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Keyword Program Manager: Career Path, Responsibilities and Salary
Search Urlhttps://www.google.com/search?q=Program+Manager%3A+Career+Path%2C+Responsibilities+and+Salary&oq=Program+Manager%3A+Career+Path%2C+Responsibilities+and+Salary&num=30&hl=en&gl=US&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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senior program manager career pathhttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=Senior+program+manager+career+path&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjj8-C9-a31AhU4jIkEHSPTCGwQ1QJ6BAh4EAE
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Result 1
TitleProgram Manager Job Description, Salary, Career Path, and Trends
Urlhttps://www.4cornerresources.com/job-descriptions/program-manager/
DescriptionExpert recruiter information for a Program Manager's job description, responsibilities, necessary skills, salary, career path, and trends
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Organic Position1
H1Program Manager
H2Job Description
Typical Duties and Responsibilities
Education and Background
Skills and Competencies
Compensation
Similar Job Titles
Career Path
Position Trends
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Typical Hours
Where You Can Find Jobs
Are You Interested in Becoming a Program Manager?
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H2WithAnchorsJob Description
Typical Duties and Responsibilities
Education and Background
Skills and Competencies
Compensation
Similar Job Titles
Career Path
Position Trends
Job Outlook
Typical Hours
Where You Can Find Jobs
Are You Interested in Becoming a Program Manager?
BodyProgram Manager Job Description. A large IT department often has multiple projects running at one time, and a Program Manager is the point person who makes sure an entire group of projects stays on track. Program Managers plan the overall program, manage the budget, and align the various projects and deliverables that are part of the program. A Program Manager is different from a Project Manager. Project Managers are in charge of one specific project, whereas a Program Manager leads multiple coordinated projects aimed at a particular goal. A Program Manager usually oversees multiple Project Managers. It’s important for an IT Program Manager to have some technical expertise. However, most companies equally value skills like leadership, budgeting, and a knowledge of different project and program management methodologies. Program Managers must work closely with stakeholders within the company to make sure the IT program aligns with the strategic goals of the company. Typical Duties and Responsibilities. Formulate, organize and monitor interconnected projects Coordinate objectives across all projects Lead and evaluate Project Managers and other staff Develop and control deadlines, budgets and activities Apply change, risk and resource management Assume responsibility for the program’s people and vendors Assess program performance and aim to maximize ROI Resolve projects’ higher scope issues Prepare reports for Program Directors Education and Background. A bachelor’s degree in management or a related field is required for this position. Project Management Professional (PMP) certification is strongly preferred. Skills and Competencies. Thorough understanding of project/program management techniques and methods Excellent knowledge of performance evaluation and change management principles Outstanding leadership and organizational skills Strong knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite Excellent problem-solving skills Excellent interpersonal skills Compensation. According to Payscale the median annual salary of a Program Manager with 1 Year of Experience: Orlando, Florida: $67,000 Tampa, Florida: $78,000 Jacksonville, Florida: $65,000 Miami, Florida: $82,000 Atlanta, Georgia: $80,000 Chicago, Illinois: $62,000 Houston, Texas: $80,000 Los Angeles, California: $70,000 New York City, New York: $80,000 Seattle, Washington: $80,000 Overall: $77,000 5 Years of Experience: Orlando, Florida: $80,000 Tampa, Florida: $81,000 Jacksonville, Florida: $68,000 Miami, Florida: $94,000 Atlanta, Georgia: $84,000 Chicago, Illinois: $93,000 Houston, Texas: $86,000 Los Angeles, California: $105,000 New York City, New York: $93,000 Seattle, Washington: $105,000 Overall: $88,000 Similar Job Titles. Technical Program Manager Scrum Master Technical Manager Program Lead Change Manager Delivery Manager Development Manager Implementation Project Manager Career Path. Program Managers don’t always start from a technical or IT background. In fact, companies say they’ve hired Program Managers with degrees unrelated to the technology world, such as English or history. The key for most Program Managers is an understanding of the life cycle of a major project, experience as a Project Manager handling complex projects, leadership skills, management training, and knowledge of different project management techniques. Many industry leaders say a Program Manager must have business acumen and a complete sense of the organization’s goals. Program Managers often work with stakeholders from many disciplines, both technical and non-technical, so an ability to work with people from different backgrounds is also essential. Program Managers often begin as Project Managers, where they learn skills like resource management, planning the work of a project, and keeping a team motivated. Companies also find it helpful for Program Managers to have their Project Management Professional (PMP) certification, which gives them a knowledge of multiple project management methods. Position Trends. According to the industry website The Digital Project Manager, Program Managers should stay on top of the evolution of automation and artificial intelligence (AI) in the years to come. Many companies are looking at automating various IT processes, especially when it comes to storing data. Industry insiders also stress that becoming even more flexible as a Program Manager will continue to be of paramount importance in the coming years. Technology has always been ever-changing, but currently it’s changing even more quickly. Companies are working to be more flexible and nimble when it comes to adopting new technologies. Change management is another trend Program Managers will see in the coming years. Whether it’s getting larger, becoming more automated, getting leaner, or adopting more cloud-based solutions, industry thought leaders say IT Program Managers will need to become proactive about managing change within their organizations. Program Managers will need to look for processes that can be improved and visualize how to streamline those processes. Job Outlook. As companies transition to digital platforms and remote working becomes more popular, IT Program Managers will be needed to oversee all of the projects that go into changing the way a company works with technology. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Computer and Information Systems Manager field will grow 11 percent between 2018 and 2028. That’s much faster than average. Typical Hours. The typical work hours in an office setting for a Program Manager are usually from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. However, some IT Program Managers might have to work more than 40 hours per week to create solutions for specific issues when they arise. Where You Can Find Jobs. 4 Corner Resources Career Builder Glassdoor Indeed LinkedIn Monster  IT Career Finder Are You Interested in Becoming a Program Manager? We will connect you to one of our headhunters or recruiters to see if you are a perfect fit for one of our job openings. If a job opening does not suit you, we will always keep you in mind as new positions open up. We have vast experience connecting professionals with some of the most well-known organizations in the country. Your next job or career path can be right around the corner. Check out our latest job openings and our blog for career advice. Feel free to contact us at any time.
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Result 2
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Result 3
TitleProgram Manager Career Path - Hired
Urlhttps://hired.com/job-roles/program-manager
DescriptionFree Program Manager career path and coaching content. Find Program Manager job postings, research salaries, and discover which companies are actively hiring Program Managers by city and industry. We've curated career coaching content just for Program Managers - to guide you on your path from junior level to senior & management level!
Date
Organic Position3
H1Career Path: How to Become a Program Manager
H2Salary range for Program Managers
Opportunities for Program Managers
Want to land the salary you deserve?
Career-building content for Program Managers
There's a better way to find work you love
Getting Through the Door
Degrees and Experience
Working as a Junior Level Program Manager
Moving up the Ranks
Advance Your Career: How to Become a Senior Program Manager
Study the Core Fields
Invest in Yourself
Don’t Stop at Program Management
Program Manager Job Description
What We Need Your Help With
We Look For
These Would Also Be Nice
Senior Program Manager Career Paths: Where to Go from Here
Top industries hiring Program Managers
H3Find top tech talent today
Get matched with Program Manager jobs
H2WithAnchorsSalary range for Program Managers
Opportunities for Program Managers
Want to land the salary you deserve?
Career-building content for Program Managers
There's a better way to find work you love
Getting Through the Door
Degrees and Experience
Working as a Junior Level Program Manager
Moving up the Ranks
Advance Your Career: How to Become a Senior Program Manager
Study the Core Fields
Invest in Yourself
Don’t Stop at Program Management
Program Manager Job Description
What We Need Your Help With
We Look For
These Would Also Be Nice
Senior Program Manager Career Paths: Where to Go from Here
Top industries hiring Program Managers
BodyCareer Path: How to Become a Program Manager Companies that engage in developing programs consisting of several interconnected projects need a skilled Program Manager to ensure business objectives are met. In this role, Program Managers are tasked with overseeing individual projects while assessing the program’s strategy and how it will affect the business. It is a career that continues to be in-demand with businesses in every industry, as Program Managers design the blueprint for programs, implement the projects that make up the program and make sure all the various pieces are in place to make the program and the business a su...more Get matched with Program Manager jobs. At Hired, we connect innovative companies with outstanding candidates like you. Plus, the employers apply to you, not the other way around. Join Hired Find candidates now Looking to hire Program Managers? Hired has them. With high response rates and deep expertise, we help you hire better talent, faster Salary range for Program Managers. See results by role, experience, and location. Data is from real (not self-reported) interviews and offers on Hired. Low data availability: this result is based on limited data. To explore more salaries for Program Manager, visit our Salary Calculator. We've got salaries for other top technical roles, too. Explore SalariesOpportunities for Program Managers. The job prospects and compensations for Program Managers varies across cities. See where Program Managers are the most sought after. Jobs by City Average Salary Companies hiring CAREER GUIDE Want to land the salary you deserve? Whether you're looking for a new job or want to land your nextpromotion, salary negotiation is a critical career skill. Our complete Salary Negotiation Guide will make sure you're prepared to land the salary you deserve, articulate your skills, and common mistakes to avoid during the interview process. Download HIRED BLOG Career-building content for Program Managers. We've collected tons of information on salaries, compensation, negotiation and more. See even more on our blog. Hired Candidate Spotlight: Eugene Matvejev, Tech Lead at Discovery Inc. Candidate Spotlight London Remote Work Congrats to Eugene, Who Found a Great UK Tech Role at Discovery Inc.! We’re excited to spotlight Eugene Matvejev, who recently secured a role at Discovery Inc. through the Hired platform. Let’s get to know a little bit about his diverse background and career journey. Hi Eugene! Please share a little bit about about your… Read More Hired Candidate Spotlight: Jason Awbrey, Engineering Manager at Tanium. Candidate Spotlight Career Transition Working with over three million candidates on the Hired marketplace, we celebrate diversity in the career paths, experiences, and skills people bring to the table. Professionals are more than their resume and we’re committed to helping everyone – including those who took the path less traveled – find their dream job.  We talked to Jason… Read More Get to know – Hired CTO Dave Walters. Career Advice Hired Engineering Hired spotlight on Chief Technology Officer Dave Walters Tell us about your career journey I graduated from SUNY Stony Brook with a BS in Mathematics. In my final year of studies, I started to form an interest in software development and took some introductory courses.  Ultimately, post graduation, I was recruited into my first job… Read More Video Interviews 101: How To Impress In The Digital Age. Career Advice Interview Process Job Search You passed your phone screen with flying colors. Next up? The (often-dreaded) video interview. How do you develop a rapport with the recruiter or hiring manager through a screen? We’ll cover 12 tips to make a great impression in video interviews. A mainstay of the modern era, video technology is used by at least 60%… Read More Interviewing? Watch out for these 5 Red Flags. Interview Process Job Search These signs suggest the potential employer is a bad fit In a pre-pandemic world, the idea of interviewing for a new job without meeting the team in person would have seemed strange at best. Now, many job candidates and employers have happily adopted remote interviews as the new standard. While they come with benefits, figuring out… Read More Combating Imposter Syndrome. Ally Series Career Advice Diversity Engineering Interview Process Job Search Anxiety, Fear of Failure? You’re Not Alone: How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome Have you ever felt like you’re in way over your head in your career? Or maybe read a job description and thought, ‘there’s no way I’m qualified for that’? If so, you may be experiencing imposter syndrome.  Imposter syndrome is the appearance of… Read More 5 Tips to Advance Your Career as a Technical Recruiter: The Path to Professional Development. Career Growth You want to get ahead. At Hired, we’re here to help make it happen.  In this step-by-step guide, we’ll outline five actionable ways to advance your career as a technical recruiter: from implementing automation to tracking market trends and more. Together, these strategies will strengthen your recruitment process—and put you on the path to measurable… Read More Why you should seek accurate salary data to land the salary you deserve. Job Search Salary Discussing salary or going into a salary negotiation conversation can be nerve wrecking for many reasons — and you’re not alone. Some may feel like they lack enough (of the right) data to discuss numbers, while others might not feel confident in the actual words to use when approaching a salary conversation to appear fair… Read More Visit the Blog HOW HIRED WORKS There's a better way to find work you love. 01 Answer a few questions to complete your profile.02 Companies request interviews with upfront compensation.03 Find your dream job! Join Hired Career Path: How to Become a Program Manager Companies that engage in developing programs consisting of several interconnected projects need a skilled Program Manager to ensure business objectives are met. In this role, Program Managers are tasked with overseeing individual projects while assessing the program’s strategy and how it will affect the business. It is a career that continues to be in-demand with businesses in every industry, as Program Managers design the blueprint for programs, implement the projects that make up the program and make sure all the various pieces are in place to make the program and the business a success. Getting Through the Door. Entering the world of Program Management takes a vast amount of education and experience, as there are various hurdles an aspiring Program Manager needs to clear to be considered by most companies. Some things a hiring manager may look for when considering a Program Manager’s background include: Experience with a role in project management Business-savvy is a plus Having a grasp on basic computer programming may be necessary (more than that if working for an IT company of course) Being highly-organized and capable of multi-tasking Strong interpersonal skills A visionary who can see how individual parts make up the whole It is also important for the Program Manager to assess the field that interests them most, i.e. information tech, healthcare, education, non-profits, etc. and see what individual requirements are likely needed for an entry-level Program Manager in that field. Degrees and Experience. Many Program Managers have a degree in business administration, computer science, communications or related field. Depending on the industry the Program Manager enters and the size of the company they intend to work for, they may need an advanced degree. There are also programs that offer certification as a Program Manager, which is beneficial to gaining key insights and skills and may be required by some employers. Typically, when a Program Manager is hired, they must have demonstrated their experience in certain areas. Many came from a project management background, so they understand how to lead a team towards accomplishing goals as well as understand who to prioritize tasks and mentor struggling team members. These are all key to gaining a role as Program Manager. Having an aptitude for business processes and subsets including planning, budgeting, assessing and organizing, are traits that will also help the candidate gain entry in a Program Manager role. Working as a Junior Level Program Manager. Program Managers at the junior level have already demonstrated their ability to guide various teams at once. They continuously visualize the program as a whole and how each individual project must evolve in order to meet program goals. They are both creative and strategic – designing how projects will transpire to make the program a success and quickly coming up with solutions if any fissures are detected. Junior level Program Managers are also adept with documenting the various stages of each project and comfortable presenting their findings to their managers and stakeholders. Moving up the Ranks. Program Management is a competitive and complex field, but with the right amount of perseverance and dedication, a Program Manager can surely ascend the career ladder. To prove their capabilities as a leader and their increasing ability to multi-task, Program Managers may ask to handle more projects at once, overseeing several project managers and project teams at any given moment. Others standout by taking extra time to connect with their project managers and project team members, earning a reputation as a Program Manager who truly excels at fostering effective communication. Many Program Managers take additional education courses, training and certifications, proving that they want to keep their Program Management skills sharp and attuned to emerging industry trends. Advance Your Career: How to Become a Senior Program Manager. To attain a senior level of Program Management, many Program Managers need a portfolio stuffed with successful projects and programs that they designed, oversaw and championed to completion. They must be willing to take on more responsibilities and thrive at each to stand out from their colleagues. As mentioned, taking opportunities to increase your knowledge base is beneficial, so will showing your willingness to mentor and guide junior contemporaries. Effectively displaying that you not only surpass your assigned duties but go the extra mile to amass more responsibilities and complete them with a professional deftness will put you on the road to senior-status in no time. Study the Core Fields. The role of Program Management is complex and comprised of various interlocking fields. Understanding these and how they relate to your position is a great way to better define and refine your duties and goals. These core fields include human resources (HR) as Program Managers often have a hand in hiring and training junior colleagues and project team members. For IT Program Managers, the ability to understand various tech tools, including Python, C++ and JavaScript coding languages, the Agile methodology for programming and Photoshop for editing and creating graphics, is essential. Budgeting is another core field, so having taken accounting courses will help prepare you for defining and following a budget for the whole program as well as for individual projects. Invest in Yourself. …and reap the rewards of a long and respected career. Program Managers can become a greater asset to their company by taking on responsibilities outside of the workplace, including attaining additional certification as a Program Manager or another aspect of business, attend training sessions related to Program Management and/or your industry and locate conferences and seminars related to your role and industry, which will not only help you gain key insight to the present and future of the field, but can also help you network and meet professionals who may have a hand in your future accomplishments. Don’t Stop at Program Management. Program Managers can evolve and improve their skill sets by understanding the careers around them that are similar. Business analysts gather the supplies necessary to get a project started within an organization and work closely with Program Managers. Product managers are like Program Managers except they help create and define all aspects of new products within a business from start to deployment. Risk analysts undertake a deep study and assessment as to how planned projects and programs may benefit or hurt a business. Taking the time to research roles like these of your colleagues can help spark your passion for your own career or perhaps interest you in another. Program Manager Job Description. Program Managers take the helm in designing, planning and overseeing the successful completion of a program and the various projects that define the program in their organization. They layout the program’s strategy, communicate its objectives and analyze how it will impact the company. Program Managers ensure long-term organizational objectives are met and that strategic benefits and business growth are achieved at the completion of a program. The role of Program Manager continues to be relied upon across all different sectors as they have singular and essential skills. These business-savvy professionals need to be just as savvy at communicating goals, leading teams and juggling multiple projects to ensure a program’s success. It is a role that is at one logical and creative, instinctive and strategic at all times. What We Need Your Help With. Meet business objectives by successfully designing, implementing and guiding programs to completion. Overseeing project managers and their project teams. Creating fast and effective solutions when issues arise. Documenting all aspects of work and presenting progress to managers and stakeholders. Keeping apprised of advances in the field that can make programs more fruitful and work more efficient. Evaluating the capabilities of individual team members. We Look For. A natural leader who ensures colleague success Basic IT skills (more advanced skills may be needed if for a tech role) An excellent communicator who can explain program goals to those in different roles and change their jargon accordingly. An aptitude for budgeting, scheduling and assigning tasks These Would Also Be Nice. Excellent organizational skills Thriving under pressure Capable of multi-tasking A visionary who is both creative and strategic Senior Program Manager Career Paths: Where to Go from Here. Achieving a senior level of your career as a Program Manager is a feat to be proud of. Professionals at this level have many years of experience as a Program Manager as well as prior years of experience in a similar field. Senior Program Managers can easily stay where they are and enjoy many more years at the senior level. Others may take this opportunity to move on to another field in which their skills translate. Program Managers who move to another field often do so in such positions as a high-ranking business analyst, the program director who assigns tasks to the Program Managers, or they may head a particular department, such as accounting, marketing or human resources. Those who remain as Senior Program Manager will have the chance to mentor and guide junior colleagues, see the successful completion of countless projects and programs and witness advances in the field they perhaps never imagined possible. Agile . "Agile Methodologies" or "Agile" are ways of describing an iterative approach to software development. Often adopted as an alternative to waterfall and other traditional sequential development practices. It is meant to help teams work quickly to i... Companies hiring for AgileJobs requiring Agile C++ . C++ is an object-oriented language derived from C, and invented by Bjarne Stroustrup, while working at AT&T's Bell Labs. It is widely used for systems-level programming, and building applications on Windows and various Unix operating systems (Lin... Companies hiring for C++Jobs requiring C++ C . C is a widely used low-level, static-typed, compiled computer language known for its efficiency. Developed in the late sixties, C has become one of the most widely used languages of all time. It provides direct access to memory and due to its de... Companies hiring for CJobs requiring C Python . Python is an object-oriented programming language notable for its clarity, power and flexibility. Python is an interpreted language, meaning that an interpreter reads and runs the code directly, rather than compiling down into static lower level c... Companies hiring for PythonJobs requiring Python Java . Java is a statically-typed, cross-platform language. It is concurrent, class-based, and object-oriented. It has minimal implementation dependencies and compiled Java code can run on all platforms that support Java without the need for recompilat... Companies hiring for JavaJobs requiring Java Photoshop . Adobe Photoshop is the mode widely used photo editing and image manipulation application in the world. It is used by designers and hobbyists worldwide to design products, advertising, applications, websites, art, and more. Companies hiring for PhotoshopJobs requiring Photoshop See All Skills Top industries hiring Program Managers. eCommerce. The retail landscape has changed dramatically over the past few decades. Retail was once a brick-and-mortar industry, comprised of small, independently owned-and-operated businesses and large chain stores with multiple outposts throughout the c... Companies in eCommerceJobs in eCommerce Education. The education industry involves working in an environment that implements and teaches various skills and applicable material. Formal education typically involves various levels of education, including preschool, primary, secondary, tertiary, vo... Companies in EducationJobs in Education Electronics. The Electronics Industry has grown into a global industry with a value of billions of dollars. Most commonly when referring to the electronics industry it is understood the industry is consumer electronics which produces items used in everyday lif... Companies in ElectronicsJobs in Electronics Looking for a job as a Program Manager?Get matched on Hired.Join Hired Job-Seekers. How Hired Works Refer a Friend Candidate Sign Up Partnerships Salary Calculator Success Stories FAQ Employers. Why Hired Pricing Employer Sign Up Partnerships Success Stories Talk Talent to Me FAQ Resources. Content Hub Blog Company Directory Skills Directory Salaries Directory Jobs Directory Release Notes Company. Contact Us About Hired Diversity Careers Press © 2022 Vettery, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Terms Sitemap Careers About Us Support Press Diversity Social Responsibility English French Privacy Terms | © 2022 Vettery, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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Result 4
TitleHow to Become A Program Manager: Step by Step Guide And Career Paths
Urlhttps://www.zippia.com/program-manager-jobs/
DescriptionA complete guide that will help you start your career as a Program Manager. Follow these essential steps to becoming a Program Manager. Learn about career path, skills, education, certifications and salary
Date
Organic Position4
H1How to Become a Program Manager
H2What is a Program Manager
Program Manager Career Paths
Average Salary for a Program Manager
Program Manager Resumes
Program Manager Demographics
Program Manager Education
Check Jobs That Match To Your Education
Top Colleges for Program Managers
Online Courses For Program Manager That You May Like
Top Skills For a Program Manager
12 Program Manager RESUME EXAMPLES
Best States For a Program Manager
How Do Program Manager Rate Their Jobs?
Top Program Manager Employers
Program Manager Videos
Becoming a Program Manager FAQs
H3What Does a Program Manager Do
How To Become a Program Manager
What is the right job for my career path?
Program Manager Jobs You Might Like
What is the right job for my career path?
Calculate your salary
Program Manager Jobs You Might Like
Program Manager Jobs You Might Like
What do you like the most about working as Program Manager?
What do you NOT like?
Do program managers get paid well?
Is program manager a good career?
What does a program manager do in the government?
What is the difference between a program manager and a program director?
What is the difference between a program manager and a project manager?
What qualifications do you need to be a program manager?
Search For Program Manager Jobs
Program Manager Related Careers
Program Manager Related Jobs
Program Manager Jobs By Location
Program Manager Salaries By Location
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Program Manager
Program Manager Career Paths
Average Salary for a Program Manager
Program Manager Resumes
Program Manager Demographics
Program Manager Education
Check Jobs That Match To Your Education
Top Colleges for Program Managers
Online Courses For Program Manager That You May Like
Top Skills For a Program Manager
12 Program Manager RESUME EXAMPLES
Best States For a Program Manager
How Do Program Manager Rate Their Jobs?
