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Keyword Best ways to manage neck pain
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Best+ways+to+manage+neck+pain&oq=Best+ways+to+manage+neck+pain&num=20&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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Result 1
TitleNeck pain - NHS
Urlhttps://www.nhs.uk/conditions/neck-pain-and-stiff-neck/
DescriptionRead about neck pain or a stiff neck, which is a common problem and generally nothing to worry about
Date
Organic Position
H1Neck pain
H2How you can ease neck pain yourself
What can cause neck pain
How you can prevent neck pain
H3Do
Don’t
Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:
Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: how to contact a GP
Do
Don’t
H2WithAnchorsHow you can ease neck pain yourself
What can cause neck pain
How you can prevent neck pain
BodyNeck pain Most neck pain only lasts a few weeks. There are things you can do yourself to ease it, but see a GP if it does not go away. How you can ease neck pain yourself. Do . take paracetamol or ibuprofen – or use ibuprofen gel on your neck use a low, firm pillow put heat or cold packs on your neck try neck exercises Don’t . do not wear a neck collar – it's better to keep your neck moving (unless a doctor tells you not to) do not do anything that could be dangerous because you cannot move your neck – for example, driving or cycling Putting heat or cold packs on your neck Try either of these:a pack of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel for 5 minutes, 3 times a daya hot water bottle wrapped in a tea towel for 20 minutes, 2 to 3 times a dayYou can also buy heat or cold packs from a pharmacy. Non-urgent advice: See a GP if: . pain or stiffness does not go away after a few weekspainkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen have not workedyou're worried about the painyou have other symptoms, like pins and needles or a cold arm – this could be something more serious Information: Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: how to contact a GP. It's still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:visit their websiteuse the NHS Appcall themFind out about using the NHS during COVID-19 What can cause neck pain. The most common causes are:the neck becoming locked in an awkward position while sleepingbad posture – for example, when sitting at a desk for a long timea pinched nervean injury – for example, whiplash from a traffic accident or fall How you can prevent neck pain. Do . when sleeping, make sure your head is the same height as the rest of your body have a firm mattress sit upright – roll your shoulders back gently and bring your neck back Don’t . do not keep your neck in the same position for a long time – for example, when sitting at a desk do not sleep on your front do not twist your neck when you're in bed Page last reviewed: 19 May 2020 Next review due: 19 May 2023
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Title9 Lesser-Known Tips for Easing Neck Pain
Urlhttps://www.spine-health.com/blog/9-lesser-known-tips-easing-neck-pain
DescriptionWhen conventional pain control methods don’t work, consider trying lesser-known methods, like acupuncture and holistic treatments
Date
Organic Position2
H19 Lesser-Known Tips for Easing Neck Pain
H21. Choose a neck-supporting chair
2. Try a water pillow
3. See a physical therapist
4. Give gua sha a chance
5. Get in the pool
6. Make time for mindful meditation
7. Keep a journal
8. Consider cognitive behavioral therapy
9. Be careful how you use your phone or tablet device
Learn more:
References
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Health Information (Sponsored)
H3
H2WithAnchors1. Choose a neck-supporting chair
2. Try a water pillow
3. See a physical therapist
4. Give gua sha a chance
5. Get in the pool
6. Make time for mindful meditation
7. Keep a journal
8. Consider cognitive behavioral therapy
9. Be careful how you use your phone or tablet device
Learn more:
References
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Body9 Lesser-Known Tips for Easing Neck Pain   share   pin it   Newsletters By Marco Funiciello, DO For many people living with chronic neck pain, common treatments such as medications, ice, or heating pads do not always provide enough relief. Finding the best combination of treatments for your neck pain may take some trial and error. Here are some lesser-known tips for managing neck pain that you might want to consider. 10 Best Tips to Prevent Neck Pain Video Save Maintaining strong daily hydration may prevent further degeneration of cervical discs, which may reduce neck pain. Watch: 10 Best Tips to Prevent Neck Pain Video 1. Choose a neck-supporting chair. When you hunch forward with forward head posture, extra stress is placed on your spine.1 Maintaining good posture throughout the day keeps the head naturally balanced on the cervical spine and may reduce pain. A headrest can help to keep your cervical spine in a neutral position, so consider getting an office chair with one—and using it. Keep the back of your head comfortably against the headrest with your ears above your shoulders. Also make it a point to use the headrest on your recliner and in your car when you can. If you're working at a computer screen be sure that the level of your eyes are even with the top third of the computer monitor. Also, consider a standing desk as a standing leads to a more natural position and dissuades us from hunching forward. See Choosing the Right Ergonomic Office Chair 2. Try a water pillow. Pillows to Ease Neck Pain Video A major complaint of chronic neck pain is that it can interfere with a good night’s sleep and/or worsen when you wake up in the morning. While no one pillow type is the best for everyone who has neck pain, some people have found water pillows to be particularly helpful. With a water pillow, you can adjust the firmness by increasing or reducing the amount of water inside. Specifically, more water equals a firmer pillow; less water provides a softer pillow. See Pillows for Neck Pain Various water pillow products are available and may be worth considering if you’ve tried more traditional neck pillows and braces to no avail. See Different Types of Pillows advertisement 3. See a physical therapist. 3 Easy Neck Exercises for Neck Pain Video It’s common to think of physical therapy as a treatment aimed at rehabilitation from a given injury, such as from a sports injury or a collision. While this is correct, physical therapy for the neck can also have other benefits, such as: Identifying poor posture or habits that may be contributing to pain and stiffness. Teaching you how to reduce the risk of reinjury. Strengthening the weak areas of the neck through targeted exercises. Check with your doctor to see if your chronic neck pain might be better managed with physical therapy. Improving the neck’s strength and flexibility may help better support the cervical spine and reduce pain. Some evidence suggests physical therapy may have even more benefits when combined with other treatments, such as aerobic activity.2 See Physical Therapy for Neck Pain Relief 4. Give gua sha a chance . Gua sha typically involves having a trained practitioner use a spoon to apply short strokes down the skin of the painful area. Gua sha is from Chinese Traditional Medicine, and it’s applied to areas of the body where blood circulation is believed to be stagnant and blocking energy (called “qi”). While there is no scientific evidence for qi, some people have reported neck pain relief from gua sha. One small study found gua sha to relieve neck pain more than heat therapy,3 but not all studies agree and more research is needed.4 See Gua Sha for Chronic Neck Pain When performed by a trained professional who uses sterile equipment, gua sha is generally considered safe. This treatment should not be applied to damaged or thinning skin. Also, as part of normal gua sha strokes across the skin, tiny capillaries break and cause petechiae (red spots) to form, which might be misinterpreted by others as a rash or bruising from abuse. The petechiae typically clear up within a few days. See Efficacy and Risks of Gua Sha for Neck Pain 5. Get in the pool. Video: Why Is Exercise Important for Neck Pain? Swimming is a great low-impact exercise for many people who have neck or back pain. Being in the water adds buoyancy, which means less stress on the spine. Depending on the cause of your neck pain, consult with your doctor or physical therapist regarding which swim strokes may need to be avoided or modified. For some, swimming is too strenuous on the neck. In that case, water therapy, which is gentle exercise done in a warm swimming pool, is often a great alternative to land-based exercises. See Water Therapy Exercises 6. Make time for mindful meditation. Finding a quiet place to relax and focus the mind may help ease stress and bring new perspective. Some examples of mindful meditation include controlled breathing exercises or guided imagery, such as envisioning the pain moving from your neck to your arm and then eventually floating off your fingers. See Mindful Meditation vs. Chronic Pain There are free videos and apps online to help you get started with mindful meditation. While mindful meditation doesn’t work for everyone, some people have reported benefits.5 7. Keep a journal. Some evidence suggests that regularly expressing emotions, such as in a private journal, may help reduce stress and improve thinking.6,7 For people who prefer not to write, making audio recordings may also be beneficial. Over time, keeping a journal of your thoughts and daily happenings may also help you to identify possible triggers that make your pain worse, such as certain foods or activities. See How to Relieve Neck Pain Caused by Stress 8. Consider cognitive behavioral therapy. Chronic neck pain can be extremely frustrating, and treatment plans may be complicated and seemingly provide little or no results. A cognitive behavioral therapist may be able to help you by teaching new ways to think about challenges. With new strategies to focus more on the positives, you might be better able to follow the treatment plan for your neck pain. Studies have been mixed on cognitive behavioral therapy’s efficacy on treating neck pain, but some people have reported benefits.8 A cognitive behavioral therapist may also offer guidance on mindful meditation and journaling. advertisement 9. Be careful how you use your phone or tablet device. One way you may not even realize that you’re aggravating your neck is by cradling your phone while talking, which puts extra stress on your cervical spine. It is also common for people to bend the head forward while looking down to read a phone or tablet for hours a day, which can contribute to painful neck strains or text neck. See How Does Text Neck Cause Pain? Avoid neck pain from phone use with these tips: Use a hands-free headset to make calls. When you're browsing or texting, hold the phone up higher to decrease the angle at which you're holding your neck. Take frequent breaks to stretch your neck. Watch Text Neck Treatment Video Hopefully at least a few of these 9 tips give you some new ideas to try for neck pain relief. Learn more:. Treatment for Neck Pain Neck Strain: Causes and Remedies References. 1.Kapandji IA. The Physiology of the Joints, Volume III. 6th ed. London: Churchill Livingstone; 2007.2.O'Riordan C, Clifford A, VanDeVen P, Nelson J. Chronic neck pain and exercise interventions: frequency, intensity, time, and type principle. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014; 95(4):770-83.3.Braun M, Schwickert M, Nielsen A, et al. Effectiveness of traditional Chinese "gua sha" therapy in patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial. Pain Med. 2011; 12(3):362-9.4.Lee MS, Choi T-Y, Kim J-I, Choi S-M. Using guasha to treat musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review of controlled clinical trials. Chin Med. 2010; 5: 5.5.Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction vs. cognitive behavioral therapy or usual care on back pain and functional limitations in adults with chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2016; 315(12):1240-96.Klein K, Boals A Expressive writing can increase working memory capacity. J Exp Psychol Gen. 2001; 130(2): 520-33.7.Langens TA, Schuler J. Effects of written emotional expression: the role of positive expectancies. Health Psychol. 2007; 26(2): 174-82.8.Monticone M, Cedraschi C, Ambrosini E, et al. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for subacute and chronic neck pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 May 26;(5):CD010664. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD010664.pub2. advertisement. Editor's Top Picks. 3 Easy Neck Exercises for Neck Pain Video Chiropractic Manipulation for the Cervical Spine What to Consider Before Starting Exercises for Neck Pain How Does Text Neck Cause Pain? Neck Strains and Sprains Video Video: The 3 Worst Things You Can Do To Your Neck Health Information (Sponsored).
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Result 4
TitleHow to Get Rid of a Stiff Neck: 10 Home Remedies and Exercises
Urlhttps://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-get-rid-of-a-stiff-neck
DescriptionA stiff neck can be painful and interfere with your daily activities, as well as your ability to get a good night’s sleep. Find out how to prevent a stiff neck and what you can do if your neck becomes stiff despite your best efforts. These 10 remedies will point you in healthier direction, even while you sleep
Date
Organic Position3
H1How to Prevent and Treat a Stiff Neck: Remedies and Exercises
H2Stiff neck prevention
Stiff neck remedies
When to see a doctor
The takeaway
related stories
H3Create an ergonomic workplace
Limit how long you look at a smartphone
Don’t drive for long periods at a time
Stretch
Change your sleep position
Apply heat or ice
Take OTC pain relievers
Stretch but avoid sudden movements
Get a massage
Try acupuncture
Consider chiropractic care
Limit physical activity
Reduce stress
Exercise regularly
Adjust your sleep environment
Read this next
H2WithAnchorsStiff neck prevention
Stiff neck remedies
When to see a doctor
The takeaway
related stories
BodyHow to Prevent and Treat a Stiff Neck: Remedies and ExercisesMedically reviewed by William Morrison, M.D. — Written by Diana Wells — Updated on April 22, 2020OverviewA stiff neck can be painful and interfere with your daily activities, as well as your ability to get a good night’s sleep. In 2010, more than 17 percent of women and more than 12 percent of men reported some type of neck pain and stiffness. That number is rising with the prevalent use of mobile devices and computers, which compel people to crane their necks at awkward angles. In fact, looking down at your phone, laptop, or other devices is the most common cause of neck strain. This hunched position puts a strain on the muscles and soft tissues of your neck.Other causes may include:poor postureclenched jawstressrepetitive neck motionosteoarthritisneck or spinal injuryWe’ll look at ways to help relieve neck stiffness and pain as well as methods to prevent the pain. Stiff neck prevention. Many times, you can prevent a stiff neck with some lifestyle changes and ergonomic workplace tools. Prevention may also mean breaking some bad habits, like poor posture. In addition, regular exercise can strengthen your muscles and make them less likely to be strained or injured.Also, not smoking or quitting smoking can help prevent neck pain. Quitting can be difficult. Talk to your doctor to create a quit-smoking plan that is right for you.Create an ergonomic workplace. Many people work at a computer desk for eight hours each day. This can contribute to a stiff neck, as well as other ailments. Here are some ways to prevent a stiff neck at work:Adjust your chair into a comfortable position with your feet flat on the floor and your knees a bit lower than your hips.Use ergonomic posture while sitting, with your back straight and your arms level to the desk.Adjust your computer so that it’s at eye level.Use an ergonomic keyboard and mouse.Stand up to stretch and move every hour.Limit how long you look at a smartphone. Constantly looking down at your phone pulls on your neck muscles and puts a constant strain on them. If you have to use your smartphone often, try some of these tips to reduce your neck strain:Hold your phone at eye level.Don’t hold your phone between your shoulder and your ear.Use earbuds or headphones.Take a break from your phone hourly.After using your phone, stretch to relax your muscles.Don’t drive for long periods at a time. Just like sitting at your desk all day, sitting behind the wheel of your car can affect your neck. If you have to drive for long periods, here are some tips for preventing a stiff neck:Take breaks to stand up and stretch.Set an alarm to remind you to check your posture while driving.Set your seat in a position that provides you the most support and puts you in good posture.Don’t text and drive. It’s illegal, dangerous, and bad for your neck to be repetitively looking up and down from your phone to the road.Stretch. Periodically stopping to stretch is a great way to help prevent getting a stiff neck. Stretches include:Roll your shoulders back and forth.Squeeze your shoulder blades together several times.Slowly move your ear to your shoulder on each side.Slowly turn your head from side to side.Change your sleep position. The position you sleep in at night can also affect your neck. Sleeping on your side or your back puts less strain on your neck than sleeping on your stomach. When you sleep on your stomach, you’re forcing your neck to strain for long periods of time and this can cause pain and stiffness.If you sleep on your side for all or part of the night, you can buy a pillow with neck support. Stiff neck remedies. If you have a painful, stiff neck, you can try several remedies to reduce the pain and lessen the stiffness. Many of these remedies can also be used for prevention.Apply heat or ice. Apply ice for 20 minutes a few times a day to help relieve neck inflammation. You can also alternate between applying ice and heat. Taking a warm bath or shower or using a heating pad may also help.Take OTC pain relievers. Over-the-counter pain relievers like the following can help reduce the pain:ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil)naproxen sodium (Aleve)acetaminophen (Tylenol)Stretch but avoid sudden movements. Stretching can help relieve the pain and stiffness, and prevent it in the future. It’s important to stretch gently and slowly. Sudden movements can cause more inflammation, pain, and a more serious injury. Apply a heating pad or take a warm shower before stretching.Stretches include:Roll your shoulders backward and then forward in a circle.Press your shoulder blades together and hold the position for a few seconds, then repeat.Slowly turn your head from side to side.Get a massage. Massage by a trained practitioner can help to loosen and stretch your neck and back muscles.Try acupuncture. Acupuncture involves inserting needles into specific pressure points on your body. While more scientific research is needed to identify proven benefits, acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years in Eastern medicine. Visit only a certified practitioner with sterile needles.Consider chiropractic care. A licensed chiropractor can manipulate muscles and joints to provide pain relief. This type of therapy can be uncomfortable or painful to some. You can discuss your comfort with a doctor.Limit physical activity. If your neck stiffness and pain started after performing physical activity, you should limit that activity until the stiffness resolves. However, you should limit heavy lifting and activities that may aggravate your neck muscles any time you have neck pain.Reduce stress. Stress can cause you to tense the muscles in your neck. Reducing stress can help treat and prevent neck pain and stiffness. You may choose to reduce stress in a variety of ways, including:listening to musicmeditationtaking a vacation or break, even if it’s just for a few hours away from the office or a stressful environmentdoing something you enjoyExercise regularly. Exercise can help strengthen your muscles to prevent injuries. Exercise can also help you to improve your posture to relieve and prevent neck stiffness. It’s also a great way to relieve stress that may be causing your stiff neck.Adjust your sleep environment. Adjusting your sleep environment can help relieve a stiff neck. Ways to change your sleep environment include:getting a firmer mattressusing a neck pillowsleeping only on your back or siderelaxing before going to sleepwearing a mouth guard if you’re grinding your teeth at night When to see a doctor. If your neck pain interferes with your regular daily activities, you should see your doctor. Other reasons you should seek medical care are:pain started after an injury or car collisionpain that spreads down your arms or legsweakness in your arms, hands, or legsheadache alongside painThese additional symptoms could be a sign of a more serious injury to your neck, like a herniated disk, pinched nerve, bulging disk, or arthritis. The takeaway. Most of the time, a stiff neck with minor pain can be treated at home with ice, heat, and stretching. If your pain does not subside after a few days or you have additional symptoms, you should see a doctor. Last medically reviewed on July 5, 2018Medically reviewed by William Morrison, M.D. — Written by Diana Wells — Updated on April 22, 2020related stories. 6 Tips to Use a Standing Desk CorrectlyWhat’s the Best Sitting Position for Good Posture?7 Morning Stretches for Perfect PostureWhy Do I Have Pain in the Right Side of My Neck?Fixing Upper Back and Neck PainRead this next. 6 Tips to Use a Standing Desk CorrectlyWritten by Joe Leech, MSStanding desks have become very popular, and can improve health and productivity. Here are 6 tips on how to use these desks correctly.READ MOREWhat’s the Best Sitting Position for Good Posture?Medically reviewed by Gregory Minnis, DPTYour posture has a major impact on your health, but most people don't know how to sit with good posture. Here's how to get started.READ MORE7 Morning Stretches for Perfect PostureMedically reviewed by Daniel Bubnis, M.S., NASM-CPT, NASE Level II-CSSDo you feel your back hunching over by midday? Work toward better posture with these seven stretches each morning. Open up your body to a taller you…READ MOREWhy Do I Have Pain in the Right Side of My Neck?Medically reviewed by Alana Biggers, M.D., MPHPain can occur on either side of your neck and may be related to simple muscle strain or more serious conditions like nerve damage or spinal injury.READ MOREFixing Upper Back and Neck PainMedically reviewed by Deborah Weatherspoon, Ph.D., R.N., CRNAIt’s an avoidable slouch that causes much upper back, neck, and shoulder pain, and pressures the discs of the upper spine. Here is how to help fix the…READ MORENeck Pain: Symptoms, Causes, and How to Treat ItThe bones, ligaments, and muscles of your neck support your head and allow for motion. Any abnormalities, inflammation, or injury can cause neck pain…READ MOREIs There a Connection Between Sinus Health and Neck Pain?Medically reviewed by Nicole Leigh Aaronson, MD, MBA, CPE, FACS, FAAPThere are several sinus conditions, including infections, that are known to cause symptoms including neck pain. Here's what you need to know.READ MOREStiff Neck and Headache Causes and SolutionsMedically reviewed by Nicole Leigh Aaronson, MD, MBA, CPE, FACS, FAAPIt’s not unusual for a stiff neck and headache to occur at the same time. Learn more about why. READ MOREThe 11 Best Neck Massagers for Neck and Shoulder Pain in 2021Medically reviewed by Gregory Minnis, DPTIf you're looking for a neck and back massager to relieve sore muscles, we have 12 to consider.READ MOREAll About Bone Spurs in the NeckMedically reviewed by Timothy Gossett, M.D.Learn all about what can cause bone spurs in your neck, see images of bone spurs, how to recognize common symptoms, and how to seek treatment.READ MORE
