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Keyword aa degree
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Result 1
TitleAssociate degree - Wikipedia
Urlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Associate_degree
Description
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Organic Position1
H1Associate degree
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Australia[edit]
Brazil[edit]
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BodyAssociate degree From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation Jump to search Undergraduate academic degree An associate degree is an undergraduate degree awarded after a course of post-secondary study lasting two to three years. It is a level of qualification above a high school diploma, GED, or matriculation, and below a bachelor's degree. The first associate degrees were awarded in the UK (where they are no longer awarded) in 1873 before spreading to the US in 1898. In the United States, the associate degree may allow transfer into the third year of a bachelor's degree.[1] Associate degrees have since been introduced in a small number of other countries. Contents. 1 Australia 2 Brazil 3 Canada 4 Europe 4.1 Netherlands 4.2 United Kingdom 4.3 Denmark 4.4 Czech Republic 4.5 Norway 4.6 Sweden 5 Hong Kong 6 Mexico and Hispanic America 7 United States 7.1 California 7.2 Historical development 8 West Indies 9 References 9.1 Citations 9.2 Bibliography 10 Further reading Australia[edit]. In 2004, Australia added "associate degree" to the Australian Qualifications Framework.[2] This title was given to courses more academically focused than advanced diploma courses, and typically designed to articulate to bachelor's degree courses.[3] Brazil[edit]. In Brazil, undergraduate degrees are known as graduação ("graduate") while graduate degrees are known as pós-graduação ("postgraduate"). Brazil follows the major traits of the continental European system; free public schools are available from kindergarten up to postgraduate degrees, both as a right established in Article 6, caput of the Brazilian Constitution and as a duty of the State in Article 208, Items I, IV and V, of the Brazilian Constitution.[4] In 2001, Brazil added Tecnólogo ("Technologist") as a form of undergraduate degree (graduação). A technologist's degree varies between 2 and 3 years of full time studies to complete. This degree takes a shorter time period to obtain than a bachelor or teaching degree (some of which may take between 4 and 6 years to complete), and it aims to provide highly specialized knowledge (e.g., agribusiness technical degree, tourism management degree, web development technical degree etc.).[5] Canada[edit]. Due to the decentralized nature of Canada, each province is responsible for education, and the education system across Canada is not standardized. British Columbia[6][7] is the only Canadian province offering American-style associate degrees.[8] These are similar to the US associate degree, consisting of a two-year program and allowing for articulation onto the third year of a bachelor's degree program. The other provinces of Canada do not offer associate degrees as such, but do offer similar higher education qualifications below the level of a bachelor's degree. These are mostly two-year courses, although Ontario also offers three-year advanced diplomas.[9] In Quebec, the Diplôme d'études collégiales (diploma of college studies), taught at post-secondary collèges d'enseignement général et professionnel (colleges of general and professional education; cégeps) can be a two-year pre-university qualification that is a pre-requisite for entry onto (three year) bachelor's degree courses, or a three-year technical programme preparing students for employment.[10] Europe[edit]. Qualifications on the short cycle of the Bologna Process/level 5 on the European Qualifications Framework sit between secondary education and bachelor's degree level and are thus approximately equivalent to an associate degree. Such qualifications include the Foundation degree (FdA, FdSc, FdEng), Certificate of Higher Education (CertHE) and Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) in the United Kingdom,[11] the Higher Certificate in the Republic of Ireland,[12] and the French Diplôme Universitaire de Technologie (DUT) and Brevet de Technicien Supérieur (BTS).[13] Netherlands[edit]. In the Netherlands, there were four pilots between 2005 and 2011 to assess the added value of the associate degree.[14] In 2007 the associate degree was added to the Dutch system of higher education within the Higher Professional Education (HBO) stream taught at universities of applied sciences (hogeschool). Associate degree courses form part of HBO bachelor's degree courses, and advising requirements are the same for the two-year associate degree and the related four-year bachelor's degree. Those gaining the associate degree may proceed to an HBO bachelor's degree in only two years, but it does not articulate to bachelor's degrees in the research-oriented (WO) stream.[15] United Kingdom[edit]. The title of Associate in Physical Science (Associate in Science (ASc) from 1879) was introduced in 1865 by the University of Durham College of Physical Sciences (now Newcastle University) and awarded from 1873.[16][17] It required (in 1884) passes in three of mathematics, physics, chemistry and geology, and allowed students to go on to take the examination for the Bachelor of Science.[18] As a university-level qualification lying below the bachelor's degree, this is considered to be the world's first associate degree in the modern sense, having been first awarded 25 years prior to the introduction of associate degrees into the US by the University of Chicago.[17][19] The ASc was withdrawn in 1904.[20] Durham also introduced an Associate in Theology (ATh) in 1901, which was only offered in 1901 and 1902.[21] Yorkshire College (now the University of Leeds) offered Associate in Engineering and Associate in Coal Mining degrees from 1877 and there were thirteen different types of associate degrees offered in British universities in 1927.[17] The title of Associate in Arts, introduced by the University of Oxford in 1857 and sometimes referred to as the degree of Associate in Arts, predates the Durham degree. However, it was an examination for "those who are not members of the university" and who were under the age of 18; as such it was at the level of a high school qualification rather than a modern associate degree. Examinations were held in English, languages, mathematics, science, drawing and music, with the title being conferred on those who students who passed any two (as long as the two were not drawing and music).[22] British equivalents to associate degrees vary depending on the national system which issued them. Based on assessment by the UK NARIC, American and Canadian associate degrees are considered equivalent to one year higher education courses such as the Higher National Certificate at level 4 of the British Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Australian associate degrees, however, are considered equivalent to two-year higher education courses such as the Higher National Diploma at level 5 on the framework.[23] Denmark[edit]. A 2-2.5 year education on BA-level is called "Erhvervsakademiuddannelse". This is called an AP-Degree (Academy Professional Degree) in English. Czech Republic[edit]. In Czech republic you can achieve a title DiS. "Diplomovaný specialista" (Certificated Specialist) Norway[edit]. A two-year education on BA-level is called Høgskolekandidat, translated "university college graduate".[24] Only a few professions require 120 ECTS, e.g. piano tuner, driving instructor. Sweden[edit]. A 2-2.5 year education on BA-level is called an AP-Degree (Academy Professional Degree). See also: List of universities and colleges in Sweden. Business academies offer two-year academy profession programmes; some business academies also offer professional bachelor programmes, further adult education and diploma programmes. Hong Kong[edit]. In Hong Kong, associate degrees were first introduced into the territory in 2000 with the aim of increasing the number of students with post-secondary qualifications.[25] As originally introduced, the qualification took two or three years, but this was reformed in 2012 to a two-year course. The associate degree is designed as a general academic education qualification, compared to the more vocational Diploma/Higher/Advanced Diploma (Qualifications Frameworks Level 4), and allows articulation onto the third year of a four-year (US-style) bachelor's degree or the second year of a three-year (British-style) bachelor's degree.[26] A survey in 2016 showed that most students believe associate degrees will help them to get onto bachelor's degree courses, but not (by themselves) in gaining a career; however only 30% of associate degree graduates gained places for further study, leading to accusations that the degree is "a waste of time and money" and calls for the government to address this by making more bachelor's degree places available.[27][better source needed] This has been criticized, with others saying that education had benefits beyond income, which is only a short-term measure.[28] Mexico and Hispanic America[edit]. An associate degree is called a carrera técnica, tecnicatura or Técnico Superior Universitario (TSU) in Mexico and Hispanic America, while a bachelor's degree would be known as a licenciatura or ingeniería. United States[edit]. In the United States, associate degrees are usually earned in two years or more and can be attained at community colleges, technical colleges, vocational schools, and some colleges, as well as at some universities. A student who completes a two-year program can earn an Associate of Arts/Associate in Arts (AA)[29] or an Associate of Science/Associate in Science (AS) degree.[29] AA degrees are usually earned in the liberal arts and sciences such as humanities and social science fields; AS degrees are awarded to those studying in applied scientific and technical fields and professional fields of study. Generally, one year of study is focused on college level general education and the second year is focused on the area of discipline. Students who complete a two-year technical or vocational program can often earn an Associate of Applied Science/Associate in Applied Science (AAS), although sometimes the degree name will include the subject (a "tagged" degree).[30] Transfer admissions in the United States sometimes allows courses taken and credits earned on an AA, AS, or AAS course to be counted toward a bachelor's degree via articulation agreements or recognition of prior learning, depending on the courses taken, applicable state laws/regulations, and the transfer requirements of the university.[31] Common associate degree titles include:[30] Associate of Applied Business (AAB) Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Associate of Applied Technology (AAT) Associate of Arts (AA) Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) Associate of Business Administration (ABA) Associate of Electrical Engineering Technology (AEET) Associate of Electronics (AE) Associate of Engineering (AE/AEng) Associate of Engineering Technology (AET/AEngT) Associate of Forestry (AF) Associate of General Studies (AGS) Associate of Industrial Technology (AIT) Associate of Nursing (AN)/Associate Degree Nurse/Nursing (ADN) Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) Associate of Occupational Studies (AOS) Associate of Science (AS) Associate of Science in Computer Assisted Design (AS-CAD) Associate of Technology (AT) California[edit]. The Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act was signed into legislation on September 29, 2010, which is a legislation that grants any California Community College student who has earned the Associate in Arts degree for Transfer (AA-T) or the Associate in Science degree for Transfer (AS-T) will be granted priority admission to the CSU (California State University) into a similar baccalaureate (BA) degree program with a guarantee of junior standing.[32] Historical development[edit]. The University of Chicago was established in 1891 with four groups of colleges – liberal arts, literature, science, and practical arts (later commerce and administration). These were subdivided into 'junior' (or 'academic') and 'senior' (or 'university') colleges. Bachelor's degrees were awarded by the senior colleges, and certificates were initially awarded by the junior colleges. In 1899 the board of trustees voted to replace these certificates with associate degrees (Associate in Arts, Associate in Literature, and Associate in Science), which were first awarded in 1900. Eells concludes that it is "not unlikely" that people at Chicago knew of the associate degrees being awarded in the United Kingdom, but there is no direct evidence of this. Chicago discontinued its associate degrees in 1918.[33] The associate degree spread across the US, with California College in Oakland (now the American Baptist Seminary of the West) introducing Associate in Arts and Associate in Letters degrees in 1900, and the Lewis Institute in Chicago (now part of the Illinois Institute of Technology) introducing Associate in Literature and Associate in Science degrees in 1901 (both replaced by the Associate in Arts in 1904) followed by the Associate in Domestic Economy degree in 1908. Associate degrees were not always two-year sub-bachelor's awards in the early 20th century: Harvard University and associated colleges awarded Associate in Arts degrees to students who had passed university extension courses "equal in number and standard to the courses required of a resident student for the degree of Bachelor of Arts" from 1910 to 1933.[34] By 1918, 23% of junior colleges were awarding Associate in Arts degrees. By 1941–42, 40% of junior colleges awarded some form of associate degree, and by 1960 this had grown to 75%, with 137 different associate degrees in use. Over a third of associate degrees awarded in the US in 1958–59 were granted by Californian junior colleges.[35] West Indies[edit]. Two year associate degrees are found throughout the West Indies. They are offered by regional organisations such as the Caribbean Examinations Council[36] and the University of the West Indies,[37] and at institutions of higher education in Barbados,[38] Jamaica,[39] and St. Kitts and Nevis,[40] among others. References[edit]. Citations[edit]. ^ "Glossary". EducationUSA. ^ "Introduction of Associate Degree in 2004". Australian Qualifications Framework Advisory Board. Archived from the original on August 5, 2004. Retrieved January 19, 2016. ^ "Main features of the Associate Degree". Australian Qualifications Framework Advisory Board. Archived from the original on August 5, 2004. Retrieved January 19, 2017. ^ "Constituição da República Federativa do Brasil de 1988". www.planalto.gov.br. Retrieved April 1, 2020. ^ "Marco legal e normativo / Catálogo Nacional de Cursos Superiores de Tecnologia". portal.mec.gov.br (in Portuguese). Retrieved April 1, 2020. ^ "Associate Degrees". British Columbia Commission on Admissions and Transfer. Retrieved January 19, 2017. ^ "Associate Degrees". Douglas College. Retrieved January 19, 2017. ^ https://www.canadim.com/study/become-an-international-student/levels-study/ ^ "Diploma Programs at Ontario Colleges". ontariocolleges.ca. Retrieved July 25, 2013. ^ "Postsecondary Education in Quebec". Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials. Retrieved January 20, 2017. ^ "The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA)" (PDF). Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 December 2011. Retrieved 16 December 2017. ^ "Recognition Ireland Statement on US associate degree". Qualificationsrecognition.ie. Archived from the original on May 27, 2013. Retrieved February 12, 2014. ^ "EQUIVALENCE DE DIPLOME (Degree equivalence)". voilanewyork.com. Retrieved March 29, 2014. ^ "Associate degree". Rijksoverheid (in Dutch). Archived from the original on March 5, 2012. Retrieved November 24, 2020. ^ "The Dutch Education System described" (PDF). EP-Nuffic. January 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2017. ^ William Crookes (1877). The Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science. XXXVI. p. 128. ^ a b c Walter Crosby Eells (1963). Degrees in Higher Education. Center for Applied Research in Education. pp. 94–95. ^ Univ, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (1884). The Durham College of Science Calendar: Session 1884–1885. pp. 13, 24. ^ Arthur Levine (1978). Handbook on undergraduate curriculum. Jossey-Bass Publishers. p. 158. ISBN 978-0-87589-376-1. The world's first associate's degree, the associate in science, was awarded by England's University of Durham in 1873. The University of Chicago awarded the first American associate's degree in 1898. It offered associate in arts, associate in literature, and associate in science degrees. ^ Durham University Calendar 1919–1920. p. 555. ^ C.E. Whiting (1932). The University of Durham 1832–1932. Sheldon Press. p. 262. ^ Thomas Acland (1858). Some Account of the Origin and Objects of the New Oxford Examinations for the Title of Associate in Arts, and Certificates for the Year 1858. J. Ridgway. ^ "Summary guide to HNC and HND qualifications" (PDF). Retrieved January 22, 2016. ^ "The Norwegian table of qualifications - NOKUT". Archived from the original on 14 July 2017. Retrieved 13 July 2017. ^ "Get An Associate Degree in Hong Kong". South China Morning Post. August 1, 2014. ^ "Q & A on Sub-degree Programmes". Information Portal for Accredited Post-secondary Programmes. Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Retrieved January 19, 2017. ^ "Associate degree not career booster: Survey". China Daily Asia. July 11, 2016. ^ Victor Fung Keung (September 6, 2016). "Don't see Hong Kong's associate degrees as substandard". ^ a b "Degree Programs". College of DuPage. Retrieved August 1, 2016. ^ a b "USNEI". Education USA. US Department of Education. ^ "Student Zone – College – Finding/Applying". College Zone. Archived from the original on July 18, 2013. Retrieved July 25, 2013. ^ "Cal State University". California State University Transfer Requirements. ^ Walter Crosby Eells (1963). Degrees in Higher Education. Center for Applied Research in Education. pp. 95–97. ^ Walter Crosby Eells (1963). Degrees in Higher Education. Center for Applied Research in Education. pp. 97–98. ^ Walter Crosby Eells (1963). Degrees in Higher Education. Center for Applied Research in Education. pp. 98–99. ^ "CXC Associate Degrees". Caribbean Examinations Council. ^ "Programmes". The University of the West Indies Open Campus. ^ "Associate Degree Programmes". Barbados Community College. ^ "Courses of Study". University of Technology, Jamaica. ^ "ASGS Associate Degrees". Clarence Fitzroy Bryant College. Bibliography[edit]. Allen, I. Elaine; Seaman, Jeff (2006). Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006. The Sloan Consortium. Bragg, Ann Kieffer (1982). Fall 1979 Transfer Study. Report 3: Second Year Persistence And Achievement. Springfield, Illinois: Illinois Community College Board. ERIC ED230228. Koltai, Leslie (1984). Redefining The Associate Degree. Washington: American Association of Community and Junior Colleges. ISBN 978-0-87117-131-3. ERIC ED242378. Wittstruck, J. R. (1985). Requirements For Certificates, Diplomas And Associate Degrees: A Survey Of The States. Denver, Colorado: State Higher Education Executive Officers Association. Further reading[edit]. Crosby, Olivia (2002). "Associate Degree: Two Years to a Career or a Jump Start to a Bachelor's Degree" (PDF). Occupational Outlook Quarterly. Vol. 46 no. 4. Washington: Bureau of Labor Statistics. pp. 2–12. ISSN 0199-4786. ERIC EJ662278. Retrieved April 17, 2018. vteLevels of academic degreeUndergraduateISCED level 5 Associate degree Foundation degree Higher National Diploma/ Diploma of Higher Education/ Certificate of Higher Education ISCED level 6 Bachelor's degree Honours degree PostgraduateISCED level 7 Master's degree Postgraduate diploma/ certificate Diplom degree Engineer's degree ISCED level 8 Doctorate Candidate of Sciences OtherPostdoctoral Higher doctorate Doktor nauk Habilitation Docent Tenure Fellow No dominant classification Academic certificate Laurea Licentiate Magister degree Professional degree Graduate diploma/ certificate Higher diploma Specialist degree/ diploma Terminal degree Unearned Honorary degree Ad eundem degree Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Associate_degree&oldid=1065077657" Categories: Associate degreesAcademic degrees of the United StatesHidden categories: CS1 Portuguese-language sources (pt)CS1 Dutch-language sources (nl)Articles with short descriptionShort description is different from WikidataUse mdy dates from July 2017Use Oxford spelling from April 2021All articles lacking reliable referencesArticles lacking reliable references from October 2021 Navigation menu. 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TitleAA, AS, AAS & AGS Degrees
Urlhttps://www.dmacc.edu/advising/Pages/understandingdegrees.aspx
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TitleWhat is an Associate’s Degree? | Top Universities
Urlhttps://www.topuniversities.com/blog/what-associates-degree
DescriptionGet an answer to the question “What is an associate’s degree?” – including information on entry requirements and career prospects
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H1What is an Associate’s Degree?
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What is an associate’s degree?
What’s the difference between a bachelor’s degree and an associate’s degree?
Types of associate degrees
Careers with an associate’s degree
Transferring from an associate’s degree to a bachelor’s degree
Why choose an associate’s degree?
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What is an associate’s degree?
What’s the difference between a bachelor’s degree and an associate’s degree?
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Why choose an associate’s degree?
BodyWhat is an Associate’s Degree? By Hasna Haidar Updated April 21, 2021 Updated April 21, 2021 298 shares 298 shares . What is an Associate’s Degree? main image If you’re from outside the US or Canada, you’ve probably heard of bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees and PhDs, but perhaps not an associate’s degree. So, what is an associate’s degree, where is it offered, and how can you decide if it’s the right choice for you? Here’s a quick guide… What is an associate’s degree? An associate’s degree is an academic program taken at the undergraduate level (the first stage after secondary school). It aims to give students the basic technical and academic knowledge and transferable skills they need to go on to employment or further study in their chosen field. Associate’s degrees are most commonly offered in the US, but you’ll also find them in some parts of Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and the Netherlands. Other countries have similar programs but under a different name, such as foundation degrees in the UK. In the US, associate’s degrees are available at various types of college, including community colleges, junior colleges and technical colleges, affiliated colleges of universities and university institutes. It typically takes two years full-time to complete an associate’s degree. For some students, an associate’s degree provides preparation for a bachelor’s degree, while for others it’s a qualification in its own right, helping to improve employment prospects compared to only having completed a secondary-level education. What’s the difference between a bachelor’s degree and an associate’s degree? Both bachelor’s degrees and associate’s degrees are categorized as “undergraduate” degrees, meaning that they are both open to students as soon as they complete secondary level education. In contrast “postgraduate” degrees, such as master’s or PhD programs, require students to have already completed a bachelor’s-level program. So how can you decide whether to apply for a bachelor’s degree or an associate’s degree? Here’s a roundup of some of the key differences: Time In order to gain either qualification, you’ll need to complete a specified number of study hours or course credits. This may vary slightly depending on the institution and location, but an associate’s degree usually takes two years to complete full time. In the US this equates to 60 credit hours as opposed to the 120 hours required for a bachelor’s degree – which takes about four years to complete full time. Many associate’s degree students choose to study part-time, which of course means the degree will take longer to complete. On the other hand, it’s also possible to take a “fast-track” course, working at an accelerated pace and even studying during the vacations to complete the degree in a shorter time. Students who’ve completed an associate’s degree may be able to transfer some relevant course credits to count towards a bachelor’s degree, shortening the time needed for the latter degree. Costs Tuition fees for associate’s degrees tend to be lower, and as the course takes less time to complete, the overall cost is considerably less than that of a bachelor’s degree. The difference in costs will vary depending on the institution, but you can typically expect to pay around two to three times less for an associate’s degree. And, as you’ll also spend less time studying, you’re likely to spend less on costs such as accommodation as well. Entry requirements Finally, entry requirements for associate’s degrees are typically much less competitive than for bachelor’s degrees, and admissions deadlines are usually later. They can be an alternative for students who don’t meet the entry requirements for a bachelor’s degree, perhaps because they studied more vocational courses or didn’t quite get strong enough grades. Types of associate degrees. There are four types of associate degrees: AA (Associate of Arts), AS (Associate of Science, AAA (Associate of Applied Arts) and AAS (Associate of Applied Science). The main difference is that the ‘applied’ courses are more focused on preparing students for a particular career, focusing on practical vocational skills, whereas the AA and AS are targeted more at students who want to go on to a bachelor’s degree, with a focus on preparation for higher levels of academic study. Online associate degrees are also becoming more popular, due to their flexibility and affordability, allowing individuals to work while they study, often for a reduced price. Careers with an associate’s degree. Possible careers with an associate’s degree will vary in terms of the type of associate’s degree, and the subject you major in. However, there are lots of relatively high-paying and highly skilled jobs that can be entered with an associate’s degree. For example, one recent list of attractive careers with an associate’s degree includes dental hygienist, web developer, nuclear technician, radiation therapist and air traffic controller. Studying a bachelor’s degree is likely to open up even more possible professional pathways – but it’s definitely worth checking whether you actually need a bachelor’s to enter your chosen career, especially if you’re facing high tuition fees. You may be surprised by how many skilled roles require only an associate’s level qualification. And as many bachelor’s degrees are more academically rather than vocationally oriented, bachelor’s graduates often need to undergo further professional training before they can start work. Transferring from an associate’s degree to a bachelor’s degree. Transferring from an associate’s degree to a bachelor’s degree is often very simple. As long as your course credits are relevant and accepted by the university offering the bachelor’s degree, you can transfer them and join the bachelor’s program halfway through – known as the 2 + 2 format. If you do want to have this option, make sure you research your chosen institutions and their requirements, as you may need to take specific classes/credit hours to ensure you’re fully prepared to transfer to the bachelor’s program. Why choose an associate’s degree? There are lots of possible reasons to choose an associate’s degree. You may want to enter the workplace more quickly and cost-effectively. Or you may want to study a full bachelor’s degree but not have strong enough grades, or simply like the idea of paying lower tuition fees for a few years before transferring. In fact, perhaps the easiest way to decide whether or not you should embark on an associate’s degree is to consider the career you want to get into, and to apply for the degree that will best equip you for that position. It might even be worthwhile checking current job listings in the country you want to work in and researching the qualifications and skills most in demand among your target employers. This article was originally published in November 2013. It was most recently updated in January 2020. Want more content like this? Register for free site membership to get regular updates and your own personal content feed. This article was originally published in November 2013 . It was last updated in April 2021 Want more content like this Register for free site membership to get regular updates and your own personal content feed. Find out more about studying in the US Written by Hasna Haidar + 22 others saved this article + 23 others saved this article 298 shares Share via Share this Page 298 shares FacebookTwitterLinkedInWhatsAppCopy Link Cancel 0/4 Universities have been added to compare Compare 0/4 Programs have been added to compare Compare 0 Applications 0 0/4 universities 0/4 0/4 programs 0/4 0/4 universities 0/4 0/4 programs 0/4 0 shortlisted 0 You also get to: Sign in Join us Sign in using: Facebook Google Step 1 of 2: Join us Join us using: FacebookGoogle  
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TitleOnline Associate Degree Programs | University of the People
Urlhttps://www.uopeople.edu/programs/online-associate-degree-programs/
DescriptionAt University of the People, we offer three accredited online Associate Degree programs in Business Administration, Computer Science and Health Science
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H1Online Associate Degree Programs
H2Why Get a College Degree?