Top Program Manager Employers
Program Manager Videos
Becoming a Program Manager FAQs
BodyHow to Become a Program ManagerOverviewJobsSalaryResumeSkillsWhat They DoEducationCertificationsDemographicsBest StatesMore Remote JobsTrendsInterview QuestionsCover LetterGet Alerts For Program Manager JobsOn This PageSkip to sectionOverviewOpen JobsCareer PathsAverage SalaryResume Examples & TemplatesMore DemographicsEducational RequirementsTop SkillsBest StatesEmployersVideosDemographicsEducational RequirementsTop SkillsBest StatesEmployersVideosWhat is a Program Manager. A program manager is someone who is able to clearly articulate the program's strategy. In addition, they're constantly evaluating projects that are needed to reach the program's goals. A super important skill for you to have in this position is definitely communication. If you can't communicate to other people than forget it. Or work on it. Which you'll be able to do while you're in college because program managers need a bachelor's degree. There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a Program Manager. For example, did you know that they make an average of $44.89 an hour? That's $93,374 a year! Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 13% and produce 21,900 job opportunities across the U.S. What Does a Program Manager Do. There are certain skills that many Program Managers have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed Managerial skills, Business skills and Problem-solving skills.Learn more about what a Program Manager doesHow To Become a Program Manager. If you're interested in becoming a Program Manager, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 66.5% of Program Managers have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 19.5% of Program Managers have master's degrees. Even though most Program Managers have a college degree, it's possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED. Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a Program Manager. When we researched the most common majors for a Program Manager, we found that they most commonly earn Bachelor's Degree degrees or Master's Degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on Program Manager resumes include Associate Degree degrees or Doctoral Degree degrees. You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a Program Manager. In fact, many Program Manager jobs require experience in a role such as Project Manager. Meanwhile, many Program Managers also have previous career experience in roles such as Senior Project Manager or Internship. Show moreWhat is the right job for my career path?Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the right jobs to get there.See My JobsAverage Salary$93,374Job Growth Rate13%Job Openings177,229Don't Have A Professional Resume?Create My ResumeProgram Manager Career Paths. In addition to switching up your job search, it might prove helpful to look at a career path for your specific job. Now, what's a career path you ask? Well, it's practically a map that shows how you might advance from one job title to another. Our career paths are especially detailed with salary changes. So, for example, if you started out with the role of Senior Project Manager you might progress to a role such as Contractor-Senior Project Manager eventually. Later on in your career, you could end up with the title Contractor-Senior Project Manager. Program ManagerSenior Project ManagerContractor-Senior Project Manager14 YearsProduct ManagerSenior Project ManagerSenior Infrastructure Project Manager14 YearsSenior ManagerSenior Project ManagerDirector Project Management Office13 YearsProject DirectorSenior Project Director8 YearsDirectorVice PresidentVice President-Project Management12 YearsProduct ManagerInformation Technology Project ManagerEnterprise Project Manager10 YearsShow MoreShareEmbed On Your WebsiteTop Careers Before Program Manager. Project Manager(148,541 Jobs)22.0 %Senior Project Manager(178,260 Jobs)9.3 %Internship(81,439 Jobs)6.5 %Show MoreSearch for these jobsTop Careers After Program Manager. Senior Project Manager(178,260 Jobs)18.5 %Project Manager(148,541 Jobs)16.9 %Consultant(186,900 Jobs)7.2 %Show MoreSearch for these jobsProgram Manager Jobs You Might Like. What is the right job for my career path?Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the rights job to get there.See my jobsCreate The Perfect ResumeOur resume builder tool will walk you through the process of creating a stand-out Program Manager resume.Create My Resume NowAverage Salary for a Program Manager. Program Managers in America make an average salary of $93,374 per year or $45 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $134,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $64,000 per year.Average Salary$93,374Find Your Salary EstimateHow much should you be earning as an Program Manager? Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to get an estimation of how much you should be earning.View Your SalarySee More Salary InformationCalculate your salary. Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to see how your pay matches up.CalculateProgram Manager Resumes. Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Program Manager. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job. Larry GreeneProgram ManagerContact InformationColorado Springs, CO(250) [email protected] AppointmentsDatabasePowerpointSales GoalsProject ManagementDaily ActivitiesData EntryTelephone CallsScrum  Employment HistoryProgram Manager2020 - PresentIntelColorado Springs, COServed as an Intel University Certified Risk Coach for the Applied Risk Management course.Developed roadmaps for IT infrastructure development, ERP manufacturing, and supply chain.Program Management / PMO Office.Implemented Project Management Office for the HRIS organization to provide structure, guidance and mentoring to business integrators and project managers.Managed a portfolio of $2.9M.Supervisor2018 - 2020Ford Motor CompanyColorado Springs, COIncreased quality indicators by 35% by utilizing Six Sigma analysis and engaging the work teams to assist in improvement process.Managed and directed all daily activities of up to 27 customerservice representatives in the collection and servicing of automotive loans.Provided coaching and counseling to direct reports on credit offering and purchased contract reviews.Tracked quality metrics and drove down warranty issues through training, constant communication and teamwork.Provided team leadership to ensure production schedules were met in accordance with quality standards.Office Assistant2017 - 2018University of Colorado Colorado SpringsColorado Springs, COAnswered multi-line phone system, directed communications and performed accurate high volume date entry.Prepared and submitted completed claims to various insurance companies and Medicare either electronically or by paper.Assist with sorting mail, filing and data entry.Programming Internship2016 - 2017El Paso CountyColorado Springs, COLearned communication techniques and approaches that diffuse hostile situations.Selected via the North Carolina State Government Internship Program to work full-time assisting with a case load of over 300 offenders.EducationBachelor's Degree Business2013 - 2016Colorado Technical UniversityColorado Springs, CO  Brenda PerkinsProgram ManagerContact InfoStamford, CT(570) [email protected] ManagementQuality StandardsInfrastructureProject ManagementWorkforceRecreational ActivitiesSales FloorStore ManagementSubstance AbuseMental HealthEmployment HistoryProgram Manager2017 - PresentGeneral ElectricStamford, CTGraduate of a comprehensive Financial Management Program involving six-month rotational positions and graduate level coursework.Project Management - Manage full SDLC programs from kick-off to delivery.Focus on compliance with documented processes to insure repeatability in the applications portfolio.Supervisor2014 - 2017WawaPhiladelphia, PAMaintain logs on all maintenance required on equipment within the food service department.Provide and maintain above satisfactory customer service to customers .Register, stocking, leadership, cleaning, customer serviceTrained, coached and developed associates in each of my departments to ensure customers received excellent service.Therapist2013 - 2014Private PracticePhiladelphia, PACharted and recorded information in client files Quickly responded to crisis situations when severe mental health and behavioral issues arose.Help clients find community resources, support, and develop effective solutions for psychological and relational struggles.Coached administrators in the school system to recognize and implement procedures for mandated substance abuse referrals, and child abuse reporting.Maintain complete charted treatment plans specific to the client and continually update the treatment plans as needed.Presented treatment plans to local review committees.Substance Abuse Counselor2012 - 2013Spectrum ProgramsMiami, FLProvide crisis intervention and therapeutic services for individuals and families with substance abuse and dual diagnosis.Delivered crisis intervention and emergency care and complied thoroughly with agency's safety protocol.Developed and implementing individualized and comprehensive treatment plans/ reviews; case management.Consulted with community agencies and families to maintain coordination in the treatment process.EducationBachelor's Degree Business2004 - 2007Miami Dade CollegeMiami, FL  Ronald BellProgram ManagerArlington Heights, IL(480) [email protected] Manager2017 - PresentMotorola Solutions•Arlington Heights, ILLed the Project Management Office for BAU and Chip projects.Developed project management governance strategies including processes for project change requests and ensured business acceptance was agreed.Project Manager2016 - 2017IBM•Atlanta, GAProject management including workload and scheduling.Develop project plan and schedule.Received IBM Ovation Award for JTRS project management excellence.Project management of IT compliance projects and continuous improvement efforts.Senior Software Engineer2014 - 2016Verizon•Columbia, SCPerformed Database Testing using SQL Server, queried test data from SQL Server by writing SQL Queries and PL/SQL Procedures.Performed Automation testing using Selenium on Web based (Browser) application.Worked on database schema for the inbound and outbound servers.Created business and data components as XML Web Services and .NET Remote Components.Systems Engineer2011 - 2014IBM•Raleigh, NCPerformed the day to day administration of Windows Server 2008/2008R2/2012.Test new hardware and software in customer environment.Participated on a Six Sigma team to provide the solution to metrics reporting improvements.SkillsSEOData CentersClient ExpectationsDatabaseUnixProject ManagementISOSANGITRisk ManagementEducationBachelor's Degree Business2008 - 2011Strayer University•Washington, DC  Judy WillisProgram ManagerEmployment HistoryProgram Manager2020 - PresentScience Applications International ...McLean, VACreated project management plan, work breakdown structure and project schedule.Manage a team eight project managers providing project management guidance and technical oversight on individual projects and 110 FTEs.Provided routine project management support in terms of financial reporting and tracks project deliverables.Manage and develop staff to provide excellent customer service with quick response times.Project Manager2017 - 2020SprintNew York, NYDevelop project schedule, review project scope and requirements.Created and implemented policies and procedures to enhance business operations.Project reporting and analysis, small demand project management, account management, requirements management and systems support.Fix minor UI/UX development bugs during core business hours Run Daily Scrum for Project Work closely with QA team.Senior Software Engineer2015 - 2017Fidelity InvestmentsBoston, MAPerformed testing of web services using ITKO Lisa.Create & distribute weekly Reports and followed up on Change Activity; managed released documents and maintain server database.Develop Spring module to integrate SOAP based web services.Systems Engineer2013 - 2014HADCOManchester, NHProvide support for multiple types of servers including Windows Server [ ] and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.Project : Next Generation Catalyst 3K Series Switches Testing OBFL feature for Next Generation Catalyst 3850, 3650, 5760 switches.Create and write automation tools for Windows, Active Directory, Splunk and Citrix servers.Supported Windows Server 2008, 2003 Vista and XP.EducationMaster's Degree Business2014 - 2015Northeastern UniversityBoston, MABachelor's Degree Accounting2010 - 2013Southern New Hampshire UniversityManchester, NH  Contact InformationMcLean, VA(410) [email protected] DirectoryInternetArchitectureProject ManagementDiskJavascriptInformation TechnologyBusiness UnitsLdapSystem Integration  Margaret BaileyProgram ManagerConway, AR(820) [email protected] GoalsBusiness DevelopmentStatus UpdatesOnlineRhelSystem PerformanceHAOversightHtml  Employment HistoryProgram Manager2020 - PresentHP•Conway, ARProvided project management for customer engagements to meet project scope, time, budget and quality expectations.Managed 13M annual paid media budget across HPE software portfolio.Partner program represented more than $700M revenue annually.Provided training for Quote & Configuration engineers on HP NonStop telecom hardware and proprietary quote management tools.Project Manager2017 - 2020Sony Corporation of America•San Diego, CAPerformed analysis and design of an enhancement for a Salesforce Sales Cloud application to accommodate the integration of Canadian business.Reported project status, establish procedures, and resolved differences.Led initiative to improve Project Management Office processes.Developed (with third party consultants) Hilton Worldwide s new Project Management System.Senior Software Engineer2016 - 2017Science Applications International ...•San Diego, CAAssisted the Architecture and Design Team reviewing and providing feedback on Software Design Notes and Use Cases.Integrate ESB implementation into a SOA architecture.Used Version Control systems GIT and SVN For the ability to revert and review code changes.Systems Engineer2012 - 2016Science Applications International ...•San Diego, CADeveloped configuration management and patch management programs for the services thus improving their "enterprise" maintainability and reliability.Provided LAN support including port security, hardware issues, configuration issues (IOS and CAT operating systems).Maintain and patch windows 2003 servers in enclave.Provide on call support for infrastructure environment issuesCollaborated with software architecture, design, and requirement working groups to understand system.EducationBachelor's Degree Business2009 - 2012Ashford University•San Diego, CA Jacob TaylorProgram ManagerParkton, NC  |  (370) 555-3859  |  [email protected]:Program Manager | IBM | Parkton, NC | 2019 - PresentPlanned, promoted, and executed 100 customer briefings worldwide with overall improvement in YTY revenue results and event attendance.Key contributor to signing a new cloud IaaS service.Ensured projects of the services agreement are managed and executed using industry accepted Project Management Methods.Supervisor | Best Buy | Chicago, IL | 2017 - 2019Shared best practices for sales and customer service with other team members to help improve the store\'s efficiency.Conducted interviews for new members of sales team Trained sales staff on product knowledge and salesmanship Performed inventory on store merchandiseAssisted Store Management in store operations, in a store that generated in excess of $65 million in annual revenue.Contributed to store's competitive advantage resulting in exceeding monthly sales goals.Therapist | NorthWestern | Chicago, IL | 2016 - 2017Provided comprehensive therapeutic care to individuals and their families with developmental disabilities and mental health diagnosis living within an outpatient facility.Collaborated with psychiatrists and other community and mental health professionals to ensure best practices and continuity of care.Maintained accurate and up-to-date clinical documentation, including progress notes and treatment plans.Substance Abuse Counselor | The Salvation Army | Arlington, TX | 2015 - 2016Participate in mandatory weekly clinical and interdisciplinary staff meetings to discuss patient care and all aspects of treatment.Provided staff training in art therapy application to addiction treatment models.Provide outpatient services to a limited number of clients dealing with mental health or substance abuse problems.Developed comprehensive treatment plans with ongoing monitoring and adjustment of goals following the client's needs.SkillsSubstance AbuseStore ManagementPHPWorkforceDaily ActivitiesProject ManagementPerformance AppraisalsCommunicationProceduresTreatment PlansEducation:Bachelor's Degree | The University of Texas at Arlington | Arlington, TX | 2007 - 2010Major: Social WorkBrian GarciaProgram ManagerNew York, NY(680) [email protected]:2018 - PresentProgram Manager / Microsoft / New York, NYPiloted the Agile Scrum Model and influenced the decision of transition of all existing projects to Agile methodology from Waterfall model.Outsourced engineering design, validation and testing as well as compliance and project management services.2016 - 2018Adjunct Professor / Adelphi University / New York, NYTeach all courses online for the university including Computer applications and programming courses.Research appropriate pedagogical methods to implement in the classroom for a range of student learning styles.Assess student learning, deliver information through lectures, and encourage progress for various mathematics classes including College Mathematics and Pre-Calculus.2014 - 2016Therapist / Private Practice / New York, NYProvide counseling for individuals & families experiencing difficulties Prepare individualized treatment plans for patients Prepare initial and discharge treatment plansRefer children and families who screen positive for mental health, substance use or other issues.2008 - 2014Mental Health Counselor / Catholic Charities USA / Washington, DCProvided shelter, security, direct supervision, and support and direction for residential clients.Case management of clients to identify mental health needs and created individualized treatment plans.Assisted in preparing treatment plans for assigned clients.Conduct psychosocial assessments; create and implement treatment plans with parents.SkillsNew Faculty, Workforce, Information Technology, Semester, CPR, PHP, Ethics, Project Management, Data Analysis, Public AdministrationEducation:2000 - 2003Bachelor's Degree In Business/ DeVry University / Oakbrook Terrace, ILAmber WatkinsProgram ManagerNew York, NY(760) [email protected] Manager, AT&T - New York, NY2019 - PresentProduce and update technical Methods & Procedures (M&Ps).Provided Project Management support for over 200 servers at AT&T's Birmingham and Charlotte Data Centers.Project Life-Cycle Compliance and maintenance for direct reporting to Program Market ManagerDevelop SOWs, secure resources, and build cross-functional technical and project management teams to service customer requests.Information Technology Project Manager, Sprint - Washington, DC2011 - 2019Received several awards for excellence and Project Management for DIR.Managed the Format IV retail store build-out initiative; an innovative first-to-market two-way video customer service and sales solution.Maintained platform stability of all mission critical applications and data (hardware, software, network, web infrastructure.).Received over 20 Sprint Valued Excellence Awards for Customer Service support.Information Technology Consultant, KPMG - Washington, DC2001 - 2011Provided customer service and support to all employees, utilized trouble ticket system to track open and pending tickets.Cloud computing and converged infrastructure.Created users and groups on Linux server.Installed and maintained servers based on RedHat AS 2.1, Suse 6-9 Linux.Deployed multiple computer systems with a wide range of software needs based upon contract requirements.Network Administrator, BAE Systems - College Park, MD1994 - 2001Monitored logs and activity on servers, backup solutions and SANs.Conducted daily backup and restoration using Net Backup software and SAN hardware.Resolved Windows related issues, Internet Explorer issues and other PC software related issues.Manage backup software installations by upgrading or installing master, media and client software.Administer and maintain end user accounts, permissions, and access rights via active directory services.Maintain Disaster recovery / BCP documentation and lead Infrastructure Disaster Recovery.SkillsProject ManagementDisaster RecoveryPhone SystemGroup PoliciesRisk ManagementInformation TechnologySdlcOSDaily OperationsInfrastructureEducationBachelor's Degree Business1991 - 1994University of Maryland - College Park - College Park, MDWilliam ScottProgram ManagerCincinnati, OH(540) [email protected] Manager, General Electric, Cincinnati, OH2018 - PresentProject Management activities, such as Resource/Cost estimation, Status reporting to Program Manager, team meeting etc.Reviewed design documents, deliverables and coached junior project managers on quality processes, project management activities and PMO interactions.Selected for fast-track GE management training program which focused on technical, leadership and project management training.Improved project management practices by launching standardized project reporting that included cross functional team leaders.Introduced Agile project management to global cross-site development teams.Partnered with Executive steering committee to integrate program goals with corporate strategy.Adjunct Professor, Concorde Career Colleges, Orlando, FL2016 - 2018Offer high-level course to master level students on Assessing Healthcare Quality.Lectured in Math, Physics and Chemistry.Promoted to Master Certified Operator of the ropes course and administrated the course.Therapist, One Hope United, Orlando, FL2014 - 2016Developed treatment plans using a variety of generally accepted intervention techniques to address areas of assessed need.Completed Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy training.Trained staff, counselors and interns in trauma and crisis issues.Provided individual, family and multi-family group therapy for children involved in the juvenile justice system.Mental Health Counselor, One Hope United, Orlando, FL2011 - 2014Supplied crisis intervention and substance abuse services to patients in the community.Supervised team of Youth Care Workers and responsible for the proper and timely completion of daily logs and Medicare billing forms.Provided support during clinical trials to mental health patients at a research facility.Perform individual counseling, psychoeducation, administer mental health assessments, develop and update treatment plans.SkillsRisk ManagementEthicsInternetStrategic PlanInstructional MaterialsChild AbuseProgram ParticipantsCustomer ServiceStudent LearningRecreational ActivitiesEducation2003 - 2006Bachelor's Degree Business, University of Central FloridaOrlando, FLBenjamin ColemanProgram ManagerKansas City, MO  |  (240) 555-9203  |  [email protected] History:Sprint - Kansas City, MO2011 - PresentProgram ManagerUtilized project management principles and processes across all knowledge areas to manage wireless projects from initiation to closing.Worked with IT and data teams ensuring proper table set up and SQL coding.Provided comprehensive project management and sales support for Broadband Local Network products.Microsoft - Redmond, WA2009 - 2011Project ManagerManaged operational and escalation/incidents of core services including connectivity, applications and services hosted in both cloud and legacy bare-metal environments.Trained on Six Sigma methodology and tools.Worked closely with internal development managers and QA to validate project plans and ensure clear communication across functional groups.Educate deployment managers on project management methodology as well as advise direct manager on project management practices to support process-improvement efforts.Ernst & Young - East Broad Street, Athens, GA1999 - 2009ConsultantPerform project management, business analysis, and technical advisory services for custom software development projects in the entertainment industry.Led and participated in many projects focused on data analysis (Advisory and Audit Services).Deployed transformative enterprise application projects through EDI implementation, ERP integration (Oracle/Siebel) and Intranet application development.Bank of America - East Broad Street, Athens, GA1994 - 1998Programmer AnalystCreated database packages, procedures, functions, triggers, views, materialized views using Oracle.Implemented solutions relying on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), using Web Services, SOAP and WSDL.Provided 2nd level assistance for 5,500 Banking Centers for hardware and software issues.Involved in conducting tests for the User Acceptance Testing (UAT).Education:University of Georgia - East Broad Street, Athens, GA1998 - 1999Master's Degree CommunicationUniversity of Georgia - East Broad Street, Athens, GA1991 - 1994Bachelor's Degree JournalismAmanda HughesProgram ManagerPhone (210) 555-1611Address Indianapolis, INE-mail [email protected] - PresentProgram ManagerEli Lilly and Company · Indianapolis, INManage the adaptation of project management software package (JIRA) across regional project teams.Developed and managed multiple project plans that follow the desired Project Management / LSEF and CCPM methodology.Focus on three main organizational elements: operating system, management infrastructure, and mindsets & behaviors.2010 - 2013ManagerPapa John's International · Indianapolis, INCreated schedules, maintained inventory, hired and trained staff members, and oversaw all restaurant operations.Mastered Point of Sale (POS) computer system for automated order taking.Oversee of set up and banquet functions.Coordinated with sales, customer service, supply chain, transportation, and production to address ongoing customer issues.Oversee all employees to ensure compliance with company policies and regulations.2009 - 2010ConsultantIBM · New York, NYDeveloped and revised system design procedures.Point of Contact for Purchasing and Payables (P2P).Install, configure and troubleshoot the YUM.2006 - 2009Programmer AnalystCiti · Garden City, NYAssisted external auditors with completion of audit of financial statements while maintaining a good business relationship on behalf of Citigroup.Track and Verify Quality Assurance milestones.Moved Application from Solaris to Linux RedHat for system benchmark E-procurement system run on Unix operating system.Involved in debugging and fixing issues raised by the QA team.SkillsVisioTechnical AssistanceJ2EeNPIStore ManagementBank DepositsIntranetPayrollCorporate OfficeProject ManagementEducation2003 - 2006Bachelor's Degree Social WorkAdelphi University · Garden City, NYAndrew CarrollProgram ManagerPhone: (630) 555-4031Email: [email protected]: New York, NYEmployment HistoryProgram Manager2018 - PresentAmerican International Group · New York, NYImplemented project management processes & methodologies in three international technology centers providing initial and on-going methodology.Established project management processes within IT Project Office.Project Manager2016 - 2018IBM · New York, NYFocus was on customer relationship management and proposal development and project management in the Intel and UNIX environments.Received GES Component Project Management Excellence Award.Mentor new PMs on organizational and project management processes.Transitioned to Nokia's project management organization to lead CDMA product development for in-market devices.Software Engineer2013 - 2016IBM · New York, NYDeveloped and implemented XML schemas to validate XML files for content handling.Ensured to understand and Implement the project procedures, standards in the project.Trained new hires with various tools and procedures needed to complete work planned, allowing quick transition into effective team member.Managed the setting up of the offshore infrastructure (servers etc.,) and performed configuration management.Used JSF for internal report generation by fetching data from database with customized view using CSS and AJAX for form processing.Programmer2012 - 2013Analog Devices · Boston, MADevelop and build the XML Web Services (JAX-WS).Established and maintained libraries of fully documented and validated SAS Programs/macros/procedures, which are used and recycled.Included some work with CDISC standards.SkillsProject ManagementPMPAPIProceduresStatus UpdatesFacilityInformation TechnologyTimely CompletionSoftware ApplicationsCommunity OutreachEducationBachelor's Degree Management2009 - 2012University of Massachusetts Boston · Boston, MACreate My Free ResumeBuild a professional resume in minutes using this template.Create My Resume NowLearn How To Write a Program Manager ResumeAt Zippia, we went through countless Program Manager resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.View Program Manager Resume Examples And TemplatesProgram Manager Demographics. Compare JobsCompare JobsProgram Manager Gender Statistics. male51.1 %female45.0 %unknown3.9 %Program Manager Ethnicity Statistics. White70.0 %Hispanic or Latino12.1 %Asian8.1 %Show MoreProgram Manager Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics. Spanish46.8 %French13.1 %German5.7 %Show MoreFind the best Program Manager job for youSearchProgram Manager Jobs You Might Like. High Paying Program Manager Jobs - $134K and UpSearch jobs near Ashburn, VAWork From Home Program Manager JobsFind Online, Remote, Telecommute Program Manager JobsEntry Level Program Manager JobsLittle to no experience requiredPart Time Program Manager JobsPart Time Jobs Hiring NowActively HiringProgram Manager jobs added within last 7 daysNo Degree Program Manager JobsSearch jobs with no degree requiredShow More Program Manager DemographicsCreate The Perfect ResumeOur resume builder tool will walk you through the process of creating a stand-out Program Manager resume.Create My Resume NowProgram Manager Education. Compare JobsCompare JobsProgram Manager Majors. Business26.1 %Psychology9.9 %Computer Science5.5 %Show MoreProgram Manager Degrees. Bachelors66.5 %Masters19.5 %Associate9.2 %Show MoreCheck Jobs That Match To Your Education. NoneHigh School / GEDAssociateBachelor'sMaster'sDoctorateTop Colleges for Program Managers. 1. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, PA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$55,584Enrollment10,764details2. University of Southern California. Los Angeles, CA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$56,225Enrollment19,548details3. Northwestern University. Evanston, IL • PrivateIn-State Tuition$54,568Enrollment8,451details4. Boston University. Boston, MA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$53,948Enrollment17,238details5. Pennsylvania State University. University Park, PA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$18,454Enrollment40,108details6. Harvard University. Cambridge, MA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$50,420Enrollment7,582details7. University of Washington. Seattle, WA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$11,207Enrollment30,905details8. University of Texas at Austin. Austin, TX • PrivateIn-State Tuition$10,610Enrollment40,329details9. New York University. New York, NY • PrivateIn-State Tuition$51,828Enrollment26,339details10. University of Maryland - College Park. College Park, MD • PrivateIn-State Tuition$10,595Enrollment30,184detailsShow More Program Manager Education RequirementsFind the best Program Manager job for youSearchProgram Manager Jobs You Might Like. High Paying Program Manager Jobs - $134K and UpSearch jobs near Ashburn, VAWork From Home Program Manager JobsFind Online, Remote, Telecommute Program Manager JobsEntry Level Program Manager JobsLittle to no experience requiredPart Time Program Manager JobsPart Time Jobs Hiring NowActively HiringProgram Manager jobs added within last 7 daysNo Degree Program Manager JobsSearch jobs with no degree requiredOnline Courses For Program Manager That You May Like. Operations Management A-Z: Business Processes and Systems4.5(1,128)Operations Management: Supply Chain & Business Processes in Industry for Manufacturing and Services Organizations...View Details on UdemyStart Improving Customer Service4.1(2,025)Creating a Customer Service advantage in Your department or business through communication and Customer Management...View Details on UdemyFundamentals of Logistics, Supply Chain & Customer Service4.5(1,048)Learn Logistics, Supply Chain and Customer Service. 3 Courses in 1...View Details on UdemyShow More Program Manager CoursesJob type you wantFull TimePart TimeInternshipTemporaryTop Skills For a Program Manager. The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 24.6% of Program Managers listed Project Management on their resume, but soft skills such as Managerial skills and Business skills are important as well. Project Management, 24.6%Procedures, 10.4%Customer Service, 5.4%Oversight, 4.8%Infrastructure, 2.7%Other Skills, 52.1%See All Program Manager Skills12 Program Manager RESUME EXAMPLES. Build a professional program manager resume in minutes. Browse through our resume examples to identify the best way to word your resume. Then choose from 12+ resume templates to create your program manager resume.Build My Resume NowBest States For a Program Manager. Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Program Manager. The best states for people in this position are Rhode Island, California, Delaware, and New Jersey. Program Managers make the most in Rhode Island with an average salary of $101,954. Whereas in California and Delaware, they would average $96,023 and $95,356, respectively. While Program Managers would only make an average of $94,604 in New Jersey, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four. 1. Rhode IslandTotal Program Manager Jobs:287Highest 10% Earn:$170,000Location Quotient:1.26 Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here$101,954Avg. SalaryView 287 Program Manager Jobs2. VirginiaTotal Program Manager Jobs:2,352Highest 10% Earn:$158,000Location Quotient:1.33 Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here$93,951Avg. SalaryView 2,352 Program Manager Jobs3. District of ColumbiaTotal Program Manager Jobs:768Highest 10% Earn:$165,000Location Quotient:2.44 Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here$98,389Avg. SalaryView 768 Program Manager JobsFull List Of Best States For Program ManagersHow Do Program Manager Rate Their Jobs?5.0Program Management - Taking The Lead. • March 20205.0Program Management - Taking The Lead. • March 2020What do you like the most about working as Program Manager?Project concept, execution - meeting business and Customer expectations. Show MoreWhat do you NOT like?Enjoy all aspects. Show MoreTop Program Manager Employers. We've made finding a great employer to work for easy by doing the hard work for you. We looked into employers that employ Program Managers and discovered their number of Program Manager opportunities and average salary. Through our research, we concluded that Microsoft was the best, especially with an average salary of $114,932. Amazon follows up with an average salary of $97,176, and then comes Google with an average of $139,059. In addition, we know most people would rather work from home. So instead of having to change careers, we identified the best employers for remote work as a Program Manager. The employers include Microsoft, Rockwell Automation, and UL RankCompanyZippia ScoreAverage Program Manager SalaryAverage Salary11.Google4.9$139,05922.Cisco Systems4.9$117,90433.Hewlett Packard Enterprise4.9$117,24944.Motorola Solutions4.7$115,19855.Microsoft4.9$114,93266.General Electric4.8$112,162Show MoreProgram Manager Videos. Day in the Life: Philip, Program Manager (PM)Becoming a Program Manager FAQs. Do program managers get paid well?Yes, program managers get paid well. Program managers tend to make salaries between $80,000 and $125,000 per year. As with any role, a program manager's salary is dependent on factors such as location, company, experience, and education.Program managers have complex jobs, which is why their salary is often quite high. Project managers often juggle between multiple projects, which means that they must be able to see things both strategically and tactically and see the "big picture" and those small details.Program managers who hold Master's in Business Administration (MBA) or Master's in Project Management often make more than those with just a bachelor's degree.Additionally, having certifications like the Program Management Professional (PgMP) certification or Project Management Professional (PMP) certification can boost a program manager's salary too.Salaries are also dependent on the actual program description and job duties. For example, a general program manager may make less than an IT or technical program manager.Learn more about this questionIs program manager a good career?Yes, program management is a good career. Many program managers enjoy their jobs because no two days are alike, and they can see their planning and hard work come to fruition.Typically, program managers have high annual salaries, handle greater business challenges, have opportunities to mentor project managers, and opportunities for career growth.The average program manager in the U.S. earns around $80,000, but the salary range typically falls between $80,000 and $120,000. As with any role, a program manager's salary is dependent on various factors such as location, company, experience, and education.As demand for project-based work grows, the Project Management Institute projects that employers are going to need to fill 2.2 million new project-oriented roles each year through 2027.Program management roles are often seen as a natural choice for project managers looking for their next challenge, and there are many opportunities for career growth.Learn more about this questionWhat does a program manager do in the government?As a program manager in the government, you will supervise and implement programs designed by administrators, elected officials, or stakeholders. Your responsibilities can vary depending on the agency and can range from total supervisory duties to developing and executing program goals.When you begin your work as a government program manager, you're given a set of goals to meet. You may be tasked with creating and executing a business development strategy, monitoring the project pipeline, or supporting the project management of state and federal government procurement bids.You will need to be familiar with government policies and procedures, as you may need to navigate compliance requirements.Additionally, you will work with project coordinators to ensure the program's operational needs are met and that projects adhere to compliance requirements throughout the project duration. You will also ensure that projects are completed efficiently and on schedule. Government program managers tend to have strict deadlines and tough requirements.Government program managers are also responsible for handling budgets and identifying solutions to resourcing challenges when necessary.Learn more about this questionWhat is the difference between a program manager and a program director?The difference between a program manager and a program director is that a program director has a higher-level position with more responsibility. While a program manager typically oversees one program, program directors are responsible for all the programs within the organization.Depending on the company or business the person is employed at, program directors and managers often work together to meet the company's goals. Their differences are in their daily management responsibilities.The program director supervises the program manager. In some industries, the program director must be a visionary who takes the board's strategies, prepares plans, and successfully implements them.This could include improving a brand or creating a strategy for a new product. It is up to the director to pass these plans on to the managers for implementation.Job Responsibilities of a Program Director:Evaluating board directed strategiesPreparing pre-cost estimates and analysis budgetsLeading managers in goal implementationA program manager oversees and works with the teams they supervise. It is their job to take the program director's strategies and put them to the test.Job Responsibilities of a Program Manager:Communicating between the program director and team membersScheduling projects and staying within budgetCollaborating throughout departments for directionLeading team meetings and performing project reviewsLearn more about this questionWhat is the difference between a program manager and a project manager?The difference between a program manager and a project manager is that program managers focus on the overall strategy while project managers oversee the individual projects that help execute the strategy.Programs consist of multiple projects that work toward a long-term goal. The role of a program manager is to oversee the operation of each project and strategize to ensure everything is on track, and make adjustments if needed. Program managers track timelines, manage budgets, and delegate tasks, but on a larger scale.Project managers are responsible for individual projects that contribute to the end goal. These projects can vary in length but are very specific and have strict deadlines -- project managers delegate tasks too, but smaller ones to consultants or project coordinators. As progress is made, project managers inform the program manager.While project managers and program managers have different tasks, it's important to be detail-oriented and analytical in both roles to keep projects moving forward.Learn more about this questionWhat qualifications do you need to be a program manager?To become a program manager, you should have at minimum a bachelor's degree. Program managers should also have excellent communications skills, be organized, and have the ability to lead and work well under pressure.While some companies may prefer candidates with a degree in business, others may be looking for applicants with expertise in a specific subject area. For example, if the program involves IT, they may require the program manager to have an IT background.Depending on the company and the scale of the program, the program manager may be required to have a master's degree or Project Management Professional (PMP) certification.Many program managers come from project management backgrounds, so they understand how to lead a team toward accomplishing goals and prioritizing tasks. Having experience with planning, budgeting, assessing, and organizing are skills that will also help the candidate gain entry into a program manager role.Learn more about this questionSearch For Program Manager Jobs. Find JobsProgram Manager Related Careers. Become an Assistant Program ManagerBecome an Associate Project ManagerBecome a Consultant/Project ManagerBecome a Deputy Program ManagerBecome a Development & Program ManagerBecome a Director Program ManagementBecome an Engineering Program ManagerBecome a Lead Program ManagerBecome a Manager, Program ManagementBecome a Manager, Project ManagementBecome a Marketing Program ManagerBecome an Operations Program ManagerBecome an Operations Project ManagerBecome a Program DirectorBecome a Program SupervisorProgram Manager Related Jobs. Assistant Program Manager JobsAssociate Project Manager JobsConsultant/Project Manager JobsDeputy Program Manager JobsDevelopment & Program Manager JobsDirector Program Management JobsEngineering Program Manager JobsLead Program Manager JobsManager, Program Management JobsManager, Project Management JobsMarketing Program Manager JobsOperations Program Manager JobsOperations Project Manager JobsProgram Director JobsProgram Supervisor JobsProgram Manager Jobs By Location. Program Manager Jobs In Albuquerque, NMProgram Manager Jobs In Alhambra, CAProgram Manager Jobs In Baton Rouge, LAProgram Manager Jobs In Boston, MAProgram Manager Jobs In Chicago, ILProgram Manager Jobs In Clearwater, FLProgram Manager Jobs In Cleveland, OHProgram Manager Jobs In Durham, NCProgram Manager Jobs In Greensboro, NCProgram Manager Jobs In Highlands Ranch, COProgram Manager Jobs In Norfolk, VAProgram Manager Jobs In Pomona, CAProgram Manager Jobs In Raleigh, NCProgram Manager Jobs In Riverside, CAProgram Manager Jobs In San Francisco, CAProgram Manager Salaries By Location. Program Manager Salaries In Albuquerque, NMProgram Manager Salaries In Alhambra, CAProgram Manager Salaries In Baton Rouge, LAProgram Manager Salaries In Boston, MAProgram Manager Salaries In Chicago, ILProgram Manager Salaries In Clearwater, FLProgram Manager Salaries In Cleveland, OHProgram Manager Salaries In Durham, NCProgram Manager Salaries In Greensboro, NCProgram Manager Salaries In Highlands Ranch, COProgram Manager Salaries In Norfolk, VAProgram Manager Salaries In Pomona, CAProgram Manager Salaries In Raleigh, NCProgram Manager Salaries In Riverside, CAProgram Manager Salaries In San Francisco, CAPrevious:Program Manager OverviewNext: Program Manager OverviewZippia CareersExecutive Management IndustryProgram ManagerUpdated August 18, 2021
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Result 5
TitleHow to Become a Program Manager
Urlhttps://www.wgu.edu/career-guide/business/program-manager-career.html
DescriptionTo become a program manager, you’ll need to obtain an undergraduate and master’s degree, develop skills in employee management, staffing, budgeting, and marketing, complete any certifications required by your employer, and gain at least a few years of experience in a relevant field
Date
Organic Position5
H1Program Manager Career Guide
H2How to Become a Program Manager
What Is a Program Manager?
