAsia and demand accountability from the company and the PNP who instigated the entire ordeal. We also call for the immediate release of the 19 arrested individuals. We likewise challenge the Duterte regime to follow through on its pronouncements and end contractualization in all of its forms.” In this example, we can see that activists fought for what they believed in. They tried to help employees in any way that they could. Even netizens got involved and tried to encourage as many people as they could to boycott the products of NutriAsia. A situation like this is extremely difficult to deal with. You will have to be careful with the statements you choose to release and what actions you take next. Understand that your brand is under the microscope at this point and every statement you release to the public will be under heavy scrutiny. The wisest way to deal with a social crisis is to make sure nothing like this ever happens again. In order to reposition your brand, you might have to run a few human resource PR campaigns that promote employee goodwill within the company. Handling Celebrities and Influencers. Journalists, celebrities, experts, and social media influencers are people your brand should watch out for. They can be similar to activists in a way that they will fight for a specific cause, but in this case, they bring their fans/followers with them. You must respond to them when addressed. Not replying will almost certainly make things worse because they have a large sphere of influence in the digital world. So, you should be open to discussions and engage with influencers with an open mind. Make sure you don’t try to control them or tell them what to do. Instead, allow them to voice their opinion to understand where they’re coming from. Being honest and transparent may tilt the tides in your favor, turning a crisis into a potential opportunity. Cosmopolitan Magazine Philippines. We all know how much celebrities have a great influence over large groups of people. A lot of fans lookup to them, copy them, and support whatever they do. Imagine if they were to say negative things about another brand. It could instantly affect your brand reputation. For example, back in March 2018, Riverdale stars Lili Reinhard and Camila Mendes called out Cosmopolitan Philippines for photoshopping their photos. They reposted the original and the photoshopped photos on their Instagram stories showing how Cosmopolitan made it look like their waists were thinner. The two actresses expressed how they worked hard to “feel confident and comfortable” in their own bodies. So, they were disappointed that their bodies were “distorted” in the final image. This example shows how the two actresses could relate more to the audience than the brand. The issue is sensitive to many women out there. So, influencers pointing out how the magazine photoshops and makes cover girls look skinnier than they are makes the audience open their eyes. It makes them aware that magazines photoshop and show “fake” images of female bodies rather than showing the truth. This was effectively a great endorsement gone wrong. Influencers can be a big help to brands. Not only do you need to build the relationship with your audience but also with the right influencers because you can always help each other out. So, nurture them to make sure they are on your side if you want to effectively mitigate a PR crisis. Dealing with Crisis. When you build a team, keep in mind that everyone should be aware of how to deal with the crisis. For the most part, reacting immediately to negative comments or reviews will probably make things worse. The main goal is to build and maintain a healthy relationship with your customers, so they continue to trust your brand. Not only should you be aware of your audience, but also of influencers and activists. Your content shouldn’t offend or hurt anyone, so make sure you filter what you post and be more sensitive to others. Take note of each crisis scenario and prepare carefully, making sure everyone in the team is on the same page. Work together and create guidelines to make sure everything runs smoothly. You should also set rules on how you communicate with your customers, which can include tone and templated responses. You will also need to discuss which channel you will use to respond, whether it is replying publicly in the comment box or messaging them directly. Be prepared to mitigate any future crises by following these tips. With the right plan in place, you’ll be able to turn negative PR situations into huge growth and positioning opportunities for your brand! Share this blog post. Recent Posts. January 6, 2022 7 Content Engagement Strategies to Help Your Business Grow Content is king, as the saying goes. So if you’re running an online business, producing... December 30, 2021 Image Copyright 101: A Guide to Online Image Copyright and Fair Usage Getting to grips with online image copyright is no small task. It can be an... December 23, 2021 8 Website Visuals That Will Convert More Visitors into Customers Visuals are, arguably, the most valuable digital asset a brand can have in its arsenal.... Frustrated about your business blog's performance? Stop going around in circles and start implementing a Content Marketing Strategy that works. GET A QUOTE
Topics
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  • 45
  • 20
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  • 22
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  • media
  • 18
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  • 11
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  • 20
  • activist
  • 10
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  • 20
  • online
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  • burberry
  • 8
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  • example
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  • user
  • 6
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  • employee
  • 6
  • 20
  • animal
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  • 20
  • fake news
  • 5
  • 20
  • multi channel crisi
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  • dev patel
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  • multi channel
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  • 3
  • 20
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • image copyright
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Result 21
TitleThe Ultimate Guide to Social Media Crisis Management | NetSuite
Urlhttps://www.netsuite.com/portal/resource/articles/business-strategy/social-media-crisis-management.shtml
DescriptionGet a series of steps for preventing social media crises -- and dealing with one, should it occur
Date30 Apr 2020
Organic Position19
H1The Ultimate Guide to Social Media Crisis Management
H2Steps for preventing a social media crisis
Steps to take during and after a social media crisis
Educational Resources
H3Create a social media policy
Secure your social media accounts
Create a social listening program
Be proactive about hashtag campaigns
Don’t capitalize on an external crisis
Define what a crisis is for your business specifically
Have a crisis communication plan in place
Acknowledge that there’s an issue
Pump the brakes on scheduled posts
Pick your battles
Keep your team in the loop
Review the experience, and learn from it
H2WithAnchorsSteps for preventing a social media crisis
Steps to take during and after a social media crisis
Educational Resources
BodyThe Ultimate Guide to Social Media Crisis Management David Luther | Digital Content Strategist April 30, 2020 In short: No brand is immune to a social media crisis, a major issue that impacts a large group of customers and requires a special response to prevent an escalating reaction.There are, however, steps you can take to both prevent a social media crisis and limit the impact, should one occur.If a crisis breaks out, use a small leadership team to triage the situation, execute a brand social media response if required, and keep teams in the loop. No matter the industry, your company is likely to face a social media crisis at some point. It may come in the form of incessant customer Tweets over a service outage, or it could be a poorly timed or insensitive post from your brand. Products might fail on live television, or a retail employee may make insensitive remarks to a customer that end up on Facebook. A solid crisis management plan can prevent and limit the impact of these happenings. Below, we describe steps businesses can take to limit the chances of a minor incident, should one occur, turning into a full-blown social media crisis. Steps for preventing a social media crisis. Proactively establishing social media guidelines for your company can limit the chances of a blowup occurring in the first place. Think of these steps as “pre-crisis mode” and prevention against scrambling in the middle of a crisis. Create a social media policy. Many of the most brand-damaging social media crises come from employees publishing a post that goes awry. A simple way to prevent these mishaps is providing guidance for how employees should post on branded accounts and mention the company on their personal profiles. In an employee handbook or onboarding materials, give detailed descriptions of how your employees should handle customer inquiries that come in through social media and ways to address questionable content like misinformation, leaks or confidential information. You should also outline how employees should: Get approval for company-related posts.Comply with copyright laws on social media.Include or withhold company information on social media profiles.React to PR crises on social media. The method by which you disseminate these rules is up to you, whether it’s via an annual employee training session, a contract for teams to digitally sign, or another way. In that communication, clearly describe the consequences for failing to adhere to the policy. Secure your social media accounts. Weak passwords and limited account security are risks in general, but note that a rogue or former employee is more likely to cause a cybersecurity crisis than a hacker. Limit and track employees’ access to social media accounts, making sure to revoke access for employees leaving the company or moving into an unrelated department. Also, make it clear that employees aren’t allowed to create unauthorized alternate accounts, whether it’s for a company event or an internal team. For example, an employee creates a sales team account to post teambuilding event photos but then forgets about the account. If a customer stumbles across this account, it could lead to confusion and brand image issues. Create a social listening program. Unlike social media monitoring, which looks at engagement metrics and mentions, social listening tries to gauge the ratio of positive/negative sentiment toward your company or one of its activities using metrics like: Brand mentionsIndustry trendsRelevant hashtags You can use social listening to monitor what people are saying about your brand and respond to issues before they develop into crises. Imagine, for example, that your brand posts a photo which other users call out as insensitive. Or perhaps an ad campaign goes viral for the wrong reasons. There are a number of tools that handle social listening. A good place to start is by setting up Google Alerts and keyword searches for your brand and products/services. But those tools only help if you have a system in place for monitoring them. Establish protocols for which member of your team is in charge of social listening, what they’re listening for and when they should be paying special attention to online chatter, such as in the week after launching a new social media campaign. Social media crises don’t observe office hours, so determine which members of the social media team will monitor channels in the evenings and on weekends — especially during high-volume sales and peak service periods — for changes in sentiment and increased mentions. Be proactive about hashtag campaigns. A catchy hashtag can be a great way to bring your social audience together and get visibility for your content, but be careful when choosing them. Make sure the phrasing can’t be misinterpreted or misconstrued. Keep the hashtag’s context narrow to limit the “creativity” users might have if they’re looking to complain or troll. McDonald’s released the #McDStories campaign hoping to get heartwarming pictures of kids with Happy Meals — instead, it developed into a bashtag. Similarly, make sure you understand the context behind hashtags before you start using them. Get a grasp on why a hashtag is trending before firing off a tweet in an attempt to join the conversation. Baked goods company Entenmanns’ ill-timed use of #notguilty during a major 2011 court case could have been avoided with a bit of research. Don’t capitalize on an external crisis. Simply put, don’t risk sounding tone deaf during a crisis that doesn’t pertain to your company. It may be tempting to sound off on evolving situations and trends quickly, but steer clear of controversial or sensitive topics unless there’s a good reason not to. For example, Kenneth Cole attempted to use the trending #cairo during the Arab Spring to sell shoes from its spring collection. Given the insensitivity, it didn’t go over well. Posts don’t have to be openly promotional to rile up social media users. Bing created a campaign to donate $1 to victims of major earthquakes in Japan for every retweet its post received. When users perceived it as a marketing grab for followers, Bing donated a full $100,000 and apologized. This isn’t to say that brands shouldn’t communicate at all during a crisis — just make sure your posts are brand-appropriate and non-promotional. For example, gaming hardware company Razer created a relevant poster whose proceeds go directly to fighting COVID-19, an effort that was well-received on Instagram. Define what a crisis is for your business specifically. At your business, not every issue is a crisis. Consider a one-off issue like an isolated outage or unpleasant service call that a customer takes to social media. You don’t need to go into crisis mode over an incident that can be resolved by contacting the customer directly. It’s important for social teams to be vigilant, however, because what seems like an isolated event can be the first indicator of an impending crisis — a major issue that impacts a large group of customers and requires a special response to prevent an escalating reaction. For example, a single customer mocking a hashtag or commenting on the insensitivity of ad copy might fit the definition of an issue, not a social media crisis. Multiple customers pointing out the issue may indicate an incipient crisis. Have a crisis communication plan in place. A social media crisis can spiral out of control within a matter of hours, and having a crisis communication plan allows companies to resolve it as soon as possible. A social media crisis response team doesn’t need to involve your entire company. Decide, in times of non-crisis, which members of the social team, management and leadership need to be involved to take action quickly. While building this team, consider these responsibilities:Looking out for and monitoring crisesActively managing social media and answering questionsGuiding the overall strategy and updating key leadershipResponding to questions from other channels such as email and handling media requests It’s important to remember that time is of the essence in a social media crisis. A tweet or two won’t resolve everything, but having a comprehensive plan that allows your organization to respond decisively lets users know that the crisis is at least acknowledged. Steps to take during and after a social media crisis. Even the largest, best-prepared companies may find themselves in hot water on social media sometimes. These steps will help mitigate a social media crisis once it’s begun. Acknowledge that there’s an issue. When customers or clients are upset or confused, they want to know that companies are aware of both the crisis (an app outage, for example) and the impact it has on them (i.e. the inability to post photos on the app). Even if your team doesn’t have all of the answers, simply acknowledging that they know about the problem can quell feelings of uncertainty. It will also help your team prevent any additional social media users from asking if your company is aware of the problem. Pump the brakes on scheduled posts. As soon as your team senses a crisis brewing, it should pause social media activity while it takes stock of the situation. Many brands use software to schedule posts in advance, and failing to stop these from running can make businesses seem tone deaf or even make a social media crisis worse. For example, don’t Tweet about your retailer’s one-day shipping guarantee when Twitter users are barraging the brand with complaints about shipping delays. For the most part, you can just delay these scheduled posts until a later time. Each and every post during a crisis should be considered and appropriate for the situation, and it’s important to vet these posts to make sure they’re aligned with crisis communication plans. Pick your battles. It’s usually safest to not reply to negative comments and posts publicly, but if you do, limit it to one or two responses to show the public that you’re responding. You’re more likely to resolve issues in private channels in which there’s no audience to fuel a performative back-and-forth between customer and brand. Remember, you won’t be able to please everyone, and in many cases, negative social media users just seek to vent or be heard. Learn to recognize when it’s best to ignore their comments so you can focus time and energy on more constructive communication. Keep your team in the loop. Once management and the social team have a grasp of the scope and scale of the social media crisis, let the rest of the company know what’s happening and how to communicate during the crisis. The idea is to avoid your team finding out about the issue from a sudden series of posts from upset customers or clients. Send them a quick message detailing: What’s happening (i.e. customers are commenting on your brand’s latest post, saying it’s insensitive)Where it’s happening (i.e. Instagram)If the team should take any action (i.e. whether they should direct-message the disgruntled customers on Instagram) This is also when you’ll want to share any preapproved messaging and let the company at large know how it should direct customer complaints from other channels — remember, many customers view social media as a customer service channel. Review the experience, and learn from it. When the crisis has abated, it’s time to circle up with the social team and leadership to discuss the crisis from start to finish. Even with a solid plan in place, the fact that the company’s gone through a social media crisis indicates that there’s room for improvement. Examine where the breakdown happened and how processes can improve, seeking input from team members. Remember, it’s also an opportunity to review which mitigation steps worked, whether they involved customer service representatives, putting out a timely statement, or another tactic. Use those learnings to tweak your social media crisis communications plan, then rest assured that you’re better-prepared to handle any future issues. Trending Articles Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A): Practices, Roles, Responsibilities, and Functions Inventory Cycle Counting 101: Best Practices & Benefits What Is Material Requirements Planning (MRP)? 50 Critical ERP Statistics: 2020 Market Trends, Data and Analysis Educational Resources. Business Solutions Glossary of Terms   Chat Sales Chat How is your business adapting to change? Start chat Top
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • social
  • 49
  • 21
  • crisi
  • 43
  • 21
  • social media
  • 38
  • 21
  • media
  • 38
  • 21
  • customer
  • 21
  • 21
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  • 20
  • 21
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  • 21
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  • 21
  • social media crisi
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  • media crisi
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  • post
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  • 21
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  • 21
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  • 21
  • response
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  • 21
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  • 4
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  • 4
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  • 4
  • 21
  • remember
  • 4
  • 21
  • social media user
  • 3
  • 21
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  • 3
  • 21
Result 22
Title8 ways to respond to a social media crisis - Our Social Times - Social Media for Business
Urlhttps://oursocialtimes.com/8-ways-to-respond-to-a-social-media-crisis/
DescriptionA social media crisis can begin chipping away at your carefully crafted reputation in seconds. Here are eight tips for what to do when the worst happens
Date
Organic Position20
H18 ways to respond to a social media crisis
H2
H3A social media crisis can begin chipping away at your carefully crafted reputation in seconds. Here are eight reputation-management tips specifically for social media.