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Title6 ways to ease neck pain - Harvard Health
Urlhttps://www.health.harvard.edu/pain/6-ways-to-ease-neck-pain
DescriptionNeck pain usually evolves over time. And it may be spurred by arthritis or degenerative disk disease and accentuated by poor posture, declining muscle strength, stress, and even a lack of sleep. These six tips can help you get relief
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Body6 ways to ease neck pain September 25, 2019 Stress, poor sleep, and physical ailments over time can lead to a pain in the neck. Image: Wavebreakmedia | Getty Images Everyday life isn't kind to the neck. You may be all too familiar with that crick you get when you cradle the phone between your shoulder and ear, or the strain you feel after working at your computer. Neck pain rarely starts overnight. It usually evolves over time. And it may be spurred by arthritis or degenerative disc disease, and accentuated by poor posture, declining muscle strength, stress, and even a lack of sleep, said Dr. Zacharia Isaac, medical director of the Comprehensive Spine Care Center at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital and director of interventional physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School. The following six tips can help you find neck pain relief: Don't stay in one position for too long. It's hard to reverse bad posture, Dr. Isaac says, but if you get up and move around often enough, you'll avoid getting your neck stuck in an unhealthy position. Make some ergonomic adjustments. Position your computer monitor at eye level so you can see it easily. Use the hands-free function on your phone or wear a headset. Prop your tablet on a pillow so that it sits at a 45° angle, instead of lying flat on your lap. If you wear glasses, keep your prescription up to date. "When your eyewear prescription is not up to date, you tend to lean your head back to see better," Dr. Isaac says. Don't use too many pillows. Sleeping with several pillows under your head can stifle your neck's range of motion. Know your limits. For example, before you move a big armoire across the room, consider what it might do to your neck and back, and ask for help. Get a good night's sleep. Sleep problems increase the risk for several different conditions, including musculoskeletal pain. Generally, neck pain is nothing to worry about, but if it's occurring with other, more serious symptoms, such as radiating pain, weakness, or numbness of an arm or leg, make sure to see your doctor. "Other key things that might make one more concerned are having a fever or weight loss associated with your neck pain, or severe pain," said Dr. Isaac. "You should let your doctor know about these symptoms." For more information on managing a stiff, achy neck, buy Neck Pain, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School. Share This Page Share this page to Facebook Share this page to Twitter Share this page via Email Print This Page Click to Print Disclaimer:. As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review or update on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician. Pain Got back pain? Can virtual reality provide real pain relief? Pain A single-session class offers chronic low back pain relief. Pain Help for your aching back. Free Healthbeat Signup. Get the latest in health news delivered to your inbox! Close Thanks for visiting. Don't miss your FREE gift. The Best Diets for Cognitive Fitness, is yours absolutely FREE when you sign up to receive Health Alerts from Harvard Medical School Sign up to get tips for living a healthy lifestyle, with ways to fight inflammation and improve cognitive health, plus the latest advances in preventative medicine, diet and exercise, pain relief, blood pressure and cholesterol management, and more. Close Health Alerts from Harvard Medical School Get helpful tips and guidance for everything from fighting inflammation to finding the best diets for weight loss...from exercises to build a stronger core to advice on treating cataracts. PLUS, the latest news on medical advances and breakthroughs from Harvard Medical School experts. BONUS! Sign up now and get a FREE copy of theBest Diets for Cognitive Fitness Close Stay on top of latest health news from Harvard Medical School. Plus, get a FREE copy of the Best Diets for Cognitive Fitness.
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TitleStiff Neck? Remedies to Find Neck Pain Relief – Cleveland Clinic
Urlhttps://health.clevelandclinic.org/do-you-have-a-stiff-neck-try-these-simple-remedies/
DescriptionYou can treat a stiff neck with stretches, over-the-counter pain relievers, and heat or ice, as well as by maintaining proper posture while on your computer or phone
Date30 Nov 2021
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BodyHow to Get Rid of a Stiff Neck Stretching or applying heat and ice can provide pain relief Share Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest email Email With so many of us gazing into computers or staring down at our smartphones most of the day, it’s no wonder we’re having neck pain. In fact, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2018 National Health Interview Survey found that 16.1% of adults experienced neck pain within the past three months. Advertising Policy Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy A stiff neck typically develops when your muscles weaken over time from poor posture or misuse, says chiropractor Andrew Bang, DC. “When your neck muscles become weak and you try to turn your head, the joint no longer moves smoothly because it’s now out of place,” Dr. Bang says. “Often the joint catches on something, either pulling a muscle or hitting the nerve irregularly, or maybe both.” “Then you’ll have instant pain and your body has a protective spasm. Your body doesn’t want you to get hurt more, so it will clench, causing you to feel like you can’t even move — and leaving you wondering what you did to injure yourself.” Looking down at your computer monitor all day can cause the muscles around the neck joints to tire and become overstretched. Driving for long periods of time, as well as looking at your smartphone, can have the same effect. And doing this day after day can add up and displace your neck joints. Stiff neck remedies to try. For minor, common causes of neck pain, try these simple remedies: Apply heat or ice to the painful area . Use ice for the first 48 to 72 hours, then use heat after that. Heat may be applied with warm showers, hot compresses or a heating pad. Be sure not to fall asleep with a heating pad or ice bag in place to avoid skin injuries. Take over-the-counter pain relievers. Doctors recommend ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Keep moving. However, avoid jerking or painful activities. This helps calm your symptoms and reduce inflammation. Gentle massage. Have a partner gently massage the sore or painful areas. When doing this, communication is key. Have your partner try a variety of techniques until they land on one that feels good. Advertising Policy “You’ll want them to say, ‘How does this feel? Do you want more or less pressure?’ That’s what a massage therapist will do,” says Dr. Bang. “Then keep adapting until you both find the sweet spot.” No matter what technique you choose, however, he advises that any massage movements should be directed toward the heart. This matches the way the blood flows in your veins, the bluish-purple lines visible under your skin. Too much pressure going in the wrong direction, away from your heart, has the potential to damage a valve. Make sure you have the proper mattress or pillow. Try sleeping on a firm mattress without a pillow or with a special neck pillow. Use a soft neck collar . Ask your healthcare provider about using a soft neck collar to relieve discomfort. Don’t use the collar for a long time. Doing so can make your neck muscles weaker. Stretches to help a stiff neck . The key to relief for a stiff neck is proper stretching and manipulation, Dr. Bang says. Doing slow range-of-motion exercises, up and down, side to side, and from ear to ear, can help to gently stretch the neck muscles. Certain yoga poses can also help ease stiffness. Here are some other specific stretches you can try at your desk or in the car that may help you avoid a stiff neck: Roll your shoulders backwards and down 10 times.Squeeze your shoulder blades together 10 times.Push your head backwards into your car head rest or hands and hold for 30 seconds.Bring your ear to your shoulder 10 times on each side. Tips to prevent neck pain. Here are some ways to prevent neck pain that comes with a stiff neck. Be mindful of your sleep positions. Dr. Bang says if your neck is bothering you, you should pay attention to your sleep positions. Sleep only on your side or on your back – never on your stomach, he says. Advertising Policy “When you sleep on your stomach, often you will end up twisting your head one way or the other for hours at a time,” Dr. Bang says. “Sleeping on your stomach also can affect your low back because your belly sinks into the bed if you don’t have enough support.” Practice proper computer posture. To help you avoid neck pain, put your monitor at eye level, sit up straight and avoid tilting and twisting your head down or to the side while you’re on the computer. Also, be sure to take breaks from staring at your screen. Be mindful of how you’re sitting in the car — or while using your phone. When you’re driving or using your smartphone, be sure to take frequent breaks and avoid having your neck bent forward for long periods of time, Dr. Bang says. How long does neck pain last? . How long neck pain lasts depends on a variety of factors. This includes what kind of injury caused the acute (or sudden) neck pain—for example, a car accident, a sports injury or a muscle pull from working outside—and how you respond to the injury. “Many times, symptoms can resolve over a period of months if you stop doing the offending behavior,” says Dr. Bang. “Neck pain from car accidents can last a long time. But if you don’t get in another car wreck, your pain will typically go away over a few months. However, if you don’t change a habit that causes neck pain, like using a computer monitor poorly, it’s going to last.” If pain persists and gets in the way of your daily activities, or any treatment you try doesn’t seem to be working, further discussion might be necessary. “If you tried some things on your own and after two months it’s not gone away, then it’s probably time to see your doctor to figure out if there’s an underlying issue or if there’s some behavior you need to change.” Advertising Policy Advertising Policy Related Articles. August 6, 2015 / Sports Health & Fitness August 6, 2015 / Sports Health & Fitness 3 Top Tips to Avoid a Stiff Neck from Cycling . August 28, 2020 / Orthopaedics August 28, 2020 / Orthopaedics No Joke: Your Desk Job Promotes ‘Dead Butt’ Syndrome . August 6, 2021 / Orthopaedics August 6, 2021 / Orthopaedics Poor Posture Hurts Your Health More Than You Realize: Tips for Fixing It . April 10, 2019 / Rheumatology & Immunology April 10, 2019 / Rheumatology & Immunology Osteoarthritis: Who Gets It and What You Can Do About It . June 22, 2020 / Wellness June 22, 2020 / Wellness How Your Body Can Benefit From Myofascial Release . August 13, 2019 / Chronic Pain August 13, 2019 / Chronic Pain Wake Up Stiff and Sore Every Morning? Try These Adjustments to Make Sleep Swell Again . Trending Topics. 1 7 Health Benefits of Turmeric . 2 Is TikTok Causing Tics in Teen Girls? What Parents Need to Know . 3 Does a Bad Night’s Sleep Affect Your Health? . 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TitleNeck pain - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic
Urlhttps://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/neck-pain/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20375587
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TitleRemedies for a Stiff Neck, Ways to Manage Muscle Stiffness, and When to See Your Doctor
Urlhttps://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/remedies-for-stiff-neck
DescriptionNeck pain or stiffness is a common problem. Learn more about muscle stiffness, remedies to manage it, and when to see a doctor
Date12 Nov 2020
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BodyRemedies for a Stiff Neck Medically Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on November 12, 2020 The phrase "pain in the neck" is funny and sometimes accurate. A stiff neck is a common problem, affecting about 10% of the population at any given time. There are many reasons for neck pain, making it difficult to determine the exact cause. If you wake up with a stiff neck, you're likely experiencing a muscle spasm, or contraction. That's known as a muscle strain. A neck sprain affects the ligaments, or tough tissues that connect and stabilize your bones. Tendinitis — inflammation in the tissue that attaches muscle to bone and controls movement — is another contributing factor for neck pain. Symptoms of a stiff neck include:Tight muscles or muscle spasmsInability to move your head, or a decreased range of motionPain that continues to get worse when you hold your head in one position for a long timeA headache that won't go away Remedies and Treatments for Neck Stiffness. At-home remedies will usually help with the majority of early-stage neck stiffness:Apply an ice pack to numb the area and soothe inflamed muscles.Take an over-the-counter painkiller, like Tylenol, Advil, or Aleve.After a day or two, apply a heating pad or warm compress. During the next few days, take these precautions:Be aware of your movements. Try not to jerk your head quickly or twist your neck. This can cause inflammation. Try gentle stretches, moving the head back and forth, then up and down.Ask a friend or partner to massage the sore area.Wear a neck collar for a few hours to rest stiff neck muscles.Sleep without a pillow, or use one that's specifically designed to support the neck. It's possible to prevent a stiff neck. The majority of neck pain is a combination of bad posture, injury, or general wear and tear as you age. If you experience neck stiffness often, try making some simple adjustments:Watch Your PostureShoulders should be in a straight line over your hips. Ears should be in line with your shoulders. Adjust Desk Furniture Your computer should be level with your eyes. Consider raising or lowering your desk monitor or laptop. When you sit, adjust your chair to ensure the knees fall slightly below the hips.  Use Headphones or SpeakerphonesIf you hold your phone between your ears and shoulder, or look down to text, you're putting the neck in an awkward position that could cause muscle strain. Wear headphones or use your speakerphone instead. Take Frequent Breaks Sitting in the car or at your desk can take a toll on your body. Get up every hour, move around, and do some light stretching. Switch ShouldersIf you carry heavy bags, make sure the weight is evenly distributed between both sides of the body. Excess weight can lead to neck strain. Find a Supportive Way to SleepThe head should be aligned with the body. Try placing a small pillow underneath your neck. It may help to sleep on your back and place extra pillows underneath the thighs to align the muscles in your spine.When to See a Doctor. A stiff neck usually improves over a few days with at-home remedies. Sometimes neck pain is a symptom of a bigger health problem, although this is rare. See a doctor if: The pain is severe.Neck soreness or stiffness doesn't go away after several days.Pain or stiffness travels down the arms or legs.You have a bad headache and notice numbness, weakness, or a tingling sensation.You've recently suffered an injury — from a car accident or a fall, for example.  Neck Pain in Children A stiff neck isn't just something that happens to adults. Children also experience neck soreness and pain. At-home remedies like ice packs, massage, neck stretches, and over-the-counter painkillers are also helpful for your kids. Make an appointment with your doctor or pediatrician if your child: Has an injury or has recently experienced head or neck traumaIs overly tired Was bitten by a tick Has a skin rash, headache, or flu-like symptomsIs nauseous or vomitingIs fussy or crankyIs an infant and is having problems nursing or sucking a bottleHealth Solutions. Penis Curved When Erect? Could I have CAD? Treat Bent Fingers Treat HR+, HER2- MBC Tired of Dandruff? Benefits of CBD Rethink MS Treatment AFib-Related Strokes Risk of a Future DVT/PE Is My Penis Normal? Relapsing MS Options Liver Transplants Save Lives Finance Plastic Surgery Bent Finger Causes Living With Psoriasis? Missing Teeth? More from WebMD. 5 Tips to Help With Relapsing MS How to Thrive With Narcolepsy Relief for Blocked Hair Follicles Psoriatic Arthritis and Your Sleep What Psoriasis Feels Like First Psoriatic Arthritis Flare Talking to Your Doctor About RA Crohn's: A 'Full-Body' Disease Avoiding Crohn’s Flares Health Benefits of Hemp Seed Oil Live Better With Psoriatic Disease Types of B-Cell Therapy for MS 5 Health Benefits of Hemp Why Prostate Cancer Spreads Living with Advanced Breast Cancer Where Breast Cancer Spreads
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TitleNeck Pain Center | Causes, Treatments, Exercises, Relief
Urlhttps://www.spineuniverse.com/conditions/neck-pain
DescriptionYou have to know what spinal condition is causing your neck pain before you can know how to treat it
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BodyNeck Pain Causes, Types, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Written by Iain Kalfas, MD and Lindsay Curtis; Reviewed by Stewart G. Eidelson, MD and Tammy J. Penhollow, DOPeer Reviewed The Universal Guide to Neck Pain: Everything you ever wanted to know, straight from the experts. In This Article: What Is Neck Pain?   |    Neck Anatomy   |    Causes   |    Types   |    Symptoms   |    Diagnosis   |    Nonsurgical Treatments  |    Surgery Options    |    Living With   |    Sources A pain-free neck is a lot like the carefree days of our youth — we don’t appreciate it ‘til its gone. Neck pain can make life feel pretty unbearable and affect your social life, family time, hobbies and even work productivity. If you’re reading this, chances are you’re familiar with neck pain. Whether you’ve just woken up with a whopper of a crick in your neck, sustained an injury or have been dealing with chronic neck pain, this handy guide can help you understand the anatomy of your cervical spine, different causes and types of neck pain, and learn more about the common treatments for neck pain. Although neck pain is commonly caused by strain, prolonged pain may be an indication of something more serious. Photo Source: 123RF.com. What is Neck Pain? Neck pain is the worst kind of overachiever. It's so common that it's the fourth-leading cause of disability globally, following ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and lower respiratory infection. Nearly 30 percent experience it each year. And it's not always centralized in the neck. It can radiate across your whole upper body, affecting your shoulders, arms and chest and can even cause headaches. Living with neck pain can be miserable, making it hard to focus and get through the day. Neck pain can be debilitating and may interfere with day-to-day life, including your ability to sleep, feel productive, and enjoy time with friends and family. And it affects more than just your physical body. Studies have shown that chronic pain can have an impact on a person’s mental health; up to 85 percent of patients with chronic pain are affected by severe depression. What Do I Need to Know About Neck Anatomy? You don’t need to memorize the physiology and anatomy of your neck to improve its function and reduce pain, but it’s helpful to have a general understanding of your cervical spine. Neck mobility is matchless. Although you won’t get any Exorcist-style head spinning, it is capable of moving the head in many directions: 90° of flexion (forward motion), 90° of extension (backward motion), 180° of rotation (side to side), and almost 120° of tilt to either shoulder. But all that mobility comes at the cost of complexity. First you’ve got your seven vertebrae (C1 through C7), each cushioned by an intervertebral disc and connected by facet joints. There are also 32 muscles, plus the tendons that attach them to bones, that help move and stabilize the neck, as well as a number of ligaments attaching bones to each other. That’s a lot of action in a comparatively small area.   What Are Common Neck Pain Causes? “Neck pain tends to peak in middle age, and is slightly more common in women and in patients with a family history of neck pain,” says NYC-based interventional pain physician and physiatrist, Benjamin Bonte, MD. “Smokers, patients with psychological diagnoses such as depression and anxiety, and patients with a sedentary lifestyle are also more at risk.” Neck pain is most common in people over the age of 50. But beyond good old aging, the causes of neck pain are as varied as the list is long. Speaking of – here’s a list of some of the more common causes of neck pain: Injury and Accidents: Whiplash is a common neck injury sustained when the head is forced to move backward and/or forward beyond the normal range of motion. The unnatural and rapid movement of the neck affects the muscles and ligaments, which tighten and contract. This creates muscle fatigue resulting in pain and stiffness. Whiplash is most commonly sustained due to a car accident, but can also result from traumas such as a fall or a sports accident. Nerve Compression: “When a [cervical] nerve becomes compressed, it can cause [radiating]pain that moves up into the head, behind the eyes, into the jaw, down the arms,” says Dr. Penhollow. Herniated discs are the most common cause of nerve compression and spinal stenosis (crowding of the spinal canal), but bone spurs can also compress nerves. Health Conditions: Osteoarthritis: Called spondylosis when it’s in spinal facet joints—is the most common form of arthritis. It’s caused by wear and tear and aging, and can create osteophytes (bone spurs) that crowd the spinal canal and compress nerve roots in the neck. Other Forms of Arthritis: Many types of arthritis, particularly the inflammatory forms like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, can affect the cervical spine. Chronic inflammation in the neck causes damage of the joints that allow movement in the neck. Other Disease Processes: Although neck pain is most commonly caused by strain, prolonged pain and/or neurologic deficit may be an indication of something more serious. These symptoms should not be ignored. Spinal infection, spinal cord compression, tumor, fracture, and other disorders can occur. If you have sustained a head injury, your neck has likely been affected, too. Seek medical attention promptly. Lifestyle Issues: Extra weight: Extra pounds put undue stress on the spine and weak abdominal muscles can fail to support it, both of which may disrupt the spine's balance and cause the neck to bend forward to compensate. Stress: If you’re stressed—and who isn’t?