What Degrees are Best for a Program Manager?
Business Management – B.S. Business Administration
Marketing – B.S. Business Administration
Master of Business Administration
Management and Leadership – M.S
What Skills Does a Program Manager Need?
H3What Does a Program Manager Do?
What’s the Difference Between a Program Manager and a Project Manager?
How Do I Become a Program Manager?
Compare Degree Options
How Much Does a Program Manager Make?
What Is the Projected Job Growth?
Where Do Program Managers Work?
Interested in Becoming a Program Manager?
FREE $65 APPLICATION CODE
THANKS FOR SIGNING UP!
H2WithAnchorsHow to Become a Program Manager
What Is a Program Manager?
What Degrees are Best for a Program Manager?
Business Management – B.S. Business Administration
Marketing – B.S. Business Administration
Master of Business Administration
Management and Leadership – M.S
What Skills Does a Program Manager Need?
BodyProgram Manager Career Guide Home Career Guide Business Program Manager Career How to Become a Program Manager. Are you a natural-born leader? Do you possess excellent communication skills and love to problem-solve? Then you could have a bright future as a program manager! Program management is a rewarding, in-demand career where you’ll help drive long-term value for your organization’s vision, direction, and outcomes. What are the other qualities of a successful program manager? Read this guide for a complete program manager job description—including salary expectations, strategic roles and manager responsibilities, education requirements (such as earning a business degree), and more. You’ll learn everything you need to know about how to become a program manager and why it’s such a fulfilling, high-paying profession.   What Is a Program Manager? Program managers oversee the fulfillment of larger organizational goals. They coordinate activities between multiple projects without directly managing them. Instead, they manage the main program, giving detailed attention to program strategy, project delegation, and program implementation. This manager has a large responsibility to ensure that all the team members understand how to work together and coordinate their efforts on the way to a larger goal. Program managers help organizations stay on schedule, on budget, and ultimately on an upward trajectory of growth and success. In many organizations, completing one large, overarching goal requires the execution of multiple individual projects. And when these projects are all interconnected, it can be challenging to keep them organized. This is where a program manager steps in. What Does a Program Manager Do? A program manager focuses on implementing strategic tasks that align new programs with an organization’s business strategy and goals. Their job description centers around high levels of coordination, delegation, and more. Just what exactly is a program? A program typically refers to a group of related projects, or projects and programs, that together support an overarching business initiative, such as a: Sales process Product launch Facility or store opening Marketing plan Customer or employee training As a program manager, you’ll analyze your programs with a broad, high-level view—leaving day-to-day project activities to your project managers. Your primary job description and responsibility is to ensure that all of your project managers are efficiently and effectively working toward program goals. You’re also responsible for making sure that your programs deliver the best return on investment (ROI). Basically, you can think of yourself as a “meta-project manager,” strategically and simultaneously orchestrating all of a program’s intertwined projects. If you love to multitask, this is the job for you! Typical day-to-day program management activities include: Planning and monitoring program execution Project coordination and managing project interdependencies Creating and managing a budget Cross-project resource management Identifying and addressing problems and risks Program documentation Stakeholder communications, negotiations, and problem-solving Aligning or realigning deliverables with program outcomes What’s the Difference Between a Program Manager and a Project Manager? A program manager's job description emphasized developing a program's objectives and strategy and assessing how it will impact their department, business, or organization. For each program, a program manager defines and oversees the projects needed to reach the targeted goals. That’s what differentiates program management from project management. Program managers guide all of the projects—and project managers—housed within one program. Alternatively, project manager job descriptions are centered around guiding the individual projects within a program. You can think of a program manager as an architect that creates the blueprint for a program and then delegates the project execution to one or various project managers. How Do I Become a Program Manager? Many program managers have a bachelor’s degree in business administration, communications, computer science (if they’re interested in working in technology), or other related fields such as marketing. Depending on what industry you prefer and the size of the company you intend to work for, you may need to get an advanced degree such as a master’s in management and leadership or a master’s in business administration. Having an MBA or other high-level management degree makes you a more desirable candidate. If you’ve already earned your degree or you’re currently working as a program manager, you should still consider: Earning program management certifications Joining related professional organizations Regularly attending industry seminars, conferences, and events This continued education will keep you abreast of new skills and best practices for improved job performance and upward mobility. What Degrees are Best for a Program Manager? Business Management – B.S. Business Administration. Hone your business acumen and garner added respect:... Hone your business acumen and garner added... Hone your business acumen and garner added respect: Time: 70% of graduates finish within 41 months.Tuition and fees: $3,720 per 6-month term.Sample careers and jobs this business degree will prepare you for:Account executiveBusiness analystProgram managerDirector or senior directorVice presidentThis online degree program is an excellent choice for kick-starting your organizational management career. College of Business More Details Apply Now Marketing – B.S. Business Administration. For those who want to lead brands and steer consumer markets:... For those who want to lead brands and steer... For those who want to lead brands and steer consumer markets: Time: 70% of graduates finish within 41 months.Tuition and fees: $3,720 per 6-month term.Some careers and jobs this business degree will prepare you for:Marketing and PR managerDirector of marketing and communicationsDirector of publicationsCustomer intelligence managerMarketing sales managerMarketing is a creative and exciting field—and one where an undergraduate degree will open better opportunities. College of Business More Details Apply Now Master of Business Administration. The flexible MBA program you need, focused on business... The flexible MBA program you need, focused on... The flexible MBA program you need, focused on business management, strategy, and leading teams: Time: Graduates can finish in 12 months.Tuition and fees: $4,675 per 6-month term.Sample careers and jobs this business degree will prepare you for:President and CEOVice presidentExecutive directorChief strategic officerOur competency-based model gives you an innovative learning experience you won't find anywhere else—and our MBA grads tell us they loved accelerating their program to see a faster ROI. College of Business More Details Apply Now Management and Leadership – M.S. An online master's degree focused on change management,... An online master's degree focused on change... An online master's degree focused on change management, innovation, and leading teams: Time: Graduates can finish in 12 months.Tuition and fees: $4,675 per 6-month term.Sample careers and jobs this business degree will prepare you for:PresidentVice presidentDirector of operationsExecutive directorDevelop a comprehensive suite of leadership skills and your confidence to navigate changing business structures. College of Business More Details Apply Now Next Start Date Start the 1st of any month—as soon as you complete enrollment! Apply Today Our Online University Degree Programs Start on the First of Every Month, All Year Long. No need to wait for spring or fall semester. It's back-to-school time at WGU year-round. Get started by talking to an Enrollment Counselor today, and you'll be on your way to realizing your dream of a bachelor's or master's degree—sooner than you might think! . Learn about Online College Admissions at WGU Compare Degree Options. There are many degree options to choose from. Compare them to find the best fit for you. Compare Degrees What Skills Does a Program Manager Need? Since program managers work with a variety of stakeholders, exceptional leadership and communication skills are part of the job description. If you want to know how to become a program manager, here are their other most common attributes: Highly analytical and organized Excellent teambuilders Great negotiators and influencers Adept at conflict resolution Creative problem solvers Outstanding planning, resource, and stakeholder manager Able to see the bigger picture and sell their vision How Much Does a Program Manager Make? $138,000 . According to salary.com, a program manager makes an average annual salary of $138,866 in 2021. The top 10% make more than $178,000, and even the bottom 10% of earners bring in just under $100,000. A career as a program manager can be financially rewarding. What Is the Projected Job Growth? 9% . The job outlook for a program manager is great. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, management occupations are expected to grow by 9% from 2020 to 2030. This translates to more than 906,000 new jobs. Where Do Program Managers Work? Varies . Program managers can work in any number of different industries. Some program managers work in technology and healthcare, while others work in the education or nonprofit space.     Interested in Becoming a Program Manager? Learn more about degree programs that can prepare you for this exciting career. View Degree Programs X FREE $65 APPLICATION CODE. Send me more information about WGU and a $65 application fee waiver code. By submitting you will receive emails from WGU and can opt-out at any time. X THANKS FOR SIGNING UP! We're emailing you the app fee waiver code and other information about getting your degree from WGU. Ready to apply now?Apply free using the application waiver NOWFREE. APPLY NOW
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TitleWhat does a Program Manager do? Role & Responsibilities
Urlhttps://www.glassdoor.com/Career/program-manager-career_KO0,15.htm
DescriptionThe average salary for a program manager is $96K per year in US. Salary estimates are based on 40K salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by program ...
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TitleProject Manager Career Path: From Entry-Level to VP | Coursera
Urlhttps://www.coursera.org/articles/project-manager-career-path
DescriptionProject managers might go on to become senior project managers, directors, or even vice presidents and other executives
DateDec 9, 2021
Organic Position7
H1Project Manager Career Path: From Entry-Level to VP
H2Is project management a good career path?
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BodyProject Manager Career Path: From Entry-Level to VPWritten by Coursera • Updated on Dec 9, 2021Project managers might go on to become senior project managers, directors, or even vice presidents and other executives.There’s no one way to become a project manager. And although that means you’ll have many options as you embark on your project manager journey, it can make deciding what to do next a little confusing. Plus, what options do you have after you’ve been a project manager for several years?An aspiring project manager might build experience in an industry before stepping into this role, then go on to become a senior project manager, director, or even vice president or other executive. Here’s a closer look at a project manager’s potential career path.All salary information comes from Glassdoor as of December 2021.1. Work in the industry. Many project managers get their start in non-managerial roles and work their way up to project manager as they take on more responsibilities. A software development project manager, for example, might start out as a software developer, and a construction project manager might have some experience as a civil engineer. Others may work as consultants to get exposure to business processes and sharpen management skills.Doing hands-on work in your industry can give you an advantage as a project manager. You’ll understand the ins and outs of the work required, empathize with team members, and have a better grasp on how to approach a project.2. Entry-level project management . As you launch your career, consider spending some time in an entry-level project management position like project coordinator, assistant project manager, associate project manager, or junior project manager. These positions help project managers plan and oversee a project’s success. Working in these roles can help you learn more about this field and bolster your experience before you apply to project manager positions. Average US salaries:Project coordinator: $53,561Assistant project manager: $75,523Associate project manager: $68,969Junior project manager: $64,756How to become a project coordinator (or a similar role): If you want to be a project coordinator or work in a parallel role, it’ll help to develop good communication and organizational skills, and have some experience in the industry you’re working in. You can also consider an entry-level certification, like the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification, or a certificate like the Google Project Management: Professional Certificate.Read more: What Does a Project Coordinator Do?3. Project manager. Project managers plan and execute projects to help organizations improve processes, develop new products, build structures, or complete other initiatives. A project manager shepherds a team through the project by making sure the schedule, budget, and communications are aligned in order to hit the project’s goals. Project managers can work in many different industries, including construction, health care, tech, finance, government, and IT.Average US salaries:Project manager: $88,907IT project manager: $104,126Technical project manager: $108,337Construction project manager: $89,474Health care project manager: $86,604How to become a project manager: Working your way up from a non-managerial position or junior position can be a good way to start. Earning certifications like the Project Management Professional (PMP), or others in Scrum or Agile, can be helpful.Read more: What Does a Project Manager Do? A Career Guide4. Senior project manager. Senior project managers help execute projects with larger scopes, like scaling processes across teams, developing complex products, or leading projects with longer time frames. They generally have several years of experience in this field. Average US salary for senior project managers: $119,754How to become a senior project manager: Gaining hands-on experience managing different types of projects with different people will be the main way you step into a senior position. You’ll want to prioritize gaining as much knowledge of project management as you can as well, either through coursework or by certification. Sharpen your managerial skills, as you’ll often be planning the work of other project managers. You can also find a mentor to help navigate your next steps.5. Director of project management. Directors of project management oversee the strategy and success of a project management division within a business. They work to ensure individual projects are aligned with the larger goals of an organization and create a blueprint for how those goals can be achieved as a project management team. They can manage multiple project managers, work cross-functionally, and interact with higher-level leaders within the organization.Average US salary for director of project management: $140,465How to become a director: You’ll want several years of management experience, plus exceptional leadership qualities, like communication, problem solving, and the ability to influence people.Leading People and TeamsUniversity of MichiganSPECIALIZATIONLearn More6. VP of operations, COO. Several years of being a leader in project management might get you to high-level positions, like vice president of operations, or executive positions like Chief Operating Officer. These high-ranking business leaders implement new strategies across the business.Average US salaries:Vice President of operations: $148,283Chief Operating Officer: $158,826How to become an executive-level manager: You should have extensive experience building and managing teams, and have strong business acumen. Getting an MBA may also help you learn the business skills to enable you to succeed at the executive level.Is project management a good career path?This career is in high demand. The Project Management Institute (PMI) estimates that the global economy will need 25 million new project professionals by 2030 in order to keep up with demand [1]. A report by Burning Glass Technologies found that there were over 280,000 postings for entry-level project management positions from 2019 to 2020 [2]. This career path can be a satisfying one for those who enjoy working with people and have strong organizational skills. Planning and starting a project from scratch, collaborating with others to overcome challenges, and seeing your efforts end in measurable success can be hugely rewarding. Project managers can also enjoy being able to work on many different types of projects and learn from each of them, as no two are the same. Some potential downsides include the demanding nature of the job and the emphasis on meeting deadlines.Getting started. The variety encountered in a project manager’s career path means there are plenty of opportunities to shape your own trajectory. If you’re ready to start learning, consider the Google Project Management: Professional Certificate to learn the fundamentals.Google Project Management:GooglePROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATELearn MoreRelated articles. Do I Need A Project Management Degree?How to Become a Project Manager in 5 StepsCAPM Certification Guide: Getting Started in Project Management10 PMI Certifications to Level Up Your Project Management CareerWhat Is Agile? A Beginner's GuideArticle sources. 1. Project Management Institute. "Talent Gap: Ten-Year Employment Trends, Costs, and Global Implications, https://www.pmi.org/learning/careers/talent-gap-2021." Accessed August 4, 2021.2. Burning Glass Technologies. "After the Storm: The Jobs and Skills that will Drive the Post-Pandemic Recovery, https://www.burning-glass.com/research-project/after-storm-recovery-jobs/." Accessed August 4, 2021.Written by Coursera • Updated on Dec 9, 2021This content has been made available for informational purposes only. Learners are advised to conduct additional research to ensure that courses and other credentials pursued meet their personal, professional, and financial goals.Learn without limits. Join for Free Coursera Footer. Start or advance your career. Google Data AnalystGoogle Project ManagementGoogle UX DesignGoogle IT SupportIBM Data ScienceIBM Data AnalystIBM Data Analytics with Excel and RIBM Cybersecurity AnalystIBM Data EngineeringIBM Full Stack Cloud DeveloperFacebook Social Media MarketingFacebook Marketing AnalyticsSalesforce Sales Development RepresentativeSalesforce Sales OperationsIntuit BookkeepingPreparing for Google Cloud Certification: Cloud ArchitectPreparing for Google Cloud Certification: Cloud Data EngineerLaunch your careerPrepare for a certificationAdvance your careerBrowse popular topics. Free CoursesLearn a LanguagePythonJavaWeb DesignSQLCursos GratisMicrosoft ExcelProject ManagementCybersecurityHuman ResourcesData Science Free CoursesSpeaking EnglishContent WritingFull Stack Web DevelopmentArtificial IntelligenceC ProgrammingCommunication SkillsBlockchainSee all coursesPopular courses and articles. 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TitleProject Management Career Path | Northeastern University
Urlhttps://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/project-management-career-path/
DescriptionA project management career path can include many roles. Here, we explore job possibilities for project managers with advice from a successful graduate
DateApr 5, 2021
Organic Position8
H1Building Your Project Management Career Path
H2What Does a Project Manager Do?
Project Management Job Outlook and Salary
Project Management Career Paths
Project Management Skills & Qualifications
How a Master’s in Project Management Helped One Alumna Rethink Her Career Path
Taking the Next Step in your Project Management Career
H3Download Our Free Guide to Advancing Your Project Management Career
1. Project Manager
2. Program Manager
3. Portfolio Manager
4. Senior- and Executive-Level Roles
5. Industry-Specific Project Management Roles
Project Management Education & Training
Related Articles
H2WithAnchorsWhat Does a Project Manager Do?
Project Management Job Outlook and Salary
Project Management Career Paths
Project Management Skills & Qualifications
How a Master’s in Project Management Helped One Alumna Rethink Her Career Path
Taking the Next Step in your Project Management Career
BodyBuilding Your Project Management Career Path By Kelsey Miller  |  April 5, 2021   Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Linkedin Highly qualified project managers are needed in all industries more than ever before. The global talent gap between employers’ needs for project management professionals and the availability of experts to fill those roles is growing rapidly. Several factors driving this gap include an increase in the number of jobs requiring project management skills, higher attrition rates, and a significant uptick in demand for project talent in developing economies. According to the Project Management Institute’s Job Growth and Talent Gap report, employers will need to fill 2.2 million new project management-oriented roles annually through the year 2027. In particular, the U.S. healthcare sector has experienced the most substantial increase in project-oriented jobs, followed by industries such as manufacturing and construction, information services and publishing, and finance and insurance. If you are considering starting a career in project management, there has never been a better time to do so. Here, we’ll explore the typical career path that project management professionals follow. Download Our Free Guide to Advancing Your Project Management Career. Learn what you need to know, from in-demand skills to the industry’s growing job opportunities. DOWNLOAD NOW What Does a Project Manager Do? Before you can begin your career path as a project management professional, it’s important to understand what project managers do, and what the role entails.  Generally, project managers plan and oversee the completion of specific projects for an organization while ensuring these projects are on time, on budget, and within scope. These individuals work in a wide range of industries, from construction and engineering to healthcare and pharmaceutical science. While the exact responsibilities of a project manager will vary depending on the industry, size of the organization, and type of project, there are some tasks that all project managers can expect to perform on a daily basis. These include: Creating project plans to define the scope of the project and develop a budget Communicating with the project team and key stakeholders Organizing project tasks Leading and developing team members Delivering the project following its completion The day in a life of a project manager will look different from one organization to the next, but regardless, these individuals create value by ensuring that projects are on time, within budget, and within scope so that organizations can maximize their efficiency. Because of this, project managers are in high demand and are compensated accordingly. Project Management Job Outlook and Salary. The median salary for project managers in the United States is $116,000 across all industries, with most earning between $93,000 and $140,000 annually. There are many factors, though, that affect a project manager’s salary, including a project management certification or graduate degree, years of experience, specialization, project team size, industry, and location. Additionally, a project manager’s salary is expected to increase as they advance along their career path. While there is no typical progression of job titles (most advance from Project Manager I to Project Manager II, for instance), there are opportunities for skilled workers to advance from project to program to portfolio management throughout their careers if desired. The most common stages of a project management career are as follows. Project Management Career Paths. While some of the most well-known positions include project manager, program manager, and portfolio manager, there are many possible job titles that project management professionals can pursue. 1. Project Manager. A project manager is responsible for applying the right tools, techniques, and processes to complete the project successfully. Project managers are responsible for balancing the scope of the work and the resources available, maintaining budget and time constraints, and meeting the quality standards required by key stakeholders. Within this role, there are various job titles that a professional might hold, including project manager I, II, or II and senior project manager. In general, these roles involve planning and executing projects by managing factors like budget, timeline, and resource allocation. The median annual salaries for these job titles are as follows: Project Manager I: $87,360 Project Manager II: $100,000 Project Manager III: $115,000 Senior Project Manager: $115,124 Many experienced project management professionals choose to advance their careers by pursuing a program management role. 2. Program Manager. After working at the project level for an organization, a PM professional can go on to oversee programs. A program is defined as a group of projects managed in a coordinated way that ensures value is achieved. Since program management involves overseeing several projects concurrently, there is inherently more responsibility involved in this role. However, program management is more strategic than managing multiple projects. The program manager also analyzes the business benefits of a program, oversees dependencies between projects, and creates program-level plans to produce a successful result. The average salary for program managers also varies depending on the industry and experience level. The PMI has reported that the median salary for general program managers is roughly $125,000, and can reach as high as $148,400 per year. 3. Portfolio Manager. A project portfolio is a collection of projects and programs that are managed as a group to achieve strategic business objectives. A portfolio manager, then, is responsible for the centralized management of one or more portfolios to meet an organization’s goals. This role carries a large amount of responsibility and therefore requires extensive experience and expertise. At this senior level, professionals can expect generous compensation. Data from the PMI shows that the average annual salary for a project portfolio manager is $138,000. 4. Senior- and Executive-Level Roles. After gaining experience in the field, there are several senior- and executive-level positions that project management professionals may be able to pursue, such as project management office (PMO) director or chief operating officer (COO). A PMO director oversees an organization’s project management office and takes a leadership role in setting and maintaining standards for projects throughout the company. The median salary for PMO directors is $144,000 per year, according to the PMI. For an established project manager with 10 or more years of experience, transitioning into the role of COO can be an attainable goal. The skills needed for this position are often similar to those developed throughout a project management career. According to PayScale, the average salary of COOs is  $144,424 per year.  5. Industry-Specific Project Management Roles. Project management professionals have career opportunities in virtually all industries, and they may come across industry-specific job titles as their careers progress. Below are some of the most promising industries for project managers, along with the average salaries that a project manager in each industry can expect to make. Healthcare: $83,523 Construction and Engineering: $117,776 Financial Services: $88,582 Software and Information Technology: $99,011 To advance within a certain industry, project managers may need to develop specialized skills related to that field. For example, those working in the information technology sector will need a strong understanding of the software development process in order to effectively manage a software project.  While the exact career path that you’ll want to follow depends on your personal and professional goals, there are certain skills and qualifications that project managers should focus on developing along the way. Project Management Skills & Qualifications. Regardless of the role that you’re preparing for, there are skills and qualifications that project managers need across all industries. Some essential project management skills include: Time management Communication Leadership Risk management Task management Technical skills  To develop these skills, aspiring project managers will typically pursue either an undergraduate degree in project management or, at a minimum, a certificate in project management. In these programs, individuals will hone their leadership capabilities and gain the technical knowledge needed to successfully lead projects. It is important to note that there is no formal definition of a career path for project managers or practitioners. Professionals from virtually all backgrounds can begin a career in project management regardless of their undergraduate degree. In fact, it is not uncommon for people to enter a project management role from an entirely different professional background. Consider Dani Beckman, for example, a 2015 graduate of Northeastern’s Master of Science in Project Management program, who shares her story below. How a Master’s in Project Management Helped One Alumna Rethink Her Career Path. It wasn’t until Dani Beckman discovered Northeastern University­­­–Charlotte that she realized project management was the career path she was meant to pursue. She initially studied pre-law before switching to business, but once she landed an office job, she recognized there were many additional opportunities to pursue. Primarily, she noticed, she enjoyed wearing different hats and being the one to keep people organized and projects on track.  “I had been constantly thinking, ‘What am I going to get my master’s degree in?’” Beckman says. “Then this light bulb went off in my head.” When she saw that Northeastern’s Charlotte campus offered a master’s in project management, it clicked; that was an area she dabbled in daily without even realizing it. Once she began taking classes, her expectations were validated. She was able to apply the lessons she learned on cost and budgeting to her day job and, although new to her at first, these are now skills she helps pass on to others. After graduating, Beckman advanced from a junior project manager at financial services firm Wells Fargo to a senior-level portfolio manager at transportation company Amtrak. There, she leveraged her network of classmates and professors from Northeastern to meet other project managers and advance in her field. Jennifer Young Baker, a former adjunct faculty member at Northeastern University­­–Charlotte and director of Amtrak’s Project Management Center of Excellence, became Beckman’s boss. At Amtrak, Beckman helped standardize the company’s project management practices. She’s created templates and written standards around topics like communication and quality management so that colleagues within Amtrak who might not have a PMP or other kind of credential can still manage their projects successfully. For Beckman, enabling others to see themselves as project managers is critical. “Just because your title is not ‘project manager’ doesn’t mean you’re not doing the work,” she says. “Anything you do is a project. If it starts one day and ends another and it’s different, it’s a project. If you have to take more than one step to finish it, it’s a project.” After choosing project management as a career, Beckman realized how much the industry has also impacted her personal life. “It has helped me see the world and my life in a whole different way,” Beckman says. “Now I break things out into smaller sections. Nothing looks big and ominous. You always get there in the end.” Taking the Next Step in your Project Management Career. There is an increasing number of opportunities for project management professionals in our project-oriented global economy. So, if you’re interested in taking the next step toward a career in project management, now is an opportune time to break into the field. However, it’s important for aspiring professionals to obtain the skills required to meet the demand and stand out from among the competition. Project Management Education & Training. Obtaining a certification, such as the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification, is one way to advance your career. However, becoming a certified PMP will not necessarily provide you with the range of skills and expertise required to manage the complex projects you may encounter on the job. For some, an advanced degree—such as Northeastern’s MS in Project Management—is a better career fit. Graduate programs in project management focus on building both the practical skills and theoretical concepts needed to lead complex projects and improve organizational outcomes. By earning a master’s in project management, you will gain the specialized knowledge needed to lead and manage complicated projects effectively while avoiding common pitfalls. You’ll also have the chance to acquire the broad, integrative knowledge required to manage project scope, risk, quality, and performance while effectively communicating with project stakeholders. Other benefits of earning an MS in PM include gaining an understanding of key project management trends, preparing for a more senior role, preparing for a role in a specific industry, and learning skills with an impact beyond project management. The skills you will learn from earning a master’s in project management can help you in whatever new role you take on. As Beckman notes, many work activities you already perform are part of a project. As such, the essential skills for successful project managers, such as effective communication, negotiation, time management, leadership, and technical expertise, are well suited for virtually any job in today’s ever-changing world. To learn more about breaking into or advancing your career in project management, download our free guide below. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in August 2019. It has since been updated for accuracy.  About Kelsey Miller Kelsey Miller is a marketing specialist and contributing writer for Northeastern University's Graduate Programs Blog. Related Articles. Should I Go To Grad School: 4 Questions to Consider 7 Advantages to Earning Your Master’s Degree Online 7 Time Management Tips for Online Students Did You Know? . Employers will need to fill 2.2 million new project-oriented roles each year through 2027. (PMI, 2017) Master of Science in Project Management Behind every successful project is a leader who forged its path. Learn More Most Popular:. 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December 8, 2021 - Industry Advice [https://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/MS-in-HMS-worth-it-1.jpg] Is an MS in Human Movement & Rehabilitation Science Worth It? October 28, 2021 - Industry Advice [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/data-analytics-vs-data-science-2.jpg] Data Analytics vs. Data Science: A Breakdown. December 8, 2021 - Industry Advice [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Computer-Science-Prerequisites-1.png] What are the Prerequisites for a Master’s in Computer Science? December 8, 2021 - Industry Advice [https://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Project-Management-Small-1.gif] Career Guide: How to Become a Project Manager. April 16, 2021 - Featured
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Result 9
TitleHow to Get a Job in Program Management
Urlhttps://careerkarma.com/blog/how-to-get-a-job-in-program-management/
DescriptionWant to pursue a career in program management? Find out how to get a job in program management, including the required time, education and skills
DateOct 1, 2021
Organic Position9
H1How to Get a Job in Program Management: Required Education and Skills
H2What Is Program Management?