1. Take ownership. Fast
2. Evaluate and learn
3. Don’t go over the top unnecessarily
4. Reschedule scheduled posts
5. Own up
6. Get discussions out of the public eye
7. Be honest, authentic and transparent
8. Put a crisis management plan in place
H2WithAnchors
Body8 ways to respond to a social media crisis A social media crisis can begin chipping away at your carefully crafted reputation in seconds. Here are eight reputation-management tips specifically for social media. . By admin We recently looked at the steps brands can take to protect themselves from a social media crisis. But what if the worst happened and you fell into one of the many pitfalls? Your social media accounts are run by humans. And sometimes humans make mistakes. It’s not hard to find examples of high-profile brands committing social media faux pas. But whether your intern has accidentally tweeted her Saturday night plans on the company account, or an offline incident has triggered the social masses to rain down complaints, abuse and vitriol on your social channels, there are simple measures you can take to contain the issue and move on with your integrity intact – and maybe even enhanced. Here are eight tips on how to manage a social media crisis. 1. Take ownership. Fast. The worst thing you can do during a social media crisis? Nothing. This is happening. You need to deal with it. Quickly too. Because we all know time moves at warp speed on social media. So instead of closing your eyes and hoping it will blow over, take a deep breath and prepare to accept responsibility. It immediately puts you on the front foot. Which is where you want to be in times of crisis. If you’re a major brand with a service that runs 24/7 then you should have a team on call to manage incidents that occur out of normal office hours. British Airways got stung several years back when their social media team wasn’t around to respond to a promoted tweet from a disgruntled customer. By the time their team logged on the tweet had been seen by thousands of people. Damage done. Unsurprisingly, BA’s Twitter account is now monitored at all hours. 2. Evaluate and learn. In the moment, a social media crisis can feel like the end of your business world. 24 hours later the storm is likely to have blown over. Once you have had time to draw breath, evaluate what happened. Key questions to ask: What caused the problem? How could you stop it happening again? How well did you react? What could you do better next time? (Always assume there will be a next time.) 3. Don’t go over the top unnecessarily. The first question to ask yourself: how big a deal is this? If your ‘crisis’ is an honest mistake with zero negative consequences, why go over the top? By all means accept that you messed up, but a little tongue-in-cheek humour can go a long way in terms of taking the heat out of the situation – as this fabulous example from the American Red Cross demonstrates… UK baking giant Gregg’s also knows how to keep a sense of humour in a crisis. 4. Reschedule scheduled posts. We’ve seen some ‘experts’ suggest burying social media blunders with a flood of new content. Come on. Instead you should do the opposite – and that includes cancelling any social media updates that have been pre-scheduled in management tools like Hootsuite. It could get pretty awkward if you suddenly start promoting your latest product when you are in the throes of a social media crisis. 5. Own up. If you were the one responsible for accidentally posting something you shouldn’t have on the company account, own up. Don’t just delete the offending content and hope for the best. Yes, it’s embarrassing, but you need to take responsibility. Once you have deleted the content, tell your boss, your PR team or whoever it is that needs to know. Give an honest appraisal of the situation, including if there has been any negative response. You are unlikely to get in serious trouble for an honest mistake, but you might if you ignore a burgeoning social media crisis that gets out of control. 6. Get discussions out of the public eye. Let’s say you have some angry comments. You need to acknowledge them. But arguing in the public eye could rapidly devalue the integrity of your brand. Your strategy here need be no longer than two letters: DM. Once you are in a private space, listen to individuals’ concerns and respond diplomatically. It’s not about point-scoring or getting defensive. Handling the situation tactfully might just enhance your reputation. Somebody should have told Applebee’s. 7. Be honest, authentic and transparent. If your crisis really is a crisis and you have offended your audience, humour probably isn’t the best policy. (And by probably, we mean definitely.) Instead you need to offer an apology and, if possible, an explanation. If you have no idea what triggered an offending tweet or post, tell your audience that you will be conducting an investigation. Smoke and mirrors fool nobody. Ditch the starch corporate lingo and be honest, authentic and real. Your audience will respect it. It doesn’t get too much more serious for a brand than when an employee personally insults the US President from the company account. The way KitchenAid USA responded to that exact scenario remains a totem of good practice. 8. Put a crisis management plan in place. Once you have completed the above step, draw up a social media crisis management plan. Create a chain of responsibility with simple guidelines on how to respond to developing scenarios. And if you genuinely don’t have the resources in-house to monitor an influx of social media attention, it’s easy to find award-winning experts who can do it for you. I found this helpful I did not find this helpful In this articleFeaturedReputation ManagementSocial Media Crisis
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TitleHow to Create a Social Media Crisis Management Plan [Free Template]
Urlhttps://blog.hubspot.com/service/social-media-crisis-management
DescriptionFrom negative comments to natural disasters, it’s important to have a proper response plan for your social media channels. HubSpot's Social Media Crisis Management Plan will help you solve tough problems quickly while avoiding damages to your company's reputation
Date28 Jul 2021
Organic Position21
H1How to Create a Social Media Crisis Management Plan [Free Template]
H2What is a social media crisis?
Social Media Crisis Management
Social Media Crisis Management Plan
Social Media Crisis Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Plan Template
H3Benefits of Social Media Crisis Management
1. Identify the source of the problem
2. Categorize the issue as a crisis or problem
3. Use an internal flowchart to execute actions
1. Undermining of Customers
2. Inappropriate Marketing Messages
3. Distasteful Comments From an Executive
1. National Cowboy Museum - Social Media Security Guard
2. Sephora - Racial Profiling
3. American Red Cross - #GettngSlizzerd
4. JC Penney - Kettle Conundrum
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H2WithAnchorsWhat is a social media crisis?
