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Copywriteroffice - What are the job prospects for a Pharm.D student in the US? serp result detail
Keyword What are the job prospects for a Pharm.D student in the US?
Search Urlhttps://www.google.com/search?q=What+are+the+job+prospects+for+a+Pharm.D+student+in+the+US%3F&oq=What+are+the+job+prospects+for+a+Pharm.D+student+in+the+US%3F&hl=en&gl=US&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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Result 1
TitleFisher PharmD Online
Urlhttps://requestinfo.onlinepharmd.sjfc.edu/phm-d.html?experimentid=17475670536
Description
Date
Organic Position
H1Earn Your Pharm.D. Online From St. John Fisher College
H2Graduate Ready for What’s Next
Licensure
Prepare to Become a Pharmacist of Distinction
H3
H2WithAnchorsGraduate Ready for What’s Next
Licensure
Prepare to Become a Pharmacist of Distinction
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Online program from the Wegmans School of Pharmacy prepares students for lives of intellectual, professional, and civic integrity. The curriculum combines courses in the pharmaceutical and administrative sciences with clinical training rotations in local communities. We are waiving the PCAT requirement for applicants to our 2021 cohort. No professional experience required. Graduate Ready for What’s Next. The Wegmans School of Pharmacy is proud to offer a clinically oriented hybrid pathway that reflects the same rigor as our on-campus program, which has brought exceptional results for students: Based on data reported to the Office of the Dean, 100% of 2020 Wegmans School of Pharmacy graduates reported employment.¹90+% first-time pass rates on the NAPLEX and MPJE²Consistent outperformance of New York averages for licensure exam²New York's First Pharm.D. OnlineLicensure . The online Doctor of Pharmacy program at St. John Fisher College is designed to meet the eligibility requirements for graduates to sit for the nationally recognized pharmacy exams as outlined by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) and those required in the state of New York.³ The Doctor of Pharmacy program at St. John Fisher College is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) through June, 2024. The online pathway was approved by NYSED. Prepare to Become a Pharmacist of Distinction. Learn more about the Fisher Pharm.D. Online program at St. John Fisher College today. REQUEST INFORMATION ¹ Pharmacy Graduate Rates and Outcomes (Employment data comes from 2020 on-campus graduates).  ² This statistic includes on-campus students who graduated in 2019. NAPLEX and MJPE National Association Boards of Pharmacy board pass rates.  ³ The online Doctor of Pharmacy program at St. John Fisher College is designed to meet the eligibility requirements for graduates to sit for the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX), the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Examination (MPJE), and the Compounding Written and Practical Examination in the state of New York. Other states may have additional requirements, and students are encouraged to research the requirements specific to their resident state if seeking licensure outside of New York.
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Result 2
TitleWhat are the career opportunities for a Pharm.D student in USA? - Quora
Urlhttps://www.quora.com/What-are-the-career-opportunities-for-a-Pharm-D-student-in-USA
Description
DateDec 21, 2014
Organic Position1
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodySomething went wrong. Wait a moment and try again.Try again Please enable Javascript and refresh the page to continue
Topics
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Result 3
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position2
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
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Result 4
TitlePharmacists : Occupational Outlook Handbook: : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Urlhttps://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacists.htm
DescriptionPharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions
DateSep 13, 2021
Organic Position3
H1Pharmacists
H2Summary
What Pharmacists Do About this section
Work Environment About this section
How to Become a Pharmacist About this section
Pay About this section
Job Outlook About this section
State & Area Data About this section
Similar Occupations About this section
Contacts for More Information About this section
What They Do
Work Environment
How to Become One
Pay
State & Area Data
Job Outlook
Similar Occupations
Contacts for More Information
2020 Median Pay
On-the-job Training
Entry-level Education
Work experience in a related occupation
Number of Jobs, 2020
Job Outlook, 2020-30
Employment Change, 2020-30
Entry-level Education
On-the-job Training
Employment Change, projected 2020-30
Growth Rate (Projected)
Projected Number of New Jobs
Projected Growth Rate
2020 Median Pay
H3What Pharmacists Do
Work Environment
How to Become a Pharmacist
Pay
Job Outlook
State & Area Data
Similar Occupations
More Information, Including Links to O*NET
Duties
Work Schedules
Education
Training
Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations
Important Qualities
Pharmacists
Pharmacists
Employment
Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)
Projections Central
CareerOneStop
CareerOneStop
O*NET
H2WithAnchorsSummary
What Pharmacists Do About this section
Work Environment About this section
How to Become a Pharmacist About this section
Pay About this section
Job Outlook About this section
State & Area Data About this section
Similar Occupations About this section
Contacts for More Information About this section
What They Do
Work Environment
How to Become One
Pay
State & Area Data
Job Outlook
Similar Occupations
Contacts for More Information
2020 Median Pay
On-the-job Training
Entry-level Education
Work experience in a related occupation
Number of Jobs, 2020
Job Outlook, 2020-30
Employment Change, 2020-30
Entry-level Education
On-the-job Training
Employment Change, projected 2020-30
Growth Rate (Projected)
Projected Number of New Jobs
Projected Growth Rate
2020 Median Pay
BodyPharmacists PRINTER-FRIENDLY Summary What They Do Work Environment How to Become One Pay Job Outlook State & Area Data Similar Occupations More Info Summary. Please enable javascript to play this video. Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ploFnvE1770. Quick Facts: Pharmacists 2020 Median Pay $128,710 per year $61.88 per hour Typical Entry-Level Education Doctoral or professional degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation None On-the-job Training None Number of Jobs, 2020 322,200 Job Outlook, 2020-30 -2% (Decline) Employment Change, 2020-30 -7,000 What Pharmacists Do . Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions. Work Environment. Pharmacists work in pharmacies, including those in drug, general merchandise, and grocery stores. They also work in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. How to Become a Pharmacist. Pharmacists must have a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), a 4-year professional degree. They must also be licensed, which requires passing two exams. Pay. The median annual wage for pharmacists was $128,710 in May 2020. Job Outlook . Employment of pharmacists is projected to decline 2 percent from 2020 to 2030. Despite declining employment, about 11,300 openings for pharmacists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. All of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. State & Area Data . Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for pharmacists. Similar Occupations. Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of pharmacists with similar occupations. More Information, Including Links to O*NET. Learn more about pharmacists by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations. What Pharmacists Do About this section. Pharmacists review the accuracy of each filled prescription before it is given to the customer. Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions. They also may conduct health and wellness screenings, provide immunizations, oversee the medications given to patients, and provide advice on healthy lifestyles. Duties. Pharmacists typically do the following: Fill prescriptions, verifying instructions from physicians on the proper amounts of medication to give to patients Check whether prescriptions will interact negatively with other drugs that a patient is taking or any medical conditions the patient has Instruct patients on how and when to take a prescribed medicine and inform them about potential side effects from taking the medicine Give flu shots and, in most states, other vaccinations Advise patients about general health topics, such as diet, exercise, and managing stress, and on other issues, such as what equipment or supplies would be best to treat a health problem Complete insurance forms and work with insurance companies to ensure that patients get the medicines they need Oversee the work of pharmacy technicians and pharmacists in training (interns) Keep records and do other administrative tasks Teach other healthcare practitioners about proper medication therapies for patients Some pharmacists who own their pharmacy or manage a chain pharmacy spend time on business activities, such as inventory management. With most drugs, pharmacists use standard dosages from pharmaceutical companies. However, some pharmacists create customized medications by mixing ingredients themselves, a process known as compounding. The following are examples of types of pharmacists: Community pharmacists work in retail stores such as chain drug stores or independently owned pharmacies. They dispense medications to patients and answer any questions that patients may have about prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, or any health concerns that the patient may have. They also may provide some primary care services such as giving flu shots. Clinical pharmacists work in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. They spend little time dispensing prescriptions. Instead, they are involved in direct patient care. Clinical pharmacists may go on rounds in a hospital with a physician or healthcare team. They recommend medications to give to patients and oversee the dosage and timing of the delivery of those medications. They also may conduct some medical tests and offer advice to patients. For example, pharmacists working in a diabetes clinic may counsel patients on how and when to take medications, suggest healthy food choices, and monitor patients’ blood sugar. Consultant pharmacists advise healthcare facilities or insurance providers on patient medication use or improving pharmacy services. They also may give advice directly to patients, such as helping seniors manage their prescriptions. Pharmaceutical industry pharmacists work in areas such as marketing, sales, or research and development. They may design or conduct clinical drug trials and help to develop new drugs. They may also help to establish safety regulations and ensure quality control for drugs. Some pharmacists work as college professors. They may teach pharmacy students or conduct research. For more information, see the profile on postsecondary teachers. Work Environment About this section. Pharmacists may consult with physicians if they have questions concerning a patient’s prescription. Pharmacists held about 322,200 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of pharmacists were as follows: Pharmacies and drug stores 42% Hospitals; state, local, and private 27 Food and beverage stores 8 Ambulatory healthcare services 5 Some pharmacists work for the government and the military. In most settings, they spend much of the workday on their feet. Work Schedules. Most pharmacists work full time. Because many pharmacies are open at all hours, some pharmacists work nights and weekends. How to Become a Pharmacist About this section. Pharmacists must pay attention to detail, ensuring the accuracy of the prescriptions they fill. Pharmacists must have a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree from an accredited pharmacy program. They must also be licensed, which requires passing licensure and law exams. Education. Pharmacists typically need a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree that includes healthcare and related courses, such as biology, chemistry, and physics. Programs are accredited by an organization such as the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). Admissions requirements vary by program, however, all Pharm.D. programs require applicants to take postsecondary courses such as chemistry, biology, and physics. Most programs require at least 2 years of undergraduate study, although some require a bachelor’s degree. Most programs also require applicants to take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). Pharm.D. programs usually take 4 years to finish, although some programs offer a 3-year option. Some schools admit high school graduates into a 6-year program. A Pharm.D. program includes courses in chemistry, pharmacology, and medical ethics. Students also complete supervised work experiences, sometimes referred to as internships, in different settings such as hospitals and retail pharmacies. Some pharmacists who own their own pharmacy may choose to get a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) in addition to their Pharm.D. degree. Others may get a degree in public health. Pharmacists also must take continuing education courses throughout their career to keep up with the latest advances in pharmacological science. Training. Following graduation from a Pharm.D. program, pharmacists seeking an advanced position, such as a clinical pharmacy or research job, may need to complete a 1- to 2-year residency. Pharmacists who choose to complete the 2-year residency option receive additional training in a specialty area such as internal medicine or geriatric care. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations. All states license pharmacists. After they finish the Pharm.D. program, prospective pharmacists must pass two exams to get a license. The North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) tests pharmacy skills and knowledge. The Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE) or a state-specific test on pharmacy law is also required. Applicants also must complete a number of hours as an intern, which varies by state. Pharmacists who administer vaccinations and immunizations need to be certified in most states. States typically use the American Pharmacists Association’s Pharmacy-Based Immunization Delivery program as a qualification for certification. Pharmacists also may choose to earn a certification to show their advanced level of knowledge in a certain area. For instance, a pharmacist may become a Certified Diabetes Educator, a qualification offered by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, or earn certification in a specialty area, such as nutrition or oncology, from the Board of Pharmacy Specialties. Certifications from both organizations require pharmacists to have varying degrees of work experience, to pass an exam, and pay a fee. Important Qualities. Analytical skills. Pharmacists must provide safe medications efficiently. To do this, they must be able to evaluate a patient’s needs and the prescriber’s orders, and have extensive knowledge of the effects and appropriate circumstances for giving out a specific medication. Communication skills. Pharmacists frequently offer advice to patients. They might need to explain how to take medicine, for example, and what its side effects are. They also need to offer clear direction to pharmacy technicians and interns. Computer skills. Pharmacists need computer skills in order to use any electronic health record (EHR) systems that their organization has adopted. Detail oriented. Pharmacists are responsible for ensuring the accuracy of the prescriptions they fill. They must be able to find the information that they need to make decisions about what medications are appropriate for each patient, because improper use of medication can pose serious health risks. Managerial skills. Pharmacists—particularly those who run a retail pharmacy—must have good managerial skills, including the ability to manage inventory and oversee a staff. Pay About this section. Pharmacists. Median annual wages, May 2020 Pharmacists $128,710 Healthcare diagnosing or treating practitioners $84,430 Total, all occupations $41,950   Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics The median annual wage for pharmacists was $128,710 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $85,210, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $164,980. In May 2020, the median annual wages for pharmacists in the top industries in which they worked were as follows: Ambulatory healthcare services $137,820 Hospitals; state, local, and private 131,290 Food and beverage stores 131,200 Pharmacies and drug stores 125,740 Most pharmacists work full time. Because many pharmacies are open at all hours, some pharmacists work nights and weekends. Job Outlook About this section. Pharmacists. Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30 Healthcare diagnosing or treating practitioners 12% Total, all occupations 8% Pharmacists -2%   Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Employment of pharmacists is projected to decline 2 percent from 2020 to 2030. Despite declining employment, about 11,300 openings for pharmacists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. All of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Employment. Many pharmacists work in retail pharmacies and drug stores, which are expected to lose jobs as more people fill their prescriptions via mail order and online and as pharmacy chains reduce the number of their retail locations. In addition, fewer of these workers are expected to be needed as pharmacy technicians increasingly perform tasks previously done by pharmacists, such as collecting patient information, preparing some types of medications, and verifying the work of other technicians. However, demand is projected to increase for pharmacists in some healthcare settings, including hospitals and clinics. These facilities will need more pharmacists to oversee the medications given to patients and to provide patient care. Employment projections data for pharmacists, 2020-30 Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Pharmacists 29-1051 322,200 315,300 -2 -7,000 Get data State & Area Data About this section. Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS). The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area. Pharmacists Projections Central. Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved. CareerOneStop. CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code. Similar Occupations About this section. This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of pharmacists. Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY Biochemists and Biophysicists Biochemists and biophysicists study the chemical and physical principles of living things and of biological processes. Doctoral or professional degree $94,270 Medical Scientists Medical scientists conduct research aimed at improving overall human health. Doctoral or professional degree $91,510 Pharmacy Technicians Pharmacy technicians help pharmacists dispense prescription medication to customers or health professionals. High school diploma or equivalent $35,100 Physicians and Surgeons Physicians and surgeons diagnose and treat injuries or illnesses and address health maintenance. Doctoral or professional degree This wage is equal to or greater than $208,000 per year. Registered Nurses Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care and educate patients and the public about various health conditions. Bachelor's degree $75,330 Contacts for More Information About this section. For more information about pharmacists, visit American Society of Health-System Pharmacists National Association of Chain Drug Stores American Pharmacists Association American College of Clinical Pharmacy For information on pharmacy as a career, preprofessional and professional requirements, programs offered by colleges of pharmacy, and student financial aid, visit American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy For more information about accredited Doctor of Pharmacy programs, visit Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education For more information about certification options, visit Board of Pharmacy Specialties National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators CareerOneStop. For a career video on pharmacists, visit Pharmacists O*NET. Pharmacists Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Pharmacists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacists.htm (visited December 21, 2021). Last Modified Date: Monday, September 13, 2021 What They Do. The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties. Work Environment. The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face. How to Become One. The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation. Pay. The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH. State & Area Data. The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop. Job Outlook. The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings. Similar Occupations. The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile. Contacts for More Information. The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). 2020 Median Pay. The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950. On-the-job Training. Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Entry-level Education. Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. Work experience in a related occupation. Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education. Number of Jobs, 2020. The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2020, which is the base year of the 2020-30 employment projections. Job Outlook, 2020-30. The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent. Employment Change, 2020-30. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Entry-level Education. Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. On-the-job Training. Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Employment Change, projected 2020-30. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Growth Rate (Projected). The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030. Projected Number of New Jobs. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Projected Growth Rate. The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. 2020 Median Pay. The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn PublicationsOccupational Outlook Handbook Healthcare
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Result 5
TitleCareer – USC School of Pharmacy
Urlhttps://pharmacyschool.usc.edu/program/doctor-of-pharmacy-pharmd/your-pharmd-career/
Description
Date
Organic Position4
H1Career
H2
H3Clinical Pharmacy Practice
Community Pharmacy​
Geriatric Pharmacy​
Governmental Agencies​
Home Healthcare​
Hospital Pharmacy​
Managed Care​
Pharmaceutical Industry​
Pharmacoeconomics​
Pharmacy Education​
Specialized Areas​
H2WithAnchors
BodyCareer Apply Request Info Program MenuDoctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)Admissions Frequently Asked Questions International Students Assessment By the Numbers Career ConnectSC Curriculum Areas of Concentration Clinical Training and Community Outreach Dual Degree Programs Learning Objectives PharmD Professional Experience Programs Student Success Tuition, Financial Aid and Scholarships Scholarships Numerous career options await our graduates, who are superbly trained experts in research, policy, community care and clinical practice. According to a report from the financial company SoFi, Trojan pharmacy graduates rank No. 4 in the nation for highest average salary in the field. Here are just a few of the many career options available to you with a PharmD degree from the USC School of Pharmacy. Clinical Pharmacy Practice. In many clinics that serve diverse populations, pharmacists are integral members of the healthcare team whose contributions optimize cost-effective patient care. Working in partnership with physicians, pharmacists increasingly assume responsibility for medication therapy management—especially for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma and high blood pressure—and help patients achieve optimal outcomes through appropriate medication, diet and lifestyle choices. Community Pharmacy . Community pharmacists serve on the front lines of healthcare. In addition to dispensing medications and monitoring patients for adverse effects and drug interactions, pharmacists provide important counseling services, such as the proper selection of over-the-counter medications and referrals to other healthcare providers. Today’s pharmacists are also versed in alternative medicines. Many USC graduates own independent pharmacies or have advanced to management positions within retail chain pharmacy organizations. Geriatric Pharmacy . Nearly 40% of the U.S. population are mature adults who consume a large proportion of healthcare resources. Our PharmD graduates are among the nation’s leaders in geriatric pharmacy. Careers in this field serve the needs of a fast-growing segment. Governmental Agencies . Local, state and federal government agencies—such as the National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, Veterans Affairs and the Armed Forces—require expertise from skilled pharmacists. Many USC graduates work in hospitals and clinics within these agencies. Home Healthcare . Many patients formerly treated in hospital settings now receive professional care in their homes. PharmD graduates who work in this field provide intravenous antibiotics, pain-management medications, nutritional supplements, chemotherapy and more. Pharmacists also monitor patients’ progress and adjust therapy as needed, as part of a home healthcare team. Hospital Pharmacy . Pharmacists in hospitals monitor and adjust patient medications and work closely with physicians, nurses and other health professionals to determine the most appropriate drug therapies. Clinical pharmacists may specialize in a variety of areas of pharmacy practice, including pediatrics, critical care, cardiology, surgery, psycho-pharmacy, neurology, infectious diseases, drug information and transitions of care. Managed Care . Managed care is planned, comprehensive and integrated provision of healthcare in a cost-effective manner that emphasizes preventive care. Optimization of drug therapy, development of drug formularies, evaluation of therapeutic protocols, patient consultation, and reduction in unnecessary doctor visits and hospitalization are among the responsibilities of pharmacists who practice in the managed-care environment. Pharmaceutical Industry . Modern drug therapy is highly sophisticated, and the pharmaceutical industry requires technically proficient sales and marketing personnel. Additionally, pharmaceutical research and development provides numerous opportunities for pharmaceutical scientists, including drug isolation and synthesis, formulation, packaging and quality control. Because of their expertise in drug therapy and knowledge of the healthcare delivery system, our graduates are actively recruited by major pharmaceutical manufacturers. Pharmacoeconomics . Graduates of our PharmD/Healthcare Decision Analysis or Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy program often choose academic positions at university schools of pharmacy, opportunities in public administration, public health, medicine, government agencies, insurance plans, managed-care organizations, professional healthcare associations, hospital administration departments, healthcare consulting, pharmaceutical companies and international organizations. Pharmacy Education . Our PharmD curriculum provides a strong foundation in clinical sciences; in fact, we were the first school to develop a clinical pharmacy curriculum and pharmacoeconomics program. Nearly half of the nation’s pharmacy schools have recruited USC graduates to join their faculties in order to teach clinical pharmacy and conduct research on optimization of drug therapies and healthcare costs. Specialized Areas . Pharmacists with expertise in specialized areas such as consulting, legal practice, drug information, poison control and pharmacy affairs are more in demand as the profession evolves. At USC, you have the opportunity to pursue a range of dual and joint degrees in combination with the PharmD to prepare yourself for specialization. Information for USC students, staff and faculty about COVID-19
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Result 6
TitleJob prospects in the US after PharmD from India ~ Revolution PharmD
Urlhttp://www.revolutionpharmd.com/2014/07/job-prospects-in-us-after-pharmd-from.html
DescriptionPharmD website
Date
Organic Position5
H1Revolution PharmD
H2Search
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visitors
H3Job prospects in the US after PharmD from India
H2WithAnchorsSearch
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BodyRevolution PharmD Home ABOUT COURSE Regulations SYLABUS INSTITUTIONS CALENDARS CAREER NEWS Exclusive NEWS PharmD NEWS EVENTS CONTACT ARTICLES FAQs NOTES QUESTION PAPERS NAPLEX LEARN WITH FUN Pharmatoons Mnemonics DIFFERENCES MEDICATION CHARTS DRUG INFO RESOURCES VIDEOS PHARM.D VIDEOS BIOCHEM MICROBIOLOGY TESTIMONIALS     Good NEWS ABOUT STIPEND FOR PHARMD STUDENTS            STIPEND FOR PHARMD STUDENTS            ACPE ACCREDITATION TO INDIAN PHARMD            PCI RESPONDS TO STIPEND FOR PHARMD STUDENTS            DISHA HEALTH CAMP WAS ORGANISED BY BHARAT COLLEGE PHARM.D STUDENTS            Are you confused about your Pharm.D research Project         Job prospects in the US after PharmD from India . Hello Students,                     The PharmD degree in India does not train you adequately to become a clinical pharmacist in the United States. Students here receive very detailed clinical/hospital pharmacy training which is just not available and/or provided in India. The road towards eventually becoming a licensed US clinical pharmacist is a long and arduous one and is also likely only if you have US citizenship or permanent residency. Job prospects for US pharmacists right now are bleak as there are many private schools that have sprung up in the US which offer PharmD degrees. Also many Indian pharmacists who have eventually obtained pharmacist licenses are now facing the prospect of going back to India after their 6 year final H1B visa expiry since it is becoming very difficult for companies to file for a green card for such individuals. If you are thinking of coming and settling permanently in the US your best bet may be to pursue a graduate degree such as a PhD where there is still some employment demand. Overall employment demand for qualified foreign individuals is at an all time low here. Please let your friends know this before you send me repeated queries as I do not have the time to respond to the same questions over and over again.Thank you very much, Dr. Rajesh Balkrishnan. Related News:  §  Licensure for Indian Pharm D graduates in US a tedious and lengthy process: Dr Christine Birnie §  Academics concerned about future of Pharm D and scope of its job opportunities Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest TAGS: EXCLUSIVE NEWS, PHARM.D NEWS Newer Post Older Post Home Search. Follow us on Social Media Subscribe. Posts Atom Posts Comments Atom Comments Revolution PharmD is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. visitors. © 2011 Revolution PharmD. All Rights Reserved. DISCLAIMER | PRIVACY POLICY |DESIGNED BY SAI KUMAR.KATAM |
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Result 7
TitleCareer Paths for a Graduating PharmD
Urlhttps://www.pharmacytimes.com/view/career-paths-for-a-graduating-pharmd
DescriptionEver wonder what opportunities exist within the field of pharmacy?
