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Keyword What are the career prospects in healthcare administration
Search Urlhttps://www.google.com/search?q=What+are+the+career+prospects+in+healthcare+administration&oq=What+are+the+career+prospects+in+healthcare+administration&num=30&hl=en&gl=US&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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what is healthcare administrationhttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=What+is+healthcare+administration&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAg_bls671AhVgmHIEHeIBAbcQ1QJ6BAgeEAE
healthcare administration job outlook 2021https://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=Healthcare+Administration+job+outlook+2021&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAg_bls671AhVgmHIEHeIBAbcQ1QJ6BAgkEAE
healthcare administration job outlook 2020https://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=Healthcare+administration+job+Outlook+2020&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAg_bls671AhVgmHIEHeIBAbcQ1QJ6BAggEAE
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career goals in healthcare administrationhttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=Career+goals+in+healthcare+administration&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAg_bls671AhVgmHIEHeIBAbcQ1QJ6BAgdEAE
healthcare administration job markethttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=Healthcare+administration+job+market&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAg_bls671AhVgmHIEHeIBAbcQ1QJ6BAgcEAE
healthcare administration degreehttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=US&q=Healthcare+Administration+degree&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjAg_bls671AhVgmHIEHeIBAbcQ1QJ6BAgaEAE
Result 1
TitleBuild the foundation necessary to address the challenges facing the healthcare industry
Urlhttps://westcoastuniversity.edu/wcu10/ca/GOOGLE/bsha-mha.html
Description.main_content h3 { margin-top:20px} .program_container { display:flex; justify-content: space-between;} .program_container > div{ width: 47%} @media only screen and (max-width: 980px) { .program_container { flex-direction: column;} .program_container > div{ width: 100%; margin-bottom:10px} } As healthcare continues to evolve and grow, healthcare organizations will need qualified administrators to lead teams across multiple disciplines. Aligning an organization’s core values is a massive undertaking that requires dedicated individuals with the passion to lead. These courses prepare students for a range of skills including organizational leadership and administration, operations, financial analysis and management, policy development, marketing and communications, and more. WCU's Health Administration Degrees also offer coursework options that allow you to specialize your training: MHA offers tracks in:Organizational LeadershipPublic HealthProject Management BSHA offers tracks in:FinanceStrategic Management
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Organic Position
H1Build the foundation necessary to address the challenges facing the healthcare industry
H2
H3WCU's Health Administration Degrees also offer coursework options that allow you to specialize your training:
H2WithAnchors
BodyBuild the foundation necessary to address the challenges facing the healthcare industry. 866-489-5275 Build the foundation necessary to address the challenges facing the healthcare industry. Jobs for Medical and Health Services Managers are expected to increase in California by 24.7% between 2016 and 2026.* As healthcare continues to evolve and grow, healthcare organizations will need qualified administrators to lead teams across multiple disciplines. Aligning an organization’s core values is a massive undertaking that requires dedicated individuals with the passion to lead. These courses prepare students for a range of skills including organizational leadership and administration, operations, financial analysis and management, policy development, marketing and communications, and more. WCU's Health Administration Degrees also offer coursework options that allow you to specialize your training:. MHA offers tracks in:Organizational LeadershipPublic HealthProject Management BSHA offers tracks in:FinanceStrategic Management   West Coast University proudly supports America's veterans, active duty military personnel and their spouses. We are committed to serving you with the same integrity with which you served your country. As a military student, WCU offers a reduced tuition rate to service members and their spouses. You also have access to certain benefits from your service and WCU is here to help you understand and access what is available to you. One of those benefits is eligibility for Tuition Assistance through the Department of Defense. Our goal is to provide you with the education and support services you need to help you pursue and achieve the success you deserve. Request Information Chat with us, powered by LiveChat
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Result 2
TitleMBA - Healthcare Management | WTAMU
Urlhttps://programs.wtamu.edu/college-of-business/mba-healthcare.html
DescriptionWTAMU offers a quality, affordable, and convenient online MBA degree program. AACSB accredited. Available full-time or part-time. GMAT waiver available
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Organic Position
H1MBA - Healthcare Management
H2The Online MBA - Healthcare Management
H3Nationally Ranked MBA Program
Program Highlights
Alumni Success Stories
Your Success Story Starts Here
H2WithAnchorsThe Online MBA - Healthcare Management
BodyMBA - Healthcare Management AACSB Accredited Affordable Tuition Available 100% Online Apply Now Send Me More Information The Online MBA - Healthcare Management. Now, more than ever, the healthcare industry is an epicenter of growth and innovation, making this the ideal time to advance your career with a Master of Business Administration in Healthcare Management from the AACSB-accredited Paul and Virginia Engler College of Business at West Texas A&M University. Our online MBA in Healthcare Management integrates practical skills with industry-specific business knowledge, including financial analysis, trend forecasting and management training, to ideally position graduates for success in the medical field including:  Hospitals & Health Systems Medical Schools Community Clinics Public Health Agencies Healthcare IT & Finance The Paul and Virginia Engler College of Business at WTAMU is accredited by AACSB International (AACSB). Fill out my online form. WTAMU respects your privacy and is committed to keeping your information secure. Please review our privacy policy at http://wtamu.edu/privacy. Nationally Ranked MBA Program. View additional program rankings. Program Highlights. Created for You: This specialized MBA degree program is ideal for healthcare professionals, medical doctors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and physical therapists and occupational therapists who want to advance their career in Management and C-suite. Accomplished Faculty: Core and elective courses taught by full-time doctorate-level faculty. Flexible: Study full-time or part-time. Start in Fall, Spring, Summer 1 or Summer 2. Convenient: Customize course delivery with 100% online, on-campus or a combination. Affordable Tuition: Scholarships, grants, assistantships and financial aid available. GMAT Waiver: Available to qualified applicants. Program Length: 37-46 Hours Alumni Success Stories . Michelle Bateman, MBAManager, Bleeding Disorders Marketing at Takeda “The flexibility of WTAMU's MBA program has helped me grow in my career. I received opportunities to work in my field of healthcare marketing, but they required me to move across the country while I was still in school. Thanks to WTAMU's online classes, I was able to pursue those opportunities while continuing my graduate program. Now that I have graduated, I am excited to apply the lessons I learned throughout my MBA coursework to my career.” John Capua, MBAInformation Technology Analyst III at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital “My two-year MBA journey at WT included late-night studying and listening to lectures after a full day's work. However, the cumulative knowledge and practical skills I gained from the program's rigorous curriculum empowered me to become an effective contributor to my organization. I plan to leverage my MBA education to address the growing healthcare complexities and take on future leadership roles to improve quality of patient care.” Your Success Story Starts Here. Apply Now Send Me More Information © West Texas A&M University | All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy | Canyon, TX 79016 | 806-651-0000
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Result 3
TitlePenn State World Campus | Health Policy and Administration
Urlhttps://www.worldcampus.psu.edu/penn-state-online-health-policy-degree-programs
Description
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Organic Position
H1Health Policy and Administration
H2The Penn State Difference
Health care administrators who can lead innovation and create meaningful change are in high demand
Health Care Degrees
H3We are Penn State Online
H2WithAnchorsThe Penn State Difference
Health care administrators who can lead innovation and create meaningful change are in high demand
Health Care Degrees
BodyHealth Policy and Administration The Penn State Difference. With our online learning format, you won't need to quit your job or change your life to earn a high-quality degree from Penn State's well-regarded Department of Health Policy and Administration in the College of Health and Human Development. Explore our site to learn more and to request information on the online health policy and administration program that best fits your needs. Health care administrators who can lead innovation and create meaningful change are in high demand. Prepare to meet these new leadership challenges by acquiring one of Penn State's health policy and administration degrees, offered online through Penn State World Campus. These programs are designed to help you keep pace with developments in a dynamically changing profession. You also gain the flexibility and convenience to expand your knowledge without having to relocate or delay your career advancement. Health Care Degrees. Health Policy and Administration (Bachelor of Science) Gain the knowledge and skills you need to balance cost, access, and quality in policy-related health care positions. This online degree program includes an internship that can give you valuable real-world experience in the field. Learn More About Health Policy and Administration Health Policy and Administration (Master of Health Administration) Prepare for challenging leadership positions in health care by supplementing your health-related work experience with a strong business management education. The online MHA program can give you the tools to lead change and solve problems in the dynamic health care environment. Learn More About Health Policy and Administration We are Penn State Online. This is the real Penn State. You will take the same classes with the same curriculum developed by the same professors who teach courses at our brick and mortar campuses. You can expect the same caliber of academic quality that you associate with Penn State. Request Info
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Result 4
TitleCollege of Health & Wellness | Johnson & Wales University
Urlhttps://www.jwu.edu/academics/colleges/college-of-health-and-wellness/index.html
DescriptionJohnson & Wales University’s College of Health & Wellness offers an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to preparing you for a health-related career
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BodyCollege of Health & Wellness Choose a Campus Providence Charlotte Online Health & Wellness Blog More Stories [[feeditem.html_title]] [[feeditem.html_title]] Be the future of healthcare Chart a path to a career in this fast-growing field — from primary/preventive care to long-term preparation for medical graduate studies. Jobs in the healthcare field are growing faster than any other sector, and are expected to grow an additional 30% through 2020 — almost twice as fast as the national economy. Johnson & Wales University’s College of Health & Wellness offers an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to preparing you for a health-related career. Programs: Bachelor of Science (BS) DegreeDietetics and Applied NutritionExercise and Sports ScienceHealthcare AdministrationHealth SciencePublic Health Master of Science in Physician Assistant StudiesPhysician Assistant Studies DoctoralOccupational Therapy Doctorate (OTD) MinorsNutritionPublic Health Non-DegreePostbaccalaureate Pre-Medical & Pre-Health Professions Program Programs for Undecided Students*Undeclared: University Explorations *Tracks into bachelor’s degree program Campus: PROVIDENCE CHARLOTTE Request information Visit Campus Providence Charlotte Start your application Contact us
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Result 5
Title5 Health Administration Careers
Urlhttps://healthadministrationdegree.usc.edu/blog/healthcare-administration-careers/
DescriptionHealth administration careers are available to individuals with a variety of expertise. Explore what a career in health administration has to offer
Date
Organic Position
H15 In-Demand Careers in Health Administration in 2021
H2Health Care Administrator Responsibilities
Outlook for Careers in Health Administration
5 In-Demand Health Administration Careers
Health Administration Careers Are Within Reach
H31. Nursing Home Administrator
2. Health Care Marketing Manager
3. Health Insurance Manager
4. Chief Nursing Officer
5. Health Information Technology Specialist
H2WithAnchorsHealth Care Administrator Responsibilities
Outlook for Careers in Health Administration
5 In-Demand Health Administration Careers
Health Administration Careers Are Within Reach