Social Media Crisis Management
Social Media Crisis Management Plan
Social Media Crisis Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Examples
Social Media Crisis Management Plan Template
BodyHow to Create a Social Media Crisis Management Plan [Free Template] Written by Clint Fontanella @ClontFont Follow Along with HubSpot's Free Social Media Customer Service TemplateDownload Now Nowadays, community managers and customer service professionals have to deal with business crises over social media. These problems could include nasty comments, unhappy customers, delivery issues, a marketing faux pas, or a global pandemic — all problems that arise frequently and deserve reasonable and empathetic responses. When these complex situations occur, how do you categorize them? How do you determine the point of escalation with each scenario? When should you get help from a manager or another team member — and who should you even reach out to? If you're working on a customer service team, you need to know the right answers to these questions, so you can communicate with customers during a time of crisis. Download the Template for Free What is a social media crisis? A social media crisis could include nasty comments from customers on social media, unhappy customers voicing their concerns, delivery issues, perhaps a social media marketing faux pas, or even the global pandemic and how your company posted about it online. Social Media Crisis Management. Whether a crisis occurs online or off, you can expect there to be a social media response from your customers. In fact, studies show that 80% of customers will use social media to engage with a brand. Social media is becoming the preferred method of communication because it empowers consumers with the ability to post a review instantly on your account for all of your followers to see. If your brand makes a mistake, customers will be quick to take to their phones to tweet or post about the issue. When left unchecked, these comments can quickly compound and escalate a simple problem into an alarming crisis. To that point, 37% of consumers who use social media to complain or question brands expect to get a response in under 30 minutes. This is why it's important to be prepared and have a plan in place. Benefits of Social Media Crisis Management. The good news is that social media can be a powerful tool for managing a business crisis: Social media allows you to communicate with nearly your entire customer base over one or two platforms. Your company can quickly broadcast a message and get ahead of a crisis when needed. Social media allows you to speak directly with customers using direct messaging or commenting. If one customer has an issue, your customer service team can respond to them instantly through a private or public message. If the customer posts publicly on your timeline, an effective response from your customer service team can serve as a positive example of your team's credibility. The next section will break down how your business can come up with a contingency plan for a crisis and integrate it into your customer service team. Social Media Crisis Management Plan. When it comes to managing a crisis, having a social media plan in place can be essential to your team's success. If you're not sure where to start, take a look at this outline which details every component that you should include in your crisis management plan. 1. Identify the source of the problem. The first step to crafting a social media crisis response is to identify the problem and locate where it originated. Not every social media crisis will start from an online source. Often something that happens in popular culture or in news events will result in a social media uproar. Finding out what caused the crisis can help you determine not only the correct response but also the appropriate channels to distribute it through. If the problem does occur offline, you'll also want to look at the current status of your social media accounts. Has there been a response? Even if there isn't one yet, you have to expect there's going to be one. If customers are already posting on your timelines, then: Assess the damage that's been made thus far. Look at which social media accounts it's affecting. Try to identify any trends in the comments. Evaluating the situation before taking action will ensure that you're creating a long-term plan to handle the crisis. 2. Categorize the issue as a crisis or problem. The next step in handling a social media crisis is to determine the severity of the issue. Is it a problem? Or, is it a crisis? You may think that's semantics, but there's a key difference between a problem and a crisis that determines the response that you'll want to deliver. A problem is a minor customer service issue that can be resolved using standard service tactics. Your company may solve this with a coupon or discount that's sent to a customer who writes an unhappy comment or post. In comparison, crises affect larger audiences and require a special response from your business to prevent escalation. It's important not to mislabel a problem as a crisis as this can result in negative attention being brought to your brand. Social media is a public forum and users will be able to watch your company make a formal apology to a seemingly minor issue. If you're unsure if it's a crisis or not, begin with your standard customer service approach but be prepared to escalate the issue to a crisis if needed. 3. Use an internal flowchart to execute actions. Once you have established the right course of action to take, the next step is to execute your prepared game plan. Since crises tend to escalate, it helps if your team plans a flowchart for what to do if a crisis becomes more severe. We've included one example of what this can look like using the image below. Image Source As you can see, standard responses using just the customer service rep and manager are at the lower end of the scale. As the crisis intensifies, additional measures are taken to ensure an appropriate response is delivered. Businesses executives can use this flowchart during the crisis as a guide to monitoring the status of the situation. One component missing from this flowchart is the action of pausing or editing future content. Note: As a crisis escalates, you may need to adjust your publishing schedule to demonstrate a complete focus on the issue. Consider pausing scheduled posts, ads, and marketing emails to show your customers that you're truly devoted to resolving the crisis. It's important to keep in mind that this plan will vary depending on the crisis you're faced with. Some situations will require you to take different steps to produce the most effective response. Before we can start planning to handle a social media crisis, we first need to know what it looks like. In the next section, we'll highlight a few examples of notable social media crises that affected real-life businesses this year. Social Media Crisis Examples. Social media crises are often unexpected and can occur at any moment. Brands big and small are both susceptible to these types of crises that can significantly impact their business's reputation. Here are a few examples of real-life social media crises that can help you become more familiar with these types of situations. 1. Undermining of Customers. A U.S.-based rideshare company caused an uproar with its customers when it took advantage of a cultural movement that it was supporting by tweeting a message to promote its discounts. Consumers immediately recognized this as an attempt to undermine the social campaign and decided to boycott the company on social media. To make matters worse, the company's direct competitor took an opposing stance by donating money to the same cause. This sparked the creation of a viral hashtag that bashed the company and resulted in increased usage of the competitor's service. Image Source 2. Inappropriate Marketing Messages. A popular clothing brand found itself in trouble with customers when it accidentally tweeted an inappropriate message following the Boston Marathon. The email's subject line was titled "Congrats on surviving the Boston Marathon," which inadvertently echoed the tragic events that occurred in 2013. Twitter users quickly criticized the company for its poor choice of wording and lack of social awareness. The company immediately deleted the Tweet once it learned of the situation that it had caused. Image Source 3. Distasteful Comments From an Executive. One highly successful social media app received significant criticism when its CEO dismissed the idea of expanding its business into Spain and India. The executive called these countries "poor" and went on to talk about how his free app was designed exclusively for wealthy people. This resulted in an immediate backlash as users from both countries and elsewhere began uninstalling the app in protest. They also left thousands of one-star reviews on the app's listing pages as well as started a boycott on competing social media channels. Image Source Successful social media crisis management begins with coming up with a strategy that proactively prepares for potential problems. Social Media Crisis Management Examples. 1. National Cowboy Museum - Social Media Security Guard. When COVID-19 plunged the world into quarantine in March 2020, the National Cowboy Museum was forced to close its doors. Ticket sales screeched to a halt, and the security team spent its time monitoring empty halls. To give these essential employees a bit more to do, the museum decided to hand the keys to its Twitter account over to the head of security, Tim the Cowboy. Image Source As you can see from his first tweet, Tim wasn't too familiar with the social media platform, which led to a series of wholesome and lighthearted follow-up tweets, like this one below. Image Source Why It Worked. In a time of uncertainty, Tim's content was exactly what the world needed. He gave us something to smile about as an escape from what was going on with the rest of the world. And, let's be honest, most of us probably haven't visited — or even knew of — the National Cowboy Museum before Tim the Cowboy. Before March 2020, the museum had just under 10 thousand Twitter followers. Now, over 300 thousand people follow the museum's account. 2. Sephora - Racial Profiling. When a celebrity mentions your brand on social media, it can bring a lot of attention to your products and services. But, if this influencer says negative things about your company, that can quickly stir up a crisis that damages your brand's reputation. Take Sephora, for example, when the musician, SZA, tweeted at the company to report an instance of racial profiling. Image Source Twitter users flocked to her defense, calling out Sephora for other examples of discrimination and showing their support SZA's remarks. Here's one response to SZA's tweet: Image Source Sephora acted quickly, though, and publicly reached out to SZA to apologize. The company also closed its stores to conduct mandatory diversity training so it could educate its employees and prevent issues like this from happening in the future. Below is Sephora's response to SZA. Image Source Why It Worked. No matter how you slice it, this situation doesn't make Sephora look great. But, when posed with an unexpected crisis, the company responded quickly and took meaningful strides to reconcile the issue. It not only issued a public apology to those that were hurt, but it also showed an investment in preventing the problem from occurring again. 3. American Red Cross - #GettngSlizzerd. The American Red Cross turned some heads back in 2011 when it tweeted this message late one Tuesday night. Image Source Clearly, this was an off-brand tweet for the company and it quickly grabbed the attention of its social media following. While the American Red Cross knew it had to delete the tweet, the social media team decided to have a little fun with the spotlight and tweeted this follow-up message. Image Source Why It Worked. Rather than taking themselves too seriously, the American Red Cross embraced the moment and playfully poked fun at its mistake. This approach not only went over well with the brand's target audience, but it also got the attention of other companies as well. Both Hootsuite and Dogfish Head Brewery responded to the American Red Cross's tweet and even made donations to the company as well. Image Source This is a great example of a company taking advantage of a timely opportunity and preventing a small social media crisis from turning into a big one. 4. JC Penney - Kettle Conundrum. In 2013, retailer, JC Penney, added a new tea kettle to its product line. Problem was, the kettle resembled an infamous political leader of the 1940's — we'll let you connect the dots below. Image Source This was clearly an oversight by JC Penney's marketing team as Twitter users quickly started to question the inspiration behind the product's design. In response, the company decided to get ahead of the issue and sent a transparent message to each of its followers fully admitting its mistake. Image Source Why It Worked. In the end, most people forgave the mishap and realized JC Penney did have much control over the product's design. While the ad could have certainly repositioned the angle of the product to make it look more like an innocent tea kettle, there was no malicious intent on behalf of the company. If you truly want to be prepared for every possible crisis then it helps to have an entire playbook that outlines the response to every possible situation. You may think that'll take forever, but below is a free template you can use to create your crisis plans. Social Media Crisis Management Plan Template. From negative comments to natural disasters, it's important to have a proper response plan for your social media channels. This guide will help you solve tough problems quickly while avoiding damages to your company's reputation. In this free PDF guide and Excel template, you'll learn: How to become an expert problem solver The differences between a problem and a crisis What to do when a problem becomes a crisis How to create your very own crisis management plan When it comes to a social media crisis, it's important to respond as quickly as you can. Owning responsibility for the action, apologizing, and perhaps poking fun at yourself (if appropriate), can help your customer service teams respond to incoming inquiries as quickly and effectively as possible. Editor's note: This post was originally published in May 2015 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.   Originally published Jul 28, 2021 11:15:00 AM, updated July 29 2021 Topics: Crisis Management Don't forget to share this post! Related Articles. 10 Crisis Plan Communication Examples (and How to Write Your Own) . Service  | 16 min read What Is Contingency Planning? [+ Examples] . Service  | 7 min read How To Create a Business Continuity Plan For Crisis Management [+ Template] . Service  | 15 min read Expand Offer Customer Service Metrics Calculator Get it now Get it now Download for Later.
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TitleCRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE SOCIAL MEDIA AGE - Affect
Urlhttp://www.affect.com/downloads/Affect_Social_Media_Crisis_Management_White_Paper.pdf
DescriptionIn this article, we break down best practices for integrating social media into your crisis communications strategy, and focus on how to leverage social media ...
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TitleHow to Manage a #Social Media #Crisis & Design a Communications #Plan | Position²
Urlhttps://www.position2.com/blog/how-to-manage-a-social-media-crisis-design-a-communications-plan
DescriptionIn today's 24/7 world, social media enables organizations to communicate with millions of customers across the globe in real-time
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H2Content Marketing
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H3#Social Media For #B2B Companies, Customer Service on Twitter and much more... | Best of the Week
Social Media Crisis Management, Google Panda 2.0 and much more... | Best of the Week
H2WithAnchorsContent Marketing
Paid Acquisition
Marketing Technology