DateOct 13, 2014
Organic Position6
H1Career Paths for a Graduating PharmD
H2
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BodyCareer Paths for a Graduating PharmDOctober 14, 2014Ever wonder what opportunities exist within the field of pharmacy? Chain pharmacy: Chain pharmacists account for the majority of pharmacists in the United States and collectively dispense approximately 2.5 billion prescriptions per year. Responsibilities for a chain pharmacist include dispensing and verifying medications, counseling patients on proper medication use, and recommending OTC products. Recently, the role of the retail pharmacist has expanded to include vaccinations and medication therapy management (MTM). Additionally, management opportunities are available to chain pharmacists. Approximately 60% of pharmacy students go into retail pharmacy upon graduation. Independent pharmacy: Independent pharmacies represent approximately 40% of all community pharmacies in the United States and provide employment for more than 60,000 pharmacists nationwide. Pharmacists employed within this setting typically have many of the same responsibilities of a chain pharmacist; however, pharmacists who own 1 or more pharmacies will have the additional responsibility of managing the business finances. In addition, there may be additional compounding opportunities within independent pharmacy. Individuals interested in pharmacy ownership may consider a dual MBA degree and the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) Junior Partnership program. Hospital pharmacy: Approximately 20% of pharmacists nationwide are employed within the hospital setting. Pharmacists working within this field are responsible for choosing, preparing, storing, compounding, and dispensing medicines, as well as advising health care professionals and patients on their safe and effective use. Other responsibilities for an institutional pharmacist include monitoring patterns of medication use, implementing hospital regulations, and other administrative tasks. Many hospital pharmacists choose to complete a hospital pharmacy residency program. Clinical pharmacy: Clinical pharmacists work directly with physicians, other health care professionals, and patients to ensure that the medications prescribed contribute to optimal health outcomes. Responsibilities for clinical pharmacists may include evaluating the appropriateness and effectiveness of medication use, consulting with health care professionals, monitoring patient therapeutic responses to drugs, attending patient rounds on hospital units, and counseling patients. In addition, some clinical pharmacists can initiate, modify, or continue drug therapy for patients under a collaborative MTM agreement. Clinical pharmacists can work within hospitals, health clinics, nursing homes, and insurance companies. Residency programs are available for students interested in pursuing a clinical pharmacy career path. Managed care: Pharmacists employed by managed care organizations are responsible for a broad range of clinical, quality-oriented, and MTM services. Additionally, they work directly with other health care professionals to provide the highest quality drug therapy management, while considering the pharmacoeconomic implications for their patient population. Other tasks include patient safety monitoring, formulary management, outcomes research, and patient education. The majority of pharmacists in managed care work for health plans and pharmacy benefit management companies. Managed care PGY-1 residencies are available for students interested in this field of pharmacy. Industry: The pharmaceutical industry serves to develop, produce, and market drugs or pharmaceuticals. Within the pharmaceutical industry, pharmacists can engage in research and development, quality assurance, drug information, and clinical trials. Additional responsibilities may include sales, marketing, drug monitoring, and regulatory affairs. Postgraduate fellowship programs are available for students interested in working within industry. Consultant pharmacy: The field of consultant pharmacy is dedicated to providing expert advice on proper medication use for patients within institutions, often long-term care settings. Services provided by consultant pharmacists include drug regimen review, nutrition assessment, pharmacokinetic dosing services, patient counseling, and therapeutic drug monitoring. Examples of long-term care settings for consultant pharmacists include nursing facilities, mental institutions, home health agencies, hospice care, correctional institutions, rehabilitation centers, and adult day care centers. Today, more than 10,000 pharmacists find themselves within the consulting field. Academia: More than 3000 full-time faculty members work across the nation's 130 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Responsibilities of pharmacists within this field include teaching, research, public service, and patient care. Others may serve as consultants for local, state, national, and international organizations. Specific disciplines within academic pharmacy include administration, biological science, clinical science, continuing education, experiential education, drug discovery, natural products, and pharmacology. Individuals wishing to pursue academia may consider a PGY-1 residency with a robust teaching component. Nuclear pharmacy: Nuclear pharmacy is a specialty area of pharmacy dedicated to the compounding and dispensing of radioactive materials for use in nuclear medicine procedures. Responsibilities of a nuclear pharmacist include preparing and compounding radiopharmaceutical agents, quality control measures, and ensuring the proper transportation of medications. Pharmacists in this profession work in highly regulated environments and often start work at early hours of the day. To enter this profession, an individual needs to complete a specialized training program. Residency programs in nuclear pharmacy are also available. Government agencies: Local, state, and federal governmental agencies including the National Institutes of Health, FDA, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Homeland Security, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Veterans Administration, and Armed Forces all require the expertise of skilled pharmacists. Within these settings, pharmacists can engage in a wide array of tasks, including direct patient care services, biomedical and epidemiological research, reviewing new drug applications, and developing and administering health care policy. Other options: Informatics, mail order, home infusion, legal practices, poison control, and veterinary pharmacy References: “Career Opportunities for Pharmacists.” Purdue University College of Pharmacy. Web. 12 Oct. 2014 Giorgianni, Salvatore J. Full Preparation: The Pfizer Guide to Careers in Pharmacy. New York: Pfizer Pharmaceuticals Group, 2002. Web. 11 Oct. 2014. "Independent Pharmacy Today." National Community Pharmacists Association. Web. 12 Oct. 2014. "Pharmacy Career Information." American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Web. 12 Oct. 2014.Related Content:RetailThe Role of Behavioral Economics in Addressing COVID-19 Vaccine HesitancyStudy: Covaxin COVID-19 Booster Neutralizes Delta and Omicron VariantsDaily OTC Pearl: HistaminumRelated Article >>>
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TitlePharmacist Job Outlook: Even Worse Than You Thought - Student Loan Planner
Urlhttps://www.studentloanplanner.com/pharmacist-job-outlook-growth/
DescriptionThe pharmacy world is going through major structural changes. Here's how to balance pharmacy school costs and the pharmacist job outlook
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Organic Position7
H1Pharmacist Job Outlook: It’s Worse than You Thought
H2How to become a pharmacist
Pharmacist job outlook
More schools of pharmacy enter the market to meet demand
The “real” job market for pharmacists
Pharmacist career growth
How to approach pharmacy student loan repayment
We are the experts for pharmacy school student loans
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Where Could Pharmacy Job Growth Come From?
Pharmacy School Applications Have Been Falling Precipitously
Closing Chain Pharmacy Locations Put More Pharmacists in the Unemployment Line
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Pharmacist job outlook
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BodyPharmacist Job Outlook: It’s Worse than You Thought By Rob Bertman, CFA, CFP® - Updated December 22, 2021 Advertising Disclosure Advertising Disclosure. This post may contain affiliate links, which means Student Loan Planner may receive a commission, at no extra cost to you, if you click through to make a purchase. Please read full disclaimer for more information. In some cases, you could obtain a better deal from our advertising partners than you could obtain by utilizing their services or products directly. This content is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone. When we’re looking at the job outlook for pharmacists, it’s important to see how many jobs are out there (demand) versus how many candidates are out there to fill the positions (supply). Download the Best Pharmacist Student Loan Forgiveness CalculatorIf there are more open positions and fewer people to fill them, it’s easier to get a job. And, thus, pharmacists’ salaries would likely increase. But if there are fewer pharmacists job openings and a bunch of pharmacists looking for jobs, it will take longer to find employment. Income can stagnate and even go down. Let’s take a look at the education requirements for pharmacists, the job market for them today, and the (unfortunately) rather grim outlook for the future. Note: The job market for pharmacists during the COVID-19 pandemic has improved markedly compared to the few years preceding it. This article reflects our view that the long-term trend of the pharmacist job market will face challenges given the oversupply of new graduates at the pharmacy school level. Table of Contents hide 1. How to become a pharmacist 2. Pharmacist job outlook 3. More schools of pharmacy enter the market to meet demand 4. The “real” job market for pharmacists 5. Pharmacist career growth 6. How to approach pharmacy student loan repayment 7. We are the experts for pharmacy school student loans How to become a pharmacist. Pharmacists have critical jobs. It’s their responsibility to make sure that patients receive not only the right medications but also the appropriate dosages. They also discuss potential side effects with patients and any existing medical conditions that could react negatively to the medicine. With all this in mind, it’s no surprise that pharmacists have rigorous education requirements. Most pharmacy schools require applicants to have completed at least two years of post-secondary education and many require a bachelor’s degree. At a minimum, most pharmacy programs will want their students to have completed undergraduate courses in chemistry, biology, and physics. It typically takes four years to graduate from a Doctor of Pharmacy program. However, some schools offer an accelerated 3-year option. Completing a one-or two-year residency is not a licensing requirement. But it may be required to qualify for certain advanced positions. After graduation or residency, prospective pharmacists must pass two exams to become licensed. The first is the NAPLEX. The second will either be the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE) or an alternative state-specific test. Graduates may also choose to pursue optional certifications to demonstrate advanced knowledge or skills. Pharmacist job outlook. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) that were just released, here is the dim outlook for the pharmacist job market. While the expected average growth rate for all occupations over the next 10 years is 4%, pharmacist employment is actually expected to decline during that period. The median wage for pharmacists in 2020 was $128,710There were 321,700 pharmacist jobs in 2019The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 3% decline in pharmacist employment from 2019 to 2029The number of pharmacist jobs will contract by 10,500 positions by 202914,000+ pharmacists graduate yearly when a projected zero new pharmacist jobs are being createdIn my conversations with industry experts, perhaps the retirement rate of pharmacists will be a couple thousand each year. At a minimum, it seems as if a net 10,000 pharmacists will be entering the labor force yearly with nowhere to go. Because of the earlier mention of supply and demand, we would expect massively declining hours, reduced pay, and less attractive working conditions for the future. Where Could Pharmacy Job Growth Come From? Baby boomers will age. And as they do, so will there need for prescriptions. The problem is that automation increases productivity per pharmacist and thus reduces the number needed. The biggest growth in the pharmacy profession is likely to come from non-retail settings such as hospitals, physician offices, and outpatient care centers. These kinds of places are seeing more and more value in having clinical pharmacists on hand so they can dispense medicine and monitor patient responses. In some states, pharmacists can even administer vaccinations. This does not bode well for pharmacists with student loan debt. That said, most hospitals would be qualifying employers to get Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF), which could save PharmDs a lot of money paying back their student loans. That is, if you can get a job. Retail pharmacies like Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Target and Express Scripts are still supplying a lot of those jobs at the moment. But they’re facing a lot of competition from online pharmacies, mail order, and specialty pharmacies. It may have been too quick because now they’re starting to reduce full-time pharmacist positions. Additionally, the BLS says that pharmacy technicians are increasingly performing tasks that pharmacists use to do. These include things like collecting patient information and preparing certain types of medications. Adding it all together, the projected growth rate means that compared to many other professions we advise, I would not recommend someone go to pharmacy school for financial reasons. You had better be passionate about the work and be the best in your class. More schools of pharmacy enter the market to meet demand. More pharmacists are graduating than ever because there has been tremendous growth in the number of pharmacy schools. As of January 2021, there are 140 schools in the U.S. that are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). That’s about 60 more than in 2000, or a 73% growth in Doctor of Pharmacy programs. More pharmacy programs mean that more applicants are getting accepted to school and becoming PharmDs. All of these new schools need to fill their classrooms with students so they make money. This means it’s easier than ever to get into pharmacy school. It used to be that only about 32% of applicants were accepted into a PharmD program, but acceptance rates have skyrocketed to over 80%. Not surprisingly, there are more PharmDs graduating than ever. Between 14,000 and 15,000 people are graduating from pharmacy school each year, according to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. Will 5% of the existing 314,300 pharmacists retire every year? Absolutely not. There used to be a shortage of people to meet pharmacist job growth. And that’s when the pharmacist salary really started to rise. But the increase in schools has led to an upsurge in students and graduates. That could mean a leveling out of pay for pharmacists. Right now, the median entry-level pharmacist salary is $102,414 according to PayScale. Keep in mind that’s for pharmacists who are fully employed. The “real” job market for pharmacists. It may seem like the job market for pharmacists is growing rapidly. But we’ve heard from hundreds of pharmacists here at Student Loan Planner®. And many of them are having trouble finding full-time work. Pharmacists often get the short end of the stick as these major pharmacy chains try to cut costs by hiring many part-time employees instead of paying for full-time benefits. Why can they do this? It’s because of all of the people now being accepted and graduating with a PharmD. Companies like Kroger laid off pharmacists and moved weekly work hours down from 40 to 32. CVS, Walgreens and Target have been hiring part-time pharmacists rather than full time. We’ve heard from many pharmacists that they have to take on two part-time jobs because their employer isn’t giving them enough hours. But it’s not only that. Residency is also now becoming a thing for pharmacists. Though this leads to much better training, it’s not great for salaries. It means hospitals can pay less for pharmacists right out of school. Hospitals can do this because the pharmacist job market is becoming more and more competitive. Pharmacists are chasing the highly-coveted, full-time jobs at hospitals, where they get the hours they need and also qualify for PSLF. Hopefully, the projected growth of pharmacist hospital jobs will come to fruition because they’re one of the better positions to get as a pharmacist compared to working in drug stores. Pharmacist career growth. We are certainly at a crossroads. What we can feel fairly sure about is that the demand for pharmacists is there and should continue to grow. The biggest question is what the job market will actually look like. The primary factor will be the number of new pharmacists graduating each year. The growth of pharmacy schools and graduates has outpaced pharmacy job growth, and right now, it appears the supply of new PharmDs is meeting the job demand. But if the growth of pharmacy school graduates continues to outpace the actual job growth, we could see pharmacist salaries stagnate and the ability to find a full-time job become an even greater challenge. Pharmacy School Applications Have Been Falling Precipitously. In a 2017 interview with Drug Topics, Lucinda Maine, the executive vice president and CEO of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), said the number of applicants to pharmacy schools is shrinking. According to our sources, applicants for the 2019-2020 cycle fell by 15%. This could theoretically help current pharmacists and their career prospects. But the applicant number needs to shrink 50% or more to fix the problem. The only way that happens is if at least half of pharmacy schools close their doors. If the pool of applicants to pharmacy school shrinks, some of the poorly-run or overly-expensive pharmacy schools won’t be able to fill their classrooms. This would cause those schools to lose money and eventually close down. That could cause a chain reaction. Fewer schools mean fewer graduates, which would slow the supply of new pharmacists entering the market. This would then make the job market better for pharmacists. But if the number of applications stays where it’s at, the pharmacist career outlook for the average graduate is very bleak. Hopefully, the first scenario plays out so that current pharmacists can have a brighter outlook. Closing Chain Pharmacy Locations Put More Pharmacists in the Unemployment Line. Smaller stores going out of business have become a frequent happening. When Fred’s closed its 80 stores, that cost the profession about 80-160 jobs. It’s not just retail locations. Campus pharmacies are also closing (see this example at Rutgers). This puts more pharmacists out of work. With giant competitors fighting for survival, any inefficient location could easily be pushed out of business. The big employers gain further market share and thus even more leverage over the large number of graduates looking for work. Of course, one way to be competitive is to pay lower wages. There might be some growth in the hospital setting like we’ve mentioned, but it might not be enough to offset the challenges in other areas of the profession. Clearly pharmacy schools need to prepare students for jobs besides traditional positions graduates usually fill. How to approach pharmacy student loan repayment. Having job uncertainty is hard enough. But not being sure how to pay off six figures of student loan debt on top of that is extremely stressful. So how do you decide which repayment plan is best for you? A general rule of thumb is that if someone owes less than 1.5 times their income in student loans (e.g., a pharmacist earning $100,000 who owes $150,000 or less in loans) should consider refinancing. Make sure you can afford to pay off your loans in 10 years or less. And confirm that you’re not eligible for PSLF or other loan forgiveness options. Those with two times their income or more in student loans (e.g., PharmDs making $100,000 who owe more than $200,000) should explore income-driven repayment. We are the experts for pharmacy school student loans. We’ve worked with a huge number of pharmacists who have an average student loan debt of $213,000 to prepare them for this future financially. Some of them didn’t know how to approach their loan repayment with a part-time job. Even the ones with full-time jobs weren’t sure what to do. Most have severe anxiety over their student debt. If you’re looking to get help finding a solid plan to pay back your student loans, we’d be happy to help. Along with potential savings, most people say they just feel relieved to have a concrete plan they understand. When you realize how to optimize your loans, you’ll feel a lot better even in a tough pharmacist job market. We’ve done over 5,000 individual consults and have advised on more than $1.3 billion in student loans. If you want to share the details of your situation and learn how we could help, simply click the “Get a Student Loan Plan” button below. Travis Hornsby contributed to this report.  Get a Student Loan Plan Refinance student loans, get a bonus in 2022 1 Disclosures $1,050 BONUS1 For 100k+. $300 bonus for 50k to 99k.1 VISIT LAUREL ROAD Variable 1.89-5.90%1 Fixed 2.50-6.00%1 2 Disclosures $1,050 BONUS2 For 100k+. $300 bonus for 50k to 99k.2 VISIT COMMONBOND Variable 2.49-6.84%%2 Fixed 2.59-6.74%2 3 Disclosures $1,000 BONUS3  For 100k or more. $200 for 50k to $99,9993 VISIT EARNEST Variable 1.74-5.64%3 Fixed 2.44-5.79%3 4 Disclosures $1,000 BONUS4 For 100k+. $300 bonus for 50k to 99k.4 VISIT SPLASH Variable 1.74-6.15%4 Fixed 2.30-6.25%4 5 Disclosures $1,275 BONUS5  For 150k+. Tiered 300 to 575 bonus for 50k to 149k.5 VISIT ELFI Variable 1.86-6.01%5 Fixed 2.47-5.99%5 6 Disclosures $1,000 BONUS6 For $100k or more. $200 for $50k to $99,9996 VISIT SOFI Variable 1.74-6.59%6 Fixed 2.49-6.94%6 7 Disclosures $1,250 BONUS7 For $100k or more. $100 to $350 for $5k to $99,9997 VISIT LENDKEY Variable 1.90-5.25%7 Fixed 2.49-7.75%7 8 Disclosures $1,250 BONUS8  $350 for 50k to 100k8 VISIT CREDIBLE Variable 1.80-9.99%8 Fixed 2.15-9.99%8 Not sure what to do with your student loans? Take our 11 question quiz to get a personalized recommendation of whether you should pursue PSLF, IDR forgiveness, or refinancing (including the one lender we think could give you the best rate). Take Our Quiz 2 shares Share Tweet Pin LinkedIn About Rob Bertman, CFA, CFP®. Rob Bertman holds both the CFA and CFP® designations and is a University of Michigan alum. He loves helping borrowers as a senior consultant for Student Loan Planner and specializes in making plans for professionals with 200k to 400k of household student loan debt. When Rob isn't working on student loans, he helps parents find money in their budget to save, invest and pay back debt even if the cost of raising kids is breaking the bank. Rob has 3 kiddos, enjoys playing basketball, watching superhero movies, and being active in the community. Reader Interactions. Footer. Get weekly student loan updates you won’t find anywhere else. Legal. Privacy Policy - Terms and Conditions - Disclaimer Student Loan Planner® is a financial coaching company and does not claim to provide financial advice on investment products. Refinancing federal loans causes the borrower to lose access to income-based repayment plans as well as the PSLF program. We may earn compensation from advertising partners when you click on links on this site. Student Loan Planner® is not a debt settlement or debt relief company. We do not provide tax or legal advice. Editorial Integrity. At Student Loan Planner®, we hold editorial integrity in high regard. This is why we work hard to ensure that our content delivers complete and unbiased information. Read more about our editorial ethics policy. [email protected] © 2016 - 2022 · STUDENT LOAN PLANNER® FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterYouTube X Lender and Bonus disclosure. All rates listed represent APR range. Commonbond: If you refinance over $100,000 through this site, $500 of the cash bonus listed above is provided directly by Student Loan Planner.  