Body5 In-Demand Careers in Health Administration in 2021View all blog posts under Articles   In 2019, U.S. health care expenditures totaled $3.8 trillion, or 17.7% of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) for that year, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Given its massive scale, the health care industry needs people who can oversee quality of care, promote efficiency and monitor the business side of providing health care — that’s where health administration professionals come into play. Health administration careers offer variety and potential for growth, and individuals who pursue an Executive Master of Health Administration (MHA) program are well positioned to become leaders in their fields. While a background in medicine isn’t required for health administration roles, clinical professionals are particularly suited for the field. Management professionals with a desire to enter the health care field are also good candidates for health administration. Health Care Administrator Responsibilities. Health care administrators carry out responsibilities that have direct and indirect effects on critical aspects of health care, such as quality of care, cost reduction and efficiency. For example, health care administrators can be responsible for: Implementing quality management systems that focus on customer satisfaction and organizational performance Performing cost-benefit analysis to improve the financial position and efficiency of health care organizations Coordinating with community organizations to help address the social determinants of health Ensuring that health care organizations have both adequate physical security and information technology (IT) security Overseeing functions such as billing, contracting, human resources, supplies and budgets Individuals can pursue health administration careers in hospitals, long-term care facilities, physician practice groups and public health agencies, among other settings. Outlook for Careers in Health Administration. The outlook for employment in health care administration is bright. The aging of the baby boomer population is translating into an increase in demand for health care at facilities such as physicians’ offices, hospitals and nursing homes. As the baby-boom population ages, the need for treatment of complex and chronic conditions, such as obesity, is also rising. The trends have resulted in increased demand for health care administrators to oversee operations at all types of health care organizations. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that employment of medical and health services managers will grow by 32% from 2019 to 2029, a growth rate that’s significantly higher than the 4% projected for all occupations. In its 2021 rankings of the best jobs, U.S. News & World Report ranked medical and health services manager as the best business job and the fourth-best job overall. 5 In-Demand Health Administration Careers. Opportunities for a career in health administration require a variety of knowledge and skills. 1. Nursing Home Administrator. When working as nursing home administrators, individuals oversee residents’ care, supervise staff, and monitor finances and building maintenance. States require individuals to be licensed to become a nursing home administrator, and licensure requirements typically include having a bachelor’s degree in areas such as health administration or business administration. Employers often prefer that health care administrators have an advanced degree, such as an MHA. According to PayScale, the average annual salary for nursing home administrators is about $91,700 as of February 2021. The BLS includes nursing home administrators among the medical and health services managers whose employment growth it projected would increase by 32% between 2019 and 2029.   2. Health Care Marketing Manager. Marketing managers who work in health care develop and implement marketing and communications initiatives, perform brand management duties, and analyze market data. They typically have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in areas such as marketing, health care administration or public health. According to the BLS, the median annual salary for marketing managers was $136,850 in 2019, with projected employment growth of 7% between 2019 and 2029.   3. Health Insurance Manager. Individuals who have expertise in the complexities of health insurance and claims management have various career options. They can work for health care providers overseeing functions such as revenue cycle management and health insurance claims; they can also manage health insurance benefits that employers provide to their employees. They typically have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in areas such as finance or administration. Salaries vary depending on the specific position. The BLS reported that the median annual salary for medical and health services managers was $100,980 in 2019, with projected employment growth of 32% between 2019 and 2029. Per the BLS, the median annual salary for compensation and benefits managers was $122,270 in 2019, with projected employment growth of 3% between 2019 and 2029.   4. Chief Nursing Officer. A chief nursing officer (CNO) oversees all the nursing activities of a health care provider. As executive leaders, they also have responsibilities in areas such as budgeting and training. Individuals who become CNOs usually begin as nurses, and a number of certifications are available to nurses who want to transition into the CNO role. According to PayScale, the average annual salary for CNOs is about $131,500 as of February 2021. The BLS included managers who oversee nursing departments among the medical and health services managers whose employment growth it projected would increase by 32% between 2019 and 2029.   5. Health Information Technology Specialist. Health administration careers are available to individuals with IT expertise in areas such as network administration, software development and database administration. As technologies such as telemedicine and electronic medical records continue to evolve, IT specialists will play an even larger role. IT specialists typically have a bachelor’s degree in an area such as computer science, and numerous certifications are open to individuals who wish to further specialize. According to PayScale, the average annual salary for jobs in health care information technology services is about $82,000 as of February 2021. The BLS projects employment for computer and information systems managers to grow by 10% between 2019 and 2029. Health Administration Careers Are Within Reach. The abundant career options and favorable employment outlook for health administration make the field attractive for clinical professionals, management professionals or anyone who wants to make a difference in health care and move into a leadership role. Individuals who pursue USC’s Executive MHA program can acquire valuable knowledge and skills for a career in health administration. Take the first step on the path to a fulfilling career today.   Recommended Readings The Future of Healthcare Administration Health Care Administration: Lasting Impacts from COVID-19 Managing Career Mobility in Health Administration: 7 Tips   Sources: American Organization for Nursing Leadership, Certified in Executive Nursing Practice Certification American Public Health Association, Health Administration Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Historical Forbes, “Healthcare Jobs Are Booming: Why It Could Be Your Next Career Move” Healthcare Financial Management Association, “Healthcare Finance Leaders Emphasize Efficiency and Consider Partnerships in Response to Ongoing Trends” Healthcare Financial Management Association, “The Evolution of Integrated Health System Leader Roles” Houston Chronicle, “Health Care Administration Qualifications” Houston Chronicle, “The Role of an IT Specialist” Houston Chronicle, “What Type of Degree Does a Nursing Home Administrator Need?” Kaiser Health News, “What the 2020s Have in Store for Aging Boomers” Mayo Clinic, Director, Hospital Billing Services and Collections – Revenue Cycle National Association of Long Term Care Administrator Boards, State Licensure Requirements National Center for Biotechnology Information, “Quality Management in Healthcare: The Pivotal Desideratum” PayScale, Average Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) Salary PayScale, Average Nursing Home Administrator Salary PayScale, Salary for Industry: Health Care Information Technology (IT) Services Society for Health Care Strategy and Market Development, SHSMD Career Center Texas Health & Human Services Commission, NFA FAQs U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Compensation and Benefits Managers U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Computer and Information Systems Managers U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Medical and Health Services Managers U.S. News & World Report, Medical and Health Services Manager: Overview Learn More About Our Executive MHA Program. Pre-Qualify NowGet Program Details X X Get Program Details This will only take a minute.
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Result 7
TitleHealthcare Administration Careers | PublicHealthOnline.org
Urlhttps://www.publichealthonline.org/healthcare-administration/
DescriptionInformation on the different career paths in healthcare administration. Includes job projections, salary info and an interview with a professional in the field
Date
Organic Position2
H1A GUIDE TO CAREERS IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
H2Being a Health Administrator
Healthcare Administration Degrees
Interview with a Health Administration Professional
Healthcare Administration Careers are Growing
Choosing a Career in Health Administration
Careers in Health Administration: Beyond the Hospital
Career Spotlight: Nursing Home Administration
Health Administrator’s Toolbox
What to Expect from Health Administration Salary
The Health Administration Job Search
H3Popular Skills for Healthcare Administrator
H2WithAnchorsBeing a Health Administrator
Healthcare Administration Degrees
Interview with a Health Administration Professional
Healthcare Administration Careers are Growing
Choosing a Career in Health Administration
Careers in Health Administration: Beyond the Hospital
Career Spotlight: Nursing Home Administration
Health Administrator’s Toolbox
What to Expect from Health Administration Salary
The Health Administration Job Search
BodyA GUIDE TO CAREERS IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Exploring Growth, Salaries and Career Paths for Healthcare Administration Students and Professionals READY TO ADVANCE YOUR CAREER IN HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION? Earn your Online Master of Health Administration from the George Washington University TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction Being a Health Administrator Interview with a Healthcare Administration Professional Healthcare Administration College Degrees Healthcare Administration Job Growth Choosing a Career in Healthcare Administration Careers in Health Administration: Beyond the Hospital Career Spotlight: Nursing Home Administration Health Administrator Toolbox Health Administration Salary Healthcare Administration Job Search School Search Tool HealthCare Administration Resources: Degree Programs Online Degrees Masters Degrees Public health professionals focus on the health of individuals, families and communities. They do this by analyzing and developing healthcare programs with the goal of reaching as many people as possible. Health administration professionals work to administer, lead and manage healthcare systems, such as hospitals, hospital networks or large healthcare systems. These dedicated individuals work closely with other healthcare professionals to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. They also administer programs that teach healthy lifestyle habits and prevention of disease and illness, in the hopes of promoting a healthier overall community. This guide is designed for those who are interested in a career in health administration. What skills are necessary to make the grade? What kind of salary is typically offered to a health administrator? Where are the best places to work? What will be expected of day-to-day life on the job? We answer all these questions and more in this comprehensive, in-depth guide. Being a Health Administrator. The day-to-day work of a health administrator varies by the organization for which they work, but the essential core of the job remains the same: Health administrators are responsible for ensuring the smooth operation of a hospital, hospital system or healthcare organization. Job duties may include the following: Wide-range planning and coordination and implementation of medical and health services Deep understanding of healthcare policy and laws, as well as current and upcoming issues that require administrators to stay ahead of the curve Attending and contributing to high-level meetings with investors or governing boards Supervising assistant administrators Keeping open communication with medical staff and heads of departments Working to improve overall efficiency and financial effectiveness Paying attention to smaller details such as staff scheduling, hiring and salary issues, patient fees and billing, and even keeping records of supplies. A health administrator might work for an enormous health company or hospital system, overseeing several facilities at once. Or they might work on a smaller scale, such as managing a group of medical practices, a particular department in a hospital system, or a single medical practice. The bachelor’s degree in health administration or a closely related field is typically minimum requirement for entry level positions. However, it is important to note that those who hold a bachelor’s degree might not be qualified for higher positions, and thus their chances for advancement could be limited. A master’s degree in health administration is a more common educational path for those who wish to reach upper management, and can open doors to positions with much more responsibility. Some choose to earn their doctorate in a management-related field in order to reach for even higher levels of employment in the healthcare system. Regardless of the degree level, most employers prefer to hire someone who has a strong background of experience in administration in a healthcare setting, or those with specialized experience in one particular area of healthcare. Healthcare Administration Degrees. The US Department of labor reports a bachelor’s degree is the typical entry-level education requirement for those aspiring to work as managers in the medical and health services field. A Master of Healthcare Administration combined with additional experience is often required for promotion to more advanced positions. Healthcare administration degrees are issued starting at the two-year associate’s level. A Bachelor of Healthcare Administration (BHA) and Master of Healthcare Administration (MHA) are the most common levels of education in this field, and those credentials are offered at colleges and universities throughout the nation. Some additionally offer doctoral-level studies in healthcare administration. Common prerequisites for healthcare administration degree programs are what one might expect for a field where written and verbal communication are important for directing, planning, and coordinating the business activities of healthcare providers: Healthcare administration degrees are conveniently stackable. The knowledge from a BHA can encompass what it takes to manage an entire department or unit of a hospital. An MHA adds on to that with depth that can give professionals the tools they need to manage an entire hospital, rather than just one unit. Incremental career advancements can coincide with incremental higher degree levels, and the material in each successive degree program is cumulative. It’s a great time right now to start down the path towards a career in healthcare administration. The US Department of Labor reports that in the decade leading up to 2028, these jobs are projected to grow by 18% – much faster than average. What does your day-to-day role entail? As CEO, I need to balance priorities of our many employees and programs with the priorities and abilities of the organization as a whole. This entails one-on-one meetings, internal group meetings, meetings or conversations with local health and human services providers (hospitals, office on aging, community coalition) as well as regional and state agencies and programs. I see my role as one that should be helping the many mission-driven employees get to our shared vision by removing the obstacles in the way of that success. The days are long, the work is never done, but there are always opportunities to improve what we do to benefit those we serve. FIND SCHOOLSSponsored Content Featured Programs: Sponsored School(s) Calvin University Featured Program: Earn your Master of Public Health degree in 18 months! Request Info Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Featured Program: Our 100% online spatial analysis graduate programs are great for working professionals to build advanced skills where health, geography, statistics, and innovation meet. Request Info Purdue University-Calumet Featured Program: Earn your MPH online at a university world-renowned for its accomplished faculty and research expertise. Request Info Southern New Hampshire University Featured Program: Bachelors of Science Public Health, Master of Public Health (MPH), Master of Public Health (MPH) - Global Health Request Info Grand Canyon University Featured Program: Online BS and MS Degree Programs in Public Health, Health Administration, Health Informatics & Health Sciences. Request Info George Washington University Featured Program: GW's top-12 public health school is offering a $10k scholarship for all admitted students. With no GRE required, this CEPH-accredited program can be completed online in as few as 12 months. Join our community of policy shapers and advocates. Request Info VIEW MORE PROGRAMSFIND SCHOOLSSponsored Content Interview with a Health Administration Professional. In order to truly appreciate what a healthcare administrator does, it is important to speak with those who are already deep in the trenches. The interview below with CEO Bryan Ayars offers unique, first-person insight into the day-to-day work of a healthcare administrator. He currently runs Community Health Program, Inc., based in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Tell us a bit about your career path. How did you wind up the CEO of a network of health centers? I took a rather indirect path to my current position, starting as a volunteer on a local ambulance when I was a teenager and becoming active in various leadership positions as a way to become more involved and to understand the “how and why” of how people got sick and hurt, and how to both prevent or minimize the suffering. I went on to work as a paramedic for many years, and then went back to school to get a degree in healthcare administration, and then a master’s degree in healthcare administration, minoring in public health. From there I jumped into actual healthcare administration as the administrator of a small rural hospital struggling to survive managed care. The hospital was sold, and I became an administrator for a state department of health and human services, working closely with rural hospitals, community health centers, and other state and federal agencies to improve access to services and assure the continuation of services at the local level. After several years, I went to work for a healthcare consultant, focusing mostly on small community hospitals and health centers. The myriad experiences in healthcare lead me to where I am now. I have been the CEO of Community Health Programs, a federally qualified health center, for more than five years and have been part of the tremendous growth of the organization and witness to the enormous disruption in the healthcare industry that promises to be in flux for years to come. What drew you to health administration? I kind of fell into it, starting as a teenager, but found I really enjoyed the opportunity to have a positive influence on the lives of others, and most people in healthcare are very passionate about helping others. Healthcare Administration Careers are Growing. The healthcare system is booming, and health administration careers are keeping pace. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, those in healthcare administration can expect job growth of 18 percent from 2018 to 2028, which is much higher than the average for all occupations. Much of this growth is expected to stem from a healthcare system that will see increased demand from an aging baby boomer population, as well as technology that allows patients to live longer lives. This demand will mean more hospitals, clinics, physicians and other healthcare professionals are needed, and that means more health administrators will be called upon to make sure everything runs smoothly. Those who choose to specialize in nursing home administration might see better opportunities in the future, as an aging population places a demand on the need for those services. Another growth area for health administrators is physician office management. As medical practices become larger and more complex, someone with the skills to keep it all under control will become very valuable to those organizations. Those who choose healthcare administration careers can find work in areas other than the hospital or healthcare organization setting. These related careers show high growth rates and the potential for worthwhile employment: Human Resource Managers 7% Social and Community Service Managers 13% Training and Development Managers 8% Administrative Services Managers 7% Medical Practice Manager 18% Health Insurance Specialist 11% Specific high-growth healthcare administration careers include the following: Health Insurance Specialist These specialists work with medical records, coding and billing professionals, and insurance companies to ensure plan benefits are properly applied. They might also work with insurance companies to develop new benefit plans. Growth: 11% Salary: $40,350 Social and Community Service Managers These managers work closely with other healthcare professionals, social workers, community organizers and the like to create and coordinate programs for the betterment of communities, families and individuals. Growth: 13% Salary: $67,150 Medical Practice Manager This health administration career involves managing healthcare practices, including large medical groups or physician organizations. Growth: 18% Salary: $100,980 While health administrator job growth varies depending on specific careers, it also varies depending on location. That’s why it’s a good idea to understand the job market in a certain area before jumping into the search for a health administration position. Choosing a Career in Health Administration. Health administration jobs are as varied as the people who work in them. When deciding on a healthcare administration career path and the type of degree you should earn, there are several factors you should take into consideration, including your skills, interests, strengths, weaknesses and even your personality traits. Do you enjoy working closely with others? noyes Are you interested in a career in which you help people ?noyes Would you prefer a quieter pace versus a more lively environment ?noyes Nursing home management Responsibilities: Managing the day-to-day running of nursing homes and extended elderly care facilities. Salary: $80k Psychiatric Rehabilitation Responsibilities: Running inpatient or outpatient mental health facilities and keeping staff well-trained and ready to handle the unique situations that may happen at these types of facilities. Salary: $93k Do you want to work in a high volume, large-scale facility ?noyes Hospital management / CEO Responsibilities: Managing all aspects of running a hospital, from high level personnel to financial to areas such as surgical management and equipment. Salary: $100k Diagnostics/ Laboratory management Responsibilities: Inventory management and personnel safety; ensuring compliance with WHO standards in regard to bio-waste disposal Salary: $100k Careers in Health Administration: Beyond the Hospital. The phrase “health administration” often brings to mind a busy executive sitting behind a desk, fielding calls and going over paperwork before the board meeting behind closed doors. But in reality, that vision of what a health administrator does is definitely not the whole story. Though working in a hospital setting is quite common, there are numerous other paths a healthcare administration professional can take, and the responsibilities of each vary widely. The education and experience required for a health administration position also lends itself well to other areas of the healthcare field. Administrators could choose to move into private practice, managing large groups of physicians. They could do the same with ambulatory services, including groups of clinics. Some find work in laboratories, where the put their skills to work behind the scenes, making sure the laboratories and diagnostic areas are safe, secure and well-stocked. The same can be said for those who find their way into pharmaceutical services. Another important area for health administration is nursing homes. Though this usually takes a more specific education or experience, nursing home administration is growing rapidly, and is expected to grow even more in the coming years. Home health care is another area that needs strong candidates to oversee both the long-term and day-to-day activities of these organizations. The graph below helps illustrate how varied the careers are for healthcare administrators beyond working in a hospital. Career Spotlight: Nursing Home Administration. The golden years are likely to last much longer than they did for previous generations, thanks to exciting new medical technology that has assured we can live longer, healthier lives. In the future, there will be a greater demand for home health services, assisted living centers and nursing home care. As a result, more nursing home administrators will be needed to ensure that the population of older adults will be well-cared for in the coming years. In addition to working to manage the staff, finances and admissions at a nursing home facility, nursing home administrators are also responsible for maintaining a regular maintenance schedule of the building and facilities. Top-notch care for nursing home patients is always a consideration, so hiring and salary become a top priority as well. A nursing home administrator might work for a single facility or could run a system that has several nursing homes and assisted living facilities spread across a large regional area. In all states, nursing home administrators must be licensed; though the requirements vary, most states require the proper education, a certain amount of experience in a healthcare setting, passing an examination and completing a training program that has been approved by the state. In most states, a bachelor’s degree is required, but those who attain this position typically hold a master’s degree. Health Administrator’s Toolbox. A nurse would not start an IV line without specific training in how to do so; a surgeon would not step into the operating room without confident skill in using a scalpel. The skills needed by a hospital administrator are equally as specific and entirely necessary to make the most out of the position and include: Management skills. Healthcare administrators must be able to manage operations, budgets, staffing issues and much more. Being able to juggle all of those at once is a skill that takes time to hone, but one that is definitely worthwhile for potential employers. Being able to work closely with a variety of strong personalities and keep the peace among all of them is vitally important for anyone who is working with an organization or business, and those in the world of healthcare are not different. Peacemaking skills, the ability to listen, and being able to make decisions with the best interests of the team in mind are crucial. Detail-oriented, have strong analytical skills, and be able to sum up a situation very quickly in order to make a smart decision. Top-notch communication skills, the ability to find creative solutions and a general willingness to think outside the box. The ability to lead those who are looking to them for guidance, and motivate and inspire the team to do more for the patient, the system and each other How do these skills translate into more salary for the seasoned health administration professional? According to Payscale.com, the most important skill by far is the ability to manage operations, followed by a prowess for managing budgets and human resources. While important, people and customer service skills may don’t apply as strongly to the bottom line, perhaps because healthcare administrators rarely work with patients or consumers directly, but instead work from within the organization to ensure everything is as smooth and easy as it can be. Popular Skills for Healthcare Administrator. What to Expect from Health Administration Salary. Those who enter health administration typically have a great deal of experience in a clinical setting before moving up the ranks. For instance, many health administrators begin as nurses who moved into leadership positions, then chose to expand their work by earning a higher degree or taking advantage of openings in administration. Due to this extensive experience and higher degree status, salaries in healthcare administration tend to be above average, depending on the position. According to Payscale.com, the median income for health administrators is $65,471 per year. But that is just the beginning of the story. Pay tends to be commensurate with experience, which is why those in the later years of their career might make 52 percent more than the national average, those who have some serious experience might make 24 percent more, and those who are in the middle of their career might make 10 percent more. On the other hand, those who are just moving into an entry-level position are likely to make about 16 percent below the national average. Out of 171 votes from health administrators on Payscale.com, all rated their contentment level as “extremely satisfied.” Health administrator salaries vary widely depending on numerous factors including education level, geographical location, industry, company size, years of experience, and more. Below, the February 2015 salaries reported by Salary.com illustrate this fact: Career Median Top 10% Lowest 10% Provider Network Executive $329,936 $482,860 $217,098 Ambulatory Services Executive $235,310 $364,926 $134,635 Provider Network Director $146,360 $208,000 $87,480 Medical Health Services Manager $100,980 $189,000 $58,820 Hospice Supervisor $84,723 $106,350 $69,902 Clinic Manager $66,270 $86,686 $47,916 Home Care Case Manager $61,206 $74,834 $51,560 Outpatient Care Supervisor $57,797 $67,572 $42,438 Wellness Program Administrator $55,871 $74,631 $40,188 Discharge Coordinator $49,909 $70,977 $30,548 The Health Administration Job Search. When searching for a job in health administration, there are many routes one can take to find the best fit. Those who have been in the field for a great deal of time have likely built up a substantial network and can use that to look for promotions to better positions, but what about those who have just graduated from a health administration program? They need a bit more help in finding the right place to begin their work. FIND SCHOOLSSponsored Content Fortunately, there are many ways that a graduate can evaluate the job market and look for the right fit. In some cases, the faculty and staff of the school they just graduated from can make for great references, and might even have some networking opportunities that can help former students land a great job. Don’t underestimate the career services department, either – they are there to help graduates move into the job market and be successful in their search. There are other job resources that health administration professionals can tackle on their own. Job boards that are specifically dedicated to health careers are a good place to begin, as they list new openings on a regular basis. Another good place is a professional organization specifically for those in health administration, where job boards are filled with very specific opportunities. Those who have earned real-world experience might see the best job opportunities in healthcare administration. Those who have already worked in the world of healthcare or in management already have some experience that will make a difference to potential employers. Those who are fresh out of college with a degree in hand can start gaining that valuable experience through internships at local healthcare facilities. Preparation for the interviews with potential employers should also be a priority; now is the time to prepare a list of important skills, credentials and advantages that a person can bring to the table. Keep in mind that health administration careers can be very competitive, and experience matters a great deal. Many applicants might start out as a manager of a specific department, or work for a time as an assistant administrator. These learning experiences in the early years are very important, as they offer a hands-on understanding of how the job works, exactly what is expected, and even things to avoid during the course of a person’s career. After some time gaining this valuable experience, administration professionals can strike out on their own in the hopes of finding a job that puts their skills to a greater test. Bryan Ayars, CEO of Community Health Systems Inc, has a few strong points to share with health administration graduates looking for the best job opportunities: “Be open to the ideas and experiences of others, be prepared to learn constantly, and share the wealth of knowledge and experiences you acquire.” Any career in health administration relies heavily on the knowledge and experience gained while moving up the career ladder; embracing the changes as they come can be one of the best lessons a health administrator can learn throughout the course of their career. Resources American College of Healthcare Executives Job Center American College of Health Care Administrators Career Center Medical Group Management Association Job Seekers Career Center American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management Jobline Health Care Administrators Association Job Postings American Hospital Association Career Center Professional Association of Health Care Office Management Career Center
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Title7 Career Paths in Health Services Administration | The Chicago School
Urlhttps://www.thechicagoschool.edu/insight/career-development/7-career-paths-in-health-services-administration/
DescriptionHealth services administration is a crucial field within healthcare focused on organization and regulation. Learn about careers in the field
DateOct 28, 2020
Organic Position3
H17 Career Paths in Health Services Administration
H2What is Health Services Administration?