Program Management Job Outlook
What Education Do I Need to Become a Program Manager?
Can I Get a Program Management Job Without a Degree?
Can a Coding Bootcamp Help Me Get a Job in Program Management?
How Long Does It Take to Get a Job in Program Management?
Common Program Management Education Paths
Key Program Management Skills to List on Your Resume
Where to Find Program Management Jobs
How to Prepare for Your Program Management Interview
The Five Highest-Paying Program Management Jobs
Program Management Career Path
Program Management Certifications
Tips on How to Get a Job in Program Management
Should You Get a Job in Program Management in 2021?
Project Manager FAQ
H3Program Management Bootcamps
Community College
Program Management Degrees
Leadership Skills
Analytical Skills
Conflict Resolution Skills
Company Websites
Job Sites
Forums
Program Management Interview Questions
Senior Technical Program Manager
Director of Program Management
Director of Technical Program Management
Senior Technical Manager
IT Program Manager
Entry-Level Program Management Jobs
Mid-Level Program Management Jobs
Senior-Level Program Management Jobs
Program Management Professional (PgMP)
Project Management Professional (PMP)
Six Sigma Black Belt Certification (SSBB)
Pursue higher education
Get a certification
Build your experience
Network
Apply for entry-level positions
Prepare for interviews
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Program Management?
Program Management Job Outlook
What Education Do I Need to Become a Program Manager?
Can I Get a Program Management Job Without a Degree?
Can a Coding Bootcamp Help Me Get a Job in Program Management?
How Long Does It Take to Get a Job in Program Management?
Common Program Management Education Paths
Key Program Management Skills to List on Your Resume
Where to Find Program Management Jobs
How to Prepare for Your Program Management Interview
The Five Highest-Paying Program Management Jobs
Program Management Career Path
Program Management Certifications
Tips on How to Get a Job in Program Management
Should You Get a Job in Program Management in 2021?
Project Manager FAQ
BodyHow to Get a Job in Program Management: Required Education and Skills Program managers manage large, complex programs. This typically involves overseeing multiple projects at a time that are all connected by a shared mission. If you want to pursue a career in program management, this guide can help. We’ll cover how to get a job in program management, the skills and education needed, and job outlook. What Is Program Management? Program management experts oversee multiple individual projects that are linked together by a shared goal or common impact. Grouping these projects provides consistency in management, approach, and greater visibility to the organization’s key stakeholders, as opposed to managing projects individually.  Program management professionals need to maintain a strategic plan and schedule for the program. Their responsibilities might include things like holding project status meetings with each project team, reviewing each project plan, and checking on progress. These professionals safeguard the quality of the program plan and often mentor project managers.  Program Management Job Outlook. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment in management professions is expected to grow by nine percent from 2020 to 2030, making it a secure career path. The growth in this sector is predicted to result in 906,800 new jobs and will be driven by the increase of new organizations that require workers to manage the operations.  What Education Do I Need to Become a Program Manager? The education requirements differ depending on the job and location. Most employers prefer candidates with a formal education, such as a bachelor’s degree in business management or similar disciplines. However, it is possible to enter the field without a degree. Can I Get a Program Management Job Without a Degree? It is possible to get a program management job without a degree. Program managers tend to start at a more junior level as project managers. There are training programs that help you to become a project manager such as coding bootcamps. Through these bootcamps you can get a job in project management and grow into the program management field. Can a Coding Bootcamp Help Me Get a Job in Program Management? Yes, a coding bootcamp can help you to get into program management. Since program management is closely linked to project management, you can start by attending a project management bootcamp. These programs will teach you the foundations of project management, They take a few weeks to complete and are much cheaper than a traditional university education.  Students learn everything from the basics to more advanced techniques in project management. The training features hands-on projects, which allows you to gain real-world experience before you enter the workforce. After a short period of working as a project manager, you can start looking to take up a role in program management. 81% of participants stated they felt more confident about their tech job prospects after attending a bootcamp. Get matched to a bootcamp today. Find Your Bootcamp Match The average bootcamp grad spent less than six months in career transition, from starting a bootcamp to finding their first job. Start your career switch today How Long Does It Take to Get a Job in Program Management? It can take a few months or years to get onto this career path, depending on the path you choose. You can become a project manager first with some work experience or training from a project management bootcamp. If you choose this option, you can be ready for the workforce within three months or less.  However, if you choose to pursue a university degree, you will spend at least four years as a full-time student. Some of these professionals earn an advanced degree in business administration or finance, depending on the field they want to break into. This will add more time to your education. Common Program Management Education Paths. There are a few program management education paths you can choose to take. This is because there aren’t a lot of specialized training programs for this occupation. Most program managers start off as project managers and advance from there. Program Management Bootcamps. You can enroll in bootcamps to gain job-specific skills in a short amount of time. It’s more common to find bootcamps in project management, rather than program management specifically. Bootcamps teach the practical and soft skills you need to enter the project management space and progress to program management. » MORE:  How to Learn Microsoft Office: Best Courses to Use the Most Popular ApplicationsThese programs give you the opportunity to work on hands-on projects. Many people prefer bootcamps because of their affordability and quick, intensive training. You’ll also gain access to career resources such as hiring schemes and mock interviews.  Community College. Training from a community college can prepare you for a career in program management. These schools offer associate degrees in management disciplines, so you can learn the foundations of project management. Students that attend these programs also have a solid foundation for business fields so they can decide to expand the application of their knowledge. On average, the programs are completed in two years and are much cheaper than a four-year degree. Find Your Bootcamp Match Career Karma matches you with top tech bootcamps Get exclusive scholarships and prep courses Program Management Degrees. Universities can also provide the necessary training needed to thrive in the field. The programs take four years for most full-time students and are more expensive than other educational paths listed. You can study business management since program management is not available as a specialized course in most schools. As a student, you will learn to build teams, assess risks, resolve conflicts, and make managerial decisions. The courses may be applicable to different industries such as technology, operations, human resources, and marketing. Key Program Management Skills to List on Your Resume. As well as having the right educational training, certain skills are essential to succeeding as a program manager. The main skill sets required are in leadership, analysis, communication, time management, and conflict resolution. These soft and hard skills will make it easier to lead programs and be successful in the role.  Leadership Skills. Program managers lead teams. You should be able to inspire and motivate your team. Good leadership and organizational skills will help you coordinate team members, oversee complex projects, and make decisions for the continuous progress of the program.   Analytical Skills. Programs often generate large volumes of statistical, financial, or metric data. A program manager should be able to gather and integrate this data quickly. They must also be able to report on current projects and use data to find better ways of executing projects in the future. For instance, this could be a way to reduce costs or be more efficient. Conflict Resolution Skills. Conflict is bound to arise within projects. Team members may disagree on things such as prioritization or stakeholder requirements. It is the job of the program manager to resolve all conflicts through effective communication. This avoids conflict causing a break in communication between team members and affecting the project outcome. Where to Find Program Management Jobs. You can find program management jobs on top job sites, forums, or directly on company websites. You can also set alerts to be one of the first to apply for such jobs. Below we have listed common places to find jobs. Company Websites. You can find program management jobs directly on company websites. These openings are often more up to date and applying directly may increase your chances of getting an interview.  Job Sites. Job boards and websites are useful for finding a job. Look at websites like Indeed, Glassdoor, and Ziprecruiter. Social networks like LinkedIn also list openings for program manager roles. Some job sites also give you access to career resources and advice.  Forums . Job forums can also help you land a role in program management. All you need to do is find one and join the community. Recruiters can post job vacancies on the forum and you can apply to suitable roles. "Career Karma entered my life when I needed it most and quickly helped me match with a bootcamp. Two months after graduating, I found my dream job that aligned with my values and goals in life!" Venus, Software Engineer at Rockbot Find Your Bootcamp Match How to Prepare for Your Program Management Interview. Leave plenty of time to prepare for your program manager interview beforehand. You can start by researching the organization and practicing answers to potential interview questions. It can also help to do mock interviews with a career coach. We have listed some sample questions below. » MORE:  The Top Four Sites to Find Junior Developer JobsProgram Management Interview Questions. Describe your dream job. What are the differences between project management and program management?How do you resolve conflict between team members?How do you measure the success of a program?What technology tools are useful to you as a program manager?What are your long-term career goals? The Five Highest-Paying Program Management Jobs. Program Management JobsAverage SalaryProjected Growth*Senior Technical Program Manager$164,1709%Director of Program Management$162,2129%Director of Technical Program Management$149,1099%Senior Technical Manager$141,5789%IT Program Manager$137,4759%*Job growth figures have been sourced from BLS. These jobs fall under their wider category for management occupations. Senior Technical Program Manager. Salary: $164,170 Senior technical program managers identify, plan, and carry out large product development projects. These experts engage cross-disciplinary staff as they conceive and develop innovative consumer products. Good tech knowledge is essential for this role.  Director of Program Management. Salary: $162,21 This is a director role that oversees the program management team. They are also responsible for coordinating related projects and coming up with solutions to enhance the overall program performance. Director of Technical Program Management. Salary: $149,109 This professional also oversees a program management team. They will typically focus on technical product development. As a director role, they are responsible for staffing, strategy, risk analysis, scheduling, allocation of resources, and contingency planning. Senior Technical Manager. Salary: $141,578 The senior technical manager is responsible for managing technical programs. These experts also ensure that different kinds of projects and initiatives are aligned with the priorities of the wider program and organization.  IT Program Manager. Salary: $137,475 The IT program manager is responsible for managing multiple IT-related projects. Their programs are typically a collection of IT projects geared towards a common objective or goal. They oversee these projects to ensure that they meet the company’s needs and objectives.   Program Management Career Path. Program management professionals experience career growth as they gain experience in the field. They often start in an entry-level job in project management, before moving onto mid and senior-level jobs. Below are some of the most popular jobs in each of these levels. Entry-Level Program Management Jobs. Program Coordinator – Program coordinators manage and facilitate different processes within the worker lifecycle from onboarding to offboarding. Program Planning and Control Specialist – This expert collates, maintains, and develops program schedules. They are also responsible for critical path analysis and variance analysis. Project Coordinator – This professional manages information flow among teams, leaders, and external organizations to ensure that complex projects are executed on time. Mid-Level Program Management Jobs. Mid-level Program Manager – Professionals in this role are responsible for managing strategic tasks and projects for an organization. At this level, the professional works and makes decisions independently to advance the projects. Senior-Level Program Management Jobs. Senior Program Manager – Senior program managers are responsible for planning, designing, and overseeing the completion of complex programs. They may oversee other project teams.  Program Management Certifications. To increase your chances of getting a job, you can earn program management certifications. It is not usually a requirement but can set you apart from other candidates. Certifications validate your skills and typically involve a certification exam. We’ve listed some common certifications in project and program management below.  Program Management Professional (PgMP). The Project Management Institute (PMI) provides some of the most well-known certifications in project and program management. Candidates who earn this certificate are recognized as professionals with significant experience, along with the ability to make important decisions and implement strategic objectives.  » MORE:  How to Get an Intuit Internship: Is It Hard to Get an Internship at Intuit?Project Management Professional (PMP). The PMI project management certification demonstrates that you have a solid foundation in project management and that you are qualified to take on roles in the field. The certification expires after a few years so you may need to renew it when necessary.  Six Sigma Black Belt Certification (SSBB). This certification shows that candidates have learned to demonstrate team leadership and understand responsibilities, dynamics, and roles. It also shows that they understand key processes that make the program management process run smoothly.  Tips on How to Get a Job in Program Management. Getting a job in program management is easy if you prepare well and know where to look. There are many pathways to becoming a program manager. Below we have listed a few key steps to help you be successful.  Pursue higher education. Earning a degree or attending a bootcamp in program management or a similar field can help you get started in this industry. Most employers prefer traditional university degrees, but bootcamp education is becoming more accepted as it provides you with more hands-on experience. Get a certification. Certifications make it possible for you to learn fundamental concepts and demonstrate these to your employer. If you are new to the program management field, earning a certification is a good way to showcase your skills because they show that you have learned the necessary skills. Build your experience. Earning real-world experience is a great way to boost your resume and help you succeed in this field. You can start by volunteering or applying for an internship. Internships don’t usually require you to have previous experience.  Network. Networking is an excellent way to find jobs. This can help you to get information about job openings before others. You can also network by attending seminars, webinars, meetings, and similar programs with professionals in your field. Apply for entry-level positions. Entry-level positions are a great way to start your career and boost your resume. Look for jobs at a junior level to start building your experience. Be sure to read the job description to see if you are qualified for the position. Prepare for interviews. It is best to prepare for your interview. Researching the company and practicing questions can help. The interview is your opportunity to make a good impression on the hiring manager and help yourself stand out among other candidates.  Should You Get a Job in Program Management in 2021? Yes. If you want to work on all kinds of projects and coordinate a team, this career is an excellent option for you. The field has many job opportunities in different industries from tech to healthcare and engineering.   The demand for program managers is good, with a projected employment growth of nine percent. The training also makes it easier to branch out in other management roles, making it a secure field full of opportunities.  Project Manager FAQ. Can You Become a Program Manager Without a Degree? You can become a program manager without a degree if you attend a coding bootcamp. However, some employers require candidates to have a bachelor’s degree in business management or similar disciplines. Is It Hard to Get Into Program Management? Program management is a rewarding career path but it can be challenging. If you want more practical training in this field, a bootcamp can help. Bootcamps teach all the essential skills employers are looking for. What Is the role of a Program Manager? Program managers are responsible for creating a program plan and oversee the achievement of organizational goals. They coordinate efforts between individual projects. They lead the program management team with delegation, implementation, and attention to strategy. How Much Does A Program Manager Make? According to Ziprecruiter, program managers make an average yearly salary of $89,504. This means their salary range is around $43 per hour. As they gain more experience, their earning potential increases. Rate this Article About us: Career Karma is a platform designed to help job seekers find, research, and connect with job training programs to advance their careers. Learn about the CK publication. What's Next? Want to take action? Get matched with top bootcamps. Want to dive deeper? Ask a question to our community. Want to explore tech careers? Take our careers quiz. Princess Ogono-Dimaro Princess, from Nigeria, started working with Career Karma in January 2021. She attended the University of Benin and the Nigerian Law School. She previously worked with a law firm and specialized in legal drafting while juggling her growing freelance writing career. Her work has appeared on Raffela, Play Junkie, Blockster, and Smartereum. Her interests include arts and tech, and she has studied blockchain and cryptocurrency, which she enjoys writing about. Read more by Princess Ogono-Dimaro Share This Previous ArticleHow to Get a Job in Digital Marketing: Required Education and Skills Next ArticleHow to Get a Job in Cloud Computing: Required Education and Skills Oct 1, 2021 Apply to top tech training programs in one clickGet Matched Many careers in tech pay over $100,000 per year. With help from Career Karma, you can find a training program that meets your needs and will set you up for a long-term, well-paid career in tech. 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Result 10
TitleEngineering Program Manager | NC State Online and Distance Education
Urlhttps://online-distance.ncsu.edu/career/engineering-program-manager/
Description
Date
Organic Position10
H1Engineering Program Manager
H2Engineering
What Does a Professional in this Career Do?
Job Outlook
Salary
Education and Experience
Skills
Alternative Job Titles
Similar Occupations
Common Employers
NC State Programs Relevant to this Career
Not sure where to start?
Not sure where to start?
H3National
State
Baseline Skills
Defining Skills
Necessary Skills
Distinguishing Skills
Salary Boosting Skills
United States
North Carolina
Programs Relevant to this Career
H2WithAnchorsEngineering
What Does a Professional in this Career Do?
Job Outlook
Salary
Education and Experience
Skills
Alternative Job Titles
Similar Occupations
Common Employers
NC State Programs Relevant to this Career
Not sure where to start?
Not sure where to start?
BodyEngineering Program Manager What Does a Professional in this Career Do?Provides support and/or lead teams through the Engineering development process and implementation of company's products. Projects are typically shorter-term, less complex and more contained with a defined time frame. Programs are typically longer-term, multi-functional, multi-project with complex requirements and effort. Manage activities, resource capability, schedules, budgets, and ensure cross company communications to facilitate product completion on schedule within budget. Work with engineering management to identify and improve process and program efficiencies.Job Outlook. There were 91 Engineering Program Manager job postings in North Carolina in the past year and 3699 in the United States.In combination with other careers in the Engineering Manager industry, which includes the Engineering Program Manager career, the following graph shows the number of people employed for each year since 2012: Salary. Many new Engineering Program Manager jobs have salaries estimated to be in the following ranges, based on the requirements and responsibilities listed in job postings from the past year. National. The average estimated salary in the United States for this career, based on job postings in the past year, is $112,477. State. The average estimated salary in North Carolina for this career, based on job postings in the past year, is $108,964. Percentiles represent the percentage that is lower than the value. For example, 25% of estimated salaries for Engineering Program Manager postings in the United States in the past year were lower than $98,835.Education and Experience. Posted Engineering Program Manager jobs typically require the following level of education. The numbers below are based on job postings in the United States from the past year. Not all job postings list education requirements. Education LevelPercentageAssociate's Degree0%Bachelor's Degree60%Master's Degree40%Doctoral Degree1%Other0% Posted Engineering Program Manager jobs typically require the following number of years of experience. The numbers below are based on job postings in the United States from the past year. Not all job postings list experience requirements. Years of ExperiencePercentage0 to 2 years5%3 to 5 years48%6 to 8 years21%9+ years26% Skills. Below are listings of the most common general and specialized skills Engineering Program Manager positions expect applicants to have as well as the most common skills that distinguish individuals from their peers. The percentage of job postings that specifically mention each skill is also listed.Baseline Skills. A skill that is required across a broad range of occupations, including this one.Communication Skills (47%)Teamwork / Collaboration (42%)Planning (41%)Problem Solving (25%)Creativity (19%)Defining Skills. A core skill for this occupation, it occurs frequently in job postings.Program Management (75%)Project Management (43%)Scheduling (34%)Budgeting (29%)Product Development (19%)Necessary Skills. A skill that is requested frequently in this occupation but isn’t specific to it.Project Planning and Development Skills (14%)Atlassian JIRA (12%)Quality Management (8%)Confluence (8%)Change Management (7%)Distinguishing Skills. A skill that may distinguish a subset of the occupation.Systems Development (6%)Lifecycle Management (6%)Hardware Experience (5%)PPM Tools (5%)Computer Engineering (4%)Salary Boosting Skills. A professional who wishes to excel in this career path may consider developing the following highly valued skills. The percentage of job postings that specifically mention each skill is listed along with the marginal value: the average salary difference between postings that request that skill and those that do not.Cloud Engineering (1%) – marginal value $5,601Alternative Job Titles. Sometimes employers post jobs with Engineering Program Manager skills but a different job title. Some common alternative job titles include:Senior Engineering Program Manager - Opportunity For Working RemotelySenior Engineering Program ManagerEngineering Manager IIDirector Of Systems EngineeringSimilar Occupations. If you are interested in exploring occupations with similar skills, you may want to research the following job titles. Note that we only list occupations that have at least one corresponding NC State Online and Distance Education program.Quality Engineering ManagerElectronics Engineering ManagerProduct Engineering ManagerEngineering Project ManagerDirector of EngineeringEngineering Manager (General)Operations Engineering ManagerMechanical Engineering ManagerAerospace Engineering ManagerCommon Employers. Here are the employers that have posted the most Engineering Program Manager jobs in the past year along with how many they have posted.United States. Apple Inc. (337)Vmware Incorporated (234)Medtronic (131)Microsoft Corporation (130)Google Inc. (83)North Carolina. Microsoft Corporation (9)Vmware Incorporated (7)Deloitte (6)Cisco Systems Incorporated (4)Jm Huber Corporation (4)NC State Programs Relevant to this Career. If you are interested in preparing for a career in this field, the following NC State Online and Distance Education programs offer a great place to start!Electrical Engineering Master's DegreesEngineering Management Master's DegreesEngineering Management Foundations Graduate Certificates Programs Relevant to this Career. Electrical Engineering Master's DegreesEngineering Management Master's DegreesEngineering Management Foundations Graduate Certificates Not sure where to start? Get personalized program recommendations with Career Insight. Go to Career Insight Top All wages, job posting statistics, employment trend projections, and information about skill desirability on this page represents historical data and does not guarantee future conditions. Data is provided by and downloaded regularly from Burning Glass Technologies. For more information about how they gather data and what it represents, see Burning Glass Technologies - Frequently Asked Questions. Not sure where to start? Get personalized program recommendations with Career Insight. Go to Career Insight
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Result 11
Title10 Things Every New Program Manager Should Know
Urlhttps://www.thebalancecareers.com/new-program-managers-tips-4125206
DescriptionWanting to move into program management? Or have you been given your first opportunity? These tips will help you succeed
DateJun 25, 2019
Organic Position11
H110 Things Every New Program Manager Should Know
H2Program Management Differs From Project Management
Expect Uncertainty
Watch Out for Burnout
Manage the Pace
Train Your Team for Success
Governance Is More Complex
Planning Is More Difficult
Don’t Plan Every Line
Delegate, Delegate, Delegate
Don’t Be Afraid of Conflict
H3
H2WithAnchorsProgram Management Differs From Project Management
Expect Uncertainty
Watch Out for Burnout
Manage the Pace
Train Your Team for Success
Governance Is More Complex
Planning Is More Difficult
Don’t Plan Every Line
Delegate, Delegate, Delegate
Don’t Be Afraid of Conflict
Body10 Things Every New Program Manager Should Know ••• UberImages/iStock/Getty Images Plus By Elizabeth Harrin Full Bio Elizabeth Harrin wrote about project management for The Balance Careers, has experience as a project manager, and wrote project management guidebooks. Learn about our editorial policies Updated on June 25, 2019 Program management is a rewarding and well-paid career choice, but it can be a challenging role as well. If you just got your first program management job, or want to know if you should make the jump to a program management career, it's important to understand what the career entails. Consider these 10 things every new program manager should be aware of before starting a program management role. Program Management Differs From Project Management . Whether opening a new office, launching a new app, or building an Olympic stadium, projects have a clear set of objectives and timeline. A program manager, however, might oversee multiple projects at one time, and each might have its own project team and project manager. Programs deliver something of value to the organization over time and evolve as they move forward. Program Management Broad scope and timeframe Multiple projects at once Evolve over time Lead to business transformation Project Management Defined start, middle, and end Plan work and resources Control process Deliver on a clear objective Expect Uncertainty . Programs are inherently uncertain. While you might know what the big picture is, it’s just a vision statement when you start out. The exact path of how to get there, and what projects will be required over an extended period of time, is something you have to work out as you go. You’ll start with detailed planning for what you do know and build up a picture of how to address the rest of it as you get closer. Progressively extend your planning and delivery horizons until you can’t go any further. Block out time at regular intervals to plan the next steps. You also can use this opportunity to ensure you are still on track to deliver business value. Watch Out for Burnout . While a project might be finished in a year or so, programs can stretch on—seemingly indefinitely. Program managers need to protect their teams against burnout. You can’t work at top speed endlessly, so ensure your staff members get adequate downtime. This should include periods of quieter time at work with fewer deliverables and adequate time away from the office for vacations. Manage sick leave closely, watch your overtime reports, and be alert to the fact that the welfare of your team is paramount if you want to slash attrition and keep your talented people for the life of the program. Manage the Pace . When delivering a program that has a distant completion date, you need to manage the pace of the work. It’s difficult to maintain momentum over multiple years, so your role as a program manager is to juggle the priorities and projects so there are measurable outputs being delivered regularly. Mix up the quick wins and the steady progress toward the bigger picture goals. Mix up the quick wins and the steady progress toward the bigger picture goals. This helps the team see you are moving forward and ensures there are some shorter-term success stories to share to keep motivation high. Finally, it helps investors and executive managers see that there is progress being made. Train Your Team for Success . Programs often deliver something novel, unique, or transformative for an organization. One challenge of working on those kinds of initiatives is that you probably don’t have the skills in-house to be able to complete all the tasks and projects required. That’s OK and to be expected. Your job as a new program manager is to ensure you can upskill, retrain, and develop the people you have so that together you can address all the resource requirements. There might be some areas where you only need a certain resource for a limited period. For example, you aren’t going to train one of your staff how to drive a forklift if that’s a skill you need for just one week. However, if you are transforming the way your company’s online presence is managed, it would be valuable to have website development skills in-house along with some expertise about social media or search engine optimization. These are skills the business will rely on in the long term. Make decisions about which of these you need to have embedded in the team and which should be outsourced, then ensure your program can deliver the training and recruitment tasks required to be ready to manage the outputs as each project delivers. Governance Is More Complex . If you’ve come from a project management background, then governance won’t be a surprise to you. It’s the way in which project and program structures are organized and controlled to ensure that decision-making is done in the right way and that the right people are involved. It’s crucial for ensuring the work is progressing in a way that fits with the overall business case, and it helps keep people accountable. Governance is the way the project management office and senior executives can ensure that a program is on track to deliver benefits. Governance provides a formal route to closing down projects or an entire program if it can be shown that those benefits no longer will be achieved. Governance is more complex in a program environment than in a project environment. Project boards and steering groups normally have an executive-level membership. This is to be expected because the end result of a program is normally business transformation. Planning Is More Difficult . Project managers, who are involved in a program, typically will put their project plans together. Then a program management team—under your direction as program manager—meets and the plans are integrated. This is easier said than done. It requires identifying the dependencies between projects and project tasks. It forces you to look at the resource requirements for the whole program and to juggle activities to suit the availability of key people. Once your integrated program plan is established, you can track it in a Gantt chart or other software tool. As your project managers track their projects in real time, you’ll have to make adjustments to the program plan, keeping everyone informed of changes and spelling out what this means for their areas of work. Don’t Plan Every Line . As a program manager, you rely on your project managers to do the detailed planning. It isn’t practical or desirable for you to be tracking a program with thousands of tasks. You need a rolled-up, high-level view of the projects with enough detail to show you whether something is going to have a program-level impact. The easiest way to do this is with dedicated software apps. Trying to manage your multi-million dollar program on a basic spreadsheet would be too challenging. Delegate, Delegate, Delegate . However good you are at delegating, being in a program management role means you need to get even better at it. The good news is that you should have a team of project managers, and you might even have a dedicated program management office to support your transformative change. There is a lot of work to do on a program, and setting it up to ensure that all the moving parts move together at the right time is a huge effort. You can’t do it alone and you shouldn’t try. Work out how much time you need to do the program initiation and then ensure you have a team in place to back you up. If you don’t have anyone in your program management office, ask for someone to be assigned to the program management team as a second responsibility. There is plenty for them to do. For example, someone in a project coordination role would be perfectly placed to deliver the coordination required at the program level, freeing you to get involved with strategic tasks. Don’t Be Afraid of Conflict . Programs have lots of strands. From projects with difficult stakeholders to seemingly unachievable deadlines, every day is going to give you opportunities for conflict. Watch out for the things that disrupt project performance and be prepared to step in when needed to head off a conflict situation before it starts. Share Tweet Share Email Top Management Skills Employers Value With Examples 7 Tips About How to Delegate Tasks to Your Team 10 Habits of Successful Project Managers Tips for Sharing Examples of Teamwork at an Interview The 5 Best Scrum Master Certifications of 2022 Project Governance 101: Everything You Need to Know What a Project Board Does and Why It Matters 5 Differences Between Projects and Business as Usual The Leadership Challenges of Being a Project Manager Pros and Cons of 3 Common Project Organizational Structures Project Flow and the 5 Stages of a Successful Project Top Organizational Skills Employers Value with Examples What Is a Line Manager? Computer Programmer Job Description: Salary, Skills, & More What Are My Options If I Pursue a Career in Management? Here Is What the Project Time Management Process Plan Includes
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Result 12
TitleProgram Manager Salary: 5 Key Things You Need to Know
Urlhttps://insights.dice.com/2020/08/13/program-manager-salary-5-key-things-you-need-to-know/
DescriptionA program manager has a difficult and complex job, which is why a program manager salary is often quite high. Technologists in this role must multi-task
DateAug 13, 2020
Organic Position12
H1Program Manager Salary: 5 Key Things You Need to Know
H2
H3What is a program manager’s average salary?
Do program managers get paid well?
Are program managers in demand?
What skills do you need as a program manager?
Do I need a degree to become a program manager?