CommonBond Disclosures: Refinancing Offered terms are subject to change and state law restriction. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900), NMLS Consumer Access. 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To qualify for this Earnest Bonus offer: 1) you must not currently be an Earnest client, or have received the bonus in the past, 2) you must submit a completed student loan refinancing application through the designated Student Loan Planner® link; 3) you must provide a valid email address and a valid checking account number during the application process; and 4) your loan must be fully disbursed. You will receive a $1,000 bonus if you refinance $100,000 or more, or a $200 bonus if you refinance an amount from $50,000 to $99,999.99. For the $1,000 Welcome Bonus offer, $500 will be paid directly by Student Loan Planner® via Giftly. Earnest will automatically transmit $500 to your checking account after the final disbursement. For the $200 Welcome Bonus offer, Earnest will automatically transmit the $200 bonus to your checking account after the final disbursement. There is a limit of one bonus per borrower. 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Interest rate incentives for utilizing Auto Pay may not be combined with certain private student loan repayment programs that also offer an interest rate reduction. For multi-party loans, only one party may enroll in Auto Pay. Skip a Payment Disclosure Earnest clients may skip one payment every 12 months. Your first request to skip a payment can be made once you’ve made at least 6 months of consecutive on-time payments, and your loan is in good standing. The interest accrued during the skipped month will result in an increase in your remaining minimum payment. The final payoff date on your loan will be extended by the length of the skipped payment periods. Please be aware that a skipped payment does count toward the forbearance limits. Please note that skipping a payment is not guaranteed and is at Earnest’s discretion. Your monthly payment and total loan cost may increase as a result of postponing your payment and extending your term. Student Loan Refinancing Loan Cost Examples These examples provide estimates based on payments beginning immediately upon loan disbursement. Variable APR: A $10,000 loan with a 20-year term (240 monthly payments of $72) and a 5.89% APR would result in a total estimated payment amount of $17,042.39. For a variable loan, after your starting rate is set, your rate will then vary with the market. Fixed APR: A $10,000 loan with a 20-year term (240 monthly payments of $72) and a 6.04% APR would result in a total estimated payment amount of $17,249.77. Your actual repayment terms may vary.Terms and Conditions apply. Visit https://www.earnest. com/terms-of-service, e-mail us at [email protected], or call 888-601-2801 for more information on our student loan refinance product. Student Loan Origination Loan Cost Examples These examples provide estimates based on the Deferred Repayment option, meaning you make no payments while enrolled in school and during the separation period of 9 billing periods thereafter. Variable APR: A $10,000 loan with a 15-year term (180 monthly payments of $157.12) and an 11.69% APR would result in a total estimated payment amount of $21,290.40. For a variable loan, after your starting rate is set, your rate will then vary with the market. Fixed APR: A $10,000 loan with a 15-year term (180 monthly payments of $173.51) and an 13.03% APR would result in a total estimated payment amount of $22,827.79. Your actual repayment terms may vary. Earnest Loans are made by Earnest Operations LLC or One American Bank, Member FDIC. Earnest Operations LLC, NMLS #1204917. 535 Mission St., Suite 1663, San Francisco, CA 94105. California Financing Law License 6054788. Visit earnest.com/licenses for a full list of licensed states. For California residents (Student Loan Refinance Only): Loans will be arranged or made pursuant to a California Financing Law License. One American Bank, 515 S. Minnesota Ave, Sioux Falls, SD 57104. Earnest loans are serviced by Earnest Operations LLC with support from Navient Solutions LLC (NMLS #212430). One American Bank and Earnest LLC and its subsidiaries are not sponsored by or agencies of the United States of America. © 2021 Earnest LLC. All rights reserved. Student Loan Planner® Bonus Disclosure: Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Lender and Bonus disclosure. Laurel Road: If you refinance more than $250,000 through our link and Student Loan Planner receives credit, a $500 cash bonus will be provided directly by Student Loan Planner. If you are a member of a professional association, Laurel Road might offer you the choice of an interest rate discount or the $300, $500, or $750 cash bonus mentioned above. Offers from Laurel Road cannot be combined. Rate range above includes optional 0.25% Auto Pay discount.  Laurel Road Bonus Offer Disclosure: Terms and conditions apply. To qualify for this Laurel Road Welcome Bonus offer: 1) you must not currently be an Laurel Road client, or have received the bonus in the past, 2) you must submit a completed student loan refinancing application through the designated Student Loan Planner® link; 3) you must provide a valid email address and a valid checking account number during the application process; and 4) your loan must be fully disbursed. If a borrower is eligible for and chooses to accept an interest rate promotional offer due to that borrower’s membership in a professional association, the borrower will not be eligible for the cash bonus from Laurel Road. However, the borrower can still be eligible for the Student Loan Planner® bonus if they qualify under the “Student Loan Planner® Bonus Disclosure terms below.”  If you opt to receive the cash bonus incentive offer, you will receive a $1,050 bonus if you refinance $100,000 or more, or a $300 bonus if you refinance an amount from $50,000 to $99,999.99. For the $1,050 Welcome Bonus offer, $500 will be paid directly by Student Loan Planner® via Giftly. Laurel Road will automatically transmit $550 to your checking account after the final disbursement. For the $300 Welcome Bonus offer, Laurel Road will automatically transmit the $300 bonus to your checking account after the final disbursement.  There is a limit of one bonus per borrower. This offer is not valid for current Laurel Road clients who refinance their existing Laurel Road loans, clients who have previously received a bonus, or with any other bonus offers received from Laurel Road via this or any other channel. You can take advantage of the Auto Pay interest rate reduction by setting up and maintaining active and automatic ACH withdrawal of your loan payment. The interest rate reduction for Auto Pay will be available only while your loan is enrolled in Auto Pay. Interest rate incentives for utilizing Auto Pay may not be combined with certain private student loan repayment programs that also offer an interest rate reduction. For multi-party loans, only one party may enroll in Auto Pay Student Loan Planner® Bonus Disclosure Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Lender and Bonus disclosure. Elfi: If you refinance over $150,000 through this site, $500 of the cash bonus listed above is provided directly by Student Loan Planner.  To begin the qualification process for the Student Loan Planner® sign on bonus, customers must apply from the link provided on https://www.elfi.com/student-loan-planner. Customers who are approved for and close a loan will receive the $300-$775 bonus through a reduction in the principal balance of their Education Loan Finance loan when your loan has been disbursed. The amount of the bonus will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. In order to receive this bonus, customers will be required to complete and submit a W9 form with all required documents. Taxes are the sole responsibility of the recipient. There is a limit of one bonus per borrower. This offer is not valid for current ELFI customers who refinance their existing ELFI loans, customers who have previously received a bonus, or with any other bonus offers received from ELFI via this or any other channel. If the applicant was referred using the referral bonus, they will not receive the bonus provided via the referring party. If the applicant becomes an ELFI customer, they may participate in the referral bonus by becoming the referring party. Additional terms and conditions apply. For the $1,275 bonus associated with refinancing at least $150,000, $500 of the bonus is provided by Student Loan Planner® via Giftly, which can be redeemed as a deposit to your bank account or PayPal account. Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Lender and Bonus disclosure. Splash: If you refinance over $100,000 through this site, $500 of the cash bonus listed above is provided directly by Student Loan Planner.  To begin the qualification process for the Student Loan Planner® sign on bonus, customers must apply from the link provided. Customers who are approved for and close a loan will receive the $300-$500 bonus through Splash Financial. The amount of the bonus will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. There is a limit of one bonus per borrower. This offer is not valid for current Splash customers who refinance their existing Splash loans, customers who have previously received a bonus, or with any other bonus offers received from Splash via this or any other channel. If the applicant was referred using the referral bonus, they will not receive the bonus provided via the referring party. Additional terms and conditions apply. For the $1,000 bonus associated with refinancing at least $100,000, $500 of the bonus is provided by Student Loan Planner® via Giftly, which can be redeemed as a deposit to your bank account or PayPal account. Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Lender and Bonus disclosure. Sofi: If you refinance $100,000 or more through this site, $500 of the $1,000 cash bonus is provided directly by Student Loan Planner. Fixed rates range from 2.49% APR to 6.94% APR with 0.25% autopay discount. Variable rates range from 1.99% APR to 6.59% APR with a 0.25% autopay discount. Unless required to be lower to comply with applicable law, Variable Interest rates on 5-, 7-, and 10-year terms are capped at 8.95% APR; 15- and 20-year terms are capped at 9.95% APR. SoFi rate ranges are current as of 11/01/2021 and are subject to change at any time. Your actual rate will be within the range of rates listed above and will depend on the term you select, evaluation of your creditworthiness, income, presence of a co-signer and a variety of other factors. Lowest rates reserved for the most creditworthy borrowers. For the SoFi variable-rate product, the variable interest rate for a given month is derived by adding a margin to the 30-day average SOFR index, published two business days preceding such calendar month, rounded up to the nearest one hundredth of one percent (0.01% or 0.0001). APRs for variable-rate loans may increase after origination if the SOFR index increases. The SoFi 0.25% autopay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. This benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit lowers your interest rate but does not change the amount of your monthly payment. This benefit is suspended during periods of deferment and forbearance. Autopay is not required to receive a loan from SoFi. SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers, or may become available, such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment or PAYE. SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp. or an affiliate (dba SoFi), a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license #6054612; NMLS #1121636 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). Additional terms and conditions apply; see SoFi.com/eligibility for details. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE. Rate Match Guarantee Disclosure Get $100 when you fund a Student Loan Refinance offered by SoFi Lending Corp. or an affiliate. $100 bonus not available to residents of OH. Rate Match valid only for private student loan refi products & will be on the rate, exclusive of all discounts. Eligible documentation of a competitor’s current rate offer, issued within 30 days of your SoFi pre-qualified rate, will be determined at SoFi’s sole discretion and must be for the same loan amount and repayment terms. Lowest rates reserved for the most creditworthy borrowers. Void where prohibited by state law. See full terms & conditions at sofi.com/refinance-student-loan/#guaranteed-rate-match. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue at any time without notice. Additional terms & conditions apply; see SoFi.com/eligibility. CFL#6054612, NMLS#1121636 (nmlsconsumeraccess.org) Student Loan Planner® Bonus Disclosure Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Lender and Bonus disclosure. Credible: If you refinance over $100,000 through this site, $500 of the cash bonus listed above is provided directly by Student Loan Planner.  To begin the qualification process for the Student Loan Planner® sign on bonus, customers must apply from the link provided on www.credible.com. The amount of the bonus will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. In order to receive this bonus, customers will be required to complete and submit a W9 form with all required documents. Taxes are the sole responsibility of the recipient. A customer will only be eligible to receive the bonus one time. New applicants are eligible for only one bonus. Additional terms and conditions apply. For the $1,250 bonus associated with refinancing at least $100,000, $500 of the bonus is provided by Student Loan Planner® via Giftly, which can be redeemed as a deposit to your bank account or PayPal account. Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Lender and Bonus disclosure. Terms and conditions apply. To qualify for this LendKey Bonus offer: 1) you must not currently be an LendKey client, or have received the bonus in the past, 2) you must submit a completed student loan refinancing application through the designated Student Loan Planner® link; 3) you must provide a valid email address and a valid checking account number during the application process; and 4) your loan must be fully disbursed. You will receive a $1,250 bonus if you refinance $150,000 or more, or a $100 to $400 bonus if you refinance an amount from $20,000 to $149,999.99, depending on the amount refinanced. For the $1,250 Welcome Bonus offer, $500 will be paid directly by Student Loan Planner® via Giftly. LendKey will automatically transmit $750 to your checking account after the final disbursement. For the $100 to $400 Welcome Bonus offer, LendKey will automatically transmit the $100 to $400 bonus to your checking account after the final disbursement. There is a limit of one bonus per borrower. This offer is not valid for current LendKey clients who refinance their existing LendKey loans, clients who have previously received a bonus, or with any other bonus offers received from LendKey via this or any other channel. Bonus cannot be issued to residents in KY, MA, or MI. Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. Sallie Mae Disclosures. 1 Lowest rates shown include auto debit discount. Advertised rates are for the Smart Option Student Loan for undergraduate students and are valid as of 7/22/2021. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. Payments may be required during the grace/ separation period depending on the repayment option selected. Variable rates may increase over the life of the loan. Advertised variable rates reflect the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Advertised APRs assume a $10,000 loan to a borrower who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae loans. The borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction benefit. This benefit applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment, if available for the loan. Sallie Mae Disclosures. 1 Lowest rates shown include auto debit discount. Advertised rates are for the Smart Option Student Loan for undergraduate students and are valid as of 7/22/2021. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. Payments may be required during the grace/ separation period depending on the repayment option selected. Variable rates may increase over the life of the loan. Advertised variable rates reflect the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Advertised APRs assume a $10,000 loan to a borrower who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae loans. The borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction benefit. This benefit applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment, if available for the loan. Sallie Mae Disclosures. 1 Lowest rates shown include auto debit discount. Advertised rates are for the Smart Option Student Loan for undergraduate students and are valid as of 7/22/2021. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. Payments may be required during the grace/ separation period depending on the repayment option selected. Variable rates may increase over the life of the loan. Advertised variable rates reflect the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Advertised APRs assume a $10,000 loan to a borrower who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae loans. The borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction benefit. This benefit applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment, if available for the loan. Discover Disclosures. Lowest APRs shown for Discover Student Loans are available for the most creditworthy applicants for undergraduate loans, and include an interest-only repayment discount a 0.25% interest rate reduction while enrolled in automatic payments. The interest rate ranges represent the lowest and highest interest rates offered on Discover student loans, including Undergraduate, Graduate, Health Professions, Law and MBA Loans. The lowest APRs shown for residency, bar exam, private consolidation and parent loans are available for the most creditworthy applicants and include a 0.25% interest rate reduction while enrolled in automatic payments. The fixed interest rate is set at the time of application and does not change during the life of the loan. The variable interest rate is calculated based on the 3-Month LIBOR index plus the applicable margin percentage. For variable interest rate loans, the 3-Month LIBOR is 0.250% as of January 1, 2021. Discover Student Loans may adjust the rate quarterly on each January 1, April 1, July 1 and October 1 (the “interest rate change date”), based on the 3-Month LIBOR Index, published in the Money Rates section of the Wall Street Journal 15 days prior to the interest rate change date, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of one percent (0.125% or 0.00125). This may cause the monthly payments to increase, the number of payments to increase or both. Our lowest APR is only available to customers with the best credit and other factors. Your APR will be determined after you apply. It will be based on your credit history, which repayment option you choose and other factors, including your cosigner’s credit history (if applicable). Learn more about Discover Student Loans interest rates at DiscoverStudentLoans.com/Rates. Sallie Mae Disclosures. 1 Lowest rates shown include auto debit discount. Advertised rates are for the Smart Option Student Loan for undergraduate students and are valid as of 7/22/2021. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. Payments may be required during the grace/ separation period depending on the repayment option selected. Variable rates may increase over the life of the loan. Advertised variable rates reflect the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Advertised APRs assume a $10,000 loan to a borrower who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae loans. The borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction benefit. This benefit applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment, if available for the loan. CommonBond Disclosures: Private, In-School Loans. Offered terms are subject to change and state law restriction. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900), NMLS Consumer Access. If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown.  If you choose to complete an application, we will conduct a hard credit pull, which may affect your credit score. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 0.15% effective Jan 1, 2021 and may increase after consummation. Student Loan Planner® Disclosures. Upon disbursement of a qualifying loan, the borrower must notify Student Loan Planner® that a qualifying loan was refinanced through the site, as the lender does not share the names or contact information of borrowers. Borrowers must complete the Refinance Bonus Request form to claim a bonus offer. Student Loan Planner® will confirm loan eligibility and, upon confirmation of a qualifying refinance, will send via email a $500 e-gift card within 14 business days following the last day of the month in which the qualifying loan was confirmed eligible by Student Loan Planner®. If a borrower does not claim the Student Loan Planner® bonus within six months of the loan disbursement, the borrower forfeits their right to claim said bonus. The bonus amount will depend on the total loan amount disbursed. This offer is not valid for borrowers who have previously received a bonus from Student Loan Planner®. Sallie Mae Disclosures. 1 Lowest rates shown include auto debit discount. Advertised rates are for the Smart Option Student Loan for undergraduate students and are valid as of 7/22/2021. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. Payments may be required during the grace/ separation period depending on the repayment option selected. Variable rates may increase over the life of the loan. Advertised variable rates reflect the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Advertised APRs assume a $10,000 loan to a borrower who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae loans. The borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction benefit. This benefit applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment, if available for the loan. Questions? Feedback? [https://www.olark.com/site/5388-486-10-2163/contact] powered by Olark live chat software [http://www.olark.com?welcome] facebook_pixel [https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1217905188224939&ev=PageView&noscript=1&cd%5Bpost_category%5D=Pharmacist&cd%5Bpage_title%5D=Pharmacist+Job+Outlook%3A+It%27s+Worse+than+You+Thought&cd%5Bpost_type%5D=post&cd%5Bpost_id%5D=8619&cd%5Bplugin%5D=PixelYourSite&cd%5Buser_role%5D=guest&cd%5Bevent_url%5D=www.studentloanplanner.com%2Fpharmacist-job-outlook-growth%2F]