Academic Degrees in Health Services Administration
7 Health Services Administration Jobs
H3Director of Managed Care
Pharmaceutical Project Manager
Clinical Manager
Nursing Home Administrator
Health Information Manager
Assistant Administrator
Federal, State, or Local Health Department Professional
H2WithAnchorsWhat is Health Services Administration?
Academic Degrees in Health Services Administration
7 Health Services Administration Jobs
Body7 Career Paths in Health Services Administration Health services administration is a crucial field within healthcare focused on organization and regulation. Learn more about careers in the field. The Chicago Schoolon October 28, 2020 Last updated:December 28, 2021What is Health Services Administration? Health services administration focuses on the management – planning, directing, and coordination – of health care systems. Health services administrators handle behind-the-scenes necessities responsible for the efficient running of entire healthcare facilities, departments, or clinical areas. As a health services administrator, it is important to be highly skilled in management and organization. However, health services administrators must also have knowledge of health policy, health science, and business management to effectively manage both the human and fiscal aspects of health care facilities. Health services administrators also ensure proper implementation of new policies and set the foundation for the delivery of top-quality patient care. Academic Degrees in Health Services Administration. There is a high demand for health service administrators for entry-level, mid-level, and senior management positions. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expects the employment of medical and health services managers to grow by 32% from 2019 to 2029. With a bachelor’s degree, you may secure an entry-level health services administration job; however, a master’s in health services administration is usually a requirement for managerial and executive positions. A postgraduate degree in health services administration equips graduates with the needed interpersonal, technical, and analytical skills for success in this career field. Request info 7 Health Services Administration Jobs. Health services administration careers range across disciplines, as health service administrators can work in various professional areas, including: Clinical settings Insurance companies Public health organizations Social and community service agencies Below are seven potential careers with a degree in health services administration. Director of Managed Care. A director of managed care acts as an intermediary between managed care staff and the health care administration. This role can be based in different health care facilities such as hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and nursing homes. Furthermore, managed care directors are responsible for a variety of needs, including: Coordinating projects among various departments Handling contract negotiation and documentation Analyzing the healthcare facility’s performance and financial assets Pharmaceutical Project Manager. Pharmaceutical companies and scientists are continuously engaged in research to develop new treatments that enable patients to recover from sicknesses or manage chronic medical conditions. Pharmaceutical project managers oversee the research and development of these new drugs. Managers in this field must possess strong leadership skills to manage research teams and other staff effectively. They also handle budgets, timelines, and expectations as the development of new pharmaceutical products can be a very demanding and complicated process. Clinical Manager. A clinical manager may work in the following professional settings: Hospitals Doctor’s offices Outpatient facilities Long-term care facilities Clinical managers are responsible for ensuring the smooth running of a health care facility’s day-to-day activities by overseeing the management of clinical, professional, administrative, and clerical staff. They may also be in charge of managing the recruitment, development, and appraisal of staff, as well as setting and monitoring budgets and making purchase decisions. At the senior level, clinical managers may work for agencies that develop health care policies. Nursing Home Administrator. Nursing home administrators oversee residents and staff in a nursing home, ensuring that the residents, their health care providers, and sponsors remain satisfied with the quality of care. Administrators are responsible for providing oversight in regard to local, federal, and state regulations. Nursing home administrators also perform financial and administrative duties such as: Implementing management systems Supervising various departments through departmental heads Budgeting Contract negotiations Health Information Manager. Health information managers help health care facilities manage databases containing patients’ personal and medical data and are responsible for ensuring health data integrity and maintenance of privacy and security. Health information managers implement systems to support accurate medical data collection and documentation and ensure compliance with state and federal privacy and security laws. Health information managers also prepare and analyze clinical data for research and create processes for the improvement of operations. Assistant Administrator. An assistant administrator takes part in the oversight of a health care facility’s employees, finances, and procedures which allow the health administrator to carry out their duties efficiently. Their responsibilities include: Balancing departmental budgets Reviewing projects Managing various group practices Federal, State, or Local Health Department Professional. Health department professionals employ various methods to create and sustain the conditions that promote better health choices and produce healthier individuals across the entire community, state, or country. They are responsible for leading efforts geared toward preventing and reducing the effects of several chronic diseases. Health department professionals also play a role in preventing the spread of infectious diseases across communities. Learn more about Health Care Administration programs at The Chicago School. The Chicago School equips graduates with the relevant information and skills to handle demands at the highest level in the health services industry. Learn more about our Health Services Administration programs here or fill out the form below to request more information.   Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. Zeen is a next generation WordPress theme. It’s powerful, beautifully designed and comes with everything you need to engage your visitors and increase conversions. Press ESC to close Top
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TitleMedical and Health Services Managers : Occupational Outlook Handbook: : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Urlhttps://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
DescriptionMedical and health services managers plan, direct, and coordinate the business activities of healthcare providers
DateSep 8, 2021
Organic Position4
H1Medical and Health Services Managers
H2Summary
What Medical and Health Services Managers Do About this section
Work Environment About this section
How to Become a Medical or Health Services Manager About this section
Pay About this section
Job Outlook About this section
State & Area Data About this section
Similar Occupations About this section
Contacts for More Information About this section
What They Do
Work Environment
How to Become One
Pay
State & Area Data
Job Outlook
Similar Occupations
Contacts for More Information
2020 Median Pay
On-the-job Training
Entry-level Education
Work experience in a related occupation
Number of Jobs, 2020
Job Outlook, 2020-30
Employment Change, 2020-30
Entry-level Education
On-the-job Training
Employment Change, projected 2020-30
Growth Rate (Projected)
Projected Number of New Jobs
Projected Growth Rate
2020 Median Pay
H3What Medical and Health Services Managers Do
Work Environment
How to Become a Medical or Health Services Manager
Pay
Job Outlook
State & Area Data
Similar Occupations
More Information, Including Links to O*NET
Duties
Work Schedules
Education
Work Experience in a Related Occupation
Important Qualities
Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations
Advancement
Medical and Health Services Managers
Medical and Health Services Managers
Employment
Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)
Projections Central
CareerOneStop
O*NET
H2WithAnchorsSummary
What Medical and Health Services Managers Do About this section
Work Environment About this section
How to Become a Medical or Health Services Manager About this section
Pay About this section
Job Outlook About this section
State & Area Data About this section
Similar Occupations About this section
Contacts for More Information About this section
What They Do
Work Environment
How to Become One
Pay
State & Area Data
Job Outlook
Similar Occupations
Contacts for More Information
2020 Median Pay
On-the-job Training
Entry-level Education
Work experience in a related occupation
Number of Jobs, 2020
Job Outlook, 2020-30
Employment Change, 2020-30
Entry-level Education
On-the-job Training
Employment Change, projected 2020-30
Growth Rate (Projected)
Projected Number of New Jobs
Projected Growth Rate
2020 Median Pay
BodyMedical and Health Services Managers PRINTER-FRIENDLY Summary What They Do Work Environment How to Become One Pay Job Outlook State & Area Data Similar Occupations More Info Summary. Please enable javascript to play this video. Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmh01pXYn5I. Quick Facts: Medical and Health Services Managers 2020 Median Pay $104,280 per year $50.13 per hour Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation Less than 5 years On-the-job Training None Number of Jobs, 2020 429,800 Job Outlook, 2020-30 32% (Much faster than average) Employment Change, 2020-30 139,600 What Medical and Health Services Managers Do . Medical and health services managers plan, direct, and coordinate the business activities of healthcare providers. Work Environment. Most medical and health services managers work in offices in healthcare facilities, including hospitals and nursing homes, and group medical practices. How to Become a Medical or Health Services Manager. Most medical and health services managers have at least a bachelor’s degree before entering the field; however, master’s degrees also are common. Prospective managers typically have some work experience in an administrative or a clinical role in a hospital or other healthcare facility. Pay. The median annual wage for medical and health services managers was $104,280 in May 2020. Job Outlook . Employment of medical and health services managers is projected to grow 32 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations. About 51,800 openings for medical and health services managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. State & Area Data . Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for medical and health services managers. Similar Occupations. Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of medical and health services managers with similar occupations. More Information, Including Links to O*NET. Learn more about medical and health services managers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations. What Medical and Health Services Managers Do About this section. In group medical practices, medical and health services managers work closely with physicians. Medical and health services managers, also called healthcare executives or healthcare administrators, plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health services. They may manage an entire facility, a specific clinical area or department, or a medical practice for a group of physicians. Medical and health services managers must adapt to changes in healthcare laws, regulations, and technology. Duties. Medical and health services managers typically do the following: Improve efficiency and quality in delivering healthcare services Develop departmental goals and objectives Ensure that the facility in which they work is up to date on and compliant with laws and regulations Recruit, train, and supervise staff members Manage the finances of the facility, such as patient fees and billing Create work schedules Prepare and monitor budgets and spending to ensure departments operate within funding limits Represent the facility at investor meetings or on governing boards Keep and organize records of the facility’s services, such as the number of inpatient beds used Communicate with members of the medical staff and department heads Medical and health services managers work closely with physicians and surgeons, registered nurses, medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians, and other healthcare workers. Others may interact with patients or insurance agents. Medical and health services managers’ titles depend on the facility or area of expertise in which they work.  