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BodyHow to Manage a #Social Media #Crisis & Design a Communications #Plan In today's 24/7 world, social media enables organizations to communicate with millions of customers across the globe in real-time. For customers, this means they now have the power to either appreciate something or vent their issues in a very public space. What does this mean for marketers? With so much going on, a social media fiasco is sometimes unavoidable and unpredictable, signaling the need for a robust crisis management plan. Although most marketers have already incorporated social media into their marketing mix and are seeing great results, some of them have no strategic social media communications plan in place. According to the 2010 Digital Brand Expressions Social Media survey: 52% companies do not have a social media crisis communications plan. 41% said that they were insured against a possible social media crisis. A whopping 88% felt that it was important to have a strategic social media communications plan in place. While every company has its critics and unhappy customers, a smart marketer will always have a recovery plan to prevent a social media disaster from snowballing. As a marketer, you can never fully control what your customers say about your brand in the digital space; however, preparing yourself for a social media crisis will ensure you are not caught off guard. Here are some points to focus on while designing a crisis communications plan: Identify the Crisis: Before proceeding to the 'what should I do' stage, it is essential to a)fully understand the situation b) find out if the people who are talking about your brand are high influencers c) what is the medium being used and d) how is it affecting your company's image. This can be best done by monitoring your brand on social media. By using social media monitoring tools such as brand monitor, you can also: Listen to what your customers are saying. Analyze the general sentiment pertaining to the issue (is it leaning towards negative or are people neutral in their opinion). Chalk up the appropriate escalation plan. Engage industry influencers to defend your brand if necessary: Online users tend to trust the influencers more than company officials. After tracking your influencers, the next step involves engaging with them to solve the problem. The key purpose of crisis identification at an early stage via media monitoring is to be able to respond quickly. Keep in mind, in the digital space, your response time needs to be very quick. For instance, United Airlines' delayed response to singer Dave Carroll's YouTube complaint video reportedly cost the airline a 10% drop in its share price. Despite 50,000 views on YouTube, United responded by saying "We're working to make what happened right." According to industry experts, if a solid social media crisis management plan been in place, the airlines could have responded faster, saving the company from the loss and reputation damage. Be Transparent: The simplest way to win back customers' trust is by being straightforward and coming clean. While it is easy to get defensive or hide behind 'no comment', this will not prevent fans and followers from continuing to talk about your brand. We believe that the first step to fixing a social media crisis is to admit it; it gives a humane touch. As discussed earlier, using influencers to diffuse a situation is a good first step; however, by getting someone relevant and important such as company Presidents and CEOs to respond is a smart move. Although today's CEOs are no longer social media shy, a recent survey by public relations agency Weber Shandwick shows that they have some catching up to do. According to the survey: 64% of CEOs are not using social media; only 36% have a social media presence. 93% of them continue to depend on traditional methods to communicate with external audiences. Many CEOs are in the 40-60 demographic, making them less social media savvy. Why We Recommend Company Heads Get Involved Several case studies involving important company officials who have successfully fixed a social media PR disaster show that: Company heads engaging with unhappy customers wield high influence in the social media space. Two-way dialogues involving important company officials send out a strong message that 'we understand and apologize'. CEOs owning up to an oversight and promising to fix it shows that the company cares. By rapidly responding to a crisis through blogs, videos or other social platforms, CEOs dispel the myth of being 'corporate executives sitting behind desks'. Customers want to hear from a person who is real and is being honest and forthright with them. Dominos' quick, direct and personal response to a social media crisis involving its employees is the perfect example of how a company should handle emergency situations in the digital space. When two of its former employees uploaded YouTube videos of themselves doing unseemly things to food, customers and fans of the pizza giant started to question the hygiene standards that were being followed. Besides registering millions of views on YouTube, the video showed up in five out of 12 Google searches for "Dominos". The company wasted no time in posting its response. The crisis management team at Dominos decided to tackle the situation by uploading their own YouTube video that featured their President; a wise move, for a press release explaining the situation would have only escalated the situation further. Instead of insisting that the video had nothing to do with the company's hygiene policy, the President, J. Patrick Doyle, said that he was as 'sickened' as the customers and promised to shut the store and clean it completely. What restored customers' faith in Dominos was the President's honesty and the fact that he thanked customers for "sticking with us". Your customers know that everyone makes mistakes once in a while; what's more important to them is to know how you are going to fix it. The key to handling a situation effectively is to have open, consistent flow of information. Restoring your Reputation: Although prevention is the best solution to manage a crisis, it is very natural for occasional slip-ups to happen. Restoring your company's image after a social media disaster is crucial for getting back in the business. While it is true that a slip-up can impact customers' perception, here are some suggestions to help revive your brand's image in the digital space: Have Seasoned Social Media Experts Handle a Crisis: Having a junior intern handle your social media activities simply because 'they get social media' may not always be the best approach. A well assembled social media disaster management team, comprising of a community manager, a PR and a senior management representative, ensures that your company is always prepared to successfully handle an unforeseen situation. Besides managing large amount of content and conversations online, the disaster management team will know a) when to respond b) what to say c) how much to say and d) when to remain silent. Social media experts know how to handle crisis without breaking sweat; and this is vital for restoring your company's image online. Turn Crisis into Opportunity: Yes! A PR crisis can be converted into positive online buzz. The most apt example in this case involves fashion retailer Gap and how the company turned its logo debacle into a social media opportunity. Instead of playing the blame game after their own version was severely criticized across Facebook and Twitter, Gap smartly decided to offer its fans the chance to redesign its logo online. By doing this, the company a) acknowledged the problem b) made customers feel involved c) shifted the focus from the actual issue by converting it into an exciting social media campaign and d) managed to improve its reputation. Talk about it: By apologizing on Facebook or tweeting that you're sorry, you have managed to mollify disgruntled fans; what next? Believe it or not, your customers want to hear what happened. Discussing the 'what' and 'how' of the situation shows that the PR representatives and social media experts are doing more than just their job. Using a personal, human voice when communicating via social media channels re-establishes trust with customers, making them believe that your company has more than just an organizational presence. Talking about an issue not only promotes trust and commitment, but also leads to a favorable brand image. Conclusion. We believe that social media is a great platform for connecting with prospects and customers on a personal level; the flip-side though, is that networking channels also attract their share of online protests, customer complaints and negative feedback. In such cases, the best line of defense for online marketers is to design a comprehensive social media policy and crisis management plan. This not only prepares your company for any outward incidents, but also helps effectively respond to potential flare-ups. However, this does not mean you should live your social efforts in fear. A crisis management plan is like a safety net; it ensures that your company is insured against a PR meltdown online. In today's customer-driven world, fans have demonstrated greater ownership over social media. Smart marketers who have understood this know that they have little control over how their brands are perceived or what is being discussed about them in the digital space. As the above studies indicate, although a greater percentage of marketers do not have a social media communications plan in place, a majority of them are willing to consider developing one in the future. As quoted by Jeremiah Owyang, crisis planning helps you 'plan and practice for the worst, yet live for the best'. June 22, 2011 By Team Position² #Social Media For #B2B Companies, Customer Service on Twitter and much more... | Best of the Week. Social Media Crisis Management, Google Panda 2.0 and much more... | Best of the Week. View the discussion thread. SUBSCRIBE FOR UPDATES Get In Touch
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Result 26
TitleManaging the 'unmanageable' Social media in a crisis - Deloitte
Urlhttps://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/uk/Documents/corporate-finance/deloitte-uk-managing-the-unmanageable.pdf
DescriptionHow will our organisation be tested? At Deloitte we help our clients not just through the good times, but also in the toughest moments of crisis. We know what ...
Date
Organic Position24
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H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
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Result 27
Title4 Examples of Social Media Crises that Could Have Been Prevented - Mediatoolkit
Urlhttps://www.mediatoolkit.com/blog/social-media-crisis-examples/
DescriptionTake a look at these social media crisis examples that could have been prevented and learn the dos and don'ts of social media crisis management
Date24 Jun 2021
Organic Position25
H14 Examples of Social Media Crises that Could Have Been Prevented
H2What is a social media crisis?
Example 1: Give orangutans a break
Example 2: Tag scandal
Where this brand went wrong:
Example 4: YouTube scandal
Detect – react – prevent
5 Free Tools Every Content Creator Should Use
Media Monitoring Integrations For Smarter Business Decisions
RACE (Reach, Act, Convert, Engage) your audience with media monitoring
Driving Referral Traffic
5 Twitter Analytics Tools to Check Out
Media monitoring for the sports industry: should your team be doing it?
5 Media Monitoring Tools You Don’t Want to Miss Out
5 tools to work with user-generated content
H3Types of social media crises
What happened:
Where this brand went wrong:
How this problem could have been prevented:
What happened:
How this problem could have been prevented:
What happened:
Where this brand went wrong:
How this problem could have been prevented:
What happened:
Where this brand went wrong:
How this problem could have been prevented:
Newsletter
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a social media crisis?
Example 1: Give orangutans a break
Example 2: Tag scandal
Where this brand went wrong:
Example 4: YouTube scandal
Detect – react – prevent
5 Free Tools Every Content Creator Should Use
Media Monitoring Integrations For Smarter Business Decisions
RACE (Reach, Act, Convert, Engage) your audience with media monitoring
Driving Referral Traffic
5 Twitter Analytics Tools to Check Out
Media monitoring for the sports industry: should your team be doing it?
5 Media Monitoring Tools You Don’t Want to Miss Out
5 tools to work with user-generated content
Body4 Examples of Social Media Crises that Could Have Been Prevented Written by Kinga Edwards Posted on June 24, 2021July 7, 2021 Saving Bookmark this article Bookmarked “Post has been published.” And now there’s no turning back.  We all know the feeling when your heart starts beating faster, and you see things are not going your way. The campaign you created with your team has taken a wrong turn, and a wave of negativity begins to wash over your brand. Every reaction, every answer counts now – it’s up to you how the whole affair will develop further. Let’s take a look at these social media crisis examples that could have been prevented and draw some useful conclusions from them. The Internet doesn’t forget. Even a good crisis management strategy can’t prevent unexpected slip-ups. In this case, you only have one option – learn how to deal with them and react at the very moment when they occur. What is a social media crisis? The answer may seem obvious, but it’s a reasonable question. How do you know when a mishap becomes a crisis? Simply put, a social media crisis is anything that could negatively impact your business’s reputation and reception through social media. It’s much more than one negative opinion or comment under a post. A crisis is a situation that creates a wave of offensive statements which get out of your control. Types of social media crises. Social media crises can even be classified into types: Multi-channel crisis – extremely dangerous because it has the potential to go viral and generate a great deal of negative publicity very quickly.Emerging crisis – If it is not anticipated and dealt with as soon as possible, it can quickly escalate into a bigger scandal.Industry crisis – occurs when a vendor or competitor is experiencing a social media crisis. For example, when many fashion brands are suddenly all attacked for non-transparent actions.Fake news – in the age of social media, a post can go viral in just one click. The ability to detect rumors about your brand quickly is essential. It is important to remember not to wait for the situation to calm down on its own – that won’t happen. You have to react immediately. Unfortunately, some PR managers think it would be better to delete a post and pretend that nothing happened. Don’t be like them.  We scoured the Internet to find the scandals that caused the biggest uproars over the years. The following social media crises should serve as reminders to you of how NOT to handle image disasters. Example 1: Give orangutans a break. What happened:. In 2010, Greenpeace launched a campaign to highlight how Nestlé’s sourcing of palm oil was endangering orangutans in Indonesia. They parodied the KitKat slogan, changing it to “Have a break? Give orangutans a break.” The YouTube video quickly became a viral hit because it revealed the problem bluntly – the video presented a bored office worker taking a break to enjoy a KitKat but instead biting into an orangutan’s finger. This is an example of a campaign designed for a good purpose, but was controversial enough to cause Nestlé many problems. Where this brand went wrong:. How did Nestlé deal with this social media crisis? The word “deal” is overused here. They did nothing more than remove the video, alleging Greenpeace of copyright infringement. What’s more, Nestlé received many social media comments, but they decided to delete every mention that wasn’t in their favor. How this problem could have been prevented:. Nestlé showed by its actions that it was trying to hide the problem at all costs. This wasn’t a good idea because it only fueled people to continue talking about it. If someone has a negative opinion about your brand, let them speak. Nestlé should have calmly explained their side and tried some greenwashing strategy. Tip! It’s much easier to handle a social media crisis if you know where the discussion originated. Mediatoolkit allows you to track every hashtag, comment, and mention of your brand so that you can react immediately. Example 2: Tag scandal. Source What happened:. While promoting the brand Veclaim, Jessica Mercedes, a founder, assured that all her clothes were made in Poland. One of the things that she stressed repeatedly was the high quality of her clothes. “Made in Poland” was the trademark of her brand. When it turned out that some of the t-shirts she sold were based on Fruit of the Loom clothing (a famously cheap t-shirt brand), social media erupted in outrage. It turned out that the original tags had simply been torn off and replaced with Veclaim labels. The Internet was quickly filled with comments from embittered customers of the brand who felt cheated and a wave of criticism fell upon the brand. Where this brand went wrong:. On the brand’s Facebook profile, many unfavourable comments were deleted, while on the brand’s Instagram and Jessica Mercedes’ profile, the ability to comment on posts was disabled. What is more, the information stating “all our products are made in Poland” disappeared from the Veclaim website. The official statement only made matters worse – it lacked an apology, and the brand’s explanation was poorly written and did not explain anything. How this problem could have been prevented:. By responding to the first signs of trouble. Instead of reacting loudly and writing a statement, they pretended that nothing had happened, and that’s never a good idea (especially on the Internet). Tip! If a brand uses a social media listening tool, it can quickly detect emerging mentions. They would be able to react swiftly and clarify an emerging situation before it escalates. Example 3: Sorry, you’re not going to fly Source What happened:. This is an example of how to turn a PR social media crisis into a total disaster. One day in 2017, United Airlines Flight 3411 was overbooked. The airline decided to draw 4 random passengers who would not be able to fly and asked them to vacate their seats to make room for 4 airline employees. When the crew requested a pulmonologist to surrender his seat, he refused, saying that he needed to see a patient the following day (which was understandable, as he had paid for that seat). After that, security appeared on the plane and forcibly dragged the man off the plane with a bleeding face. The whole situation was recorded by fellow passengers on the flight and immediately posted online. A video of the incident went viral on social media, stoking anger over the violent action. One such video was shared 87,000 times and viewed 6.8 million times in less than a day.  