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  • directly student
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  • send email 500
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  • 500 gift
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  • gift card 14
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  • planner bonu month
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  • bonu amount depend
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  • 500
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  • 9
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  • bonu month
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  • disbursement borrower
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  • bonu amount
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  • amount depend
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  • rate range
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  • 10000 loan
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  • lender bonu disclosure
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  • amount disbursed offer
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  • disbursed offer valid
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  • offer valid borrower
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  • valid borrower previously
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  • borrower previously received
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  • received bonu student
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  • bonu student loan
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  • term condition apply
  • 8
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  • rate shown
  • 8
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  • disbursed offer
  • 8
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  • valid borrower
  • 8
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  • borrower previously
  • 8
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  • bonu student
  • 8
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  • bonu provided
  • 8
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  • bank account
  • 8
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  • provided directly student
  • 7
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  • borrower complete refinance
  • 7
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  • complete refinance bonu
  • 7
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  • request form claim
  • 7
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  • form claim bonu
  • 7
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  • loan planner borrower
  • 7
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  • planner borrower claim
  • 7
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  • claim bonu bonu
  • 7
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  • bonu bonu amount
  • 7
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  • loan planner lender
  • 7
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  • planner lender bonu
  • 7
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  • planner borrower
  • 7
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  • planner lender
  • 7
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  • monthly payment
  • 7
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  • rate vary
  • 7
  • 8
  • pharmacist job market
  • 6
  • 8
  • month libor
  • 6
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  • loan planner giftly
  • 6
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  • checking account final
  • 6
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  • account final disbursement
  • 6
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  • deferred repayment option
  • 6
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  • due designated amount
  • 5
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  • designated amount successfully
  • 5
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  • amount successfully withdrawn
  • 5
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  • successfully withdrawn authorized
  • 5
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  • withdrawn authorized bank
  • 5
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  • authorized bank account
  • 5
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  • bank account month
  • 5
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  • account month suspended
  • 5
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  • month suspended forbearance
  • 5
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  • suspended forbearance deferment
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  • forbearance deferment loan
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Result 9
TitleEconomic Analysis of Obtaining a PharmD Degree and Career as a Pharmacist
Urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4678742/
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BodyPMC US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health Advanced Journal list Help Try out PMC Labs and tell us what you think. Learn More. Journal ListAm J Pharm Educv.79(8); 2015 Oct 25PMC4678742 Am J Pharm Educ. 2015 Oct 25; 79(8): 117. doi: 10.5688/ajpe798117PMCID: PMC4678742PMID: 26689560Economic Analysis of Obtaining a PharmD Degree and Career as a PharmacistMarie A. Chisholm-Burns, PharmD, MPH, MBA, Justin Gatwood, PhD, MPH, and Christina A. Spivey, PhDAuthor information Article notes Copyright and License information DisclaimerUniversity of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Knoxville, and Nashville TennesseeCorresponding author.Corresponding Author: Marie Chisholm-Burns, PharmD, MPH, MBA, FCCP, FASHP, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy, 881 Madison Ave., Suite 264, Memphis, TN 38163. Tel: (901) 448-6036. Fax: (901) 448-7053. E-mail: [email protected] 2014 Sep 8; Accepted 2014 Nov 10.Copyright © 2015 American Association of Colleges of PharmacyThis article has been cited by other articles in PMC.Abstract. Objective. To evaluate the economic value of pharmacy education/career and the effects of the cost of private or public pharmacy school, the length of degree program, residency training, and pharmacy career path on net career earnings.Methods. This study involved an economic analysis using Markov modeling. Estimated costs of education including student loans were considered in calculating net career earnings of 4 career paths following high school graduation: (1) immediate employment; (2) employment with bachelor’s degree in chemistry or biology; (3) employment as a pharmacist with no residency training; and (4) employment as a pharmacist after completing one or two years of residency training.Results. Models indicated that throughout their careers (up to age 67), PharmD graduates may accumulate net career earnings of $5.66 million to $6.29 million, roughly 3.15 times more than high school graduates and 1.57 to 1.73 times more than those with bachelor’s degrees in biology or chemistry. Attending a public pharmacy school after completing 3 years of prepharmacy education generally leads to higher net career earnings. Community pharmacists have the highest net career earnings, and PGY-1 residency-trained hospital pharmacists have greater net career earnings than those who immediately started their careers in a hospital setting.Conclusion. The economic models presented are based on assumptions described herein; as conditions are subject to variability, these models should not be used to predict future earnings. Nevertheless, the findings demonstrate investment in a pharmacy education yields favorable financial return. Application of results to schools of pharmacy, students, and graduates is discussed.Keywords: economic analysis, pharmacy career, prepharmacyINTRODUCTION. In recent years, the US economy, with its increasing challenges, has put traditional investment strategies and positions in question. Moreover, this increased economic uncertainty has been associated with intense scrutiny and critical evaluation of financial decision making from virtually all sectors. Criticism of the financial value of certain careers and the pursuit of particular postsecondary degrees, including health professions, have not been spared. In fact, a survey conducted by Taylor et al found that 57% of Americans believe the higher education system does not provide good value for the money spent on it.1 Further, financial concerns were the primary impediment to pursuing a college education, especially given that more than 60% of undergraduate students borrowed money to assist in covering their educational costs, and currently more than 40% of median income is used to pay for college tuition (an increase from less than 25% in 2000).2,3 An article published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicated that students in health professions graduate with considerable debt-to-average annual income ratios, ranging from slightly more than 30% for orthopedic medicine to greater than 160% for veterinary medicine.4 The authors concluded the high cost of health professions education may not be sustainable.Projected growth for the pharmacy profession is anticipated at 14% between 2012 and 2022, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.5 Factors contributing to the proposed projected growth include the aging population, availability of new drug products, and increasing complexity of the health care system. The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projections are corroborated by the US Department of Health and Human Services, which anticipates that national need for pharmacists will increase 1.4% annually through 2030.6Based on this information, pharmacy seems to be a good career choice. Yet, many have expressed concerns regarding the future employment prospects of pharmacists. For example, Brown noted that a 60% increase in the number of pharmacy schools between 2000 and 2012 and growth of existing pharmacy programs resulted in a considerable influx of new pharmacists into the job market.7 As a result of the increased supply of pharmacists, the demand has consequently decreased. According to the Pharmacy Manpower Project’s Aggregate Demand Index, national demand for pharmacists has declined somewhat from 3.8 in September 2005 to 3.49 (5.0 indicates highest possible demand and 3.0 indicates balance between demand and supply) in August 2015.8 Although this demonstrates there is still greater demand for pharmacists than supply, it also suggests pharmacists may face different challenges than in the past.Zavadski suggested pharmacy education may be subject to a bubble market, wherein “a good becomes overvalued because buyers are willing to pay higher prices in hopes of selling it for a greater payoff. The bubble deflates when the asset suddenly returns to a more reasonable intrinsic value, leaving buyers from the peak of the boom with something worth far less than what they paid.” 4,9,10 In other words, for many, pharmacy education is worth the investment as long as pharmacist salaries remain high and jobs are available and desirable; thus, should salaries decrease and jobs/desirable employment opportunities become unavailable, the value of pharmacy education declines.Although commentary exists concerning the value of a pharmacy degree, virtually no studies published in the literature objectively model the estimated long-term economic benefit and return on investment of obtaining a pharmacy degree and working as a pharmacist under current conditions. Hagemeier and Murawski compared economic outcomes of directly entering community pharmacy practice after earning a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) vs earning a PhD after earning a PharmD and then entering a career in academia or industry; however, this study did not consider the effects of other educational tracks, residency training, and/or pharmacy career paths such as hospital.11 Objective data like this are not only imperative to those considering pharmacy as a career, but also of interest to stakeholders in the pharmacy profession, including academics. Therefore, the overall purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic value and return on investment of pharmacy education and a pharmacy career, and the effects on long-term earnings of attending a private or public pharmacy school, the length of PharmD program (7-year or 8-year PharmD program), and residency training. Specifically, this study modeled and compared the career earnings (up to age 67) of graduates of high school, those with a bachelor of science in chemistry or biology, and those with PharmDs, with and without residency training.METHODS. This study involved an economic analysis of 4 educational and subsequent career paths following graduation from high school: (1) immediate employment; (2) employment after obtaining a bachelor’s degree in chemistry or biology; (3) employment as a pharmacist in a hospital or community pharmacy setting after at least 3 years of undergraduate study and obtaining a PharmD (ie, 3+4 programs and 4+4 programs); and (4) employment as a pharmacist in a hospital pharmacy setting after at least 3 years of undergraduate study, obtaining a PharmD, and completing one or two years of postgraduate residency training (PGY-1 and PGY-2). Employment in hospital or community (retail) pharmacy settings were included in the model as they represent the predominant sectors of the pharmacist job market, and salaries in these settings are well-documented.12 Net career earnings from employment beginning at age 18 and through age 66 were used to determine the overall benefit of each career path. Age 66 was selected as the end age of analysis because age 67 was the official retirement age per the US Social Security Administration, and for study purposes, retirement is assumed to begin promptly on an individual’s 67th birthday.13 Estimated costs of education (including student loans) and gross salary estimates were used to determine net career earnings, defined as gross cumulative career earnings minus expenditures for postsecondary education. Net career earnings of a high school diploma comprised the base case or option used for main comparisons. All analyses were conducted using TreeAge Pro Healthcare, v2014 (TreeAge Software, Inc., Williamstown, MA), and individual inputs (with supporting references) are listed in Table 1.12,14-26Table 1.Data Inputs Used in Markov Models12,14-26Open in a separate windowThe economic analysis involved a series of individual Markov cycles for each career option within the branches of the decision tree. For high school graduates, only one Markov cycle was employed, and this singular model spanned all years of the analysis. The models for the branches involving college graduates and beyond were designed around the stage of employment for each career path: in school (or training), early career, and experienced worker. For purposes of model simplification and since reliable data were not available concerning career path changes, individuals were assumed to have remained in the same career path after entering the job market.At base, an individual could either be a high school graduate, college graduate (bachelor’s degree in biology or chemistry), or have chosen to attend college, completing either 3 or 4 years of undergraduate study as is required for acceptance by most colleges of pharmacy (according to the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy [AACP]), and pharmacy school thereafter at either a public or private institution.27 Biology and chemistry were chosen as they were common undergraduate disciplines/degree pathways studied by pharmacy school matriculates. Chemistry or biology degree holders were assumed to progress within the same job from graduation to retirement, receiving raises and regular salary adjustments each year. For pharmacy school graduates, an additional decision was placed within the model. After pharmacy school graduation, these individuals could have found immediate employment in either a community or hospital setting, completed a PGY-1 residency followed by employment, or completed 2 years of residency (PGY-1 and PGY-2) followed by employment. These decisions were put in place to model the most popular options presented postgraduation.14 Those who obtained residencies were assumed to find employment in hospital settings because traditionally most positions requiring residency training were in hospitals or clinics, and salary data for this distinction in hospital settings were available, whereas they were not readily available for other settings.The decision to attend pharmacy school was modeled by allowing for either 3 or 4 years of prepharmacy undergraduate education followed by the choice to attend either a public or private pharmacy school. Within the 4 resulting branches, graduates were then distributed by career choice.12,14 The probabilities of enrolling in a PGY-1 residency were calculated using graduation and residency data from 2012 among 4-year public and private pharmacy schools; the odds of a PGY-2 were then calculated among those having completed a PGY-1.28 These data revealed that graduates of public schools of pharmacy had greater probabilities of doing PGY-1 and PGY-2 residencies. These probabilities were included to model the observed differences in career choices made by graduates of public and private pharmacy programs.The benefits of attending college and pharmacy school were summarized by cumulative incomes across each career path prior to age 67. For high school graduates, gross annual salary began to cycle at age 18.20 For those obtaining 4-year college degrees only, gross annual salary began to cycle starting with the first year after graduation. Gross salary data (Table 1) for chemistry and biology degree holders allowed for the imputing of mean starting salaries as well as salaries for experienced workers (>5 years of work experience).16 For the first 5 years after graduation, the model gave these employees the national average salary increase of 2.9% annually; after 5 years, salaries were increased to the average “experienced” level and thereafter received the national average salary increase annually.16 After 10 years of work, salaries were capped and only national average cost of living increases of 1.5% annually were factored into income data to account for inflation.16,21Pharmacy graduates were allotted starting gross salaries according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy, and gross salaries of pharmacists who were PGY-1 and PGY-2 trained were obtained from several hospitals.12 Salaries for residents were accounted for in the model.22 Salaries for all pharmacy positions were allowed to increase using national average raises of 2.9% annually for the first 10 years of initial employment, but were only given a cost of living increase of 1.5% annually for subsequent years prior to age 67.16,21All cycles were probability weighted based on unemployment rate for each branch.15-17 Within each employment cycle, an individual was defined as either “employed” or “unemployed” to weight each year’s income with the odds of having been unemployed during the year. Both cost and income values for unemployed individuals were adjusted based on mean length of unemployment (weeks) for Americans with high school, undergraduate, or doctoral degrees.18,19 During times of unemployment, it was also assumed that unemployment benefits would be sought and no student loan payments would be made. When available, rates of unemployment were adjusted to reflect reductions in these odds as a result of accrued work experience.16 Unemployment benefits were assumed to be received by workers of all educational levels according to the benefit schedule by quarterly income or the maximum benefit when reached. Benefits were adjusted annually to keep pace with inflation.18,19 To determine income during periods of unemployment, the weekly rate was multiplied by the average number of weeks of unemployment for each level of education; income for the remaining weeks returned to regular, full-time levels for each year.To calculate the net benefits of higher education, all costs of attendance were incorporated into the models for both undergraduate and pharmacy schools. National average amounts from 2012 for college tuition and room and board were used to establish the total cost of undergraduate attendance based on the number of years enrolled in a post-secondary institution (Table 1).23 The immediate (annual) cost of undergraduate attendance ($15 716) was determined by the difference between the total cost of attendance for each year ($23 066) and the average amount borrowed ($29 400) and divided by 4;24 thus, a negative net benefit of education defined the years spent in college. For students completing only 3 years of college prior to beginning pharmacy school, the total cost and amount borrowed were reduced by 25%.National average tuition amounts as well as average student loan amounts for public and private pharmacy schools were provided by AACP.14,25 Cost of living was included in the total cost of attendance. Similar to undergraduate costs, the difference between the average amount borrowed and the total cost of attendance was assumed to be immediately absorbed by the student and was imputed as net negative benefits for the years spent in pharmacy school.To account for the long-term costs of education, student loan repayment was factored into the determination of net benefits. Cost of education was modeled as the sum of subsidized loans for undergraduate studies (at maximum amounts of $13 500 for 3 years of pre-pharmacy and $19 000 for 4 years of prepharmacy), unsubsidized loans for undergraduate studies (in the amounts of $8550 for 3 years of prepharmacy and $10 400 for 4 years of prepharmacy, which supplemented subsidized loans to the mean amount borrowed per year), unsubsidized loans for pharmacy school (maximum amount allowed which was $20 500 per year), and PLUS loans for pharmacy school (in the amounts of $21 828 for public pharmacy school and $60 848 for private pharmacy school, which supplemented unsubsidized loans to the mean amount borrowed).26 Undergraduate loans, both subsidized and unsubsidized, had interest rates of 4.66%, while graduate unsubsidized loans had an interest rate of 6.21% and graduate PLUS loans had an interest rate of 7.21%.26 Biology and chemistry degree holders were assumed to begin repayment immediately upon graduation and complete payments after 10 years using the standard repayment schedule.29 Among pharmacy graduates, the total amount borrowed during either 7 or 8 years of postsecondary education was used to determine the monthly payment, with repayment over 25 years.29 For pharmacy graduates who pursued residency training, loans were assumed to be in forbearance with interest accruing at the aforementioned interest rates for the 1 or 2 years spent in residency training.RESULTS. The final economic model spanned 49 years, representing net career earnings from age 18 until age of retirement (67 years). The base case analysis was net career earnings for those with a high school diploma, determined to be approximately $1.80 million. For those earning a bachelor’s degree in biology or chemistry, estimated net career earnings were $3.26 million and $3.60 million, respectively. Earning a PharmD resulted in net career earnings ranging from $5.66 million to $6.29 million, depending on years of prepharmacy education, type of school (public or private), and