What is an Associate’s Degree?
Why Get an Associate’s Degree?
What are the Different Types of Associate’s Degrees?
10 Highest Paying Associate Degree Jobs
Admission Requirements
Associate’s Degree Costs
UoPeople’s Associate’s Degree Programs
UoPeople Offers the Following Online Associate Degrees Programs:
H3Associate of Arts (AA)
Associate of Science (AS)
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
What is the difference between AA vs. AS vs. AAS Degree?
1. Air Traffic Controller
2. Computer Programmer
3. Radiation Therapist
4. Nuclear Medicine Technologist
5. Dental Hygienist
6. Nurse
7. Web Developer
8. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer
9. Cardiovascular Technologist and Technicians
10. Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technician
Online Associate Degree in Computer Science
Online Associate Degree in Health Science
Online Associate Degree in Business Administration
H2WithAnchorsWhy Get a College Degree?
What is an Associate’s Degree?
Why Get an Associate’s Degree?
What are the Different Types of Associate’s Degrees?
10 Highest Paying Associate Degree Jobs
Admission Requirements
Associate’s Degree Costs
UoPeople’s Associate’s Degree Programs
UoPeople Offers the Following Online Associate Degrees Programs:
BodyOnline Associate Degree Programs Why Get a College Degree? In today’s world, there is no stronger asset than a degree from an accredited university or college. Individuals choose to pursue a degree for a number of reasons: to deepen their knowledge, to develop themselves professionally, and to open new doors in their careers. Degree holders gain invaluable training and expertise in their chosen field of study and are more eligible than individuals without degrees for careers in skilled, dynamic, and specialized professions.   What is an Associate’s Degree? An Associate’s Degree is a 2 year degree. A student generally earns an Associate degree after completing 20 courses, or 60 course credits of study. Not all colleges or universities offer an Associate’s Degree program. Associate’s degrees are often awarded at community colleges. Once completed, students often go on to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a Bachelor’s degree.   Why Get an Associate’s Degree? Getting an associate’s degree is a great way to jumpstart or change both your academic and professional career without the 4 year commitment, or high-cost of a traditional Bachelor’s degree program. Students who decide to continue their education in their chosen field of study after completing their Associate Degree program can continue straight on to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree. Another benefit of an Associate’s degree is that students can transfer credits from completed college courses towards their Bachelor’s degree program. Moreover, many scholarship opportunities are available especially to Associate’s Degree holders.   Associate’s Degree holders who don’t choose to continue their education right away will find themselves primed and qualified to enter the workforce in their chosen field. They will have gained a broad base of knowledge and specialized training which will make them more attractive applicants in today’s competitive job market.   What are the Different Types of Associate’s Degrees?   Associate of Arts (AA). An Associate of Arts degree is generally earned in the fields of liberal arts, sciences, humanities, and social science. Those who pursue an AA degree go on to work in a wide variety of fields including professions in the arts, education, sales, management, and more.   Associate of Science (AS). An Associate of Science degree is generally awarded to those in applied scientific and technical areas of study, including math and science. Those who earn an AA degree go on to have a career in a wide range of fields including in technology, nursing, business, criminal justice, and more.   Associate of Applied Science (AAS). An Associate of Applied Science, or Associate in Applied Science is a degree that is usually specific to a particular field of study, vocation, or career. In these types of degree programs, students often learn the practical skills for a particular career path.   What is the difference between AA vs. AS vs. AAS Degree? The main difference between these 2 year degrees is that an AA and AS degree consist of General Education related courses that are usually transferable towards earning a Bachelor’s Degree. With respect to an AAS Degree, the courses are usually focused on a particular field of study, and the credits earned are not transferable.   10 Highest Paying Associate Degree Jobs. 1. Air Traffic Controller.   • Salary: $124,540 • Degree Type: AS Air traffic controllers keep our skies safe by guiding pilots during take-off and landing, and monitoring aircrafts during travel. They also promote the efficient flow of air traffic to minimize plane delays.   2. Computer Programmer.   • Salary: $82,240 • Degree Type: AS/AAS Also referred to as a “software engineer,” these professionals design and create computer software programs, write code, system instructions, and maintain operating systems.   3. Radiation Therapist.   • Salary: $82,330 • Degree Type: AAS Radiation therapists assist oncologists and radiologists with the implementation of therapeutic treatment plans of patients undergoing radiation therapy.   4. Nuclear Medicine Technologist.   • Salary: $76,820 • Degree Type: AAS Nuclear Medicine Technologists prepare imaging of body scans for patients undergoing medical treatment, keep detailed records of procedures, and assist physicians with patient care.   5. Dental Hygienist.   • Salary: $74,820 • Degree Type: AAS Dental Hygienists screen patients for an array of dental issues, perform x-rays, clean and polish teeth, administer flourides and sealants, counsel patients about dental health, and more.   6. Nurse.   • Salary: $70,000 • Degree Type: AS These health care professionals help treat patients who are sick and injured. They assist doctors to diagnose patients, provide patients advice, and administer follow-up care.   7. Web Developer.   • Salary: $69,430 • Degree Type: AAS Web Developers perform coding and are responsible for website design and layout. These technology professionals use their skills and knowledge in graphic design and computer programming to meet a company’s specifications.   8. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer.   • Salary: $68,970 • Degree Type: AS/AAS Often known as an “ultrasound technologist,” these health care professionals perform body scans to produce images of patients that aid in medical diagnoses.   9. Cardiovascular Technologist and Technicians.   • Salary: $67,080 • Degree Type: AS/AAS These healthcare professionals help to diagnose cardiovascular problems and treat patients with heart conditions, vascular problems, and other heart-related medical conditions.   10. Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technician.   • Salary: $67,010 • Degree Type: AAS Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians work with engineering and construction teams to operate and maintain efficient work platforms.   Admission Requirements. Requirements and prerequisites vary depending on the institution for admission to an associate’s degree program. However, most institutions, including UoPeople, require students to have a high school diploma, or equivalent in order to be admitted.   Associate’s Degree Costs. The average cost of an associate degree is significantly lower than the cost of a traditional four year degree. The difference in costs varies significantly between public and private institutions. Some research estimates associate’s degrees costing over $30,000 at some private universities. At University of the People, an Associate’s Degree costs a total of about $2,460. This includes 20 courses, which cost $120 per course, plus a $60 application fee.     UoPeople’s Associate’s Degree Programs. At University of the People, we offer three accredited online Associates Degree programs in Business Administration, Computer Science and Health Science, as well as master’s degree programs in business administration and education. Explore our Associate Degree programs below to learn more about how an Associate Degree can get you moving towards your professional and academic goals!   UoPeople Offers the Following Online Associate Degrees Programs:. Online Associate Degree in Computer Science.   UoPeople’s Computer Science program prepares students to enter the workforce, speak the language of technology, and write code. Students will focus on a wide range of topics including mathematics, logic, engineering, and information. The courses offered in this program teach students to learn and understand hardware and software, as well as practical application and maintenance services.   Online Associate Degree in Health Science.   The UoPeople Health Science Program takes an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on public health, healthcare, bioethics, and mental health. In our Program, students will learn how different healthcare systems operate, as well as disease prevention, nutrition, and mental health. This program will equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to pursue a higher degree in the healthcare industry if they so choose, and obtain meaningful careers in the healthcare industry.   Online Associate Degree in Business Administration.   UoPeople’s Associate of Science in Business Administration program enables students to gain a broad understanding of business principles and fundamentals. Students take business models and apply them to real-life situations, learn how to work effectively in a professional team environment, and learn valuable concepts in business ethics. UOPEOPLE'S USE OF COOKIES. UoPeople uses cookies to enhance your experience, to display customized content in accordance with your browser settings, and to help us betterunderstand what your needs are. To learn more about the cookies we use, see our Privacy Policy Accept
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Result 6
TitleAA, AS, AAS, AFA and Certificate Requirements
Urlhttps://catalog.brookdalecc.edu/content.php?catoid=7&navoid=448
DescriptionThe Associate in Fine Arts (A.F.A.) is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college to pursue a Bachelor in Fine Arts Degree. It provides ...
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TitleAA Liberal Arts | Fairleigh Dickinson University
Urlhttps://www.fdu.edu/program/aa-liberal-arts/
DescriptionThe Associate of Arts (AA) in Liberal Arts degree is a 60-credit, undergraduate degree offered in-person at both FDU's Metropolitan and Florham campuses
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Organic Position7
H1AA Liberal Arts
H2Program highlights
Admissions requirements
Degree requirements
Online AA enrollment
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AA For High School Graduates
Course Descriptions
H3Communication, Mathematics and Computer Skills (12 credits)
Liberal Arts and Sciences (27 credits)
Free Electives (15-18 credits)
H2WithAnchorsProgram highlights
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Degree requirements
Online AA enrollment
Curriculum
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AA For High School Graduates
Course Descriptions
BodyAA Liberal Arts Home Program AA Liberal Arts Navigation Learn More Becton College   Admissions Apply now Visit FDU Request Information The Associate of Arts (AA) in Liberal Arts degree is a 60-credit, undergraduate degree offered in-person at both FDU’s Metropolitan Campus in Teaneck and Florham Campus in Madison, as well as entirely online. The AA degree is ideally suited to students, including adult learners, with little or no previous college credit. The program offers a timely and cost-effective way to earn an associate’s degree as either a terminal degree or as a stepping stone to a bachelor’s degree. Program highlights. Offered fully online, as well as on-campus Tuition for the AA program is 50 percent less than standard FDU tuition, with additional aid available from the Office of Veterans Services to eligible students Rolling admissions and convenient year-round scheduling with classes that are 8-10 week sessions Up to 30 credits of the 60 credit AA degree can come from sources such as transfer credits from other institutions, standardized exams (e.g. CLEP, TECEP, DANTES), military/professional training evaluated by American Council on Education (ACE), and FDU’s assessment of prior learning that was attained outside the traditional classroom Seamless transition to FDU’s bachelor of arts degree completion program One-on-one support is available in the form of in-person and online tutoring Admissions requirements. Completed online application. There is no fee to apply Proof of a high school diploma (official transcript) or GED Official transcripts from all previously attended colleges or universities (if applicable) No SAT or ACT scores required The AA is designed for those with few (up to 30) or no transfer credits and can eventually roll directly into the Bachelor of Arts Degree Completion Program. Degree requirements. The minimum requirements for the Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts degree are:  Completion of 60 credits of acceptable college work; up to 64 credits can be earned in the AA program prior to transferring to an upper-division program.  A cumulative grade point average of 2.00;  Completion of 30 credits (normally the last 30) taken at FDU. Online AA enrollment. The online AA option consists of registration forms and processes that are particular to this modality. The following links contain forms to assist students with enrollment in online courses.  Course registration form Course add/drop form Application for readmission AA Checksheet Online programs reference guide Billing and payment FAQs Corporate reimbursement deferred payment plan Curriculum. Communication, Mathematics and Computer Skills (12 credits). The ability to use the English language, the ability to understand and use basic mathematical symbols and the mastery of basic computer skills are required of all students in the program. ENGL 1111 Literature & Composition I (3 credits) ENGL1112 Literature & Composition II (3 credits) MATH1131 College Mathematics I or MATH 1141 Mathematical Methods (3 credits) MIS1135 Intro to Computers (3 credits) Liberal Arts and Sciences (27 credits). Students are exposed to social, scientific, aesthetic, moral and religious ideas. Humanities (18 credits). Courses in four areas such as: Cultural Arts or Film Fine Arts Literature History Philosophy Social Sciences (6 credits ). Courses in two areas such as: Economics Psychology Sociology Natural Sciences (3 credits). A course in one of the following areas: Life Sciences Earth and Planetary Sciences Physics University Core (6 credits). CORE 1001 Perspectives on the Individual CORE 3004 Global Issues Free Electives (15-18 credits). Students should consult with their advisor for help in selecting from the many varied course offerings. Electives can be chosen to form a specialization in business or public service administration. Certain courses may be important in the development of an upper-division major. Students at Petrocelli College are permitted to take select electives as part of the AA undergraduate program from varied course offerings including: cybersecurity, health and human resources, general science, data analytics, digital media, business, public administration, applied technology and more. Program learning outcomes. Each college program has identified outcome measures that indicate whether students are successful in meeting the specific outcomes for the program. The following are outcome measures that will be assessed for the AA program at Petrocelli College: Communication: An FDU graduate will demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate in oral and written form using technology as a tool to enhance presentations when appropriate. Critical Thinking: An FDU graduate will demonstrate the ability to use critical thinking skills to understand and solve problems from a variety of perspectives and in a global context. Analytic Understanding: An understanding of basic mathematical tools and principles. AA For High School Graduates. FDU is New Jersey’s only private university to offer a comprehensive, full-time associate degree program for recent high school graduates. Leading to the Associate of Arts degree, this full-time program of study offers the personal support and attention of a smaller college environment. As an AA student, you can take full advantage of University resources and activities — academic, social, cultural and recreational — that are available to FDU undergraduates. Upon successful completion of the program, you can transfer seamlessly into many of the nearly 100 undergraduate majors and concentrations offered at the University’s Metropolitan Campus (Teaneck, NJ) or Florham Campus (Madison, NJ). As a graduate of the program, you’ll automatically receive an annually renewable $4,000 Alumni Award to continue your studies at FDU. AA Programs for Latino Students Latino Promise Program HACER Contact Information Dr. Francisco Parra, Asst. Director, In-Person Undergraduate Programs 201.692.2740 [email protected] Course Descriptions. CORE1001   Persp on Individual   3 credits CORE1001 The purpose of this course is to stimulate personal reflection by carefully examining situations in which individuals struggle to come to grips with some very important features of self--integrity, purity of heart, the ability to make choices. Individuals seek to find meaning in their consciousness of their own mortality and to forge understandings of themselves through consciousness of their relation to nature. The effects of genetics, internal conflict, the totalitarian state and social prejudice pose challenges to the very survival of the individual self, but the challenges show individuals' courage to grow and to survive. Readings include Plato's Apology and Crito, Gilgamesh, Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Wiesel's Night and Haley's The Autobiography of Malcolm X. CORE3004   Global Issues   3 credits CORE3004 This capstone course of The University Core sequence examines three topics- global economics, the environment, and world governance/ citizenship. Critical thinking skills are brought to bear on values at issue in each of these areas. ENGL1111   Literature and Composition I   3 credits ENGL1111 Principles of grammar, rhetoric and style; expository writing; introduction to literary forms, especially short fiction. Prerequisite to all other English courses. Fall, Spring ENGL1112   Literature and Composition II   3 credits ENGL1112 Expository writing; literary criticism; introduction to literary forms, especially drama, poetry and the novel; research techniques. Fall, Spring MATH1131   College Mathematics I   3 credits MATH1131 Set theory, number sets, coordinate geometry, matrices, number theory. Fall, Spring MATH1141   Intro to Mathematical Methods   3 credits MATH1141 Linear and nonlinear equations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, simple and compound interest, annuities, matrices and simultaneous equations, sets, introduction to calculus. Fall, Spring MIS1135   Introduction to Computers   3 credits MIS1135 An overview of computers. Topics include hardware, software components,word processing, spreadsheets, databases, e-mail and the Internet.
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Result 8
TitleWhat is an AA Degree? | SNHU
Urlhttps://www.snhu.edu/about-us/newsroom/liberal-arts/what-is-an-associate-of-arts-degree
DescriptionAn Associate of Arts (AA) degree can give you the broad-based education and in-demand career skills you need to reach your personal and professional goals
DateOct 20, 2021
Organic Position8
H1What is an Associate of Arts Degree?
H2Apply Now
Online Students
International Students
Campus Students
What is an Associate of Arts Degree Program Really Like?
How Many Credit Hours for an AA Degree?
What Can You Study in an AA Degree Program?
Which is Better, an AA or an AS Degree?
What is an Associate of Arts Degree Used For?
What Jobs Can You Get With an Associate of Arts Degree?
Is an Associate of Arts Degree Worth It?
What Bachelor’s Degree Can I Get With an Associate in Arts?
Why Earn an Associate of Arts Degree?
What is an Associate of Arts Degree?
What Can You Do with a Communications Major?
What is a Liberal Arts Degree and What Can You Do With It?
H3AA in Liberal Arts
AA in Digital Photography
H2WithAnchorsApply Now
Online Students
International Students
Campus Students
What is an Associate of Arts Degree Program Really Like?
How Many Credit Hours for an AA Degree?
What Can You Study in an AA Degree Program?
Which is Better, an AA or an AS Degree?
What is an Associate of Arts Degree Used For?
What Jobs Can You Get With an Associate of Arts Degree?
Is an Associate of Arts Degree Worth It?
What Bachelor’s Degree Can I Get With an Associate in Arts?
Why Earn an Associate of Arts Degree?
What is an Associate of Arts Degree?
What Can You Do with a Communications Major?
What is a Liberal Arts Degree and What Can You Do With It?