The following are examples of types of medical and health services managers: Nursing home administrators manage staff, admissions, finances, and care of the building, as well as care of the residents in nursing homes. All states require licensure for nursing home administrators; licensing requirements vary by state. Clinical managers oversee a specific department, such as nursing, surgery, or physical therapy, and have responsibilities based on that specialty. Clinical managers set and carry out policies, goals, and procedures for their departments; evaluate the quality of the staff’s work; and develop reports and budgets. Health information managers are responsible for the maintenance and security of all patient records and data. They must stay up to date with evolving information technology, current or proposed laws about health information systems, and trends in managing large amounts of complex data. Health information managers must ensure that databases are complete, accurate, and accessible only to authorized personnel. They also may supervise the work of medical records and health information technicians. Work Environment About this section. Some medical and health services managers oversee the activities of a number of facilities. Medical and health services managers held about 429,800 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of medical and health services managers were as follows: Hospitals; state, local, and private 33% Offices of physicians 12 Nursing and residential care facilities 10 Government 9 Outpatient care centers 7 Most medical and health services managers work in offices. Work Schedules. Most medical and health services managers work full time. Some managers work more than 40 hours per week. Work during evenings or weekends may be required in healthcare settings that are open at all hours, such as hospitals and nursing homes. Medical and health services managers may need to be on call in case of emergencies. How to Become a Medical or Health Services Manager About this section. Medical and health services managers must effectively communicate policies and procedures with other health professionals. Most medical and health services managers have at least a bachelor’s degree before entering the field. However, master’s degrees are common and sometimes preferred by employers. Educational requirements vary by facility and specific function. Education. Medical and health services managers typically need at least a bachelor's degree to enter the occupation. However, master’s degrees are common and sometimes preferred by employers. Graduate programs often last between 2 and 3 years and may include up to 1 year of supervised administrative experience in a hospital or healthcare consulting setting. Common majors for medical and health services managers include healthcare and related fields, such as health administration, nursing, or public policy and social services. Degrees that focus on both management and healthcare combine business-related courses with courses in medical terminology, hospital organization, and health information systems. For example, a degree in health administration or health information management often includes courses in health services management, accounting and budgeting, human resources administration, strategic planning, law and ethics, health economics, and health information systems. Work Experience in a Related Occupation. Many employers require prospective medical and health services managers to have some work experience in either an administrative or a clinical role in a hospital or other healthcare facility. For example, nursing home administrators usually have years of experience working as a registered nurse. Others may begin their careers as medical records and health information technicians, administrative assistants, or financial clerks within a healthcare office. Important Qualities. Analytical skills. Medical and health services managers must understand and follow current regulations and adapt to new laws. Communication skills. These managers must effectively communicate policies and procedures to other health professionals and ensure their staff’s compliance with new laws and regulations. Detail oriented. Medical and health services managers must pay attention to detail. They might be required to organize and maintain scheduling and billing information for very large facilities, such as hospitals. Interpersonal skills. Medical and health services managers discuss staffing problems and patient information with other professionals, such as physicians and health insurance representatives. Leadership skills. These managers are often responsible for finding creative solutions to staffing or other administrative problems. They must hire, train, motivate, and lead staff. Technical skills. Medical and health services managers must stay up to date with advances in healthcare technology and data analytics. For example, they may need to use coding and classification software and electronic health record (EHR) systems as their facility adopts these technologies. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations. All states require licensure for nursing home administrators; requirements vary by state. In most states, these administrators must have a bachelor’s degree, complete a state-approved training program, and pass a national licensing exam. Some states also require applicants to pass a state-specific exam; others may require applicants to have previous work experience in a healthcare facility. Some states also require licensure for administrators in assisted-living facilities. For information on specific state-by-state licensure requirements, visit the National Association of Long Term Care Administrator Boards. A license is typically not required in other areas of medical and health services management. However, some positions may require applicants to have a registered nurse or social worker license. Although certification is not required, some managers choose to become certified. Certification is available in many areas of practice. For example, the Professional Association of Health Care Office Management offers certification in medical management, the American Health Information Management Association offers health information management certification, and the American College of Health Care Administrators offers the Certified Nursing Home Administrator and Certified Assisted Living Administrator distinctions. Advancement. Medical and health services managers advance by moving into higher paying positions with more responsibility. Some health information managers, for example, can advance to become responsible for the entire hospital’s information systems. Other managers may advance to top executive positions within the organization. Advancement to top level executive positions usually requires a master’s degree. Pay About this section. Medical and Health Services Managers. Median annual wages, May 2020 Medical and health services managers $104,280 Other management occupations $95,180 Total, all occupations $41,950   Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics The median annual wage for medical and health services managers was $104,280 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $59,980, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $195,630. In May 2020, the median annual wages for medical and health services managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows: Government $116,380 Hospitals; state, local, and private 112,870 Outpatient care centers 100,690 Offices of physicians 94,240 Nursing and residential care facilities 89,880 Most medical and health services managers work full time. Some managers work more than 40 hours per week. Work during evenings or weekends may be required in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes, which are open at all hours. Medical and health services managers may need to be on call in case of emergencies. Job Outlook About this section. Medical and Health Services Managers. Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30 Medical and health services managers 32% Other management occupations 9% Total, all occupations 8%   Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Employment of medical and health services managers is projected to grow 32 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations. About 51,800 openings for medical and health services managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Employment. As the large baby-boom population ages and people remain active later in life, there should be increased demand for healthcare services. This means greater needs for physicians and other healthcare workers, medical procedures, and healthcare facilities, and therefore greater needs for managers who organize and manage medical information and healthcare staff. There should also be increased demand for nursing care facility administrators as the population grows older. Employment is projected to grow in offices of health practitioners. Many services previously provided in hospitals will shift to these settings, especially as medical technologies improve. Demand in medical group practice management is projected to grow as medical group practices become larger and more complex. In addition, widespread use of electronic health records (EHRs) will continue to create demand for managers with knowledge of health information technology (IT) and informatics systems. Medical and health services managers will be needed to organize, manage, and integrate these records across areas of the healthcare industry. Employment projections data for medical and health services managers, 2020-30 Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Medical and health services managers 11-9111 429,800 569,400 32 139,600 Get data State & Area Data About this section. Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS). The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area. Medical and health services managers Projections Central. Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved. CareerOneStop. CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code. Similar Occupations About this section. This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of medical and health services managers. Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY Administrative Services and Facilities Managers Administrative services and facilities managers plan, direct, and coordinate activities that help an organization run efficiently. Bachelor's degree $98,890 Computer and Information Systems Managers Computer and information systems managers plan, coordinate, and direct computer-related activities in an organization. Bachelor's degree $151,150 Financial Managers Financial managers create financial reports, direct investment activities, and develop plans for the long-term financial goals of their organization. Bachelor's degree $134,180 Human Resources Managers Human resources managers plan, coordinate, and direct the administrative functions of an organization. Bachelor's degree $121,220 Insurance Underwriters Insurance underwriters evaluate insurance applications and decide whether to provide insurance, and under what terms. Bachelor's degree $71,790 Medical Records and Health Information Specialists Medical records and health information specialists organize, manage, and code health information data. Postsecondary nondegree award $45,240 Social and Community Service Managers Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise programs and organizations that support public well-being. Bachelor's degree $69,600 Top Executives Top executives plan strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals. Bachelor's degree $107,680 Purchasing Managers, Buyers, and Purchasing Agents Buyers and purchasing agents buy products and services for organizations. Purchasing managers oversee the work of buyers and purchasing agents. Bachelor's degree $72,270 Contacts for More Information About this section. For more information about medical and healthcare management, visit Professional Association of Health Care Office Management American Health Information Management Association American College of Health Care Administrators For more information about academic programs in this field, visit Association of University Programs in Health Administration Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education For information about career opportunities in healthcare management, visit American College of Healthcare Executives For information about career opportunities in medical group practices and ambulatory care management, visit Medical Group Management Association For more information about licensure and training requirements for nursing home and assisted-living facility administrators, visit National Association of Long Term Care Administrator Boards O*NET. Medical and Health Services Managers Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Medical and Health Services Managers, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm (visited December 22, 2021). Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 8, 2021 What They Do. The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties. Work Environment. The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face. How to Become One. The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation. Pay. The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH. State & Area Data. The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop. Job Outlook. The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings. Similar Occupations. The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile. Contacts for More Information. The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). 2020 Median Pay. The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950. On-the-job Training. Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Entry-level Education. Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. Work experience in a related occupation. Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education. Number of Jobs, 2020. The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2020, which is the base year of the 2020-30 employment projections. Job Outlook, 2020-30. The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent. Employment Change, 2020-30. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Entry-level Education. Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. On-the-job Training. Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Employment Change, projected 2020-30. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Growth Rate (Projected). The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030. Projected Number of New Jobs. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Projected Growth Rate. The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. 2020 Median Pay. The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn PublicationsOccupational Outlook Handbook Management
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TitleWhat Can You Do With a Healthcare Administration Degree? | BestColleges
Urlhttps://www.bestcolleges.com/careers/healthcare/healthcare-administration/
DescriptionWe answer your question about earning a bachelor's degree in healthcare administration - career outlook, admissions, cost, and program information
Date
Organic Position5
H1What Can You Do With a Healthcare Administration Degree?
H2Ready to start your journey?
How Much Does a Healthcare Administrator Make?
Related Programs That Might Interest You
What Jobs Can You Get With a Healthcare Administration Degree?