subsequent pharmacy career choice/path (community, hospital/no residency, hospital/PGY-1, or hospital/PGY-2; Figure 1).Open in a separate windowFigure 1.Net career earnings for degree holders by educational track, length of pre-pharmacy education (3 or 4 years), and type of pharmacy school (public or private).When weighted by the distribution of respective graduates, those with a PharmD may expect to earn, on average and after educational expenses, roughly 3.15 times that accrued by a high school graduate. A college graduate would be expected to earn approximately 1.8 to 2 times that of an individual with a high school diploma (Figure 2).Open in a separate windowFigure 2.Net career earnings ratios of post-secondary degree holders compared to high school graduates.Differences in net career earnings were observed between graduates of pharmacy schools and those with undergraduate degrees alone. As presented in Table 2, probability-weighted comparisons showed that incremental (defined as the cost difference between alternatives) net earnings over career resulting from a PharmD vs a bachelor’s degree were, on average, between $2.06 million and $3.03 million; differences were dependent on the type of pharmacy school attended, years of prepharmacy education, and the comparative field of study (biology or chemistry). When factored over the years of gainful employment, pharmacy school graduates would net approximately $65 000 more per year, on average, than those with bachelor’s degrees in biology or chemistry.Table 2.Incremental Pharmacy Net Career Earnings Compared to Bachelor’s Degree HoldersOpen in a separate windowWeighted analysis indicated that among the 4 educational tracks, attending a public pharmacy school after completing 3 years of prepharmacy education led to higher net career earnings than the other educational tracks. Graduates of public 3+4 programs would earn additional incomes of at least $168 642 (vs 3+4 private pharmacy schools), $240 407 (vs 4+4 public pharmacy schools), and $408 753 (vs 4+4 private pharmacy schools) over the course of their careers. Differences were also observed between public and private pharmacy schools whose graduates had completed 4 years of prepharmacy preparation: public school graduates were expected to earn approximately $177 000 more over their career, on average, than private school graduates.When examining specific career paths, the extra year of employment afforded public pharmacy school graduates with only 3 years of prepharmacy work (compared to 4 years of prepharmacy work) resulted in higher net career earnings regardless of pharmacy school type or career path (Table 3). Among like schools and the same career path, the choice to do only 3 years of prepharmacy education resulted in approximately $240 000-$249 000 of extra net income. For example, hospital pharmacists who completed 3 years of undergraduate (prepharmacy) study and attended a public pharmacy school would have extra net income of $240 407 compared to hospital pharmacists who completed 4 years of undergraduate study and attended a public pharmacy school. Differences were most dramatic for students choosing this 7-year route when entering community pharmacy where, compared to any form of hospital-based career, between $273 000 and $626 000 in extra earnings might be garnered regardless of type of pharmacy school.Table 3.Incremental Pharmacy Net Career Earnings of 3 Years vs 4 Years of Prepharmacy EducationOpen in a separate windowThe choice to attend a private vs public pharmacy school also came with distinct differences in net career earnings potential based on chosen career path. Regardless of years spent completing prerequisites, graduates of public schools were observed to earn approximately $168 000 to $192 000 more than their private school peers who had chosen the same pharmacy career (Table 4).Table 4.Incremental Net Career Earnings of Public vs Private Pharmacy School Graduates by Prepharmacy Education and Career TrackOpen in a separate windowThe choice to pursue one or 2 years of postgraduate training led to inconsistent differences in net career earnings when compared to other pharmacy career paths. As depicted in Table 5, residency-trained pharmacists earned less than community pharmacists over the course of their careers, regardless of prepharmacy education and choice of pharmacy school. For example, PGY-2-trained pharmacists who graduated from 3+4 public pharmacy programs would earn $186 417 less than community pharmacists who graduated from 3+4 public pharmacy programs. However, over the course of their careers, PGY-1 residency-trained pharmacists were observed to make more in net career earnings than pharmacists who immediately started their careers in a hospital setting. For these PGY-1 residency-trained pharmacists, incremental income ranged from $57 127 to $74 431. On the other hand, among PGY-2 residency-trained pharmacists, only those who graduated from public pharmacy programs were able to surpass the earnings of hospital pharmacists who began their careers immediately following pharmacy school graduation.Table 5.Impact of Residency Training on Net Career Earnings of Hospital Pharmacists Compared to Other Employment OptionsOpen in a separate windowPharmacists with PGY-1 residency training who completed 7 years of total postsecondary education were able to make up the gap in incomes earliest, catching their hospital-based peers by age 48. Other PGY-1 trained pharmacists (ie, those who attended private schools of pharmacy and/or were in 4+4 program) did so by age 55 at the latest. Pharmacists with PGY-2 residency training who graduated from 4+4 public pharmacy programs made up the gap in earnings by approximately age 65. Pharmacists with PGY-2 residency training who graduated from private schools were unable to make up the gap in earnings throughout their careers.DISCUSSION. According to the August 2014 issue of Money Magazine, consumers have a high degree of stress concerning college education, both in terms of financing and postgraduation employment prospects.30 Therefore, as with any financial investment, adequate return on investment of postsecondary education must be assessed. To better understand the long-term economic impact of pursuing a pharmacy degree and a career in pharmacy, the current analysis compared the lifetime projected earnings of those with a high school degree, a bachelor’s degree in biology or chemistry, or a pharmacy degree (including parameters for length of education, public or private university, residency training, and pharmacy career path). Net career earnings of pharmacists were approximately 3.15 times more than high school graduates and 1.57 to 1.73 times more than bachelor’s degree holders. Thus, substantive economic differences existed favoring a career in pharmacy compared to the alternatives investigated in this study.In evaluating economic return of a career, salary is not the only consideration. Employment rate must also be examined, thereby making job/career security (as denoted by market growth/shrinkage and unemployment rate) a central factor in assessing return on investment of postsecondary education. Health care employment increased 22.7% between 2003 and 2013, while all other US industries experienced growth of only 2.1%.31 Moreover, pharmacists have a low unemployment rate of approximately 3%, compared to the national average of 5.9%.17,32 Although concerns exist regarding a pharmacist job market bubble partly as a result of slowed growth in some sectors and increased number of pharmacy graduates9 (as evident by decreasing sign-on bonus offers, fewer open positions in certain areas, and a Pharmacist Aggregate Demand Index that declined from a prerecession high of 4.31 in mid-2006 to 3.49 in August 2015), it should be noted that the Index has generally held steady above 3.2 since the summer of 2012, suggesting a favorable job market for pharmacists.8With the increasing number of pharmacy schools in the United States and the growth of existing programs, it is essential that pharmacy schools focus on outcomes, or indicators of success, of graduates. It has been suggested that a more true-to-life ranking system or model of evaluation of higher education is needed, one that considers factors such as educational quality, affordability, alumni job placement, and alumni earnings.30 In other words, pharmacy schools that provide quality, cost-effective education (eg, lower tuition, more scholarships, greater job opportunities) will be better positioned in the educational market. Additionally, schools of pharmacy should use business models that prepare graduates for success in current and future job markets, and those pharmacy schools with proven track records have a distinct advantage compared to those without long-term positive outcomes.Strategies should be focused on preparing graduates to be more competitive for desirable pharmacist positions and postgraduate training by offering additional degrees, certificates, and other marketable qualities such as leadership. Although many students enter pharmacy school with undergraduate degrees (more than 60% of the 2012-13 applicant pool), several schools offer students the opportunity to complete their undergraduate degree and/or pursue graduate degrees while in pharmacy school by offering degrees themselves or through agreements with other institutions.33 Possessing a 4-year degree, graduate degree, or specialty certificate(s) offers students an opportunity to distinguish themselves. Likewise, completing postgraduate training may result in significant advantages. As this study indicated, such training can enhance long-term salary in hospital settings; moreover, many settings now require or at least prefer residency training when filling open pharmacist positions. Schools with high rates of success in graduates obtaining residencies should present this data to prospective students. In this study, the percentage of public pharmacy school graduates entering residencies was higher than that of private pharmacy school graduates.To reiterate, net career earnings is only one factor to consider when selecting an occupation, or even when selecting a specific practice setting within pharmacy. Thus, selecting a career path should be driven by one’s passion, skill sets, competencies, and recognition of what choice will result in general life and work satisfaction. In contrast, it is easy to draw conclusions from the results of this study that choosing the shortest route into the pharmacy job market is the most advantageous career strategy. This view may be short-sighted. For example, in tightened job markets, where there are a higher number of applicants for each open position, employers may expand employment criteria such as requiring or preferring an undergraduate degree and/or specialty certification. Similarly, as stated previously, in many pharmacy settings, including community pharmacies, employment preference is increasingly given to pharmacists with residency training over those without. Collectively, for prospective or current pharmacy students, it may be wise to invest a few more years in education and/or postgraduate training to increase competitiveness in the job market and, in turn, increase job security.As with any study, this one had limitations. The findings are subject to the validity of the data we used to create models. However, as well-established and reliable data sources were used, the data and models are valid under the assumptions but should not be used to predict future earnings. We assumed that employees remained in the same career track for the duration of their career, that no additional training or education was sought, and that student loan repayment periods were 10 years for those with bachelor’s degrees and 25 years for those with PharmDs. In real life, changes in career/practice occur, earnings fluctuate, and student loan repayment periods vary. This represents a common limitation in economic models that is accepted under the described conditions and interpreted under these assumptions. However, as career changes often result in significant increases in income, our model is likely a conservative estimate of what may be experienced by some pharmacists throughout their professional careers. In the future, the availability of reliable employment data with more precise estimates of career earnings may make possible the modeling of career behaviors that more closely resemble real-world scenarios. Thus, future economic analyses of pharmacy education and career choices should consider the possible effects of career changes, earnings fluctuations, variable student loan repayment periods, and other significant dynamic factors on net career earnings when reliable data are available. Additionally, this model was meant to represent the pharmacy career paths most historically explored by pharmacists; therefore, these results may not be applicable to those with different career paths. Nevertheless, the models provide a representation of diverging net career earnings estimates based on educational track, length of prepharmacy education, and pharmacy career track/path. Future studies should use both quantitative and qualitative data, in addition to factors such as net career earnings and time to employment, to explore student and graduate choices and satisfaction with education and career pathways.CONCLUSION. The economic models presented in this study are based on assumptions described herein; as conditions are subject to variability, these models should not be used to predict future earnings. Nevertheless, the findings suggest positive financial outcomes of a pharmacy education and career under the model assumptions. Specifically, over the course of their careers (minus educational expenses), pharmacists may make approximately $3.87 million to $4.49 million more than high school graduates and $2.06 million to $3.03 million more than chemistry or biology degree holders who did not attend pharmacy school and practice as a pharmacist. On average, community pharmacists achieved the highest net career earnings of the employment options explored in this study, while those who completed PGY-1 residency training had greater net career earnings in hospital pharmacy than those who did not do a residency. Although graduates should find ways to distinguish themselves to increase their competitiveness in the job market, pharmacy remains a dynamic and remunerative career option.ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. We would like to thank Janice Maddox in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center financial aid office for her assistance.REFERENCES. 1. Taylor P, Parker K, Fry R, et al. Is college worth it? College presidents, public assess value, quality and mission of higher education. Pew Research Center 2011. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2011/05/higher-ed-report.pdf . Accessed August 29, 2014.2. American Student Assistance. Student loan debt statistics. http://www.asa.org/policy/resources/stats/ . Accessed August 29, 2014.3. Selingo JJ. The value equation. Measuring and communicating the return on investment of a college degree. The Chronicle of Higher Education. 2015. http://results.chronicle.com/LP=1006. Accessed April 24, 2015.4. Asch DA, Nicholson S, Vujicic M. Are we in a medical education bubble market? N Engl J Med. 2013;369:1973–1975. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]5. US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational outlook handbook. Pharmacists. http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Pharmacists.htm#tab-1. Accessed September 2, 2014. [PubMed]6. US Bureau of Health Professions. The adequacy of pharmacist supply: 2004 to 2030. US Department of Health and Human Services. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2008. http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/pharmsupply20042030.pdf. Accessed September 2, 2014.7. Brown DL. A looming joblessness crisis for new pharmacy graduates and the implications it holds for the academy. Am J Pharm Educ. 2013;77(5) Article 90. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]8. Aggregate Demand Index. Time-based trends in Aggregate Demand Index. Pharmacy Manpower Project. http://www.pharmacymanpower.com/trends.jsp . Accessed November 2, 2015.9. Zavadski K. The pharmacy school bubble is about to burst. New Republic. September 29, 2014. http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119634/pharmacy-school-crisis-why-good-jobs-are-drying. Accessed October 20, 2014.10. Boscia T. Study: medical education is still worth the cost. Cornell Chronicle. http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/10/study-medical-education-still-worth-cost. Accessed September 2, 2014.11. Hagemeier NE, Murawski MM. Economic analysis of earning a PhD after completion of a PharmD. Am J Pharm Educ. 2011;75(1) Article 15. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]12. US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational employment and wages. May 2014. 29–1051 Pharmacists. http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291051.htm. Accessed August 21, 2014.13. US Social Security Administration. Retirement planner: benefits by year of birth. http://www.socialsecurity.gov/retire2/agereduction.htm . Accessed August 29, 2014.14. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 2012 graduating student survey. http://www.aacp.org/resources/research/institutionalresearch/Pages/GraduatingStudentSurvey.aspx . Accessed August 18, 2014.15. US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Labor statistics from the Current Population Survey: employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population 25 years and over by educational attainment, sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. http://www.bls.gov/cps/aa2012/cpsaat07.htm . Accessed August 18, 2014.16. Carnevale AP, Cheah B, Strohl J. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce; 2012. Hard times: college majors, unemployment and earnings: Not all college degrees are created equal.http://cew.georgetown.edu/unemployment . Accessed August 18, 2014. [Google Scholar]17. Best healthcare jobs. Pharmacist. U.S. News & World Report. http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/pharmacist . Accessed September 2, 2014.18. Pew Research CenterThe rising cost of not going to collegeWashington, DC: Pew Research Center’s Social & Demographic Trends; 2014http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/02/11/the-rising-cost-of-not-going-to-college/. Accessed August 18, 2014 [Google Scholar]19. US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Labor statistics from the Current Population Survey: Unemployed persons by occupation, industry, and duration of unemployment. http://www.bls.gov/cps/aa2012/cpsaat32.htm . Accessed August 18, 2014.20. Mishel L. Entry level workers’ wages fell in lost decade. Economic Policy Institute 2012. http://www.epi.org/publication/ib327-young-workers-wages/ . Accessed September 2, 2014.21. US Social Security Administration. Baltimore, MD: 2013. Latest cost-of-living adjustment.http://www.ssa.gov/oact/cola/latestCOLA.html . Accessed August 18, 2014. [Google Scholar]22. 2014 Directory of Residencies, Fellowships, and Graduate Programs. Lenexa, KS: American College of Clinical Pharmacy; 2014. [Google Scholar]23. U.S. Department of Education. Digest of education statistics. 2012 http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d12/tables/dt12_381.asp . Accessed August 18, 2014. [Google Scholar]24. Institute for College Access & Success. Student debt and the Class of 2012. 4. http://projectonstudentdebt.org/state_by_state-data.php . Accessed August 18, 201.25. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Tuition Trends, 2004-2012Alexandria, VA: 2014 [Google Scholar]26. Subsidized and unsubsidized loans. Federal Student Aid. U.S. Department of Education https://studentaid.ed.gov/types/loans/subsidized-unsubsidized. Accessed April 22, 2015.27. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Table 1. PharmD programs anticipated for 2014-15. http://www.aacp.org/resources/student/pharmacyforyou/admissions/admissionrequirements/Documents/Table%201%20PSAR-1415-tables.pdf. Accessed August 18, 2014.28. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Fall 2012 profile of pharmacy students. http://www.aacp.org/resources/research/institutionalresearch/Pages/StudentApplications,EnrollmentsandDegreesConferred.aspx . Accessed August 29, 2014.29. How to repay your loans. Federal Student Aid. U.S. Department of Education. https://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/understand/plans/income-driven . Accessed April 30, 2015.30. Clark K. The best colleges for your money. Money Magazine 2014;August:56–67.31. Ross M, Kulkarni S.Healthcare metro monitor supplementBrookings Institution2013http://www.brookings.edu/research/reports/2013/07/01-healthcare-metro-monitor. Accessed August 29, 2014 [Google Scholar]32. US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Economic situation summary. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm . Accessed October 20, 2014.33. American Association of Colleges. Fall 2013 profile of pharmacy students. http://www.aacp.org/resources/research/institutionalresearch/Pages/StudentApplications,EnrollmentsandDegreesConferred.aspx . Accessed August 18, 2014.Articles from American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education are provided here courtesy of American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Formats:. Article | PubReader | ePub (beta) | PDF (638K) | CiteShare. Facebook Twitter Google+ Support Center Support Center External link. Please review our privacy policy. NLM NIH DHHS USA.gov National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA Policies and Guidelines | Contact
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TitleDoctor of Pharmacy - Careers & Outcomes - School of Pharmacy
Urlhttps://pharmacy.wisc.edu/academics/pharmd/careers-and-outcomes/
Description
Date
Organic Position9
H1Doctor of Pharmacy – Careers & Outcomes
H2Quick Links
Related Links
H3Doctor of Pharmacy
5 Reasons to say "Yes!" to a Career in Pharmacy
Career Services & Professional Development Resources
H2WithAnchorsQuick Links
Related Links