—you may be clenching the muscles that move your neck without realizing it, potentially leading to a stiff, sore neck. Poor Posture: Prolonged poor posture—looking at you, excessive smartphone usage—can lead to neck pain. “Clenched teeth, improper lifting, prolonged periods of sitting at the computer, and reading in bed may lead to neck pain,” says Scottsdale, AZ-based anesthesiologist and pain specialist Tammy Penhollow, DO. What are Some Different Types of Neck Pain? The most common types of neck pain. There are different neck pain profiles. Some people experience only one type, while others experience a combination. Neuropathic neck pain: Stemming from the nerves or nerve roots in the cervical spine,  neuropathic neck pain could result from conditions such as a herniated disc that presses against a nearby nerve, or other causes of nerve compression. Mechanical neck pain: This pain stems from the spine and its supporting structures (e.g., muscles, ligaments, bones, or cartilage). Typically, mechanical pain is caused by poor posture, neck strain caused by work or sporting/physical activities, and even stress. Central neuropathic pain: Most commonly a result of a stroke, spinal cord injury, or multiple sclerosis. It may also be a result of injury to the central nervous system, caused by traumatic injury to the brain/spinal cord or infection (e.g., abscess, encephalitis, myelitis) What Are Neck Pain Symptoms? Other than neck pain itself, you may notice other symptoms that accompany the pain. Some of the more common symptoms of neck pain include: Neck muscle stiffness: Tight muscles in the back of the head or a “muscle knot” in the neck. This may spread to your shoulders, upper back and arms. Headache: Experiencing headaches in the occipital region (back of the scalp) is very common but can also extend to the top of the head, causing "tension" headaches from muscle tightness. Pain and/or weakness that shoots down the arm: This may be caused by muscle fatigue or nerve compression. Very often along specific nerve roots (i.e., vertebrae C6, which extends to the thumb and index finger and vertebrae C5, which extends to the deltoids and bicep). Loss of neck mobility: Inability to turn your head and neck easily. Paraesthesias: A sensation of numbness and/or tingling in the arms, most often caused by nerve compression at the level of the spine, or as the branching nerves pass through tight, inflamed muscles. If your neck pain is caused by nerve compression, you may experience the following symptoms: Weakness in the shoulder, arm or hand A feeling of numbness or “pins and needles” in arm, fingers or hand  Sharp, burning pain near the pinched nerve that radiates outward Some conditions, such as coronary artery disease (angina) or even lung tumors may mimic these conditions, notes Stewart G. Eidelson, MD. “It is best to have a skilled physician perform a thorough physical examination when the symptoms described are present,” he says. Daily life (and night life) can take its toll on your neck. You may have slept wrong last night, causing your neck muscles to tighten. Photo Source: 123RF.com. How Can You Get a Neck Pain Diagnosis? Neck pain is most often diagnosed by a primary care provider. “The most important aspect of treatment is to try to identify the underlying cause of the pain, as this will direct the treatment,” explains Dr. Bonte. “For example, if the cause is due to a muscle imbalance or poor ergonomics (e.g. while working from home at a makeshift desk!), it is important to address these underlying issues when thinking through the overall treatment plan.” To assess your neck pain, your healthcare provider will: Ask for your medical history Ask questions to determine the source of your pain, including: When did the pain start? What activities preceded the pain? What have you tried to relieve the neck pain? Does the pain radiate or travel into other body parts? What makes the pain less or greater? Perform a physical exam to determine whether your pain is related to muscle, joint or ligaments. This exam will include: Observation of your posture Palpating/feeling the curvature of your spine, vertebral alignment and muscle spasms An assessment of your neck mobility, including the strength and sensation felt in your neck and arms Diagnostic testing: to rule out certain conditions (e.g., infection, fracture or tumor). Your doctor visit may include a neurological examination that tests your reflexes, muscle strength, sensory and/or motor challenges, and pain distribution in order to help them make the correct diagnosis. This exam is most often performed if you are experiencing numbness or tingling in your shoulder, arms or neck, or if you have focal weakness that indicates nerve damage. Your doctor may also order a nerve conduction study (also known as electromyography/EMG) to check how quickly your nerves send and receive signals to and from your brain. Slower speeds in the nerve conduction study could indicate nerve damage. Imaging studies can help your doctor narrow down the cause of neck pain. An X-ray can reveal narrowing of disc space, fracture, osteophyte formation, and osteoarthritis. An X-ray won’t show soft tissue like muscles, ligaments or intervertebral discs, though; you’ll need an MRI or CT scan for that. What Are the Most Common Nonsurgical Treatments for Neck Pain? . If you are experiencing chronic pain (2+ weeks), it is important to seek medical attention for further evaluation and treatment. Treatments for neck pain vary, depending on the cause and duration of the neck pain you are experiencing. Many neck pain patients find relief in using one or a combination of these therapies. The most common treatments include: Medications: Both over-the-counter and prescription medications may help manage neck pain, reduce inflammation, and decrease muscle spasm and sleep disturbance. The first line of treatment when it comes to neck pain medication is typically non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS), such as ibuprofen and naproxen, and acetaminophen (Tylenol). Some NSAIDS can be applied topically to the skin, such as Voltaren Gel and Aspercreme; other topical treatments include Icy-Hot, lidocaine based patches, and CBD creams/ointments. “Prescription medications such as muscle relaxers and nerve pain medications are sometimes considered,” says Dr. Bonte. Muscle relaxants are used more often for acute pain rather than chronic pain. If you’re using medicines to treat neck pain, remember to take all medications as prescribed by your doctor and report any side effects. Some pain medications — such as opioids — are highly addictive and should be used only as prescribed. If you are experiencing neck pain of a degenerative origin, no medicine will ‘cure’ the pain, but it will help with pain control. For more information, you can read our article just on medications to relieve neck pain. Interventions: Interventions such as injections of pain-relieving medicine into the affected joints or nerves are sometimes an option for relieving neck pain. “Depending on the cause of neck pain, injections such as trigger point injections, epidural steroid injections, and radiofrequency ablations can be performed,” says Dr. Bonte. Botox injections are sometimes given at the site of pain, or dry needling into tight bands of muscle, though studies show mixed results of its effectiveness. For those with neuropathic neck pain, injections including a steroid and pain reliever may be effective, especially if done in conjunction with physical therapy. Ablation (burning) of the nerves near the neck joints may improve mobility and reduce pain, too. Steroid injections may help neck pain. For those who do not want (or should not have) corticosteroids or ablation procedures to the neck but still seek an option for pain relief, regenerative treatments such as platelet rich plasma (PRP) and/or stem cells from bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) may be appropriate.   “All of the other traditional injections, ablations, and surgeries are destructive,” says Dr. Penhollow. “For the first time we have a treatment that is reversing the process—not covering it up—and is thereby constructive.” It is widely held that these treatments need more research before they can be considered standard, and most insurances will not cover them. Cervical collar and/or cervical pillow: If you’ve sustained a neck injury, a cervical collar is used to provide support and limit motion while you are healing. It also helps keep your cervical spine in proper alignment. Cervical pillows are designed to place the right amount of curvature in your neck during sleep. They help decrease pressure on the nerves in your neck to help you sleep better — much needed when living with pain! Complementary therapies: Alternative treatments may be helpful in managing neck pain. Some of the more popular complementary therapies for treating neck pain include: Acupuncture: Acupuncture practitioners work to restore a healthy flow of your “qi” — your body’s energy force. Some people find relief after one acupuncture treatment, though others require a few sessions to feel less neck pain. Herbal remedies: Topical herbal remedies such as capsaicin cream can temporarily reduce pain when applied to the skin. Devil’s claw and/or white willow bark are both commonly used to reduce inflammation and pain. Massage: Whether your neck pain is caused by stress, injury or misuse, a massage can help release muscle tension and reduce pain and inflammation. Regular massages may also be an effective neck pain prevention measure.  Yoga and pilates: These exercises can increase your core strength, improve balance and posture and reduce stress — all fantastic ways to help you prevent and/or reduce neck pain. If your pain is caused by tense muscles or weak core muscles, yoga and pilates can be particularly helpful. Chiropractic care:  A chiropractor may help reduce your neck pain through the use of chiropractic neck adjustments, called cervical manipulation. These adjustments loosen up the joints of the cervical vertebrae in the neck to help reduce the pain caused by muscle spasms and pinched nerves. Your chiropractor may employ several techniques to reduce joint restrictions or misalignments in order to reduce inflammation, improve function and eliminate neck pain. Physical therapy: Most physical therapy treatments for neck pain involve an exercise program that will strengthen and stretch the neck to reduce pain and stiffness. Research shows that physical therapy is often a better treatment for neck pain than surgery or pain medication. Your physical therapist will work with you on exercises and treatments you can do at home to help you return to your normal activities and lifestyle. Will I Need Surgery for Neck Pain? Most patients with neck pain respond well to non-surgical treatments, so cervical spine surgery is seldom needed to treat it. In fact, less than 5% of neck pain patients need surgery. “Surgery is typically a last resort,” explains Dr. Penhollow, “unless it's an acute disc herniation compression on the spinal cord where it's a neurosurgical emergency, such as when someone experiences loss of bowel or bladder control, or extreme weakness in the limbs where decompression of the cord is imperative.” You may need cervical spine surgery if: Non-surgical treatment is not helping. That is, you've tried a combination of medication, chiropractic care, physical therapy, massage, exercises, and more, and you're still in pain. Your pain is worsening. A pinched nerve in your neck — called cervical radiculopathy — can lead to pain, numbness, and weakness in your shoulders or down your arms. If your pain is worsening, surgery can remove the source of pressure on your nerves (often caused by a herniated disc). Your spinal cord is being compressed. Certain neck conditions can put pressure on your spinal cord. You may experience pain or stiffness, problems with balance, or have difficulties with fine motor skills. You experience progressive neurological symptoms. If you are feeling numbness, tingling and weakness in your arms and legs and/or are having trouble with balance or walking. Generally, surgery is done for degenerative disc disease, trauma, or spinal instability. These conditions may put pressure on your spinal cord or on the nerves coming from the spine, and surgery is the only option for relief. What Kinds of Surgery Are Used For Neck Pain? There are two common types of cervical spine surgeries performed to relieve neck pain: Decompression: removing the tissue that is pressing against a nerve structure Stabilization: limiting the motion between vertebrae. Spinal fusion (including cervical spinal fusion), involves the surgeon using plates, screws, bones and other materials to limit motion between the vertebrae in order to stabilize the spine. There are different types of decompression procedures, including: Discectomy: the surgeon removes all or part of a damaged disc Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF):Often thought of as the “gold standard” in cervical spine surgery, ACDF involves removing a damaged disc to relieve nerve root or spinal cord pressure. Your surgeon will insert a graft to fuse together the bones above and below the disc. Cervical disc replacement: Also known as artificial disc replacement or total disc arthroplasty, this procedure involves removing the damaged cervical disc — along with any bone spurs —  and replacing it with a metal or polymer prosthetic. Corpectomy: the vertebral body is removed to access whatever is compressing the spinal cord or nerve. Transcorporeal Microdecompression (TCMD): the surgeon accesses the cervical spine from the front of the neck. TCMD is performed through a small channel made in the vertebral body to access and decompress the spinal cord and nerve. This restores normal spacing in the spinal cord while preserving the disc. Foraminotomy: removes bone spurs that are pressing on a nerve Your surgeon will work with you to determine what's best for your condition. Stabilization surgery is sometimes—but not always—done at the same time as a decompression surgery. In some forms of decompression surgery, the surgeon may need to remove a large portion of the vertebra or vertebrae. That results in an unstable spine, meaning that it moves in abnormal ways, which puts you more at risk for serious neurological injury. In that case, the surgeon will restabilize the spine. This is typically done with a spinal fusion or implantation of an artificial disc. Some patients are at high-risk for poor bone healing or unsuccessful fusion. Smoking and diabetes are two of several risk factors that impede bone healing and fusion. A bone growth stimulator may be recommended and prescribed for patients with certain risk factors. Preventing and Living with Neck Pain. While avoiding neck pain isn’t always possible, you can keep your neck muscles strain- and stress-free by creating healthy habits. Instead of in front of a computer all day, for example, take stretch breaks throughout the day. If your neck pain feels worse at the end of each day, consider your posture. Are you sitting up straight? Sitting in your chair with your feet flat on the floor? If your neck pain feels worse in the morning, check your sleep position and pillow. Use a pillow that supports your neck and keeps it straight. Avoid sleeping on your stomach with your neck twisted, if possible. What if you go to sleep feeling fine and wake up with neck pain? Daily life (and nightlife, even if it’s just spent on your pillow!) can take its toll on your neck. If you wake up with neck pain, the best thing to do is give your body time to heal on its own. To get through the day without letting the pain interfere with your normal activities, you have a few options. Gently stretch your neck: the Spine Universe Exercise Center offers a video with 3 neck stretches and exercises to help relieve a stiff neck. Take over-the-counter pain medications, such as Tylenol or Advil. Alternate between heat and ice treatments on your neck: 20 minutes of heat followed by 20 minutes of ice should help relieve the pain and expedite the healing process. Rest: take a few days off from any strenuous activities that aggravate your symptoms, such as sports and heavy lifting. Already dealing with neck pain? . While there are many options for relieving neck pain, there is currently no treatment that has been scientifically proven to cure chronic neck pain. Even common treatments have conflicting evidence around their effectiveness at eliminating pain and increasing neck function. Sometimes, people must learn to manage their pain on a daily basis through lifestyle changes and self-management. Here are a few strategies to help reduce chronic neck pain and improve your quality of life: Stay active every day: stretch and walk and do light exercises that don’t make your pain worse Pace yourself: don’t feel like you have to ‘do it all’. Allow time to rest throughout the day each day. Advocate for yourself: learn how to communicate how you’re feeling with your care providers and friends and family. Set limits on what you can and cannot do and allow people in your life to support you. Get plenty of sleep: being well-rested can help you cope better with your pain. Sources. BMJ. 2017 Advances in the diagnosis and management of neck pain. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28807894/ Mayo Clin Proc. 2015. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of neck pain. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25659245/ Open Orthop J. 2016. A Qualitative Description of Chronic Neck Pain has Implications for Outcome Assessment and Classification. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5301418/ Anesth Pain Med. 2017. Classification and Treatment of Chronic Neck Pain: A Longitudinal Cohort Study. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27846187/ Neural plasticity. 2017. The Link between Depression and Chronic Pain: Neural Mechanisms in the Brain. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5494581/ Man Ther. 2016. Subjective and clinical assessment criteria suggestive for five clinical patterns discernible in nonspecific neck pain patients. A Delphi-survey of clinical experts. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27507590/ IASP Terminology. International Association for the Study of Pain. 2017. Available at: https://www.iasp-pain.org/Education/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1698 Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes. Mayo Clinic. 2016. Available at: https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(16)00073-2/fulltext#:~:text=Central%20neuropathic%20pain%20can%20result,cord)%2C%20or%20neoplastic%20disorders  Asian Spine J. 2017. Neuropathic Pain Related with Spinal Disorders: A Systematic Review. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5573862/ Toxins (Basel). 2020. Comparative Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Injection for Chronic Shoulder Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7232231/ Medicine (Baltimore). 2020. Total disc replacement compared with fusion for cervical degenerative disc disease: A systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7220152/ J Neurol. 2018. Advances in understanding nociception and neuropathic pain. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808094/ Phys Ther. 2018. A Mechanism-Based Approach to Physical Therapist Management of Pain. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6256939/ Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Management of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview of Systematic Reviews. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541004/ Mind and Body Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says. 2019. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Available at: https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/providers/digest/mind-and-body-approaches-for-chronic-pain-science   Updated on: 03/30/21 Related Articles. Neck Pain and Headaches Pinched Nerves Can Cause Back and Neck Pain Spondylosis (Spinal Arthritis): Reduce Back and Neck Pain How Aging Affects Your Cervical Spine Neck Pain OverviewNeck Pain Caused by Pinched NervesUpper Neck Pain ProblemsAxial Neck PainCervical Radiculopathy: Radiating Neck PainWhen is Neck Pain an Emergency?Cell Phone-Related Neck InjuryCervicogenic Headaches Start in the NeckAging's Effect on the Cervical SpineDegenerative Neck PainStiff Neck PainTrigger Points and Neck PainNonsurgical Treatment. Braces/Collars for Neck PainCervical Radiculopathy TreatmentsMuscle Relaxant MedicationsMassage Therapy Eases Neck PainPhysical Therapy's Role in Managing Neck Pain4 Neck Care Exercises Slideshow Find a Back Pain Specialist Near You. Other Resources. Glossary of Spinal Terms Find a Doctor Remedy Health Media Sites Editorial Board About SpineUniverse Advertising Policy Advertising Opportunities Contact Us Editorial Guidelines Partners and Sponsors Do Not Sell My Info Cookie Preferences Terms of Use Privacy Policy © 2022 Remedy Health Media, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED This information is not designed to replace a physician's independent judgment about the appropriateness or risks of a procedure for a given patient. Always consult your doctor about your medical conditions or back problem. SpineUniverse does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use of the SpineUniverse.com site is conditional upon your acceptance of our User Agreement Stewart G. Eidelson, MDSpineUniverse Founder Orthopaedic Surgeon Southpalm Ortho-Spine Institute Tammy J. Penhollow, DO Sign up for our newsletter, and get this free sanity-saving guide to life in the time of corona. Sign Up × SHOW MAIN MENU SHOW SUB MENU CancelDelete Continue Reading: Pinched Nerves Can Cause Back and Neck Pain. People commonly talk about having a pinched nerve, but what is a pinched nerve? Read More
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TitleNeck pain | Causes, exercises, treatments | Versus Arthritis
Urlhttps://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/neck-pain/
DescriptionNeck pain is common but it’s not usually a sign of arthritis or medical condition. Learn about the causes, exercises, treatment and how the neck is structured
Date
Organic Position9
H1Neck pain
H2How is the neck structured?