Many politicians expressed concern and called for an official investigation. Donald Trump criticized United Airlines, saying the airline’s treatment of the passenger was “horrible.” Where this brand went wrong:. The following day, the then-CEO of United Airlines, Oscar Munoz, issued a statement that appeared to justify the removal of the passenger. And it gets worse. After that, Munoz sent an email to United Airlines staff that was obtained by the media. Munoz said the passenger was “disruptive and belligerent” and that employees “followed established procedures.” The email contained utterly different information from the official statement. This caused more online fury. United shares plummeted in value dramatically. How this problem could have been prevented:. A coherent, sincere message at first. The airline should have responded to each and every comment with complete respect. There was no reason for them to blame a passenger whose safety they should have been prioritizing. The whole situation should have been explained. TRACK EACH AND EVERY COMMENT ABOUT YOUR BRAND Example 4: YouTube scandal. Source What happened: . Even though this one is an old example, it should still be mentioned as a precaution. It was Easter Sunday in Conover in the USA, and the Domino’s food chain was in danger.  Two employees, counting on their popularity (in which they succeeded), shared a Youtube video in which they showed how to prepare the food in one of Domino’s restaurants. There would be nothing wrong with the situation, but there was one problem: they did it in an awfully disgusting manner. We won’t go into details because you don’t want to know them, but after watching this video you wouldn’t be willing to eat there for sure. The reaction of people was immediate. Within three days, the video had been viewed more than one million times, and Domino’s dominated Google search results for all the wrong reasons. Where this brand went wrong:. Customer perception of Domino’s brand turned negative within hours of the unfortunate publication. Despite this, Domino’s reaction took a very long time – they waited a few days before making a statement in which they apologized for the whole situation. How this problem could have been prevented:. Domino’s marketing team should have reacted as soon as the video was published. They shouldn’t have allowed people to spread fake news. However, we do have to take into account that it was one of the first such colossal Internet scandals. They didn’t have experience with crisis management (Domino’s had just assembled a social media team a month before), and they didn’t want to make any hasty decisions. Nevertheless, if the whole situation happened now, they would probably react very differently and they would know that in such a case, every minute and every “view” matters. Detect – react – prevent. Preventing a social media crisis is possible if you react quickly and detect the dangers as soon as they occur. It’s apparent that you can’t monitor the whole Internet all the time. However, this problem can be solved. Are people spreading rumours about your brand? A social media monitoring tool, like Mediatoolkit, will keep you informed and notify you as soon as somebody mentions your business online. You don’t need to consider if the mention is negative because Mediatoolkit automatically detects the sentiment. This will allow you to respond faster and see only those mentions that matter. Manage crises more effectively by visiting every article, hashtag, or comment as soon as they’re published. By using Mediatoolkit, you can be sure that you are doing everything in your power to avoid appearing on the list above. Do you want to start? START YOUR FREE TRIAL NOW crisis communication social media social media crisis Kinga Edwards Member since March 3, 2021 CEO @ Brainy Bees - she thinks insights are everywhere. https://www.brainybe.es/ Related articles . Marketing 5 Free Tools Every Content Creator Should Use . As a content creator, your main job is to create content (well, duh). But what exactly does that mean?  In general, it means you have to create infographics, blogs, videos, animations, flyers, etc. which will then be used to represent the company you work for. 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The thing with media monitoring is that more often than not, the data it provides is the start […] [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/ba54eefcd193c4a707e2c3469f7ddb70?s=60&d=mm&r=g] Written by Matija Martek February 8, 2019April 9, 2021 Saving Bookmark this article Bookmarked [https://867611.smushcdn.com/1931877/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Vizual.jpg?lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1] [https://867611.smushcdn.com/1931877/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Vizual-150x150.png?lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1] Marketing Media Monitoring RACE (Reach, Act, Convert, Engage) your audience with media monitoring . Media monitoring, social media monitoring, social listening and other terms have been marketing buzzwords for quite a while now. What’s the deal? Media monitoring tools (like Mediatoolkit) provide marketers with information necessary to improve their performance. They enable marketers to: Track all the relevant mentions of a particular keyword (company, brand name, industry, competitors, etc.) […] [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/ba54eefcd193c4a707e2c3469f7ddb70?s=60&d=mm&r=g] Written by Matija Martek March 14, 2016October 8, 2021 Saving Bookmark this article Bookmarked Marketing Driving Referral Traffic . Mediatoolkit makes content discovery easy. But what happens once you find good content? Where do you publish it? Are you sure you’re getting the maximum possible reach? Maybe you could tweak some points in your social media strategy to get the optimized result! 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[…] [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/da2f8be77ea90c9fa37bb5eba89d597a?s=60&d=mm&r=g] Written by Irma Jakić February 16, 2021June 30, 2021 Saving Bookmark this article Bookmarked [https://867611.smushcdn.com/1931877/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ugc-guest-blog-350x350.png?lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1] [https://867611.smushcdn.com/1931877/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ugc-guest-blog-150x150.png?lossy=1&strip=1&webp=1] Marketing 5 tools to work with user-generated content . Influencers are the new pop stars today. Millions of people want to be like their favorite bloggers: watch the same movies, eat at the same places, buy the same clothes. It’s difficult to underestimate the power of the content they share.  However, not only influencers’ content can boost your business. 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TitleHow to Handle a PR Crisis - businessnewsdaily.com
Urlhttps://www.businessnewsdaily.com/8935-recover-from-pr-crisis.html
DescriptionThis guide includes tips for managing a PR crisis and protecting your brand reputation from further damage
Date
Organic Position26
H1PR Crisis? 6 Steps to Help Navigate the Storm
H2A PR crisis can be challenging to navigate, but these six steps can help your brand recover
What is a PR crisis?
What effect does a PR crisis have on your business?
How to handle a PR crisis
What not to do during a PR crisis
H3Example of a PR crisis
1. Appoint a response team
2. Devise a strategy and brief your team
3. Craft your message
4. Identify and address the affected parties
5. Monitor the situation
6. Review and learn from the situation
Lashing out
Offering "no comment"
Responding too quickly or too slowly
Dwelling on the situation
H2WithAnchorsA PR crisis can be challenging to navigate, but these six steps can help your brand recover
What is a PR crisis?
What effect does a PR crisis have on your business?
How to handle a PR crisis
What not to do during a PR crisis
BodyPR Crisis? 6 Steps to Help Navigate the StormSammi CaramelaBusiness News Daily Contributing WriterUpdated Dec 21, 2021A PR crisis can be challenging to navigate, but these six steps can help your brand recover.A PR crisis occurs when negative events or reviews threditoraten to impact your brand reputation.Bad PR is likely at some point, but how your company responds can determine how detrimental the impact becomes.These six tips can help you navigate a PR crisis, limit the damage to your brand and emerge the other side unscathed.This article is for small business owners interested in strengthening and protecting their brand reputation.Public relations is a concept every small business has to deal with at some point. From online reviews to general customer satisfaction, if you run a business that has to deal with the public, you’re in the public relations business. Part of public relations is effectively dealing with negative news and events related to your business. Accidents happen. Problems pop up. Your business can never be fully safe from potential negative events that could impact your relationship with your customers. What’s important, however, is understanding how to handle these problems when they occur, so you can mitigate damage and ensure your business weathers the PR storm.What is a PR crisis?Most businesses will face a public relations crisis at one time or another. From a string of bad reviews to a serious executive scandal, a negative incident can have a powerful impact on a company's reputation. No one expects you to be perfect, but they do expect you to be human – and that shows in the way you handle such instances.A PR crisis is when any negative event or review related to your business gains traction in the public sphere. It could be related to an unhealthy business practice, a customer accident at your location, or an internal, employee-related issue. PR crises are important because they can taint your small business’s image in the minds of your customers. What’s more important to understand about PR crises: You likely can’t control their outcome. While there are some strategies you can implement to mitigate damage, once the information is out there, your business is going to have to roll with the punches and do its best to turn a wrong into a right.Example of a PR crisis. Two examples of PR crises come from two of America’s most well-known companies: Facebook and Uber.Facebook had to deal with data privacy issues related to Cambridge Analytica, which may have affected the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. Uber struggled with internal issues regarding sexual harassment and hostile work environments. In both cases, each company made mistakes that small businesses can learn from.For example, these companies did their best to acknowledge the issue, like when Facebook claimed that "something happened," rather than something was done (by them). Or when Uber attempted to pave a smoother path, to "move in a new direction," as if solving the issue were that simple.Insincerity is a major concern with these apologies, especially when some of the damage is deeply rooted in discriminatory beliefs and criminal actions. At times, it seems that all these companies are doing is sweeping the issue under the rug and hoping society forgets it ever existed.Key takeaway: A PR crisis threatens your brand reputation and can happen to any company. Sincerity and genuine concern is the best way to respond. What effect does a PR crisis have on your business?While a PR crisis’s effect may seem intangible at first, it will definitely affect your business in the long run. Customers and clients want to interact with businesses they trust. If your company is caught in a PR storm, it puts that trust in jeopardy. While at first the issue may seem simple or small, if the PR crisis isn’t handled properly, it can grow into a major issue.Facebook is a perfect example. The Cambridge Analytica PR crisis changed the way Americans viewed Facebook. For instance, while over half of America’s teens are using Facebook, it no longer dominates the teen social media landscape. While other technologies and platforms can account for this change, Facebook’s data privacy issues play a major role in the company’s future relationship with new and existing customers.Key takeaway: PR crises can have a material impact on your ability to do business. Limiting the fallout related to a PR crisis is essential to surviving and rebuilding brand reputation.How to handle a PR crisis. Every business should have a PR crisis team and plan in place. Business News Daily asked experts what to do – and not to do – if your company finds itself in the middle of a PR crisis. Here are six tips to navigate the storm.1. Appoint a response team. Your business should already have a response team in place before a crisis even hits. However, during a controversy, you'll want to appoint a response team quickly to ensure the right people are speaking on behalf of your company."It's important that the organization is able to react fast and speak with one voice, which is difficult to achieve when multiple people begin to speak on its behalf," said Evan Nierman, founder of Red Banyan.He said the most effective teams are made of both in-house professionals who have inside knowledge of the company and external experts who can see that situation from a journalistic perspective.Editor's note: Looking for the right reputation management service for your business? Fill out the below questionnaire to have our vendor partners contact you about your needs.2. Devise a strategy and brief your team.Protocol is essential to the proper management of your crisis communications efforts. Sabina Gault, CEO of Konnect Public Relations, said each member of your response team should understand their responsibilities and know whether to take a proactive or reactive approach in their media coverage of the incident."Whatever the strategy is, the company must relay protocol to any and all persons who could be approached to speak on their behalf," said Gault. "This means informing all employees, stakeholders, board members, etc., of who is to be speaking with [the] media and how they are to direct any inquiries. This will save the company from having to explain comments from any unofficial company representatives later."3. Craft your message. Once you and your team have gathered all the facts about the incident, you should agree on how you will frame your response. Think about the most transparent way to address the situation and what your company has done or will do about it – without placing external blame."The best way to handle a crisis is to just be open and honest with your audience," said Joe Culotta, communications manager for the Hispanic Leadership Fund. "The sooner you apologize and admit your mistake, the sooner people can forgive you. Also, the faster you handle the problem, the sooner people will stop trashing you on social media."Culotta referred to how Starbucks handled their recent scandal as a prime example of what to do: Apologize right away, take responsibility for the occurrence, and make it clear that it won't happen again."If the company has a large following on social media, make it more personal by having the president or CEO of the company apologizing for their mistake," he said. "The more visual you could be, the better."However, in some instances, it may be better not to release a statement, said Bill Pinkel, account director at Reputation Management. It's important to be patient while still being responsive, and not to make too many statements."Often, it is better to say nothing in response to a crisis," he said. "In legal situations where an apology is an admission of guilt, an apology won't slow down the blowback from a story. A press