BodyDoctor of Pharmacy – Careers & OutcomesDoctor of Pharmacy. Our nationally-recognized Doctor of Pharmacy program offers an outstanding record of student success with a proven curriculum. With top clinical training on a leading medical campus, the PharmD program combines the best of student life, acclaimed faculty, and cutting-edge research and facilities. Apply Today Request Info Virtual Advising Doctor of Pharmacy Unlock a world of opportunity with your UW–Madison PharmD degree.Although we pride ourselves on having an innovative, nationally-ranked program, it’s what our graduates do after they leave that is truly special. Our alumni are changing lives and improving health — from treating diabetes and heart conditions to developing new medications. They’re making a difference for the people in their community. It’s why pharmacists are one of the most trusted professionals in the country (Gallup). Preparing PharmD students for success.UW–Madison continues to have an impressive first-time pass rate on the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX), consistently performing higher than the national average. Our PharmD students are matched into residencies at a significantly higher rate than the national average. Plus, 92% of our surveyed graduates land a full-time position within six months. Student Outcomes The training ground for pharmacy leaders.A career in pharmacy doesn’t mean wearing a white coat.Our graduates work in pharmacies, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, startups, pharmacy benefit management companies, government agencies, research centers, and care facilities around the world.Our alumni are the movers and shakers of their professions and organizations, with a shared mission of helping others. Positions held by our alumni include: Pharmacists are the pioneering minds at the heart of healthcare Find lifelong connections through our world-class alumni network.You won’t begin your search for employment alone, and other UW‒Madison School of Pharmacy graduates will be there to help you manage and grow your career. Our 8,000+ pharmacy alumni network includes recruiters, executives, and pharmacists who want to see you succeed. Our Badger Pharmacy alumni are actively involved with our PharmD students and work with them as caring mentors, top preceptors, job recruiters, and expert instructors.Badger Pharmacists hit the ground running, ready to step into positions with leading organizations right away.So many ways to make a difference. Is a career in pharmacy right for you? Your PharmD degree will open doors to hundreds of roles. It might be perfect if you want to… Julie - Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Monica - Pediatric Pharmacy Charlie - Community Pharmacy Marnie - Managed Care Pharmacy Career Spotlights Limitless possibilities with a PharmD degree.You might be amazed at how many doors open to you with a PharmD degree from UW‒Madison. As a pharmacist you could:Play a life-saving role in the event of an epidemic or act of bioterrorismAdvise doctors, nurses, and other prescribers about medication therapyWork with patients to counsel on medication use and provide clinical services to help optimize their careProvide follow-up primary care for chronic diseases with complex medication regimens, such as diabetes and heart conditionsReview medications to identify and manage possible drug interactions, adverse effects, and antibiotic-resistance risksImmunize patients and provide screenings for preventative care and conduct health and wellness programsManage pharmacy departments, including those within government agencies, such as the Department of Veterans Affairs and branches of the militaryResearch, develop, and test new medications, as well as run clinical trials for new drug discoveriesWork in all areas of the pharmaceutical industry, including drug development, medical affairs, clinical trials, and marketingBecome entrepreneurs, creating and marketing new health-related productsEvaluate best medications for prescription drug formulariesPartner with veterinarians to provide customized medications for pets A pharmacy career with six-figure income potential and work-life balancePharmacy Manager and Pharmacist are rated as the #2 and #4 Highest Paying Jobs in America by Glassdoor, with literally hundreds of career paths to follow.  Plus, Pharmacist is the #1 Highest Paying Job for Women, according to USA Today.There’s lots of reasons why Pharmacist ranks #6 among Best Careers in Healthcare by CareerCast. One of them is great work-life balance. You can still save lives and have a life, too. Pharmacists have demanding, important jobs, but they have one of the best work-life balance professions in health care. Whether you want to travel, spend time with family, or enjoy your hobbies, pharmacy careers offer flexibility with reasonable hours and career mobility, so you can be at your professional — and personal — best. Licensure Exam for Pharmacists NAPLEX measures a candidate's knowledge of the practice of pharmacy. It is just one component of the license process and is used by the boards of pharmacy as a part of their assessment of a candidate's competence to practice as a pharmacist.Professional Licensure DisclosureThe Doctor of Pharmacy program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) for mandatory educational requirements. State boards of pharmacy require that licensure applicants from the United States have graduated from an accredited pharmacy degree program to be eligible to sit for the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX®). The PharmD program satisfies all professional licensing requirements for the state of Wisconsin. The School has not made a determination as to the sufficiency of its program to satisfy all professional licensing requirements of any other state or jurisdiction. Each licensing authority sets and enforces its own professional licensing standards. Every student should inquire directly to the licensing authority in the jurisdiction where the student plans to seek licensure in order to determine the mandatory requirements to be licensed to practice. 700+ Roles in Pharmacy #2, #4 Highest Paying Jobs in America Glassdoor #3 Most Trusted Profession Gallup #6 Best Job in Healthcare CareerCast Quick Links. Overview Admissions Application Process Application Timeline Prerequisites Selection Criteria Prospective Student Events PharmD Admissions Portal Admitted Students Curriculum Tuition & Aid Careers & Outcomes 5 Reasons to say "Yes!" to a Career in Pharmacy. Download our guide to learn more about why pharmacy is a great career choice. Career Services & Professional Development Resources. We help PharmD students with their job search, resume writing, practice interviews, networking with employers, and more. Related Links. Top 10 Reasons To Become a Pharmacist (AACP) Which Pharmacy Career is Best for Me? Pharmacy Career Options (APhA) Careers in Health-System Pharmacy (ASHP) Careers in Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Pharmacy is Right for Me Pharmacists for Healthier Lives
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Result 11
TitleWCU - PharmD Career Opportunities: What can I do with a PharmD degree?
Urlhttps://westcoastuniversity.edu/news/post/pharmd-career-opportunities-what-can-i-do-with-a-pharmd-degree
DescriptionWest Coast University -
DateDec 2, 2019
Organic Position10
H1PharmD Career Opportunities: What can I do with a PharmD degree?
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H2WithAnchors
BodyPharmD Career Opportunities: What can I do with a PharmD degree? , , , , , , , , , Previous Next The Doctor of Pharmacy, or PharmD, program at West Coast University (WCU) is a rigorous one. The program takes four years to complete and combines coursework with hands-on training. WCU strives to prepare each PharmD student with the education and experience required to flourish in the field. However, once WCU students receive their ceremonial hoods and bid their peers and faculty goodbye, what’s next? What can one do with a PharmD Degree? We’ve listed some of the top PharmD career opportunities that graduates can pursue after graduation. Careers After PharmD Clinical Pharmacies – Working out of medical clinics, clinical pharmacists provide assistance as key members of the cohesive healthcare teams that form a part of these clinics. Clinical pharmacists work closely with the physicians at the clinic to dispense and help manage medications for the patients of the clinic. Hospital Pharmacies – Working in a hospital is another popular option as a career for PharmD graduates. You get to be part of a large medical institution and help numerous patients — providing drug therapy based on the inputs from the medical staff. There are even opportunities for specialization to move up into medical departments such as pediatrics, cardiology, psychotherapy and more.   Community Pharmacies – Pharmacists can work in a pharmaceutical outlet – whether it’s a standalone, part of a chain, or start their own pharmacy. These community pharmacies are often the first points of contact for patients. Dispensing medication over the counter for common ailments and providing general medical advice is part of the responsibility of a pharmacist working in this environment.   Consultation Services – Pharmacists can also provide visiting or consulting services with medical institutions that offer long term care. This requires repeated visits to the site and constant monitoring of patients, tracking their medication intakes, watching for changes in condition and communicating with the medical staff working there to help alter dosage or change treatments based on changes in their health. Government Agencies – Everything from local government bodies to departments in the federal government regularly require pharmacists to join their ranks. In a government agency, pharmacists could be responsible for a variety of tasks including but not limited to: administering pharmaceutical care to veterans or prisoners, working toward disease prevention on a macro scale, researching or reviewing new drugs, and even helping with the formulation of drug policies. Education – Teaching is another valid career opportunity in pharmacy. Pharmacists could be part of the teaching staff at an educational institute that teaches courses on pharmacy and help shape the careers of the pharmacists of tomorrow. They could also conduct research projects, studies and polls in order to help provide deeper insights into the field of pharmacy. Nuclear Pharmacy – A highly specialized branch of pharmacy, nuclear pharmacy involves radioactive materials that nuclear medicinal procedures such as digital imaging - like MRIs, CT Scans and more - generally require. Nuclear pharmacists have the delicate task of handling these radioactive materials, including delivering these materials to the medical institutes that require them and dispose of them after they have been used. Those are just seven popular PharmD career opportunities that graduates can pursue after receiving their degrees. Feel free to contact us if you have queries about the program. Prev Back to The Monitor Next WCU cannot guarantee employment. Programs vary by campus. The views and opinions expressed are those of the individuals and do not necessarily reflect the beliefs or position of the school or of any instructor or student. Share Article: Share to Facebook Post to Twitter Post to LinkedIn Find the Latest WCU News on The Monitor WCU Online Alumni Spotlight: Tanisha White, RN, MSN January 11, 2022 WCU-Texas Alumni Spotlight: Saba Tavakolianrad January 10, 2022 WCU PharmD Students Win 2021 CSHP Quiz Bowl January 5, 2022 WCU-OC BSN Student Spotlight: Erica Martinez December 23, 2021 More news WCU Online Alumni Spotlight: Tanisha White, RN, MSN January 11, 2022 More videos Apply Now Are you ready to get started? Click to begin our simple application process. Apply Now
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Result 12
TitlePharmD Careers - UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
Urlhttps://pharmacy.unc.edu/education/pharmd/careers/
Description
Date
Organic Position11
H1PharmD Careers
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BodyPharmD Careers Our graduates go on to work in a wide range of practice settings including hospital pharmacy, community pharmacy, research and drug development, pharmacoeconomics, managed care, nuclear pharmacy, home health care, government agencies, and academia.   By the Numbers 88% of graduates receive first/second choice position No. 1 residency match rate in the U.S. 94% NAPLEX pass rate   PharmD Graduation Rate . as of Dec. 8, 2021 Graduating YearFour-Year Graduation Rate (%)Delayed (%)*Dismissed (%)Withdrew (%) 20219730<1 202094<4<1<1 201990802 201896202 2017973<10 201696202 201593402 201492531 2013953<1<1 2012923<14 20119054<1 201095203 200994312 2008972<1<1 2021: 5 students were delayed: 2 to meet the requirements for the PharmD/MBA dual degree program, 2 for academic reasons, and 1 medical leave 2020: 6 students were delayed: 4 to meet the requirements for the PharrmD/MPH dual degree program, 1 to meet the requirements for the PharrmD/MBA dual degree program, 1 for medical reasons 2019: 13 students were delayed: 3 to meet the requirements for the PharrmD/MPH dual degree program, 1 to meet the requirements for the PharrmD/MBA dual degree program, 2 for academic reasons, 3 for medical reasons, 3 for leave of absence, and 1 other 2018: 4 students were delayed: 3 for medical reasons and 1 to meet the requirements of the PharmD/MPH dual degree program 2017: 8 students were delayed: 3 for academic reasons, 1 for medical reasons, 3 to meet the requirements of the PharmD/MPH dual degree program, and 1 to meet the requirements of the PharmD/MBA dual degree program 2016: 4 students were delayed: 1 for academic reasons, 2 for medical reasons, and 1 for other reason 2015: 7 students were delayed: 4 for academic reasons, 1 for medical reasons, and 2 for other reasons 2014: 7 students were delayed: 2 for academic reasons, 4 for medical reasons, and 1 to meet the requirements of the PharmD/MBA dual degree program 2013: 5 students were delayed: 3 for academic reasons, 1 for medical reasons, and 1 to meet the requirements of the PharmD/MBA dual degree program 2012: 5 students were delayed: 1 for academic reasons, 3 for medical reasons, and 1 to meet the requirements of the PharmD/MBA dual degree program 2011: 7 students were delayed: 5 for medical reasons, 2 for other reasons 2010: 4 students were delayed: 1 for academic reasons, 2 for medical reasons, and 1 for other reasons 2009: 4 students were delayed: 3 for academic reasons, 1 for other reason 2008: 2 students were delayed: 1 for academic reasons, 1 for medical reasons PharmD Licensure Pass Rate . as of Jun. 23, 2021   Graduating YearNAPLEX First-Time (%)MPJE In-state First-Time (%) 2021*97.0088.00 202098.4695.60 201994.2693.10 201895.4893.22 201792.0590.48 201695.2194.93   *Partial result as testing period not yet closed   Career Placement for Class of 2021 . as of Dec. 3, 2021 Postgraduate Training133 (85%) Fellowships17 (11%) Residencies80 (51%) Acute Care Residency49 Ambulatory Care Residency10 Community Residency9 Health System Residency9 Managed Care Residency1 Other Specialty Residency2 Pharmacy Practice35 (22%) Community Practice18 Industry Practice4 Long-Term Care Practice0 Health System Practice3 Nuclear Practice1 Other5 Post Graduate Education0 (0%) Not Yet Accepted a Position2 (1%) 36% of all graduates who have accepted post graduate training or pharmacy practice positions did so in North Carolina 57% of graduates who accepted pharmacy practice positions are practicing in North Carolina 34% of graduates who accepted residencies/fellowships are practicing in North Carolina 156 professional students surveyed 63% of students who matched with a residency did so with their first-choice program (75% first or second choice) 76% of students who secured a fellowship did so with their first-choice program (100% first or second choice) Alumni Spotlight The Profession of Pharmacy. Hear From Our Alumni. More From Our Alumni. DeLon Canterbury Franklin Roye Irene Ulrich Jai Patel Kimberley Brown Patrick Brown Sarah Cobb Meet alum DeLon Canterbury, President and Chief Executive Officer at GeriatRx, Inc. DeLon Canterbury, Pharm.D., BCGP, (Class of ’14), is President and Chief Executive Officer of GeriatRx, Inc. in Durham, N.C., and is a Certified Community Pharmacogenomics (PGx) Consultant. Canterbury has dedicated his career to serving low income and rural socioeconomic populations across the Triangle, aiming to give his patients healthier lives by supporting them in their health journeys. Please describe your practice setting. What makes your career path unique? I work as a consultant pharmacist at GeriatRx, which uses a patient-centered approach to holistic care. We implement telehealth, Comprehensive Medication Management and Pharmacogenomics to provide cost-effective solutions for patients. GeriatRx provides invaluable health care consulting services and demonstrates the unique skillset pharmacists have in improving health care outcomes while managing our patients effectively with precision medicine and evidence-based Practices.  GeriatRx deprescribes unnecessarily written medications and we work to reduce costs for our patients while removing the side effect headache from our patients’ providers. Our job is to find complex solutions to really complex health barriers for our patients, such as assessing the social determinants of health (food, shelter, community resources, health education) that are linked to positive health outcomes. It’s about the interdisciplinary team-based approach to care that health care needs. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take? It’s kind of two stories in one. I’ll start with the very real, raw side. I was a retail pharmacy manager for about six years. I just kept seeing the very same patients who were either minorities or elderly coming in with the same medication errors. It ended up being such a theme that I thought, ‘how can we avoid this all together? How can we stop them from coming in with duplicate therapies and drug interactions that are causing harm?’ Time and time again, I saw the same issues. And you think, ‘this is broken. Health care is broken.’ It struck a chord with me to have to tell patients their co-pay was $1,200, even after I checked the coupons four times and did everything I could. Their heart is breaking, my heart is breaking. I felt like I wasn’t truly helping people. That led me down a dark road of depression and unfulfillment in pharmacy. I felt like I was a part of the problem and I was another cog in the wheel. So, I tried to pull myself out of this depression by remembering why I got into pharmacy in the first place, which was for community service. It started with volunteerism. So I found an amazing group – Senior Pharmacists, led by Gina Upchurch who’s also a Tar Heel alum. She runs a nonprofit called Senior PharmAssist that focuses on helping older patients with Medicare assistance and Medicare enrollment in Durham. I started working on their formulary committee and started researching medications we should put on or take off the formulary, and that was so fun! It got my fire back; it got my passion back. We were able to give that extra help outside of the four walls of a pharmacy and it encouraged me to see how pharmacists can tremendously influence the way health care is delivered and change the impact with have. Story number two, my grandmother suffered from dementia in her later years, and that encouraged me to get that Board Certified Geriatrics Pharmacotherapy Certificate. We had to move her from New York to Atlanta because she was declining so poorly in her care and her dementia was worsening. Come to find out, when we went to refill her prescriptions, a pharmacist realized she was on an inappropriate medication that was worsening all of her symptoms. Preventable. My parents suffered for months in trying to figure out the cause, with countless medical bills and expenses wasted on a condition that was due to an inappropriately prescribed medication. Imagine how many other caregivers and family members are suffering just like this without a pharmacist to guide them along their medication management journey? Her side effects completely subsided after the pharmacist talked to her doctor and changed her medication. Health care shouldn’t be so plug and chug that those errors slip through the cracks. That also inspired me to continue in pharmacy, but to also specialize in geriatric care. What does a typical workday look like for you? Day-to-day, I’m following up with providers as well as patients to make sure we are keeping up with patients’ health care goals. For patients, I’m checking in to make sure they are keeping up with their goals, asking questions such as, “are we checking our blood sugar and blood pressure every day?” Each day varies based on patient needs. Some days are about motivational interviewing and talking about medication adherence and compliance. Some days we are talking about financial barriers to be able to adhere to those medications. Other days, we are talking about new therapies and pharmacogenomics, or health literacy. We are able to do assessments and customize patient needs like falls risks, or anticholinergic toxicity burden. We look at the social determinants of health that impact health outcomes for our patients while providing medication/therapy management and pharmacogenomic testing if needed. With us, you’re getting a full medication/therapy review. We provide that record to patients and their provider(s). Once a patient comes on board, we also go through each disease state they have and educate on each disease. We are teaching our patients everything we can about their body as if we are presenting a patient case from pharmacy school in a fun and easy to follow manner.  We’re educating and empowering our patients. With education we hope comes change in behavior. And when we communicate with the patient, we also consult their doctor and identify any barriers that we can address as a team. Everything is team-based and patient-centered for us. This is why we stress the need for a holistic and public health approach model to care. We serve a mixed demographic of patients. So right now, during COVID-19, the majority are skeptical of the vaccine. But they know they can reach out to us at any time and ask their questions.  I make myself readily available for anything COVID because of the misinformation. That’s been at the forefront of our practice. I’m offering free consultations to our patients, and to anyone who has questions about the vaccine. It’s led to me being in town halls, speaking on church panels, being a part of media interviews, and being hosted on several news channels and radio features which has given us much traction.  I’m on the Executive Board of the African American COVID Task Force (AACT+) here in Durham and it’s been amazing because we’ve helped to provide testing, resources and community connections so people can get the support they need in these tough times. We’re here to educate and advocate so our patients make the best decisions. Through media interviews, I’ve also been able to speak to some of the power pharmacists can really have in this time of need and figuring out vaccine logistics. I’ve also been able to address COVID-19 and systemic racism that’s in play and the lack of equity we are seeing in the vaccine rollout across the state. At the time, 8 or 9 percent of African Americans had gotten the first dose and 80 percent were white. It speaks to the fact that systemic racism, or medical racism, has always been there, but COVID has now shed a mirror to the gaps in health care especially within our Black communities. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your role? On a day to day, I leave every speaking engagement knowing someone has peace of mind. Each day, there are people who leave understanding and trusting the science is there. That’s especially important for me as a Black pharmacist. That barrier still hits home today. We still have the blemish of the Tuskegee experiment fresh in our minds. We still have the North Carolina eugenics program fresh in our minds that sterilized black females for population control, funded by our state government. So with the COVID-19 vaccine, there’s a need to address that hesitation. And when you start hearing it from your own family members, you think ‘ok, I’ve got to do something. I’ve got to speak up.’ I can’t let my loved ones who are high risk just play the misinformation game. We must never downplay the history and ugliness of the medical past towards people of color, but we cannot conflate half-truths in the midst of a global pandemic where Black, Latino, and Indigenous people are dying at rates 2-4 times more than white Americans. Describe the most fulfilling moment of your career? Honestly, one of my most fulfilling moments was working with an 80-year-old patient. The poor thing was prescribed 36 medications. Completely ridiculous. I’m seeing she’s on five different drugs that will contribute to anticholinergic toxicity, she’s on two other sleep meds. Her caregiver described her as a “walking zombie.” She’s was barely responsive, she was depressed, she was dying. After we reviewed her case and managed her meds, we were able to reduce her down to 8 medications, which was amazing. If it wasn’t for our Comprehensive Medication Management, this patient would have been thrown into a nursing home costing over $150,000 annually. As a consultant pharmacist, GeriatRx was asked to serve as a medical expert on this case and provide the evidence behind our pharmacy interventions. I stated in court that it’s not her, it’s the medications. We were able to save her family hundreds of thousands of dollars, because her family was battling to seize all of her assets, including her home, independence, and access to grandchildren. GeriatRx not only worked with her provider on developing an efficient deprescribing plan but we were able to get our patient her life back.  