When to see a doctor
Symptoms
Causes
Diagnosis
Treatment
Managing symptoms
Persistent neck pain
Conditions related to neck pain
Working with neck pain
Research and new developments
Further help
H3Pain and stiffness
Numbness or tingling
Clicking and grating noises
Dizziness and blackouts
Muscle spasms
Other symptoms
Physical treatments
Manipulation
The Alexander Technique
TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation)
Collars
Acupuncture
Injections
Surgery
Drug treatments
Radiofrequency denervation
Painkillers
Relaxation
Using heat and ice packs
Massage
Posture
Sleep
Exercise
Related information
Let's Move with Leon
Let's Move
Cervical spondylosis
Whiplash
Tension
Slipped discs
Stenosis and myelopathy
H2WithAnchorsHow is the neck structured?
When to see a doctor
Symptoms
Causes
Diagnosis
Treatment
Managing symptoms
Persistent neck pain
Conditions related to neck pain
Working with neck pain
Research and new developments
Further help
BodyNeck pain Download versus Arthritis - Neck pain information booklet Print this page Share this page Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn How is the neck structured?   Your neck and back are made up of small bones called vertebrae. These are stacked on top of each other to form the spinal column. The spinal column supports your head and protects the spinal cord. This is the main structure which links the network of nerves throughout your body. Messages travel along this network sending sensations, such as pain, to your brain. The top seven bones in the spinal column form your neck, and these are called the cervical vertebrae. The bones are linked together by facet joints. These are small joints between your vertebrae that, together with your neck muscles, allow you to move your head in any direction. Between the vertebrae are discs of cartilage. The discs act as shock absorbers and give the spine its flexibility. A slipped disc occurs when one of these discs slips slightly out of its natural position in the spine. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn When to see a doctor. If your neck pain lasts more than a few days, you should see a healthcare professional. You should also speak to them if you: have symptoms other than pain and stiffness have pain, tingling, numbness or weakness in your arms or legs have sudden severe pain after a fall or injury suddenly develop neck stiffness along with difficulty lifting both arms above your head. Some rare causes of neck pain include: a fracture an infection a tumour inflammation – which can happen in ankylosing spondylitis or meningitis. If you suspect you have any of the above, see your doctor urgently. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Symptoms. The most common symptoms are: Pain and stiffness. You may feel pain in the middle or on either side of your neck, but it may also extend to the shoulder or to the upper chest. You may have pain or weakness in your arms. You may have tension headaches, where the pain can travel to the back of your head and sometimes into your ear or behind your eye. It may be painful to move your neck and your muscles may feel tight, especially if you’ve been sitting or sleeping in one position for a long time. You may notice that your neck won’t turn as far as it normally does, for example when you try to look over your shoulder while reversing the car. If you have pain and stiffness in the neck that came on quickly, possibly overnight, and you have difficulty lifting both arms over your head, this could be a sign of a condition called polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). This is an inflammatory condition of the muscles. It’s more common in people over the age of 65. If you think you have this condition, you should see a doctor as soon as possible. Numbness or tingling. A nerve can become pinched when the muscles, bones or tissues surrounding it apply too much pressure. As a result, you may feel numbness, pins and needles or a tingling sensation that can be felt down your arm, sometimes right down to your fingers. You’ll find that numbness and tingling will go away once the problem resolves itself. However, if your symptoms are severe, talk to your doctor; they may be able to prescribe drugs that target the pinched nerve, such as gabapentin or pregabalin. Clicking and grating noises. You may hear or feel clicking or grating as you move your head. This is called crepitus, and it can be caused by air bubbles popping, or tissues and bones moving over each other, in the joint. Other joints often do this too, but noises from your neck usually seem louder because they’re happening closer to your ears. You may also find they’re more noticeable at night. While this is a common symptom and can sound alarming, it’s not serious. Dizziness and blackouts. If you feel dizzy when looking up or turning your head, this may be due to pinching of the arteries that run alongside the spine, otherwise known as vertebral arteries. This can sometimes happen as a result of changes in the vertebrae. Pinching of these vertebral arteries can occasionally cause blackouts as the blood flow is temporarily reduced. However, blackouts can have other causes so it’s important to seek medical advice if this is happening to you. Muscle spasms. Muscle spasms are the sudden stiffening of a muscle or groups of muscles in your body. Often there is no known cause and they can be very unpleasant. When it occurs in the neck it usually causes pain and stiffness down one side, which can make it difficult to turn your head. It usually only lasts a few hours or days, although rarely it may continue for several weeks. You can try to ease the pain at home with gentle stretches, over-the-counter painkillers as well as heat or ice packs. People with muscle spasms report that applying heat is particularly soothing. Other symptoms. If you have long-lasting neck pain and stiffness, particularly if your sleep is disturbed, then you may feel very tired and, not surprisingly, you may start to feel rather down or low in mood. Talking about your pain with friends, family or your doctor may help. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Causes. Neck pain is very common and most of us will have it at some point in our lives. Usually, neck pain is the result of holding your neck in the same position for too long. However, other things can also cause or contribute to neck pain, such as: worry or stress sleeping awkwardly an accident, which can cause whiplash a sprain or a strain a flare-up of cervical spondylosis; which can happen as the discs and joints in the spine age. Many people develop a stiff and painful neck for no obvious reason. It may happen after sitting in a draught or after a minor twisting injury, for example while gardening. This is called non-specific neck pain. This is the most common type of neck pain and usually disappears after a few days, providing you keep gently moving your neck and rest when you need to. You can often manage short spells of neck pain yourself using over-the-counter painkillers and gentle stretches. However, if your neck problem persists or significantly affects your everyday activities then it’s sensible to see a doctor or other healthcare professional. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Diagnosis. Most neck problems can be diagnosed and treated based on your symptoms and a simple examination, and it’s unlikely that you’ll need any special tests. Occasionally, your doctor may ask you to have an x-ray, a blood test or an MRI scan to rule out other important causes of neck pain. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Treatment. Simple self-help treatments and a day or two’s rest are often enough to clear up a spell of neck pain. But if you have a more complex or a continuing neck problem, a healthcare professional will be able to recommend other treatments and therapies that should help. If your pain isn’t settling, your doctor may also be able to prescribe stronger painkillers, although these aren’t suitable for everyone. Physical treatments. Physiotherapists, chiropractors and osteopaths are all trained to treat neck problems. Treatment carried out by one of these therapists, along with home exercises, are often all that’s needed. They can suggest general or specific stretching and strengthening exercises for the neck. It’s important to make sure that any physical treatments are given by qualified practitioners who are registered with the relevant body. Manipulation. Manipulation is a type of manual therapy used to adjust parts of your body to treat stiffness. It can be uncomfortable at the time, so it’s important to understand what’s involved. Make sure you discuss your condition with your therapist and explain what symptoms you have been experiencing. This will enable them to make a more informed decision on what types of treatments you are most likely to benefit from. It’s also a good idea to seek advice from a healthcare professional before you try manipulation as, even though some people report to have benefitted from it, it’s not suitable for everybody. If you have a condition such as osteoporosis, some therapies won’t be recommended. The Alexander Technique. The Alexander technique is a method of teaching bodily awareness and reducing unwanted muscle tension. A qualified teacher will advise you on your standing and sitting posture and your patterns of movement. Some physiotherapists are trained in this technique, but it’s not always available on the NHS. If you have spinal problems, such as a slipped disc, this technique might not be suitable for you. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). A TENS machine is a small battery-driven machine which may help to reduce pain. Small pads are placed over the painful area and low-voltage electrical stimulation produces a pleasant tingling sensation. It’s suggested that this can interfere with pain signals from the nerves to the brain. You can buy TENS machines from pharmacies, but your physiotherapist may be able to let you borrow one to try first. Collars. Some people find a special collar helpful to support the neck in cases of more serious or complex health problems. They are not routinely required. Acupuncture. During a session of acupuncture, very fine needles are inserted, virtually painlessly, at a number of sites on the skin. These are not necessarily at the painful area. Acupuncture seems to relieve pain in the short term by interfering with the signals to your brain and by causing the release of natural painkillers, known as endorphins. Injections. In a very small minority of cases, especially if you have continuing pain in the back of your head or arm, a long-acting local anaesthetic or a steroid injection may help. The injection is usually given into the small facet joints of your neck. These injections tend to be given in an x-ray department so that the specialist can position the needle precisely. Surgery. Surgery is only rarely needed. It may be helpful if a nerve or the spinal cord is being squeezed and is causing weakness in the arm or severe pain that won’t go away. The surgeon will ask for a scan to look at the nerves and bones before discussing the pros and cons of surgery with you and whether to go ahead with an operation. Drug treatments. Amitriptyline. If over-the-counter painkillers alone aren’t effective, you may be prescribed an additional medication called amitriptyline. This is also prescribed as an anti-depressant drug, but in lower doses it can be used to relax muscles and improve sleep. You shouldn’t take amitriptyline if you have glaucoma, prostate problems or urinary retention. Gabapentin and pregabalin. Gabapentin and pregabalin aren’t usually given as an initial treatment for ‘ordinary’ neck pain. However, if a pinched nerve in your neck is causing discomfort in your arm or arms, then these drugs can help by reducing nerve irritation. Depending on what drug you’re taking, you may need to trial it for a period of three to eight weeks to begin with. As with all drugs there can be side-effects, so they won’t be suitable for everyone. You should discuss this with your doctor. Radiofrequency denervation. Radiofrequency denervation may help with long-term neck pain that originates from your facet joints. The procedure uses electrical currents produced by radio waves to heat up the tip of a needle. This is then used to stop nerve endings sending pain signals to your brain. Radiofrequency denervation is only considered after other treatments have failed and steroid injections have successfully reduced your neck pain for a short period of time. It‘s aimed at being a longer-term solution to persistent pain as regular steroid injections are no longer advised. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Managing symptoms. Simple self-help treatments and a day or two's rest are often enough to clear up a spell of neck pain. If you do have a more complex or persistent neck problem, your doctor will be able to recommend other treatments and therapies. Painkillers. Painkillers such as paracetamol will often help. It’s best to take them before the pain becomes very bad, but you shouldn’t take them more often than prescribed. Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, can also help. You can use these for a short course of treatment (about 5 – 10 days), but if they’ve not helped within this time then they’re unlikely to. If the pain returns when you stop taking the tablets, try another short course. You can rub anti-inflammatory gels or creams onto tender areas if you prefer. NSAIDs can interact with other drugs such as warfarin, so it’s best to check with a pharmacist before you start taking them. You shouldn’t take ibuprofen or aspirin if you’re pregnant, if you have asthma, a stomach ulcer or any heart problems, until you’ve spoken with your doctor or pharmacist. Relaxation. Stress can make neck pain worse. One way of reducing the effects of stress is to learn how to relax your neck muscles. Aim for a balance between relaxation and exercise. There are many relaxation, meditation or mindfulness tapes, CDs and MP3 downloads available. Your doctor or physiotherapist may be able to offer you some. If not, they’re also available to buy online and from high-street shops. Using heat and ice packs. Applying a heat pack to your neck can help to ease pain. You can use a microwavable wheat bag, a hot-water bottle or a reusable heat pad; which you can buy from chemists and sports shops. An ice pack, or even a bag of frozen peas, can also be helpful. Make sure you wrap heat or ice packs in a towel and don’t put them directly onto your neck to avoid burning or irritating your skin. You might want to consider applying a heat pack to your neck before and after exercise to help soothe the muscles. Massage. Gentle massage of your neck muscles, particularly with aromatic oils, often helps. However, you should discuss the use of these oils with a healthcare professional as they won’t be suitable for everybody. You should be particularly careful if you’re pregnant or have a condition such as epilepsy. Rubbing the area with ointments and creams can also help by reducing pain and producing a feeling of warmth. Some over-the-counter ointments contain capsaicin. This is an extract of the pepper plant that can be used as a painkiller. A similar but stronger preparation is available on prescription. Posture. Pain and stiffness can be caused by: poor standing posture staying in the same position for too long a bed that’s too soft or too hard a pillow that's uncomfortably hard or soft poor posture at work. When you’re sitting, your feet should be flat on the floor and your knees should be slightly lower than your hips. Use a footrest if you think you’d be more comfortable. A correctly adjusted chair will give you good support for your lower back. Hardback, upright chairs or straight-backed rocking chairs are better for your posture than low, soft, upholstered chairs or sofas. Using back supports can help your posture when sitting at home, at work or in the car. If you do a lot of reading, having the book or papers on a reading frame will often help to correct your posture. If you use a desk at home or at work, you should check that the desk and computer screen aren’t too low and that your head isn’t bent forwards for long periods; as this can stretch your neck and may cause muscle pain. You should also check that your mouse and keyboard are comfortably positioned in relation to the screen. Regularly getting up to stretch and walk around will also help relieve tension and prevent aches and pains. Some employers have occupational health specialists who can check that workstations are set up according to individual needs. Make sure you don’t spend a long time with your neck twisted sideways or cradling the telephone with your shoulder. If you find that this is happening to you, speak to your employer as they should be able to provide you with a headset. Sleep. If your pillow is too firm or thick, it can make neck pain worse. Changing the number or position of pillows may be helpful. Your head and neck should be supported so your head is level with your body in a neutral position. The pillow should fill in the natural hollow between the neck and shoulders – a soft or moulded pillow may be useful, or a supportive roll inside your pillow case can support the hollow of your neck. If your mattress doesn’t give your back proper support, it can also make neck pain worse. You may want to consider replacing it if it’s old or uncomfortable. If you have trouble sleeping, you should try to wind down before bed. You can do this by having a hot bath, listening to the radio or reading a book. Some people also find keeping a sleep diary particularly useful. Try different things and see what works best for you. If night-time pain is making it difficult for you to get to sleep, you can take a painkiller, such as paracetamol, before you go to bed. It’s unlikely to last through the night but should ease pain for long enough for you to go to sleep. If all else fails, you might benefit from discussing your sleeping patterns with your doctor or a sleep expert. Exercise. You may find a short period of rest is helpful initially to ease the pain and discomfort. But to prevent your neck muscles becoming weaker and your joints from stiffening, you should rest for as short a time as possible and certainly no more than a day or two. As soon as possible, start some gentle stretches and neck movements, as these can help the muscles and ligaments to relax and ease your pain and stiffness. You might want to consider seeing a physiotherapist as they can give you advice on some of the best exercises to do for your condition. You should do some simple stretching and strengthening exercises every day. These can help to increase the strength of your muscles, ease stiffness, and restore your range of movement. Start by exercising very gently and gradually build up how much you do. You can find examples of exercises for the neck on our webpage. As with any physical activity, some aches or discomfort during or following exercise are normal and should be expected. But if an exercise makes your symptoms significantly worse you should stop doing it. It’s also important to find some form of exercise that you enjoy and to keep doing it. Walking, swimming, and exercise classes such as yoga or Pilates are all popular and will help with your general health and fitness. Related information. Let's Move with Leon. Sign up to Let’s Move with Leon our weekly email programme of 30-minute movement sessions, presented by fitness expert Leon Wormley. Let's Move. Sign up to Let’s Move to receive a wide range of content about moving with arthritis – from exercise videos to stories and interviews with experts – straight to your email inbox. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Persistent neck pain. In some cases, persistent neck pain has a specific cause, such as a damaged facet joint or disc. However, neck pain quite often continues even after the original problem has settled down. Lack of movement can cause your neck muscles to become weak and stiff. They will then tire more easily and will be more likely to hurt when you move them. Over time you may start avoiding more and more activities and this can start to affect your work, social life, personal relationships, hobbies and interests. As you do less of the things you enjoy and start to lose confidence you may start to feel anxious or depressed. You may feel that family members and medical professionals appear unhelpful or unsympathetic. If you’re anxious or depressed, you may not feel like exercising or doing everyday activities, so your muscles become weaker still, and so it goes on. This can happen to anyone, and the longer it continues the harder it’ll be for you to recover your movement, activities and confidence. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Conditions related to neck pain. Cervical spondylosis. Spondylosis is quite normal as you get older and happens when the bones and discs in your spine change as they age. It’s caused by your body naturally adapting to the everyday use that occurs over many years. In spondylosis, small lumps of new bone, called osteophytes, grow at the edges of the vertebrae and the facet joints. Over some time, the discs in your spine can also start to become thinner. These changes can be seen in x-rays and when they happen in the neck it’s known as cervical spondylosis. They may also occur at the bottom of the spine, where they’re known as lumbar spondylosis. Spondylosis shouldn’t affect your everyday life, if you do the right exercises, seek advice from your doctor and look after your general wellbeing, then your symptoms are more likely to improve. Almost everyone will have spondylosis somewhere in the spine at some point in their life and often it doesn’t cause any pain at all. Although spondylosis doesn’t always cause pain, it may increase the risk of having spells of neck pain. However, because neck pain tends to come and go over several weeks, it’s not usually possible to identify spondylosis as a direct cause. Occasionally, if you have spondylosis: You may feel pain or numbness. This occurs if the nerves are irritated or pinched, either by bulging discs or osteophytes. You may have blackouts or dizziness. This happens if the vertebral artery is pinched, as it controls the blood supply to your brain. To ease the pain, try to go about your daily activities as usual. Improving your posture and performing regular neck exercises can also help. If you have long-term pain, your doctor may want to prescribe painkillers or drugs that relax the muscle, however muscle relaxants are rarely offered for more than a few days at a time. In rare cases, where there’s a problem with your spinal cord or a nerve is being pinched by a slipped disc, surgery may be considered to relieve the nerve pain. Spondylosis shouldn’t be confused with ankylosing spondylitis, where inflammation of the spine leads to a build-up of calcium on the bones, causing pain and stiffness. Whiplash. Whiplash occurs when your head is jerked violently forwards, backwards or sideways. This happens most commonly in car accidents and sports injuries. The pain is caused by the unnatural stretching of the tissues that hold the bones of your neck in place. There’s often a delay of 24-48 hours before you feel any pain or stiffness from whiplash. Although whiplash can badly strain your neck, seat belts and properly adjusted headrests in cars help to prevent serious injuries. Try to ensure that your headrest, and that of everyone else in the car, isn’t too low or pushed too far back. Most whiplash improves within a few days or weeks. Make sure you go about your normal daily activities and keep your neck mobile. You can take painkillers, such as paracetamol, and you can try physiotherapy or gentle exercises to prevent long-term problems and get you back to normal as soon as possible. Try to avoid using soft collars that prevent your neck from moving, as these can actually slow down your rate of recovery. If your pain lasts a long time, you may be referred for specialist treatment and support at an NHS pain clinic. Tension. Most of your muscles relax completely when they’re not being used, but some muscles have to work all the time in order to keep your body upright. Muscles at the back of your neck must always be active, otherwise your head would fall forwards when you’re sitting or standing. When you’re worried or stressed you often tighten these muscles even more, which can cause neck pain and tension headaches. Tension headaches are very common and are sometimes wrongly called migraines. Relaxation techniques are often a good way to treat tension. You might want to try meditating or joining a class that promotes mindfulness or self-awareness, such as yoga, tai chi and Pilates. Slipped discs. A slipped or bulging disc occurs when the cartilage that cushions the vertebrae in the spine pushes out. Although discs are designed to move, occasionally they slip or bulge out of their normal position. If a slipped disc is pressing on a nerve, the neck pain you feel can be accompanied by: pain radiating down one or both arms numbness pins and needles weakness. This will often settle by itself or following self-help treatments, but occasionally you may need further treatment, especially if symptoms persist after several weeks. Try to keep active and gradually increase the amount of exercise you do. You can also take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, and painkillers, such as paracetamol. NSAIDs aren’t suitable for everyone, so speak to a pharmacist if you’re unsure (NHS, 2018b). In some cases, your doctor may want to prescribe something stronger or ask you to have an MRI scan. It’s unlikely that you’ll need surgery for a slipped disc. Stenosis and myelopathy. Rarely, disc bulges and osteophytes can cause narrowing of the spinal canal, which is called spinal stenosis. This can affect the spinal cord and cause weakness in arms and legs, a condition known as myelopathy. As with most neck pain conditions, you should try to remain active. Over-the-counter painkillers are also often suitable to manage the pain. However, symptoms associated with myelopathy and stenosis can progress. It is therefore important to let your doctor know whether you are experiencing any symptoms which could be a sign of nerve problems; including walking difficulties, falls or clumsiness. Your doctor may send you for an MRI scan or refer you to a specialist. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Working with neck pain. Overall, getting back to work sooner rather than later is helpful for most people. In the past, people were advised to rest up in bed, but we now realise that it does more harm than good. It’s much better to keep moving, even if you need to take some painkillers to allow you to do so. Most people are able to return to work within 2−3 days, although this varies from person to person and depends on the type of job you do. You don’t need to wait until your neck problem has gone. In many cases, the longer you’re off work the more likely you are to develop longer-term problems and the less likely you are to return to work. It’s important to keep in contact with your employer and discuss what can be done to help you return to work. If your work involves physically demanding tasks, you might find it useful to work shorter hours or move to more desk-based duties for a couple of weeks. If you have an occupational health adviser at your workplace, they can help advise what work you are fit to do and arrange any simple adjustments to help you to cope. If you are having difficulties travelling to or from work or need an item of equipment, the Government’s Access to Work Scheme might be able to help. If you are unable to get back to work after two weeks of absence because of your neck pain, you should talk to your doctor and employer about getting physiotherapy or other treatments that can get you moving again. You can get further advice through your local Jobcentre Plus and the Government’s Fit for Work website. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Research and new developments. Research has helped us to understand the make-up and function of the discs between our vertebrae and has demonstrated that inherited factors affect the normal wear of the spine. Research has also shown that acupuncture can be an effective treatment for back and neck pain. Discoveries about the effect of stress, anxiety and depression as well as the importance of exercises, are changing the way doctors think about neck pain. This will be improved further as a result of ongoing research to monitor the differences in musculoskeletal care across the UK. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Further help. If your neck pain continues despite treatment and is affecting your day-to-day activities or perhaps is affecting your mood, a pain management programme may help you. These programmes focus on improved coping techniques and better long-term self-management strategies. While they won’t cure the pain, they should help you to have a better quality of life in spite of the pain. Pain management programmes are generally outpatient group sessions run by a team of healthcare professionals including doctors, physiotherapists, psychologists and sometimes nurses, occupational therapists and other specialist clinicians. Make sure you talk to your doctor as they may be able to refer you for a pain management programme if they think you would benefit from it. Yoga, Pilates and other similar classes are a great way to keep fit while simultaneously improving your wellbeing. If you have any questions or want to talk to someone about neck pain, you can try giving our helpline a ring on 0800 5200 520 for free. Share This Section Share on Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Back to top
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Result 11
TitleNeck pain and stiff neck | nidirect
Urlhttps://www.nidirect.gov.uk/conditions/neck-pain-and-stiff-neck
DescriptionNeck pain or a stiff neck is a common problem which usually gets better after a few days or weeks. It's rarely a sign of anything serious
Date
Organic Position10
H1Neck pain and stiff neck
H2About neck pain and stiff neck
Managing neck pain at home
When to see your GP
Causes of neck pain and stiffness
More serious causes
Preventing neck pain and stiffness
More useful links
Help improve this page - send your feedback
H3A twisted or locked neck
Wear and tear in the neck
Whiplash
Pinched nerve
H2WithAnchorsAbout neck pain and stiff neck
Managing neck pain at home
When to see your GP
Causes of neck pain and stiffness
More serious causes
Preventing neck pain and stiffness
More useful links
Help improve this page - send your feedback
BodyNeck pain and stiff neck Neck pain or a stiff neck is a common problem which usually gets better after a few days or weeks. It's rarely a sign of anything serious. About neck pain and stiff neck. You can often get a painful or stiff neck if you:sleep in an awkward positionuse a computer for an extended period of timestrain a muscle because of bad postureAnxiety and stress can also sometimes cause tension in your neck muscles, leading to neck pain.Managing neck pain at home. For most types of general neck pain, the advice is to carry on with your normal daily activities, keep active, and take painkillers to relieve the symptoms.These steps may help you to manage your pain:take regular doses of paracetamol, ibuprofen, or a combination of the two, to control pain – ibuprofen gel can be rubbed on to your neck as an alternative to taking tablets (always follow the instructions that come with the medication)try holding a hot water bottle or heat pack to your neck – this can help reduce the pain and any muscle spasms, although some people find cold packs offer better reliefsleep on a low, firm pillow at night – using too many pillows may force your neck to bend unnaturallycheck your posture – bad posture can aggravate the pain, and it may have caused it in the first placeavoid wearing a neck collar – there's no evidence to suggest wearing a neck collar will help to heal your neck, and it's generally better to keep your neck mobileavoid driving if you find it difficult to turn your head – this may prevent you being able to view trafficif your neck is stiff or twisted, try some neck exercises – gently tense your neck muscles as you tilt your head up and down and from side to side, and as you carefully twist your neck from left to right; these exercises will help strengthen your neck muscles and improve your range of movementThe Chartered Society of Physiotherapy has more information about neck exercisesWhen to see your GP. You should see your GP if:the pain or stiffness doesn't improve after a few days or weeksyou can't control the pain using ordinary painkillersyou're worried your neck pain could have a more serious causeYour GP will examine your neck and ask some questions to help identify any underlying condition. They may also prescribe medication to help improve your symptoms.If you've had neck pain or stiffness for a month or more, your GP may refer you to a physiotherapist, if they think it will help you.If your symptoms are particularly severe or don't improve, your GP may consider referring you to a pain specialist for further treatment.Causes of neck pain and stiffness. A twisted or locked neck. Some people suddenly wake up one morning to find their neck twisted to one side and stuck in that position. This is known as acute torticollis and is caused by injury to the neck muscles.The exact cause of acute torticollis is unknown.It may be caused by:bad posturesleeping without adequate neck support carrying heavy unbalanced loads (for example, carrying a heavy bag with one arm)Acute torticollis can take up to a week to get better, but it usually only lasts 24 to 48 hours.Wear and tear in the neck. Sometimes neck pain is caused by the ’wear and tear’ that occurs to the bones and joints in your neck. This is a type of arthritis called cervical spondylosis.Cervical spondylosis occurs naturally with age. It doesn't always cause symptoms, although in some people the bone changes can cause neck stiffness.Nerves that come off the spinal cord, at the level of your neck can become squashed as the bones and joints wear down.This can result in nerve pain that is felt in the arms, shoulders, or occasionally up towards your head. You may also experience, pins and needles, or numbness.  Most cases improve with treatment in a few weeks.Whiplash. Whiplash is a neck injury caused by a sudden movement of the head forwards, backwards or sideways.It often occurs after a sudden impact such as a road traffic accident. The vigorous movement of the head overstretches and damages the tendons and ligaments in the neck.As well as neck pain and stiffness, whiplash can cause:tenderness in the neck musclesreduced and painful neck movementsheadachesPinched nerve. Neck pain caused by a squashed nerve is known as cervical radiculopathy. It's usually caused by one of the discs between the bones of the upper spine (vertebrae) splitting open and the gel inside bulging outwards on to a nearby nerve.The condition is more common in older people. This is because your spinal discs start to lose their water content as you get older. This makes them less flexible and more likely to split.The pain can sometimes be controlled with painkillers and by following the advice below (see preventing neck pain and stiffness). Surgery may be recommended for some people.More serious causes. Your neck pain may have a more serious cause if it's persistent and getting progressively worse, or you have additional symptoms, such as:a lack of co-ordination (for example, finding fiddly tasks increasingly difficult)problems walkingloss of bladder or bowel controla high temperature (fever)unexplained weight lossA serious cause is more likely if you've recently had a significant injury – for example, a car accident or a fall – or you have a history of cancer or conditions that weaken your immune system, such as HIV.See your GP if you're concerned.Preventing neck pain and stiffness. You may find the following advice helpful in preventing neck pain:make sure you have good posture – read about how to sit correctly, posture tips for laptop users, and common posture mistakes and fixestake regular breaks from your desk, from driving, or from any activity where your neck is held in the same position for a long period of timeif you often feel stressed, try relaxation techniques to help ease any tension in your neckavoid sleeping on your front, and make sure your head is in line with your body (not tilted to the side) if you sleep on your sideonly use enough pillows (usually only one) to keep your head level with your body  make sure your mattress is quite firm – a soft mattress could mean your neck is bent while you sleep More useful links. How to use your health services The information on this page has been adapted from original content from the NHS website.For further information see terms and conditions. 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TitleNeck pain or spasms - self care: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia
Urlhttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000802.htm
DescriptionYou have been diagnosed with neck pain. Your symptoms may be caused by muscle strains or spasms, arthritis in your spine, a bulging disc, or narrowed openings for your spinal nerves or spinal cord
Date11 Jul 2019
Organic Position11
H1Neck pain or spasms - self care
H2Pain Relief
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Preventing Neck Pain
Chronic Neck Pain
When to Call the Doctor
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BodyNeck pain or spasms - self care To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have been diagnosed with neck pain. Your symptoms may be caused by muscle strains or spasms, arthritis in your spine, a bulging disc, or narrowed openings for your spinal nerves or spinal cord.Pain Relief. You can use one or more of these methods to help reduce neck pain:Use over-the-counter pain relievers such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), or acetaminophen (Tylenol).Apply heat or ice to the painful area. Use ice for the first 48 to 72 hours, then use heat. Apply heat using warm showers, hot compresses, or a heating pad.To prevent injuring your skin, do not fall asleep with a heating pad or ice bag in place.Have a partner gently massage the sore or painful areas.Try sleeping on a firm mattress with a pillow that supports your neck. You may want to get a special neck pillow. You can find them at some pharmacies or retail stores.Ask your health care provider about using a soft neck collar to relieve discomfort.Only use the collar for 2 to 4 days at most.Using a collar for longer can make your neck muscles weaker. Take it off from time to time to allow the muscles to get stronger.Acupuncture also may help relieve neck pain.Activity Changes. To help relieve neck pain, you may have to reduce your activities. However, doctors do not recommend bed rest. You should try to stay as active as you can without making the pain worse.These tips can help you stay active with neck pain.Stop normal physical activity for only the first few days. This helps calm your symptoms and reduce swelling (inflammation) in the area of the pain.Do not do activities that involve heavy lifting or twisting of your neck or back for the first 6 weeks after the pain begins.If you are unable to move your head around very easily, you may need to avoid driving. After 2 to 3 weeks, slowly begin to exercise again. Your health care provider may refer you to a physical therapist. Your physical therapist can teach you which exercises are right for you and when to start.You may need to stop or ease back on the following exercises during recovery, unless your doctor or physical therapist says it is OK:JoggingContact sportsRacquet sportsGolfDancingWeight liftingLeg lifts when lying on your stomachSit-ups Stretches and Exercises. As part of physical therapy, you may receive massage and stretching exercises along with exercises to strengthen your neck. Exercise can help you:Improve your postureStrengthen your neck and improve flexibility A complete exercise program should include:Stretching and strength training. Follow the instructions of your doctor or physical therapist.Aerobic exercise. This may involve walking, riding a stationary bicycle, or swimming. These activities can help improve blood flow to your muscles and promote healing. They also strengthen muscles in your stomach, neck, and back. Stretching and strengthening exercises are important in the long run. Keep in mind that starting these exercises too soon after an injury can make your pain worse. Strengthening the muscles in your upper back can ease the stress on your neck.Your physical therapist can help you determine when to begin neck stretching and strengthening exercises and how to do them.Preventing Neck Pain. If you work at a computer or a desk most of the day:Stretch your neck every hour or so.Use a headset when on the telephone, especially if answering or using the phone is a main part of your job.When reading or typing from documents at your desk, place them in a holder at eye level.When sitting, make sure that your chair has a straight back with an adjustable seat and back, armrests, and a swivel seat.Other measures to help prevent neck pain include:Avoid standing for long periods. If you must stand for your work, place a stool by your feet. Alternate resting each foot on the stool.Do not wear high heels. Wear shoes that have cushioned soles when walking.If you drive long-distance, stop and walk around every hour. Do not lift heavy objects just after a long ride.Make sure you have a firm mattress and supportive pillow.Learn to relax. Try methods such as yoga, tai chi, or massage.Chronic Neck Pain. For some, neck pain does not go away and becomes a long-lasting (chronic) problem.Managing chronic pain means finding ways to make your pain tolerable so you can live your life.Unwanted feelings, such as frustration, resentment, and stress, are often a result of chronic pain. These feelings and emotions can worsen your neck pain.Ask your health care provider about prescribing medicines to help you manage your chronic pain. Some with ongoing neck pain take narcotics to control the pain. It is best if only one health care provider is prescribing your narcotic pain medicines.If you have chronic neck pain, ask your health care provider about a referral to a:Rheumatologist (an expert in arthritis and joint disease)Physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist (can help people regain body functions they lost due to medical conditions or injury)NeurosurgeonMental health provider When to Call the Doctor. Call your provider if:Symptoms do not go away in 1 week with self-careYou have numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm or handYour neck pain was caused by a fall, blow, or injury, if you cannot move your arm or hand, have someone call 911The pain gets worse when you lie down or wakes you up at nightYour pain is so severe that you cannot get comfortableYou lose control over urination or bowel movementsYou have trouble walking and balancing Alternative Names. Pain - neck - self-care; Neck stiffness - self-care; Cervicalgia - self-care; Whiplash - self-careImages. Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References. Lemmon R, Leonard J. Neck and back pain. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 31.Ronthal M. Arm and neck pain. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 31. Review Date 7/11/2019. Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics. Neck Injuries and Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia
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TitleHow to Ease Neck Pain at Home - YouTube
Urlhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hk5-7RFSsR0
DescriptionTo learn more about chiropractic services at Cleveland Clinic, please visit https://cle.clinic/3f3IaXYChiropractor Andrew Bang, DC shares a simple routine th..