How to Start Your Career in Healthcare Administration
How to Advance Your Career in Healthcare Administration
Resources for Healthcare Administration Majors
Frequently Asked Questions About Healthcare Administration
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H3Top Industries for Healthcare Administrators
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BodyWhat Can You Do With a Healthcare Administration Degree? by Staff Writers Published on September 30, 2021 Share this Article BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site. Ready to start your journey? Healthcare administration graduates typically manage medical facilities and personnel, improving overall efficiency. The demand for healthcare administrators is high. The BLS projects 18% job growth through 2028. There are many opportunities for continuing education and advancement in healthcare administration careers. Healthcare administration graduates can pursue many different career paths. Some students choose to work directly with people, while others prefer focusing on numbers and data. Selecting a concentration in healthcare administration allows students to specialize in areas such as education, informatics, operations, and health policy. Each concentration can give students a leg up when preparing for their chosen career path. Read our interview to learn what it takes to become a healthcare administrator. Pursuing an undergraduate degree in healthcare administration opens up entry-level positions, while an advanced degree can lead to career advancement into managerial and executive roles. Find the Best Online Bachelor's in Healthcare Administration Programs. Find the Best Online Master's in Healthcare Administration Programs. How Much Does a Healthcare Administrator Make? According to the BLS, medical and health services managers earn an average annual salary of more than $115,000. The most lucrative sector for these professionals — pharmaceutical and medical manufacturing — pays an average annual salary of over $204,000. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects 18% job growth for medical and health services managers between 2018 and 2028. A degree in healthcare administration provides the essential knowledge and fundamental skills needed to make the most of this rapidly growing field. The demand for medical and health service managers remains high; the BLS projects that 71,600 new positions will be created between 2018 and 2028. Median Annual Salary for Healthcare Administration Careers Job Title Entry-Level (0-12 months) Early Career (1-4 Years) Midcareer (5-9 Years) Experienced (10-19 Years) Healthcare Administrator N/A $52,440 $65,420 $71,770 Hospital Administrator $64,270 $79,950 $89,440 $89,960 Nursing Home Administrator $73,030 $84,090 $97,380 $100,300 Source: PayScale Related Programs That Might Interest You. Learn about start dates, transferring credits, availability of financial aid, and more by contacting the universities below. What Jobs Can You Get With a Healthcare Administration Degree? A degree in healthcare administration opens up career opportunities across the healthcare sector. Hospitals, medical laboratories, and physicians' offices serve as common work settings for healthcare administrators. Healthcare administrators can also find career opportunities with insurance companies, government agencies, pharmaceutical corporations, and outpatient care facilities. When beginning their job search, healthcare administration graduates should consider factors like industry, setting, location, and local population. Each of these factors can impact job availability, salary rates, and career growth. Top Industries for Healthcare Administrators. General Medical and Surgical Hospitals General medical and surgical hospitals are large organizations dedicated to providing broad care to patients, including intensive care, pregnancy care, pediatrics, and emergency care. These operations typically have many departments and include both physician and nonphysician staff. Average Salary: $124,180 Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories Medical and diagnostic labs run tests to determine diagnoses and treatment options for patients. Healthcare administrators working in these labs oversee sensitive patient information and work closely with lab technicians. Average Salary: $122,300 Physicians' Offices Physicians' offices include independent healthcare practices and can provide general or specialized care for patients. Healthcare administrators in this field manage doctors' offices, scheduling, inventory, and budgeting. Average Salary: $108,750 Nursing Care Facilities Nursing care facilities offer care for the elderly and infirm. Healthcare administrators in these facilities manage day-to-day operations, personnel issues, inventory, and patient data. Average Salary: $97,300 Outpatient Care Centers Outpatient care centers, also called ambulatory care centers, treat patients who do not need overnight observation in a medical facility. Healthcare administrators in these settings oversee scheduling, patient information, and inventory. Average Salary: $110,530 Top Locations for Healthcare Administration Jobs. Medical and health services managers tend to earn the highest salaries in the Northeast U.S. — specifically in the District of Columbia and New York. Average annual salaries in these areas are near $150,000. However, states such as Hawai'i, California, and Washington also provide high wages, indicating that this profession offers high levels of earning potential from coast to coast. State Choose Your State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Washington, D.C. West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming FL TX NM AZ AK CA NV UT CO OR WA ID HI OK MT WY ND SD NE KS MN IA MO AR LA MS AL GA SC IL WI MI IN OH TN KY NC WV VA PA NY ME VT NH RI CT NJ DE MA MD DC How to Start Your Career in Healthcare Administration. While healthcare administration is a vast field, career availability depends a lot on your level of education. The most lucrative careers in healthcare administration, like CEOs, require a master's degree or even a doctorate. Get started on your degree with our Student Guide to College Planning. What Can You Do With an Associate Degree in Healthcare Administration? Graduates with an associate degree in healthcare administration find jobs in hospitals and doctors' offices, as well as other healthcare-related industries like insurance. They manage day-to-day operations and perform administrative tasks. true Medical Office Manager Medical office managers handle administrative duties for hospitals, clinics, and doctors' offices. They oversee day-to-day operations, including scheduling, organizing paperwork and patient files, and reviewing expenses and accounts. Medical office managers must understand physician guidelines and relevant healthcare policies. Salary: $48,950 Medical Billing Manager Medical billing departments manage patient paperwork, insurance, and eligibility. Medical bill managers often handle all the paperwork for small clinics or oversee employees in a larger facility. Some employers may require a bachelor's degree for this position. Salary: $54,060 Medical Records and Health Information Technician Medical records and health information technicians oversee office records and IT duties, maintaining patient files and creating organizational structures for efficient record keeping. These professionals may also keep hospital or clinic computer systems up to date. Salary: $40,350 Sources: BLS and PayScale What Can You Do With a Bachelor's Degree in Healthcare Administration? Earning a bachelor's degree in healthcare administration is often the first step on a managerial career track. Graduates can assume administrative or management roles in medical settings like hospitals, clinics, and doctors' offices. They may also find work as consultants. true Human Resources Manager HR managers act as intermediaries between an organization and its employees. They oversee policies and procedures for personnel, which requires strong interpersonal skills and the ability to manage complaints in a professional and timely manner. Salary: $67,380 Healthcare Consultant Healthcare consultants work with healthcare organizations to conduct research, identify systemic or procedural problems, and find or create solutions. Some professionals in this field hold contract jobs, while others work full time for large organizations. Consultants must be detail oriented and have keen observation and interpersonal skills. Salary: $77,670 Medical Reimbursement Specialist Medical billing specialists work with healthcare providers to help customers schedule and process insurance claims and payments. Hospitals, doctors' offices, clinics, and emergency centers all employ billing specialists. Professionals in this field need strong communication skills and the ability to parse complex insurance policies. Salary: $50,440 Medical Health and Services Manager Medical and health services managers oversee healthcare facilities like hospitals and clinics. Their duties include accounting and budgeting, human resources management, and the development of new health programs. Professionals in this field need organizational and research skills to keep their facilities running efficiently. Salary: $67,580 Clinical Supervisor Clinical supervisors manage the day-to-day operations of medical clinics. These supervisors maintain scheduling for clinic employees, delegate tasks, enforce healthcare quality standards, and manage inventory. Clinical supervisors may also take charge of clinical records and patient reports. Salary: $58,910 Source: PayScale What Can You Do With a Master's Degree in Healthcare Administration? Many upper-level careers require a bachelor's degree and at least five years of experience, but a master's degree in healthcare administration can help graduates enter this upper tier more quickly. This degree also builds the skills necessary to succeed in challenging management positions. true Director of Managed Care A director of managed care is a liaison between managed care staff and healthcare administration in rehab centers, nursing homes, senior living centers, and hospitals. Directors of managed care coordinate between departments, keep contracts updated, and act as go-betweens for medical facilities and various governmental agencies. Salary: $118,890 Clinical Manager A clinical manager works in a medical office that provides ongoing care to patients. In small medical facilities, clinical managers oversee scheduling for day-to-day treatment strategies. In larger operations, these specialized managers may run a particular department and oversee nonphysician staff. These professionals also maintain and order equipment for their department. Salary: $70,990 Nursing Home Administrator Nursing home administrators oversee residents and staff in a nursing home. They create and implement management systems; supervise all departments; and provide oversight in regards to local, federal, and state regulations. These administrators also perform financial and administerial duties, including budgeting and contract negotiations. Salary: $90,660 Health Information Manager Health information managers maintain digital databases for medical facilities that contain vital patient information and treatment data. Their main responsibility is staying in compliance with privacy laws and ethical standards, which tend to evolve quickly. Health information managers may also lead a team of technicians who implement data collection strategies. Salary: $58,530 Practice Administrator Practice administrators oversee staffing at medical facilities, including clinics and hospitals. They are in charge of recruitment, contract negotiation, and budgeting for hiring and training. In some cases, practice managers also keep track of the advertising budget. Professionals in this field need strong communication skills and must work well under pressure. Salary: $74,000 Source: PayScale What Can You Do With a Doctorate Degree in Healthcare Administration? Graduates with doctoral degrees are experts with extensive theoretical and practical knowledge that applies directly to their work. Doctoral degree-holders can also become professors at accredited colleges and universities. true Hospital CEO Hospital chief executive officers are in charge of an entire hospital. They oversee all departments, manage staffing and budgeting, and work with donors to keep the hospital funded. CEOs must make tough decisions quickly and professionally, which requires strong interpersonal skills. Salary: $156,130 Postsecondary Professor While professors are known for giving lectures, they may also conduct their own research, oversee student research, act as advisors, and publish academic papers. Professors rely on strong research, data collection, analysis, and communication skills. Salary: $79,540 Director of Operations Directors of operations are primarily in charge of managing employees. These directors may also oversee research and development departments or manage inventory and ordering. Salary: $91,880 Sources: BLS and PayScale Discover other career paths in healthcare. How to Advance Your Career in Healthcare Administration. Healthcare administration professionals can advance their careers through advanced degrees, training programs, continuing education classes, and professional development. Membership in professional organizations like AHCAP, PAHCOM, and AAHAM give healthcare administrators access to resources and updates in the field. Healthcare Administration Certifications. Healthcare administrators benefit from earning professional certifications from organizations like the Association for Healthcare Administrative Professionals (AHCAP) and the Professional Association of Health Care Office Management (PAHCOM). ACHAP provides a certified healthcare administration professional certification that demonstrates excellence in healthcare administrative knowledge and experience, while PAHCOM provides certifications in medical management and health information technology. The American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM) also offers five professional certifications. Resources for Healthcare Administration Majors. Professional Organizations Association of University Programs in Health Administration: AUPHA serves as a resource for prospective students, current scholars, faculty members, and departmental leaders. The association maintains extensive online databases of healthcare administration programs and career opportunities. Members can also take professional certification exams in order to gain AUPHA certification. Association for Healthcare Administrative Professionals: AHCAP is one of the main certification agencies for healthcare professionals. Members also gain access to exclusive publications, career boards, and forums. The association hosts an annual networking conference and webinars to provide professional growth opportunities. American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management: AAHAM provides multiple professional certifications for leaders in healthcare administration. Members also gain access to management training, periodicals, seminars, and conferences. Health Care Administrators Association: HCAA is dedicated to members from multiple disciplines that work in healthcare administration. This organization regularly posts job and sponsorship opportunities. Members can also pursue certification if they wish to work with self-funded healthcare plans. Open Courseware Open courseware for healthcare administration professionals is a free, convenient resource. Offered in conjunction with Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology provides courses in health sciences and technology. The Harvard-MIT program incorporates undergraduate and graduate classes in topics such as principles and practices of drug development, information technology for the future of healthcare, and health information systems to improve the quality of healthcare. MIT also provides online open courseware in healthcare management. Classes include comparative health policy, engineering capacity in community-based healthcare, and business model innovations of global health in frontier markets. Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health also provides open courseware in healthcare administration-related areas. Learners can study public health, global health, and health policy while also exploring population science and health issues for aging populations. Stanford University provides open courseware in health and medicine, with additional offerings in business and management. Classes applicable to healthcare administration careers include health across the gender spectrum and disaster medicine training. The University of California, Berkeley offers open courseware in academic and science writing and solving public policy problems, while open educational resources provided by the University of Michigan cover topics like public policy and public health, nursing, and pharmaceutical science. Publications Journal of Hospital Administration: JHA is an international, open-access publication for healthcare management specialists. Dedicated to publishing articles related to managing research and practice in all branches of hospital administration, JHA puts out four volumes each year. Covered topics include clinical department management, health policy, and nursing management. Journal of Healthcare Management: An official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), JHM offers a forum for the discussion of issues and trends facing healthcare today. Published quarterly, JHM provides information that can help healthcare managers make strategic decisions and handle complex healthcare issues. International Journal of Health Planning and Management: With an emphasis on policy and implementation, this journal also publishes articles on topics related to developing effective health systems and services around the world. Thejournal is interdisciplinary and international in scope, embracing content that addresses how health planning and management relate to social, economic, and cultural development. Frontiers of Health Services Management: Published by ACHE, Frontiers functions as a "bookazine." Structured in a magazine format, Frontiers offers information normally found in books, albeit in a shortened form. Each issue focuses on one aspect of healthcare management, providing an overview of the topic before diving into debates, discussion, and expert opinions. Frontiers publishes four issues each year. Journal of Healthcare Risk Management: Published by the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association, this journal focuses on topics related to evidence-based healthcare risk management. Articles address areas including clinical risk management, risk management tools and techniques, quality improvement, and risk financing. Frequently Asked Questions About Healthcare Administration. Is a degree in healthcare administration worth it? A degree in healthcare administration builds knowledge and skills in medical, business, and managerial topics. Graduates can pursue careers in hospitals, private physicians' offices, or short-term and long-term patient care facilities. A degree in healthcare administration also opens up opportunities to work in research settings, within government agencies, or with insurance companies. How do I start a career in healthcare administration? Earning a bachelor's degree in healthcare administration is a common pathway to enter a career in the field. Professionals with a background in medicine or business may also have insight into healthcare administration, facilitating entry into the profession. Starting a career in healthcare administration requires strong communication, interpersonal, and critical thinking skills. What kind of jobs can you get with a healthcare administration degree? With a degree in healthcare administration, learners can work as hospital administrators, healthcare office managers, or insurance compliance managers. A healthcare administration degree can also lead to jobs at nursing homes, outpatient care facilities, and community health agencies. How much do entry-level healthcare administrators make? Wages vary by location. However, according to PayScale, the average salary for an entry-level healthcare administrator is about $52,000. Is healthcare administration a stressful job? A career in healthcare administration requires strong organizational and critical thinking skills. Healthcare administration careers offer an opportunity to provide quality healthcare and improve the lives of patients, which can sometimes be stressful. Healthcare administrators take on duties related to facilities management, finance, and organizational development. The class action lawsuit alleges that some of these schools did not admit students on a fully need-blind basis, which was required by law. Online certificate in sonography programs can offer a pathway to a lucrative career. Learn more about the best certificate programs in sonography. Kinesiology studies the mechanics of human movement and how exercise, stress reduction, and mobility can impact overall health and well-being. A bachelor's degree in kinesiology prepares students to work as exercise physiologists, athletic trainers, and recreational therapists. A bachelor's in kinesiology (sometimes called an exercise science program) typically takes 3-4 years to complete. Degree programs […] BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site. Compare your school options. View the most relevant school for your interests and compare them by tuition, programs, acceptance rate, and other factors important to find your college home.