H2WithAnchors
BodyProgram Manager Salary: 5 Key Things You Need to Know by Nick KolakowskiAugust 13, 20207 min read Program ManagerProgram Manager SalarySalaries A program manager has a difficult and complex job, which is why a program manager salary is often quite high. Technologists in this role must multi-task between shared projects within a particular program or initiative, which means that ideal candidates must see things both strategically and tactically; deal with both the “big picture” and those small details that can mean the difference between success and failure.  Although some people might use the terms “program manager” vs “project manager” interchangeably, the two are often very different. As the name implies, project managers usually tackle discrete projects that result in a product or service (if everything goes right), whereas program managers head up initiatives that result in systemic change (hence the term “super project managers” that some folks use to describe the role).  For example, one program manager might oversee a portfolio of projects that result in new products for a company, while another tackles a program of cost-cutting and operational streamlining that improves their company’s revenue. The program management timeline is often quite long, whereas a project manager might tackle projects of relatively short duration. What is a program manager’s average salary? According to Burning Glass, which collects and analyzes millions of job postings from across the country, the median salary for a program manager is $91,450, although one can earn quite a bit more (or less, if you’re just starting out). Do program managers get paid well? As with any technology position, program manager salary is highly dependent on factors such as company, experience, and education. Here’s how tenure as a program manager can have an impact on pay, based on a Burning Glass analysis: The compensation structures at each company are different, and senior program managers at certain firms can also expect to earn equity and other perks as part of their overall packages. Within the highest percentile of program managers, the average pay is $131,468.  Are program managers in demand? Over the past 12 months, Burning Glass has noted some 131,736 postings for program managers, and predicts that the profession will grow eight percent over the next decade. That indicates a solid level of demand in the medium- to long-term. At the moment, the average time to fill an open program manager position is 36 days, which suggests that employers need to really work to find available candidates—again, a sign of a tight market for the position. For comparison’s sake, the time to fill a software developer/engineer position is 39 days, and a systems analyst is 37 days. What skills do you need as a program manager? As you might expect, the most-requested skills that pop up in program manager job description postings include program and project management, along with an aptitude for budgeting, scheduling, and staff management. Related to that, program manager resumes must also showcase excellent “soft skills” such as communication and empathy, because they’ll necessarily spend a solid chunk of their day negotiating and talking to various stakeholders. Depending on the program manager’s area of focus, they may also need specialized knowledge in certain kinds of technologies. For example, if you’re overseeing a company’s data transformation efforts, you may need to know everything from SQL to the tools that data scientists and analysts need to actually do their jobs. As you might expect, such specialized knowledge will vary considerably from job to job. Do I need a degree to become a program manager? . In short, you don’t need an advanced degree in order to become a program manager. According to the Burning Glass database, some 8.5 percent of all program manager jobs ask only for a high school diploma; around 80 percent want a bachelor’s degree, and 7.2 percent ask for a master’s degree. That being said, education can have a substantial impact on how much you get paid. Check out this breakdown of how educational attainment correlates with salary: Depending on the role, a program manager position may ask for a project-management certification such as Project Management Professional (PMP), which is offered by the Project Management Institute and requires 35 hours of project management education/training (or CAPM certification), or Certified ScrumMaster (CSM). As with technical skills, though, certification requirements can vary wildly from job to job.  Download Dice’s 2021 Salary Survey Report Now! Click here to cancel reply. Copyright ©1990 - 2022 Dice . All rights reserved. Use of this site is subject to certain Terms and Conditions. dhi-neg-i Dice is a DHI service Ad
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Result 13
TitleProgram Manager Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More - ClimbtheLadder
Urlhttps://climbtheladder.com/program-manager/
DescriptionA program manager is a person who is responsible for overseeing the development of a project or the implementation of a new process. The program manager is…
DateOct 4, 2021
Organic Position13
H1Program Manager Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More
H2Program Manager Job Duties
Program Manager Salary & Outlook
Program Manager Job Requirements
Program Manager Skills
Program Manager Work Environment
Program Manager Career Advancement
Program Manager Trends
How to Become a Program Manager
You may also be interested in..
H3Table of Contents
Electrician Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More
Property Manager Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More
H2WithAnchorsProgram Manager Job Duties
Program Manager Salary & Outlook
Program Manager Job Requirements
Program Manager Skills
Program Manager Work Environment
Program Manager Career Advancement
Program Manager Trends
How to Become a Program Manager
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BodyProgram Manager Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More A program manager is a person who is responsible for overseeing the development of a project or the implementation of a new process. The program manager is usually in charge of a team of people who work together to complete the project. Climbtheladder Published Oct 4, 2021 Table of Contents. Program Manager Job Duties Program Manager Salary & Outlook Program Manager Job Requirements Program Manager Skills Program Manager Work Environment Program Manager Career Advancement Program Manager Trends How to Become a Program Manager A program manager is a person who is responsible for overseeing the development of a project or the implementation of a new process. The program manager is usually in charge of a team of people who work together to complete the project. A program manager is usually responsible for both the day-to-day management of the project, including coordinating the work of all team members, and the overall vision for the project. The program manager must be able to work with the project team to ensure that the project is completed within budget and on time. Program managers often work in the fields of engineering, information technology, manufacturing, or consulting. Program Manager Job Duties. The responsibilities of a program manager vary depending on the type of organization they work for, but in general, they include: Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs to achieve organizational goalsWorking with management to establish objectives and budgets for assigned programsFacilitating communications and coordination among all the people and agencies involved in a programEnsuring compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and policiesMonitoring and analyzing progress and ensuring alignment with the project’s objectivesProviding feedback to management about program strengths and weaknessesImplementing corrective actions and accountability procedures to ensure continuous improvement of programs and projects Program Manager Salary & Outlook. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that, as of May 2020, the median annual wage for program managers was $95,000. The highest-earning 10% made more than $162,000. The employment of program managers is projected to grow 5% from 2019-2029. The demand will be driven by the need to manage growing organizations, as well as the need to develop and implement strategies to compete in a global economy. Program Manager Job Requirements. The program manager is responsible for the successful implementation of an entire project. He or she must have a mix of education and experience in order to excel in this position. Education: A bachelor’s degree in a related field of study, such as business management, information technology, engineering, or project management is often required. Experience: Program managers often work their way up the ranks, starting as project managers or team leaders. They may work in a variety of positions before moving up to program manager. Certification: PMI offers the Project Management Professional certification. To become PMP certified, a candidate must pass the Project Management Institute’s exam, maintain their PMP certification through continuing education, and pay an annual certification maintenance fee. Program Manager Skills. The following skills are required for this job: Analytical skills: Program managers must be able to evaluate and understand the technical aspects of a project. Ability to communicate well: A program manager must be able to clearly convey ideas and instructions to other team members. Able to handle stress: Program managers are under a lot of pressure since they are responsible for the success or failure of a project. It’s important that they can handle stress well. Interpersonal skills: The program manager will work closely with clients, vendors, contractors, employees, and other stakeholders throughout the life cycle of the project. Therefore, interpersonal skills are essential for building good relationships with these individuals. Technical knowledge: Program managers need a good understanding of the technical aspects of their organization’s products or services. Program Manager Work Environment. Program managers typically work in an office environment. The work is often deadline-driven, so the time spent in the office can be extensive. A program manager may be required to work on a team with other managers, engineers, and technicians. They must be skilled in group dynamics and able to communicate with people from diverse backgrounds and levels of expertise. Program Manager Career Advancement. In order to advance in this field, you’ll want to demonstrate leadership and a strong ability to communicate and collaborate. In this position, you’ll use your skills to ensure all project members are moving forward based on the same strategy. You’ll also be able to identify ways to streamline your workflow and improve your processes. This will help you complete projects faster and more effectively. Once you have mastered this position, you might consider becoming a senior program manager, program director, or even a vice president position. The responsibilities of these roles can vary greatly depending on the needs of the company and the organization’s goals. Program Manager Trends. Here are three trends influencing how Program Managers work. Program Managers will need to stay up-to-date on these developments to keep their skills relevant and maintain a competitive advantage in the workplace. Increased Demand for Project Management As companies grow more global and seek to establish themselves as the go-to source for specific products or services, they will look to improve efficiency by streamlining their internal processes. Improved efficiency will require additional project management and managers who can work with internal stakeholders and outside vendors to ensure that all aspects of a project come together seamlessly. Accelerated Pace of Change Because the future is always changing, program managers will need to develop skills that allow them to effectively adapt to changes in their environment. For example, one study found that it takes an average of 6 months for companies to adapt their strategy after a major change has occurred, suggesting that program managers who can identify and implement necessary changes more quickly will be well-positioned for success. Increased Importance of Interpersonal Skills Interpersonal skills are often a more valuable asset than technical skills in the field of program management, largely due to the diverse nature of this role. In addition to possessing technical knowledge and project management expertise, successful program managers also need strong interpersonal skills in order to ensure that their team members are properly motivated and coordinated. How to Become a Program Manager. 1. Planning Your Career Path Program managers often hold a broad role in the workplace and are often tasked with multiple responsibilities at once. This means that there is no one-size-fits-all career path for program managers; instead, aspiring program managers should focus on their strengths and tailor their education and experience accordingly. 2. Writing a Resume In the case of program manager positions, it’s important to emphasize your leadership and organizational skills. The best resumes for program managers highlight their ability to get things done and see projects through to completion. This means that you should list all of your accomplishments in a way that highlights your ability to plan, prioritize and execute. Make sure to include the results of your work in your resume as well. This will show employers that you can take initiative and complete tasks independently. 3. Applying for Jobs You can get a lot of insight into how to get a job as a program manager by asking the right questions. A great place to start is by reaching out to your network, which will allow you to ask your contacts about their career paths and what it’s like to work in the industry. You can also try to get some insight into the hiring process by reaching out to a program manager at a company you’re interested in working for. 4. Ace the Interview In order to succeed in an interview as a program manager candidate, it is important to show your knowledge of the field and have examples ready about how you have helped to improve the process in other organizations.  Also, keep your responses concise, but make sure they are complete enough for employers to get a clear picture of your qualifications. If possible, practice answering interview questions so that you are prepared for any curveballs. Previous Electrician Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More. Back to Career Development Next Property Manager Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More. Climbtheladder We're committed to being your source for expert career guidance. Come to us in your pursuit of success. You may also be interested in... Career Development Primary Care Physician Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More Climbtheladder Nov 8, 2021 Career Development Gynecologist Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More Climbtheladder Oct 27, 2021 Career Development Flight Attendant Job Description: Salary, Duties, & More Climbtheladder Oct 27, 2021 Career Development How Philosophical Training Can Help You in Your Career Logan Berger May 4, 2021
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Result 14
TitleWhat does the career path for a program manager look like? - Quora
Urlhttps://www.quora.com/What-does-the-career-path-for-a-program-manager-look-like
Description
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Organic Position14
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BodySomething went wrong. Wait a moment and try again.Try again Please enable Javascript and refresh the page to continue
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Result 15
TitleHow to Become a Program Manager (Non-Profit) | Salary.com
Urlhttps://www.salary.com/articles/how-to-become/how-to-become-a-program-manager-non-profit
DescriptionHow to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit)? Find out Program Manager (Non-Profit) duties, skills and certifications, tips to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit), Program Manager (Non-Profit) lifestyle
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Organic Position15
H1How to Become a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
H2Step 1: Understand the job description and responsibilities of a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 2: Learn best tips to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 3: View best colleges and universities for Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 4: Think about whether is it worth to be a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 5: Prepare relevant skills for being a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 6: View average salary for Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Average salary for Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs
Step 7: Find relevant Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs, and apply
Step 8: Explore Career Path of Program Manager (Non-Profit)
H3What does a Program Manager (Non-Profit) do?
Best tips for those who want to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Best colleges and universities for Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Is being a Program Manager (Non-Profit) Worth it?
What skills do you need to be a Program Manager (Non-Profit)?
How much does a Program Manager (Non-Profit) make?
Looking for Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs?
H2WithAnchorsStep 1: Understand the job description and responsibilities of a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 2: Learn best tips to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 3: View best colleges and universities for Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 4: Think about whether is it worth to be a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 5: Prepare relevant skills for being a Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Step 6: View average salary for Program Manager (Non-Profit)
Average salary for Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs
Step 7: Find relevant Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs, and apply
Step 8: Explore Career Path of Program Manager (Non-Profit)
BodyHow to Become a Program Manager (Non-Profit) Share this article: Twitter Linkedin Facebook email Step 1: Understand the job description and responsibilities of a Program Manager (Non-Profit). What does a Program Manager (Non-Profit) do? A Program Manager (Non-Profit) manages a team that coordinates programs for a non-profit organization. Designs programs that align with the organization's mission and support the organization's goals. Being a Program Manager (Non-Profit) establishes fundraising and development goals, identifies potential donors or sources of funding, and plans outreach strategies. Schedules and forecasts planning for special events that publicize the organization and its programs to the community. Additionally, Program Manager (Non-Profit) may assist in the development of grants applications or proposals. Typically requires a bachelor's degree. Typically reports to a department head. The Program Manager (Non-Profit) manages subordinate staff in the day-to-day performance of their jobs. True first level manager. Ensures that project/department milestones/goals are met and adhering to approved budgets. Has full authority for personnel actions. Extensive knowledge of department processes. To be a Program Manager (Non-Profit) typically requires 5 years experience in the related area as an individual contributor. 1 to 3 years supervisory experience may be required. People's Opinions on Program Manager (Non-Profit) responsibilities As a non profitable profession it reaches out of the world with thousands of people in countless, unique and different ways. 12/12/2019: Modesto, CA Nonprofit program manager are dedicated people obtaining the possibility of plan and implement organization’s constituent-facing activities inside a huge assortment of the way. 02/08/2020: Fort Worth, TX It doesn’t matter that you will be passionate, nonprofit program manager provide opportunity with meaningful and directly impact for the society. 01/30/2020: Hialeah, FL Non-profit program managers tend to be found in a variety of fields, from academic institutions and human services organization to environmental and political group inside the society. 01/17/2020: Mcallen, TX This sort of job signifies that it reaches the programs aim and successfully mandate along with ensuring the proportions of funds to have a successful and continually forthcoming. 02/17/2020: Bradenton, FL Read all People's Opinions Submit your opinion Step 2: Learn best tips to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit). Best tips for those who want to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit). Here are some tips to become a Program Manager (Non-Profit). People's Opinions on best tips program manager non profit interview question. 01/27/2020: Portland, OR Read all People's Opinions Submit your opinion Step 3: View best colleges and universities for Program Manager (Non-Profit). Best colleges and universities for Program Manager (Non-Profit). Princeton University Providence College Rollins College Taylor University Bentley University University of Portland Step 4: Think about whether is it worth to be a Program Manager (Non-Profit). Is being a Program Manager (Non-Profit) Worth it? People's Opinions on lifestyles They may also use evaluations to identify areas that need improvement for the program to be more effective. 02/11/2020: Pittsfield, MA The individual will ensure post-award compliance, and maintain relationships with external funding managers and program officers, as required. 02/02/2020: San Bernardino, CA Manages the day-to-day delivery operation of Community Servings’ home delivered meals program to meet program plans and goals. 02/21/2020: Ventura, CA To be considered for the manager position, candidate must have three or more years project management experience. 12/20/2019: Virginia Beach, VA Support storytelling program as needed, by determination of the Manager of Patient Advocacy and Youth Organizing. 01/13/2020: New London, CT Read all People's Opinions Submit your opinion Step 5: Prepare relevant skills for being a Program Manager (Non-Profit). What skills do you need to be a Program Manager (Non-Profit)? This role is not a beginner's role, as such, there are many skills required.  It is vital to the role to command: Community Management, Community Outreach/Activism, Fundraising, Grant Management, Program Development, Program Management, Volunteer Management.  Management isn't easy, if it were, everyone would have the competenticies to execute the role with success. People's Opinions on Program Manager (Non-Profit) skills Travel can be required to speak to donors, attend conferences and manage program implementation in local, regional or maybe international simply to compensate and featuring its missions. 12/03/2019: Carson City, NV Non-profit program manager should have a solid interpersonal skills and being able to be a powerful and efficient communicator. 02/08/2020: Omaha, NE As required, they need to have good relationships with all the staff and communicate with the heads within the organizations together with other office leaders as a way to collaborate together with the projects as well as evaluate programs. 02/17/2020: Nashville, TN Non-profit program manager gives the great chance of its advancement inside nonprofit world, providing a few people the chance to work with a mission they want passionately. 02/14/2020: Saint Louis, MO Tell us about your experience as a Non Profit Program Manager. 02/17/2020: Nashville, TN Read all People's Opinions Submit your opinion Step 6: View average salary for Program Manager (Non-Profit). How much does a Program Manager (Non-Profit) make? The average salary range for a Program Manager (Non-Profit) is from $83,987 to $100,661. The salary will change depending on your location, job level, experience, education, and skills. Salary range for a Program Manager (Non-Profit) $83,987 to $100,661 View average salary for the United States Adjust salary by state Average salary for Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs. Program Manager Read more related jobs Step 7: Find relevant Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs, and apply. Looking for Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs? Here are some Program Manager (Non-Profit) jobs in the United States. Search Program Manager (Non-Profit) Jobs in the United States Step 8: Explore Career Path of Program Manager (Non-Profit). Program Manager (Non-Profit) Step 8: Explore Career Path of Program Manager (Non-Profit)? Program Manager (Non-Profit) Top Community Development Executive Program Director (Non-Profit) Program Director - Social Service Adult Day Care Director Top Program Executive (Non-Profit)
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Result 16
TitleProgram Manager Job Description Template - Business ...
Urlhttps://business.linkedin.com/talent-solutions/resources/talent-engagement/job-descriptions/program-manager
DescriptionYour program manager job description should be direct and concise. Using simple language, tell candidates how their work will influence the success of your ...
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TitleProgram Manager Job Description
Urlhttps://www.betterteam.com/program-manager-job-description
DescriptionLearn about the key requirements, duties, responsibilities, and skills that should be in a program manager job description
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Organic Position17
H1Program Manager Job Description
H2Program Manager Job Description Template
Program Manager FAQ
Related Articles:
H3Program Manager Responsibilities
Program Manager Requirements
What is a program manager?
What is a program manager responsible for?
Can I customize the program manager role description?
What are some common titles to use for the program manager role?
Do have program manager interview questions?
Operations Manager Job Description
Manager Job Description
Project Manager Job Description
Program Manager Interview Questions
Operations Manager Interview Questions
Manager Interview Questions
Project Manager Interview Questions
H2WithAnchorsProgram Manager Job Description Template
Program Manager FAQ
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BodyProgram Manager Job DescriptionLearn about the key requirements, duties, responsibilities, and skills that should be in a program manager job description. A program manager acts as a coordinator between multiple projects at a business or organization to be sure they're benefiting each other and aligning with overall business goals. They are different from project managers because they do not directly oversee individual projects.Special Offer Try Betterteam for FREESend jobs to 100+ job boards with one submission Post Jobs for FREECompletely free trial, no card required.Reach over 250 million candidates.Program Manager Job Description Template. We are looking for a project manager to be responsible for organizing programs and activities for our organization. You will be tasked with developing programs to support the organization's strategic direction, as well as creating and managing long term goals. You will also be in charge of developing budgets and operating plans for programs and writing program funding proposals.In order to be successful in this role, you will need to have prior experience in both program management and team management. A bachelor's degree is required.Program Manager Responsibilities. Organizing programs and activities in accordance with the mission and goals of the organization.Developing new programs to support the strategic direction of the organization.Creating and managing long-term goals.Developing a budget and operating plan for the program.Developing an evaluation method to assess program strengths and identify areas for improvement.Writing program funding proposals to guarantee uninterrupted delivery of services.Managing a team with a diverse array of talents and responsibilities.Ensuring goals are met in areas including customer satisfaction, safety, quality, and team member performance.Implementing and managing changes and interventions to ensure project goals are achieved.Meeting with stakeholders to make communication easy and transparent regarding project issues and decisions on services.Producing accurate and timely reporting of program status throughout its life cycle.Analyzing program risks.Working on strategy with the marketing team.Program Manager Requirements. Bachelor's degree or master's degree in business or related field.Proven experience in program management.Proven stakeholder management skills.Proven experience managing a team.Experience using computers for a variety of tasks.Competency in Microsoft applications including Word, Excel, and Outlook.Understanding of project management.Program Manager FAQ. What is a program manager?The role of a program manager is to act as a coordinator for an organization’s projects. They supervise and organize activities and ensure that project goals align with the company’s objectives.What is a program manager responsible for?The program manager coordinates activities between multiple projects to ensure they align with the organization’s goals. The exact program manager duties may vary between companies and by the department.Can I customize the program manager role description?You may customize the program manager job description to reflect the skills, qualities, and level of experience you want in your next hire.What are some common titles to use for the program manager role?The job description for a program manager may vary to reflect his or her area of expertise. When you advertise a program manager job, you need to post a program manager job listing that reflects your specific needs. If you’re seeking someone to coordinate HR projects, you should post a human resources program manager job description. If you’re needing assistance in your IT department, you should create an IT program manager job description. To attract candidates from abroad, you could also post a program manager job description.Do have program manager interview questions?We have interview questions for all of our job descriptions. Related Articles:. Operations Manager Job Description. Learn about the key requirements, duties, responsibilities, and skills that should be in an operations manager job description. Manager Job Description. Learn about the key requirements, duties, responsibilities, and skills that should be in a manager job description. Project Manager Job Description. Learn about the key requirements, duties, responsibilities, and skills that should be in a project manager job description. Program Manager Interview Questions. Top 5 program manager interview questions with detailed tips for both hiring managers and candidates. Operations Manager Interview Questions. Top 5 operations manager interview questions with detailed tips for both hiring managers and candidates. Manager Interview Questions. Top manager interview questions with detailed tips for both hiring managers and candidates. Project Manager Interview Questions. Top 7 project manager interview questions with detailed tips for both hiring managers and candidates.
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Result 18
TitleProgram Manager: What Is It? and How to Become One?
Urlhttps://www.ziprecruiter.com/Career/Program-Manager/What-Is-How-to-Become
DescriptionLearn what a Program Manager is, what they do, and how become one
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Organic Position18
H1What Is a Program Manager and How to Become One
H2Table of Contents
Program Manager Job Description Sample
How Can I Become a Program Manager?
What Is the Job of a Program Manager?
What Is the Difference Between a Program Manager and a Project Manager?
31,656+ Program Manager Jobs in the Ashburn, VA area
You Already Have an Account
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H2WithAnchorsTable of Contents
Program Manager Job Description Sample
How Can I Become a Program Manager?
What Is the Job of a Program Manager?
What Is the Difference Between a Program Manager and a Project Manager?
31,656+ Program Manager Jobs in the Ashburn, VA area
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BodyWhat Is a Program Manager and How to Become One By ZipRecruiter Marketplace Research Team Table of Contents. Program Manager Job Description Sample How Can I Become a Program Manager? What Is the Job of a Program Manager? What Is the Difference Between a Program Manager and a Project Manager? Program Manager Job Description Sample . With this Program Manager job description sample, you can get a good idea of what employers are looking for when hiring for this position. Remember though, every employer is different and each will have unique qualifications when they hire for their Program Manager position. Job Summary We are seeking a highly organized, goal-oriented program manager to join our growing organization. In this position, you will lead and supervise a program through completion, overseeing successful output. You will outline the program’s goals and objectives while acting as a liaison between program staff and upper management and executives. Duties and Responsibilities Strategize and outline the goals and objectives of the program Assign project managers and team members to projects Estimate and implement program budgets Set program controls, governance, and standards Monitor multiple projects through the entire program cycle Manage the day-to-day detailed aspects of multiple projects Set timelines and due dates Coordinate and utilize resources for multiple projects in the program Manage and submit program documentation Communicate with project managers to address potential risks Solve problems and issues Track program progress Communicate program objectives, goals, and progress to program directors, executives, upper management, and stakeholders Evaluate and supervise multiple projects Lead and mentor project staff and team members Set objectives to maximize ROI Prepare and present progress and budget reports to program directors Assist team members and project managers when needed to accomplish team goals Requirements and Qualifications Bachelor’s degree in management, business, or related field; Master's degree (MA or MSc) in business or related field preferred 5+ years’ previous experience in program management, project management, administration, or related field Proficient computer skills, experience with Microsoft Office Suite; working knowledge of program/project management software (Basecamp, MS Project) Knowledgeable in program management methodology and techniques; performance evaluation and change management principles Experience with compiling and following strict budgets Excellent verbal and written communication skills Able to multi-task, prioritize, and manage time effectively How Can I Become a Program Manager? . To become a program manager, you must have a bachelor’s degree. If you intend to work at larger companies, a master’s degree in a subject such as finance, business administration, or a technical subject if you work in a field such as engineering or software design, is preferred and sometimes required. In addition to educational qualifications, you need to have several years of experience in program management, human resources, or a similar department. Strong leadership qualities, communication skills, and the ability to multitask are all essential for succeeding in this role. What Is the Job of a Program Manager? . The job of a program manager is to plan, organize, and coordinate management programs or external programs for a business or institution. As a program manager, your duties vary depending on the type of organization for which you work, but many of the responsibilities for this role are similar or overlap. You typically supervise numerous associates and analysts who help prepare data and assessments about current programming and how it can be improved. You help to implement new programs for employees or customers and promote them through HR or outreach coordinators and marketing professionals. You also assess individual projects and how they interact with one another. What Is the Difference Between a Program Manager and a Project Manager? . The difference between a program manager and a project manager is that a project manager oversees a particular project that is part of a larger program whereas program managers rarely manage an individual project. They may report to the program manager and help them assess whether or not different projects focus on the same end goals. On the other hand, a program manager’s role is to harmonize multiple projects and set a long-term strategy for organizational programs. Often, having experience as a project manager is a prerequisite for becoming a program manager. All Jobs Program Manager Jobs What Is a Program Manager and How to Become One 31,656+ Program Manager Jobs in the Ashburn, VA area . Get new jobs emailed to you daily You Already Have an Account. We're sending an email you can use to verify and access your account. If you know your password, you can go to the sign in page. Close
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Result 19
TitleProgram Manager vs. Project Manager: Know the Differences and How to Become Either One
Urlhttps://www.simplilearn.com/program-manager-vs-project-manager-article
DescriptionProgram & project managers are great leadership roles. Learn the ✅ top differences b/w a ✅program manager & ✅project manager and choose the right one for you
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H1Program Manager vs. Project Manager: Know the Differences and How to Become Either One
H2Table of Contents
What Is a Project Manager?
What Is a Program Manager?
The Role of a Project Manager
The Role of a Program Manager
Which Role Do You Choose?
Gain a Competitive Edge in Project Management
Find our PMP® Plus Online Bootcamp in top cities:
About the Author
Recommended Programs
Recommended Resources
H3PRINCE2® Foundation & Practitioner Overview, Eligibility, and Exam Tips
How to Stay Popular in Project Management Field?
Free Mind-map: PMP Certification
Project Management Learning Series: Fast Tracking Versus Crashing
Course Review: How Project Management Certification Increases Efficiency and Opportunity
A Deep Dive Into ZOPA Negotiations and How It Applies in Real Life
Feasibility Study And Its Importance in Project Management
Project Scope Management and Why It's Important?
Project Manager Job Description: Role Overview, Skills Needed, Salaries, and Job Trends
PRINCE2 Vs. PMP: Choosing The Best Certification
How to Get Promoted from a Project Manager to Program Manager
H2WithAnchorsTable of Contents
What Is a Project Manager?
What Is a Program Manager?
The Role of a Project Manager
The Role of a Program Manager
Which Role Do You Choose?