Date8 Jun 2020
Organic Position12
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BodyrightContact usCreatorsAdvertiseDevelopersTermsPrivacyPolicy & SafetyHow YouTube worksTest new features© 2022 Google LLC
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TitleBest Exercises to Do at Work for Neck Pain
Urlhttps://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/patient/resource-centers/pain-workplace/best-exercises-do-work-neck-pain
DescriptionNeck pain caused by poor posture and too many hours spent looking at our computers and cell phones can become chronic. Here are exercises you can at work when pain strikes
Date29 Apr 2019
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H1Best Exercises to Do at Work for Neck Pain
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BodyBest Exercises to Do at Work for Neck Pain Discomfort in your neck a pain in the neck? Neck pain is often related to poor posture, says Allyson Shrikhande, MD. Try these simple exercises at your desk to alleviate neck pain. By Rosemary Black The National Institutes of Health reports that for 1 in 10 people neck pain becomes chronic. If the discomfort you feel in your neck is, well, a pain in the neck, you’re far from alone. Neck pain is very common, with nearly one in three individuals affected by it once a year, according to the National Institutes of Health. Women are affected more often than men, and while the symptoms tend to go away on their own, they may recur. Unfortunately, in about 1 in 10 people with recurring neck pain, the pain becomes chronic.1“Neck pain is a common condition that almost 75% of people experience at some point in life,” says Paul Christo, MD, associate professor in the Pain Division at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore and host of the Aches and Gains radio show. “Women, older adults, and those involved in whiplash injuries from car accidents are at increased risk.”Neck pain is often related to poor posture, says Allyson Shrikhande, MD, physiatrist and pain management specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.You may be interested in these related articles:More Ergonomic Workstation Products & Screen Tips Expert Tips for Maintaining Good Posture Throughout the Day Posture 101 How to Avoid the "Hunchback" Frame “When you sit at a computer for eight hours a day, you tend to have poor alignment,” she says. “The poor posture that many people have from sitting like this causes neck pain.”Besides poor posture, improper positioning of your head while you talk on your phone can cause neck pain. So-called “text neck” is neck pain that results from tilting your head down to look at a smartphone screen, Christo explains.Stress may also be causing your neck pain, says Shaheda Quraishi, MD, physiatrist at Northwell Health’s Pain Center in Great Neck, New York. “Women especially tend to carry stress in the neck and shoulders,” she explains.The good news is that exercises (that you can do at your desk!) can alleviate neck pain and stiffness. Before you start the exercises, consider warming your neck muscles by laying a heating pad on your neck for a few minutes. Or, take a warm bath or shower to relax those tense neck muscles, Dr. Christo advises. Here are a few easy exercises to try at the office:Sit Up Straight It may seem obvious but maintaining good posture by sitting up straight is an important way to prevent pain. During the day we all tend to slouch so make a point of being mindful about your seated posture. Throughout the day, rotate your shoulders back. Hold for a few seconds, relax and repeat the move 3 or 4 times, recommends Dr. Christo.Another exercise that feels great and can be done from either a sitting or standing position is to  pull your arms backward and—with fingertips pointing down—rest them on your buttocks. Then try to pinch your shoulder blades together. Hold for a few seconds. Relax and repeat 4 times.Neck FlexThis exercise can be preformed sitting at your desk or standing. It's important to hold the position for a full 3 seconds.This exercise can be done sitting or standing. Look straight ahead. Now look down at the floor for a few seconds and then up at the ceiling for a few seconds.Now turn your head very slowly to the right as far as you can. Hold for 3 seconds. Return your head to the center and maintain this position for 3 seconds.Next, turn your head to the left and hold for 3 seconds. Finally, bring your head back to the center. Repeat 4 times, Dr. Quraishi says.Sit up straight, facing forward, Dr. Christo explains. Tilt your head to the right and try to touch your right ear to your right shoulder. Hold for a few seconds. Relax and straighten your head. Now tilt your head to the left and try to touch your left ear to your left shoulder. Repeat 3 or 4 times.Chin  Tuck Sit up straight in a chair with your shoulders back, says Dr. Shrikhande. Next, pull your chin back toward your neck. “Bring your chin in but not down, and look straight in front of you,” she says. Hold this for 5 seconds. Repeat this 10 times and do this exercise once a day.Stretch with Chin Raise Tilt your chin up instead of dropping it down as you turn your head slightly to the right side. Your chin should be lifted. Hold for 20 seconds. Now turn it slowly to the left, bringing your chin up as you look toward the ceiling. Don’t lift your shoulders as you turn. Do this exercise 3 times on each side, recommends Dr. Shrikhande.Thoracic Spine Stretch Hold this pose for 10 seconds and repeat 5 times for the full benefit of the stretch. Stand up and lift your elbows out to your sides, Dr. Shrikhande says. Rest your hands on the back of your head. Pull your elbows back slightly while stretching out your spine. Your eyes should be looking ahead. Hold this for 10 seconds. Repeat 5 times.  .     Other Pain Relievers and Prevention Methods. Besides exercises, here are some other pain relieving remedies to try: Consider tai chi. Studies show that it’s useful for treating musculoskeletal conditions, Dr. Christo says. “The practice encourages motion and graduated improvement in range of motion,” he says. “In the neck, the practice offers low impact motion that can ease pain and improve function.” Be conscious of your posture while seated at your desk. You should be sitting up straight and the keyboard should be placed so that your elbows are flexed at 90 degrees, says Dr. Quraishi. Make sure your shoulders are back, and don’t slouch. Short periods of standing and walking throughout the day are beneficial. Get up from your desk at least once an hour, Dr. Christo says. Walk around your office for 3 minutes. Try acupuncture. The evidence suggests that acupuncture, a traditional Chinese treatment where thin needles are inserted into the skin at specific points on your body  may temporarily relieve neck pain. However, the positive effect is small and temporary, and more research is needed to measure the effect of acupuncture.2  (Dr. Christo says that a number of his patients have benefitted after several sessions of acupuncture.) Be mindful of how you position your head while on your cell phone or at your laptop, Dr. Christo says. You may be bending your head forward and slouching while looking at those screens. Avoid pinning the phone between your shoulder and your ear as you multitask, Dr. Christo says. It’s an instinctive move, but strains the neck muscles. Avoid this position when you’re on your phone, and for any conversation that will last for more than five minutes, try to use a headset or speakerphone.   Consider using a keyboard designed with ergonomic considerations meant to minimize muscle strain. In a “fixed split keyboard,” the keys are separated into two or three groups. This lets the user type at a different angle than a regular straight keyboard. In an “adjustable split keyboard,” the keyboard is split into several independent pieces; the angle can be changed as needed. It’s not for everyone and can take some getting used to. “An ergonomic keyboard can help patients with pinched nerves in their neck radiating down to their hands,” Dr. Quraishi says. Updated on: 04/29/19 View Sources Sources Allyson Shrikhande, MD. Phone interview. February 2017. Shaheda Quraishi, MD. Phone interview. February 2017. Dr. Paul Christo. Phone interview. February 2017. References “Top 3 exercises for managing neck pain.” YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjvl3Sv27Po Rodts, Mary. “Can therapeutic massage help relieve back pain?” Spine Universe. Updated 30 January 2017. https://www.spineuniverse.com/treatments/alternative/can-therapeutic-massage-help-relieve-back-pain Footnotes 1. "Neck pain: overview.” 17 December 2015. Pub Med Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0084213/#i2374.prevalenceandoutlook 2. "Can acupuncture relieve neck pain?” 2 December 2015. Pub Med Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0084214/   Continue Reading:Chair Yoga Introduction. How to Manage Pain in the WorkplaceMaximize Ergonomics and Your Posture. The Benefits of Standing While WorkingPosture 101Maintain Good Posture All Day LongConvince Your Boss You Need a Sit-Stand DeskMore Workstation Products & TipsHigh-Risk Jobs and Your SpineHow to Avoid the "Hunchback" Frame Getting Through the Workday. How to Communicate an Invisible IllnessStrategies to Stay AheadDesk Exercises for Neck PainChair YogaModify Your Career Path. How One Woman Is Helping Chronic Pain Patients Alter their CareersWhen a Migraine Strikes at WorkThe Construction Industry: No Pain, No Gain Certain content in this resource section is sponsored. Conditions Cancer Carpal Tunnel Syndrome CRPS/RSD Diabetic Neuropathy Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) Fibromyalgia Gout hATTR Amyloidosis Low Back Pain Lupus Lyme Disease Migraine and Headaches Neck Pain Opioid Use Disorder/Addiction Osteoarthritis Osteoporosis Plantar Fasciitis Postherpetic Neuralgia Insomnia Pelvic Pain Psoriatic Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Sickle Cell Disease Thigh Pain Traumatic Brain Injuries TMJ Disorders Treatments Alternative Treatments Bracing/Splinting Hormone Therapy Interventional Pain Management Manipulation and Massage Marijuana/Cannabis Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) Medications Mental and Emotional Therapy Nutraceuticals Palliative Care Physical Therapy/Rehabilitation Tapering Resources Community Advice Find a Specialist Labs and Diagnostic Tests Understanding Pain Policy and Contact About PPM Press Releases Advertising Opportunities Editorial Board Editorial Guidelines Privacy Policy Advertising Policy Do Not Sell My Info Terms of Use Contact Us For Professionals This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information. © 2022 Remedy Health Media, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Remedy Health Media, LLC does not, by publication of the advertisements contained herein, express endorsement or verify the accuracy and effectiveness of the products and claims contained therein. Remedy Health Media, LLC disclaims any liability for damages resulting from the use of any product advertised herein and suggests that readers fully investigate the products and claims prior to purchasing. The views of the authors are not necessarily those of Remedy Health Media, LLC. Practical Pain Management is sent without charge 6 times per year to pain management clinicians in the US. Use of this website is conditional upon your acceptance of our user agreement. Sign up for our newsletter, and get this free sanity-saving guide to life in the time of corona. Sign Up × SHOW MAIN MENU SHOW SUB MENU
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TitleAll about neck problems - NHS TIMS
Urlhttps://www.tims.nhs.uk/self-care/neck/
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H1All about neck problems
H2What should I do? There are several ways you can help yourself including:
What about pain relief?
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H3Information leaflets developed by TIMS giving advice on:
YouTube Exercise Video developed by TIMS:
Other sources of information
H2WithAnchorsWhat should I do? There are several ways you can help yourself including:
What about pain relief?
What about work, sports?