release can flood the internet with content on the crisis topic, [which] tells search engines it is a prevalent topic [and] could make cleaning up a company's online reputation more difficult."4. Identify and address the affected parties. You should identify the people who need to know about the situation, such as employees, stakeholders, business partners, customers and the media. Gault noted that the audience will depend on the context of the situation, but regardless of who's receiving your message, you should make sure it is sent out in a timely manner.Pinkel suggested sending messages or a press release to known and friendly press contacts who are likely to portray the story in a fair or favorable light. But media outlets are quick to pick up stories once they break, so you should have prepared statements and press releases ready to go before you're approached by reporters.5. Monitor the situation. Assessing your brand's image is especially important following a PR crisis. You will need to keep an eye on inbound and outbound communications to address follow-up questions or concerns."It's necessary to exercise extreme caution and care when dealing with customers and partners," said Morgan Mathis, vice president at Highwire PR.It's important to also track what people are saying about your company online. Companies are at risk of losing 22 percent of their business with just one negative article on the first page of search results, according to Reputation Management. Look at Google images, online review sites, social media platforms and even your own website for any negative, user-generated content."A key component of effective crisis communications is understanding what various audiences and stakeholders are saying about an organization at any given time," said George Sopko, vice president of Stanton.He suggested establishing monitoring systems that quickly uncover negative trends before they become a bigger problem and migrate to the media.Sopko also recommended monitoring the company's brand and crisis keywords, influencers and competitors.6. Review and learn from the situation. Once the crisis is over, Nierman suggests conducting a post-action review."Look at how well your staff and management handled the situation," he said. "Discuss what could have been done differently and what changes are necessary to prevent a similar situation."In an infographic on the topic, Reputation Management recommended focusing on recovering your credibility after a crisis. Shift the conversation to positive news from your brand.Key takeaway: When a PR crisis occurs, devise a strategy and adhere to it. Address the problem sincerely and own responsibility. Implement actionable solutions and continue to learn from the incident.What not to do during a PR crisis. When creating and executing your media-response strategy, our expert sources warned against the following tactics.Lashing out. Even if the opposing party has said something completely false about your company, it is never a good idea to respond negatively or blame the complainant for the situation, Mathis said."You need to think strategically and put any emotions on the back burner," she added.Offering "no comment". Not having answers to potential questions is the worst thing you can do during a crisis, said Nierman. But, sometimes, you truly can't give a good answer with the information you presently have.While using "no comment" is better than making something up just to give an answer (which our sources agreed is never the right choice), it's easy to see how this phrase can be misconstrued as trying to cover up or avoid an issue. If you don't have enough information to give a solid response, say so, and assure the person asking that you will issue a statement when you have more details.Responding too quickly or too slowly. Handling a PR crisis is all about timing. You don't want to give a premature response before you have all the facts, Gault said. Having to backtrack or contradict previous statements later could further damage your reputation. Delaying your response time won't do you any favors either.Dwelling on the situation. Mathis reminded business owners that the news cycle is short, and the situation will almost certainly blow over. A period of "bad" press is often just a hiccup on your path to success – you shouldn't let it completely distract you from running your business. People can forgive and forget your mistake, but they won't forget how you conducted yourself in the process, she said."Always remember to use good taste, no matter how bad [the outlook] seems," Mathis said. "It's important to handle the situation the right way."Key takeaway: Do not lash out and blame others. Address the situation by responding in a measured, sincere way. Move on from the incident and learn from it.Additional reporting by Matt D'Angelo, Saige Driver and Nicole Fallon. Some source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article.Image Credit: wellphoto/ShutterstockSammi CaramelaBusiness News Daily Contributing WriterSammi Caramela has always loved words. When she isn't writing for business.com and Business News Daily, she's writing (and furiously editing) her first novel, reading a YA book with a third cup of coffee, or attending local pop-punk concerts. She is also the content manager for Lightning Media Partners. Check out her short stories in "Night Light: Haunted Tales of Terror," which is sold on Amazon.Lead Your TeamSee More >Updated 12.21.21Workplace Harassment: How to Recognize and Report ItWorkplace harassment takes many forms. Here's how to identify some...Updated 08.24.206 Biggest Business Insurance Risks (and How to...These are the biggest insurance risks for small businesses that...Updated 12.17.21How to Choose a Reputation Management ServiceHere is a guide to choosing the right reputation management...Updated 12.21.21You're Being Sued: A Guide to Handling a Business...Getting sued is a small business owner's worst nightmare. Here's... 11.04.19Your Guide on How to Plan a Corporate EventDo you have a corporate event to plan? This guide will help you...
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Result 29
TitleMedia Crisis Management | PR Crisis Management - Q&A with a PR Pro
Urlhttps://blog.tveyes.com/managing-a-crisis-qa-with-a-pr-pro
DescriptionInterview with a PR Pro about media crisis management. TVEyes gets your questions answered about PR crisis management
Date
Organic Position27
H1Media Crisis Management | PR Crisis Management - Q&A with a PR Pro
H2The Broadcast Monitoring Blog
Free Trial of TVEyes
H3YOU GOT THIS
I recently had the opportunity to interview seasoned PR professional, Brittany Bevacqua, about Crisis Management. Brittany is a Senior VP at Affect, a NYC-based public relations, marketing and social media firm. She has extensive experience helping clients prepare for and navigate through crisis events.Because let's face it, no one is immune to crisis. We're in an age of cyber crime, fake news and workplace harassment. It's the not-even-that-new normal. So...the most important thing you can do is be prepared. We thought it would be helpful pass along her knowledge on the PR crisis management
Get started today.
Recent Posts
H2WithAnchorsThe Broadcast Monitoring Blog
Free Trial of TVEyes
BodyMedia Crisis Management | PR Crisis Management - Q&A with a PR Pro I recently had the opportunity to interview seasoned PR professional, Brittany Bevacqua, about Crisis Management. Brittany is a Senior VP at Affect, a NYC-based public relations, marketing and social media firm. She has extensive experience helping clients prepare for and navigate through crisis events.Because let's face it, no one is immune to crisis. We're in an age of cyber crime, fake news and workplace harassment. It's the not-even-that-new normal. So...the most important thing you can do is be prepared. We thought it would be helpful pass along her knowledge on the PR crisis management. How do you prepare for a crisis? Inherently they're unexpected, but how can you better anticipate so you're poised for timely response? Surprisingly, there's a lot you can do to prepare for a crisis. First thing's first, you need to know that a crisis will happen to your business - it might be small or isolated, but it will happen, and preparation is key. You also need to know that no matter where the crisis originates, people--including your c-suite--will likely turn to you, marketing and communications team, to save the day or fix the problem. In order to effectively manage a crisis event, it's so important to understand what occurs--and what to expect--within the four phases of crisis communications. The phases include the following: Readiness: Anticipating and assessing threats that could lead to a crisis, and defining how the business should respond if an incident were to occur.  Response: Executing against the crisis communications plan, focusing on accurate and consistent communication from your company to all necessary stakeholders (internal and external) deemed appropriate for the crisis scenario.  Reassurance: Demonstrating empathy and/or reassurance to key stakeholders about critical steps that your company is taking to address/resolve the issue at hand and/or prevent a similar situation from occurring again.  Recovery: Establishing and executing against short- and long- range plans to rebuild/regain stakeholder trust and support following the conclusion of the crisis event. So, going back to the readiness piece, it's all about expecting the unexpected. Assembling a crisis response team Crisis Mapping - an annual exercise (often conducted with the crisis response team) to identify and rank potential incidents your business could face related to four areas: People Products/Services Facilities/Operations Environmental factors Establishing and/or revisiting corporate policies & procedures - sexual harassment, ethics, alcohol/drug policies, etc.  This also includes distribution of a corporate media and communications policy - which should clearly define who is permitted to speak with media, and what employees need to do if they are contacted by press. Employee training/seminars - don't push off HR-related training!  Run drills or tabletops to simulate the actions your team would take in a crisis situation.  24/7 Crisis Monitoring - in the media, across social channels, on other "influencer" channels - i.e. Glassdoor. Google Alerts are certainly helpful but not always reliable. And of course, all companies need a detailed crisis communications plan.  What does a good PR crisis management plan look like/include? Well, it needs to exist, it needs to be current, and it needs to be actionable.  We have worked with far too many companies that don't even have a crisis communications plan in place. Some companies have one, but haven't dusted it off in 10 years. The world has changed dramatically in the past 10 years! Cyber-security crises, data breaches, etc, were almost non-existent 10 years ago. Social media wasn't used in the way it is today. You have to evolve plans to ensure you have the most appropriate steps in place.  A good crisis plan includes: Names/titles/contact information for all crisis response team (CRT) members - work and home. And also, contact information for outside vendors - legal, PR/marketing agency, IT security, and accounting firms. Approved Crisis Response Team (CRT) workflows to follow if/when a crisis event occurs.  Digital and Social Media platform log-in credentials - blog, intranet, employee apps, social media platforms, media monitoring tools, and your press release distribution service. Log of basic company information - office locations/addresses, data center locations/addresses. Specific crisis scenarios derived from your company's Crisis Mapping exercise with standard communication templates - employee memos, customer emails, FAQs, sample social media posts (if relevant). Think if this as Mad Libs for crisis communication.  Who needs to get involved? Believe it or not, you need far more people involved in your crisis response team than you might expect. The responsibilities are far-reaching beyond the communications function. And often, a crisis begins in departments outside of the comms function.  On the client side, you'll need people involved who can make decisions quickly- C-suite, HR, Legal, Marketing/Comms, and sometimes, security/IT, social media managers/team leads. On the agency side, you'll need to work with the most senior-level team members on strategy - President, VP-level. Additional team members will provide execution support - news monitoring/reporting, etc.  In your experience, what are some early warning signs of a potential crisis? How do you spot them?  Social media! A blessing, in that a lot of crisis-related issues surface on social. A curse, because bad news spreads fast. You can get tipped off to outages, operational issues, etc.  Comments on sites like Glassdoor. Companies should pay close attention to what employees are posting on those sites. Sometimes, it's a pattern of complaints internally - about employees, customers, products/services. Sometimes, it's the media calling to tell you a crisis is happening.  Which tools and tech do you use during a crisis situation? Media monitoring tools, like TVEyes, are absolutely essential, enabling us to remain in control! Here's a checklist to help you choose the right broadcast media monitoring solution. And, check out review sites like G2 to explore your media monitoring options and decide what's right for your organization.  At the basic level, you'll want to be able to search and monitor relevant key terms across all applicable media, 24/7. We rely on near real-time alerts that are delivered automatically via email, to stay well informed.   Time is a factor - how do you manage quickly without going into panic mode? Assemble a crisis response team quickly and agree on the action plan, who is responsible for what and next steps. Don't delay - you will risk losing control of the narrative. Acknowledge the situation and deal in facts. An immediate response, even if all the facts are not available, helps you control the narrative and message, conveys that the company takes the incident seriously and is empathetic to the situation, and reaffirms its commitment to an appropriate resolution. Acknowledge impact and empathy for "victims". Commit to investigate. Commit to sharing information/cooperating with relevant parties. Share a corrective action plan.  How transparent should a company be when addressing a crisis?  It depends. Every crisis situation differs, but generally speaking, companies that are transparent, deal in facts and show empathy for what has occurred will have shorter and more controlled crisis events than those who refuse comment, delay response, or worse, lie or try to cover up an incident. The goal is to always remain in control of your company's narrative. Being open and forthcoming with journalists from the start--even if you don't have all of the facts yet--puts you in greater control of a news cycle and the perception of your brand as a result. What does crisis management success look like? How is it measured? Success can be permanent or temporary - depending on the crisis situation. Litigation-related issues can occur in several waves.  We usually deem the "end" of a crisis related to the following three factors: When the situation itself has been resolved and the root cause has been determined. The number and frequency of inquiries reaches normal levels. Sentiment returns to normal levels.  What happens once the crisis has been addressed / mitigated? Debrief! What worked? What didn't? You'll surely find things to do better next time. Review the need for operational, regulatory, environmental and employee changes. Develop a long-term plan including policies and prevention tactics. Reassess your crisis management plan. What needs to be added? What needs to be changed or updated? Regain the trust of key stakeholders. Demonstrate improvements through strategic communications. Don't harp on the crisis, but rather, promote ways the company has changed/improved following it.    Interested in learning more about Affect's crisis communications support or other services? Email Brittany at [email protected] or call 212.398.9680 Request a FREE, Custom TVEyes Trial Today!     Free Trial of TVEyes. Get started today. . TVEyes makes it easy to search TV, report on results and prove the value of your efforts.With instant access to every domestic media market – local, regional, national – as well as unmatched global reach, TVEyes helps you pinpoint exactly the right clip instantly.   TVEyes lets you: Monitor and research coverage. Develop strategy. Report successes. Contain a crisis.  Media train executives.  Recent Posts. All content © copyright 2021 TVEyes Inc. All rights reserved. TVEyes clips are for internal review, analysis and research only. Any editing, reproduction, publication, rebroadcast, public showing, public display or placement on any website is prohibited and may violate copyright laws.