Gain a Competitive Edge in Project Management
Find our PMP® Plus Online Bootcamp in top cities:
About the Author
Recommended Programs
Recommended Resources
BodyProgram Manager vs. Project Manager: Know the Differences and How to Become Either OneBy SimplilearnLast updated on Oct 28, 20214594Table of Contents. View More If you’re confused about the difference between these two titles, that’s likely because their fundamental differences are often ignored. Companies will sometimes refer to these positions interchangeably, which can cause confusion around role responsibilities and expectations. Understanding the differences between the two is key to landing your ideal job.   Let’s start with an example. As an avid Lean consultant, perhaps you’ve decided you want to organize a Lean strategies conference for start-up company executives. One project that’s part of this process would be coordinating the speakers. Another project might be to plan and order catering. In both instances, the project is limited by several measures, including budget, time, and resources. In addition, both projects serve the overarching goal of developing a strong conference: the program. While this example highlights the top-level differences between the two roles, we’ll dive deeper into the difference between a program manager vs. project manager to help you decide which one is right for you.  PMP Plus Master's Program. All You Need To Maintain Your PMP CertificationExplore Course What Is a Project Manager? Project managers are responsible for individual projects that contribute to the overarching goals or programs. These projects are often specific and short-term, with precise deadlines to keep the momentum moving forward. While this position reports progress to the program manager, they’re also in charge of their own team and responsible for the smooth execution of their assigned projects.  What Is a Program Manager? In contrast to project managers, program managers are responsible for overseeing the entire program. In our example about the conference, the program manager would be responsible for ensuring that the conference in its entirety is a success. This position requires a deep understanding of the program goals and objectives and how each project’s completion will impact the bottom line for the business. Oversight of project managers is often a critical element of this role to ensure that each project is consistently and effectively executed.  The Role of a Project Manager. A project can range in scope from something as simple as planning a one-hour webinar to something as elaborate as a 12-day Lean strategies training for several hundred staff members at a Fortune 500 company. Regardless of scope, a project is bound by deadlines, resources, and budget. And, at any given time, a company can have dozens of projects running simultaneously, each with specific short-term goals and limitations – all in service of the broader business goal. A project manager’s job is to oversee the operations of a singular project, which includes five key roles: Team and timeline management Team organization Technology integration Leadership Performance tracking and measurement Depending on the company and size of the individual projects, project managers may oversee more than one project, which requires fine-tuned skills and experience.  Project managers schedule meetings, track timelines, manage budgets, and delegate smaller tasks to one or more coordinators. This means that project managers should have effective leadership acumen and demonstrate practical communication skills to effectively manage their team’s needs. As progress is made, project managers update the program manager, often using them as sounding boards for continuous project improvement.  Salaries for project managers vs. project managers typically start around $50,000 but can top out at over $100,000, especially if the project manager comes with additional qualifications and certifications.  Post Graduate Program In Project Management. The Complete Project Management ProgramExplore Course The Role of a Program Manager. A program consists of several projects, each providing value and progress to a long-term goal or outcome. These projects often build on one another until this goal has been achieved, enabling the company to determine a new set of larger goals. This is how organizational growth takes place.  A program manager’s job is to oversee not only the operations of each project, but also how the completion of each project contributes to the bigger picture. Think of a program manager like a pilot. It’s their job to make course corrections, strategize direction based on potential threats or obstacles, and keep the flight on track to meet its destination on time. Each project’s potential success or failure will have an impact on a company or business, and it’s up to the program manager to assess this impact and adjust.  Program managers also schedule meetings, track timelines, manager budgets, and delegate tasks, but they do so from a larger vantage point, often involving project managers in the process. It’s their job to put the appropriate teams together, measure ROI, and serve as a liaison between the various project leaders to see the full program goals to fruition. Salaries for program managers vs project managers typically start around $80,000 but can top out at over $120,000. With advanced training and specialized certifications, program managers can advance to the higher end of the salary range.  Which Role Do You Choose? Both project and program management are great roles for natural leaders. In fact, the critical attributes for both roles overlap quite a bit, making both positions equally attractive to similar candidates. Both program managers vs project managers require gifted communicators who have mastered the art of concise and thoughtful idea narration. Though the details are slightly different depending on the scope of the role, it’s equally important to be detail-oriented and analytical in both roles to help keep projects moving forward. Folks who fill both roles are often strategic, decisive, and looking for new ways to further advance the mission and goals of either the project or the program.  With so many overlapping attributes, it’s no shock that many project managers work their way up through the ranks to become program managers later in their careers. Good program managers often have advanced training and experience, enabling them to be effective coaches for the project managers they ultimately lead. Enroll in our PMP Certification Course today and develop a strong foundation in the principles of project management. Gain a Competitive Edge in Project Management. Knowing the key differences between a program manager vs. project manager will help you choose which path is right for you. If you’re ultimately looking for a position in program management but lack the experience or skills required of those roles, consider starting your career in project management with Simplilearn's Project Management Certification Training.  If you want to accelerate your career in either of these fields, sign up for our PMP® Plus Master’s Program so you can maintain your PMP certification and earn 60 PDUs. Find our PMP® Plus Online Bootcamp in top cities:. NameDatePlace PMP® Plus Class starts on 22nd Jan 2022, Weekend batchYour CityView Details PMP® Plus Class starts on 4th Feb 2022, Weekdays batchChicagoView Details PMP® Plus Class starts on 5th Feb 2022, Weekend batchHoustonView DetailsAbout the Author. SimplilearnSimplilearn is one of the world’s leading providers of online training for Digital Marketing, Cloud Computing, Project Management, Data Science, IT, Software Development, and many other emerging technologies.View MoreRecommended Programs. PMP® Plus 23676 LearnersLifetime Access*Post Graduate Program in Project Management 1093 LearnersLifetime Access*PMP® Certification Training 81764 Learners*Lifetime access to high-quality, self-paced e-learning content.Explore Category Next ArticleHow to Get Promoted from a Project Manager to Program Manager. By Eshna3758Mar 10, 2017Recommended Resources. Digital Marketing Resume Guide: Your Chance to Win the Digital Marketing Manager JobEbookHow to Become a Certified Project ManagerArticleRoles and Responsibilities of a Project ManagerVideo TutorialProject Management Interview GuideEbookTop Project Manager Qualifications You Need in 2021ArticleThe Complete Guide to Learn the Difference Between Coding Vs ProgrammingVideo TutorialprevNext DisclaimerPMP, PMI, PMBOK, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, ACP, PBA, RMP, SP, and OPM3 are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.
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Result 20
TitleIT Project Manager Career Path | Training, Pay, Skills & Requirements
Urlhttps://www.itcareerfinder.com/it-careers/it-project-manager-career-path.html
DescriptionIT project manager job description featuring jobs and salaries, training programs, marketable skills and certifications, education requirements, job outlook and more
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H1IT Project Manager
H2IT Project Manager Skills & Responsibilities
IT Project Manager Salary
IT Project Manager Education Requirements
IT Project Management Training
IT Project Manager Certifications
IT Project Manager Job Outlook
IT Project Manager Jobs
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IT Career Paths
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IT Project Manager Salary
IT Project Manager Education Requirements
IT Project Management Training
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BodyIT Project Manager IT Project Managers oversee large-scale technology projects. IT project managers ensure that complex technical projects, such as systems upgrades and technology deployments, are completed on time, under budget and to specifications. These professionals plan and coordinate the efforts of the internal project team, third party contractors and consultants to bring IT projects to successful completion. IT project management skills are in high demand as an increasing number of organizations prefer specialists and project-based methods to get the job done right the first time. Opportunity for advancement and earning potential in this field are excellent; the average salary for IT project managers in the U.S. is over $128,000, and this role can springboard to C-level positions like CIO and CTO where salaries can soar into the high six figures. Colleges and universities offer degree programs in business and IT project management. Private training centers also offer specialized courses and certificate programs in the latest PM tools and techniques, including prep for industry certifications like PMI's Project Management Professional (PMP), the preeminent credential for project managers. Compare the top-rated IT project management training programs in the U.S. and online. a.k.a. IT Program Manager | IT Operations Manager | Project Manager | IT Project Lead IT Project Management Training IT Project Manager SkillsIT Project Manager SalaryIT Project Manager Education RequirementsIT Project Management Training and Degrees IT Project Manager Certifications IT Project Manager Job OutlookIT Project Management JobsRelated Career Paths IT Project Manager Skills & Responsibilities. Typical day-to-day activities and in-demand skill sets for IT project managers include: IT project managers plan, execute and finalize technology projects on schedule, under budget and to scope. IT project managers develop and manage a work breakdown structure (WBS) for large-scale IT projects. IT PMs write project plans detailing a project's goals, technologies, systems, schedules, budget and personnel. IT project managers develop project plans that include cost-benefit or return on investment (ROI) analyses. IT PMs coordinate recruitment of project personnel and assign duties, responsibilities and spans of authority. IT project managers develop and manage budgets, and subsequent budget updates, for technology projects Information technology project managers understand project management concepts and best practices. IT project managers monitor, analyze & summarize performance and trends to create project status reports. IT project managers hold status and implementation meetings with project personnel and upper management. Successful IT project managers build, grow and develop business relationships vital to the success of the project. IT Project Manager Salary. Average salary for IT project managers (USA): $128,750 IT Project Manager Salary $128,750   Salary range for IT project managers and related tech pros and executives: IT Project Manager: $96,000 - $161,500 Network/Cloud Manager: $100,500 - $174,750 Software Product Manager: $104,250 - $177,000 Technical Services & Operations Manager: $111,500 - $190,750 Database Manager: $114,500 - $192,000 Technology Director: $122,000 - $206,000 Information Security Manager: $124,250 - $213,000 Chief Technology Officer (CTO): $153,000 - $267,250 Chief Information Officer (CIO): $175,500 - $300,250 Source: 2021 IT Salary Guide, Robert Half Technology IT Project Manager Education Requirements. IT project managers typically have at least a bachelor's degree, while some employers require PMs to possess a graduate diploma. A specialized master's degree in project management, or a master's of business administration (MBA) with a technology concentration is often preferred, however an advanced technical degree with a non-business focus can also be effective if the project management job you desire requires strong technical expertise in a specific computing domain, for example a Master's in Software Engineering may be a great fit for a software development PM role. Earning a respected project management credential - such as Project Management Institute's respected PMP certification - will validate your skills and expertise, making it easier to secure a top position and salary in this space. Marketable skills to look for in an IT project management degree program include: project management concepts from PMI's PMBOK (project management body of knowledge), leadership, IT strategy & operations, computer systems analysis, software management, and soft skills like effective verbal/written communication and creative problem solving. With recent technological advancements in online education platforms, the subject matter in IT project management degree programs works well in most online learning formats. Research and compare IT project manager training programs online and in your area. IT Project Management Training. Browse top-rated degrees from accredited universities, professional certificates, and self-paced online courses matching IT project managers' education requirements. Admissions advisors can provide more info about IT project management programs and curriculum, admissions & start dates, career placement, tuition costs, and personalized financial aid & scholarship options. Got targeted learning goals? Many schools offer individual courses from accredited degree programs. IT Project Manager Certifications. Marketable certifications for IT Project Managers include the following: CompTIA Project+ PMI Project Management Professional (PMP) (ISC)2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) IT Project Manager Certification Prep IT Project Manager Job Outlook. The job outlook for IT project managers is excellent. A survey of IT executives indicated that one out of every four organizations plans to hire project managers in the year ahead, placing it among the nation's hottest technology disciplines alongside juggernauts like cyber security and mobile application development. Organizations everywhere are implementing specialized, project-based methods to achieve technology goals on-time and under budget, skyrocketing IT project manager to one of the fastest growing career paths. The Project Management Institute - the world's largest PM association and preeminent certifying body - forecasts 15.7 million new project management jobs through 2020 with a financial equivalent of $6.6 trillion. IT project management is here to stay, and you can feel confident pursuing this career if job security, salary and upward mobility are key concerns. Sources: U.S. Department of Labor | PMI's Talent Gap: Project Management through 2020 IT Project Manager Jobs. Your IT project management training, experience & certifications qualifies you for a wide range of positions including: IT Project Manager jobs Project Manager jobs Technology Manager jobs Agile Project Manager jobs PMP Certified Project Manager jobs CAPM Certified Project Manager jobs Project Manager / Business Analyst jobs IT Process Manager jobs Search Jobs Related Career Paths. Technology Manager Software Engineer IT Security Specialist Data Scientist Mobile Application Developer Chief Information Officer IT Career Paths. Chief Information Officer Cloud Engineer Computer Animator Computer Programmer Computer Scientist Computer Systems Analyst Database Administrator Data Scientist DevOps Engineer Drafter Graphic Designer Hardware Engineer Health Information Technician Help Desk Technician IT Manager IT Project Manager IT Security Specialist Mobile App Developer Network Administrator Network Architect Robotics Engineer Software Engineer User Interface Developer Video Game Designer Web Developer Online IT Schools. SNHU Capella University SNHU provides affordable, online degree programs that are recognized by employers, certifying bodies, and higher learning institutions nationwide. Cybersecurity Software Engineering Computer Science Business Analytics Browse Programs Capella's competency-based online degree programs provide knowledge, real-world skills and IT certifications that are immediately applicable to your career goals. Data Analytics Cisco Networking Microsoft Networking Software Development Browse Programs
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Result 21
TitleHow to become a Program Manager - Salary, Qualifications, skills & Reviews – SEEK
Urlhttps://www.seek.com.au/career-advice/role/programme-manager
DescriptionThinking of becoming a Program Manager? Learn more about the role including real reviews and ratings from current Program Managers, common tasks and duties, how much Program Managers earn in your state, the skills current Employers are looking for and common education and career pathways
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Organic Position21
H1Program Manager
H2What's it like to be a Program Manager?
What can I earn as a Program Manager?
Latest Program Manager jobs on SEEK
How to become a Program Manager
Explore related qualifications
Skills and experience employers are looking for
Upskill with an online short course
Is Program Manager the right role for me?
Latest Program Manager reviews
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Read more from SEEK
H3SEEK users who have worked as a Program Manager have studied these qualifications
Master of Business Administration
PMP - Project Management Professional
Bachelor of Arts
Hi there, have any of these? Add your skills directly to your SEEK Profile
Get instant access to online training for these in-demand Program Manager skills
Job opportunities
H2WithAnchorsWhat's it like to be a Program Manager?
What can I earn as a Program Manager?
Latest Program Manager jobs on SEEK
How to become a Program Manager
Explore related qualifications
Skills and experience employers are looking for
Upskill with an online short course
Is Program Manager the right role for me?
Latest Program Manager reviews
Explore similar careers
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BodyProgram ManagerManage a portfolio of interrelated projects at an organisation under the one program of work.Explore careersJob opportunities3,571Jobs in AUS right nowJob growth10.3%*Projected job growth in 5 yearsSalary$110kMost common salary Job satisfaction4.2What's it like to be a Program Manager?Program Managers supervise and organise activities to ensure that project goals align with the company's objectives and to make sure those projects are delivered on time, on budget and to the required quality standards.Read lessA Program Manager is responsible for coordinating the project teams and managing the dependencies between projects to achieve overall delivery of the program.Hi there,Explore roles based on your skills and experience.Find out moreWhat can I earn as a Program Manager?AllNSWVICWAQLDTASSANTACTDid you find this helpful?Latest Program Manager jobs on SEEK . Program Manager23h agoIgnite RecruitmentCanberraA great opportunity for Program Managers to work in Federal Department.Program Manager2h agoChief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development DirectorateCanberraCome join the our Strategic Business Branch as the Program Manager, to help lead and manage a team of project managers and other professionals.Program Manager - Avenir2d agoBlueScope SteelCBD, Inner West & Eastern Suburbs > SydneyJoin our Business Improvement team as a Program Manager for our Avenir business and technology transformation program.Program Director (Contract)3h agoTalent InternationalAdelaideStart the Year with an exciting role! Manage a large transformation program of work within the Healthcare sector!Senior Project Manager3d agoEnterprise IT ResourcesSydneyMajor Service Management Transformation Program - Cloud - Major Investment Bank - Flexible Working Available - Competitive Daily Rate - Agile - ITSMIT Programme Manager6h agoStocklandCBD, Inner West & Eastern Suburbs > SydneyA new opportunity has arisen for a Programme Manager with large-scale delivery experience to join the Innovation, Marketing & Technology team inSenior Project Manager/Program Manager2h agoLeidosCBD, Inner West & Eastern Suburbs > SydneyWe have an opportunity for an accomplished Senior Project Manager who offers experience in the delivery of end to end complex projects.Senior Program Manager - Business Systems Transformation2d agoDavidson RecruitmentCairnsBring your large-scale ERP implementation and strong leadership experience - Exec/business stakeholders / Vendor/Contract ManagementSenior Project Manager8m agoTalent InternationalCBD & Inner Suburbs > MelbourneHelp drive a range of initiatives improving core logistics technology and strategy for an iconic Australian companySenior Project Manager3d agoLime RecruitmentCBD & Inner Suburbs > BrisbaneSenior Project Manager contract to Nov 22 working on innovative, IT enabled transformation projects. Call Kate Gear 0477 624 569See all related jobs on SEEKSource: Full time annual package based on job ad data.How to become a Program Manager. Program Managers typically have a solid educational background with wide and varied leadership experience in project management and a proven track record of successful team building.Complete a bachelor degree in business management or economics or in the industry you plan to enter, such as engineering or computer science.Pursue a Masters of Business Administration (MBA) or similar post-graduate qualification.Obtain a project management certification from a professional body such as the Project Management Professional.Gain extensive work experience in project management across a range of businesses or work your way up through a company.Explore related qualifications. SEEK users who have worked as a Program Manager have studied these qualifications.AllNSWVICWAQLDTASSANTACTMaster of Business Administration. This master degree will give you the crucial skills and knowledge needed to be a business leader.Compare institutionsSee 7 institutions that offer this course in Australia and Online.PMP - Project Management Professional. This course will allow you to develop your existing knowledge of project management and open up career opportunities.View course detailsSee 1 institution that offers this course Online.Bachelor of Arts. This qualification gives you broad skills and knowledge in your chosen area of specialisation to get you started in your career.Compare institutionsSee 33 institutions that offer this course in Australia and Online.Powered bySkills and experience employers are looking for. Hi there, have any of these? Add your skills directly to your SEEK Profile.Program ManagementStakeholder ManagementTeam LeadershipFinancial ManagementSocial WorkNegotiationInterpersonal SensitivityTime ManagementSkills listed in your SEEK Profile. Sign in or register to add skills to your SEEK ProfileSign inorRegisterBased on your skills, here are some roles to explore. Roles where your skills are commonly valued by employers.Sign in and add skills to your SEEK Profile, to see roles that match your skill-setDid you find this helpful?Source: SEEK job ads and SEEK Profile dataUpskill with an online short course. Get instant access to online training for these in-demand Program Manager skills. Is Program Manager the right role for me?Job market trends for Program ManagersAllNSWVICWAQLDTASSANTACTJob opportunities. Program Manager jobs on SEEK3,571Jobs on SEEK right nowSource: SEEK Source: SEEK job ads and SEEK Role ReviewsLatest Program Manager reviews. Latest reviews from 12 Program Managers surveyed on SEEKAllPositiveNegativeNov 2018Being a Sustainability Program Manager can be challenging but the outcomes delivered back to industry make it very satisfying. Reviewer's QualificationMaster of ScienceExperience1 – 4 yearsOrganisation sizeSmall (1-19 employees)SpecialisationagricultureThe good thingsIt is a diversified position that allows for many opportunities to work across many different topic areas, in my industry this includes biosecurity, health, animal welfare, human nutrition and food sa...The challengesManaging a large program of work with many moving parts, it can be challenging to keep everything rolling forward - it requires a high degree of organisation. Working for a nationally focused organisa...Read moreMay 2021This role has taken me Around the world, developing my cultural awareness, plus the differing needs sometimes clash with the wants. I am satisfied when I make an improvement wherever I go, that strengthens the company people and ideals.Reviewer's QualificationPostgraduate Diploma in Project ManagementExperience10+ yearsOrganisation sizeMedium (20-199 employees)SpecialisationProjectsThe good thingsTechnical and value satisfaction. Tough role, many resource and customer challenges Changing omg requirements between customers Personal satisfactionThe challengesYou need to have a " thick skin", for example: conflicts develop between different internal agendas and the program objectives and timelines which you will have to manage, and sometimes wear - to move...Read more123456Source: SEEK Role ReviewsExplore similar careers. Process ManagerMost common salary$110kSatisfactionN/AProject OfficerMost common salary$90kSatisfactionGroup LeaderMost common salary$160kSatisfactionApplications DeveloperMost common salary$90kSatisfactionResearch AssociateMost common salary$90kSatisfactionSee all Information & Communication Technology careersSource: SEEK job ads and SEEK Profile dataRead more from SEEK. How to talk to your boss about boundaries3.5 min readWorkplace tips & wellbeing11 ways to manage parental leave and ease your return to work4 min readWorkplace tips & wellbeingP.R.I.D.E Report 20212 min readWorkplace tips & wellbeing
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Result 22
TitleProject Manager: Job Description & Average Salary
Urlhttps://www.investopedia.com/articles/wealth-management/021616/project-manager-job-description-average-salary.asp
DescriptionDiscover more about the specific tasks that project managers are responsible for and the average salary that can be expected in such a position
Date
Organic Position22
H1Project Manager: Job Description & Average Salary
H2Primary Responsibilities of a Project Manager
Skills of a Project Manager
Requirements for Project Managers
Salary of Project Managers
Certifications for Project Managers
Organizations for Project Managers
H3Article Sources
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H2WithAnchorsPrimary Responsibilities of a Project Manager
Skills of a Project Manager
Requirements for Project Managers
Salary of Project Managers
Certifications for Project Managers
Organizations for Project Managers
BodyProject Manager: Job Description & Average Salary By Julia Hawley Full Bio Julia Hawley is a full-time writer focusing on investing. She combines her writing skills with her experience in personal wealth management. Learn about our editorial policies Updated October 14, 2020 Fact checked by Kimberly Overcast Fact checked by Kimberly Overcast Full Bio Kimberly Overcast is an award-winning writer and fact-checker. She has ghostwritten political, health, and Christian nonfiction books for several authors, including several New York Times bestsellers. Kimberly also holds a Class C private investigator license. Learn about our editorial policies Salaries & Compensation Guide to Unemployment Project management lies at the heart of most daily operations. Project managers are responsible for organizing teams, developing team plans and facilitating project execution to achieve a company's goals. A project manager's role depends on the organization and its industry. Many begin their management careers at a consulting firm that trains them in project management methodology, though some start as part of a team and work their way up the corporate ladder. Successful project managers pay attention to detail, have excellent communication and motivation skills, enjoy working closely with others and are especially organized. Primary Responsibilities of a Project Manager . A project manager's primary responsibility is organization. If a project is assigned a manager, it generally involves multiple elements that must fall into place. Even if multiple departments in a business share responsibility in completing a project, the project's manager is responsible for ensuring each department plan functions properly and syncs with the others to complete the project punctually. Thus, project managers must keep each task on track and visualize the project as a whole to ensure it comes together properly. Staying on budget and meeting every deadline are two equally important project manager responsibilities. Skills of a Project Manager . Project managers must have extensive organizational skills and be able to function on strict deadlines. Many wear multiple hats and are responsible for various tasks at once. Under such circumstances, it is also critical for project managers to have extensive time-management skills. A keen attention to detail is another essential skill, as projects often entail intricate plans that cannot fall into place without each component being right. At the same time, a project manager must also be able to visualize the whole project to ensure all parts properly come together. Project managers should also be creative because projects often fall off track and meet obstacles. Creativity allows a project manager to outline a new course of action to overcome challenges. Leadership skills also help when enforcing new plans. Project managers must be able to communicate effectively, build trust, and lead multiple teams using project outlines as their guides. Requirements for Project Managers . The quickest path toward a project management career is to earn at least an undergraduate degree in management. This provides a background in crucial areas of management and human resources and strengthens crucial communication skills. Some requirements for this position vary and depend on the company and industry to which the person applies. It is increasingly common for companies to require a master’s degree for project management positions, even though higher education in this field only adds to a candidate's value to the organization and increases their salary. Most prospective project managers also seek out some type of internship while achieving a master’s degree. Real world experience helps bridge the gap between studying and practice, and certain skills can only be learned through on-the-job training. Salary of Project Managers . Median salary for U.S. project managers sits at around $116,000, but this figure depends heavily on the region, the manager's company, the company's industry and the manager's level of education and experience. According to the Project Management Institute, project manager salaries range anywhere from $55,000 to $175,000. Most entry-level and mid-level managers earn between $65,000 and $91,000 in annual income. Of course, senior project managers bring in the largest annual salaries. Some of the highest paying companies include Aetna, Worley, American Airlines, and General Dynamics Information Technology, according to salary information reported on Indeed.com. Certifications for Project Managers . Though it depends on the size and industry of the company, obtaining certifications tends to increase salary. For example, the Project Management Professional certification can come with a median yearly salary of $120,000. This certification requires a minimum of 35 hours of coursework or practical application and a digital or written exam. Other certifications include Certified Professional in Management (CPM) and International Project Management Association (IPMA) Four-Level Certification. Organizations for Project Managers . Project managers can join a number of organizations. Some of the most well-known organizations include the American Management Association (AMA), the Project Management Institute (PMI) and the International Project Management Association (IPMA). Organizations such as these allow project managers of all skill levels and in every area of expertise to communicate, share and help promote efficiency and success in the field. They also provide outlets to ask questions, reflect on experiences and troubleshoot new problems. Article Sources. Investopedia requires writers to use primary sources to support their work. These include white papers, government data, original reporting, and interviews with industry experts. We also reference original research from other reputable publishers where appropriate. You can learn more about the standards we follow in producing accurate, unbiased content in our editorial policy. Project Management Institute. "Earning Power: Project Management Salary Survey, Eleventh Edition," Pages 300–306. Accessed Oct. 14, 2020. Indeed. "How Much Does a Project Manager Make in the United States?" Accessed Oct. 14, 2020. Project Management Institute. "Project Management Professional (PMP)®." Accessed Oct. 14, 2020. International Project Management Association. "Certification Program Overview." Accessed Oct. 14, 2020. American Management Association. "AMA Certified Professional in Management™." Accessed Oct. 14, 2020. Take the Next Step to Invest Advertiser Disclosure × The offers that appear in this table are from partnerships from which Investopedia receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where listings appear. Investopedia does not include all offers available in the marketplace. Service Name Description Related Articles. Salaries & Compensation 25 Highest Paid Occupations in the U.S. Career Advice A Project Manager's Qualifications and Career Path. Career Advice The Ultimate Guide to Working from Home. Career Advice How to Get a Job in Compliance. Salaries & Compensation Accountant Job Description & Average Salary. Salaries & Compensation 7 High-Paid Public Service Jobs. Partner Links Related Terms. Branch Managers: A Demanding and Highly Visible Job A branch manager is an executive who is in charge of the branch office of a bank or financial institution. more Why Hard Skills Matter Hard skills are learned abilities that you acquire through practice and education. Learn about examples of hard skills to include on your resume. more What Is a Program Manager? A program manager oversees the management of a specific program, generally in the credit card or information technology business. more Understanding Compliance Officers A compliance officer ensures a company complies with its outside regulatory requirements and internal policies. more Chartered Wealth Manager (CWM) Chartered wealth manager is a professional designation issued by the Global Academy of Finance and Investment. more Investment Consultant An investment consultant provides investors with investment products, advice, and/or planning. more About Us Terms of Use Dictionary Editorial Policy Advertise News Privacy Policy Contact Us Careers California Privacy Notice # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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TitleCAREER LADDER GUIDE - the University of Houston ...
Urlhttps://www.uhd.edu/administration/employment-services-operations/compensation/Career%20Ladders/Career%20Ladder%20Guide.pdf
DescriptionThe Compensation Program includes the creation and maintenance of formal job descriptions that accurately detail the duties and responsibilities of each job.
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Urlhttps://www.floridatechonline.com/blog/business/senior-program-manager-career-and-salary-profile/
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TitleHow to Become a Project Manager - A Complete Guide for 2021
Urlhttps://www.paymoapp.com/blog/the-complete-project-manager-guide/
DescriptionA complete guide that will help you start your career as a project manager and prepare for any difficult work situation that you might encounter
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H1Becoming a Project Manager – A Complete Guide for 2022
H2Start your Free Trial
Are you preparing to become a project manager but you don’t know where to start?
Here are the things that you should consider before starting a project management career:
What does being a project manager actually mean?
A project manager’s skills
What does a project manager actually do?
What’s the secret of a project management career path?
How to become a project manager
Project management education
Project management certifications
Which are the most important PM certificates out there?
Project manager salary
Project manager career problems
Advice for beginners from experienced project managers
Ways of managing projects and product development
Tools and resources for project managers
What’s next for you?
H3Don’t forget
Remember this
Tip
PMP® certification
Note
The PRINCE2 Certification
Scrum certifications
Remember
Agile
Scrum
Kanban
Extreme Programming
Waterfall
PRINCE2 (Projects In Controlled Environments2)
PRiSM (Projects integrating Sustainable Methods)
Six Sigma
Critical Path
Lean
PMI’s PMBOK
What to read next
H2WithAnchorsStart your Free Trial
Are you preparing to become a project manager but you don’t know where to start?
Here are the things that you should consider before starting a project management career:
What does being a project manager actually mean?
A project manager’s skills
What does a project manager actually do?
What’s the secret of a project management career path?
How to become a project manager
Project management education
Project management certifications
Which are the most important PM certificates out there?
Project manager salary
Project manager career problems
Advice for beginners from experienced project managers
Ways of managing projects and product development
Tools and resources for project managers
What’s next for you?