BodyWhat is an Associate of Arts Degree? An Associate of Arts or AA Degree is a two-year undergraduate degree program requiring the completion of 60 credit hours. An AA offers a foundation of general education and career skills in subjects such as social sciences and liberal arts. An AA degree can boost your earning potential and help you pursue a more advanced degree. Danielle Gagnon October 20, 2021 Associate Degree Types If you’re ready to start a new career or want to advance in your current field, gaining a broad-based education through an Associate of Arts program could help you reach your goals. But what is an Associate of Arts degree, and what can you do with one? An Associate of Arts (AA) degree is one of the most common types of two-year degree programs. It offers a strong foundation of general education courses in subjects like writing, humanities and social science and also provides key career skills. “The AA degree prepares students with skills that 21st-century employers seek in job candidates, like communication, critical thinking, quantitative reasoning and technological literacy,” said Calliope Pappadakis, a general education instructor at Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU). Earning an AA degree can give you the boost you need to start an exciting career across many fields, including social services, business, retail and more. If you’re ready to kickstart your career, an Associate of Arts degree could help you reach your goals. What is an Associate of Arts Degree Program Really Like? AA degree programs are designed for students who have achieved a high school diploma or equivalent and want to advance in their current careers, start new careers or lay a foundation for their future education. Because associate degrees are typically two-year programs, they can help you get the knowledge and skills you need to start your career faster than a bachelor’s degree program. While an associate degree is more affordable than a bachelor's degree, cost can vary by university and a student’s transfer credits. While a two-year program is more accessible financial aid is available for students working towards an associate degree. “The AA degree might be a better choice for someone who is not ready to commit to the four-year degree, even if they are considering it in their long-term goals,” said Pappadakis. “The AA degree helps you get your foot in the door, both professionally and educationally.” How Many Credit Hours for an AA Degree? Associate degree programs typically require 60 total credits. Since an undergraduate course is usually worth three credits, a 60-credit degree program translates into 20 courses. These courses are traditionally completed over the span of two years. So, what is an Associate of Arts degree program really going to take to complete? The actual number of courses required and the time it takes to finish an AA degree can vary significantly from student to student. Because more students are balancing work and family obligations with their education, a growing number of online associate degree programs offer more flexibility to earn a degree at your own pace. If you're working full-time while pursuing your degree, it may take you longer than two years to complete the program. While not typically required for AA degree programs, gaining real-world learning experience through internships may also add additional credit hours to your degree. But while some students may take longer than two years to complete an AA program, others can earn their degree even faster. Because general education courses make up a large portion of the Associate of Arts program, students with past educational experience can often apply transfer credits toward their program requirements. Some degree programs may even offer credit for professional experience, said Pappadakis. What Can You Study in an AA Degree Program? A wide variety of Associate of Arts degree programs are available to help you reach your personal career goals. Two examples of AA degree programs include liberal arts and digital photography. AA in Liberal Arts. In a liberal arts associate degree program, you can get the general education and career skills you need to seek entry-level jobs in business, social services, administration or management positions. You’ll get an introduction to arts and culture and begin to better understand your place in the world around you. This broad-based degree program can help you gain valuable writing, computational and technical skills as you explore a variety of subject areas, including: Humanities and history Social and behavioral sciences Technology and math You can also gain important critical thinking and problem-solving skills as you learn to analyze issues from all angles, research solutions and communicate your findings to a variety of audiences. AA in Digital Photography. With a digital photography associate degree, you can combine the benefits of a liberal arts education with essential technical and artistic photography skills. Along with general education courses in writing, communication and social sciences, you can explore design theory, learn how to use light and color and gain key post-production editing skills to process digital images. Other topics of study may include: Media communication Visual literacy History of photography If you dream of running your own photography studio, an Associate of Arts degree can also provide you with business knowledge to help you get your career up and running after graduation. No matter what you choose to study in an AA degree program, you’ll have the opportunity to explore a wide variety of topics and gain valuable skills through general education courses. Associate of Arts degree programs also typically include several elective courses. This means you can tailor your degree to your particular interests and career goals and graduate with the knowledge and skills you need to seek your dream job. Which is Better, an AA or an AS Degree? If you’re considering an AA degree, you may be wondering about other associate degrees and if some are better than others. There are two primary types of associate degrees available: an Associate of Arts (AA) and an Associate of Science (AS). An AA degree typically focuses on liberal arts subjects, including social sciences, humanities, design and more. Developing career skills is a focus of AA degree programs, and students can go on to many entry-level positions in human services, communications and administrative roles. An AS degree is also a two-year program. While there is still a focus on liberal arts subjects through general education courses, degree-specific courses typically focus on business, technology or practical sciences, depending on the specific program. Deciding which type of associate degree is right for you is less about one program being better than the other and more about how they each prepare you to reach your personal and professional goals, said Pappadakis. “The AA and AS are both valuable degrees as they strengthen students’ real-world skills and prepare students for both personal and professional success,” she said. “Both degrees offer students the opportunity to gain skills that are valuable in today’s workforce, and both prepare students for a new career or job advancement.” It’s important to explore the types of jobs you can get with an associate degree and how they align with your professional goals to determine which program is right for you. What is an Associate of Arts Degree Used For? AA degrees provide a strong foundation of career skills that employers are looking for across many industries. Earning an associate degree could help boost your lifetime earnings and employment prospects. “The AA degree is a stepping stone for students looking to grow in a career where their current employer requires some postsecondary education,” said Pappadakis. Through the broad-based education of an AA program, you can develop skills such as: Critical thinking Problem-solving Decision making Communication Collaboration While the specific jobs you can get with an AA degree will vary depending on your particular area of study, these skills can help you stand out to employers and get a rewarding job across many industries. What Jobs Can You Get With an Associate of Arts Degree? . According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), possible jobs for AA degree holders include: Administrative assistant: Manage business operations and keep an office running smoothly by assisting with paperwork, scheduling meetings and being the office's first point of contact. In 2020, administrative assistants earned a median annual salary of $40,990, according to BLS data. Customer service representative: Help customers online, over the phone or in person by answering questions and responding to complaints about a business and its products or services. According to BLS, the median wage for customer service representatives in 2020 was $17.23 per hour – an annual wage of about $35,000 for full-time employees. Food service manager: Oversee the daily operations of a bar, restaurant, hotel or cafeteria. If you've worked in the service industry before, management positions can help you advance your career. Food service managers earned a median annual wage of $56,590 in 2020, according to BLS data. Information clerk: Perform clerical tasks such as preparing routine reports, bills, claims, payments or orders for an organization. Manage records for a business and provide information to company employees and customers. According to BLS, information clerks earned a median annual salary of $36,920 in 2020. Social and human service assistant: Provide services to individuals and families, assist social workers and other human service professionals and connect clients with community services. In 2020, social and human service assistants earned a median annual wage of $35,960, according to BLS data. Photographer: Use your technical expertise and creativity to produce, edit and preserve images that tell a story or record an event. Jobs are available in aerial photography, commercial photography, portrait photography, event photography and other types of photography. According to BLS data, photographers earned a median wage of $19.85 per hour – or about $41,288 annually for full-time workers. Preschool teacher: Educate and care for children in preschools, daycare centers and other similar settings. Teach language, motor and social skills and provide for children's health and safety. In 2020, preschool teachers earned a median salary of $31,930. [Note: some states may require licensure or other credentials for preschool teachers.] Is an Associate of Arts Degree Worth It? In many fields, an associate degree is enough to get started in entry-level positions. If you already have professional experience in your chosen field, earning an AA degree may also be enough to pursue higher-level leadership positions and advance your career. “More and more employers are requiring some form of postsecondary education, and in many cases, a two-year degree is sufficient and offers graduates an opportunity to advance in t According to the BLS, associate degree holders earned about 20% more per week in 2020 than workers with only a high school diploma. Associate degree holders also experienced lower unemployment rates, at 7.1% for associate degree holders compared to 9% for high school graduates without any college experience.heir career or launch into a new one,” said Pappadakis. Jobs for associate degree holders are also growing. According to BLS data, jobs requiring at least an associate degree are expected to rise 10.5% from 2020-2030. An AA degree can also set you up for success in a four-year bachelor’s degree program, which can help you advance your education and career even further.  “The AA degree can serve as a meaningful milestone to someone who is considering a bachelor’s degree, as it is the equivalent to the first two years of the four-year degree,” said Pappadakis. What Bachelor’s Degree Can I Get With an Associate in Arts? An AA degree is a great first step toward almost any bachelor’s degree. Because a large portion of the AA degree consists of general education courses, you’ll likely be able to transfer those credits to a bachelor’s degree program. “Students can transfer quite easily into bachelor’s programs should they decide to in the future,” said Pappadakis. Depending on the bachelor’s program you’re seeking, you may need to take some prerequisite classes before officially beginning to work toward your degree. But in most cases, you’ll be able to start your bachelor’s degree with your general education courses already completed. This means you can get started on your program courses faster and graduate with your four-year degree sooner. And if you end up pausing your education before completing the four-year degree, you’ll still have your Associate of Arts credential to support your career. According to BLS data, people with an associate degree have better earning and professional potential than workers who have taken some college courses without completing any degree. Why Earn an Associate of Arts Degree? Now that you've explored the ins and outs of an AA degree, you may still be wondering if this educational path is right for you. So, what is an Associate of Arts degree really good for? According to Pappadakis, there are many direct career benefits for students. “Many jobs today require an associate degree, so for someone looking to join the workforce, the AA degree can increase their marketability and job candidacy,” said Pappadakis. Perhaps you don’t need a four-year degree to advance your career in your chosen field. Or maybe you’re just not sure what your calling is and aren’t ready to commit to a four-year degree. No matter your reasons for pursuing a two-year degree program, an AA degree is a credential that can open many doors. “Students gain skills that are in high demand today, like communication, intercultural knowledge and skills that are part of lifelong learning and empower students to take control of their own learning and explore the world with curiosity and reflection,” said Pappadakis. Consider how an associate degree can fit into your life. Danielle Gagnon is a freelance writer focused on higher education. Connect with her on LinkedIn. What is an Associate of Arts Degree? . October 20, 2021 Interested in starting a new job or advancing in your current field? An Associate of Arts (AA) degree can give you the broad-based education and in-demand career skills you need to reach your goals. Learn more about earning an AA degree and what you can do with one. What Can You Do with a Communications Major? . October 07, 2021 A communications major is a great way to prepare yourself for a career in fields ranging from media relations and journalism to marketing, corporate communications and many more. What is a Liberal Arts Degree and What Can You Do With It? . October 04, 2021 Liberal arts majors are strong communicators, who bring creativity and critical thinking to the table. If you're willing to be flexible in your search and smart about branding yourself, you can find there are many opportunities.
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Result 9
TitleAssociate Degrees - What is an Associate Degree? | TheBestSchools
Urlhttps://thebestschools.org/degrees/what-is-an-associates-degree/
DescriptionAn associate degree can mean increased pay and career opportunities. Explore typical AA degree types, requirements, cost, and benefits in our guide
DateDec 8, 2021
Organic Position9
H1What Is an Associate Degree?
H2Online Associate Degree Programs
Featured Online Associate Degree Programs
How to Choose an Online Associate Degree?
Types of Associate Degrees
Admission Requirements
Requirements for an Associate Degree
Cost of an Associate Degree
Common Questions About Associate Degrees
Learn more, do more
Popular with our students
Take the next step toward your future with online learning
H3Are you ready to discover your college program?
Bachelor's Degrees Vs. Associate Degrees
H2WithAnchorsOnline Associate Degree Programs
Featured Online Associate Degree Programs
How to Choose an Online Associate Degree?
Types of Associate Degrees
Admission Requirements
Requirements for an Associate Degree
Cost of an Associate Degree
Common Questions About Associate Degrees
Learn more, do more
Popular with our students
Take the next step toward your future with online learning
BodyWhat Is an Associate Degree? by TBS Staff December 8, 2021 • 6 min read thebestschools.org is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site. Are you ready to discover your college program? Thinking About an Associate Degrees Before a Bachelor Degree Associate degrees are foundational degrees that can help students achieve academic and professional goals in less time than it takes to earn bachelor's degrees. An associate degree is often used as a building block toward a bachelor's. Transfer credits from a two-year associate program can count toward general education, core, and elective classes for the four-year degree. Community colleges, which frequently charge lower tuition than four-year schools, may deliver these associate degrees online. Associate programs can also qualify students for entry-level careers in fields like healthcare, education, and public service. Preschool teachers, for instance, only need an associate degree. In other fields, an associate degree can mean increased pay and career opportunities, even if the job does not require a degree. Plumbers, for instance, do not need a degree, but companies may prefer applicants with an associate. In 2018, associate graduates earned a median pay rate of $132 more per week than individuals with only a high school diploma. Online Associate Degree Programs. Some online associate degrees require general coursework that transfers into bachelor's programs. Others have focused curriculums that lead to immediate careers. At most institutions, online and on-campus programs are taught by the same faculty, but virtual delivery allows students to complete assignments on their own schedules, without visiting campus. This means that distance programs can offer flexibility without sacrificing quality. Online programs may also cost less than in-person options, especially since degree-seekers do not have traveling costs. Featured Online Associate Degree Programs. How to Choose an Online Associate Degree? Students should consider time requirements when choosing associate degree programs. Learners who want to earn their degrees quickly, for instance, should avoid programs with high credit requirements. Additionally, degree-seekers with hectic schedules should choose asynchronous programs, since synchronous options require set attendance times. An online associate program should prepare for career goals, and all program costs should not exceed the student's budget. Whether students plan to transfer to a bachelor's program or pursue immediate careers, they can benefit from an associate degree. Bachelor's Degrees Vs. Associate Degrees. An associate degree explores the most fundamental aspects of a subject over a two-year period. Bachelor's degrees build on this knowledge and often take four years to complete. For instance, an associate degree may include an oral communication class, while bachelor's curriculums advance into cross-cultural and organizational communication coursework. Students can pursue associate degrees at community colleges and, in some fields, earn employment with no additional education. For instance, preschool teachers only need an associate. Other careers, however, require a degree from a four-year college or university, such as K-12 educators. Both degrees include general education requirements and major courses. Learners at both degree levels may qualify for financial aid. Types of Associate Degrees. Students can typically complete certificatesand associate degree programs in two years. Certificate programs often include only field-specific courses, while associate of arts (AA) and associate of science (AS) programs also require general education classes. Learners can transfer associate coursework into bachelor's programs for quicker graduation, especially if their associate school participates in transfer agreements with four-year institutions. Associate degrees can also prepare learners for certain career roles, like preschool teacher or paralegal, without additional education. true Associate of Arts (AA) AA degrees cover liberal arts subjects, like humanities, sociology, communications, and English. Programs usually focus on general education to prepare for transfer into liberal arts bachelor's programs, but they also offer specialty concentration courses in areas like early childhood education, social work, or digital photography. Students can finish these associate degrees in two years, with possible careers including teacher assistants, desktop publishers, photographers, and social and human service assistants. true Associate of Science (AS) AS programs incorporate liberal arts courses, but require more scientific and technical coursework than AA degrees. AS programs include general studies curriculums that help learners transfer into different bachelor's programs, but they also offer focuses like accounting, paralegal studies, business administration, information technology, and pre-dental education, which prepare for entry into specific bachelor's programs. AS students can graduate in two years and pursue a variety of careers, including as paralegals, web developers, bookkeepers, and information clerks. true Associate of Applied Science (AAS) While AAS coursework can transfer into a four-year program, it is more common for AAS graduates to pursue work after graduation without earning a bachelor's degree. In this respect, these degrees are sometimes considered terminal. These two-year, career-centered programs prepare for jobs in healthcare, engineering, construction, or home repair, including positions like dental hygienist, surgical technologist, welder, hairdresser, or construction equipment operator. Some of these careers also require a license or certification. Admission Requirements. Admission into college associate degree programs requires a high school diploma or equivalent. Colleges and universities may also expect learners to have a specific minimum GPA and to complete their state's pre-college curriculum, which often includes English, math, and science courses. Candidates without college credit may also need ACT or SAT scores. Other admission materials can include personal statements, writing samples, and recommendation letters. Departments may also expect applicants to fill out the FAFSA. Requirements for an Associate Degree. Associate degrees require around 60 credits, which full-time students can complete in two years. These credits frequently include general education coursework in English, math, social sciences, and natural sciences. Associate learners may also take classes in public speaking and computers, plus concentration-specific coursework. For example, accounting students may need classes in federal taxation and business law, and education students may take child development and literacy courses. Schools can also require college introduction classes, which familiarize students with higher education and help them develop study skills. Beyond the usual papers, exams, and projects, some programs require field experiences, clinicals, labs, practicums, or internships. These requirements are particularly common in healthcare programs, like medical assistant or nursing degrees. Similarly, early childhood education programs may require practicums in preschools or childcares, and paralegal students may need to complete an internship. Departments often insist on minimum GPAs for graduation. Cost of an Associate Degree. Students may need to take out student loans with payment plans in order to afford tuition, which can lead to student loan default or forced pauses in studying for candidates who fall behind on tuition payments. To help manage costs like tuition and textbooks, degree-seekers should fill out a FAFSA to apply for financial aid, which can give them access to grants, scholarships, and work-study programs. Readers can visit this page for more information on financial assistance. Typically, you don't want your cost of attendance to exceed your financial aid award, though a reasonable out-of-pocket amount is sometimes acceptable. Public schools are usually cheaper than private institutions. In-state programs can also cost less than out-of-state options, and online students may also pay less for tuition, though they often need to pay technology fees. Students should consider all of these factors when choosing programs. Common Questions About Associate Degrees. Are Associate Degrees Hard? Associate degrees introduce learners to foundational concepts related to their disciplines, as well as general education subjects. These courses are usually harder than high school classes, but not as in-depth as upper-level or graduate curriculums. How many credit hours is an associate degree? Time frames and credit requirements vary, but degree-seekers usually graduate in two years. Individuals who complete AP courses in high school may graduate more quickly. Is an Associate Degree Worth It? For some fields, an associate degree meets the criteria for certifications, licenses, or entry-level careers. Other professions require higher degrees, which students can pursue after earning a college associate degree, though they may also go directly into a bachelor's program. Is an Online Associate Degree Worth It? Virtual learning lets students complete assignments on their own schedules and eliminates travel time and cost. These details allow learners to advance in their careers while managing day-to-day responsibilities. What Can You Do With an Associate Degree? Associate degrees can qualify individuals for many careers, including as dental hygienists, preschool teachers, paralegals, MRI technologists, and web developers. Graduates can also transfer into bachelor's programs. Learn more, do more. More topic-relevant resources to expand your knowledge. Popular with our students. Highly informative resources to keep your education journey on track. Take the next step toward your future with online learning. Discover schools with the programs and courses you’re interested in, and start learning today.
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Result 10
TitleAssociate Degree Programs | Coastline College
Urlhttps://www.coastline.edu/academics/associate-degree-programs/index.php
Description
Date
Organic Position10
H1Associate Degree Programs
H2Earn Your Associate Degree at Coastline
Associates in Arts or Science (AA / AS)
Associates to Bachelor's Online
Associate Degrees for Transfer
Focus On Your Path at Coastline
A.A. and A.S. Degrees Requirements
January 1, 2022 - January 31, 2022
January 3, 2022 - May 28, 2022
January 14, 2022
February 1, 2022 - February 28, 2022
H3Additional Graduation Requirements
Student Events: January
Transfer Events
Food Pantry Pickups
Student Events: February
H2WithAnchorsEarn Your Associate Degree at Coastline
Associates in Arts or Science (AA / AS)
Associates to Bachelor's Online
Associate Degrees for Transfer
Focus On Your Path at Coastline
A.A. and A.S. Degrees Requirements
January 1, 2022 - January 31, 2022
January 3, 2022 - May 28, 2022
January 14, 2022
February 1, 2022 - February 28, 2022
BodyAssociate Degree Programs Start the Transfer Process or Kickstart Your Career Earn Your Associate Degree at Coastline. Associate degrees in arts or science (AA or AS) are some of the most popular offerings at Coastline. That's because of the incredible flexibility we provide. Certain AA and AS programs are designed for transfer to four-year institutions. Coastline even has collaborative partnerships to get you on the fast track to a bachelor's degree. But transferring is just one of your options. An associate degree can also launch your career, or lead to that big promotion. Associates in Arts or Science (AA / AS). Our college's AA and AS degrees are designed to provide students with the necessary skills to compete successfully in a culturally diverse and global job market. Associates to Bachelor's Online. The Associate to Bachelor's Online program a.k.a. Learning 1st is a collaborative partnership among four nationally recognized, regionally-accredited online institutions and Coastline College Associate Degrees for Transfer. Students who receive an Associate Degree for Transfer are eligible for admission with junior standing into the California State University (CSU) system. Focus On Your Path at Coastline. Don't know what path may be right for you? Contact our Counseling Department! Academic Counseling A.A. and A.S. Degrees Requirements. The following requirements for AA and AS degrees are in accordance with the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges and the Board of Trustees of the Coast Community College District. General Education Talk to an advisor. Requirements depend on you whether you intend to transfer and, if so, to the UC or CSU system, or an independent college. Contact the Counseling Department for more information. Major Field of Study Complete required coursework in your chosen major. All coursework must be completed with a C grade or higher. Units Complete at least 60 units of acceptable college work with a minimum of 12 Coastline units. Electives Complete additional courses to meet the 60 unit requirement (must be AA or AS applicable). Global & Multicultural Studies Complete at least 2.5 units from Global and Multicultural Studies: Anthropology C100, C150; Art C100, C101, C103, C104, C105, C109, C135, C136, C137, C138, C175, C233, C235, C236, C237, C260, C261,C262, C265 Criminal Justice C148 English C144, C145 Foreign Language—any over C100 Geography C185 Gerontology C140 History C115, C122, C124, C128, C130, C160, C165, C180, C185 Humanities C100; Human Services C100; Music C103 Philosophy C100, C113 Sociology C130 Additional Graduation Requirements. Achieve an overall grade point average of 2.0 or higher (from all colleges). Achieve a grade point average of 2.0 or higher at Coastline. Forward all official college transcripts from other schools to Coastline. Be in good academic standing (i.e., not on probation and/or disqualification) during the semester of your intended graduation. Petition for the degree at the beginning of the semester when you will complete your final requirements. Associate Degree Programs Associate Degrees for Transfer Associate in Arts or Science See All Highlighted Events January 1, 2022 - January 31, 2022. Student Events: January. various. January 3, 2022 - May 28, 2022. Transfer Events. various. January 14, 2022. Food Pantry Pickups. 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM. February 1, 2022 - February 28, 2022. Student Events: February. various.
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Result 11
TitleOnline A.A. Degrees - Seminole State College
Urlhttps://www.seminolestate.edu/online/degrees/aa-degrees
DescriptionOnline A.A. Degrees Available at Seminole State College of Florida
Date
Organic Position11
H1Online A.A. Degrees
H2Contact
An Error Occurred
H3
H2WithAnchorsContact
An Error Occurred
BodyOnline A.A. Degrees Seminole State offers all required General Education courses via online, allowing students to earn an Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree entirely online.Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree - General Education RequirementsThe A.A. is the two-year college degree program designed for students who wish to transfer into a baccalaureate program. The College also offers online prerequisite courses for many baccalaureate degree majors. The College Catalog provides a complete listing of A.A. prerequisite courses for each major.Please note: While coursework for these programs can be completed entirely online, some courses may require students to come to campus for orientations and/or exams. Alternate arrangements may be made for students who cannot physically come to campus to complete an orientation or exam. Such exceptions are granted on a case-by-case basis at the discretion of the course professor. For more information about program requisites and distance learning course offerings, consult the Seminole State College Catalog or schedule an appointment with an advisor.  Visit the Online Course Schedule for more information about specific distance learning course requirements. Contact. eLearning Office407.708.2424L-122 S/LM CampusNeed help with Canvas?Submit a Service Request (ticket) for Assistancecomplaint resolution | consumer disclosure | state authorization   An Error Occurred. Close
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Result 12
TitleA.A. and A.S. – What’s the Difference in These Degrees?
Urlhttps://myonline.centralchristian.edu/news/2016/07/12/associate-arts-and-associate-science-%E2%80%93-whats-difference
DescriptionBoth degrees are equally effective at preparing students for the next step in their education. But there are some differences. Here's what you need to know
DateJul 12, 2016
Organic Position12
H1Associate of Arts and Associate of Science – What’s the Difference?
H2Associate of Arts Degrees
Associate of Science Degrees
H3
H2WithAnchorsAssociate of Arts Degrees
Associate of Science Degrees
BodyAssociate of Arts and Associate of Science – What’s the Difference? Associate of Arts and Associate of Science – What’s the Difference? by CCCK Online July 12, 2016 Associate of Arts vs. Associate of Science Both the associate of arts degree (A.A.) and the associate of science degree (A.S.) signify that a student has completed coursework comparable to the first few years of a bachelor's degree. Both degrees require roughly the same number of credit hours, and both degrees are transferable to a four-year college or university to earn a bachelor's degree. A.A. and A.S. degrees are also both equally effective at adequately preparing students for the next step in their education. They are both primarily transfer degrees, with neither requiring specific technical training. However, a few key differences exist as to the considerations a student should take into account when deciding on which postsecondary education to further pursue. Associate of Arts Degrees. An A.A. degree typically includes a liberal arts and science background, with greater importance placed on the humanities. It shows that a student learned about: Social sciences  Humanities Literature Performing arts Fine arts in general A student seeking a bachelor's degree in any of those fields should seek an A.A. An associate of arts degree is the most general postsecondary degree. Therefore, it is also the most easily transferable. Associate of Science Degrees. Similarly, an A.S. degree also includes a liberal arts and science background, but it places a larger emphasis on the fields of math and science. Most students who earn an associate of science degree go on to pursue a B.S. in a science-related field. Compared to an A.A., an A.S. usually has fewer general education requirements. For further reading, check out Everything You Need to Know About an Associate of Arts Degree. Request More Info Chat Back to top
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Result 13
TitleAssociate of Arts Degree in Liberal Arts | AA Liberal Arts
Urlhttps://www.adelphi.edu/program/undergraduate/liberal-arts/
DescriptionFind out how Adelphi University's adult education programs can put you on the fast track for success. Earn your associate's degree in liberal arts today!
Date
Organic Position13
H1AA (Associate of Arts) in Liberal Arts
H2Why Earn Your Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts?
Why Earn An AA in Liberal Arts At Adelphi?