Useful links about neck pain
BodyAll about neck problemsNeck problems are very common. Neck pain is a common problem – two out of three of us will experience it at some point. It’s not usually serious and most often eases on its own or with simple treatment within a few days.Neck pain is often caused by a simple muscle strain or tension. Other causes include injuries (for example whiplash) or changes to the bones or joints of the spine.You will not normally need an X-ray or an MRI scan.What should I do? There are several ways you can help yourself including:. taking painkillers exercising regularly learning how to relax (particularly your neck muscles) massaging your neck yourself using ice/heat packs checking your posture.What about pain relief?Painkillers may help you keep moving, so sensible use of painkillers will help, not harm your neck. However, if you are already taking medication for something else or have other health problems, check with your local pharmacist before taking painkillers. Always follow the instructions on the packet.Initially it may be helpful to use a covered icepack to ease your pain – never apply ice directly onto your skin. Alternatively heat can be soothing, so a covered hot water bottle may also be used. You should not use heat /ice for more than 15 minutes, three to four times a day.What about work, sports?You will recover faster if you can stay at or get back to work as early as possible. Don’t worry if your neck still hurts; consider doing light tasks at first if this helps you get back to work easier and quicker. Try to stay active and remember to keep moving. Speak to your manager at work about any concerns you may have. You should try to do your normal activities as much as possible and use painkillers as needed. With regard to sports, start with light fitness training, and play when you feel ready.Useful links about neck pain. Information leaflets developed by TIMS giving advice on:. Management of Neck PainManaging Thoracic Back PainMyelopathy – A rare but serious problem affecting the spine is myelopathy. If you are experiencing symptoms of, upper limb / lower limb weakness, loss of dexterity, unsteadiness or disturbance of gait discuss with your GP.YouTube Exercise Video developed by TIMS:. This video has been developed by the clinical teams in Tyneside Integrated Musculoskeletal Service (TIMS) to support the management of patients in our service. If you have not been referred to this resource by TIMS you follow the advice at your own risk.Neck PainA comprehensive set of neck exercises to increase strength, stability, range of movement and function of the cervical spine. In addition elements of basic shoulder strengthening exercises and activities to enhance balance.Other sources of information. Versus Arthritis neck pain information booklet. Everything you need to know about neck pain in an information leaflet, including self-help and exercises.Whiplash Injury Recovery booklet 2019 – a self help guide developed by the University of Queensland.You should seek further advice if:the pain doesn’t improve within a few weeksyou have pain, tingling, numbness or weakness in your armsyou suddenly develop stiffness in the neck along with stiffness in both shoulders. Website design by Peacock Carter We use cookies on our website to give you the most relevant experience by remembering your preferences and repeat visits. By clicking “OK”, you agree to allow NHS TIMS permissions for all cookies.Cookie settingsOKPrivacy & Cookies Policy Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may have an effect on your browsing experience. Necessary Necessary Always Enabled Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information. Non-necessary Non-necessary Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website. SAVE & ACCEPT
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TitleNeck pain - Better Health Channel
Urlhttps://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/neck-pain
Descriptionbetterhealth.vic.gov.au
Date
Organic Position16
H1Neck pain
H2Actions for this page
Summary
On this page
Treatment for neck pain
Poor postures and neck pain
Osteoarthritis and neck pain
Neck pain – whiplash
Acute neck pain – wry neck
Where to get help
Give feedback about this page
More information
Related information
From other websites
Content disclaimer
H3Symptoms of whiplash
Causes of wry neck
Treatment for wry neck
Self-care of wry neck
H2WithAnchorsActions for this page
Summary
On this page
Treatment for neck pain
Poor postures and neck pain
Osteoarthritis and neck pain
Neck pain – whiplash
Acute neck pain – wry neck
Where to get help
Give feedback about this page
More information
Related information
From other websites
Content disclaimer
BodyNeck pain Actions for this page. Listen Print Summary. Read the full fact sheet The neck is highly mobile to allow us to see in all directions.Strains from poor postures, trauma and arthritis are common causes of neck pain.Treatments provided by physiotherapists, osteopaths, chiropractors or remedial masseurs can generally help neck pain. On this page. Treatment for neck pain Poor postures and neck pain Osteoarthritis and neck pain Neck pain – whiplash Acute neck pain – wry neck Where to get help  The neck supports the head. It is made up of seven bones (vertebrae) stacked one on top of the other. The vertebrae are connected by two facet joints and a disc. The vertebrae are also bound together with ligaments. Muscles provide movement and vital support for all structures of the neck.The neck is very mobile, to allow us to see in all directions. Strains from poor postures, trauma and degenerative diseases, such as arthritis, are the most common causes of neck pain. There is good evidence to show that exercise helps reduce these symptoms.Treatment for neck pain. Neck pain can generally be successfully treated by physiotherapists, although there are other options such as osteopathy, chiropractic or remedial massage to consider. If you need short-term pain relief from medication, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.Treatment depends on the cause, but may include:information on how to look after your neck to prevent unnecessary strains from work and everyday activitiesspecific exercise programs to retrain and then strengthen the neck musclesposture training exercisespassive joint mobilisation or manipulationsoft tissue massagetaping to guide correction of posturerelaxation therapy.Poor postures and neck pain. Poor sitting or working postures commonly cause neck pain by putting extra strain on the joints and muscles. Sitting and working with the shoulders slouched and chin poking forward, such as when working for many hours on a computer, may strain the neck as may playing with devices with your head down for long periods of time. Sleeping on your stomach with your head turned around to breathe may also be a strain on your neck. Suggestions on how to prevent posture-related neck pain include:Ensure your workstation is set up to help you sit in a good supported posture. When using a computer, ensure the screen is at a height so that your head is upright and the centre of the computer is viewed when you lower your eyes slightly. Change your posture regularly when either sitting or standing. To do this, grow tall by rolling up from your pelvis. Then gently elongate the back of your neck and draw your shoulders back. Use no more than 10 per cent effort. Hold the position for 10 seconds and then relax. Perform posture correction frequently while you are working (two to three times per hour). This exercise keeps tone in the supporting muscles of the neck.Combat the tight or tired feeling of your neck by regularly performing the posture exercise.Try not to sleep on your stomach, which may strain your neck.Check whether your pillow is the right size for you. Choice of pillows is very individual – there is no one pillow that suits everyone. Check the distance between the side of your neck and your shoulder. That gives you an idea of the pillow height you need to keep your head and neck supported when you sleep on your side.Move and exercise regularly to improve muscle tone and posture.Osteoarthritis and neck pain. Osteoarthritis is a common type of arthritis that affects many people. Its incidence increases as we grow older. Osteoarthritis can result from:previous joint injury overuseoverweight (in cases of hip or knee osteoarthritis) genetic predisposition (in some people).Symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain and stiffness and weakening of the muscles. Commonly affected areas include the neck, lower back, hands, hip and knee. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, but it can be managed well with exercise. Keeping the joints mobile and the muscles strong are the best ways to manage osteoarthritis.Osteoarthritis in the joints of the neck commonly results in local neck pain. If the upper joints of the neck are affected, the neck pain may develop into a headache as well. Osteoarthritis may occasionally cause some irritation of the nerves as they exit the neck. If you experience shooting pains down your arm, or numbness or lack of power in your arm or hand, then see your doctor, as you may need further investigations, such as an x-ray.You can manage neck pain related to osteoarthritis with:advice and education on how to care for and self-manage your neckpain management – speak to your doctor about taking pain relieving medication or using a heat pack to relieve neck paingentle active mobilisation exercises to maintain neck movementgentle exercises focussing on retraining and maintaining muscle function gentle soft-tissue and joint mobilisation posture exercisesstrengthening exercises.Neck pain – whiplash. An injury to the neck due to a motor vehicle crash is often referred to as a whiplash injury. Typically, this occurs as a result of a rear-end collision and any structure of the neck might be strained.Symptoms of whiplash. Common symptoms of a whiplash injury include neck pain, headache and neck stiffness. Some people may also feel unsteady or light headed. Recovery from whiplash depends on the individual and the extent of the injury, but can vary from a few weeks to months.Early treatment for whiplash may include:advice and education on how to care for and manage your neck to help recoverypain-relieving or anti-inflammatory medicationgentle active mobilisation exercisesgentle exercises focussing on retraining muscle function gentle soft-tissue and joint mobilisation posture exercisesstrengthening exercisesresumption of usual activities, as your neck tolerates.Maintaining as many of your normal daily activities as you can is ideal, although modifications in the early stages may be necessary to assist in the recovery of your neck. Be adaptable and remain positive. If pain is severe or persists or if you have unusual symptoms associated with the injury, further examination or investigation by a healthcare professional may be required.Acute neck pain – wry neck. Wry neck is the term used to describe a condition where your neck temporarily becomes stiff and painful. It can occur at any age, but is more common in the teenage or young adult population. Turning your head to the side (generally one side more than the other) and looking up can produce an acute pain.One or both sides of the neck may also go into spasm, and pain may be felt from the top of the neck down to the shoulder blade and even out to the top of the shoulder.Causes of wry neck. There are many causes including:sleeping in an awkward posturea sudden flicking or jerking of the headcarrying heavy unbalanced loads – such as a suitcaseviral infection.Treatment for wry neck. In most cases, if treated early, wry necks respond well to treatment in a few days. Heat and passive joint mobilisation can be used to loosen the neck joints and reduce the pain and muscle spasm.In rare cases, particularly for people over 40, or very rarely in infants, wry neck can be caused by a medical condition. Your doctor or therapist can help with this diagnosis and give you a referral for appropriate care.Self-care of wry neck. While you are recovering from wry neck:avoid sitting or lying with your neck in an awkward positionavoid going out in the cold without being well wrapped upkeep moving your neck (as pain allows)use a small heat pack (such as a wheat pack or similar) at home or at work for pain relief, or hot showers can helpkeep warm. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about pain medication if your pain is severe.Where to get help . Your GP (doctor)PharmacistPhysiotherapistAustralian Physiotherapy Association  Tel. 1300 306 622Musculoskeletal Australia National Help Line Tel. (03) 8531 8000 or 1800 263 265 This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Give feedback about this page. View all bones muscles and joints More information. Related information . Abdominal muscles The abdominal muscles support the trunk, allow movement and hold organs in place by regulating internal abdominal pressure. Acromegaly Acromegaly is caused by an excess of growth hormone in adults, which causes the overgrowth of bones in the face, hands, feet and internal organs. Ageing - muscles bones and joints Exercise can prevent age-related changes to muscles, bones and joints and can reverse these changes too. Amyloidosis A person with amyloidosis produces aggregates of insoluble protein that cannot be eliminated from the body. Ankle sprains Ankle sprain is a common sports injuries caused by overstretching and tearing the supporting ligaments. From other websites . Choosing Wisely Australia Choosing Wisely Australia - Tests, treatments and procedures physiotherapists and consumers should question Choosing Wisely Australia - Tests, treatments and procedures clinicians and consumers should question Musculoskeletal Australia NPS Medicinewise - Medicines Line 1300 633 424 This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Content disclaimer. Content on this website is provided for information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not in any way endorse or support such therapy, service, product or treatment and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. The information and materials contained on this website are not intended to constitute a comprehensive guide concerning all aspects of the therapy, product or treatment described on the website. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions and to ascertain whether the particular therapy, service, product or treatment described on the website is suitable in their circumstances. The State of Victoria and the Department of Health shall not bear any liability for reliance by any user on the materials contained on this website. Reviewed on: 20-02-2019
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Result 18
TitleNeck pain: Causes and treatment
Urlhttps://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326670
DescriptionThere are many possible causes of neck pain, from muscle strain to spinal stenosis. In this article, we list more causes of neck pain, discuss their symptoms, and provide some home remedies
Date15 Oct 2019
Organic Position17
H1What are the possible causes of neck pain?
H2Causes
Home remedies
Prevention
When to see a doctor
Outlook
Latest news
H3Muscle strain
Cervical spondylosis
Injury
Cervical radiculopathy
Spinal stenosis
Meningitis
Cancer
Related Coverage
H2WithAnchorsCauses
Home remedies
Prevention
When to see a doctor
Outlook
Latest news
BodyWhat are the possible causes of neck pain?Medically reviewed by Stacy Sampson, D.O. — Written by Shannon Johnson on October 15, 2019Many people experience neck pain or stiffness from injury, overuse, or inflammation. There are many treatment options available for neck pain, depending on what is causing it.The neck consists of seven vertebrae. These are interlocking bones, separated by disks, that enable movement and stability.The neck is less protected than the rest of the spine. For this reason, it may be more prone to injury or conditions that cause pain.Many cases of neck pain are mild and will resolve on their own within a few days. Sometimes, however, neck pain can be a sign of something more serious.This article will discuss different causes of neck pain and how to treat them.Causes. There are many possible causes of neck pain, including:Muscle strain. Share on PinterestA possible cause of neck pain is muscle strain.Straining the neck muscles can cause soreness in the area. This soreness might present as an aching or throbbing pain.It can also cause a sharp pain, especially when moving the head.Muscle strain can occur as a result of:having bad posturesleeping in a position without good neck supportsitting at a desk or computer for too longCervical spondylosis. Cervical spondylosis, or cervical disk degeneration, refers to when the disks between the neck’s vertebrae wear down.This increases friction between the vertebrae and can cause pain and stiffness in the neck as a result.These disks typically wear down over time, so cervical spondylosis becomes more common with age.The disk can also begin to bulge out and put pressure on the spinal cord or its nerve roots. This degenerative process may worsen, leading to a herniated cervical disk fragment. This can fully push against nerve tissue to cause significant neck pain that may also radiate to the shoulder and down one or both arms.Injury. The neck is flexible and constantly supporting the head. This makes it particularly susceptible to injury.Examples of possible neck injury causes include:motor vehicle accidentsimpact sports, such as footballfallsdivingweightliftingDamage to a muscle or ligament usually causes neck injuries.In more severe cases, injury can lead to a broken neck. This is occurs when one or more of the vertebrae becomes fractured.A broken neck can cause severe pain that may spread to other areas of the spinal cord. It also increases the risk of further injury to the spinal cord and loss of neurological function, including paralysis.Cervical radiculopathy. Cervical radiculopathy involves a pinched nerve. This occurs when a nerve root from the spinal cord in the neck becomes irritated or compressed. This gives rise to radiating pain from the neck to the shoulder and upper extremity.It can also cause muscle weakness, numbness, and a tingling sensation through the arms or hands.Other conditions, such as arthritis, can also lead to cervical radiculopathy, as can injuries resulting in a herniated cervical disk.Spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis refers to the narrowing of the spinal canal that puts pressure on nerve roots. This narrowing usually occurs in the neck or lower back.People with spinal stenosis can experience pain in their neck, back, or legs. The pain is usually worse with activity, but sometimes, posturing the neck in a certain way can relieve the discomfort.Osteoarthritis typically causes spinal stenosis. Other causes of this condition include spinal tumors, birth defects, and Paget’s disease.Meningitis. Share on PinterestA person with meningitis may experience neck stiffness.Meningitis refers to inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. An infection, such as from bacteria or a virus, can cause this inflammation to occur.Bacterial meningitis can be serious and sometimes life threatening. If any of the following symptoms arise, immediate medical attention is necessary:neck stiffnessfeverheadachenauseavomitingsensitivity to lightCancer. Head and neck cancers can cause pain in the neck. These forms of cancer make up about 4% of all cases of cancer in the United States.There are several different types of head and neck cancers, including:nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancerlaryngeal canceroral cancernasopharyngeal cancersalivary gland cancerOther symptoms of head and neck cancers include:mouth soresgrowths on the head or neckvoice changestrouble breathingjaw painfeverfatigueweight lossHome remedies. There are many ways to ease neck pain at home, including by:taking over-the-counter pain relief medication, such as acetaminophen (also called Tylenol)placing warm or cold packs on the neck to reduce pain symptomsavoiding contact sports and heavy liftingseeing a physical therapistdoing gentle neck stretcheskeeping good postureengaging in light exercises, such as yogausing supportive neck pillows for sleepThere are also many different neck exercises that can help relieve pain. To try a simple exercise for the neck:Stand up or sit in a chair with the feet flat on the floor, around shoulder width apart.Slowly turn the head to the right until feeling a gentle stretch. Be careful to avoid stretching too far and causing further pain. Hold this position for 10–30 seconds.Turn the head to the left and hold for 10–30 seconds.Repeat these steps up to five times on each side.For more serious cases of neck pain, a doctor may recommend corticosteroid injections or surgery.Prevention. Share on PinterestRegular exercise can help keep joints loose and flexible.Some tips to prevent neck pain or injury include:practicing good posture, especially when sitting at a desk or looking at a computersleeping on a supportive mattress and pillowregularly exercising to keep joints loose and flexiblewearing a seatbelt while in the carnot diving into shallow waterwearing suitable protective gear during sports or exerciseWhen to see a doctor. In most cases, neck pain will go away on its own. However, it is important to see a doctor if the following symptoms occur:neck pain following a motor vehicle accident, fall, or diving accidentpain, numbness, or weakness that spreads to the arms and legsbowel or bladder problemssevere or worsening painsevere headache with neck pain or stiffnesssigns of fevernausea and vomitinga lump in the neck or headOutlook. Neck pain is common and tends to go away on its own within a few days.Poor posture and muscle strain or tension are some common causes of neck pain.Some people will have more severe neck pain, sometimes with additional symptoms that occur in nearby areas. This could be a sign of something more serious. In these cases, it is essential to see a doctor. Last medically reviewed on October 15, 2019Back PainBones / OrthopedicsHeadache / MigrainePain / AnestheticsMedically reviewed by Stacy Sampson, D.O. — Written by Shannon Johnson on October 15, 2019Latest news. COVID-19: Did Omicron evolve in mice?Clues to origins of bipolar and schizophrenia found in 'dark genome'Dementia: Frailty is an independent risk factor, study saysHow McDonald's social ads impact health of global youthCould vitamin D deficiency increase the risk of heart disease?Related Coverage. How do you treat neck pain in children?Many cases of neck pain in children are due to muscle strain. Home remedies and lifestyle changes are often enough to help a child get relief…READ MORENeck pain: What does it mean?Medically reviewed by William Morrison, M.D.Causes of neck pain include bad posture, a sprain, infections, arthritis, and whiplash. Learn all about what causes neck pain, the symptoms to look…READ MOREWhat is lymphangitis?Medically reviewed by Elaine K. Luo, M.D.Lymphangitis is a serious secondary infection that affects the lymph system. In this article, learn about the symptoms, what it looks like, and when…READ MOREExercises for easing and preventing upper back painMedically reviewed by Gregory Minnis, DPTPoor posture or tense or tired muscles can often lead to upper back pain or discomfort. Gently stretching the back and shoulders can help both relieve…READ MORE
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Result 19
TitleNeck pain - treatments, causes and related symptoms | healthdirect
Urlhttps://www.healthdirect.gov.au/neck-pain
DescriptionNeck pain is a common condition that can affect anyone. Learn what can cause neck pain and how to treat it here
Date
Organic Position18
H1Healthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on
H2What is neck pain?
What symptoms relate to neck pain?
What causes neck pain?
When should I see my doctor?
How is neck pain diagnosed?
How is neck pain treated?
Can neck pain be prevented?
Complications of neck pain
Resources and support
Search our site for
Need more information?
Disclaimer
H3Neck pain: treatment - MyDr.com.au
Neck Pain - Pain Conditions - painHEALTH
Neck Pain (Non-Traumatic)
Neck pain: symptoms and causes - MyDr.com.au
Neck Pain — Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment | MSK Australia
Neck pain - Better Health Channel
Neck — Arthritis Australia
Quit smoking - Musculoskeletal Australia (MSK)
Consumer resources
Meningitis in babies and children | Raising Children Network
Pain Conditions - painHEALTH
Management of dental pain in primary care
Tonsillectomy in Children: When is it Necessary? | Ausmed
Managing Dyspepsia (Indigestion) in Older Adults | Ausmed
Choking First Aid in Residential Aged Care | Ausmed
H2WithAnchorsWhat is neck pain?
What symptoms relate to neck pain?
What causes neck pain?
When should I see my doctor?
How is neck pain diagnosed?
How is neck pain treated?
Can neck pain be prevented?