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Result 11
TitleHealth Care Administration Careers: A Complete Guide
Urlhttps://www.columbiasouthern.edu/blog/june-2019/health-care-administration-careers
Description
DateJun 24, 2019
Organic Position6
H1Health Care Administration Careers: A Complete Guide
H21. Hospital Administration and Management
2. Medical Staff Directors
3. Financial Management
4. Ambulatory Care
5. Community Health Centers
6. Medical Coding and Billing
7. Database Administrator
8. Senior Care Staff
9. Patient Advocates
10. Emergency Preparedness Administrator
11. Quality Assurance Manager
12. Marketing and Communications
13. Telehealth Program Managers
Conclusion
Emergency Management: Career Outlook and Job Opportunities
Thank you for your interest
H3
H2WithAnchors1. Hospital Administration and Management
2. Medical Staff Directors
3. Financial Management
4. Ambulatory Care
5. Community Health Centers
6. Medical Coding and Billing
7. Database Administrator
8. Senior Care Staff
9. Patient Advocates
10. Emergency Preparedness Administrator
11. Quality Assurance Manager
12. Marketing and Communications
13. Telehealth Program Managers
Conclusion
Emergency Management: Career Outlook and Job Opportunities
Thank you for your interest
BodyHealth Care Administration Careers: A Complete Guide Category: Careers Arrow Share this article Posted on June 24, 2019 The health care field is a broad industry, and it’s growing larger by the day. In addition to medical professionals, hospitals and other organizations require skilled employees in many other areas. Focusing on specific areas of health care administration is an excellent way to develop desirable skills and potentially earn more income. Attention to detail, business acumen, confidentiality and communication skills are helpful when it comes to decision making and strategic thinking. Additionally, public speaking skills are valuable for a health care administrator asked to represent a company in public settings. Health care administration is a worthwhile career choice, and we’ve compiled 13 of the best career options below: 1. Hospital Administration and Management. Hospital administrators strategize and create long-term plans for the operations of hospitals or clinics. As the health care industry evolves, so do the roles of hospital administrators, which include positions like chief executive officer, chief financial officer, chief medical or nursing officer, and chief information officer. Health care administration also encompasses leadership roles in patient care, quality assurance, legal, communication and public health, among others. Together, these administrative teams ensure that hospitals function efficiently and safely and are prepared to meet future challenges. Although specific job duties within hospital administration and management vary, leaders can expect to be responsible for the development and implementation of programs and policies related to all aspects of the hospital’s day-to-day operations, as well as controlling and coordinating services in line with relevant regulations and best practices. Hospital managers also typically manage teams and are responsible for department budgets. It’s a demanding role that often requires working irregular hours and a great deal of ongoing learning to keep up with ever-changing regulations and expectations, but there are plenty of opportunities for experienced administrators. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for hospital administrators was $108,730 in May 2018. 2. Medical Staff Directors. While hospital administrators focus on the overall operations of a medical center, medical staff directors are devoted to ensuring compliance with bylaws, rules and regulations in terms of the hiring and onboarding of medical staff. Also known as medical staff credentialing directors, this role involves verifying the experience and credentials of new medical providers, ensuring they comply with all federal, state and local regulations, industry standards, and organizational policies. Medical staff directors also ensure that all employees comply with regulatory and accreditation agency requirements in daily operations, and they implement changes as needed and evaluate practice performance. This typically involves coordinating peer reviews, proctoring and other competency assessment activities, and preparing and maintaining credentialing packets for new physicians and other privileged providers. According to Salary.com, the average annual salary for medical staff directors was $75,652 as of October 30, 2019. 3. Financial Management. Financial managers in health care administration are responsible for their organization’s overall financial health. Although general accounting and finance principles apply to health care just as they do other industries, there are some unique challenges to effective financial management faced by hospitals and other health care organizations. Dealing with reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid and insurance companies, fluctuating patient loads, demands for cost transparency, and ever-changing regulations all require specialized financial management skills. Financial management opportunities in health care range from CFO roles down through billing and collection specialists, all of which are focused on the efficient management of the facility and finding ways to continue to keep costs in check while delivering quality care. The median annual wage for financial managers across all industries was $127,990 in May 2018 according to the BLS. 4. Ambulatory Care. From outpatient clinics and surgery centers, to urgent care and small-provider practices, ambulatory care directors oversee the day-to-day operations, developing and implementing standards and guidelines for the services and programs. Often considered part of a hospital’s leadership team, ambulatory care directors develop budgets, oversee subordinate leaders and reams, and contribute to strategic planning and decision-making from the perspective of the ambulatory services department. The average annual salary for ambulatory services directors was $135,677 as of October 30, 2019 according to Salary.com. 5. Community Health Centers. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, the number of community health centers has grown to more than 1,400 centers nationwide. These centers fill a major gap in the health care delivery system, offering access to comprehensive primary and preventive care services to traditionally underserved communities. Managers at community health centers ensure the efficient delivery of medical services, education on healthy living, access to healthy foods, and assistance for accessing necessary services. Health center managers oversee day-to-day operations, oversee budgeting and fiscal management, supervise staff, and build relationships with community organizations, among other responsibilities. According to Salary.com, the average salary for community health directors was $133,918 as of October 30, 2019. 6. Medical Coding and Billing. Medical coding and billing managers play an integral role in any health care organization, ensuring that the facility and providers are paid for their services and that patients and insurers receive accurate bills. While their primary responsibility is to oversee the team of medical billing and coding specialists, these individuals also work closely with payers to negotiate contracts, provide training and updates to policies and procedures, handle billing disputes and claim denials, and ensure that all accounts are balanced. Because this field requires performing complex coding and billing procedures, specialized education and training is a must. The BLS reported median annual wages for medical records and health information technicians as $40,350 in May 2018. 7. Database Administrator. If you want to combine your love of technology with a career in health care administration, becoming a database administrator – sometimes referred to as a DBA – may be the right option for you. Database administrators organize and store data, and they oversee everything involved in database development, storage, security and retrieval. In the realm of health care, database administrators manage patient information, billing and other key databases used in the delivery and management of patient care. They configure, install, test, monitor and troubleshoot health care facility database systems, ensuring that they are secure and functional. DBAs often work closely with other information technology professionals and system architects to create an efficient network that meets everyone’s needs and ensures the flow of information. The median annual salary for database administrators was $90,070 in May 2018 according to the BLS. 8. Senior Care Staff. An aging population means that more people are seeking senior care, from home health care to assisted living to full-time nursing care. With this increased demand comes a wealth of new opportunities within geriatric care and health care administration, all with an eye toward supporting the mental, physical and emotional health of aging patients. Administrators in eldercare living environments oversee the day-to-day operations of the facilities, communicate with families and patients, and manage financial operations. Long-term care administrators are typically more focused on staffing and managing the care providers in a long-term care facility. For those who want more hands-on patient interaction, consider roles in nursing home admissions or patient advocacy; those professionals are focused on helping patients and families transition into a care environment and coordinating all of the moving parts that come with that. The average annual salary for senior living care coordinators was $57,700 as of October 30, 2019 according to Salary.com. 9. Patient Advocates. Today’s health care system is complex, and bringing together all of the disparate elements can be challenging for patients and their families. Care coordinators and patient advocates help patients and their families navigate all aspects of care, including, but not limited to: Facilitating with care transitions, such as moving from the hospital to a rehabilitation facility. Responding to complaints and grievances from patients or their families and following up on opportunities for improvement. Serving as a liaison between patients, providers and other organizational departments. Patient advocates ensure that every patient gets the appropriate level of care. They also ensure that patients have access to the services they need, both while they are in the hospital and after discharge. These roles are ideal for people with excellent communication and organizational skill who want to put their management experience to work in a direct patient care role. According to Salary.com, the average salary for patient advocates was $61,858 as of October 30, 2019. 10. Emergency Preparedness Administrator. Preparing to respond to emergencies requires coordination among multiple agencies, including police, fire, EMS and hospitals. Within the last few decades, more hospitals and health care systems have added emergency preparedness administrators to their leadership teams to help develop the health care response plans for emergencies. In addition to ensuring that the facility and its staff are ready to respond to both natural and manmade emergencies, emergency preparedness administrators develop and deliver emergency preparedness training opportunities to the public, first responders, and other stakeholder groups, ensuring that emergency response is coordinated and effective. The median annual wage for hospital emergency management directors was $84,040 in May 2018 according to the BLS. 11. Quality Assurance Manager. Quality care is a major priority in health care, especially when financial reimbursements are tied to patient outcomes and the effectiveness of care. To ensure that patients receive the highest level of care, health care leadership teams include quality assurance managers who make sure that technology, care and medical advisement provided to patients meets and exceeds standards. The role is typically filled by a registered nurse or other provider with experience in administration. These professionals focus on implementing and monitoring quality assurance and compliance initiatives, track regulatory changes to ensure policies are compliant, and make strategic plans for consistent quality improvement. The average salary for health care quality assurance managers was $99,897 as of October 30, 2019 according to Salary.com. 12. Marketing and Communications. Communication within the health care field involves developing and delivering messages to both internal and external stakeholders, while also managing the facility’s reputation and ensuring compliance with key regulations like HIPAA. Marketing and communications leaders are charged with creating an overall strategic plan for corporate communication, including developing and maintaining branding standards and communication policies, as well as serving as spokespeople for the organization. In addition to overseeing in-house communication initiatives, they also help build awareness of hospital services and policies to the public. This might include sharing information about day-to-day operations – such as where to park when visiting the hospital – to coordinating public health initiatives. Public engagement is important to this role, whether via social media or in-person meetings. Health care communication leaders are typically always on call and are vital members of the team during emergency situations. Still, for those interested in a fast-paced, multi-faceted role that combines aspects of marketing, public relations, journalism and corporate communications, health care communication is an option worth pursuing. According to PayScale in November 2019, the average salary in health care marketing communications was $61,000. 13. Telehealth Program Managers. With more care, education and support being delivered virtually using video conferencing, digital medical devices and social networking platforms, there’s an increased need for individuals who understand the technical and operational aspects of providing this type of health care. Telehealth program managers work closely with information systems leaders and clinical staff to: Create operational policies and processes to guide the delivery of care. Facilitate communication and partnerships between clinical staff at multiple sites. Provide support and education of patients in a non-face-to-face environment. Select and set up equipment. The average salary for health care information technology professionals was $79,000 according to PayScale in November 2019. Conclusion. Health care organizations are some of the largest and most complex in the world; therefore, the different varieties of administration careers available in the field are growing, both for seasoned workers and those starting their careers. Knowing what to expect about careers and workplace environments in health care administration can give you an advantage over other applicants. Whether you pursue one the options listed here or one of the many career paths in public health, your education is a critical component. For more information about online health care administration degree programs from Columbia Southern University, visit ColumbiaSouthern.edu. Columbia Southern University does not guarantee that students or those who pursue these careers will earn the specific salaries listed. Topics in This Article Business Careers Health Care Administration Related Articles Category: Careers Arrow Emergency Management: Career Outlook and Job Opportunities . Published on August 19, 2019 Bottom Angle Request More Information Ready for more information about Columbia Southern University? Fill out the form here to be connected with an admissions counselor and learn more about: Online degree programs. Transfer credits. Enrollment options. Tuition and payment. Thank you for your interest. Your information has been sent and we will contact you soon.