BodyBecoming a Project Manager – A Complete Guide for 2022Written byAlexandra CotePublished onAugust 19, 2020Read Time 28 minutesCategoryWork Management Are you preparing to become a project manager but you don’t know where to start? We’ve put together an extensive guide for you to serve as a beginning point and reference for your future career as a project manager. You can now start being part of this line of work right away by reading the basics of each aspect of a project manager’s career growth. Note: We are looking to enrich our section of tools and resources of this article, should you have any useful tools or other resources that project managers could benefit from, do get in touch with us. Here are the things that you should consider before starting a project management career:. What does being a project manager actually mean? – the basic personality traits of a good project manager A project manager’s skills – find out if you have the skills needed to be a part of the project management field What does a project manager actually do? – an analysis of the most common project management responsibilities on the current job market What’s the secret of a project management career? – tips on becoming better in the project management profession How to become a project manager– education and the most important PM certificates you can get out there Project manager salary – know how much to ask for according to your experience level Project manager career problems – find out how project management experts dealt with problems when they were beginners and prepare to successfully face any issues you might encounter Ways of managing projects and product development – Agile, Waterfall, PRINCE2, PRiSM, Six Sigma, Critical Path, and many more Tools and resources – collaboration tools, video chat systems, project management software, and all the apps that project managers need to start a project Looking for a tool to help you manage projects from start to finish? What does being a project manager actually mean? Are you always the leader of your group who likes to keep everything and everyone organized and with a goal in mind? If your answer is yes, you could be on your way to a career in project management. Project management is one of the most complex fields of work out there. Be prepared for a true adventure you’ll never get bored of. There is no space for dullness in this profession. A project manager (PM) is responsible for leading an entire project through initiation, planning, execution, control, and completion. Project managers always work in a team. They are most often sociable and great team players. As a PM, you will need to adapt to different people, cultures, environments, and situations. Being flexible is key to team communication since you’ll be the builder and controller of the team. To be a great PM, you have to be a team leader, co-worker, and supervisor at the same time. This is one of the most challenging careers as no day will be the same and you will need all of your project management skills to solve every problem. Also, you’ll be the first person your team goes to when a problem occurs. They might expect you to hold the answers to any inquiry. But, this is what makes the project management career path interesting. You’ll deal with both formal and informal interactions. If you believe that you’re a person that knows people well from the second you meet them, this might be the right career path for you. Essentially, project managers are similar to psychologists. They know exactly what problems, desires, and expectations employees and clients have. However, despite being a people person, a PM won’t get emotionally involved in their projects. Some of your duties in your career as a project manager will include: taking part in the creation process, executing the project, preparing communication methods, finding solutions to recurring issues, monitoring the project’s progress from start to finish, ensuring your team is actually getting things done, and many more. To put it briefly, you’ll be responsible for connecting each project to the business world and to its clients. You must be aware that the entire responsibility of the project’s success will fall on your shoulders. You will be held accountable for any mistakes that your team makes or for any client complaints. In this position, you’ll focus both on the accuracy of your work and that of your team. This profession is always changing and facing new demands. If you’re the kind of person who prefers diversity, this is the type of career you’ll never get bored of. You can always switch the project you’re working on, the team you interact with, the industry you’re involved in, and even the processes and tools to ease your work. No project is the same. Yet, your expertise in this field will prove helpful whenever you’ll come across similar situations and issues in the future. Similarly, your past experience will be essential to solving problems quickly. If you’re looking for an efficient way to manage your project or your employee work, check out this list of task management software. Most project management software includes modules such as reporting, timesheets, team scheduling, and even invoicing. If you need a system for recurring bills and invoices, it’d be best to check out this article on free invoicing software for 2022. A project manager’s skills. Knowledge of project management is sometimes just not enough for you to become a great PM. As discussed above, you need soft skills as well. Being a good communicator and an open leader is not enough. Tackling daily project management challenges also requires accountability, adaptability, analytical and strategic thinking, decisiveness, a stress-resistant personality, and even a bit of love for risk-taking. Being a multitasker with great written and oral communication skills can place you among the top project managers in your sector. When it comes to hard skills, you should be aware that there is no specific project management skill. In fact, depending on the project, you’ll have to know a bit of everything. General business knowledge is highly desired. Don’t worry though, you don’t need to be an expert in technical skills such as coding. However, being able to give accurate and detailed tasks to your developers is important. Leading a project is all about making sure that your team members lack no crucial information to successfully finish a task and deliver the final project.  Another important skill is understanding resource allocation, being able to determine the proper timing of the resources needed within the project schedule. Regardless of whether you run a small business or a large one, choosing the best online resource management software can ease your work a lot. You should have an adequate level of knowledge to spot an issue and suggest possible solutions. At the same time, you should know that many project managers have had previous jobs such as software developers, marketing managers, accountants, designers, and so on. This means that they hold the required solid knowledge for projects related to their previous fields of interest. If you’re one of these people, you might be one step ahead of the others; but you must keep in mind that you’ll also need to develop your own knowledge of project management processes, frameworks, and people management. You might be used to working individually, but project management is all about teamwork. Don’t panic if you end up realizing that working in a project manager position is not the right fit for you. This profession creates many new opportunities and pathways for other future careers. Take a look at the skills of the most successful project managers and find out if you have what it takes to become like them and what you have to improve: solid understanding of business cases and risk management processes expert knowledge to meet specific circumstances proven project management and self-management skills strong leadership skills ability to monitor and control budgets critical thinking good communication and negotiation skills capability to make decisions under pressure strong interpersonal skills necessary to lead a team ability to define situations, document data, and draw conclusions strong business acumen ability to interpret instructions regardless of their form strong organizational and multitasking skills creative mindset analytical skills accuracy and attention to detail excellent time management skill capacity to maintain schedules and meet deadlines problem-solving skills self-motivation accountability work ethic working knowledge of project management tools If you’d like to see what other skills you’ll need for your next project manager job, check out our complete analysis of 200+ project management job descriptions. What does a project manager actually do? Depending on the industry you work in, your duties might differ. We have analyzed over 200 LinkedIn worldwide job postings and compiled this list of the most common project manager responsibilities: direct all project management phases set and manage project expectations with external and internal stakeholders coordinate and track various projects through an entire project lifecycle develop a detailed project management plan to track project progress mentor, motivate, and supervise project team members develop professional business relationships define the overall scope of the project prioritize the tasks of the project create and continuously update the project documentation create accurate forecasts for revenue and resource requirements partner with all departments to ensure work is done according to demands establish effective communication ensure team members have all the necessary information track work times and maintain accurate daily timesheets ensure project tasks are executed and reviewed within the predefined scope align various teams to maintain the quality of deliverables report and escalate issues to management when necessary conduct project status meetings, daily stand-ups, and retrospective meetings continuously follow up on the progress, risks, and opportunities of the project focus on customer satisfaction manage projects through KPIs manage budgets and billings act as the main customer contact for project activities make recommendations for project improvements conduct workshops and training obtain customer input measure project performance using appropriate systems, tools, and techniques evaluate team performance What’s the secret of a project management career path? There is no definite secret. Project managers are good at their job for various reasons. Thinking that you hold the secrets of this job can make you believe that you’re prepared for any situation. Nevertheless, there are many problems that could occur anytime, making it impossible for you to know how to solve them without too much struggle. For this reason, it’s better to focus on being a great professional rather than on hunting down the secrets of success. Doing what the best PMs are doing won’t guarantee that you’ll become successful like them. Being passionate and open to change whenever something is not working right though is more important. The project management world is one of the most dynamic business environments. You should be able to adapt to its changing nature and become comfortable in it. Another tip that project managers might hesitate to share has to do with the use of project management tools. These apps can automate their tasks and help them manage projects with ease. Finding the best tools often takes a lot of time and testing. Also, the apps and techniques you’ll use can depend on your style of work. More experienced project managers might even be able to tell you some secrets that you’ll find nowhere else. The true secrets of this profession come only with experience. Making mistakes and learning from them is a valid statement even in project management. Meanwhile, some of the things that you can test are: making sure that you understand the client’s requirements, picking the right team members, being able to create tasks in detail, making sure you have the best tools and systems for finishing the project, focusing on the real issues, setting reasonable requirements, always taking failure into consideration, and creating backup plans. Don’t forget. Testing methods and tools is vital for the project’s success and for your development as a professional. By testing and experimenting, you’ll be able to learn the secrets of project management on your own. This is beneficial since the tips you’ll get from another project manager might not apply to your project. You must be aware that every PM is different and every project is peculiar in its own way. How to become a project manager. Where should you actually start your education to become a project manager? Before you begin your project management journey you have to see if this career is right for you. Read the stories of other project managers, reach out to them, ask questions, or try a project management internship. Additionally, you can take some introductory online courses to get your first look at this subject. Usually, these courses provide tasks and assignments designed to make you interact with this business branch and see if you can handle its responsibilities. Here’s are some websites where you can find online project management education opportunities: edX, Alison, Coursera, Simplilearn, Udemy. Remember this. You should never start working as a project manager without having previously discovered the processes and tools commonly used in project management. You have to know if you’re capable of using those techniques and platforms before you take part in a real project. Before you start looking for a project manager job, write down all of the aspects that your future workplace must have and make a list of what you never want to deal with in your following career. Don’t rush into getting a job just for the sake of working. If you’re an entry-level project manager, you should find a work environment that allows you to grow through all project manager levels and learn more from your coworkers. This takes us to the importance of having a mentor at the beginning of your project manager career. We’ve previously talked about how you could research the activity of other project managers before deciding whether this path is right for you or not. A role model can shape your entire career. This is the reason why you should find a skilled project manager who’d be able to allocate part of his time to teach you what he already knows. By working close to their side, you’ll master project management methods, methodologies, frameworks, processes, and best practices. This will also ease your process of becoming a project manager. A mentor’s purpose is also to honestly highlight your mistakes so that you can use them to further develop yourself. Know that finding compatible project managers who want to share their wisdom and knowledge can be rather difficult. Most, however, will be willing to do this in return for some help with their tasks. As a result, they’ll involve you in real projects and even supervise you while doing so. This is imperative for a project management novice because you wouldn’t otherwise be able to know if you’re using your theoretical knowledge correctly without someone analyzing your work. Trust is at the base of the trainee-mentor relationship. You believe they’ll share their tips with you and they allow you to work on projects with them. Project management education. Your project management career can start with you getting a project manager or business administration degree. Not having a diploma in project management is, however, not a disadvantage; but, if you do study it on a daily basis in an academic environment, you’ll have a head start. It’s never too late to switch to a career that suits your interests. In fact, PM does not belong to only one industry. Usually, projects will belong to another line of business such as software, art, logistics, economics, linguistics, etc. In fact, a design agency might require you to hold a degree in Arts or Design for a better understanding of the field. In this case, project management education is entirely up to your own will and desire to improve yourself professionally. Any college degree can prove helpful for a future project manager since the academic world teaches you how to study and acquire knowledge gradually. This is essential for a PM that could have to learn all about a new project’s main field in a short time. Self-development, self-learning, and a will to constantly develop oneself throughout a lifetime are vital for keeping your career at the top. Tip. Before deciding on a degree, see how project management works in real life. College activities don’t allow you to see the actual consequences of your decisions. Working with a real project can teach you all about accountability and outcome management. There are also numerous online project management degrees, learning resources, blogs, and programs that you can follow. This could be an option if you don’t live close to the college you’d like to attend or if you just don’t have enough time to attend university. These three examples are degrees that you can get through online project management education: Online Master’s Degree in Project Management from the Colorado State University – Global Campus Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration from Purdue Global University Master of Business Administration in Project Management from the Liberty University. For more learning opportunities like these ones, check out the best project management courses you can take or other training resources. Alternatively, you can take a look at some of the most commonly used project management terms. Another way of educating yourself is getting a similar position. You don’t have to begin your career as a PM. You can start by managing smaller projects, products, or even teams. Alternatively, you can go for an internship in this field. Don’t get discouraged if the work you’ll be doing won’t seem like something you’ll love for the rest of your life. Sometimes all it takes is to find a different project to work on. All project managers dream of working in a field that is actually one of their hobbies. If your hobby is in the field of business, you’re lucky. Project management certifications. Are project management certificates still worth it? Of course! As you advance in your career as a project manager you’ll either feel the need to certify your project management knowledge or you’ll be asked by your employer to get a certificate. Although certificates might slowly start losing their importance for recruiters, the experience you’ll get during training and exams is indispensable. Having a PM certificate is a plus, but extensive knowledge and experience in the field matter more for a project’s success. What you must remember is that certificates are not everything. You could have all the diplomas in the world and, yet, if you have no real knowledge or working experience in project management, no one will want to work with you. Which are the most important PM certificates out there? Don’t rush into studying for just any project management certification. Some employers don’t even accept them while online certifications are almost useless. Also, you should study for a certification that’s related to the projects you work on or the industry you’re involved in. Here’s a list of project management certifications that you should consider: PMP® certification. Perhaps one of the most commonly known project management certifications, the Project Management Professional certification, provided by the Project Management Institute (PMI®), sets the standards for project management. The PMBOK Guide and Standards contain the most important guidelines and characteristics needed for project management. The PMBOK® Guide is the main study resource but you’re free to use any other materials that focus on the PMP® exam. Not just anybody can sit this test. The exam consists of 200 multiple-choice questions and it requires three years of previous working experience as a project manager (or five if you don’t have a four-year degree in PM), at least 4,500 hours of experience working on directing a project (or 7,500 if you don’t have a four-year degree), and 35 hours of formal education on the project management process. If you’re looking for a comprehensive course, the PMP® training offers widely accepted standards that can help you achieve project success. Keep in mind that this certificate expires as you have to renew it every 3 years due to the changing nature of project management standards. Note: the PMBOK® Guide and the PMP® certification are mostly known in the USA, Canada, and the Middle East. For Europe, you might want to look for PRINCE2 certification. Take a few minutes to find out some of the secrets of passing the PMP® exam:  Note. If you’re not yet prepared to sit the PMP® exam, you can try going for a Certified Associate in Project Management examination.  The CAPM® certification is perfect for less experienced people who have little project management experience but would like to pursue this career in the future. Earning this certificate helps you prove your dedication to project management despite not having enough work experience yet. The PRINCE2 Certification. The PRINCE2 (PRojects IN Controlled Environments) is a project management method. The UK government developed PRINCE2, so if you’re planning on working in the UK, you might want to give this certificate a go. This certification has two main learning paths you can choose to pursue: PRINCE2 Foundation This first level can confirm your basic knowledge of this method. There are no prerequisites to take this exam, but you should have previous experience with project management. Having this certificate doesn’t mean that you can be a project manager, but that you can work in a team that uses PRINCE2 as a PM method. PRINCE2 Practitioner This level confirms whether the candidate can use the PRINCE2 method in real-life scenarios or not. It’s perhaps the most important one that you can get if you want to work with PRINCE2 in the future. The certification allows you to be employed as a project manager that can apply PRINCE2 principles to a project. Scrum certifications. Scrum is an Agile framework that’s often used for product management or for software-industry projects. Scrum.org provides assignments that can certify your Scrum knowledge. You can choose between the following assessments: Professional Scrum Master™ Professional Scrum Product Owner™ Professional Scrum Developer™ Scaled Professional Scrum™ Professional Agile Leadership™ Professional Scrum With Kanban™ If you’re not looking for a certification and you just want to test your command of Scrum, there are also a series of open assignments that are free to take. Remember. The views expressed in all of the above project management training opportunities are different. It’s best that you look at all opinions since you’ll probably need all the information in the future. Don’t consider them opposites. In fact, they are complementary and you’ll need all of them for successful project delivery. Project manager salary. A project manager’s salary varies according to the country in which they’re working and to their previous experience. Considering this, a PM’s annual income can be anywhere between $51,000 to $111,000. According to Glassdoor, the average project manager salary in the United States is $75,474 while additional cash compensation can be anywhere between $1,541 and $19,755. However, depending on your skills, experience, and knowledge, this project lead salary can be even lower or higher. Project management careers are still in high demand and annual wages are expected to grow for all project manager levels in the next ten years. If you’re unsure whether project management will still be desired in the future, here’s a report on PM job growth. Companies are shifting their attention from typical routine actions to actual projects. More and more positions will be created and there aren’t yet enough people qualified to fill all of them. Project manager career problems. Project management careers are not perfect. Just like any other job, it has its downsides. The reality is that it can be a difficult job and you have to be the right person to do it and handle all project management challenges. Some PMs can even work long stressful hours to make sure that a project’s on track and to deliver it before the deadline. More than this, as a project manager you can’t expect to just go home and disconnect entirely from your work. Many PMs keep track of their projects, answer emails, and stay connected with their team even after work or on holidays. If you’re working for a smaller company where you’re the only project manager, you might be in charge of all duties. This means that you’ll need to juggle several different projects and allocate just enough daily time to manage and control all of them. If you’re barely at the start of your career, this could be impossible since you don’t yet have the necessary knowledge to manage your time accordingly. On the other hand, you might not get to choose the project you’ll work on. This means you’ll get small projects that could waste your time. Similarly, you could come across a project related to a field you’re not interested in. This will make it difficult for you to want to learn more and grasp full control of that domain. The responsibility a project manager has is not easy to handle just by anyone. The pressure of delivering a project on time can be too much if you’re not used to holding such authority. Likewise, if you’re not resistant to stress, keep away from hard-to-handle projects or even from this vocation. From the outside, being a project manager could seem like you’ll maintain full control of what goes on in the project development process. However, the truth is that you are entirely dependent on what your clients want. Don’t get this wrong. You can make your own suggestions but you also have to be flexible to any last-minute changes your client might want to make without complaining. Top management often gets to make the final decisions. This is one of the reasons why a project management process is so hard to implement in a company where the main managers and the project managers hold similar powers. Also, people don’t always like project managers. Employees like good project managers because they give detailed and accurate tasks, are considerate, and can lead by example. On the other hand, bad project managers are the ones that emphasize the necessity of a lot of meta-work: too many meetings, presentations, status reports, and less actual work and growth opportunities. In other words, project managers dedicate themselves to providing valuable output rather than to the development process. There are also project managers that believe the project belongs to them. But it’s not just project managers. Product managers and program managers encounter the same issues and the truth is that any employee can be a supporter of meta-work. Not being able to open up to your employees and listen to their opinions can only push them away. You’ll come across some difficult employees during your career and it’ll be difficult to get them to understand your purpose. To gain the respect of your team and to avoid unnecessary arguments, learn to actively listen to others, focus on team cooperation, communicate openly, and aim for real project results not just measurements and status documentation. Learn how you can become their mentor and make sure that the way in which you guide them is as helpful and detailed as possible. Nobody hates anyone more than a project manager that throws random tasks with no accurate descriptions or client requirements to guide them. This can show that you don’t know much about the subject or the client’s requirements. Value individuals and treat them with respect. Never see your team members as simple resources or machines that can instantly execute any task. Listen, understand, and adapt to their own needs. If you don’t like working with people and you’re impatient when waiting for co-workers to finish their duties, you might not be a good match for this job. Advice for beginners from experienced project managers. We asked expert project managers the following question: What was the biggest problem you encountered when you started your PM career and how did you overcome it? Here’s what they had to say: Carmen Pop, Global Project Manager @Dropbox “My story on my career project management is as follows – I was assigned a project back in 2016, which seemed like a regular project at the start. However, after a first round of initiating and planning, it turned out to be a large program with multiple cross functional stakeholders within Dropbox and external technical vendors. This experience definitely pushed me out of my comfort zone as a project manager and it was difficult managing ongoing changes on a continuous basis. My best advice besides the general rules of project management (initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, closing) is to remain compassionate and composed. People will get upset, things will not go the way you want them to, but as the project manager you are the glue that needs to keep everything together and moving forward. I believe I was able to achieve this in my project and as a result, we were able to launch as a team.” Susanne Madsen, Project Leadership Coach, Facilitator, and Speaker @Susanne Madsen International “When I first started out as a project manager my biggest problem was that I had no one to shadow, or learn from, within my company. For many many years I was the only project manager around. It would have probably fast-tracked my career had I had someone to ask for advice, but instead I learned to find my own answers, to rely on my intuition and to use common sense. I always tried to find the most simple and effective way to track and communicate something without the use of jargon. To learn about the project management process I researched the internet and studied the PRINCE2 manual at my own initiative. Furthermore, I often asked myself: “what would the head of department do right now?” That helped me to gain a different perspective and make sure that I was focusing on the right things.” Glauco Paiva,  Senior Delivery Project Manager @Microsoft “In my career as a project manager my biggest problem was how to manage the anxiety to do the things done in a scenario which we cannot control the others. The experience through delivering projects, interacting (listening to) with other people as a customer, partner or the same company, studying techniques and the last but not the least thing, always keep pursuing to understand myself. When you recognize your limitations as respect yourself, you can achieve and leverage the best from the others, for me it is the nicest thing we can do. So, it is possible to work with a satisfied team and helping the business to grow. ” Bert Heymans, Senior Project Manager @Journeyman PM “The biggest problem I encountered when I started my PM career was deciding what not to do in order to get good at project management. I have a technical background and made the common mistake of dividing my time between project management and production related tasks while I should have been concentrating on project management only. It’s really hard to let go of something you know how to do very well because you’re used to doing it and feel like it’s expected of you. After a while I learned and discovered how deep the project management skill set runs and how many things you need to know and do to be good at it. Project management is 90% communication (at least) and learning how to do that as effective as possible takes time and practice. Even just getting the right people to listen to you requires leadership skills, tact and creating rapport. Those skills take time to develop, and you’ll never learn them from a book. My advice for people in a similar situation who want to get good at project management would be to let go as soon as possible and focus on doing project management work. If you don’t know or if it’s just not clear what “doing project management work” means in your company, educate yourself or switch to another company or department.” Ben Aston, Owner @The Digital PM “I tend to be pretty optimistic and naturally, I’m a ‘just wing it’ kind of guy. So when I first started my career as a project manager and relied on my natural instincts to just take it easy, perhaps unsurprisingly, projects kept on going over budget, timelines slipped and clients got mad when they didn’t get what they thought they had paid for. It was soon brought to my attention that the way I was managing projects wasn’t really managing at all – I was just letting projects happen around me – hoping for the best and that everything would work itself out in the end. The lesson I quickly learned is that if I wanted to succeed as a project manager, I needed to park my optimism and be more of a pragmatic realist. I had to learn to lead projects more proactively and assertively. Not just hoping that the team knew what they were doing but making sure they were briefed properly. Not just hoping they were on track but making sure they knew the milestones and dependencies. Not just hoping we were on time and budget but tracking progress daily. Not just hoping the client knew what was going on but making sure everything was documented properly. You get the idea – it’s a lot more effort, but it’s what gets results.” Elizabeth Harrin, Project Management Expert @Girl’s Guide to Project Management “When I first started out, I think the biggest issue for me was being taken seriously at work. As a young woman in a project management position, I was trying to influence others more senior and older than myself. I was lucky to have the support of a good mentor and a supportive line manager as well, plus I was able to attend leadership training. Having confidence in my abilities and knowing what I was able to contribute made me feel more positive about the difference I was making. For people in a similar situation, beginning their careers, I’d advise you to get a mentor, and also to be brave! Believe that you have the right to be taken seriously because of what you bring to the table.” Ramiro Rodrigues, Owner @RR Project Consulting “It´s known that a great PM professional has to have this triad of skills – technical, managerial, and behavioral. I knew that the first two could be acquired with study and that the most complex to develop would be the last one. So I plunged into two fronts: 1 – self-assessment and analysis to understand my behavior and seek to change my mindset of what I knew that needed to change; 2 – study of philosophy to better understand the nuances of human behavior. In short, if you want to succeed as PM, know that you need to understand yourself. This made and continues to make all the difference in my professional life (and personal).” Alejandro Roman, Integrative Technology Projects Engineer – Project Management Office @Huenei IT Services “It was the beginning of 2003 when I started my career in project management and led my first project: the MPLS network update of the Atento Global Holding Client (for ten countries). The problem appeared since the MPLS Service Upgrade had installed Cisco Router equipment and there was a significant delay from the manufacturer in the delivery of this equipment. This made it necessary for us to opt for a local supplier in Argentina to be able to comply in a timely manner with what was planned with the client. The chosen strategy was successful and the time and budget of the project were met.” Stéphane Parent, CEO @Leader Maker “The biggest problem I encountered when I started my project management career was that I was the only project manager at my office. There was nobody around me I could reach out to ask questions or get coaching. What I had to do was build out my virtual network to provide the support I needed during my project management learning and growth. Through phone calls, emails and discussion boards, I was able to get the encouragement and answers that helped me with my first projects.” Ways of managing projects and product development. There are several different approaches to the project management process and its methods, methodologies, or frameworks. These are always changing. New frameworks and PM trends appear all the time. If you think you can get away with knowing only Agile for the rest of your career, you are wrong. The framework you’ll use depends entirely on your company, project, and team. It is true that a company might want you to own a certain certificate or have experience with a specific one. However, you can’t solely rely on the use of a method. As a project manager, you’ll probably get to work with more than just one throughout your career. We have simplified a list of eight ways in which you can manage a project to make them easy to understand. You’ll also be able to find out which are better for your manner of working. Agile. Agile is a series of practices and principles that are best for products and initiatives that face various changes during their progress. This mindset is based on short delivery cycles (called sprints) and on a dynamic work culture that supports continuous team collaboration. “Just like its name, Agile means being adaptable – the ability to gracefully adapt to rapidly changing customer needs”, remarks Kamlesh Ravlani, an Agile Coach and Scrum Trainer at Agile For Growth. Agile focuses on team members and on their regular feedback that can reshape the course of a project. Stakeholders will review each stage and recommend adjustments accordingly. This system allows the entire team to share a project’s responsibility by being in charge of specific individuals or collaborative tasks. There is no clear predefined path or extensive control as projects are very flexible. Objectives are named from the very beginning but deliverables and outcomes can be changed. Scrum. Scrum is used predominantly in software or product development. Small cross-functional teams work with a Product Owner who is responsible for the direction of the product. “A Scrum Master then serves the entire team and ensures that all obstacles are cleared.”, says Kamlesh Ravlani. The Scrum process is divided into smaller cycles of 2 weeks (usually). Every day, the team members review what they’ve done and what they’ll work on for rest of the day during the daily stand-up meeting.  Kanban. Kanban is a method that allows you to get a visual overview of your tasks. The method consists of a physical or digital board with three columns (To Do, In progress, Done). These include tasks written on cards that can be moved from one progress stage to another until they are completed. Kanban focuses on an entire team’s capacity to work collectively and it can help you manage your workflow and identify bottlenecks early on. Extreme Programming. Extreme Programming’s purpose is to improve the quality of software (hence its name). Like Scrum, it relies on quick sprints, frequent releases, and constant stakeholder collaboration that can improve productivity. With this framework, project managers can avoid employee burnout and increase the quality of project deliverables. Waterfall. This traditional approach breaks your workload into a series of related tasks that you must execute in strict order. One has to complete each task before starting to work on another one. In a similar manner, one phase won’t start before you complete the previous one. Extensive planning sits at the base of this approach. It comes with clear timelines and set budgets that support success. Outlining all steps prior to development can eliminate risks and misunderstandings. The idea behind Waterfall implies investing more time in the early stages of project development to prevent errors and save maintenance time. Its downside is that it has not yet adapted to the requirements of modern software development. In fact, it works better for companies and industries that build physical products. There are 7 main phases/components to this method: Client Requirements Design Creation (Construction) Integration Validation (Testing) Installation Continuous Maintenance PRINCE2 (Projects In Controlled Environments2). In PRINCE2 control over the project is divided between a higher-authority project board and a project manager. While the board is responsible for providing resources and setting business justification, the project manager takes care of daily activities and team management. Compared to other methods, PRINCE2 can offer greater control of resources, increased management of risks, structured accountability allocation, focus on the final user, regular review cycles, and organized planning and execution. This project management method includes all of the essential themes, principles, and processes needed to conduct a project from start to finish.  PRiSM (Projects integrating Sustainable Methods). If you’re a fan of sustainability, this is the method for you. PRiSM takes environmental factors into account during the project management process. This is why it is commonly used for construction, architecture, or landscape projects that impact the environment. It can help project managers reduce pollution levels, eliminate waste, and save energy. Six Sigma. Centered around quality control, the main focus of the Six Sigma approach is reducing defects, bugs, and errors. It is driven by data that has to be analyzed in order to discover nonconformities from the original specifications before an issue arises. All decisions are made based on existing data and statistics. The goal of this approach is to deliver efficient and uniform products. The six main steps of Six Sigma are: Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control, and Synergize. Critical Path. This method can help you prioritize tasks and identify a project’s shortest timeline. Project managers can investigate milestones, dependencies, and deadlines easier. A model of the project is first created using four elements: a list of the required tasks, the work hours needed for each task, dependencies, and milestones.  A project manager has to decide which item is essential (critical activities) and which can be delayed without disturbing the project’s final date (non-critical activities). This method is usually used by scientists and manufacturers because of the heavy emphasis placed on a task’s length. Established on the theory that you can’t start working on a task until another one is finished, the Critical Path method allows for faster completion times, fair resource allocation, and bottleneck prevention. Lean. Tired of waste? Lean supports the delivery of high-quality products with fewer people and resources in less time. A focus on customer value, bottlenecks removal, and repeated process improvement eliminate waste. Using this method can help a small team deliver great results in a short amount of time without spending a fortune on materials. Lean focuses on moving the main goal towards valuable product delivery with fewer resources. It also helps companies adapt rapidly to changing customer desires and behaviors. PMI’s PMBOK. With this guide, project managers can divide projects into the following five process groups selected by the Project Management Institute (PMI): Initiating Planning Executing Monitoring Closing The PMI standards are used mostly in the USA, Canada, and the Middle East and it contains the project management processes and techniques needed to complete projects. It’s more of a reference guide that outlines the standards of project management rather than an actual method. Tools and resources for project managers. Sometimes it takes more than just a great project manager to complete a project on time and on budget. Times have changed. Project management tools can now ease your work and eliminate the hassle of working with paperwork that can be lost forever. Let’s start with the basic tools we recommend you use from the beginning of your career. What your entire team will need is a complete system for creating project documentation. Your best free option, in this case, is the Google Suite. Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides, can all be used collaboratively. In this way, you’ll be able to work with your team members efficiently even when working remotely. Also, by using Google Drive you can ensure the safety of your data. Remember to always connect your files to cloud storage providers so that you don’t lose any of your documents. Other similar file-sharing systems include Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, and Apple iCloud Drive. Efficient collaboration is key to making sure that each task is completed according to the requirements of your client and that no mistakes are made in the process. For this, you’ll need a place to ask questions, share news, plan meetings, clarify tasks, and get feedback. In this sense, there are many collaboration tools, such as Slack, that you can connect your entire team to. If you prefer face-to-face interaction, you can also use services that provide video chat as well. In this case, Slack works as a video calling system too, but you can opt for other alternatives like Skype, Google Hangouts, or Viber. You shouldn’t ignore the productivity aspect of the entire project development process. For this purpose, you can organize your articles, notes, and even documents using Evernote, Pocket, or Google Keep. And if you want to keep track of the time you’ve spent on a task or project, there are always time tracking tools you can use for this. These can help you see exactly where you’re slacking through time reports and improve your work performance by fixing those time-related issues. The tools we’ve mentioned above are mere “toys” compared to complex project management apps. Even if you’re a project management beginner you should get used to using one or more advanced tools. If you’re looking for a complete solution to do all of the above tasks in one single place, turn to project management software that can bring all of your required features together. This complete platform option will eliminate your need to switch between different apps. Some of the most comprehensive project management platforms that you can use include Paymo, Scoro, Teamwork Projects, or Hive. There are several platforms where you can search and find the best project management software for your specific needs. Plan, schedule, and manage all your projects from a single place with a free Paymo trial. What are the benefits of using end-to-end project management tools? Schedule priorities Organize teams Assign tasks quickly and accurately Manage clients Keep track of work times Collaborate easily Oversee projects Improve team productivity Integrate with other tools Speed up project development Increase reliability Maintain full control of resources and finances Track project development Monitor team activity Keep all of your files in one safe database Access all data from anywhere Share documents Manage budgets, expenses, and invoices Create timesheet and budget reports Prevent and eliminate risks Detect bottlenecks and fix issues or errors If your team often works on non-project activities besides project-related ones, you will have to use work management software. These provide more flexibility and can be used for projects too. The focus this time though will be on both projects and other types of work. What’s next for you? Your career path doesn’t have to stop at being a project manager. You can go on to become a program manager and handle multiple related projects. Another alternative is a portfolio manager position. They hold the responsibility of choosing and prioritizing future projects according to an organization’s rules and strategy. Finally, you can become a project management office manager. This job helps ensure the entire company’s project organization. If you have higher expectations from your career, you can always opt for an executive position or start your own company. You can go on and use websites such as Glassdoor and Jooble to find a project management job and see what the others are saying about the workplace you’re planning on applying to and what salary range to expect. Also, try Paymo for free to start working with project management software yourself or use it to track your own learning process. Paymo is available for free without limitations to schools, colleges, and universities. If we’ve convinced you that project management is the perfect career for you, you can start your PM learning journey right now. Follow all of the above-given steps and begin preparing for a successful future in the world of project management. Bookmark this guide and come back to it whenever you need some more tips to help you become a project manager, and if you found it useful, please share it with your friends and teammates. Jump to Section What Does Being a Project Manager Actually Mean? Project Manager Skills Project Manager Duties Secrets of a PM Career How to Become a Project Manager Project Manager Salary Career Problems Ways of Managing Projects and Product Development Tools and Resources What to read next. Jan 5, 2022 8 MIN READ Effective time management techniques for WFH . Meenz Nautiyal Dec 14, 2021 19 MIN READ Top 8 Time Tracking Apps To Swear By . Marcel Tit Dec 7, 2021 11 MIN READ 12 Best Tools for Remote Teams . Hugh Beaulac 1.8KSHARES Subscribe via emailGet monthly tips on how to successfully run projects and remain sane at the same time. Thank you for subscribing!Hmm, something went wrong... Please try again.We don't spam and we deeply respect your privacy!