Complications of neck pain
Resources and support
Search our site for
Need more information?
Disclaimer
BodyHealthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on. Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do. Neck pain PRINT SHARE share via Facebook share via Twitter share via Email beginning of content Neck pain 5-minute read Listen What is neck pain? Neck pain is a common condition that will affect most people at some point in their lives. Many different things can cause neck pain, which is usually not the sign of a more serious condition. Most neck pain clears up by itself in a few days. It is very rarely a symptom of something more serious. What symptoms relate to neck pain? The pain often spreads from the neck towards the shoulders or upper back, and it often causes headaches. You might find the pain is worse when you hold your head in one position for a long time, for example, at a computer. Neck pain might also come with muscle tightness or spasms, and you might not be able to move your head very well. If you have a neck injury, you might also have dizziness, pins and needles or numbness, weakness, changes to your vision or hearing, problems concentrating or difficulty swallowing. See your doctor if you have any of these symptoms. CHECK YOUR SYMPTOMS — Use our neck pain and stiffness Symptom Checker and find out if you need to seek medical help. What causes neck pain? Common causes of neck pain include: poor posture (the way your body is positioned when standing or sitting) sleeping in an awkward position tension injury such as a muscle strain or whiplash prolonged use of a desktop or laptop computer wear and tear in the bones of the neck, which is a normal part of ageing Rarer causes of neck pain include: damage to the vertebrae, spinal cord or nerves in the neck a compressed nerve an infection osteoporosis related bone damage or fractures cancer meningitis arthritis When should I see my doctor? You should see a doctor if: the pain is getting worse the pain doesn’t ease up in a week or so you have numbness, tingling or pins and needles in your arms or legs you start having difficulties with your bladder or bowel you have a fever as well as neck pain FIND A HEALTH SERVICE — Our Service Finder can help you find doctors, pharmacies, hospitals and other health services. How is neck pain diagnosed? Your doctor will examine you and discuss what makes the pain worse or better. If they think there may be a more serious cause of your neck pain, they may order tests like a blood test, x-ray, CT scan or an MRI. However, usually these tests aren’t recommended because they won’t change how your neck pain is treated. How is neck pain treated? The best way to treat most neck pain is to keep moving your neck, stay active and adapt any activities that might be causing your pain. Over-the-counter painkillers might be recommended. If your neck pain doesn’t go away, your doctor will investigate the cause. Serious, long-term neck pain is sometimes treated with steroid injections or, very rarely, surgery. It might be helpful to rest your neck at first, but don’t rest it for too long. If you don’t move, the muscles will get stiffer and it will take longer for the pain to go away. It’s better to gently stretch the neck muscles. Your doctor or physiotherapist can show you how to do this gently and safely. There are ways you can manage your neck pain: You can use a heat pad or an ice pack, whichever helps to relieve your neck stiffness and pain. You can buy anti-inflammatory analgesic cream or gel from your pharmacist. Make sure you have a comfortable, supportive pillow. Try sleeping with one firm support pillow rather than softer pillows to avoid stretching your neck muscles. Ensure your working environment is adjusted to your needs. You may need a footstool to ensure your hips and knees are level. Ask for a telephone headset if you spend a lot of time on the phone to avoid bending your neck to one side constantly. You may also need to adjust the height of your computer screen to avoid stretching your neck. Hold reading materials at eye level to avoid hunching over. Work on your posture — exercises such as those found in yoga or Pilates all work to improve your posture. Neck supports (braces and collars) are not generally recommended, unless your healthcare professional has advised you to wear one. Avoid activities such as lifting, pulling, punching, and repetitive bending and twisting for a few days as they can make your neck pain worse. Try not to overdo it. If you cannot fully move your neck left and right, you should not drive until you have regained full movement in your neck. If you can safely drive, adjust your headrest so that your head and neck are properly supported. Manipulating or massaging your neck can help in the short-term. You may find some physical therapies such as physiotherapy, chiropractic, osteopathy or acupuncture of use. Can neck pain be prevented? The best way to prevent neck pain is to keep your spine flexible and your muscles strong. You can do this with regular exercise — 30 minutes on most days. Make sure you take plenty of breaks throughout the day to stretch. It’s important to develop good posture especially when you’re sitting, at work or driving. Try not to slouch or to poke your chin out. A supportive pillow is also important to prevent neck pain. Complications of neck pain. Sometimes pain doesn’t go away. Chronic or persistent pain can continue even after the original problem has healed. If this happens, you may need help to address emotional, social and environmental factors that may be contributing to your pain. Resources and support. These websites provide more detailed information about the causes and management of neck pain. painHEALTH Musculoskeletal Australia Chronic Pain Australia Learn more here about the development and quality assurance of healthdirect content. Last reviewed: December 2019 Back To Top Search our site for. Sprains and Strains Torticollis Whiplash Need more information? These trusted information partners have more on this topic. Top results Neck pain: treatment - MyDr.com.au. Treatment for neck pain depends on the cause and how severe it is. Neck pain treatment, including treatment for whiplash, often involves a combination of self-care, medicines, exercises and relaxation therapies.   Read more on myDr website Neck Pain - Pain Conditions - painHEALTH. Learn about neck pain as a musculoskeletal pain condition to identify how you can approach neck pain in your co-management treatment plan Read more on painHEALTH website Neck Pain (Non-Traumatic). This article tells consumers about non-traumatic neck pain and how it is diagnosed, including what imaging tests they may need to have. Read more on Diagnostic Imaging Pathways website Neck pain: symptoms and causes - MyDr.com.au. Knowing the symptoms of your neck pain and when to see a doctor can help in finding the cause and getting a diagnosis. Read more on myDr website Neck Pain — Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment | MSK Australia. Do you have neck pain? Find out about the different causes, how you can manage your musculoskeletal condition, and where to find support. Call us: 1800 263 265 Read more on Musculoskeletal Australia website Neck pain - Better Health Channel. betterhealth.vic.gov.au Read more on Better Health Channel website Neck — Arthritis Australia. Neck pain is pain that is felt in the upper part of the spine Read more on Arthritis Australia website Quit smoking - Musculoskeletal Australia (MSK). Smoking is linked to back pain, neck pain, rheumatoid arthritis and increased pain. It’s never too late to quit. Find out more and how MSK can help. Read more on Musculoskeletal Australia website Consumer resources. RECOVER Injury Research Centre has developed a number of resources to assist people who have been injured in road traffic crashes. Read more on RECOVER Injury Research Centre website Meningitis in babies and children | Raising Children Network. Meningitis is an emergency. Symptoms include headache, sore neck and sensitivity to light. If you think your child has meningitis, go straight to hospital. Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website Show more Top results Pain Conditions - painHEALTH. Clinically supported, in-depth information about a range of musculoskeletal pain conditions to help you better understand your musculoskeletal pain Read more on painHEALTH website Management of dental pain in primary care. Patients sometimes present to a medical practitioner with dental pain if they cannot see a dentist. Doctors need to be aware of the common dental diseases that result in pain so they can help to manage the patient’s symptoms until they are able to see a dentist. Read more on Australian Prescriber website Tonsillectomy in Children: When is it Necessary? | Ausmed. The tonsils, which form part of the immune system, consist of two pads of lymphatic tissue at the back of the throat. They help to prevent infection by trapping pathogens that enter the nose and mouth and producing antibodies to kill them. The tonsils are prone to infection and inflammation. Read more on Ausmed Education website Managing Dyspepsia (Indigestion) in Older Adults | Ausmed. Dyspepsia (indigestion) is a common symptom characterised by discomfort or pain in the upper abdomen. It typically occurs after eating or drinking. Symptoms may include early satiation, uncomfortable fullness, bloating, nausea, vomiting, belching, flatulence, heartburn, regurgitation and diarrhoea. Read more on Ausmed Education website Choking First Aid in Residential Aged Care | Ausmed. Choking is the second most common cause of preventable death in residential aged care. It occurs when the trachea is completely or partially blocked by a foreign body, obstructing airflow. Choking can be gradual or sudden. It may only take a few seconds for the airway to become completely blocked. Read more on Ausmed Education website Show more Disclaimer. Healthdirect Australia is not responsible for the content and advertising on the external website you are now entering. Healthdirect 24hr 7 days a week hotline 24 hour health advice you can count on 1800 022 222 Government Accredited with over 140 information partners We are a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information and advice
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Result 20
TitleBack and Neck Pain | Cedars-Sinai
Urlhttps://www.cedars-sinai.org/health-library/diseases-and-conditions/b/back-and-neck-pain.html
DescriptionBack and neck pain can interfere with your ability to function. Overuse, overweight, and other problems can cause back and neck pain
Date
Organic Position19
H1Back and Neck Pain
H2What is back and neck pain?
What causes back and neck pain?
What are the symptoms of back and neck pain?
How are back and neck pain diagnosed?
How are back and neck pain treated?
How are back and neck pain managed?
What are possible complications of neck and back pain?
Can I prevent neck and back pain?
When should I call my healthcare provider?
Key points about back and neck pain
Next steps
H3Need Help?
H2WithAnchorsWhat is back and neck pain?
What causes back and neck pain?
What are the symptoms of back and neck pain?
How are back and neck pain diagnosed?
How are back and neck pain treated?
How are back and neck pain managed?
What are possible complications of neck and back pain?
Can I prevent neck and back pain?
When should I call my healthcare provider?
Key points about back and neck pain
Next steps
BodyBack and Neck Pain Not what you're looking for? Start New Search ABOUT CAUSES DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT NEXT STEPS What is back and neck pain? Back pain can range from a mild, dull, annoying ache to persistent, severe, disabling pain. Pain in your back can limit your ability to move. It can interfere with normal functioning and quality of life. Always talk with your healthcare provider if you have persistent pain. Neck pain occurs in the area of the cervical vertebrae in your neck. Because of its location and range of motion, your neck is often left unprotected and at risk for injury. Pain in your back or neck area can come on suddenly and intensely. Chronic pain lasts for weeks, months, or even years. The pain can be constant or come and go. What causes back and neck pain? Even with today's technology, the exact cause of back and neck pain is hard to find. In most cases, back and neck pain may have many different causes. They include: Overuse, strenuous activity, or improper use, such as repetitive twisting or heavy lifting Trauma, injury, or fractures Breakdown of vertebrae, often caused by stresses on the muscles and ligaments that support your spine, or the effects of aging Infection Abnormal growth, such as a tumor or bone spur Obesity, which puts extra weight on your spine and pressure on your disks Poor muscle tone or muscle weakness in the back and belly (abdomen) Muscle tension or spasm Sprain or strain Ligament or muscle tears Joint problems, such as arthritis Smoking Slipped disk (protruding or herniated disk) and pinched nerve Osteoporosis and compression fractures Problems of your vertebrae and bones that you were born with (congenital) Abdominal problems, such as an aortic aneurysm What are the symptoms of back and neck pain? . Symptoms linked to back pain may include: Dull, burning, or sharp pain in your back. The pain can be limited to a single spot or cover a large area. Leg numbness or tingling above or below your knee Stiffness or aching that occurs anywhere along your spine from your neck to your tailbone Sharp, shooting pain that spreads from your low back to your buttocks, down the back of your thigh, and into your calf and toes Consistent ache in the middle or lower part of your back, especially after standing or sitting for a long period Loss of bladder and bowel control with weakness in both legs are symptoms of a serious condition that needs medical attention right away. Symptoms linked to neck pain can be: Arm numbness or tingling Headaches Shoulder pain Sharp shooting pain or a dull ache in your neck Pain that occurs suddenly in your back or neck from an injury is acute pain. Acute pain comes on quickly and may leave sooner than chronic back or neck pain. This type of pain should not last more than 6 weeks. Pain that may come on quickly or slowly and lingers for 3 months or more is chronic pain. Chronic pain is less common than acute pain. How are back and neck pain diagnosed? . Your healthcare provider will ask about your health history and do a physical exam. They may also do X-rays of the affected areas, as well as an MRI. This allows a more complete view. The MRI also makes pictures of soft tissues such as ligaments, tendons, and blood vessels. The MRI can help spot infection, tumor, inflammation, or pressure on your nerve. Sometimes a blood test may help diagnose arthritis, a condition that can cause back and neck pain. How are back and neck pain treated? . In many cases, acute back or neck pain may simply improve with some rest. Over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen may also help with the discomfort. Try to move gently during this period, so that you won't become stiff and lose mobility. If you have chronic pain of your back and neck, try several remedies before considering surgery. These include: Hot or cold packs as advised by your healthcare provider Certain exercises to strengthen back and belly muscles and ease pain, such as stretching and flexing. Your healthcare provider can show you these exercises. Physical therapy can also help you find the correct exercises. Aerobic exercise may help with your overall fitness and strength. Certain anti-inflammatory medicines or muscle relaxants may be used, as advised by your provider. Sometimes your provider may suggest a brace or corset for extra support. Shots (injections) for pain relief in the area Nerve block. This eases pain signals from the affected nerve. Acupuncture Osteopathic manipulation How are back and neck pain managed? . Acute back pain usually gets better without special treatment. Using acetaminophen or ibuprofen as directed will decrease pain and help you rest. Surgery and special exercises are generally not used with acute pain. For severe, disabling, or chronic back and neck pain, rehabilitation programs can be designed to meet your needs. The type of program will depend on the cause and the type and severity of your pain, injury, or disease. Your active involvement is key to the success of rehab programs. The goal of back and neck rehab is to help you manage disabling pain. It's also important to return you to your highest level of functioning and independence, and improve your quality of life. The focus of rehab is on easing pain, improving movement. It also focuses on limiting any additional damage, and increasing your functional ability. To help reach these goals, back and neck rehab programs may include: Exercise programs to improve range of motion, increase muscle strength, improve flexibility and mobility, and increase endurance Help with assistive devices that keep you independent Education and counseling Pain management methods Help to quit smoking Gait (walking) and movement retraining Stress management Nutritional counseling Ergonomic assessments and work-related injury prevention programs Job counseling What are possible complications of neck and back pain? Complications of back and neck pain may include:  Loss of productivity. Back pain is the most common reason for disability in working adults. Nerve damage. If your back pain is from a herniated disk, pressure on the spinal nerves may cause a variety of problems, such as weakness, numbness, or severe shooting pain that travels from the back to the leg. Depression. Back or neck pain can disrupt all aspects of life. This includes work, physical exercise, social activities, and sleep. The anxiety and stress caused by the change in movement and pain can lead to depression. Weight gain. Loss of movement and inability to exercise can lead to weight gain and the loss of muscle strength. It is a good idea to see a healthcare provider if you have numbness or tingling, or if your pain is severe and does not get better with medicine and rest. If you have trouble urinating, weakness, pain, or numbness in your legs, fever, or unintentional weight loss, call your healthcare provider right away. Can I prevent neck and back pain? . The following may help to prevent back and neck pain: Practice correct lifting techniques. Don't lift heavy items. When you do lift something, bend your legs, keep your back straight, and then slowly lift your body and the object. Wear a seat belt in motor vehicles in case of a collision. Use telephones, computers, and other equipment correctly. Maintain correct posture while sitting, standing, and sleeping. Exercise regularly. Learn back-strengthening exercises to keep your back and belly muscles strong. Warm up with stretching exercises before doing exercises. Do exercises that improve your balance. Don't smoke. Stay at a healthy weight. Reduce emotional stress that may cause muscle tension. Get enough vitamin D and calcium in your diet. When should I call my healthcare provider? . See your healthcare provider if you have: Loss of bladder or bowel control with weakness in either leg. These symptoms need attention right away. Severe back or neck pain that does not decrease with medicine and rest Pain after an injury or a fall Weakness, numbness, or tingling in your legs or arms Fever of 100.4°F (38°C) or higher, or as advised by your healthcare provider Unintentional weight loss Key points about back and neck pain. Back and neck problems range from minor aches to severe, disabling pain. Often, the reason for your pain can't be found. See a healthcare provider if you have numbness or tingling, severe pain that does not improve with medicine and rest, trouble urinating, weakness, pain, or numbness in your legs, fever, unintentional weight loss, or pain after a fall. Often, back and neck pain will improve over time. See your healthcare provider if your pain is not decreasing. Use prevention strategies to keep yourself healthy and injury-free. For severe, disabling, or chronic back pain, consider an individualized rehabilitation program. Next steps. Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your healthcare provider: Know the reason for your visit and what you want to happen. Before your visit, write down questions you want answered. Bring someone with you to help you ask questions and remember what your provider tells you. At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you. Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed and how it will help you. Also know what the side effects are. Ask if your condition can be treated in other ways. Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean. Know what to expect if you do not take the medicine or have the test or procedure. If you have a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit. Know how you can contact your provider if you have questions. Medical Reviewer: Joseph Campellone MD Medical Reviewer: Marianne Fraser MSN RN Medical Reviewer: Raymond Kent Turley BSN MSN RN © 2000-2021 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions. Not what you're looking for? Start New Search Want More Information? Cedars-Sinai has a range of comprehensive treatment options. See Our Spine Program Looking for a Physician? Choose a doctor and schedule an appointment. Find a Doctor Need Help? 1-800-CEDARS-1 (1-800-233-2771) Available 24 Hours A Day Schedule a Callback Expert Care for Life™ Starts Here Adult Primary Care Pediatric Primary Care Urgent Care Need Help? 1-800-CEDARS-1 (1-800-233-2771) Schedule a Callback Looking for a Physician Choose a doctor and schedule an appointment. Find a Doctor Share Email Print
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