Exceptional Hands-On Learning (optional)
Program Info
Application Requirements
Transfer and Life Experience Credits
Related Programs
Awards & Recognition
Admissions
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhy Earn Your Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts?
Why Earn An AA in Liberal Arts At Adelphi?
Exceptional Hands-On Learning (optional)
Program Info
Application Requirements
Transfer and Life Experience Credits
Related Programs
Awards & Recognition
Admissions
BodyAA (Associate of Arts) in Liberal Arts Degree Granted AA Degree Level Undergraduate Location Garden City School College of Professional & Continuing Studies Request Info Apply Now Explore This Section Close Give yourself a powerful career boost by building a strong foundation in the liberal arts. Why Earn Your Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts? Are you planning to earn a bachelor’s degree down the road but want to jump-start your professional growth right away? Adelphi’s AA in Liberal Arts is a fast, accessible and affordable pathway to success. This program will provide you with a well-rounded education in the arts, humanities, sciences and social sciences as you sharpen your writing, thinking, research and communication skills. Many students in the AA program take advantage of fast-track admission to a bachelor’s degree through Adelphi’s College of Professional and Continuing Studies (CPCS) or other colleges and schools at Adelphi in areas ranging from business to health sciences, social sciences, social work and criminal justice. Why Earn An AA in Liberal Arts At Adelphi? Study while balancing work, family and other obligations with convenient, flexible course schedules that are offered both online and on campus. Busy adult learners also have access to a wide range of academic support services and a dedicated team of advisers. Plan the fastest route to graduation by earning credit for prior college-level experiences (including CLEP exams and credits for life experience) on your résumé. Many traditional associate’s degrees do not offer this important benefit, which reflects Adelphi’s commitment to valuing the unique skills and background every returning student brings to the table. A student who successfully applies for the maximum 34 life experience credits can complete this degree program in just two semesters. Enjoy personalized attention in small classes from faculty who are recognized for their outstanding teaching and scholarship as well as their real-world industry experience. 100%* * Adelphi University Career Outcomes Survey: Class of 2019 of our 2019 liberal arts graduates were employed or continuing their education within six months of graduation Adelphi University Career Outcomes Survey: Class of 2019 Outcomes Report “Through engaged conversations, I feel privileged to come to know the students in CPCS. The CPCS students bring much depth to the subject matter as they discuss their travels, service, professional careers and family interactions. These narratives and rich discussions are of utmost importance as we interact and communicate across multiple platforms.” Josefa Pace ’05, PhD, Senior Adjunct Faculty, Writing Exceptional Hands-On Learning (optional). Students in the program benefit from small classes, personalized attention from faculty and access to Adelphi’s labs and learning studios. The program culminates in a capstone experience that provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills to employers by engaging in real-world problem-solving. Program Info. Courses & Requirements Search All Courses Plan of Study for the AA in Liberal Arts Application Requirements. The College of Professional and Continuing Studies was founded to serve the nontraditional and adult student, and its admission policy reflects a commitment to enrolling students who may not have had the opportunity to complete their degree in a traditional undergraduate program. Although past academic records are required and reviewed, more focus is placed on a student’s present motivation to earn a degree than on previous academic performance. An SAT score is not required. The Office of University Admissions makes every effort to notify candidates of their admission decision approximately three weeks after a completed application is received. Admissions Nontraditional Student Admissions Meet Our Counselors Transfer and Life Experience Credits. Want to learn more about how your prior credits and life experiences can count toward your degree, or create a customized plan for finishing your degree that meets your unique needs? Schedule an appointment with an adviser today Related Programs. Liberal Arts: Pre-Nursing (AA) Liberal Studies (BA) Awards & Recognition. U.S. News & World Report: Social Mobility Adelphi is committed to transforming students’ lives. Our U.S. News & World Report ranking as a Top Performer on Social Mobility reflects our success in meeting that goal. Awards & Rankings Abound Adelphi’s College of Professional and Continuing Studies ranks among Abound’s 2021 Top Adult Degree Programs for meeting the needs of non-traditional students in accessibility, affordability, acceleration and advancement. Awards & Rankings Colleges of Distinction Adelphi University has been recognized as a Career Development College for the exceptional way in which our institution is equipping students with the skills to succeed in their lifelong career journey. Career Development Excellence U.S. News & World Report U.S. News & World Report ranked Adelphi University as a Best College nationwide in the National Universities category, for the fourth consecutive year. Best College Admissions . Contact E-mail [email protected] Phone Number 516.877.3050 Fax 516.877.3039 More Info Website Location Nexus Building First Floor Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram Site Menu Adelphi University Close Quick Links Search Menu Close Adelphi University Explore Quick Links for COVID-19 Information COVID-19 Information Current Students Faculty Staff Parents & Families Alumni & Friends Local Community Resources for COVID-19 Information Tools Daily Health Screenings Messages to Campus (News) Admissions & Aid Updates ICE/SEVP Info COVID-19 Vaccine Upload Vaccination Documents Vaccine Info Resources A Safe Return to Campus COVID-19 Dashboard Dining Mobile App HR Working Remotely Guide Remote Learning Remote Technology Guide Self Check Form for Visitors Teaching Online Resources for Current Students Tools CLASS Moodle Email Academic opportunities Winter Intersession Academics Academic Calendar Academic Catalog Advisement & Mentoring Request a Transcript Course Search Course Registration General Education Requirements Library Learning Disability Support Learning & Writing Center (Tutoring) Registrar Financial Services Pay your Bill Refunds Scholarships & Grants Tuition & Financial Aid Student Consumer Info Student Life Athletics Clubs & Activities The Delphian (Student Newspaper) Dining Housing Interfaith Worship Student Government Association (SGA) Student Involvement (CSI) Recreation Resources Accessibility Office Availability of Employees Bookstore Career Services Campus Map Community Discounts Concerns and Resolutions Counseling & Support Diversity, Equity & Inclusion DEI Library Resources Emergency Notification (RAVE) Handshake / Job Search Health Services International Services LinkedIn Learning Panther Pantry Public Safety & Transportation Remote Learning Student Disclosures Technology Resources for Faculty Tools Moodle Email CLASS My Profile Academics Academic Calendar Academic Catalog Curriculog Library Navigate OARAA Provost Research & Sponsored Programs Resources Alice Brown Early Learning Center (Childcare) Brand & Style Guide Community Discounts Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Emergency Notification (RAVE) Faculty Payroll & Course Load Faculty Senate FCPE Human Resources Interfaith Worship LinkedIn Learning My Profile Public Safety & Transportation Technology News & Events Share Your News or Story University News University Events Resources for Staff Tools Email My Profile Resources Accounts Payable Alice Brown Early Learning Center (Childcare) Brand & Style Guide Benefits Community Discounts Concerns and Resolutions Contracts Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Emergency Notification (RAVE) Handshake / Post Jobs Human Resources Interfaith Worship LinkedIn Learning Public Safety & Transportation Technology News and Events Share Your News or Story University News University Events Resources for Parents & Families Tools Career Services High School Programs Parents & Families Info Tuition & Financial Aid Academics Academic Calendar FERPA General Education Requirements Registrar Financial Services Paying a Bill Refunds Scholarships & Grants Student Consumer Info Resources Accessibility Office Availability of Employees Bookstore Campus Map Concerns and Resolutions Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Handbooks & Brochures Health Services Parents & Families Association Public Safety & Transportation Technology News and Events Commencement Athletics Performing Arts Center University News University Events Resources for Alumni & Friends Tools Email Give Career Services Resources 125th Oral History Project Adelphi Gold Bookstore Discounts & Benefits Jobs at Adelphi Networking Order a Transcript News and Events Athletics Momentum Tour Performing Arts Center Share Your News or Story University News University Events Resources for Local Community Tools Athletics Campus Map Performing Arts Center High School Programs For Kids & Future College Students Alice Brown Early Learning Center (Childcare) Camps High School Programs Pre-College Programs Student Consumer Info For Art & Culture Lovers Performing Arts Center Art Exhibitions For Fitness Adult Fitness Program Gym Membership For Lifelong Learners Continuing Education & Professional Development Community Auditing Program For Those Who Need Support Breast Cancer Hotline & Support Program Hy Weinberg Center for Communication Disorders Institute for Parenting Literacy Center Mental Health Services Social Training Center For Those Giving Back to the Community Become a Mentor Center for Nonprofit Leadership For Vendors Accounts Payable For All Bookstore Jobs at Adelphi Reserve Event Space Share Your News or Story Menu Close You are now leaving the Adelphi University website... 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  • student consumer
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  • consumer info
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  • community discount
  • 3
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  • concern resolution
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  • health service
  • 3
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  • brown early
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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Result 14
TitleAssociate Degrees | SPS
Urlhttps://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/academics/associate-degrees.html
Description
Date
Organic Position14
H1Associate Degrees
H2Earn Your Associate Degree in a Supportive Learning Environment
Frequently Asked Questions
H3AAS in Business
AA in Liberal Arts
AAS in Health Administration
AAS in Information Systems Management
Once I receive my Associate how can I transfer into a Bachelor's program?
Can I transfer into a Bachelor's program while in the Associate program?
Does NYU SPS offer scholarships for Associate's degree candidates? If so, how can I apply?
How much does the Associate degree program cost?
Can I still apply for financial aid as an Associate candidate?
What Associate programs are available?
Can I transfer directly into a Bachelor’s degree when I’ve completed the Associate degree?
Are any Associate degree programs offered online?
Is the Associate degree program flexible so that I can maintain employment?
Will I be able to transfer college level courses and apply them to the Associate program?
How can I speak with a current Associate degree candidate or visit the school?
H2WithAnchorsEarn Your Associate Degree in a Supportive Learning Environment
Frequently Asked Questions
BodyAssociate Degrees Designed for students with fewer than 24 college credits, associate degrees provide a learning experience that gives you the academic and professional advantage. Earn Your Associate Degree in a Supportive Learning Environment. Our associate degrees are designed for individuals who could not take advantage of the opportunity to pursue a degree after high school, or who stopped out of college because of other responsibilities or financial obligations. The cost of tuition is surprisingly affordable—comparable to your local community college. Flexible day, evening, and online classes are available for those who are balancing the demands of life and work. A broad array of services—tutoring, academic advising, career counseling—are at your disposal. These programs are designed for students who have earned LESS THAN 24 transferable college credits. If you have earned more than 24 transferable college credits consider one of our bachelor's degrees.   APPLY TODAY Request Info AAS in Business . Build quantitative and reasoning skills, while exploring global economies and business practices. AA in Liberal Arts . Develop critical writing and analytical thinking skills, while developing interests and intellect. AAS in Health Administration . Prepare for roles in managing healthcare systems effectively and efficiently. AAS in Information Systems Management . Prepare to design, operate, and evaluate diverse technologies to meet organizational needs. Frequently Asked Questions. Once I receive my Associate how can I transfer into a Bachelor's program? . to expand content With the help of your academic advisor you will begin investigating the various seamless transfer pathways that are available to you. Before you have completed your Associate's degree, students in good academic standing are offered seamless transfer into a DAUS Bachelor's degree. Your academic advisor will provide a roadmap and work with you every step of the way. Can I transfer into a Bachelor's program while in the Associate program? to expand content Students typically complete an Associate degree before pursuing a Bachelor’s degree but it is not a requirement.  A student in good standing may declare intent to enroll in a Bachelor's degree once they have completed a minimum of 24 credits. Does NYU SPS offer scholarships for Associate's degree candidates? If so, how can I apply? to expand content Yes! We offer scholarship opportunities for new and continuing students. Most scholarships require an application and the completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®)  Visit  Undergraduate Financial Aid to learn more. How much does the Associate degree program cost? to expand content The Associate degree is offered at a deep discount.  Associate students pay approximately ⅓ the tuition of a Bachelor’s student. The cost of tuition is surprisingly affordable—comparable to your local community college. See tuition rates and fees here. Can I still apply for financial aid as an Associate candidate? to expand content Yes. Please see the NYU Financial Aid page for more information on financial aid. What Associate programs are available? to expand content Students can select one of the following Associate degrees: AA in Liberal Arts AAS in Business AAS in Information Systems Management AAS in Health Administration You can find detailed information on degree requirements here. Can I transfer directly into a Bachelor’s degree when I’ve completed the Associate degree? to expand content Seamless transfer into a DAUS Bachelors degree is available from all Associate degrees into the corresponding Bachelor’s degrees. Examples of pathways: AA in Liberal Arts to the BA in Social Science or Humanities AAS in Business to the BS in Leadership & Management Studies AAS in Information Systems Management to the BS in Information Systems Management AAS in Health Administration to the BS in Healthcare Administration Students must be in good academic standing at the time of the program change and have either completed the Associate degree or have attained a minimum of 24 credits toward the Associate degree. Are any Associate degree programs offered online? to expand content While you cannot complete the Associate degree entirely online, you might have the opportunity to engage in online coursework. Is the Associate degree program flexible so that I can maintain employment? to expand content Yes. DAUS offers evening, daytime, and online coursework with special sensitivity to students who work during the day. Most courses are offered at night and meet only once a week, to allow for more convenience in scheduling. Will I be able to transfer college level courses and apply them to the Associate program? to expand content Students can transfer up to 30 credits to the Associate’s degree (including transfer credits, AP credits, CLEP). We invite you to visit us on a Walk in Wednesday day or send your transcripts to [email protected] for further evaluation. Visit our Events calendar to RSVP for the next available Walk in Wednesday. How can I speak with a current Associate degree candidate or visit the school? to expand content Please visit our Events calendar to RSVP to an in person or virtual event. Join us for Walk-in Wednesday to have your transcripts evaluated and receive expedited admission decisions.
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  • student
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  • content
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  • bachelor degree
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  • 4
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  • 3
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  • associate program
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Result 15
TitleDifference between an A.A. & an A.S. - Helena College
Urlhttps://helenacollege.edu/student_support_center/advising/aa_as_dif.aspx
Description
Date
Organic Position15
H1Difference between an A.A. & an A.S
H2Resource Links
H3Minimum Requirements for A.A. and A.S
Distinction between the Two Degrees
Associate of Applied Science Degree
H2WithAnchorsResource Links
BodyDifference between an A.A. & an A.S. Helena College > Student Support Center > Academic Advising > Difference between an A.A. & an A.S. How do I determine what program to take? The Associate of Arts (A.A.) and Associate of Science (A.S.) degrees are general transfer degrees. Completion of either program indicates the student has completed a course of study equivalent to the first two years of a bachelor’s degree. Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees do not officially include a major or minor course of study; nevertheless, students do complete a 24 credit program of study option for either an A.A. or A.S. degree. Minimum Requirements for A.A. and A.S. Completion of 60 semester credit hours, 15 credits of which are at the 200 level. Completion of 36 credits in General Education and 24 Credits in a Program of Study. An overall GPA of 2.25 upon completion of the degree. A grade of “C-” or higher in each course in the program of study. Distinction between the Two Degrees. A: A.A. Degree (5+ credits in social science/humanities) Students seeking an A.A. degree must complete an additional 5+ credits in humanities/social science—these additional credits must include one foreign language course. B: A.S. Degree (5+ credits in math/science) Students seeking an A.S. degree must complete an additional 5+ credits in math/science. Students must complete the second half of one of the science sequences noted above. Associate of Applied Science Degree. The Helena College offers the Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree in Accounting Technology, Automotive Technology, Aviation Maintenance Technology, Computer Technology, Construction Technology, Diesel Technology, Electronics Technology, Fire and Rescue, Metals Technology, Nursing, Office Technology, Water Resources, and Welding Technology. The A.A.S. degree is awarded to any student satisfactorily completing a program as established by the College. The A.A.S. degree is not designed for transfer; however, graduates may be accepted into baccalaureate programs offered at several four-year institutions. A passing grade of “C-“ or better in required courses and a 2.0 (2.5 for Nursing) minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) are required for a degree to be awarded. Courses numbered below 100 are not applied toward program completion requirements. Students seeking more than one program must inform the Registrar’s Office and/or the Financial Aid Office. Students will be required to use the catalog in use at the time the program is declared unless a Request to Graduate from Alternate Catalog form is completed and approved. Students entering after a one-semester time lapse (excluding summer) or longer will re-enroll under the current catalog. Resource Links. Alumni Bookstore Class Schedule Contact Us Course Catalog Employment Library Learning Hub Student Forms   Student Health 101 Student Support Center Testing Center Transcript Request About Accreditation Alumni Campus & Facilities Helena College at a Glance HC Foundation Institutional Research Strategic Enrollment Planning Why Helena College Academics Academic Advising Academic Calendar Academic Programs of Study Community Education Dean's List eLearning Educational Partners Honors Pathway Program Library Service Learning Study Abroad Tutoring Student Resources Advising Campus Store Career Services Disability Resources Financial Aid Paying your bill ASHC & Student Clubs Student Guide to Applying, Paying & Registering Student Handbook Student Support Center TRIO Veterans Benefits Wellness & Counseling Campus Safety Helena College 2020-2021 Campus Safety Health Advisories
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  • helena
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Result 16
TitleAssociate of Arts | Minneapolis Community & Technical College
Urlhttps://minneapolis.edu/academics/school-liberal-arts-and-cultures/associate-arts
Description
Date
Organic Position16
H1Associate of Arts
H2Delivery Options
Popular Careers
Awards
Share this Program
Related Programs
H3Highlights
Award Requirements and Course Descriptions & Outlines
H2WithAnchorsDelivery Options
Popular Careers
Awards
Share this Program
Related Programs
BodyAssociate of Arts Apply Online Request Info Visit Campus Course Schedules Delivery Options Delivery Options. On Campus Popular Careers Popular Careers. Customer service professional Patient services representative Retail sales associate Awards Awards. A.A. Degree Apply Request Info Virtual Tour Jessica Prody Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Cultures Faculty Directory Share this Program. What it is The Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree is designed for you to develop entry-level career skills or earn your first two years of college credits for transfer to earn your bachelor’s degree. This degree is a general liberal arts degree and 40 of the 60 credits earned must be taken within the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC). If you plan to transfer, work closely with your admissions and academic advisors to be sure you are taking the right classes to meet your goals. Highlights. Our instructors have real world experience and bring their expertise in business and industry to the classroom. You’ll gain in-demand professional skills in communication, collaboration and teamwork. We offer a flexible schedule, allowing you to choose courses during the day, at night or online, providing convenient scheduling options. Widgets Award Requirements and Course Descriptions & Outlines. Please select the award below to view the degree options and requirements in the college catalog.  Associate of Arts A.A. Degree—60 credits Transfer Agreements Related Programs Related Programs. Department-Subjects A-Z Minneapolis College A member of Minnesota State Privacy Nondiscrimination
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  • 16
Result 17
TitleAssociate in Arts Degree | Pasco-Hernando State College
Urlhttps://phsc.edu/academics/programs/general-studies/associate-arts
Description
Date
Organic Position17
H1Associate in Arts Degree
H2Associate in Arts
Program Information
Financial Information
H3Job Outlook
H2WithAnchorsAssociate in Arts
Program Information
Financial Information
BodyAssociate in Arts Degree Many professions require a bachelor's degree from a four-year college or university. PHSC's Associate in Arts degree allows students to complete the first two years of a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree conveniently and affordably. The AA degree serves as the foundation for bachelor's degree and is guaranteed by a statewide articulation agreement to transfer to Florida's State University System and Florida College System (FCS) institutions. PHSC as a member FCS institution, also maintains similar transfer agreements with independent and private Florida colleges and universities. Associate in Arts. Program Information. Intake Method Open Access Job Outlook. The flexible AA degree can also be customized to meet degree program requirements at targeted transfer institutions. With the help of a PHSC advisor, students can select electives to prepare for career-specific transfer opportunities or they may work toward earning an AA degree and an Associate in Science degree simultaneously. Print this page Financial Information. Application Fee $25.00Estimated In-State Tuition $6310.80Estimated Out-of-State Tuition $24063.00Course Fees View Catalog for Course FeesCurriculum and Requirements View Catalog for Curriculum and Requirements
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  • aa
  • 3
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  • florida
  • 3
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  • 3
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Result 18
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position18
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
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Result 19
TitleAssociate Degrees and University Transfer | Pierce College District
Urlhttps://www.pierce.ctc.edu/associate-degrees
DescriptionTwo-year associate degrees prepare you to find a job in your field or transfer to a four-year college. Learn how an associate degree can help you succeed
Date
Organic Position19
H1Associate Degrees and University Transfer
H2Associate Degrees
University Transfer
H3Career Roadmaps
Career Pathway Course Map
Educational Planning Form
Direct Transfer Degrees
Career Pathway Course Map
Understanding Transfer Requirements
Requirements for All Transfer Degrees
H2WithAnchorsAssociate Degrees
University Transfer
BodyAssociate Degrees and University Transfer Image Associate Degrees. Below you can find the associate and university transfer degrees offered at Pierce College. You can find more in-depth information in the catalog, as well as a full list of course maps and programs. The Associate in Arts (AA-DTA) is for liberal arts transfer students. It is also sometimes known as the DTA Associate degree. These degrees can be tailored to your university of choice. The Associate in Science (AS-T) is for science transfer students and is offered on two tracks, depending on the field of study. Track One is for science students who wish to focus on biological and environmental/resource sciences, geology and earth science, or chemistry. Track Two is for students who wish to focus on engineering, computer science, physics, or atmospheric science. Career Roadmaps. Learn more about roadmaps to your desired career by visiting our Career Roadmaps page, where you can view flow charts, roadmaps, and employment outlooks for a variety of degrees and careers. Career Pathway Course Map. The Career Pathway Course Map for each associate degree outlines the courses you will need to take to earn that degree at Pierce College. The Career Pathway Course Maps can be found in the list of Course Maps and Programs A-Z. Associate in Arts (AA-DTA) Associate in Arts (AA-DTA) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Science (AS-T) Track 1  Associate in Science (AS-T 1) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Science (AS-T) Track 2 Associate in Science (AS-T 2) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap  Educational Planning Form. Use the Educational Planning Form to map out the required courses you plan to take each quarter. University Transfer. A university transfer degree from Pierce College satisfies the first two years of coursework required at four-year colleges and universities, at a fraction of the cost. Completion of most of the two-year degrees listed below allow for transfer to many public and private four-year colleges in Washington. A list of schools that accept each DTA, along with other valuable transfer information is on the State Board’s website. Direct Transfer Degrees. Direct transfer agreements (DTA) are available in the following specific fields. These degrees satisfy the lower division general education (core) requirements and lower division degree-related requirements of four-year institutions. Career Pathway Course Map. The Career Pathway Course Map for each associate degree outlines the courses you will need to take to earn that degree at Pierce College, as well as courses required for university transfer. The Career Pathway Course Maps can be found in the list of Course Maps and Programs A-Z. Associate in Biology (DTA/MRP) Associate in Biology (DTA/MRP) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Business (DTA/MRP) Associate in Business (DTA/MRP) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Construction Management (DTA/MRP) Associate in Construction Management (DTA/MRP) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Math Education (DTA) Associate in Math Education (DTA) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Music DTA/MRP Associate in Music (DTA/MRP) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Associate in Pre-Nursing (DTA/MRP) Associate in Pre-Nursing (DTA/MRP) Degree Requirements Career Roadmap Understanding Transfer Requirements. Pierce College has partnerships with many four-year institutions. For more information about these partnerships, please visit our Transfer Guide page.  Transfer requirements vary by university, so it’s helpful to choose your transfer destination early. Review the requirements for your intended four-year school, as well as the requirements specific to your planned major. Then, meet regularly with your Pierce College Advisor to ensure you’re on track with those requirements. The Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) defines policy for courses accepted for transfer at Washington's public colleges and universities. Guides for admissions deadlines and requirements for in-state and out-of-state colleges and universities are available for download here: Public four-year colleges in Washington state Private four-year colleges in Washington state Four-year colleges out of state Requirements for All Transfer Degrees. While Pierce College allows students to earn more than 90 credits, some four-year institutions may allow no more than 90 credits to apply to your chosen field of study. Be sure to check with the four-year institution to determine their specific policy. It is your responsibility to ensure your courses are acceptable for transfer to your desired school. College preparatory courses, as well as those numbered below 100, are not acceptable for transfer.