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Result 30
TitleSocial Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right | Synthesio
Urlhttps://www.synthesio.com/blog/social-media-crisis-management/
DescriptionIn the fast-paced world of social media, discover how 3 companies approached social media crisis management and remedied high-stake situations
Date19 Nov 2021
Organic Position28
H1Social Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right
H2Social Media Crisis #1: Nike and Zion Williamson
Social Media Crisis #2: Sephora and SZA
Social Media Crisis #3: Gucci’s Balaclava Sweater
What Can Help Your Social Media Crisis Management Strategy?
H3How Did Nike Respond?
How Did Sephora Respond?
How Did Gucci Respond?
About the Author: Carmen Yeung
Related Posts
H2WithAnchorsSocial Media Crisis #1: Nike and Zion Williamson
Social Media Crisis #2: Sephora and SZA
Social Media Crisis #3: Gucci’s Balaclava Sweater
What Can Help Your Social Media Crisis Management Strategy?
BodySocial Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right Social Media Crisis Management 3 Examples Done Right When negative opinions are shared on social media, corporations can quickly feel the backlash. A single tweet directed at a company can go viral on the Internet in a matter of hours. Overnight, your brand’s health can take massive hits. That’s why adopting effective social media crisis management strategies is crucial for any company. In honor of Social Media Day, which is celebrated nationally and internationally on the 30th of June each year, we’ve taken a look at the best social media crisis management cases we’ve seen so far this year. Social Media Crisis #1: Nike and Zion Williamson. On the 20th of February, Zion Williamson, a star player from Duke University, suffered a knee injury when a malfunctioning Nike shoe fell apart. This accident happened less than a minute into a highly-anticipated game against North Carolina. Media outlets and social media users quickly began talking. ESPN had broadcasted the game nationally. On Twitter, former President Barack Obama, who was watching the game courtside, expressed his well-wishes to Williamson, as did NBA giants like LeBron James. How Did Nike Respond? This accident was so high-profile that Nike stock dropped 1.8% the following day. Nike soon released a statement expressing its concern and well wishes for Williamson. The footwear megabrand reassured the world that its teams were “working to identify the issue.” The following day, Nike sent a team to Durham, North Carolina where the game took place. This team then visited Nike’s manufacturing site in China and returned with numerous suggestions. About a month later, Williamson returned to the court with custom shoes, which he told reporters were “incredible.” He thanked Nike for creating them. A good crisis management strategy is timely, compassionate, and proactive. In this scenario, Nike responded with immediate concern. The company demonstrated its commitment to improvement by sending a team to rectify the situation and create a new pair of shoes. Social Media Crisis #2: Sephora and SZA. In April 2019, hit singer SZA tweeted that a Sephora employee had called security on her to prevent shoplifting. Social media users, primarily on Twitter, were quick to defend SZA. Some called the employee disrespectful, while others accused the employee of racial profiling. How Did Sephora Respond? As the conversation started heating up, Sephora responded directly to SZA’s original tweet. The tweets expressed the company’s apologies and thanked the singer for bringing the problem to their attention. About a month after this social media firestorm, Sephora announced on Facebook that all stores and offices would close for an hour of centralized diversity training. Although it is unclear whether the training session is related to this incident, this is nonetheless a proactive step toward both diversity and crisis management. At its heart, crisis management is about reaching your audience and consumers. When the time calls for it, don’t be afraid to use social media to address your audience. In fact, Sephora’s direct response to SZA’s tweet demonstrated that its team was paying close attention to what people were saying online. Notice how Facebook was the platform of choice for Sephora’s official statement. Sharing on social media platforms humanizes your brand and signals to the world that you are ready for a conversation. The cosmetics and skincare retailer used social media to its advantage as a tool for crisis management.  Social Media Crisis #3: Gucci’s Balaclava Sweater. Early this year, one of Gucci’s sweaters received sudden backlash for its resemblance to blackface. Although the item officially launched months earlier, the crisis arose suddenly on Twitter and spread everywhere. How Did Gucci Respond? Gucci quickly removed the sweater from its website and store shelves. The luxury brand posted an official statement on its Twitter account, apologizing for the offense. The company humbly referred to the incident as a “powerful learning moment.” Gucci’s statement affirmed its dedication to diversity and awareness. About a month after the crisis, it announced its plans to launch global scholarship programs in Ghana, Nigeria, Mexico, New York, and other global locations. Gucci has also created an advisory panel that includes supermodel Naomi Campbell, activists, and academics. The company is now looking for a director of diversity and inclusion. When it comes to sensitive topics like this scenario, a good social media crisis management strategy is especially important. Companies have to demonstrate their dedication to improvement through concrete actions. Consumers have to see that measures for preventing future offenses are underway. Brands also have to make sure that their statements are effectively reaching the public through social media. What Can Help Your Social Media Crisis Management Strategy? Many media firestorms begin on social media platforms, such as Twitter or Facebook. That’s why it’s important to carefully manage what’s being said about your company. Using a social listening tool can help you monitor and minimize the impact of bad press and negative sentiment. Choosing the best way to respond to a crisis involves properly gauging both the social media landscape and media outlet coverage. Learn how to create a social media crisis management plan in 4 easy steps. Book a demo Carmen Yeung2021-11-19T12:16:49-05:0026 June 2019| Share This Story, Choose Your Platform! FacebookTwitterRedditLinkedInTumblrPinterestVkEmail About the Author: Carmen Yeung . As a marketing associate at Synthesio, Carmen creates content related to social intelligence and marketing by making connections between Synthesio's software and real-world applications. She also works to monitor and optimize Synthesio's social platforms. Outside of work, she enjoys reading, dabbling in art, and spending time with family and friends. Related Posts . Why You Need Decision Intelligence to Make Data-Driven Insights Actionable . 6 January 2022 Decoding The Patient Journey With Social Insights . 21 December 2021 Building The Business Case For AI-Enabled Consumer Intelligence . 16 December 2021 We use cookies to give you the best user experience on our website. Please click "OK" to continue, or read our privacy & cookie policy. OK English Go to Top
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TitleSocial Media During a Crisis: A Checklist for Social Media Managers
Urlhttps://www.agorapulse.com/blog/social-media-best-practices-crisis/
DescriptionYou can't predict when a crisis is going to hit your business. But you can take care of how you handle that crisis and have a plan in place
Date21 Jul 2021
Organic Position29
H1Social Media Best Practices to Help Guide You During Any Crisis
H2What Social Media Managers Need to Do First in a Crisis
Crisis Checklist Before Pausing Ad Campaigns
How to Interact With Your Customers
PR and Social Media Need to Work Together
In Conclusion
* * *
How to Grow Your Social Media Presence–Organically!
Store, Share, and Organize Social Media Assets Easily With Agorapulse’s Asset Library
How to Get the Absolute Most Out of Your Social Media Inbox
H3Initial crisis checklist
Social media messaging during a crisis
Social media strategy during a crisis
Deepen interactions with your audience
Communicate with your customers with video
Focus on the good
More from the blog
H2WithAnchorsWhat Social Media Managers Need to Do First in a Crisis
Crisis Checklist Before Pausing Ad Campaigns
How to Interact With Your Customers
PR and Social Media Need to Work Together
In Conclusion
* * *
How to Grow Your Social Media Presence–Organically!
Store, Share, and Organize Social Media Assets Easily With Agorapulse’s Asset Library
How to Get the Absolute Most Out of Your Social Media Inbox
BodySocial Media Best Practices to Help Guide You During Any Crisis Written by Jennifer Watson Last modified Jul. 21 2021 · 11 min read ShareTweetSharePinEmail Table of Contents What Social Media Managers Need to Do First in a CrisisCrisis Checklist Before Pausing Ad CampaignsHow to Interact With Your CustomersPR and Social Media Need to Work TogetherIn Conclusion* * * Table of Contents What Social Media Managers Need to Do First in a CrisisCrisis Checklist Before Pausing Ad CampaignsHow to Interact With Your CustomersPR and Social Media Need to Work TogetherIn Conclusion* * * Want to receive the best of our blog every single month? Yes, I’m in!   You can’t always predict when a crisis is going to hit your business. But you can take care of how you handle that crisis … and also make sure to have a plan in place for when a new crisis pops up. As a former meteorologist and storm chaser (yes, really), I’ve been able to see gathering storms and upcoming disasters. But not all tough times can be predicted. Sometimes, you get sideswiped. And that’s what’s been happening globally with the COVID-19 crisis. Nobody expects a global pandemic. Most of us social media managers operate and plan for businesses to continue to succeed, and everything to be good in the world. Everything is not sunshine and rainbows all the time. (I have to tell myself that sometimes.) So, you should always have a crisis plan and checklist to use when needed. You don’t want to scramble to determine how to approach the situation. What Social Media Managers Need to Do First in a Crisis. The No. 1 thing you need to do is pause all scheduled content and take a step back to assess the situation. (Don’t forget to take a couple of deep breaths.) Understand all sides, and gather all the information possible, so you have a holistic view of the issue at hand. Ask yourself, “Does this impact just our company or is it a national or global concern?” Initial crisis checklist. The following initial crisis checklist should already be part of your crisis plan: Check and potentially pause all Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn Ads. Consider going more into Pinterest, YouTube, and Google instead—where people are actively searching rather than being interrupted with your ad. Check and potentially pause any scheduled content. Check other social media automation systems like Triberr, Viral Content Bee, Quuu, and other reciprocal sharing systems or RSS Feed aggregators. Check your pinned posts on Twitter and Facebook as well as Facebook Group(s) to ensure they’re not tone-deaf. Check your website’s copy to make sure it’s not oblivious to the current situation. Check your outgoing messages, such as voicemail or even out of office. Schedule a team and company meeting to make sure everyone fully understands how to handle the crisis and whether temporary new guidelines need to be in place. Crisis Checklist Before Pausing Ad Campaigns. Here is a checklist from Facebook Ad expert Amanda Robinson regarding what you need to consider before pausing any ad campaigns. Do continue ads as usual if your products and services are still selling normally without interruptions to the supply chain. Do re-evaluate your ad copy and make sure it is still relevant in today’s social environment. Leave campaigns alone unless you need to make changes. Note: Editing your Targeting, Creative (e.g., images, text, links, or videos), Optimization, or Billing Event causes your ad to be pulled from inventory and sends it back into Facebook’s review process. Once approved, it is like starting a campaign over from scratch restarting the learning phase. Do duplicate campaigns if you need to make edits/changes. This is to preserve the campaign data for how your ads performed originally and then create a new campaign with your changes to compare results. Do focus on engagement, video view, and traffic campaigns, so when business and spending resumes, your audience sizes maintain regular volume. You can retarget web visitors up to 180 days (six months) and retarget engagement + video view audiences for up to a year. Reducing spend now means less engagement now, and your audience quality can take a hit in six months to a year. How to Interact With Your Customers. Next, look at your company’s mission statement and goals. Ask yourself, “How does this problem impact your company’s mission? Can you go on like business as usual? What do you need to tweak?” Social media messaging during a crisis. Now, put yourself in your customers’ place regarding social media messaging. You need to understand what their thought process is right now, their needs, and their wants. One of the best things you can do is confront the crisis and then ask your customers, “How can we help you through this?” Social media strategy during a crisis. You need to be sensitive to the issue. Relate to your audience. Understand that this is a difficult time for your customers and fans, and reassure them you are there for them. Provide useful information they can start implementing immediately to strengthen their company or business. Remember when curating content during a time of crisis: Understand that sometimes it’s best to say nothing. Be intentional with the content you post; make sure it is helpful and necessary. Provide useful resources that customers can use immediately. Prep for extra customer service needs and questions. Monitor the situation and breaking news closely to stay aware of the latest developments and how it could impact your business and your customers. Avoid getting involved in any political or negative discussions EVER! If you’re unsure about how to respond or if you should, ASK! Most importantly, BE HUMAN. Treat others like how you would like to be treated. Deepen interactions with your audience. People crave interaction and acceptance. During a time where things aren’t normal, maintain some type of normalcy and positivity for your customers and fans. To understand how they are handling and processing the situation, you can ask them how are they doing and adapting to the situation. You can also ask, “What is the most important thing you need right now?” Their responses will give you a good idea of the type of resources and content that will benefit them the most. Strengthening and building your community is a great way to