She got back to normal. That was the most humbling and rewarding moment in my career as a pharmacist and that solidified my calling and purpose to advocating and empowering my patients against a broken health care system. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role? Some people are still new to the idea that pharmacists can even do consulting work. It’s a relatively minor barrier when you share the great stories GeriatRx has accomplished, but patients may be hesitant. The traditional lens of how people look at pharmacists is something we need to change, as its outdated and ineffective. Pharmacists have to be loud and be our own champions in demonstrating our invaluable services to the health care team. People don’t know much about pharmacogenomics, but pharmacists are leading this charge, which is another service GeriatRx includes with our Comprehensive Medication Management. How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists? You’ve got to get exposed to know what you’re getting into. Joining a pharmacist association has been extremely beneficial for me such as the Student National Pharmaceutical Association and American Society of Consultant Pharmacists.  Join the ones that speak to you. Build relationships with your faculty and staff. If you really wanted to break out of the traditional roles, find mentors in untraditional roles. Follow people that are entrepreneurs within the pharmacy space and gain the tools to be your own entrepreneur. Go to conferences and network. Networking has been so valuable. And invest in yourself with coaching or conferences. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future? It’s really the ones who think out of the box that are going to do well. And remember to go into pharmacy from a place of passion and a place of servitude. Don’t do it for the money or the prestige. Do this because you know someone else is going to benefit from your education. If you are considering pharmacy, go volunteer in a pharmacy. Get into the hospitals. Start from the ground up. And if you don’t know where to start, start with your teachers because they can guide you. I was extremely fearful to ask for support or letters of recommendation. You don’t learn or realize that until you’re out of school. Traditional pharmacy is not very pretty right now, so don’t feel confined. Show up. Think outside of the box. Meet alumus Franklin Roye, Pharm.D., President of IndyCare In this alum spotlight, we chat with Franklin Roye, Pharm.D. (Class of ’03), President of IndyCare, a retail health and wellness center based in the Triangle that provides technology-enhanced, collaborative care on-demand, at your local independent community pharmacy. IndyCare works to transform independent pharmacies into integrated healthcare hubs that empower local communities to thrive through exceptional health. Please describe your practice setting. What makes your career path unique? Right now, I work at IndyCare and I am one of the co-founders of the company. It’s a community pharmacy health hub practice setting. We have an independent community pharmacy and an embedded medical clinic where our pharmacists and our medical providers work collaboratively together to deliver simplified, high quality care for patients. The collaborative aspect of this is what I think makes it unique. There are certainly retail pharmacies out there with clinics inside of them, think CVS minute clinic, Walgreens, Kroger. However, what you find at these places is they see patients in a clinic space that’s within the pharmacy, but they don’t actually involve the pharmacist or the pharmacy staff in care delivery. We felt that was a real wasted opportunity, given that patients see their pharmacists five to 10 times more often than their medical provider. So we created this true collaborative care model of community pharmacy where our pharmacists can turn those frequent encounters into engagements where they provide patient care and get financially compensated for that. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take? It definitely wasn’t a preconceived plan and that brought me here. I worked most of my career in the biopharmaceutical industry in various commercial roles, such as sales, marketing account management, strategic consulting and business development. I started out with GlaxoSmithKline here in North Carolina and went with them to New York City after that. Next, I took an international opportunity with a market access consulting firm called the NUCLEUS Group. That took me to Singapore, where led their business development team for the Asia Pacific region, covering  a  region spanning from China to Australia and everything in between. Eventually I shifted again to a similar role in Asia with PPD, a global contract research organization. Three years ago, I came back to the US to start IndyCare with a pharmacy school friend of mine Greg Vassie. So this is really my first foray into frontline healthcare. What does a typical workday look like for you? It’s pretty intense. I start my day at five o’clock in the morning so I can get up, get a coffee, get a little exercise in and have some time to think through my plans before my kids get up. Then, I’m onsite at the clinic and pharmacy about three days a week, working on operations that include managing our employees, providing training, rolling out new services and doiong some overall problem solving.  I usually also have a few virtual meetings each day with different partners and vendors that we work with. Those cover everything from marketing, technology platforms that we use, insurance companies and other collaborators. We’re constantly seeking new information because the consumer health care industry is fast paced and constantly evolving. The other days of the week that I’m not at the clinic, I’m working more on medium-to-long-term growth initiatives for the company. Looking at new services that we want to implement, evaluating different business partners and business development. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your role? Right now, for me, it’s definitely the feedback that we get from patients. The feedback that we’ve gotten from patients has really blown away even our own high expectations, and I think that’s when you really feel like you’re making an impact. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role? The US healthcare system is not easy to disrupt. You can have a very simple and common-sense approach to providing what patients, pharmacists and medical providers want, but theirs is a complex maze of legal, regulatory, financial, and insurance requirements that may be a barrier to your plan. You have to work incredibly hard to figure out how to navigate this complex matrix of stakeholders and still deliver on your plan and that’s a constant challenge. How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists? I believe it’s very important to study the business of health care and trends in healthcare consumerism. In pharmacy school, you devote most of your learning to the science and the clinical aspects of our profession, which is a critical foundation. However, once you start working, things shift pretty dramatically, and the clinical side often is a much smaller part of what you do every day. A large part of what you do is navigating non-clinical business information and solving real world business problems, so learning about the business of health care and healthcare consumerism will provide a good knowledge base to work in a setting like ours. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future? Take advantage of every opportunity, both within and outside pharmacy school to supplement your clinical education. When I was at the School of Pharmacy, I took electives at the business school, for example. Also, learn about big data and start to develop a baseline level of data fluency. Being able to look at, understand and act upon data is going to be a significant part of your professional life going forward. Lastly, get as much diverse experience as you can. You’re going to get plenty of clinical training through the School and through your rotations, so it’s always going to be helpful to mix that with other types of business experience. What advice would you give to a high school student? Really look into trends in the profession because pharmacy is changing very rapidly and by the time you get out of pharmacy school, it may not be what you think it is now. Pharmacy is a very valuable education and training. The medical and pharmaceutical knowledge you gain from a pharmacy program can serve you well in a number of different career paths, so I would say keep an open mind as to what a pharmacist career means. There are trends in our industry with automation and technology that will lead to a contraction of traditional dispensing pharmacy roles which is what many people outside of the profession think of first. However, for every loss there are also gains in areas of healthcare that people may not realize and where your Pharmacy education will allow you to excel professionally. Can you share a brief story about a time you had a positive impact on patient population or community in your role? In our practice setting, we have all the ingredients that you need to solve problems for patients. We have pharmacists, medical providers, electronic health record system, contracts with insurance companies and more. When you have all these resources and your small and nimble it gets very interesting as you can find lots of ways to help people because you’re not constrained. Recently, we were contacted by a gentleman who was desperately searching for help to get his elderly, disabled, homebound mother with Alzheimer’s tested at her home for COVID. He had already checked with the big health systems around the area and several other medical facilities and no one was willing to do it, primarily because they didn’t have a protocol or a policy to do that. He was exasperated and when he came to us and asked if we could help, our response was, ‘sure, why not?!’ There’s nothing stopping us from doing it, we have all the things we need to help this person so why would we not do it. To me that is rewarding because occasionally it can be so simple to solve challenging problems for people if you’re willing to just take the tools you have and use them, without the usual constraints that sometimes prevent our healthcare system from reaching the people who need it the most.   Meet alumna Irene Ulrich, clinical pharmacist at MAHEC In this alum spotlight, we chat with Irene Park Ulrich, Pharm.D., BCACP, clinical pharmacist in the Mountain Area Heath Education Center’s Department of Family Medicine, and associate professor of clinical education at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Please describe your novel practice setting. What makes your career path unique?    MAHEC is a multidisciplinary health care institution in Western North Carolina. I work in the Family Medicine Department and practice at 2 of the MAHEC satellite practices alongside family medicine physicians. I practice under a collaborative practice agreement, and have my clinical pharmacist practitioner (CPP) designation in North Carolina. In both my practice sites, I have developed a co-visit patient care model in which I see patients in real time alongside the provider, which has been shown to have financial benefit for the practice. I am also adjunct faculty with the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and precept 8-10 fourth year pharmacy students each year. My career path is unique is because I started pharmacy school with no intentions of pursuing residency. I felt sure that I would go into community pharmacy and was comfortable with that. However, as I learned more about clinical pharmacy, I began to consider pursuing community pharmacy residency. It was not until I completed by ambulatory care rotation during my fourth year of pharmacy school that it became clear to me that was the path I wanted to take. I decided in the fall of my PY4 year to pursue ambulatory care PGY1 residencies. I was very fortunate to match with Mission/MAHEC in 2012, and ultimately was able to stay on at MAHEC. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take?   My ambulatory care clinical rotation in the fall of my PY4 year convinced me that this was the route I wanted to take. This rotation was in a diabetes clinic, and I loved that in the process of gathering information for clinical decision making, I would have to learn about the patient’s lifestyle and values. I loved being able to focus on the patient in front of me. I also loved practicing under a CPP where I could make adjustments to medications right then, rather than having to draft a recommendation that may or may not be taken. Following this rotation, I requested a change in my rotation schedule that would allow me to have one more ambulatory care rotation before ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. This solidified my interest in ambulatory care. What does a typical workday look like for you?   I typically have clinic for at least half of the day. Pre-COVID, I would arrive in clinic and huddle with my physician partners and clinical staff to talk about patients for the day. We would see patients together or sequentially and share documentation responsibilities. If clinic is light, I respond to drug information and med access questions that come to my inbox, or make follow-up phone calls as needed to patients. I also help with insurance communications re: medication recommendations for patients. The other half of the day is often administrative time. In this time, I work on a variety of tasks including but not limited to teaching time with students and residents, scholarly activity including manuscript writing, other initiatives including transgender care work. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your (novel) practice role?   Working so closely with my physician colleagues who value and respect my role as a pharmacist is the best aspect. I also love my institution because I have the ability to take on and champion issues that are important not only to me but to our community. The best example of this is my work leading a transgender equity work group that includes representation across our entire organization. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role?   It is very easy to overcommit. Because anyone can take on new initiatives that they are passionate about, there is often a lot to get involved in. How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists?  There are wonderful resources about ambulatory care practice from large pharmacy organizations including ASHP and APhA. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future?   Shadow a pharmacist in this setting. The bulk of the work is in face-to-face patient encounters. Those who are excited and energized by this would do well in ambulatory care. What general advice would you give to a high school or college student who is interested in pursuing a pharmacy career?  Shadowing is so important to understanding what this might look like as a career. No matter how detailed a description, nothing can prepare you more than an in person shadowing experience. Can you share a brief story about a time you had a positive impact on a patient, population, or community in your role as a pharmacist.  Within the first few weeks of starting at one of my satellite clinic sites, I saw a patient with diabetes who had just obtained private insurance and was referred to me to help her switch from 70/30 insulin to a basal-bolus regimen. We discussed the patterns of her blood sugars, and her desire to lose weight. Based on our discussion, we decided to change to a long-acting insulin analogue and rather than doing bolus insulin, we started a GLP-1 agonist. On follow-up 1 month later, she had lost quite a bit of weight, had not had any low blood sugars and her A1c had gone from 8.5 to 6.5. I continued to check on her in the following years and she lost a total of 30 lbs and her A1c remained in the 6s without requiring any additional changes to her diabetes medications!   Meet alumna Jai Patel Jai Patel, Pharm.D., BCOP, CPP, (Class of ’11) is the Chair of Cancer Pharmacology & Pharmacogenomics at Levine Cancer Institute in Charlotte, North Carolina. Please describe your novel practice setting. What makes your career path unique?   My current position at Levine Cancer Institute is Chair of our Department of Cancer Pharmacology & Pharmacogenomics, as well as associate professor in our division of Hematology Oncology. Originally, I was hired at Levine in 2013 as Chief of Pharmacology Research and was promoted to chair of the department in early 2020. My practice setting is a bit novel in that it’s primarily focused on investigator-initiated research, meaning research that we propose, develop, and execute. Most of the research that we do is with pharmacogenomics, so looking at the genetic basis for drug response and drug toxicity. That’s really been an area over the last decade that has been expanding a lot with regards to precision medicine research and looking at clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics testing to improve medication management. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take?  I think one of the key things for me early on was identifying a champion, a mentor who could help guide me and reflect what I see myself doing. I found that early on in pharmacy school and worked to establish an oncology pharmacogenomics fellowship at UNC. The pharmacogenomics fellowship wasn’t available, but I approached my mentor and said, ‘this is what I want to practice. I have the ambition and drive.’ I had to convince him I was a good investment. Just because something doesn’t exist, doesn’t mean it isn’t possible. That’s what will set you apart from others when trying to build something new. Health care is always changing. Position yourself to be in the forefront of medicine. What does a typical workday look like for you? I do have a lot of meetings. I spend a lot more time in meetings than most other pharmacists just because of the nature of research, it’s so collaborative. I work with so many pharmacists, but also physicians, scientists, statisticians, protocol coordinators, and data managers as well. We’ve got a lot of meetings scheduled every day to keep things moving forward. Otherwise, there’s time for data analysis, data collection for studies, manuscript writing, and grant writing – I have to do a lot of scientific writing. I also read a lot of literature, it’s the first thing I do every morning when I get in and I try to get in before others for some ‘quite time’ before things really start to get crazy, so around 6:30 to 6:45 a.m. Being in research, things are always changing and you’re always looking for ways to fill a gap in the literature or improve on how medicine is being practiced. Especially within oncology, there’s just such a vast amount of information and I’m constantly learning every single day, so I read a lot to help me generate new ideas for research. And then there are the presentations and conferences, and I take about five or six students per year on rotation. I do about 50 percent research, 25 percent direct patient care, 15 percent teaching and 10 percent administrative. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your (novel) practice role?  The most rewarding is really being able to make that positive impact on patient care, whether that’s directly or indirectly, including pharmacogenomics testing or helping to manage cancer-related symptoms through my clinic time in palliative medicine, or just simply talking to patients. To spend time with the patient and just talk to them about not only their treatment, but also about what’s going on outside of cancer care, including their family or friends or traveling, etc.  It’s also really rewarding when we’ve made progress in cancer research that directly benefits patients, which is the whole reason that I got into this field. Selfishly, it’s also really fun to present your research findings at conferences and publish in peer-reviewed journals. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role? I think the most challenging aspect, I was put into this role fairly early in my career. I graduated in 2011 and finished my fellowship in 2013, then immediately started here. Levine was a brand-new cancer institute at that time and the building had been up for one year. They were really trying to figure out how they wanted to expand and how they wanted to build this brand-new cancer institute, and they knew they wanted to have pharmacogenomics and pharmacology research to be a part of that. But it was a lot of pressure to figure out how to build a pharmacogenomics and pharmacology research program pretty soon after my fellowship training. I had some great colleagues and mentors that helped along the way. How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists? Luckily, there is a lot more information out there regarding pharmacogenomics programs than there was 10 years ago. One piece of advice for other folks looking to find a similar opportunity is to look out there on social media like LinkedIn. Connect with folks that have positions within pharmacogenomics or are doing pharmacogenomics and reach out to them see if they can spare 15 to 30 minutes to share with you what they do and why they do it. The best way to learn is to network and connect with people who are already doing what you’re interested in and who can help you achieve what you’re most passionate about. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future? Start networking early. I can’t say enough about how important networking is. I wouldn’t be here today without it. Students can shadow professionals, interview professors and professionals. Because I was interested in oncology, I shadowed my oncology professor. Then I developed an interest in pharmacogenomics, so I sought out a pharmacogenomics rotation and ultimately convinced the preceptors to take me as a fellow after graduation. What general advice would you give to a high school or college student who is interested in pursuing a pharmacy career? When I was in high school, I worked in retail pharmacy. I knew as a freshman in college that I wanted to be a retail pharmacist. But halfway through pharmacy school I realized all of the other opportunities for pharmacists, whether that be in retail, clinical, regulatory, or research. High schoolers now a days have an advantage with social media to reach out and develop their own interests, seek advice or input from professionals. There are so many people out there who want to help, you just have to take that leap of faith. You don’t have to know exactly what you want to do when you grow up. This is the time of your life where you should be learning about various opportunities and find what excites you. Can you share a brief story about a time you had a positive impact on a patient, population, or community in your role as a pharmacist?