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  • college
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  • roadmap
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  • a
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  • state
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  • degree requirement
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  • career roadmap
  • 11
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  • science a
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  • university
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  • map
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  • 19
  • dtamrp
  • 10
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  • degree requirement career
  • 9
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  • requirement career roadmap
  • 9
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  • 9
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  • requirement career
  • 9
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  • year institution
  • 8
  • 19
  • pierce college
  • 8
  • 19
  • pierce
  • 8
  • 19
  • dta
  • 8
  • 19
  • career roadmap associate
  • 7
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  • associate science
  • 7
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  • roadmap associate
  • 7
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  • cours
  • 7
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  • associate science a
  • 5
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  • dtamrp degree requirement
  • 5
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  • associate degree
  • 5
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  • university transfer
  • 5
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  • dtamrp associate
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  • dtamrp degree
  • 5
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  • washington
  • 5
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  • associate art
  • 4
  • 19
  • degree pierce
  • 4
  • 19
  • transfer degree
  • 4
  • 19
  • required
  • 4
  • 19
  • public
  • 4
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  • list
  • 4
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  • art
  • 4
  • 19
  • institution
  • 4
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  • list map program
  • 3
  • 19
  • associate art aa
  • 3
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  • art aa dta
  • 3
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  • degree pierce college
  • 3
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  • year college washington
  • 3
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  • list map
  • 3
  • 19
  • art aa
  • 3
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  • aa dta
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  • dta associate
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  • college university
  • 3
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  • college washington
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  • earn
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  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
TitleAssociate of Arts Degree | North Seattle College
Urlhttps://northseattle.edu/degrees/associate-arts-degree
Description
Date
Organic Position20
H1
H2English
Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning
Individuals, Cultures and Societies
Natural World
Visual, Literary and Performing Arts
Electives
Additional Requirements
Integrated Studies
View class schedule and register for classes
Find the most up-to-date A.A. Transfer Degree PDF here
H3
H2WithAnchorsEnglish
Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning
Individuals, Cultures and Societies
Natural World
Visual, Literary and Performing Arts
Electives
Additional Requirements
Integrated Studies
View class schedule and register for classes
Find the most up-to-date A.A. Transfer Degree PDF here
Bodyip to main content Top LanguageEnglishAfrikaansAlbanianArabicArmenianAzerbaijaniBasqueBelarusianBengaliBosnianBulgarianCatalanCebuanoChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CroatianCzechDanishDutchEsperantoEstonianFilipinoFinnishFrenchGalicianGeorgianGermanGreekGujaratiHaitian CreoleHausaHebrewHindiHmongHungarianIcelandicIgboIndonesianIrishItalianJapaneseJavaneseKannadaKhmerKoreanLaoLatinLatvianLithuanianMacedonianMalayMalteseMaoriMarathiMongolianNepaliNorwegianPersianPolishPortuguesePunjabiRomanianRussianSerbianSlovakSlovenianSomaliSpanishSwahiliSwedishTamilTeluguThaiTurkishUkrainianUrduVietnameseWelshYiddishYorubaZulu Donors . Community . Employees . International . Students . Quick Links . Class Schedule ctcLink Calendars Canvas Find Student ID# Pay Tuition Register, Add, Drop Safety and Security Testing Transcripts Library & Student Media Center Bookstore Office 365 People Pages Visit NSC Virtual Assistance About . About North Seattle College Alumni Calendars Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Events and Rentals Facts and Figures Foundations Job Opportunities Leadership and Organization Mission, Strategic Plan, and Initiatives News Center Parking and Transportation Safety and Security Sustainability Visit Us Where We Stand Programs . Areas of Study Programs A-Z Bachelor's Degrees Career Training College to Career College Transfer Continuing Education eLearning High School Programs Integrated Studies International Programs Pre-College and ESL Enrollment & Funding . Admissions Application Attend Orientation Campus Tours & Info Sessions Class Schedule Enroll Now Enrollment Services Paying for College Placement for Classes Registration Request Information Seattle Promise Transcripts Transfer Credits Tuition and Fees Undocumented Students Workforce Education Student Services . Advising Bookstore Career Services Child Care Counseling Disability Services Emergency Assistance for Students Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Financial Aid IT Services Library & Student Media Center Opportunity Center (OCEE) Placement Testing TRIO Services Tutoring Veterans & Military Services Campus Life . Art Campus Attractions Campus Events Health and Fitness Nature Around NSC Phi Theta Kappa Student Life Student Leadership × Students, report your vaccination status so you can register for Winter Quarter. Services are available in-person and remotely. Please follow campus entry procedures. North Seattle Home Page Associate of Arts Degree Purpose The Associate of Arts Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) degree is a 90-credit transfer degree that provides a broad liberal arts education for students intending to transfer to a four-year university or college and pursue a baccalaureate degree in major areas such as humanities, literature, political science, psychology or sociology. To earn the AA degree, students must complete coursework in English composition, quantitative/symbolic reasoning, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and several electives. Benefits The AA degree allows students to fulfill some or all of the general education requirements and prerequisite coursework for many four-year degrees in the arts and humanities. Most baccalaureate institutions require completion of this degree prior to admission in order to receive the benefits of the Direct Transfer Agreement. Learning Outcomes Have college-level knowledge and skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis, and written composition. Have college-level mastery of information literacy and technology literacy. Have effective skills for in-person and media-based interactions with individuals and within groups. Understand methods and modes of inquiry specific to traditional and contemporary areas of knowledge in the humanities and arts, natural and physical sciences, mathematics, and the social sciences. Understand the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge. Understand the United States as a multicultural society. Understand the global society and processes of globalization from mostly, but not exclusively, non-Western and indigenous perspectives. Advising Because the rules for successful completion of this degree and transfer of credits to other institutions are complex, students are strongly encouraged to meet with an advisor, and consult with a faculty member in their field of study, who will assist in developing a program of study. Students should also meet with a transfer advisor at the intended four-year institution to determine which degree will best serve their needs, get assistance in developing an educational plan, and get guidance in course selections. It should not be assumed that earning this degree constitutes completion of the general college or university requirements of the institution to which one intends to transfer. Requirements Completion of the Associate of Arts degree requires earning 90 credits of college-level courses (numbered 100 or greater) with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better. At least 15 credits from courses numbered 100 or greater must be earned from NSC. Students with incoming credits from other colleges or universities must request an official evaluation after registering for the first time at NSC. In addition, students must complete an application to graduate. The application must be submitted no later than 3-weeks prior to the start of your final quarter. Transferability of courses must be coordinated between you and the institution to which you plan to transfer. Completion of degree requirements, official evaluation requests, and graduation application are the student’s responsibility. Depending on initial placement testing, students may need to complete prerequisite math and science courses. If so, those courses can be included as part of the major-specific or elective degree requirements provided they also qualify to satisfy those requirements. Note that many four-year institutions require students to have completed some foreign language credits for admission and/or graduation. Please check with the four-year institution to which you plan on transferring regarding foreign language requirements. English. 10 credits. Both ENGL&101 and ENGL&102 must be successfully completed. Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning. 5 credits of QSR courses must be earned from this category. Courses offered at NSC that currently qualify to fulfill the QSR distribution requirement are listed here for your convenience. Students are encouraged to verify transferability of courses in advance. MATH102, MATH103, MATH&107, MATH109, MATH116, MATH120, MATH&131, MATH&132, MATH136, MATH&141, MATH&142, MATH&146, MATH&148, MATH&151, MATH&152, MATH&153, MATH172, MATH220, MATH224, MATH238, MATH239 PHIL&120 Individuals, Cultures and Societies. 15 credits of social science classes must be earned from at least 2 different disciplines (identified by the course prefix) in this category. Natural World. 15 credits of natural/physical sciences must be earned from a minimum of two different disciplines (identified by the course prefix) in this category. Of those, 5 credits (minimum) must be from lab sciences. Visual, Literary and Performing Arts. 15 credits of arts and humanities classes must be earned from this category, and must include a minimum of 2 different disciplines (identified by the course prefixes). Of those, no more than 5 credits of studio/performance classes may be used in this category, and no more than 5 credits of college-level (numbered 100 or greater) world language classes may be used to fulfill this category. Electives. 30 credits of elective courses must be successfully completed. Acceptable courses include the following. Any course included in the Natural World, Individuals, Cultures, and Societies, and Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts categories not being used to satisfy the credit requirements of those specific categories Any course numbered 296, 298, or 299 ACCT&201, ACCT&202, ACCT&203, BUS&101, BUS200, BUS&201, BUS210, CSC198, DRMA200, DRMA201, DRMA211, DRMA224, DRMA231, DRMA241, DRMA251, DRMA261, DRMA271, DRMA281, DRMA291, ENGL&230, ENGR&112, ENGR140, ENGR141, ENGR170, ENGR&204 MATH198 (5 credits maximum) Any college-level (numbered 100 or greater) Physical Education Activity (PEC) course (3 credits maximum) No more than 15 credits of career/professional-training or typically non-transferable courses from the following list: CMST290, CMST291, CMST292, CMST293, CMST294, MATH106, MATH118, PEC155, PHYS118, PSYC160 Any other college-level (numbered 100 or greater) course with the following discipline-prefix: ACCT, AHE, AHM, AMA, ATEC, BUS, CCE, EET, EMT, FAM, HIN, HVAC, IT, NANO, NUR, PHA, RES, TDR 3 credits maximum from EDUC200, or any college-level (numbered 100 or greater) Service Learning (SLN) course 5 credits maximum of any college-level (numbered 100 or greater) Internship/Cooperative Work Experience (CWE) course 6 credits maximum from LIB101, LIB140, LIB150, LIB180 6 credits maximum  of Human Development (HDC) courses 6 credits maximum of Parent Education (FAM) course Additional Requirements. The following additional requirements must also be satisfied to earn the AA degree. It is acceptable to concurrently satisfy one or more of these requirements with the same course. It is also acceptable to concurrently satisfy one or more of these requirements and any other AA degree requirement with the same course. Of the 90 credits required to complete this degree, at least one course must be from the Communication category, Global Studies and US Cultures categories. Integrated Studies. 8 credits of integrated studies courses must be successfully completed as either Linked Classes or as a Coordinated Studies course. See your options for Integrated Studies here.   View class schedule and register for classes.            Find the most up-to-date A.A. Transfer Degree PDF here.   Revised March 15, 2016 Effective beginning Summer Quarter 2004 0003
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TitleAssociate in Arts (A.A.) Degree | Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College
Urlhttps://abtech.edu/program/associate-arts-aa-degree
DescriptionThe Associate in Arts degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit (SHC) of college transfer courses. Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and basic computer use
Date
Organic Position21
H1Associate in Arts (A.A.) Degree
H2What is a Pathway Program?
Courses in this program
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Pathway Program?
Courses in this program
BodyAssociate in Arts (A.A.) Degree Facebook‌ Twitter‌ Linkedin‌ The Associate in Arts degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit (SHC) of college transfer courses. Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and basic computer use. The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) and the Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (ICAA) enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year associate in arts programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina and to Signatory Institutions of North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities to transfer with junior status. Community college graduates must obtain a grade of “C” or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in order to transfer with a junior status. Courses may also transfer through bilateral agreements between institutions. See your advisor for specific pathways. The General AA Pathway is available in traditional format or 100% online. Curriculum is based on the 2020-21 catalog. What is a Pathway Program? AB-Tech’s Pathways are a selection of courses designed to prepare you for your desired Major at a four-year university. Pathway Programs are based on program requirements from regional universities and are designed to help you transition smoothly to a BA or BS degree program. Associate in Arts - General Pathway Program Sheet Accelerated Associate in Arts Program Sheet AA - Business/Accounting Pathway Program Sheet AA - Communications Pathway Program Sheet AA - Creative Arts Pathway Program Sheet AA - Criminal Justice Pathway Program Sheet AA - English Pathway Program Sheet AA - Foreign Language Pathway Program Sheet AA - Health and Wellness Pathway Program Sheet AA - History Pathway Program Sheet AA - Information Systems Pathway Program Sheet AA - Music Pathway Program Sheet AA - Philosophy Pathway Program Sheet AA - Political Science Pathway Program Sheet AA - Pre-Health Pathway Program Sheet AA - Psychology Pathway Program Sheet AA - Social Work Pathway Program Sheet AA - Sociology Pathway Program Sheet Courses in this program. English Composition Humanities/Fine Arts Social/Behavioral Sciences Mathematics Natural Sciences Additional General Education Other 6 Minimum Required Hours - English The following two English composition courses are required. Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details ENG-111 Writing and Inquiry 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition. View course details for Writing and Inquiry View course details‌‌ ENG-112 Writing/Research in the Discipline 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and argumentative strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing data and incorporating research findings into documented argumentative essays and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using standard research format and style. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies English Composition. View course details for Writing/Research in the Discipline View course details‌‌ 9 Minimum Required Hours - Humanities/Fine Arts Courses must be from at least two different disciplines. COM-120 orCOM-231 may count towards the degree, but not both. Select three courses from the following list. Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details ART-111 Art Appreciation 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art Appreciation View course details‌‌ ART-114 Art History Survey I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art History Survey I View course details‌‌ ART-115 Art History Survey II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art History Survey II View course details‌‌ COM-120 Intro Interpersonal Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations. View course details for Intro Interpersonal Communication View course details‌‌ COM-231 Public Speaking 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication. View course details for Public Speaking View course details‌‌ ENG-231 American Literature I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for American Literature I View course details‌‌ ENG-232 American Literature II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for American Literature II View course details‌‌ ENG-241 British Literature I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading an eighteenth century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for British Literature I View course details‌‌ ENG-242 British Literature II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading a nineteenth-century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for British Literature II View course details‌‌ MUS-110 Music Appreciation 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Music Appreciation View course details‌‌ MUS-112 Introduction to Jazz 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Jazz View course details‌‌ PHI-215 Philosophical Issues 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique the philosophical components of an issue. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Philosophical Issues View course details‌‌ PHI-240 Introduction to Ethics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Ethics View course details‌‌ 9 Minimum Required Hours - Social/Behavioral Science Courses must be from at least two different disciplines. Select three of the following courses; one must be an HIS course: Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details ECO-251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Principles of Microeconomics View course details‌‌ ECO-252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Principles of Macroeconomics View course details‌‌ HIS-111 World Civilizations I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for World Civilizations I View course details‌‌ HIS-112 World Civilizations II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for World Civilizations II View course details‌‌ HIS-131 American History I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American History I View course details‌‌ HIS-132 American History II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American History II View course details‌‌ POL-120 American Government 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American Government View course details‌‌ PSY-150 General Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for General Psychology View course details‌‌ SOC-210 Introduction to Sociology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Introduction to Sociology View course details‌‌ 3 Minimum Required Hours - Mathematics Select one course from the following: Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details MAT-143 Quantitative Literacy 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through a project and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. View course details for Quantitative Literacy View course details‌‌ MAT-152 Statistical Methods I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students will be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results. View course details for Statistical Methods I View course details‌‌ MAT-171 Precalculus Algebra 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology. View course details for Precalculus Algebra View course details‌‌ 4 Minimum Required Hours - Natural Sciences Select 4 credit hours from the following: Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details BIO-110 Principles of Biology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Principles of Biology View course details‌‌ BIO-111 General Biology I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for General Biology I View course details‌‌ CHM-151 General Chemistry I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for General Chemistry I View course details‌‌ GEL-111 Geology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Geology View course details‌‌ PHY-110 Conceptual Physics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Conceptual Physics View course details‌‌ PHY-110A Conceptual Physics Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.   View course details for Conceptual Physics Lab View course details‌‌ 11 Minimum Required Hours - Additional General Education HUM-220 Human Values and Meaning is required. Select 10-11 hours of courses from the following: Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details ANT-220 Cultural Anthropology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the nature of human culture. Emphasis is placed on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and analyzed. View course details for Cultural Anthropology View course details‌‌ ART-111 Art Appreciation 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art Appreciation View course details‌‌ ART-114 Art History Survey I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art History Survey I View course details‌‌ ART-115 Art History Survey II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art History Survey II View course details‌‌ BIO-110 Principles of Biology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Principles of Biology View course details‌‌ BIO-111 General Biology I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for General Biology I View course details‌‌ BIO-112 General Biology II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of BIO-111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associate in Science. View course details for General Biology II View course details‌‌ BIO-120 Introductory Botany 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Introductory Botany View course details‌‌ BIO-130 Introductory Zoology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Introductory Zoology View course details‌‌ BIO-140 Environmental Biology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Environmental Biology View course details‌‌ BIO-140A Environmental Biology Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Environmental Biology Lab View course details‌‌ CHM-132 Organic and Biochemistry 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Organic and Biochemistry View course details‌‌ CHM-151 General Chemistry I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for General Chemistry I View course details‌‌ CHM-152 General Chemistry II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. View course details for General Chemistry II View course details‌‌ CIS-110 Introduction to Computers 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include the identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. Microsoft Office will be used in this course; this includes Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. View course details for Introduction to Computers View course details‌‌ CIS-115 Intro to Programming and Logic 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces computer programming and problem-solving in a structured program logic environment. Topics include language syntax, data types, program organization, problem-solving methods, algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon completion, students should be able to use top-down algorithm design and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming language. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics (Quantitative). View course details for Intro to Programming and Logic View course details‌‌ COM-110 Introduction to Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of communication and the skills necessary to communicate in various contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and mass communication situations. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and illustrate the forms and purposes of human communication in a variety of contexts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Communication. View course details for Introduction to Communication View course details‌‌ COM-120 Intro Interpersonal Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations. View course details for Intro Interpersonal Communication View course details‌‌ COM-140 Intro to Intercultural Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces techniques of cultural research, definitions, functions, characteristics, and impacts of cultural differences in public address. Emphasis is placed on how diverse backgrounds influence the communication act and how cultural perceptions and experiences determine how one sends and receives messages. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles and skills needed to become effective in communicating outside one’s primary culture. View course details for Intro to Intercultural Communication View course details‌‌ COM-231 Public Speaking 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication. View course details for Public Speaking View course details‌‌ ECO-151 Survey of Economics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions for economic problems faced by the private and government sectors. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Survey of Economics View course details‌‌ ECO-251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Principles of Microeconomics View course details‌‌ ECO-252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Principles of Macroeconomics View course details‌‌ ENG-114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Students entering this course should be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a technical field and should anticipate interdepartmental evaluation of course projects. View course details for Professional Research and Reporting View course details‌‌ ENG-231 American Literature I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for American Literature I View course details‌‌ ENG-232 American Literature II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for American Literature II View course details‌‌ ENG-241 British Literature I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading an eighteenth century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for British Literature I View course details‌‌ ENG-242 British Literature II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading a nineteenth-century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for British Literature II View course details‌‌ FRE-111 Elementary French I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary French I View course details‌‌ FRE-112 Elementary French II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of FRE-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written French and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary French II View course details‌‌ FRE-211 Intermediate French I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the French language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate French I View course details‌‌ FRE-212 Intermediate French II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of FRE-211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate French II View course details‌‌ GEL-111 Geology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Geology View course details‌‌ HIS-111 World Civilizations I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for World Civilizations I View course details‌‌ HIS-112 World Civilizations II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for World Civilizations II View course details‌‌ HIS-131 American History I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American History I View course details‌‌ HIS-132 American History II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American History II View course details‌‌ HUM-110 Technology and Society 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Technology and Society View course details‌‌ HUM-115 Critical Thinking 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Critical Thinking View course details‌‌ HUM-120 Cultural Studies 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Cultural Studies View course details‌‌ HUM-160 Introduction to Film 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Attendance at five film showings and an in-depth written analysis of one film is required. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Film View course details‌‌ MAT-143 Quantitative Literacy 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through a project and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. View course details for Quantitative Literacy View course details‌‌ MAT-152 Statistical Methods I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students will be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results. View course details for Statistical Methods I View course details‌‌ MAT-171 Precalculus Algebra 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology. View course details for Precalculus Algebra View course details‌‌ MAT-172 Precalculus Trigonometry 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangle, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology. View course details for Precalculus Trigonometry View course details‌‌ MAT-263 Brief Calculus 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science. View course details for Brief Calculus View course details‌‌ MAT-271 Calculus I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the first of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science. View course details for Calculus I View course details‌‌ MAT-272 Calculus II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the second of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations.  Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. . View course details for Calculus II View course details‌‌ MAT-273 Calculus III 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the third of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrations, solid analytical geometry, vector-valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. View course details for Calculus III View course details‌‌ MUS-110 Music Appreciation 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Music Appreciation View course details‌‌ MUS-112 Introduction to Jazz 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Jazz View course details‌‌ PHI-215 Philosophical Issues 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique the philosophical components of an issue. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Philosophical Issues View course details‌‌ PHI-240 Introduction to Ethics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Ethics View course details‌‌ PHY-110 Conceptual Physics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Conceptual Physics View course details‌‌ PHY-110A Conceptual Physics Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.   View course details for Conceptual Physics Lab View course details‌‌ PHY-151 College Physics I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree. View course details for College Physics I View course details‌‌ PHY-152 College Physics II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. View course details for College Physics II View course details‌‌ PHY-251 General Physics I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. View course details for General Physics I View course details‌‌ PHY-252 General Physics II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. View course details for General Physics II View course details‌‌ POL-120 American Government 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American Government View course details‌‌ POL-220 International Relations 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a study of the effects of ideologies, trade, armaments, and alliances on relations among nation-states. Emphasis is placed on regional and global cooperation and conflict, economic development, trade, non-governmental organizations, and international institutions such as the World Court and UN. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss major international relationships, institutions, and problems. View course details for International Relations View course details‌‌ PSY-150 General Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for General Psychology View course details‌‌ PSY-237 Social Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the study of individual behavior within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of social influences on behavior. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Psychology View course details‌‌ PSY-241 Developmental Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Developmental Psychology View course details‌‌ PSY-281 Abnormal Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Abnormal Psychology View course details‌‌ SOC-210 Introduction to Sociology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Introduction to Sociology View course details‌‌ SOC-213 Sociology of the Family 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Sociology of the Family View course details‌‌ SOC-220 Social Problems 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an in-depth study of current social problems. Emphasis is placed on causes, consequences, and possible solutions to problems associated with families, schools, workplaces, communities, and the environment. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, define, analyze, and propose solutions to these problems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Problems View course details‌‌ SOC-225 Social Diversity 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Diversity View course details‌‌ SOC-240 Social Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course examines the influence of culture and social groups on individual behavior and personality. Emphasis is placed on the process of socialization, communication, conformity, deviance, interpersonal attraction, intimacy, race and ethnicity, small group experiences, and social movements. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze cultural and social forces that influence the individual in a society. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Psychology View course details‌‌ SPA-111 Elementary Spanish I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary Spanish I View course details‌‌ SPA-112 Elementary Spanish II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of SPA-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.  Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary Spanish II View course details‌‌ SPA-211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts.  Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate Spanish I View course details‌‌ SPA-211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts.  Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate Spanish I View course details‌‌ 15 Minimum Required Hours - Other ACA-122 College Transfer Success Additional Hours - Select 14 credit hours from courses listed below: Course Code Course Credit Hours Link to course details ACC-120 Principles of Financial Accounting 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Principles of Financial Accounting View course details‌‌ ACC-121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course includes a greater emphasis on managerial and cost accounting skills. Emphasis is placed on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts, including product costing systems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Principles of Managerial Accounting View course details‌‌ ANT-220 Cultural Anthropology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the nature of human culture. Emphasis is placed on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and analyzed. View course details for Cultural Anthropology View course details‌‌ ART-111 Art Appreciation 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art Appreciation View course details‌‌ ART-114 Art History Survey I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art History Survey I View course details‌‌ ART-115 Art History Survey II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Art History Survey II View course details‌‌ ART-121 Two-Dimensional Design 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the elements and principles of design as applied to two-dimensional art. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements, the principles of visual organization, and the theories of color mixing and interaction. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and use critical and analytical approaches as they apply to two-dimensional visual art. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Two-Dimensional Design View course details‌‌ ART-122 Three-Dimensional Design 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces basic studio problems in three-dimensional visual design. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements and organizational principles as applied to mass and space. Upon completion, students should be able to apply three-dimensional design concepts. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Three-Dimensional Design View course details‌‌ ART-131 Drawing I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the language of drawing and the use of various drawing materials. Emphasis is placed on drawing techniques, media, and graphic principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of graphic form and various drawing processes. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Drawing I View course details‌‌ ART-171 Digital Design I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to introduce students to the elements and principles of design through the use of digital software. Emphasis is placed on developing composition and design skills using vector, raster, and time-based media. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and use tools in digital software, understand and utilize digital and artistic vocabulary, and employ the principles and elements of design to create artwork using digital means. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Digital Design I View course details‌‌ ART-214 Portfolio and Resume 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers resume writing, interview skills, and the preparation and presentation of an art portfolio. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of a portfolio of original artwork, the preparation of a photographic portfolio, approaches to resume writing, and interview techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to mount original art for portfolio presentation, photograph and display a professional slide portfolio, and write an effective resume. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Portfolio and Resume View course details‌‌ ART-231 Printmaking I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces printmaking: its history, development techniques, and processes. Emphasis is placed on basic applications with an investigation into image source and development. Upon completion, students should be able to produce printed images utilizing a variety of methods. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Printmaking I View course details‌‌ ART-240 Painting I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the language of painting and the use of various painting materials. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and use of various painting techniques, media, and color principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of creative processes directed toward the development of expressive form. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Painting I View course details‌‌ ART-244 Watercolor 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces basic methods and techniques used in watercolor. Emphasis is placed on application, materials, content, and individual expression. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a variety of traditional and nontraditional concepts used in watercolor media. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Watercolor View course details‌‌ ART-261 Photography I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces photographic equipment, theory, and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, darkroom technique, and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, develop, and print a well-conceived composition. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Photography I View course details‌‌ ART-264 Digital Photography I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces digital photographic equipment, theory and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, computer photo manipulation, and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, digitally manipulate, and print a well-conceived composition. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement View course details for Digital Photography I View course details‌‌ ART-266 Videography I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces various aspects of basic video production including concept development, scripting, camera operation, and post-production. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, camera handling, storyboarding and editing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of video camera operation and production techniques. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Videography I View course details‌‌ ART-267 Videography II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to provide a framework for the production of a long-term video project. Emphasis is placed on the realization of the unique creative vision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce a thematically coherent, edited video with sound and titling. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Videography II View course details‌‌ ART-275 Introduction to Graphic Design 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces students to the field of graphic design. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of visual communication, the design process and the ability to evaluate and discuss design issues in a critical manner. Upon completion, students should be able to use contemporary design software and visual language techniques as they apply to creative visual problem-solving involving typography, image manipulation, symbolic representation, and page management while being responsive to the relationship between client, designer, and audience. View course details for Introduction to Graphic Design View course details‌‌ ART-276 Interactive Media Design 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques used in designing and producing interactive projects. Emphasis is placed on the interactive development process, aesthetics of visual solutions, technical proficiency, and graphical user interface (GUI) with projects including digital imaging, web design, simple animation, graphics, and copyright issues. View course details for Interactive Media Design View course details‌‌ ART-281 Sculpture I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an exploration of the creative and technical methods of sculpture with a focus on the traditional processes. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills as they pertain to three-dimensional expression in various media. Upon completion, students should be able to show competence in a variety of sculptural approaches. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Sculpture I View course details‌‌ ART-283 Ceramics I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to three-dimensional design principles using the medium of clay. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals of forming, surface design, glaze application, and firing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in slab and coil construction, simple wheel forms, glaze technique, and creative expression. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Ceramics I View course details‌‌ ART-284 Ceramics II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers advanced hand building and wheel techniques. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, surface design, sculptural quality, and glaze effect. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a high level of technical competence in forming and glazing with a development of three-dimensional awareness. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Ceramics II View course details‌‌ BIO-110 Principles of Biology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Principles of Biology View course details‌‌ BIO-111 General Biology I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for General Biology I View course details‌‌ BIO-112 General Biology II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of BIO-111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associate in Science. View course details for General Biology II View course details‌‌ BIO-120 Introductory Botany 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Introductory Botany View course details‌‌ BIO-130 Introductory Zoology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Introductory Zoology View course details‌‌ BIO-140 Environmental Biology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Environmental Biology View course details‌‌ BIO-140A Environmental Biology Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Environmental Biology Lab View course details‌‌ BIO-155 Nutrition 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the biochemistry of foods and nutrients with consideration of the physiological effects of specialized diets for specific biological needs. Topics include cultural, religious, and economic factors that influence a person’s acceptance of food, as well as nutrient requirements of the various life stages. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the functions and sources of nutrients, the mechanisms of digestion, and the nutritional requirements of all age groups. View course details for Nutrition View course details‌‌ BIO-163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 5 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Basic Anatomy and Physiology View course details‌‌ BIO-168 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Anatomy and Physiology I View course details‌‌ BIO-169 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Anatomy and Physiology II View course details‌‌ BIO-175 General Microbiology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis on microorganisms and human disease. Topics include an overview of microbiology and aspects of medical microbiology, identification, and control of pathogens, disease transmission, host resistance, and immunity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of microorganisms and the disease process as well as aseptic and sterile techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for General Microbiology View course details‌‌ BIO-275 Microbiology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers principles of microbiology and the impact these organisms have on man and the environment. Topics include the various groups of microorganisms, their structure, physiology, genetics, microbial pathogenicity, infectious diseases, immunology, and selected practical applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills including microscopy, aseptic technique, staining, culture methods, and identification of microorganisms. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Microbiology View course details‌‌ BUS-110 Introduction to Business 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Introduction to Business View course details‌‌ BUS-115 Business Law I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is placed on contracts, negotiable instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Business Law I View course details‌‌ BUS-137 Principles of Management 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to be an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Upon completion, students should be able to work as contributing members of a team utilizing these functions of management. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Principles of Management View course details‌‌ CHM-130 General, Organic, and Biochemistry 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of basic facts and principles of general, organic, and biochemistry. Topics include measurement, molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, solutions, acid-base chemistry, gas laws, and the structure, properties, and reactions of major organic and biological groups. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for General, Organic, and Biochemistry View course details‌‌ CHM-130A General, Organic, and Biochemistry Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a laboratory for CHM-130. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHM-130. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic laboratory procedures and apply them to chemical principles presented in CHM-130. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for General, Organic, and Biochemistry Lab View course details‌‌ CHM-132 Organic and Biochemistry 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Organic and Biochemistry View course details‌‌ CHM-151 General Chemistry I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM-152. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for General Chemistry I View course details‌‌ CHM-152 General Chemistry II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. View course details for General Chemistry II View course details‌‌ CHM-251 Organic Chemistry I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers; further topics include isomerization, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of covered organic topics as needed in CHM-252. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Organic Chemistry I View course details‌‌ CHM-252 Organic Chemistry II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a continuation of the systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines and heterocyclics; multi-step synthesis will be emphasized. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of organic concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. View course details for Organic Chemistry II View course details‌‌ CHM-271 Biochemical Principles 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ The course covers the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Topics include structures, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of biomacromolecules including amino acids, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, enzymatic metabolic pathways, and biochemical genetics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental biochemical processes. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Natural Science. View course details for Biochemical Principles View course details‌‌ CIS-110 Introduction to Computers 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include the identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. Microsoft Office will be used in this course; this includes Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. View course details for Introduction to Computers View course details‌‌ CIS-115 Intro to Programming and Logic 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces computer programming and problem-solving in a structured program logic environment. Topics include language syntax, data types, program organization, problem-solving methods, algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon completion, students should be able to use top-down algorithm design and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming language. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics (Quantitative). View course details for Intro to Programming and Logic View course details‌‌ CJC-111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate career options. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Introduction to Criminal Justice View course details‌‌ CJC-121 Law Enforcement Operations 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces fundamental law enforcement operations. Topics include the contemporary evolution of law enforcement operations and related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to explain theories, practices, and issues related to law enforcement operations. There will be an emphasis on practical skills. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Law Enforcement Operations View course details‌‌ CJC-141 Corrections 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the history, major philosophies, components, and current practices and problems of the field of corrections. Topics include historical evolution, functions of the various components, alternatives to incarceration, treatment programs, inmate control, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the various components, processes, and functions of the correctional system.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Corrections View course details‌‌ COM-110 Introduction to Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of communication and the skills necessary to communicate in various contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and mass communication situations. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and illustrate the forms and purposes of human communication in a variety of contexts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Communication. View course details for Introduction to Communication View course details‌‌ COM-120 Intro Interpersonal Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations. View course details for Intro Interpersonal Communication View course details‌‌ COM-140 Intro to Intercultural Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces techniques of cultural research, definitions, functions, characteristics, and impacts of cultural differences in public address. Emphasis is placed on how diverse backgrounds influence the communication act and how cultural perceptions and experiences determine how one sends and receives messages. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles and skills needed to become effective in communicating outside one’s primary culture. View course details for Intro to Intercultural Communication View course details‌‌ COM-150 Intro to Mass Communication 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces print and electronic media and the new information technologies in terms of communication theory and as economic, political, and social institutions. Topics include the nature, history, functions, and responsibilities of mass communication industries in a global environment and their role and impact in American society. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate awareness of the pervasive nature of mass media and how media operate in an advanced post-industrial society. View course details for Intro to Mass Communication View course details‌‌ COM-231 Public Speaking 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in a group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Communication. View course details for Public Speaking View course details‌‌ CSC-134 C++ Programming 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for C++ Programming View course details‌‌ CSC-151 JAVA Programming 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for JAVA Programming View course details‌‌ CTS-115 Information System Business Concepts 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ The course introduces the role of IT in managing business processes and the need for business processes and IT alignment. Emphasis is placed on the industry need for understanding business challenges and developing/managing information systems to contribute to the decision-making process based on these challenges. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the ‘hybrid business manager’ and the potential offered by new technology and systems. Students will acquire the skills to prepare themselves and their work for a career in the information technology field. View course details for Information System Business Concepts View course details‌‌ DFT-170 Engineering Graphics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces basic engineering graphics skills and applications. Topics include sketching, selection, and use of current methods and tools, and the use of engineering graphics applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic engineering graphics principles and practices. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Engineering Graphics View course details‌‌ ECO-151 Survey of Economics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions for economic problems faced by the private and government sectors. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Survey of Economics View course details‌‌ ECO-251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Principles of Microeconomics View course details‌‌ ECO-252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Principles of Macroeconomics View course details‌‌ EDU-144 Child Development I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course includes the theories of child development, observation and assessment, milestones, and factors that influence development, from conception through approximately 36 months. Emphasis is placed on knowledge, observation and assessment of developmental sequences in approaches to play/learning, emotional/social, health/physical, language/communication and cognitive domains. View course details for Child Development I View course details‌‌ EDU-145 Child Development II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course includes the theories of child development, observation and assessment, milestones, and factors that influence development, from preschool through middle childhood. Emphasis is placed on knowledge, observation and assessment of developmental sequences in approaches to play/learning, emotional/social, health/physical, language/communication and cognitive domains. View course details for Child Development II View course details‌‌ EDU-216 Foundations of Education 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the examination of the American educational systems and the teaching profession. Topics include the historical and philosophical influences on education, various perspectives on educational issues, and experiences in birth through grade 12 classrooms. Upon completion, students should be able to reflect on classroom observations, analyze the different educational approaches, including classical/traditional and progressive, and have knowledge of the various roles of educational systems at the federal, state and local levels. View course details for Foundations of Education View course details‌‌ EDU-221 Children with Exceptionalities 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers atypical patterns of child development, inclusive/diverse settings, evidenced-based educational/family plans, differentiated instruction, adaptive materials, and assistive technology. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of exceptionalities and delays, early intervention/special education, transitions, observation, developmental screening, formative assessment of children, and collaborating with families and community partners. View course details for Children with Exceptionalities View course details‌‌ EGR-150 Intro to Engineering 2 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is an overview of the engineering profession. Topics include goal setting and career assessment, ethics, public safety, the engineering method, and design process, written and oral communication, interpersonal skills and team building, and computer applications. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the engineering process, the engineering profession, and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Intro to Engineering View course details‌‌ EGR-212 Logic System Design I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to digital circuits and analysis. Topics include Boolean Algebra; mixed logic; design of combinational circuits; introduction to sequential systems; and MSI building blocks. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and design digital circuits and systems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Logic System Design I View course details‌‌ EGR-215 Network Theory I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to Kirchoff's laws and terminal equations, circuit analysis techniques and network theorems, transient and natural response, and state variable analysis. Topics include Kirchoff's laws, Ohm's law, circuit analysis techniques, Network theorems, singularity functions, transient and natural responses, power, and state variable analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze electric circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors to determine the required parameters. View course details for Network Theory I View course details‌‌ EGR-216 Logic and Network Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides laboratory experiments in network measurements and logic design and laboratory equipment and techniques. Topics include network measurement and applications, experimental logic design and introduction to laboratory equipment and techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to complete network measurement logic design and be able to use laboratory equipment with proper techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Logic and Network Lab View course details‌‌ EGR-220 Engineering Statics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the concepts of engineering based on forces in equilibrium. Topics include concentrated forces, distributed forces, forces due to friction, and inertia as they apply to machines, structures, and systems. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems that require the ability to analyze systems of forces in static equilibrium. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Engineering Statics View course details‌‌ EGR-228 Intro to Solid Mechanics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to engineering theory of deformable solids and applications. Topics include stress and deformation resulting from axial, torsion, and bending loads; shear and moment diagrams; Mohr's circle of stress; and strain and buckling of columns. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze solids subject to various forces and design systems using a variety of materials. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Intro to Solid Mechanics View course details‌‌ ENG-114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Students entering this course should be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a technical field and should anticipate interdepartmental evaluation of course projects. View course details for Professional Research and Reporting View course details‌‌ ENG-125 Creative Writing I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice the art of creative writing. Emphasis is placed on writing fiction, poetry, and sketches. Upon completion, students should be able to craft and critique their own writing and critique the writing of others. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Creative Writing I View course details‌‌ ENG-231 American Literature I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for American Literature I View course details‌‌ ENG-232 American Literature II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course requires a research paper. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for American Literature II View course details‌‌ ENG-241 British Literature I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading an eighteenth century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for British Literature I View course details‌‌ ENG-242 British Literature II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading a nineteenth-century novel is required. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for British Literature II View course details‌‌ FRE-111 Elementary French I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary French I View course details‌‌ FRE-112 Elementary French II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of FRE-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written French and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary French II View course details‌‌ FRE-211 Intermediate French I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the French language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate French I View course details‌‌ FRE-212 Intermediate French II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of FRE-211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate French II View course details‌‌ GEL-111 Geology 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Geology View course details‌‌ GIS-111 Introduction to GIS 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System and reviews GIS applications. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects. Upon completion, students should be able to identify GIS hardware components, typical operations, products/applications, and differences between database models and between raster and vector systems. The ESRI software used in the course only works in a Windows environment. View course details for Introduction to GIS View course details‌‌ HEA-110 Personal Health/Wellness 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to basic personal health and wellness. Emphasis is placed on current health issues such as nutrition, mental health, and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the factors necessary for the maintenance of health and wellness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Personal Health/Wellness View course details‌‌ HEA-112 First Aid and CPR 2 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the basics of emergency first aid treatment. Topics include rescue breathing, CPR, first aid for choking and bleeding, and other first-aid procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in providing emergency care for the sick and injured until medical help can be obtained. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for First Aid and CPR View course details‌‌ HIS-111 World Civilizations I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for World Civilizations I View course details‌‌ HIS-112 World Civilizations II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for World Civilizations II View course details‌‌ HIS-131 American History I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American History I View course details‌‌ HIS-132 American History II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American History II View course details‌‌ HIS-236 North Carolina History 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a study of geographical, political, economic, and social conditions existing in North Carolina from America’s discovery to the present. Topics include native and immigrant backgrounds; colonial, antebellum, and Reconstruction periods; party politics; race relations; and the transition from an agrarian to an industrial economy. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in North Carolina. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for North Carolina History View course details‌‌ HUM-110 Technology and Society 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Technology and Society View course details‌‌ HUM-115 Critical Thinking 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem-solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Critical Thinking View course details‌‌ HUM-120 Cultural Studies 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Cultural Studies View course details‌‌ HUM-160 Introduction to Film 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Attendance at five film showings and an in-depth written analysis of one film is required. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Film View course details‌‌ MAT-143 Quantitative Literacy 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through a project and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. View course details for Quantitative Literacy View course details‌‌ MAT-152 Statistical Methods I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students will be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results. View course details for Statistical Methods I View course details‌‌ MAT-171 Precalculus Algebra 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology. View course details for Precalculus Algebra View course details‌‌ MAT-172 Precalculus Trigonometry 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to develop topics that are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangle, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology. View course details for Precalculus Trigonometry View course details‌‌ MAT-252 Statistical Methods II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to provide a technology-based treatment of multiple sample inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on two-sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals, linear and multiple regression, analysis of variance, experimental design, and non-parametric techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to draw statistical inferences and communicate results on multiple sample data taken from business and health, social, natural, and applied sciences. View course details for Statistical Methods II View course details‌‌ MAT-263 Brief Calculus 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science. View course details for Brief Calculus View course details‌‌ MAT-271 Calculus I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the first of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Mathematics for the Associate in Science. View course details for Calculus I View course details‌‌ MAT-272 Calculus II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the second of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations.  Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. . View course details for Calculus II View course details‌‌ MAT-273 Calculus III 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This is the third of a three-course sequence designed to develop the topics of differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrations, solid analytical geometry, vector-valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students will be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. View course details for Calculus III View course details‌‌ MAT-280 Linear Algebra 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to be an introduction to linear algebra topics. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, multi-dimensional linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization, and orthogonality. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to linear algebra-related problems with and without technology. View course details for Linear Algebra View course details‌‌ MAT-285 Differential Equations 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to be an introduction to topics involving ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for first-order and linear higher-order differential equations, systems of differential equations, numerical methods, series solutions, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, and LaPlace transforms. View course details for Differential Equations View course details‌‌ MUS-110 Music Appreciation 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Music Appreciation View course details‌‌ MUS-112 Introduction to Jazz 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Jazz View course details‌‌ MUS-121 Music Theory I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to the musical elements of melody, rhythm, and harmony. Emphasis is placed upon the interaction of these elements through fundamental analysis and an introduction to part writing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of melodic voice leading, rhythmic functions within simple and compound meters, and simple harmonic progressions. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Music Theory I View course details‌‌ MUS-122 Music Theory II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a comprehensive study of diatonic harmony. Emphasis is placed on voice leading tasks, part writing, and analysis using various labeling systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate harmonic principles through four-voice part writing, recognize and label non-harmonic tones, analyze chords using Roman numerals, figured bass, and lead sheet symbols, and classify small-scale phrase structure and cadence types. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Music Theory II View course details‌‌ MUS-125 Aural Skills I 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a comprehensive study of diatonic harmony. Emphasis is placed on voice leading tasks, part writing, and analysis using various labeling systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate harmonic principles through four-voice part writing, recognize and label non-harmonic tones, analyze chords using Roman numerals, figured bass, and lead sheet symbols, and classify small-scale phrase structure and cadence types. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Aural Skills I View course details‌‌ MUS-126 Aural Skills II 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a foundation in aural skills. Emphasis is placed on the development of sight-singing and ear training skills in diatonic melody, diatonic harmonic progression, and rhythmic patterns. Upon completion, students should be able to fluently read music in treble and bass clefs; utilize any solmization system while sight-singing simple diatonic melodies; identify elementary diatonic chord progressions; perform rhythms in simple and compound meters; and dictate diatonic melodic, diatonic harmonic, and advanced rhythmic patterns. View course details for Aural Skills II View course details‌‌ MUS-131 Chorus I 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an opportunity to gain experience singing in a chorus.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study and performance of a variety of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Chorus I View course details‌‌ MUS-132 Chorus II 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a continuation of studies begun in MUS-131.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study and performance of a variety of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Chorus II View course details‌‌ MUS-231 Chorus III 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of MUS-132.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study and performance of a variety of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Chorus III View course details‌‌ MUS-232 Chorus IV 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of MUS-231.  Emphasis is placed on vocal techniques and the study of styles and periods of choral literature.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to participate in choral singing leading to performance.  This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Chorus IV View course details‌‌ PED-110 Fit and Well for Life 2 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to investigate and apply the basic concepts and principles of lifetime physical fitness and other health-related factors. Emphasis is placed on wellness through the study of nutrition, weight control, stress management, and consumer facts on exercise and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to plan a personal, lifelong fitness program based on individual needs, abilities, and interests. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Fit and Well for Life View course details‌‌ PED-117 Weight Training I 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the basics of weight training. Emphasis is placed on developing muscular strength, muscular endurance, and muscle tone. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement a personal weight training program. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Weight Training I View course details‌‌ PED-118 Weight Training II 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers advanced levels of weight training. Emphasis is placed on meeting individual training goals and addressing weight training needs and interests. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement an individualized advanced weight training program. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Weight Training II View course details‌‌ PED-119 Circuit Training 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the skills necessary to participate in a developmental fitness program. Emphasis is placed on the circuit training method which involves a series of conditioning timed stations arranged for maximum benefit and variety. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and appreciate the role of circuit training as a means to develop fitness. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Circuit Training View course details‌‌ PED-120 Walking for Fitness 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces fitness through walking. Emphasis is placed on stretching, conditioning exercises, proper clothing, fluid needs, and injury prevention. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in a recreational walking program. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Walking for Fitness View course details‌‌ PED-122 Yoga I 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the basic discipline of yoga. Topics include proper breathing, relaxation techniques, and correct body positions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the procedures of yoga. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Yoga I View course details‌‌ PED-123 Yoga II 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces more detailed aspects of the discipline of yoga. Topics include breathing and physical postures, relaxation, and mental concentration. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate advanced procedures of yoga. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Yoga II View course details‌‌ PED-125 Self-Defense - Beginning 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to aid students in developing rudimentary skills in self-defense. Emphasis is placed on stances, blocks, punches, and kicks as well as non-physical means of self-defense. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic self-defense techniques of a physical and non-physical nature. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Self-Defense - Beginning View course details‌‌ PED-126 Self-Defense - Intermediate 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is designed to aid students in building on the techniques and skills developed in PED-125. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate psychological and physiological responses to various encounters. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate intermediate skills in self-defense stances, blocks, punches, and kick combinations. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Self-Defense - Intermediate View course details‌‌ PED-128 Golf - Beginning 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course emphasizes the fundamentals of golf. Topics include the proper grips, stance, alignment, swings for the short and long game, putting, and the rules and etiquette of golf. Upon completion, students should be able to perform the basic golf shots and demonstrate a knowledge of the rules and etiquette of golf. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Golf - Beginning View course details‌‌ PED-130 Tennis - Beginning 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course emphasizes the fundamentals of tennis. Topics include basic strokes, rules, etiquette, and court play. Upon completion, students should be able to play recreational tennis. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Tennis - Beginning View course details‌‌ PED-143 Volleyball - Beginning 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the fundamentals of volleyball. Emphasis is placed on the basics of serving, passing, setting, spiking, blocking, and the rules and etiquette of volleyball. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational volleyball. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Volleyball - Beginning View course details‌‌ PED-145 Basketball - Beginning 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the fundamentals of basketball. Emphasis is placed on skill development, knowledge of the rules, and basic game strategy. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational basketball. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Basketball - Beginning View course details‌‌ PED-171 Nature Hiking 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides instruction on how to equip and care for oneself on the trail. Topics include clothing, hygiene, trail ethics, and necessary equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully participate in nature trail hikes. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Nature Hiking View course details‌‌ PED-211 New Games 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course includes an explanation, demonstration, and participation in games that provide an alternative to traditional sports. Emphasis is placed on playing for pleasure rather than for competitive purposes. Upon completion, students should be able to participate and lead others in participating in non-competitive games.  This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for New Games View course details‌‌ PED-217 Pilates I 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an introduction to the Pilates method of body conditioning exercise. Topics include instruction in beginning and intermediate Pilates exercises using a mat or equipment, history of the Pilates method, and relevant anatomy and physiology. Upon completion, students should be able to perform beginning and intermediate exercises and possess an understanding of the benefits of conditioning the body’s core muscles. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Pilates I View course details‌‌ PED-218 Pilates II 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides continued instruction to the Pilates method of body conditioning exercise. Topics include instruction in intermediate and advanced Pilates exercises using a mat or equipment, relevant anatomy and physiology, and further discussion of related concepts. Upon completion, students should be able to perform intermediate and advanced exercises and possess the autonomy to maintain their own personal Pilates practice. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Pilates II View course details‌‌ PED-235 Tai Chi 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces martial arts using the Tai Chi form. Topics include proper conditioning exercises, proper terminology, historical foundations, etiquette, and drills. Upon completion, students should be able to perform skills and techniques related to this form of martial arts. This course has been approved for the transfer under the CAA as a pre-major and/or elective course requirement. View course details for Tai Chi View course details‌‌ PHI-215 Philosophical Issues 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique the philosophical components of an issue. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Philosophical Issues View course details‌‌ PHI-240 Introduction to Ethics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on utilitarianism, rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objectivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punishment, and justice. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Introduction to Ethics View course details‌‌ PHY-110 Conceptual Physics 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences. View course details for Conceptual Physics View course details‌‌ PHY-110A Conceptual Physics Lab 1 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences.   View course details for Conceptual Physics Lab View course details‌‌ PHY-151 College Physics I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Natural Sciences for the Associates in Science Degree. View course details for College Physics I View course details‌‌ PHY-152 College Physics II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. View course details for College Physics II View course details‌‌ PHY-251 General Physics I 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. View course details for General Physics I View course details‌‌ PHY-252 General Physics II 4 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. View course details for General Physics II View course details‌‌ POL-120 American Government 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for American Government View course details‌‌ POL-220 International Relations 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a study of the effects of ideologies, trade, armaments, and alliances on relations among nation-states. Emphasis is placed on regional and global cooperation and conflict, economic development, trade, non-governmental organizations, and international institutions such as the World Court and UN. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss major international relationships, institutions, and problems. View course details for International Relations View course details‌‌ PSY-150 General Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for General Psychology View course details‌‌ PSY-237 Social Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the study of individual behavior within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of social influences on behavior. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Psychology View course details‌‌ PSY-241 Developmental Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Developmental Psychology View course details‌‌ PSY-281 Abnormal Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Abnormal Psychology View course details‌‌ SOC-210 Introduction to Sociology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course that satisfies Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Introduction to Sociology View course details‌‌ SOC-213 Sociology of the Family 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Sociology of the Family View course details‌‌ SOC-220 Social Problems 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides an in-depth study of current social problems. Emphasis is placed on causes, consequences, and possible solutions to problems associated with families, schools, workplaces, communities, and the environment. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, define, analyze, and propose solutions to these problems. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Problems View course details‌‌ SOC-225 Social Diversity 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Diversity View course details‌‌ SOC-240 Social Psychology 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course examines the influence of culture and social groups on individual behavior and personality. Emphasis is placed on the process of socialization, communication, conformity, deviance, interpersonal attraction, intimacy, race and ethnicity, small group experiences, and social movements. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze cultural and social forces that influence the individual in a society. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Social/Behavioral Sciences. View course details for Social Psychology View course details‌‌ SPA-111 Elementary Spanish I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary Spanish I View course details‌‌ SPA-112 Elementary Spanish II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course is a continuation of SPA-111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.  Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Elementary Spanish II View course details‌‌ SPA-211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts.  Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate Spanish I View course details‌‌ SPA-212 Intermediate Spanish II 3 ‌‌ ‌‌ This course provides a continuation of SPA-211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. View course details for Intermediate Spanish II View course details‌‌ Total Credit Hours Required: 60 Curriculum is based on the 2020-21 catalog. 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Result 22
TitleLiberal Arts Associate of Arts (AA) Degree Requirements - Hawkeye Community College
Urlhttps://www.hawkeyecollege.edu/programs/liberal-arts/courses
Description
Date
Organic Position22
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Bodyrc="https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-NW7LR5S" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden">
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Result 23
TitleDegrees & Certificates at College of San Mateo - Associate Degree Requirements
Urlhttps://collegeofsanmateo.edu/degrees/requirements.asp
Description
Date
Organic Position23
H1Associate Degree Requirements
H2Philosophy of General Education
Student Catalog Rights
Additional Associate Degrees and Certificates
Requirements for the Associate in Arts for transfer (AA-T) or Associate in Sciences for transfer (AS-T)
H3
H2WithAnchorsPhilosophy of General Education
Student Catalog Rights
Additional Associate Degrees and Certificates
Requirements for the Associate in Arts for transfer (AA-T) or Associate in Sciences for transfer (AS-T)
BodyAssociate Degree Requirements The awarding of an Associate Degree is intended to represent more than an accumulation of units. It is to symbolize a successful attempt on the part of the college to lead students through patterns of learning experiences designed to develop certain capabilities and insights. Among these are the ability to think and to communicate clearly and effectively both orally and in writing; to use mathematics; to understand the modes of inquiry of the major disciplines; to be aware of other cultures and times; to achieve insights gained through experience in thinking about ethical problems; and to develop the capacity for self-understanding. In addition to these accomplishments, the student shall possess sufficient depth in some field of knowledge to contribute to lifetime interest. Graduation from College of San Mateo with the Associate in Arts or Science degree is based upon the completion of 60 units of lower-division college-level work, including the requirements A through E in the A.A./A.S. Degree Worksheet. A maximum of 12 units from courses in which the student has a Credit/No Credit option may be applied toward an Associate degree. An application for the degree must be filed in the Office of Admissions and Records during the last semester of attendance (refer to the calendar for the college year for deadline). Philosophy of General Education. Central to an Associate Degree, General Education is designed to introduce students to the variety of means through which people comprehend the modern world. It reflects the conviction of colleges that those who receive their degrees must possess in common certain basic principles, concepts and methodologies both unique to and shared by the various disciplines. College educated persons must be able to use this knowledge when evaluating and appreciating the physical environment, the culture, and the society in which they live. Most importantly, General Education should lead to better self-understanding. Student Catalog Rights. Graduation requirements are listed in the Catalog. Each catalog covers an academic year that reflects enrollment beginning with the fall term and includes subsequent spring and summer terms. Having "catalog rights" means students are held to the graduation requirements listed in the catalog at the time enrollment begins. Students may choose to use catalog rights for any subsequent year of continuous enrollment at Cañada College, College of San Mateo, and Skyline College. Catalog rights apply to enrollment in any of the San Mateo County Community College District colleges.For the purpose of this policy, "continuous enrollment" means attending at least one term (fall, spring, summer) each academic year. Attendance is required through the fourth week of instruction for semester length classes or thirty percent (30%) of summer classes and semester classes that are shorter than the full semester.Catalog rights gained at a college outside of the San Mateo Community College District are not applicable at Cañada College, College of San Mateo, or Skyline College.Catalog rights cannot supersede any State or Federal Regulation or requirement in effect at the time of graduation. Additional Associate Degrees and Certificates. A student may earn multiple Associate Degrees and Certificates from College of San Mateo. Each additional degree and Certificate of Achievement will be posted to the student's academic record and the student will receive diplomas for each degree and Certificate of Achievement earned. For additional degrees and certificates any course used to meet the prescribed graduation requirements may count toward more than one degree and certificate. Courses used for one major used to meet the prescribed graduation requirements for additional majors. Courses used to meet competency requirements and general education requirements for the first degree may be used to fulfill these requirements for additional degrees, provided the student has maintained "continuous" enrollment (see Graduation Requirements and Student Catalog Rights). If a break in enrollment occurs, a student must comply with the competency, general education, and major requirements in effect at the time the student resumes attendance or those in subsequent years of the student's enrollment. Requirements for the Associate in Arts for transfer (AA-T) or Associate in Sciences for transfer (AS-T). The Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act (Senate Bill 1440, now codified in California Education Code sections 66746-66749) guarantees admission to a California State University (CSU) campus for any community college student who completes an "associate degree for transfer", a newly established variation of the associate degrees traditionally offered at a California community college. The Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) or the Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor's degree in a similar major at a CSU campus. Students completing these degrees (AA-T or AS-T) are guaranteed admission to the CSU system, but not to a particular campus or major. In order to earn one of these degrees, students must complete a minimum of 60 required semester units of CSU-transferable coursework with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Students transferring to a CSU campus that accepts the AA-T or AS-T will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor's degree (unless the major is a designated "high-unit" major). This degree may not be the best option for students intending to transfer to a particular CSU campus or to a university or college that is not part of the CSU system. Students should consult with a counselor when planning to complete the degree for more information on university admission and transfer requirements.The degrees are described in the following document and are included in the CSM catalog. Associate Degrees for Transfer CSM Home | About CSM | Apply & Enroll | Contact CSM | Events | Maps | Nondiscrimination | Privacy | Schedule & Catalog | Web Accessibility | WebSMART | Webmaster 1700 W. Hillsdale Boulevard, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Result 24
TitleDegree Program Overview - Associate Degree Programs - Georgia Military College
Urlhttps://www.gmc.edu/academic-programs/overview.cms
Description
Date
Organic Position24
H1Degree Program Overview
H2Associate of Arts (AA)
Associate of Science (AS)
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
Associate of Arts (AA) versus Associate of Science (AS)
Top 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Provided by Front Range Community College
Academic Affairs Directory
Division Chair and Degree Program Coordinator Directory
Department Chair Directory
H3
H2WithAnchorsAssociate of Arts (AA)
Associate of Science (AS)
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
Associate of Arts (AA) versus Associate of Science (AS)
Top 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Provided by Front Range Community College
Academic Affairs Directory
Division Chair and Degree Program Coordinator Directory
Department Chair Directory
BodyDegree Program Overview At Georgia Military College we offer three types of associate degrees: an Associate of Arts (AA), an Associate of Science (AS), and an Associate of Applied Science (AAS).    Associate of Arts (AA). The core curriculum of the AA degree at GMC includes those courses that the faculty members of the college have identified as central to the development of the proficiencies of a Georgia Military College student. The core courses are also those in common with the core requirements of most four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. This curriculum facilitates transfer, after graduation from GMC, to a four-year degree program. Associate of Science (AS). The core curriculum of the AS degree at GMC includes those courses which the faculty of the college have identified as central to the development of the proficiencies of a Georgia Military College student. The core courses are also those in common with the core requirements of most four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. This curriculum facilitates transfer, after graduation from GMC, to a four-year degree program. Associate of Applied Science (AAS). The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree provides the educational background necessary for a chosen career field or profession and for transfer into career- oriented bachelor degree programs. While some four-year colleges offer the bachelor of applied science degree, many do not. Therefore, students completing the AAS degree who have decided to pursue a higher degree, need to ensure their selected four-year college offers the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) or similar degree in their concentration area prior to enrolling. Please note that many colleges who do not offer the BAS degree may accept core curriculum coursework based on a course-by-course evaluation for transfer. Associate of Arts (AA) versus Associate of Science (AS). The Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) degrees provide the foundation, after graduation, for transfer to a four-year college or university. An Associate of Arts (AA) is most suitable for those continuing an education in Liberal Arts, whereas an Associate of Science (AS) is geared towards studying the sciences and behavioral sciences.  Each degree includes the core curriculum that mirrors the core requirements of most four-year colleges as well as elective courses in selected areas of study (the concentration) that are foundation courses in the specific fields of study. An Associate of Arts (AA) does require completion of a foreign language for the degree.  Completion of an AA or AS degree provides the most effective method for transfer of college coursework to a four-year college or university. Top 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Provided by Front Range Community College. Take Advantage of Transfer Agreements GMC offers 52 transfer agreements to better prepare you to jump start into your major courses at a four-year college or university. Forty-five (45) of these agreements are guaranteed admission agreements upon completion of an AA or AS degree at GMC. Save Your Money Typically, tuition rates at a community college are significantly less than at a four-year college or university. Increase your Earning Potential Completing an associate degree significantly increases your lifetime earnings compared to just a high school diploma or GED. Solidify Your Credits If a life situation occurs while continuing your education, you at least still have a degree. Finish What You Start It is rewarding to show your friends and family what you have accomplished by finishing what you have started. Academic Affairs Directory. Division Chair and Degree Program Coordinator Directory. Department Chair Directory. ALLIED HEALTH BIOLOGY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COMMUNICATION COMPUTER SCIENCE CRIMINAL JUSTICE CYBER SECURITY  ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION ENGLISH GENERAL STUDIES HISTORY HOMELAND SECURITY & EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND ANALYTICS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY KINESIOLOGY LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MATHEMATICS OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT PARALEGAL STUDIES POLITICAL SCIENCE PRE-NURSING PSYCHOLOGY SOCIAL WORK SOCIOLOGY STUDIO ART TECHNICAL STUDIES  
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Result 25
TitleAssociate in Arts Degree Program | Leeward Community College - 2021
Urlhttp://www.leeward.hawaii.edu/aa-degree
DescriptionProgram Overview The AA Degree is a general education and pre-professional degree designed to provide you with skills and competencies in a wide range of subjects and is a stepping stone on the way to further educational goals. Many opportunities in the job market seek a minimum education requirement of an Associate Degree and this can translate to $360,000 more in lifetime
Date
Organic Position25
H1Associate in Arts Degree Program
H2
H3Program Overview
AA Degree Overall Requirements
AA Degree Course and Credit Breakdown
H2WithAnchors
BodyAssociate in Arts Degree Program Program Overview. The AA Degree is a general education and pre-professional degree designed to provide you with skills and competencies in a wide range of subjects and is a stepping stone on the way to further educational goals. Many opportunities in the job market seek a minimum education requirement of an Associate Degree and this can translate to $360,000 more in lifetime earnings compared to that of a high school diploma. AA degrees are offered in different areas of study (e.g., Liberal Arts, Hawaiian Studies, Teaching) and can assist you in entering a specific career or furthering your education in that field. Leeward's AA program fulfills a majority of freshman and sophomore requirements for a baccalaureate degree at any one of the University of Hawaii campuses. If you intend to transfer into a 4-year degree program, speak with a counselor to plan your AA degree in accordance with the baccalaureate program at your future University. AA Degree Overall Requirements. Minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 GPR or better for all courses used to meet the degree requirements (Transfer coursework is not calculated into the GPR) 60 credits, all in courses numbered 100 or above A maximum of 48 transfer credits earned at other colleges may be applied toward the degree A minimum of 12 credits of courses number 100 or above must be earned at Leeward CC The 60 credits are composed of: 31 credits in General Education Core requirements (12 credits in Foundation, 19 credits in Diversification) 29 credits of electives Graduation Requirements (Focus Requirements): 1 course: Contemporary Ethical Issues (ETH) 1 course: Hawaiian, Asian, & Pacific Issues (HAP) 2 courses: Writing Intensive (WI) 1 course: Oral Communication (OC) AA Degree Course and Credit Breakdown. Requirements Course Credits General Education Foundation Requirements Written Communication (FW) ENG 100 Composition I or ENG 100E Composition I (for non-native speakers of English) 3 Symbolic Reasoning (FS)One of the following PHIL 110 MATH 100, MATH 100C, MATH 103 MATH 112, MATH 115, MATH 135, MATH 140, MATH 140x, MATH 203, MATH 241 ICS 141, ICS 241 3 Global Multicultural Perspectives (FG)2 courses, each from a different group Group A: ANTH 151, ART 175, HIST 151 Group B: ANTH 152, ART 176, BUSN 277, BUSN 279, GEOG 102, HIST 152 Group C: GEOG 151, MUS 107, REL 150 6 Foundation Credits 12 General Education Diversification Requirements Diversification Arts, Humanities, and Literature (DA/DH/DL)6 credits required from two different disciplines (subjects) See Catalog for courses that fulfill DA, DH, or DL requirements. Note: HWST 107 is a recommended DH course that also satisfies the HAP Graduation Requirement 6 Diversification Social Sciences (DS)6 credits required from two different disciplines See Catalog for courses that fulfill DS requirements. 6 Diversification Natural Sciences (DB/DP/DY)3 credits from the biological science area (DB), 3 credits from the physical science area (DP), and a science laboratory/field-trip course (DY) that matches one of the chosen science courses. See Catalog for courses that fulfill DB, DP and DY requirements 7 Diversification Credits 19 Elective Requirements Combination of courses numbered 100 or above not previously taken for General Education credits See Catalog or class availability for a list of all courses offered at Leeward* Elective Credits 29 Graduation Requirements These requirements should overlap with your general education and elective requirements. See an academic advisor for help with degree planning. 1 course: Contemporary Ethical Issues (ETH)** 1 course: Hawaiian, Asian, & Pacific Issues (HAP) 2 courses: Writing Intensive (WI) 1 course: Oral Communication (OC)***   Total AA Degree Credits 60 NOTES: *Elective credits come from courses of your choosing; however, if you pursue an AA degree with a concentration (such as Hawaiian Studies), or an Academic Subject Certificate, many of these may be replaced with core requirements or electives from that program. **This E-focus requirement is not the same as required by UH Mānoa. UH Mānoa requires a 300-level E-focus course for graduation. However, all approved E-focus courses from UH Mānoa, UHWO, or any community college will meet the Leeward CC E-focus graduation requirement. ***This oral requirement is not the same as required by UH Mānoa. Courses that fulfill the AA degree requirements (pdf) Follow us on Social Media. Copyright 2012-2021 - University of Hawai'i Community Colleges - Leeward Community College 96-045 Ala Ike, Pearl City, Hawaii 96782Phone: (808) 455-0011 Map & Directions Disclaimer | Web Accessibility Leeward Community College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex, or disability in its programs and activities. Details of our non-discrimination under Title IX and for CTE program. The complete nondiscrimination policy may be found at http://www.leeward.hawaii.edu/policies-nondiscr-aa. For more information or inquiries regarding these policies, please contact: Title IX: Thomas Hirsbrunner, Title IX Coordinator, Leeward CC, AD 122, 808-455-0478, Send an email Section 504 and ADA: Dean of Academic Services, Leeward CC, LC 301B, 808-455-0440, Dean's email
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Result 26
TitleHealth Science A.A. Degree Track - Indian River State College
Urlhttps://irsc.edu/programs/health-science-aa-track.html
DescriptionAdvancing education, training and economic development
Date
Organic Position26
H1Health Science A.A. Degree Track
H2Once You Complete the Program
Academic Plans/Guided Pathways for Health Science
Employment Outlook
H3Health Science A.A.