show your support. If you don’t have a Facebook group or some kind of private group or Slack channel, create one if this is a widespread crisis that will last several weeks to months. In the group, you can share resources and start conversations where members can collaborate to help each other and show support. Groups are a smart way to show extra support and to prevent potentially “spamming” other people that follow your content on your main social channels that aren’t impacted. Communicate with your customers with video. Live video is the best way to directly communicate with your customers and fans, especially during a crisis. If you haven’t done a live video, check out these tips about how to create an Instagram live video or LinkedIn videos. (If you’re awkward in front of the camera, these tips for camera-shy social media managers can help.) Video responses to social media replies and in company- or customer-wide emails are also a great way to instantly humanize your brand, become more relatable, and connect with your employees and customers—all while getting the appropriate messages you need to get across. Focus on the good. A great way to control the conversation and maintain a positive mindset is to highlight any positive outcomes from the situation. Making sure to have positive content is also key to keeping your customers’ thoughts (and yours) positive. Any easy way to do this is to ask your customers and fans, “What positive thing has happened to you personally or professionally recently?” You’ll likely be amazed by the outpouring of responses that come in. Along with connecting with your customers and fans, one of the most critical components to successfully responding to a time of crisis is making your PR and social media teams and messages align. PR and Social Media Need to Work Together. Digital strategist Stephanie Liu shares her insight on the best ways for your PR and social media teams to work together: “It’s important for PR and social media teams to cooperate on a unified message that will be broadcast across all channels. It’s not about speed, it’s about strategy. This is an opportunity for both teams to discuss what works and what doesn’t work on channels to eliminate blind spots. “This isn’t a time to play email whack-a-mole either. Schedule a conference call to lay out the details and next steps. Taking a few extra beats now to get your strategy right can help prevent having to work on damage control later because your initial messaging didn’t have the right tone or all the information it needed to convey. “Next, have processes in place to Manage Your Online Presence. “When an event like the novel coronavirus impacts all industries, there’s more that your Social Media team can do in addition to keeping customers informed with posts. Take the time to update your hours of operation across all social media profiles and online listings that appear in search results, such as Google My Business, Yelp, and so on. “If the way that you conduct business has or will change, post about that as well. Be transparent and communicative so that your audience is as well informed as you can make them. “If you don’t already have a Crisis Playbook, create a Google Doc now and start documenting everything that you’re doing through the current issue, so each time your team has to navigate trouble, there’s less confusion and delay. “For some businesses and thought leaders, the next step is an interesting one: Winning the Pitch. “If you or your client is the subject matter expert in a particular industry, the PR team can look for opportunities to pitch the media and provide expertise either written or via video interview. The social media team can help support the pitch by providing a list of curated content that can be used in the media overview, such as past instances of interviews. “Even better, create a content library organized by topic to make finding and repurposing content even faster. Say, for example, the CEO for one of your client brands is an expert on managing a remote workforce and has blog posts, guest columns and major media outlet interviews they’ve done on the topic in the past. A savvy PR team will have those at their fingertips to reference when reaching out to journalists and media outlets. “If you aren’t already, jump into Help A Reporter Out (HARO) where you can search for active media stories, as well as set up alerts for new requests that might be of interest. “Finally, with PR and Social Media working overtime during a PR crisis, we always recommend updating your email signature to link to the latest updates. This will give recipients an opportunity to stay updated while waiting for your timely response. “This applies to both internal and external issues. When it’s an external issue, you can have blog content or videos there to simply help your audience and customers with whatever is going on. If it’s an internal issue, you may have a press release or landing page with updated information and resources. “As with any issue, pre-planning can help tremendously, but no amount of pre-planning can anticipate every nuance of any crisis. So give yourself time to consider what has happened or is happening, how it will impact your business and, most importantly, what your customers and audience is most concerned about. Then set out to be the best possible communicators you can be.” In Conclusion. Be proactive in your approach, so your customers know where your company stands, what resources you can provide, and if there are any changes to hours of operation or processes. Remember no matter the situation, be compassionate, understanding, and relatable as your customers’ needs change. You need to maintain a fluid strategy that can easily be pivoted due to changing circumstances. Lastly, be the kind of company you would want them to be if you were a customer. * * *. Want more helpful, actionable content like this? Subscribe to the Agorapulse newsletter, and get the most recent blog posts and news about the social media channels you use most. ShareTweetSharePinEmail More from the blog. How to Grow Your Social Media Presence–Organically! By Charli Day Dec. 20 2021 Store, Share, and Organize Social Media Assets Easily With Agorapulse’s Asset Library. By Anna Sonnenberg Nov. 18 2021 How to Get the Absolute Most Out of Your Social Media Inbox. By Charli Day Nov. 15 2021 × Keep up to date with social media marketing! Our newsletter is packed with the hottest posts and latest news in social media. By using this website, you automatically accept that we use cookies to improve your experience. For more information, refer to section 3 of our privacy policy here.I understand
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Result 32
Title10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis | Blog | Online Digital Marketing Courses
Urlhttps://digitalmarketinginstitute.com/blog/10-steps-to-prepare-for-a-social-media-crisis
Description10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis page on the Digital Marketing Institute Blog, all about keeping you ahead in the digital marketing game
Date26 May 2021
Organic Position30
H110 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis
H21. Build a crisis team
2. Put processes in place
3. Agree on a single internal communication channel
4. Decide who is in charge
5. Remember who your friends are
6. Know what content you have
7. Decide who will be your spokesperson
8. Determine the key social media channels you need to take control of
9. Agree on your crisis tone of voice
10. Decide how you will measure whether you are winning
Conclusion
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Toolkits:Facebook Data Feed Manager
Articles:4 Reasons to Use Memes in your Marketing
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Videos:Team Talk: How to best utilize LinkedIn?
eBooks:The DMI Guide to Social Media Crises
Webinars:Webinar: How to Use SEO and Social Media
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H2WithAnchors1. Build a crisis team
2. Put processes in place
3. Agree on a single internal communication channel
4. Decide who is in charge
5. Remember who your friends are
6. Know what content you have
7. Decide who will be your spokesperson
8. Determine the key social media channels you need to take control of
9. Agree on your crisis tone of voice
10. Decide how you will measure whether you are winning
Conclusion
Recommended For You
Body10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis ArticlesSocial Media MarketingShare via: by Julie Atherton Posted on May 26, 2021 A social media crisis is a frightening prospect. So much so, that many organisations avoid thinking about it, have only rough plans in place, and only learn how to deal with one when they actually face a problem.Every crisis, even an online one, can be managed. If you do some preparation, careful planning and maintain a can-do team spirit you will be more than able to spot, evade, manage, survive and learn from any crisis you may face. Expert Julie Atherton has created this handy 10-step checklist to help you think about and prepare for a situation that can happen out of the blue, for anyone. It's adapted from the eBook she wrote for DMI on How to Manage a Social Media Crisis. 1. Build a crisis team. If a crisis happens, who needs to be in the team, what will be their roles and what authority will they have? It is too late to decide this in a crisis, and it is essential they have worked together before the crisis happens.Trust takes time to build. A cohesive team that trusts each other will perform much better in the heightened anxiety conditions of a crisis than a group of people who have never met before. Make sure your team is small with limited levels of hierarchy. Decisions need to be made swiftly and with authority.2. Put processes in place. Map your crisis management plan. Make sure it is short and sweet - no more than one page long - as no one has time to read “War and Peace” in a crisis!3. Agree on a single internal communication channel. Choose a separate internal communications channel which has full transparency such as Microsoft Teams or Slack to ensure you have full visibility of information across the team as the crisis develops. 4. Decide who is in charge. At what level does sign-off happen? Is the team empowered to make all decisions? When do they need to get higher-level sign off and from whom?5. Remember who your friends are. Traditional media is highly trusted by the public. Now is the time to call in those favors with your journalist and influencer buddies. Who are they and how will you reach them in an emergency?6. Know what content you have. Make sure your content repository is well documented and it is quick and easy to find content, or create new content, to tackle a crisis.7. Decide who will be your spokesperson. Someone will need to take responsibility. They may well need to be publicly humble and honest about what has happened and be seen to have the authority and credibility to take responsibility for the organization.8. Determine the key social media channels you need to take control of. Where is it essential that you disseminate your core messages in a credible and consistent way? This should include the channel where the crisis is mainly occurring, but also typically other important channels such as:Twitter - where journalists and traditional media outlets are highly active,Instagram - where influencers and celebrities have large followings and actively participate, andFacebook - which has huge reach and is often the go-to channel of choice for news for large sections of the public. 9. Agree on your crisis tone of voice. Ideally, this will be consistent with your brand positioning, but also empathetic, human, considered, and honest (if these aren’t already your values).Make friends not enemies. There is no need to escalate the crisis when a more conciliatory approach can build bridges and defuse the situation.10. Decide how you will measure whether you are winning. What information do you need to know if the tide is turning your way? Will you use sentiment analysis, complaint levels, stock price, or a combination of multiple factors?It is useful to have some granular level indicators as well as the headline stats, but you need to know if your crisis management is improving or damaging the situation.Conclusion. Social media is nothing if not a highly vocal critical friend. When an organisation continually listens, learns, and engages, its crisis management and reputation can only grow.Get a full picture of how to navigate an online storm with the DMI Guide to Social Media Crises, or have a listen to our podcast on How to Survive a Social Media Crisis.Have a look at the DMI Social Media Marketing course to cover the foundations of all you need to know to manage your brand online. Related. DMI Guide to Social Media CrisesSlack: Blowing Up the Business Communications RealmJohnson & Johnson: Big Pharma Pioneers on the Front LineRisqué Brand Tone on Social Media: Where to Draw the Line?Related Free Video Lessons. Instagram and SnapchatInstagram Stories FacebookMessenger Digital CommunicationsInfluencers Social Media MarketingAnalyzing and Reporting Using Social Media ToolsView CoursesRelated Content. Toolkits:Influencer Tracker Tool. Toolkits:Competitor Analysis Tracker. Toolkits:Facebook Data Feed Manager. Articles:4 Reasons to Use Memes in your Marketing. Articles:10 Steps to Building Your Personal Brand on Social Media. Articles:9 Persian Recipes to Flavor your Instagram Marketing. Share via: Julie AthertonJulie is an award-winning digital strategist, with over 30 years’ experience. Having worked both agency and client-side, she has a wealth of knowledge on delivering marketing, brand and business strategy across almost every sector. In 2016, Julie set up Small Wonder. Drawing on her past experience, she now supports a wide range of businesses, from global brands, to educational organisations and social enterprises.She is the author of the book, Social Media Strategy which was a top read chosen by Thinkers360. You can find her on Twitter and LinkedIn.Categories: ArticlesSocial Media Marketing Upgrade to Power Membership to continue your access to thousands of articles, toolkits, podcasts, lessons and much much more. Become a Power Member Recommended For You. Videos:Team Talk: How to best utilize LinkedIn? eBooks:The DMI Guide to Social Media Crises. Webinars:Webinar: How to Use SEO and Social Media. Articles:10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis . Articles:Team Talk: Put a Little Love into your Valentine’s Social Strategy. Articles:10 Steps to Building Your Personal Brand on Social Media. CPD points availableThis content is eligible for CPD points. Please sign in if you wish to track this in your account. Sign in CPD Points AvailableThis content is eligible for CPD points. Please login if you wish to track this in your account. Login View Courses- - - Courses Resources- - - My Account Change Password Logout Search Results✕esc"search term" Get the latest digital marketing data, insights and toolkits from DMI View CoursesShare via:
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