­ I’ll talk about implementing pharmacogenetic testing. When I started here at Levine there was no pharmacogenetic testing being done here. We set up a collaboration with our genomics lab which was already established. They had never done pharmacogenomics testing before, but they had done genetic testing for other areas. So, it took a while to set up the infrastructure to be able to build new assays and tests that we could look at specific genes for specific drugs. We then identified where there were opportunities to implement testing. The first test we performed was for an antifungal drug that we use routinely after patients undergo a stem cell transplant. Based off of literature, we knew that there was genetically a third of the population that rapidly metabolized this drug, so they were still at risk of developing a fungal infection. So, we developed an assay to be able to test for that particular gene to identify who would be expected to genetically metabolize this drug very quickly. And we wanted to know that up front before we actually started the drug. We quickly saw that we were able to kind of normalize drug exposure and ensure that all patients were receiving the appropriate dose based off of their genetics. It’s great in that I think we’ve been able to do 700-800 transplants, and we’ve prevented serious fungal infections.   Meet alumna Kimberley Brown, National Field Director of Janssen Infectious Diseases & Vaccines In this alum spotlight, we chat with Kimberley Brown, Pharm.D. (Class of ’03), National Field Director for Janssen Infectious Diseases & Vaccines. In this role, she leads the development of medical strategy for field-based medical teams and oversees development for the broader organization. Please describe your novel practice setting. What makes your career path unique?   I have been in the pharmaceutical industry since 2007 and have been in various roles involving medical affairs and research and development. I joined the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson in 2007 as a Medical Science Liaison from the Rainbow Center for Women, Children and Families in Jacksonville, Florida where I served as an HIV Clinical Specialist and Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Florida School of Pharmacy. Prior to my current role, I served as Scientific Director for Janssen Research and Development, leading two large Phase III trials and several Phase I studies. From 2015 through Jan 2018, I served as the U.S. Medical Director for the HIV franchise. Before that, I served as Associate Medical Director of U.S. Medical Affairs, Infectious Diseases, where I worked on both the HCV and HIV clinical teams, leading efforts on research trials, as well as product launch activities. I was also the company’s Pharmacovigilance Officer and served as Associate Director of Training with responsibilities for the Virology Medical Science Liaison team. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take?  I was the nerdy kid who wanted a microscope for Christmas. When I was 10, I remember Dr. David Ho was the Times Man of the Year for discovering AZT, and I was just fascinated by it. For me, studying HIV and hepatitis was the perfect combination of my interests in internal medicine and infectious disease. From there, my infectious diseases clinical rotation at Moses Cone really set my infectious diseases career in motion – notably, my time at the HIV clinic. I saw that most people coming into the HIV clinic looked like me and were my age at the time. That formulated my ‘why.’ We were seeing huge health disparities, and lack of access to care. Since then, we’ve seen the HIV epidemic continue, but treatment has evolved. Back then, we were trying to keep people alive, now we’ve moved on to more novel therapies to manage this chronic disease. What does a typical workday look like for you?  Right now, during COVID-19, there’s a lot of focus on medical strategy and building teams. We’re in the process of hiring a new Medical Science Liaison vaccines team that will focus on providing medical information about our vaccines portfolio, driving innovation. Our community liaison team will educate and impact how we can connect to communities. I am spending a lot of time strategizing, collaborating and driving innovation. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your (novel) practice role?  Over my career, the most impactful thing was leading an HIV pregnancy study. It gave pregnant women an option to manage their HIV that has proven to be safe and effective (especially in patients with multi-class resistance. Further, these data showed no mother to child transmission which has impacted lives around the world. My previous roles have been focused on data and research, however my current role has posed a new and interesting challenge – developing leaders that are subject matter experts and strategic. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role?  Part of the most challenging portion is balancing the needs of health care providers in the community with the business. How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists?  I would encourage those interested in a similar role to reach out to those in the pharmaceutical industry. Take advantage of any internships or experiential opportunities. Call us, network with us, shadow us. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future?  Express your interest early and often. Take on projects that seem interesting as well as those that don’t. Each experience will allow you to build your skillset and your network. What general advice would you give to a high school or college student who is interested in pursuing a pharmacy career? Make sure that you’re prepared by speaking with folks in the profession and have a true understanding of the various realms of pharmacy. Don’t underestimate your potential. And when faced with challenges or closed doors, keep top of mind ‘why not me?’ Continue moving one step forward at a time. Can you share a brief story about a time you had a positive impact on a patient, population, or community in your role as a pharmacist?  Right now I’m building a field medical science liaisons team to educate health care professionals and the community. We are hoping to educate about vaccines in general, as well as the safe and effective use of our COVID-19 vaccine product. What do you do in your free time? In my free time, I serve as Recording Secretary and Co-Chair of the Technology Committee for Delta Sigma Theta, Sorority, Inc. and as Vice President of Marketing for the Junior League of Philadelphia. I am also a board member of Vetri Community Partnership, The Brodsky Center Advisory Board (Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts), UNC Pharmacy Alumni Association, and UNC’s Alumni Committee on Racial and Ethnic Diversity (ACRED).   Meet alum Patrick Brown, Pharm.D., Senior Program Manager at the North Carolina Division of Public Health In this alum spotlight, we chat with Patrick Brown, Pharm.D. (Class of ’13), Senior Program Manager at the North Carolina Division of Public Health. Please describe your novel practice setting. What makes your career path unique?  I joined the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services on January 19 as a Senior Program Manager in the Division of Public Health. Right now, I am exclusively focused on COVID-19 response, specifically working to support our COVID-19 response efforts in long-term care facilities and vaccine rollout into those facilities, and I am also the operational lead for North Carolina’s for community pharmacy vaccine rollout. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take? I came into pharmacy school thinking I wanted to be an independent pharmacy owner. But, when I was getting closer to graduation, I realized I wanted to get a broader perspective of pharmacy before I made any major career decisions, so I pursued a community pharmacy residency. My residency really made me realize that I like the bigger picture stuff more than the day-to-day of pharmacy operations. So I came back to UNC after graduation to pursue a fellowship where I got to continue to explore that. From there, I joined Mutual Drug where I was lucky to spend almost five years supporting independent pharmacies in a variety of roles. From there, I started to really think that maybe I would be interested in broadening my horizons. This opportunity came up at the NC Division of Public Health and I decided to make the jump and move into more of a public health role. What does a typical workday look like for you? Right now, most days are meeting heavy, with a heavy focus on coordinating our vaccine rollout. It’s been an all-hands-on deck approach at the state, and there are a lot of moving pieces to say the least. Most of my day-to-day is working to connect the dots between all of the different teams working vaccine and Long Term Care response at the state to our frontline providers. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your (novel) practice role? Right now, it’s being a part of the vaccine rollout. It’s a once in a century moment. As overwhelming and tiresome as it can be, it’s pretty incredible to be helping to coordinate this effort. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role? It’s all of the moving pieces. This is a monumental undertaking trying to rollout vaccines to the 10+ million North Carolinians. So it’s about the speed at which we have to move, especially since I joined after the rollout had already started.  How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists? There are a surprising number of pharmacists involved in this effort. If pharmacists are interested in public health, I think the biggest thing is to find ways to network outside of conventional pharmacy circles. Go to meetings, lectures and symposiums that aren’t just pharmacy-related, but are health care-related. The other thing is to look into jobs that don’t necessarily have ‘pharmacist’ in the title. Throw your name in the hat. The hiring manager may have never considered a pharmacist for a role only for it to prove to be a perfect fit. That’s how I found my way to this current position. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future? There is an MPH dual degree program at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. For students who are really interested in public health, that would be a good way to broaden your horizon. And always keep an eye out for internships or fellowships and lean on the student affairs office to connect with others in similar roles. And certainly find ways to network with Public Health students at Gillings. What general advice would you give to a high school or college student who is interested in pursuing a pharmacy career? High school or college students need to understand that pharmacy is more than just working at the drug store on every corner. Those are great jobs, but those are not the only jobs for pharmacists. Come into pharmacy school with an open mind about the profession. And be ready to blaze your own trail. Can you share a brief story about a time you had a positive impact on a patient, population, or community in your role as a pharmacist? In my current role, the most impactful thing we are doing right now is trying to help long-term care facilities gain access to COVID-19 vaccines. It’s been especially rewarding to be able to connect long-term care facilities and group homes who have not been able to get their residents and staff vaccinated to pharmacists in their communities that can help. The relief in someone’s voice when they hear that a vaccine event has been scheduled for them can be quite powerful. We still have a long way to go, but it’s nice to be contributing towards the effort to get back to normal.   Meet alumna Sarah Cobb, Director of Safety Project Leadership and Strategic Solutions at IQVIA In this alum spotlight, we chat with Sarah Cobb, BSPharm (Class of ’84), Director of Safety Project Leadership and Strategic Solutions at IQVIA. In this role, Cobb oversees global pharmacovigilance projects to ensure patient safety. Please describe your novel practice setting. What makes your career path unique?   As a Safety Project Director, I direct and oversee the service delivery excellence of a range of regional and global pharmacovigilance projects covering single and multiple lifecycle safety functions. IQVIA is a human data sciences company. We focus on advanced analytics and technology that drive healthcare forward. My career path began as a community pharmacist and includes several different pharmacy-related positions throughout my journey. What led you to this career path? What steps did you take?  My non-traditional pharmacy career evolved over time. When I was floundering at the beginning of my sophomore year in college, my advisor gave me a career test and pharmacy consistently appeared at the top. Pharmacy combines my love of people, math and analytics. Since I love people, I wanted to be in a position to help people. After shadowing my hometown pharmacist and working as a volunteer in a pharmacy during the summer, I concluded I wanted to be a community pharmacist. While attending pharmacy school, I loved everything about pharmacy! I participated in career day my 4/5 year and found a job as a summer intern with Peoples Drug in Virginia. The summer internship gave me the opportunity to build relationships throughout the organization, leading to a full-time position upon graduation. I sincerely enjoyed my first job as a community pharmacist! I learned how to be a real pharmacist while working at Peoples Drug. While working as a community pharmacist, I also worked in a hospital pharmacy some evenings and weekends to maintain my hospital pharmacy knowledge. After a couple of years, I decided to move closer to Chapel Hill as I missed going to Tarheel basketball and football games. I was offered a job at Wake Med and moved to Raleigh. After approximately two years, I was offered a position at a small startup company, Biomedical Homecare, which was a unique pharmacy experience. After marrying a community pharmacist, life continued to change. We moved to the Sandhills area and I worked for an independent pharmacy. One day a friend, sales representative, visited our pharmacy and encouraged me to consider being a pharmaceutical sales representative. My next endeavor was working as a professional sales representative for Merck. After my husband and I had our first baby and the overnight sales traveling expanded, I resigned and worked in a hospital pharmacy. Next, I was blessed to have the opportunity to work for GlaxoSmithKline, beginning in Pharmacovigilance. I had several positions within the Company, including helping to build a world-class call center. After two major mergers/acquisitions and over 18 years, I was sitting in my office and I thought about how I wanted to return to healthcare directly helping patients and understanding the value of electronic health records. Duke Health hired me as their EPIC Clinical Inpatient Training Manager. What grand experience being part of such a huge project, all working for a common goal. Once the EPIC implementation was completed, I wanted my next challenge to include pharmacovigilance and data analytics as I envisioned the benefit of maximizing data analytics to enhance end-to-end pharmacovigilance. I started with Quintiles and after a couple of years, Quintiles and IMS Health became IQVIA, a human data sciences company. Currently, I am a Safety Project Director. When people ask me what I do, I reply: “I am a non-traditional pharmacist.” What does a typical workday look like for you? Working for a global company is quite different than working a 9 to 5 job. Additionally, the pharmacovigilance clock never stops. We are continuously monitoring global safety projects, ensuring patient safety. I begin my work day about 6:30 or 7 a.m. solving problems, creating new processes and ensuring the safety of our clients’ products. Due to different time zones, some meetings may take place late at night. That’s rare, however a reality. Typically, I try to stop working by 6 p.m. Sometimes I will return to my office after dinner to check emails as my collaegues on the other side of the world are beginning their day. Describe the most exciting or rewarding aspect of your (novel) practice role? The people! I enjoy interacting with people all over the world. The majority of my day is spent talking to people in the Asia-Pacific and European areas which is rewarding. I have learned a great deal about different cultures and traditions as well as global holidays. I meet new people and learn new things while having the privilege to lead patient safety teams and collaborate with pharmaceutical and clinical research industry colleagues. On another note, I recently became a certified pharmacy-based vaccine immunizer to help administer COVID vaccines and other vaccines in the future. The most rewarding experience in my pharmacy career has been observing how appreciative people have been when receiving their COVID vaccines. Describe the most challenging aspect of your role?  The most challenging aspect of being a Safety Project Director is the safety clock never stops (24/7), especially during global inspections and audits. How can someone learn more about this unique practice setting and the career opportunities it presents for pharmacists? I always remind students to maximize their network inside and outside of the Pharmacy school. Talk to leaders within the Pharmacy school and pharmaceutical industry. A good way to get a foot in the door is by doing a summer internship or volunteering. Several pharmacy students from UNC have worked at IQVIA for that purpose. What advice would you give to a current student pharmacist who is interested in pursuing a similar type of practice role in the future?  I would highly encourage students to become a traditional community or hospital pharmacist first unless they are on a specific career track leading them to be a non-traditional pharmacist. If they are not 100% sure what they want to do, I recommend learning how to be a community pharmacist while treating patients. As a community pharmacist, they will learn how to dispense medications, identify drug interactions, build relationships with patients and colleagues while creating the foundation of their pharmacy career. Community and hospital pharmacy experiences were the foundation of my non-traditional pharmacist career. What general advice would you give to a high school or college student who is interested in pursuing a pharmacy career? I would encourage the student to research pharmacy careers and learn as much about pharmacy as possible via networking or volunteering. Collaborate with pharmacists in various roles. Build a network and attend career days. A big advantage would be to talk to their advisor(s) and shadow some pharmacists working in different pharmacy settings. My husband and I have participated in numerous high school career days as we love to talk with students about different pharmacy-related career opportunities. I would recommend researching pharmacy via the internet and learning more about the different pharmacy schools. Take the time to explore options. Can you share a brief story about a time you had a positive impact on a patient, population, or community in your role as a pharmacist? Wow, there have been so many! During my community and hospital pharmacy ventures, I worked for a startup home healthcare company. As a pharmacist, I was on-call certain weekends and carried a beeper. One weekend, I was beeped. We had a cancer patient who was out of his saline syringes. I needed to take some syringes to him as soon as possible. He lived somewhere between the Sandhills and Raleigh. Since it was late in the day, my husband rode with me. When we arrived, the setting was like something you would see in a movie. He lived down a long dirt road in a little old house. I walked up to the front door with the box of syringes and knocked on the door. Several family members invited me inside and were so appreciative to see the syringes. The patient was lying in a hospital bed in an extremely small family room just inside of the front door. When I walked out to my car, tears were rolling down my face. I will never forget that poor little man’s name and his family.       Download our Pharmacy Career Guide to learn more about pharmacy careers. Download the Guide   Pharmacy Salaries Ready to take the next step? APPLY NOWCONTACT USDOWNLOAD OUR PHARMD GUIDE
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  • current student
  • 7
  • 12
  • student pharmacist
  • 7
  • 12
  • pursuing similar
  • 7
  • 12
  • similar type
  • 7
  • 12
  • type practice
  • 7
  • 12
  • role future
  • 7
  • 12
  • positive impact
  • 7
  • 12
  • impact patient
  • 7
  • 12
  • community pharmacist
  • 7
  • 12
  • advice give high
  • 6
  • 12
  • give high school
  • 6
  • 12
  • share story time
  • 6
  • 12
  • story time positive
  • 6
  • 12
  • time positive impact
  • 6
  • 12
  • impact patient population
  • 6
  • 12
  • patient population community
  • 6
  • 12
  • population community role
  • 6
  • 12
  • high school college
  • 6
  • 12
  • school college student
  • 6
  • 12
  • traditional pharmacist
  • 6
  • 12
  • role pharmacist
  • 6
  • 12
  • cancer institute
  • 6
  • 12
  • traditional
  • 6
  • 12
  • vaccine rollout
  • 6
  • 12
  • hospital pharmacy
  • 6
  • 12
  • school pharmacy
  • 6
  • 12
  • give high
  • 6
  • 12
  • share story
  • 6
  • 12
  • story time
  • 6
  • 12
  • time positive
  • 6
  • 12
  • patient population
  • 6
  • 12
  • population community
  • 6
  • 12
  • school college
  • 6
  • 12
  • college student
  • 6
  • 12
  • student interested
  • 6
  • 12
  • safety project
  • 6
  • 12
  • meet requirement pharmdmba
  • 5
  • 12
  • requirement pharmdmba dual
  • 5
  • 12
  • pharmdmba dual degree
  • 5
  • 12
  • reason meet
  • 5
  • 12
  • reason reason
  • 5
  • 12
  • long term care
  • 5
  • 12
  • alum spotlight chat
  • 5
  • 12
  • rewarding aspect practice
  • 5
  • 12
  • aspect practice role
  • 5
  • 12
  • general advice give
  • 5
  • 12
  • college student interested
  • 5
  • 12
  • student interested pursuing
  • 5
  • 12
  • interested pursuing pharmacy
  • 5
  • 12
  • pursuing pharmacy career
  • 5
  • 12
  • independent pharmacy
  • 5
  • 12
  • step
  • 5
  • 12
  • requirement pharmdmba
  • 5
  • 12
  • pharmdmba dual
  • 5
  • 12
  • term care
  • 5
  • 12
  • medication management
  • 5
  • 12
  • alum spotlight
  • 5
  • 12
  • spotlight chat
  • 5
  • 12
  • aspect practice
  • 5
  • 12
  • general advice
  • 5
  • 12
  • pursuing pharmacy
  • 5
  • 12
  • infectiou diseas
  • 5
  • 12
  • medical science liaison
  • 4
  • 12
  • division public health
  • 4
  • 12
  • pharmacogenomic testing
  • 4
  • 12
  • medical provider
  • 4
  • 12
  • patient care
  • 4
  • 12
  • meet alumna
  • 4
  • 12
  • medical science
  • 4
  • 12
  • science liaison
  • 4
  • 12
  • division public
  • 4
  • 12
  • delayed meet
  • 3
  • 12
  • program meet
  • 3
  • 12
  • comprehensive medication management
  • 3
  • 12
  • day day
  • 3
  • 12
  • covid 19 vaccine
  • 3
  • 12
  • pharmacist medical provider
  • 3
  • 12
  • unc eshelman school
  • 3
  • 12
  • eshelman school pharmacy
  • 3
  • 12
  • community role pharmacist
  • 3
  • 12
  • senior program manager
  • 3
  • 12
  • term care facility
  • 3
  • 12
  • safety project director
  • 3
  • 12
  • program manager
  • 3
  • 12
  • care facility
  • 3
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  • pharmacy related
  • 3
  • 12
  • director safety
  • 3
  • 12
  • patient safety
  • 3
  • 12
  • project director
  • 3
  • 12
  • pharmacist working
  • 3
  • 12
  • career day
  • 3
  • 12
  • sale representative
  • 3
  • 12
  • community hospital
  • 3
  • 12