H2WithAnchorsOnce You Complete the Program
Academic Plans/Guided Pathways for Health Science
Employment Outlook
BodyHealth Science A.A. Degree Track There are many careers within the health science industry, including jobs requiring patient care to laboratory testing and healthcare management. Once You Complete the Program. IRSC Associate in Arts Degree in Health Science graduates often continue their studies by enrolling in IRSC selective admissions health sciences programs. These students build a strong foundation for future employment in the growing healthcare field. Request Information Register for an Event or Information Session Academic Plans/Guided Pathways for Health Science. To view and print an Academic Plan/Guided Pathway, double-click on the program title. For course descriptions, see the College Catalog. Academic Plans/Guided Pathways are recommended sequences of courses and prerequisites needed to complete your degree. It is a general suggestion for when to take your courses; it is not a course schedule. Students should meet with their advisors to make appropriate course selections. The Academic Plans/Guided Pathways listed below are for the current academic year. Students should consult with their advisors for plan requirements specific to their academic year. Health Science A.A. (full- and part-time). Complete your A.A. at IRSC and continue your studies in health science by applying to one of the selective admissions Associate in Science Degree programs.  Health Science A.A. . Employment Outlook. Top New version available REFRESH  DISMISS ©
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Result 27
TitleAssociate of Arts and Associate of Fine Arts Degrees | ACC
Urlhttps://www.arapahoe.edu/academics-programs/degrees-certificates/associate-arts-aa
DescriptionAn Associate of Arts or Associate of Fine Arts degree is for a major in liberal arts and is a transfer degree for students who plan to get their bachelor’s at a 4-year college or university
Date
Organic Position27
H1Associate of Arts (AA)
H2Section Navigation
Associate of Arts and Associate of Fine Arts Degrees at ACC
Add Academic Experiences to your AA degree
What You'll Learn
H3Academic Plans
H2WithAnchorsSection Navigation
Associate of Arts and Associate of Fine Arts Degrees at ACC
Add Academic Experiences to your AA degree
What You'll Learn
BodyAssociate of Arts (AA) This degree is for students looking for a major in liberal arts and who plan to continue to get a bachelor’s degree at a 4-year college or university. Classes are guaranteed to transfer to any 4-year college in Colorado. With an AA degree, you’ll complete 60 credit hours of basic classes at ACC (English, math, science, etc.) and then enter as a junior to complete your bachelors degree at a Colorado 4-year school. Studies may include coursework in anthropology, art history, business, communications, criminal justice, education, economics, English, geography, history, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, studio art, and world languages. Associate of Arts and Associate of Fine Arts Degrees at ACC. Accounting AA Anthropology Transfer Major AA Art History Transfer Major AA Associate of Arts General Associate of Fine Arts AFA Business Transfer Major AA Communication Transfer Major AA Creative Writing Transfer Major AA Criminal Justice Transfer Major AA Early Childhood Teacher Education Transfer Major AA Economics Transfer Major AA Elementary Teacher Education Transfer Major AA English Transfer Major AA French Transfer Major AA Geography Transfer Major AA History Transfer Major AA Journalism Transfer Major AA Music Transfer Major AA Philosophy Transfer Major AA Political Science Transfer Major AA Psychology Transfer Major AA Public Health Transfer Major AA Sociology Transfer Major AA Spanish Transfer Major AA Studio Art Transfer Major AA Add Academic Experiences to your AA degree. Take a trip with our Study Abroad program or contribute to ACC’s publications the Progenitor or Arapahoe Pinnacle. There are many programs that can enhance your experience at ACC. Academic Experiences What You'll Learn. Communication Information Management Personal Development Quantitative Reasoning Cultural Awareness Responsibility and Accountability Academic Plans. Associate of Arts General Academic Plan PDF | Accessible Word doc @ArapahoeCC Need help navigating ACC's Parker Campus courses? Drop-in virtually for an advising Q&A Jan 17-19 from 9am - 5pm and get your questions answered. https://t.co/jsjWrgD47h https://t.co/aJhOSJR11G 2022 Study Abroad is happening in a few months. Learn more about the amzing things you will learn and experien...
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Result 28
TitleAssociate in Arts (AA) Degree Online | Rio Salado College
Urlhttps://national.riosalado.edu/degree-programs/associates-in-arts
DescriptionSet your future on the right track with an online Associate in Arts degree. With over 40 start dates throughout the year, you can start as soon as next week!
Date
Organic Position28
H1Associate in Arts (AA) Degree
H2Join a community of creators
Career Choices
Earn an Associate in Arts Degree
THE ART OF SUCCESS
H3Associate in Arts
Looking To Take Just a Few Classes?
H2WithAnchorsJoin a community of creators
Career Choices
Earn an Associate in Arts Degree
THE ART OF SUCCESS
BodyAssociate in Arts (AA) Degree Interested in History, Languages, Psychology, or other Liberal Arts? The Associate in Arts degree program is a great way to expand your knowledge and explore new ideas in a variety of potential fields. Join a community of creators. The Associate in Arts online degree program is designed for students planning to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The courses are geared towards meeting the requirements for majors like sociology, journalism, music, and other liberal arts. Broaden your horizons while getting yourself one step closer to graduation. And with Rio's flexible block calendar system, you can set a schedule that works best for you. Part-time, full-time, anytime: Get an Associate in Arts degree on your personalized schedule. Learn more Career Choices. An Associate in Arts is a stepping stone that can prepare you for getting a four-year degree in a wide range of fields that includes: Languages History Psychology Sociology Journalism Cultural Studies Political Science Earn an Associate in Arts Degree. Image Associate in Arts. Associate in Arts (60 credit hours) Cost per credit hour: $250 See More Information Image Looking To Take Just a Few Classes? Browse the class schedule to find the classes you need. See Schedule Image THE ART OF SUCCESS. At Rio, we want our students to focus their energies on broadening their horizons through learning. That’s why we have a dedicated team of Success Coaches on hand to help you achieve your goals. When it comes to enrollment, advising, and financial aid, our Success Coaches have the expertise to help you find the most flexible and affordable college options to get you on the fast track towards a brighter future. or call us 833-746-9283. AVAILABLE MON-FRI 7 A.M.-5 P.M. MST Explore all degree and program areas Find out how to fund your education
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Result 29
TitleAA Degree | Defense Language Institute Foreign Language ...
Urlhttps://www.dliflc.edu/administration/registrar/aa-degree/
DescriptionPlease read the AA Degree Application and Degree Plan to ensure you understand all program requirements including eligibility. Students may also obtain these ...
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TitleMoraine Valley Community College - A.A. Degree
Urlhttps://morainevalley.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2017-2018/Catalog/Transfer-Programs/Specific-Requirements-for-AA-and-AS-Degrees
Description
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TitleProgram: AA Degree General Education Requirements - Northwest Florida State College - Acalog ACMS™
Urlhttps://catalog.nwfsc.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=19&poid=6021
DescriptionNorthwest Florida State College is part of Florida’s network of public State Colleges and offers postsecondary education opportunities to 16,000 students annually at seven campuses and centers. The college is accredited to award Bachelor and Associate Degrees, Certificates and Diplomas. Northwest Florida State College operates the Mattie Kelly Fine and Performing Arts Center, the professional Northwest Florida Symphony Orchestra, a Collegiate High School, the region's Criminal Justice Training Center and various other community programs and services
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H2AA General Education Requirements
Total AA General Education Credits Required: 36
Footnote Legend
AA Degree Checklist:
H3Communications: 6
Humanities: 6
Mathematics: 6
Natural Sciences: 6
Social Sciences: 6
Additional General Education Credits: 6
H2WithAnchorsAA General Education Requirements
Total AA General Education Credits Required: 36
Footnote Legend
AA Degree Checklist:
BodyFuture Raiders Apply Now Request Campus Tour or More Information Admissions International Admissions Selective Program Admissions Student Resources Financial Services Financial Aid Forms Military Tuition Assistance Net Price Calculator Scholarships Tuition Fees and Refunds Academic Services Student Success Navigation Class Search Free Tutoring Commencement Reading to Learn Register for Class Textbooks Transcripts Career Resource Center CareerCoach FloridaShines Featured Jobs & Internships Raider Job Connection Campus Resources Accommodation Resource Center Bookstore Campus Maps Campus Safety Computer Labs NWF Raider Pantry Parking Student ID Cards Susan Myers Learning Resources Center (Library) Testing & Assessment Services Veteran Services Weather Station Raider Life Clubs and Other Organizations Student Government Student Awards & Honors Mattie Kelly Arts Center Northwest Florida Symphony Orchestra Raider Athletics Academics Catalog NWF Online Explore Programs Arts, Humanities, Communication & Design Business Education Health Sciences Industry, Manufacturing & Construction Public Safety Social and Behavioral Sciences STEM University Partnerships Connect to FSU Panama City Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University FAMU: Architecture Pathway USA Northcentral University Transfer2UWF Troy University Troy University Online UCF Transfer Connect Western Governors University Non-degree Programs Adult Education Continuing Education Workforce and Professional Training Collegiate High School Dual Enrollment About NWF State News Accreditation Leadership Board of Trustees Institutional Research Strategic Plan NWF State College Foundation Mattie Kelly Arts Center Campus Maps & Locations Campus Programs Community Host Your Event With Us Partners & Programs AmeriCorps Child Development & Education Center Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance Institute for Senior Professionals NWF Symphony Orchestra NWFSC Reads Mattie Kelly Environmental Institute Continuing Education Workforce Development Title IX Human Resources Employee Directory Purchasing Current Bids     Northwest Florida State College         Jan 12, 2022   2018-2019 Updated Catalog Updated Through 1/9/2019  Catalog Navigation   Catalog Home   Welcome from the President   College Campuses and Centers   Academic Calendar   Contact NWF State College   Where To Go For Assistance A to Z   Paying for College   General Information   Admissions   Financial Aid/Veteran’s Affairs   Testing Services   Academic Advising   Enrollment   Distance Learning   Student Records   Graduation   Campus Services   Student Life   Student Handbook   All Programs   General Education   Bachelor Degrees   AA Degree   AA Transfer Programs   AAS Degree   AS Degrees and Certificates   Developmental Education   Adult Education   Professional and Continuing Education   Articulation Agreements   Accreditations   Course Descriptions   Archived Catalogs   Browser Help   My Catalog HELP 2018-2019 Updated Catalog Updated Through 1/9/2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG] AA Degree General Education Requirements Print Degree Planner (opens a new window) | Print-Friendly Page (opens a new window) Associate in Arts students must complete 60 college credits to complete the degree; 36 of these credits must be general education credits distributed across five subject area categories. A student must satisfy the required number of credits in each category. The remaining 24 elective credits should be selected in consultation with an advisor, who will assist with selecting the college credits most advantageous to the student’s educational goals. To assure that graduates of the state university and state college systems share a common base of General Education requirements, the State of Florida has designated general education core course options in each of five areas of study—Communication, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences.  Beginning with students initially entering a Florida College System institution or state university in 2015‐2016 and thereafter, each student must complete at least one identified core course (designated with ♦) in each area of study as part of the general education course requirements. Furthermore, NWF State College has embedded the core competencies of speaking, writing, and technology in both the AA and AS programs of study; by program design, all AA and AS graduates take courses that allow them to demonstrate their abilities in these important life skills. AA General Education Requirements. Communications: 6. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze communication critically. A minimum grade of “C” in each Communications course is required for general education credit. ENC 1101 - English Composition I 3 Credit Hours ♦ ▲ ¶ ENC 1102 - English Composition II 3 Credit Hours ¶   ♦   Core General Education ▲ Technology-Across-the Curriculum ¶ Writing requirementsHumanities: 6. Students will confirm the ability to think critically through demonstrating interpretive ability and cultural literacy. Students will acquire competence in reflecting critically upon the human condition. A minimum grade of “C” in each Humanities course is required for general education credit. Choose one Core Humanities course and one General Humanities course, or Choose two Core Humanities courses.  Core Humanities. ARH 1000 - Art Appreciation 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ♦ ¶ HUM 1020 - Humanities – lntroduction 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ♦ ¶ MUL 1010 - Music Appreciation 3 Credit Hours † ♦ ¶ PHI 2010 - Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ♦ ¶ THE 2000 - Theatre Appreciation 3 Credit Hours † ♦ ¶   ♦   Core General Education † Speaking-Across-the Curriculum ❖ International and/or diversity focus ¶ Writing requirementsGeneral Humanities. AML 2010 - American Literature I 3 Credit Hours ¶ AML 2020 - American Literature II 3 Credit Hours ¶ ARH 2050 - Art History: Pre-Renaissance 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ¶ ARH 2051 - Art History: Renaissance - 18th Century Neo-Classicism 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ¶ ARH 2060 - Architecture History 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ¶ ARH 2402 - Art History: Modern Art 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ¶ ENL 2012A - English Literature I 3 Credit Hours ¶ ENL 2022 - English Literature II 3 Credit Hours ¶ HUM 2250 - Humanities – A Contemporary Perspective 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ¶ HUM 2700 - Humanities – Foreign Study 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ LIT 2090 - Contemporary Literature 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ LIT 2100 - World Literature I 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ LIT 2120 - World Literature II 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ PHI 2600 - Introduction to Ethics 3 Credit Hours ❖ † ¶ REL 2300 - Introduction to World Religions 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ THE 2071 - Humanities – Cinema Appreciation 3 Credit Hours † ¶ THE 2300 - Dramatic Literature 3 Credit Hours † ¶   † Speaking-Across-the Curriculum ❖ International and/or diversity focus ¶ Writing requirementsMathematics: 6. Students will determine appropriate mathematical and computational models and methods in problem solving, and demonstrate an understanding of mathematical concepts. Students will apply appropriate mathematical and computational models and methods in problem solving. All Mathematics courses listed below meet Mathematics requirements outlined in FAC Rule 6A-10.030 . A minimum grade of “C” in each Mathematics course is required for general education credit. Choose one Core Mathematics course and one General Mathematics course, or Choose two Core Mathematics courses. (Any student who successfully completes a Mathematics course for which one of the general education core course options in Mathematics is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Mathematics core.) Core Mathematics. MAC 1105 - College Algebra 3 Credit Hours ♦ MAC 2311 - Calculus I 4 Credit Hours ♦ MGF 1106 - Practical Applications of Mathematics 3 Credit Hours ♦ MGF 1107 - Math in Society 3 Credit Hours ♦ STA 2023 - Statistics 3 Credit Hours ♦   ♦   Core General EducationGeneral Mathematics. MAC 1114 - Trigonometry 3 Credit Hours MAC 1140 - Pre-Calculus Algebra 3 Credit Hours MAC 2233 - Business Calculus 3 Credit Hours MAC 2312 - Calculus II 4 Credit Hours MAC 2313 - Calculus III 4 Credit Hours MAD 2104 - Introduction to Discrete Mathematics 3 Credit Hours MAP 2302 - Differential Equations 3 Credit Hours MAS 2103 - Linear Algebra 3 Credit Hours MTG 2206 - College Geometry 3 Credit Hours STA 2122 - Statistical Applications 4 Credit Hours Natural Sciences: 6. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically examine and evaluate scientific observation, hypothesis, or model construction, and to use the scientific method to explain the natural world. Students will successfully recognize and comprehend fundamental concepts, principles, and processes about the natural world. Choose one Biological Science course and one Physical Science course. At least one course must be a Core Natural Science course indicated by the ♦ symbol. (Any student who successfully completes a Science course for which one of the general education core course options in Science is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Science core.) Biological Sciences. BOT 1010C - Botany 4 Credit Hours BSC 1005 - General Biology 3 Credit Hours ♦ BSC 1010C - Principles of Biology I 4 Credit Hours ♦ BSC 1011C - Principles of Biology II 4 Credit Hours BSC 1085C - Anatomy and Physiology I 4 Credit Hours ♦ BSC 1086C - Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Credit Hours BSC 2020C - Human Structure and Function 4 Credit Hours ZOO 1010C - Zoology 4 Credit Hours   ♦   Core General Education  Physical Sciences. AST 1002 - Descriptive Astronomy 3 Credit Hours ♦ AST 1005 - Introduction to Astrobiology 3 Credit Hours CHM 1020 - Chemical Science 3 Credit Hours ♦ CHM 1032C - General Chemistry for Life Sciences 4 Credit Hours CHM 1045C - College Chemistry I 4 Credit Hours ♦ CHM 1046C - College Chemistry II 4 Credit Hours ESC 1000 - Earth Science 3 Credit Hours ♦ EVR 1001C - Environmental Science 4 Credit Hours ♦ GLY 2010C - Principles of Geology I 4 Credit Hours GLY 2100C - Principles of Geology II 4 Credit Hours ISC 1003 - Natural Disasters – Causes, Consequences, Human Response 3 Credit Hours MET 1010C - Introduction to Meteorology 4 Credit Hours OCE 1001C - Oceanography 4 Credit Hours OCE 1013C - Aquatic Environmental Science 4 Credit Hours PHY 1020 - Physical Science 3 Credit Hours ♦ PHY 1053C - General Physics Without Calculus I 4 Credit Hours ♦ PHY 1054C - General Physics Without Calculus II 4 Credit Hours PHY 2048C - General Physics With Calculus I 4 Credit Hours ♦ PHY 2049C - General Physics with Calculus II 4 Credit Hours   ♦   Core General EducationSocial Sciences: 6. Students will demonstrate the ability to examine behavioral, social, and cultural issues from a variety of points of view. Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic social and behavioral science concepts and principles used in the analysis of behavioral, social, and cultural issues, past and present, local and global. Choose one Behavioral Social Science course and one History/Government Social Science. At least one course must be a Core Social Science course indicated by the ♦ symbol, or Choose two History/Government Social Sciences courses.  At least one course must be a Core Social Science course indicated by the ♦ symbol. Behavioral Social Sciences. ANT 2000 - Introduction to Anthropology 3 Credit Hours ❖ ♦ ANT 2100 - Introduction to Archaeology 3 Credit Hours ❖ DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development 3 Credit Hours ECO 2013 - Economics I 3 Credit Hours ♦ GEA 1000 - World Regional Geography 3 Credit Hours ❖ PSY 2012 - Psychology 3 Credit Hours ♦ SYG 2000 - Sociology 3 Credit Hours ❖ ♦   ♦   Core General Education ❖ International and/or diversity focusHistory/Government Social Sciences. A minimum grade of “C” in each History/Government Social Science course is required for general education credit. AMH 2010 - American History I 3 Credit Hours ¶ AMH 2020 - American History II 3 Credit Hours ♦ ¶ POS 1041 - American Government 3 Credit Hours ♦ ¶ SYG 2010 - Social Problems 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ WOH 1012 - World Civilization I 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶ WOH 1022 - World Civilization II 3 Credit Hours ❖ ¶   ♦   Core General Education ❖ International and/or diversity focus ¶ Writing requirementsAdditional General Education Credits: 6. Additional General Education Credits should be selected in alignment with a student’s choice of transfer major.  Any general education hours over a total of 36 will apply as electives in the AA degree. Consult with an academic advisor for assistance. ASL 1140 - American Sign Language I 4 Credit Hours ❖ BSC 1005L - Biology Lab 1 Credit Hour CGS 1100 - Microcomputer Applications 3 Credit Hours ▲ CHI 1120 - Mandarin Chinese I 4 Credit Hours ❖ ENG 1001 - Research Papers 1 Credit Hour ESC 1000L - Earth Science Lab 1 Credit Hour FRE 1120 - French I 4 Credit Hours ❖ HLP 1081 - Wellness: Practice and Theory 3 Credit Hours HUN 2201 - Nutrition 3 Credit Hours LIS 1001 - Library Skills 1 Credit Hour LIS 2004 - Introduction to Internet Research 1 Credit Hour ▲ LIT 2335 - Introduction to Children’s and Adolescent Literature 3 Credit Hours ❖ LIT 2603 - Literature of War in the 20th Century 3 Credit Hours ❖ SLS 1101 - College Success 3 Credit Hours SLS 2505 - Critical Thinking 3 Credit Hours SPC 1006 - Essentials of Speech 1 Credit Hour † SPC 1608 - Public Speaking 3 Credit Hours † (students transferring to FSU are advised to take SPC 1608)SPC 2300 - Interpersonal Communication 3 Credit Hours † SPN 1120 - Spanish I 4 Credit Hours ❖ ___ ____ - Any A.A. General Education Communications, Mathematics, Humanities, Natural Science, or Social Science course♦   Core General Education † Speaking-Across-the Curriculum ▲ Technology-Across-the Curriculum ❖ International and/or diversity focusTotal AA General Education Credits Required: 36. Footnote Legend.   Symbol Description ♦ Courses listed with this symbol are Florida State Core Courses and are protected in transfer to other public state institutions as meeting the state Core General Education requirements. ▲ Courses listed with this symbol address NWF State College’s Technology-Across-the Curriculum  student learning outcome, namely that all associate degree graduates are competent in basic technology use. † Courses listed with this symbol address NWF State College’s Speaking-Across-the Curriculum  student learning outcome, namely that all associate degree graduates are competent in basic public speaking skills. ❖ Courses listed with this symbol have an international and/or diversity focus  and meet Teacher Education Programs’ common prerequisites. ¶ Courses listed with this symbol meet writing requirements outlined in FAC Rule 6A-10.030  and require a minimum grade of “C” when used for General Education credit. AA Degree Checklist:. Have you completed a minimum of 60 credit hours in the following areas? 36 Hours of General Education 6 hours in Communications (“C” or better) 6 hours in Mathematics (“C” or better) 6 hours in Humanities (“C” or better) 6 hours in Natural Science 6 hours in Social Sciences (“C” or better in History/Government Social Science category) 6 hours in Additional General Education Credits (if needed) 24 hours of college credit A.A. transferable electives Have you completed at least 15 of the 60 credits at NWF State College? Have you completed the foreign language requirement ? Have you met the minimum 2.0 GPA requirements for the A.A.? Have you met the Civic Literacy Competency  requirement for the A.A? Have you applied for graduation  by the advertised deadline?    Back to Top | Print Degree Planner (opens a new window) | Print-Friendly Page (opens a new window)     All catalogs © 2022 Northwest Florida State College. Powered by the Acalog™ Academic Catalog Management System™ (ACMS™).
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