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Result 26
TitleBecoming a program manager--moving your career to the next level
Urlhttps://www.pmi.org/learning/library/program-manager-career-advancement-skills-6545
DescriptionAfter several years of successfully managing projects, many project managers begin thinking about advancing their careers. For some, that move means expanding their skills and evolving into program managers. This paper examines how project managers can develop the skills they need to successfully manage programs of projects. In doing so, it defines the discipline program management and lists seven principles for successfully managing programs; it compares six areas involved in managing projects and in managing programs. It lists seven techniques that can help project managers evolve into program managers, noting five concerns that are critical to managing programs. It then details a program manager's primary activities, explaining how experienced program managers perform such activities as planning programs, delegating authority, conducting meetings, defining stakeholders, delivering executive presentations, using the balanced scorecard, communicating with senior managers and stakeholders, leading steering me
Date
Organic Position26
H1Becoming a program manager--moving your career to the next level
H2Serrador Project Management
Related Content
H3Abstract
What is a Program?
Learn from the best – try to work with successful Program Managers
Components of a Structured Program
Standing out from the Start
Ready, Set, Stretch
Exit Strategy
Inner Strength
2018 Jobs Report
H2WithAnchorsSerrador Project Management
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BodyBecoming a program manager--moving your career to the next level Tweet Conference Paper Career Development, Technical Skills 12 October 2010 Serrador, Pedro How to cite this article: Serrador, P. (2010). Becoming a program manager—moving your career to the next level. Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2010—North America, Washington, DC. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute. Serrador Project Management. Abstract. You are an experienced Project Manager with a good track record and some successful projects under your belt. So how do you take your career to the next level, and become a program manager? Becoming a program manager is the next obvious step, but is not necessarily an easy step. As you rise in seniority, fewer positions are available and they are harder to get. You need to be prepared and be ready to take that leap. Program management is a discipline separate from project management; it is important to understand a program manager’s extra responsibilities. This paper will define program management vs. project management, discuss strategies for moving your career into program management and discuss how to start running your program once you have the job. What is a Program? The follow points have been used to describe programs. - Focused on coordination of multiple related projects - Longer view spanning all sub projects - Has a defined value proposition - There is defined value through coordination of subprojects - Major concerns are with synchronized delivery of project results, resource sharing, issue and risk management, and budget control to achieve program success This is a mechanical view of a program. However, from a higher level we can look at it in the following way: - projects deliver outputs, discrete parcels of change; programs create outcomes. Programs can be seen as more strategic, more focused on managing organizational growth and change. An experienced program manager will always think of his program in that broader context and new program managers should learn to think in the same way. (Exhibit 1) The Standard for Program Management—Second edition (PMI, 2008), states that: “A program is a group of related projects managed in a coordinated way to obtain benefits and control not available from managing them individually.” (p. 5) Vincent J. Bilardo, Jr.(2008) identifies 7 key principles of program success. Seven Key Principles of Program Success Establish a Clear and Compelling Vision Secure Sustained Support from the Top Exercise Strong Leadership and Management Facilitate Wide-Open Communication Develop a Strong Organization Manage Risk Implement Effective Systems Engineering and Integration He also states, though not as one of his 7 points, but as part of his text the following statement: “Create Your Own Success” (p. 38). This points to another key aspect of program management. A program manager has to show the leadership required to find success in any program. Exhibit 1 – Projects vs Programs Becoming a Program Manager. So how do you get the opportunity to be a Program Manager? Here are some key techniques: -   Deliver the goods -   Upgrade your education -   Make sure you delegate and are seen to be delegating effectively -   Mentor others -   Promote yourself -   Show leadership -   Act the role Of course to become a program manager, you need to have shown to be able to deliver consistently good project results. No-one is going to promote to program manager a project manager that has been struggling or has been delivering less than successful projects. Remember that there are less program management roles available than project manager roles. You need to be one of the top delivering project managers to move into the program management role. If you don’t feel your projects are as consistently delivering, that is a key area to focus on changing. Upgrading education can also set you above the crowd for promotions. If you don’t have your Project Management Professional (PMP®) Certification, you should have it. Consider an Masters in Business Administration (MBA) or Masters in Project Management (MPM) degree. Training courses in program management are also highly beneficial. The Program Management Professional (PgMP®) credential is designed for experienced program managers and so is probably not an option for a project manager. Program managers can’t be detail people; they need to think at a more strategic level. Someone who is not good at delegating probably shouldn’t be a program manager. Become good at delegating and let management know you are good a delegating. Make yourself promoteable by having juniors who can take your place. Help to mentor other project managers. Sharing templates you have created, documenting best practices or offering to be a “buddy” to new employees shows you are ready to guide project managers in a program management situation. Promote your successes to management. Quietly delivering successful projects should get you recognition, but sometimes it just doesn’t. Bosses are busy people who sometimes don’t recognize everything you’re doing. Make sure your bosses know what you’ve been doing and how you have made your projects successful. Leadership is required to be a successful program manager. Show your leadership ability by pioneering new techniques and practices in your projects and then disseminating them more broadly across the organization. This is the type of leadership required in a program manager role. Cleland (2004, p. 220) states that a leader does the right things and a manager does things right. Doing the right things leads to effectiveness and doing things right leads to efficiency. Age old advice about promotions says that if you want to move up a level, start acting the part now. If you are a project manager, manage your projects with company strategy in mind. Add program management features to your projects. If you are managing a large project with junior project managers or project coordinators (which you probably should if you’re ready to move into program management), then structure their work as subprojects. Let them run those subprojects, provide status reports, and do everything a standalone project would do. Management should notice and it is something you can promote when applying for program management roles. Learn from the best – try to work with successful Program Managers. There is no better training for program management then to work closely with an experienced and successful program manager. To manage large programs, one should strive to work as a project manager on large programs first. A project manager should search out those opportunities and work to get assigned to that program. Moving is a career strategy. Often the fastest way to get a more senior role is apply to an open position whether in different group or a different company. Most senior managers come from internal staff development. However, according to a study, outside CEOs earn on average 13% more than internal candidates (Aguilar, 2007). Moving between companies can expose a manager to different environments, techniques and challenges. It can also be a faster way to get more senior roles and higher pay. There is a certainly a risk; the grass may not really be greener on the other side. Senior executives fail, in general, 34 percent of the time when hired from the outside and 24 percent when hired from the inside (Kelly-Radford, 2001). Often the most certain way to advance a career is to grow within a company. If there aren’t advancement opportunities you want in your current department, other departments or divisions may be looking to fill the types of roles you’re looking for. Managing Programs. You’re a junior Program Manager – now what? The follow are some key points to consider in running a program. Structure sub-projects properly Make your project managers run things as you would run them Don't micromanage. You're the program manager not the project manager. Focus should be at the executive level Business focus is also critical Note that these items are not required in most projects. Running projects and programs are different. Components of a Structured Program. Here are the key components of a structured program Steering meetings Action items Issues Status reports Cascading status meetings Risk Registers Project Plans Change Management Budgets Planning. Pace Productivity Inc. has published detailed studies of time use. They report that 5% overall time in planning appears to be ideal for salesmen. (Ellwood, n.d., p 10) Less or more time spent planning results in less salesman success. Typical managers spend 1.7 hours per week on planning. The more senior, the manager the typically more they spend planning. Program managers need to ensure the planning and analysis work they do is adequate to the project. (Ellwood, 2005) “Failures don’t plan to fail; they fail to plan” Harvey MacKay (n.d.) “In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” Dwight D. Eisenhower (n.d.) Delegation. Make sure you delegate and are seen to be delegating effectively. Delegate as much as you possibly can. Delegate until those to whom you delegate complain or start to falter. This is good for you and them. It helps employees grow. No-one reaches successful program management without good delegation skills It is also important to challenge your project managers. People rise to a challenge: You should delegate until they tell you they have too much or start having problems delivering what you ask of them. Excuses not to delegate They’ll make lots of mistake? “If you don't make mistakes, you're not working on hard enough problems”. F. Wikzek I can do it myself in the time it takes to explain it “You cannot do everything at once, so find people you trust to help you”. Jane Seymour (nd. ¶3) Having Good Meetings. Program mangers will chair numerous meetings and must run good meetings. The program manager may spend most of his or her time in meetings. They need to remember these basic rules of running meetings. Define an agenda Stick to your agenda consistently Discuss new findings and techniques Focus on problem solving Interrupt long winded team members Cut off tangents – “Let’s park that item for a follow on meeting” Document action items Stakeholders. Defining the stakeholders is a critical task. Who are a Program’s most critical stakeholders? Not the team Not absolutely everyone who could potentially be involved or be impacted by the project. Not the management who has directed the completion of the project. Stakeholders who can impact the success of the project could come from any of the groups below (Exhibit 2): Exhibit 2: Stakeholders Who Impact a Project The key stakeholders are usually the business users, often senior management on the business side. They are, in effect, the clients who have purchased the product or service. They are the customers! It is similar to running a small business. These stakeholders can make or break the small business. These are the stakeholders a program manager should focus on. As Freeman and McVea state (2001, p. 14)), the stakeholder approach is about concrete “names and faces” for stakeholders rather than merely analyzing particular stakeholder roles. Knowing that “business users” are impacted is not enough. It is necessary to communicate directly with the senior manager (“John Smith” or whoever) of the business team. Presenting to Senior Managers. As a program manager, you will be regularly presenting to senior mangers and stakeholders. It is important to remember basic rules of presenting to senior managers. Introduce yourself and explain your role/background. It is important to be concise and focused. Answer honestly: If you don’t have the answer, offer to get back to them. Always prepare your slides and distribute ahead of time. Ask if they want to go through the deck or just review the highlights. Read the body language of the group. If they look board, speed it up. If they look confused, slow down and ask for questions. Also remember these presentation tips. Start by summarizing the reason for the presentation. 3-4 bullet points per slide is usually best. Expand with your verbal comments. Always give concise options: both pros and cons. Remember to summarize and outline next steps. Leave time for discussion at the end. Consider having a 30 second summary ready just in case a key manager has to leave before you can get through your presentation. Know to stop at yes: If you’re looking for an approval on an item, don’t keep going after they agree. This can indicate you’re not confident in the recommendation and gives time to for them to reconsider. This is not only good advice for program managers. Good presentations and well run key meetings by a project manager may get the notice of senior management. This may be an area that they will feel comfortable with you as program manager. Balanced Scorecard. Balanced Scorecard is a tool developed by Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton, as described in two successful books. “The Balanced Scorecard translates an organization's mission and strategy into a comprehensive set of performance measures that provides the framework for a strategic measurement and management system.” Kaplan and Norton, (1996, p. 76) The Balanced Scorecard balances the financial perspective with the organisational, customer and innovation perspectives which are crucial for the future of an organisation. It is a tool program managers should become familiar with. Communication Styles. Program managers will spend more time dealing with very busy, senior managers and stakeholders. Getting their time and attention may be a challenge. A technique that can be used is to try to understand their preferred communication style. Written – e-mail, Instant Messaging Verbal – phone, voicemail Visual – in-person Once this style is understood, a program manager should use this method to communicate. Steering meetings. Steering meetings are critical in ensuring that the senior stakeholders are aware of project progress and issues. For this reason, it is important tailor the materials for these senior stakeholders. The following are guidelines for these meetings: Joint Issue list Crisp presentations for the sponsor Don’t gloss over challenges Review issues and risks Program managers should create simple, crisp presentations for the sponsors. Don’t gloss over problem areas, risks or issues. Sponsors want to know about potential problems, they don’t want to be surprised at the last minute. They want to know while there’s still time to act. Program managers need to remember these are the people who can help overcome obstacles. They should let them help and give them the information they need to help. Status Reports. Weekly Crisp and to the point High level issues and risk Highlight the actions required to resolve issues Document successes A program manager must ensure each subproject creates a status report. These can then be rolled into the overall program status report. The program manager should define a subproject status format that lends itself to rolling into a program level status report. Joint Action Items. A key challenge in program management is not only managing the team’s deliverables, but monitoring the deliverables of stakeholders and business partners. An action items list is a great way to do this. Keep the deliverables in sight every week Update them regularly Don’t just include items for the project team here. Program managers should ensure they have the business action items and stakeholder action items as well. They should review every week. This will ensure that action items and task are not forgotten or lost (which can happen easily in a complex project.) Some people like to use issue and action items interchangeably. A clear distinction is preferred. Issues are items for management attention, items they should be aware of and either monitor closely to take action on immediately. Action items are used to document items that may not appear in the project plans, but that need to be tracked and should not be forgotten (a to-do list as it were). The program manager should be most concerned with the issues list. Action lists should be closed by the program’s project managers. Risk reviews. Risk management is important and involving stakeholders ensures a more thorough job. Make sure the project risks have been considered Don’t assume stakeholders understand their internal risks Each subproject needs to have their own risk review Risk reviews are critical. Just by talking about them, the team may even end up avoiding the very risks they document. Of course, it’s not the program manager’s job to analyse stakeholder risks for them. However, the program manager can help them and may well help himself. And it is part of the role. Ask Questions. Don’t assume everyone’s done their homework. For example, are the tools or vendors vetted? Is the project design optimum? Is the design built for future needs? If you ask questions, you never know what you might find. Faulty assumptions early on can doom your program to slow inevitable failure. Who would like to be involved in that kind of project? In fact some of the greatest project failures are due to bad assumptions. You usually don’t hear about projects where they had carefully reviewed and vetted their designs, vetted their suppliers, carefully checked their assumptions and then somehow messed it all up in the execution. Why? It doesn’t happen. If you have a good solid solution analyzed and planned, you can ride out and resolve the inevitable bumps in the road. It is like a house: a house built on a good foundation will stand many years. But if you have foundation problems, you’re going to pay to fix it! Or worse yet, see your house condemned or collapse. Pitfalls. There are many pitfalls but using good practices, a new Program Manager can avoid becoming a short term Program Manager. Aguilar M., (2007, May 1,) An Outside Job: External CEO Hires Paid More, Compliance Week Bilardo V., (2008). Seven Key Principles of Program and Project Success, Ask Magazine, 25P. 37 Brown, C., (2007), An Introduction to Stakeholder Management, www.pmhut.com Cleland, D.I., (2004). Field guide to project management (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Eisenhower, D.D. (n.d.) In Thinkexist.com Retrieved from http://thinkexist.com/quotation/in_preparing_for_battle_i_have_always_found_that/10642.html Ellwood, M.(n.d.) How sales reps plan their time. Retrieved from http://www.paceproductivity.com/files/How_Sales_Reps_Spend_Their_Time.pdf Ellwood, M. (2005, November) Time priorities for top managers. Presented at International Association of Time Use Researchers (ATUR) Conference, Halifax, NS, Canada. Retrieved from http://www.paceproductivity.com/files/TimePriorities_for_Top_Managers.pdf Freeman, R. E. and McVea, J.,(2001), A Stakeholder Approach to Strategic Management, Handbook of Strategic Management, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Gaston, B, (Jan. 2010), Communicating Effectively to Executives, The Journal of Policy Engagement 2(1) 15 Kaplan, R.S., Norton, D.P. (1996), Using the balanced scorecard as a strategic management system, Harvard Business Review 74 (1), pp.75-85. Kelly-Radford, L. (2001, August/September). The revolving door of talent. CEO Magazine, 86-89. Kozak-Holland, M. (2004, November), Measurements & Balanced Scorecard, Presentation to Toronto SPIN, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Retrieved from http://www.torontospin.com/torontospin/events/doc/presentations/20041124-MarkKozak-Holland.pdf Mackay, H. (n.d.) In Thinkexist.com Retrieved from http://thinkexist.com/quotation/failures_don-t_plan_to_fail-they_fail_to/192081.html Nimax G, (2008), Balanced Scorecard, Presentation on Management Methodologies in Practice at UVa Retrieved from http://www.virginia.edu/processsimplification/Management%20Methodologies.pdf Project Management Institute (2008). A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK Guide® guide) – Fourth edition, Newton Square, PA: Author Project Management Institute. (2008). The standard for program management—2nd edition. Newtown Square, PA: Author. Rowe, S. F. (2009, October) Collaborative Project Leadership: Program Management From the Project Manager’s Perspective, 2009 PMI Global Congress Proceedings, Orlando, Florida, USA Seymour, J. (n.d.) In Brainyquotes.com Retrieved from http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/jane_seymour.html Wilszek, F. (n.d.) In The quotations page Retrieved from http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/38308.html Zhang, Y. & Rajagopalan, N, (in press). Once an outsider, always an outsider? CEO origin, strategic change, and firm performance, Strategic Management Journal This material has been reproduced with the permission of the copyright owner. Unauthorized reproduction of this material is strictly prohibited. For permission to reproduce this material, please contact PMI or any listed author. © 2010, Pedro Serrador Originally published as a part of 2010 PMI Global Congress Proceedings – Washington DC Advertisement Advertisement Related Content. Article Career Development, Technical Skills, New Practitioners 1 June 2019 PM Network Standing out from the Start . By Scott, Lindsay Project management recruitment professional Lindsay Scott provides career guidance. Article Career Development, Talent Management, Technical Skills 1 June 2019 PM Network Ready, Set, Stretch . By Bishel, Ashley A strategic skill set can guarantee a static career. But for project professionals eager to be recognized, get promoted or take on more ambitious and complex projects, an expansive skill set is a… Article Career Development, Technical Skills 1 May 2019 PM Network Exit Strategy . Uncertainty looms for project professionals in the United Kingdom. But there's hope amid the Brexit chaos: Salaries are up—especially for those who change jobs. Article Career Development, Talent Management, Technical Skills 1 March 2019 PM Network Inner Strength . By Parsi, Novid AT&T had a problem. As the era of hardware and landlines faded into the age of mobile phones and the cloud, the global telecom company's offerings had changed—but the skill set of its workforce had… Article Resource Management, Career Development, Talent Management, Technical Skills 1 January 2018 PM Network 2018 Jobs Report . By Rockwood, Kate The outlook is better than it's been in years. The global economy is surging, boosting job markets across sectors and continents. The global GDP growth projection of 3.7 percent for this year… Advertisement
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TitleProgram Manager vs. Project Manager: Key Differences - LSU ...
Urlhttps://online.lsu.edu/newsroom/articles/what-difference-between-program-manager-and-project-manager/
DescriptionThe job responsibilities of program and project managers are similar, ... Betterteam, Software Project Manager Job Description.
DateMar 3, 2021
Organic Position27
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TitleProgram Manager (Unspecified Type / General) Salary | PayScale
Urlhttps://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Program_Manager_(Unspecified_Type_%2F_General)/Salary
DescriptionThe average salary for a Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) is $85,246. Visit PayScale to research program manager (unspecified type / general) salaries by city, experience, skill, employer and more
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What is the Pay by Experience Level for Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General)s?
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Common Health Benefits
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BodyAverage Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) SalaryPayJob DetailsSkillsJob ListingsEmployersHow should I pay?Price a JobWhat am I worth?Find market worth$85,246/ yearAvg. Base Salary (USD)10%$54kMEDIAN$85k90%$127kThe average salary for a Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) is $85,246Base Salary$54k - $127kBonus$2k - $20kProfit Sharing$988 - $26kCommission$2k - $30kTotal Pay$53k - $138kBased on 2,457 salary profiles (last updated Dec 19 2021)Is Average Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) Salary your job title? Find out what you should be paidUse our tool to get a personalized report on your market worth.What's this?EXPLORE BY:CitySeattle, WANew York, NYSan Francisco, CAWashington, DCBoston, MAChicago, ILAtlanta, GALos Angeles, CAPortland, ORAustin, TXSee All CitiesDon't see what you are looking for?Get A Free Custom Salary Report »ExperienceEntry LevelEarly CareerMid CareerExperiencedLate CareerDon't see what you are looking for?Get A Free Custom Salary Report »SkillProgram ManagementProject ManagementLeadershipStrategic PlanningOperations ManagementCustomer Relationship Management (CRM)Data AnalysisProcess ImprovementTeam LeadershipPeople ManagementSee All SkillsDon't see what you are looking for?Get A Free Custom Salary Report »EmployerAmazon.com IncMicrosoft CorpGoogle, Inc.Zillow, Inc.Dell, Inc.Facebook IncStarbucks CorporationTableau Software, Inc.Nordstrom.ComPTCSee All EmployersDon't see what you are looking for?Get A Free Custom Salary Report »JobOperations ManagerProject Manager, (Unspecified Type / General)Administrative AssistantOffice ManagerRetail Store ManagerCustomer Service Representative (CSR)Account ManagerExecutive DirectorFinancial AnalystProject EngineerDon't see what you are looking for?Get A Free Custom Salary Report »Featured Content. ‹Remote WorkNew research shows how to set pay for remote employeesGender Pay GapNew research shows that each woman experiences the disparity of gender pay gap in different ways, depending on her position, age, race and education.Compensation Best Practices ReportFrom compensation planning to variable pay to pay equity analysis, we surveyed 4,900+ organizations on how they manage compensation.Why people quit their jobsWhy do people leave their jobs? We take a deep dive into what's impacting employee retention and what employees are looking for in their new role.How to ask for a raiseNew research on who's asking for raises and who's getting them as well as advice on how to ensure you're getting the salary you deserve.Variable Pay PlaybookBefore you decide whether variable pay is right for your org, get a deeper understanding of the variable pay options and the cultural impact of pay choices.›What is the Pay by Experience Level for Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General)s?Entry Level▼25%Early Career▼13%Mid Career▲5%Late Career▲17%Experienced▲28%An entry-level Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) with less than 1 year experience can expect to earn an average total compensation (includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay) of $63,730 based on 50 salaries. An early career Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) with 1-4 years of experience earns an average total …Read moreWhat Do Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General)s Do?Program managers are responsible for overseeing programs - sets of large, time-consuming projects which require detailed analysis and care - within a company, as well as prioritizing projects and delegating responsibilities to members of the project team. They may also be responsible for interviewing and hiring the best candidates for each project.Multitasking is important in this position to work with several clients and maintain constant communication, and they meet with clients regularly …Read moreProgram Manager (Unspecified Type / General) TasksOversee direction, training, mentoring, and management of staff.Track and report on team progress, and determine key milestones.Identify and capitalize on opportunities for growth and to enhance the organization's competitive position.Coordinate with other departments or members in the organization to achieve specified goals.Build rapport and maintain strong relationships with customers.Find your market worth – how it works:Job Satisfaction for Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General). 3.8 out of 5(485)Highly Satisfied22ReviewsBased on 485 responses, the job of Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General) has received a job satisfaction rating of 3.78 out of 5. On average, Program Manager (Unspecified Type / General)s are highly satisfied with their job.Gender Breakdown. Female63.0%Male35.6%Prefer to self-define1.4%This data is based on 1,520 survey responses. Learn more about the gender pay gap.Common Health Benefits. Medical89%. Dental85%. Vision79%. None10%. WHAT AM I WORTH?What your skills are worth in the job market is constantly changing.
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Result 29
Titlecareer path navigator | University of Michigan
Urlhttp://careernavigator.umjobs.org/detail?mTitle=103624&mType=band
Description
Date
Organic Position29
H1Project Management Director (103624)
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyProject Management Director (103624)Administration > Business Administration > ManagerialPath Level: AD260 Description: Manage execution of project in accordance with organization's project management methodology. Develop, prioritize and submit project plans, budgets and methodologies across a range of key projects. Define project resources, performance reviews and post implementation evaluations. Take ownership of the successful implementation of a set of projects that collectively can comprise a program. Manage the work of project managers. Lead the most complex or critical projects; monitor progress and performance against the project plan; identify and resolve operational problems and minimize delays. Evaluate and authorize changes that significantly impact the scope, budget, or timeline of a project. Select and manage ongoing relationships with external contractors so that the organization receives satisfactory standards of service. Lead, direct, evaluate, and develop a team of project managers to ensure that projects are completed on-time, within budget and according to project specifications. The primary duty of employees in this classification is the management of a customarily recognized department or subdivision, including the supervision of three or more full-time equivalent employees every week. Direction is over a permanent status-continuing function, not a collection of employees assigned to complete a project. Management duties include interviewing, selecting and training of employees; setting and adjusting their rates of pay and hours of work; planning and directing their work; appraising their productivity and efficiency for the purpose of recommending promotions or other changes in their status; handling their complaints and grievances and disciplining them when necessary. Management responsibilities include the authority to hire, fire, or promote assigned employees or make recommendations that are given particular weight. Employees have impact on budgeting, controlling costs, planning, scheduling, and procedural change. Under FLSA, this is the exempt job classification for this title. Incumbents in this position must meet the full criteria for exempt status: salary level, salary basis, and duties tests. Paths Within Band Paths Across Bands Wolverine Career Tracks Possible Next Steps. Make a Leap: Explore new Career opportunities. To provide feedback please email, [email protected] Copyright © 2022 The Regents of the University of Michigan Last updated: 1/12/2022 6:05 pm
Topics
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  • project
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  • employee
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  • management
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  • project management
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  • manage
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  • budget
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  • duty
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