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Result 12
TitleHealthcare Administration Career Path - Administration Jobs
Urlhttps://administrationjobs.com/career-advice/healthcare-administration-career-path/
DescriptionHealthcare Administration Careers - A discussion of career path and estimated earning potential. Includes overview of entry level healthcare administration positions
Date
Organic Position7
H1Healthcare Administration Career Path
H2
H3Earning Potential
Salary Benchmarks
H2WithAnchors
BodyHealthcare Administration Career Path Your first Healthcare Administration job will depend on your level of education and experience. People early in Healthcare Administration careers often start out in associate staff positions in larger organizations, but may obtain higher-level positions in some smaller organizations. People typically enter a career in Healthcare Administration by one of two paths: either they have just completed an associate’s degree or higher level program and have little to no on-the-job experience, or they began working in a related field and have sufficient career experience to move into a Healthcare Administration position. Entry-level Healthcare Administration jobs include assistant administrative positions such as operating assistants, marketing assistants, insurance company representatives, and accountants. Graduates of healthcare management programs may obtain jobs as managers and supervisors in smaller organizations, such as physician offices, clinics, and public health or human service agencies. Healthcare Administrators at this level can expect to earn average annual salaries of around $30,000 to $40,000, although applicants with related work experience may command higher salaries. Healthcare Administration jobs at the middle management level include department managers, case managers, marketing directors, and contract negotiators. The average annual salary for positions at this level typically ranges from $50,000 to $80, 000. It will generally take about ten years for Healthcare Administration managers to become senior-level managers and executives. Positions at this level include department vice presidents, senior vice presidents, chief financial officers, chief operating officers, and chief executive officers. Annual salaries at this level range from $100,000 to $200,000 or more, and often include bonuses and stock options. You can definitely expect to earn your salary, however, as Healthcare Administration executives often work 60 or more hours per week.   Earning Potential. Healthcare Administration jobs are typically spread across three tiers: entry-level positions, middle management positions, and executive-level positions. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median income for Medical and Health Services Managers was $76,990 in 2007. On average, Healthcare Administrators who work in hospitals earn the highest salaries, while those who work for home health care agencies earn the lowest. In 2006, the median annual earnings for managers in home health care facilities was $66,720, while the median annual earnings for managers in hospitals was $78,660.   Salary Benchmarks. Healthcare Administrator Salary | More details for Healthcare Administration Careers   Stay Connected. Facebook Twitter Linkedin For Job Seekers. Career Advice Benefits Administration Jobs Business Administration Jobs For Employeers. Administration Assistant Job Requirements Administration Assistant Career Path Administration Assistant Careers © Copyright AdministrationJobs.com Privacy Policy About Us Contact Us Terms & Conditions HomeEmployersJob SeekersCareer AdviceJob Seeker LoginEmployer Login We use cookies to improve and personalize your experience. By using this site, you consent to the use of cookies.Ok
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Result 13
TitleHow to Become a Healthcare Administrator and Job Duties
Urlhttps://www.publichealthdegrees.org/careers/healthcare-administrator/
DescriptionWhat does a healthcare administrator do? What are their primary job responsibilities? Check this guide on how to become a healthcare administrator and what your job duties will include
Date
Organic Position8
H1How to Become a Healthcare Administrator
H2What Is Healthcare Administration?
What Does a Healthcare Administrator Do?
5 Steps to Become a Healthcare Administrator
Work Settings for Healthcare Administrators
H3Essential Skills for Healthcare Administrators
Step 1. Obtain a Bachelor’s Degree in a Required Field
Step 2. Gain Work Experience in Healthcare Administration
Step 3. Consider an MHA Program
Step 4. Earn Industry Certifications
Step 5. Pursue a Job in Healthcare Administration
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Healthcare Administration?
What Does a Healthcare Administrator Do?
5 Steps to Become a Healthcare Administrator
Work Settings for Healthcare Administrators
BodyHow to Become a Healthcare Administrator Healthcare is growing at a faster rate than most industries. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates that healthcare employment will grow 16% from 2020 to 2030, creating about 2.4 million new jobs. A portion of these new jobs will be healthcare administration roles. Scroll to 5 Steps to Become a Healthcare Administrator Sponsored George Washington University Earn your Master’s in Health Administration in as few as 24 monthsGRE not required • 50 credits • Live classes Request info from [email protected] What Is Healthcare Administration? To become a healthcare administrator, first you need to understand what healthcare administration is. A healthcare administrator is involved with the daily operations of a medical facility, particularly staffing, efficiency and finance. If you pursue the career path in healthcare administration, you could work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, nursing homes and outpatient clinics. The BLS categorizes healthcare administrators under “Medical and Health Services Managers,” with a median salary of $104,280 for May 2020. The role of a healthcare administrator is challenging but rewarding. The BLS expects the medical and health services managers field to grow 32% from 2020 to 2030. That means there will be plenty of opportunities for candidates who have the right educational background and clinical experience. What Does a Healthcare Administrator Do? Healthcare administrators keep medical facilities running smoothly by managing the day-to-day operations and planning future improvements. Depending on your role, job description of healthcare administrators can vary but may include: Coordinating staff schedulesOverseeing hiring and salariesImproving efficiencyManaging finances and budgetMaintaining health recordsAddressing the needs of doctors, nurses and other staff membersEnsuring the facility is following healthcare laws and regulations Not all of these duties will apply to every position. For example, those healthcare administrators working in the government usually focus on health policy and won’t have a lot of these administrative duties. You may also move into a higher position at a facility and take on greater responsibilities, like shaping programming for the entire organization. A master’s in healthcare administration (MHA) degree may lead to a variety of roles, such as chief executive officer (CEO), department director or operations manager. You can choose to focus on a particular area through coursework, internships, clinical experience and certifications. Think of an MHA as the starting point for your career goals; you have the freedom to shape your path. Essential Skills for Healthcare Administrators. Healthcare administrators must complete a wide variety of tasks. They need to be detail-oriented yet also look at the bigger picture. Here are the essential healthcare administration skills you need to succeed at this role: Knowledge of healthcare laws and regulationsLeadership skillsTechnological proficiencyProblem-solving abilitiesCommunication skillsAdaptabilityBusiness expertise 5 Steps to Become a Healthcare Administrator. These steps may help individuals create a new career path and become a healthcare administrator. Step 1. Obtain a Bachelor’s Degree in a Required Field. First, earn a bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration or a related field, such as public health, business or a clinical discipline. Your undergraduate coursework should include a mix of healthcare and business courses to prepare you for your job duties. Sponsored Simmons University Women with 45+ prior college credits or an associate degree:Complete your bachelor’s degree in a supportive women’s online public health BS program. Up to 96 transfer credits accepted • Live, online courses & self-paced course work Learn more about [email protected] Step 2. Gain Work Experience in Healthcare Administration. Before pursuing a higher level of education, it is beneficial to gain real-world experience. Some MHA programs, either on-campus or online MHA programs, may require up to three years of work experience. Other programs may prefer applicants who are currently working in the field. Not all master’s programs require work experience, but having some will help you stand out in a competitive program. You could complete an internship, apply for an entry-level job or work part time while completing your bachelor’s degree. While direct healthcare administration experience is ideal, you may also get applicable experience in a different but related role. For instance, you might work for a hospital’s human resources department or coordinate billing at a physician’s office. Step 3. Consider an MHA Program. For many candidates, the next step is to earn a master of health administration (MHA). Most higher-level positions require a graduate degree, so earning your MHA is vital for career advancement.  When selecting a program, look for a certification from the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME). This indicates that the program will adequately prepare you for a future career in the healthcare management industry. CAHME is the only certifying organization in the healthcare management education industry that is recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation.  When you choose a CAHME-accredited MHA program, you know that the program meets rigorous academic standards and provides up-to-date information. Likewise, employers know that graduates from an accredited program are well-prepared for the healthcare administrator role. Also consider whether you should attend an on-campus program or complete your degree online. There are many benefits to an online master’s in healthcare administration program, including flexibility and a wider variety of choices. You are not limited to schools in your geographic area and are free to choose the program with the best curriculum and reputation. Sponsored George Washington University Earn your Master’s in Health Administration in as few as 24 monthsGRE not required • 50 credits • Live classes Request info from [email protected] Step 4. Earn Industry Certifications. Earning an industry certification may help you further advance your career or improve your job prospects. There are many healthcare administration certifications available, including: Certified Healthcare Administrative Professional (CHAP) certification from the Association for Healthcare Administrative Professionals Executive Certification (CRCE) and Professional Certification (CRCP) certification from the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM)Certified Healthcare Financial Professional (CFHP) certification from the Healthcare Financial Management AssociationCertified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ) certification from the National Association for Healthcare Quality Requirements for earning a certification vary but may include education, work experience in the healthcare administration industry and membership in the certifying organization. Most certifications require you to pass an exam. According to AAHAM, getting certified can increase your earning potential, provide opportunities for career advancement and expand your skills through continuing education. Step 5. Pursue a Job in Healthcare Administration. Once you’ve completed your bachelor’s and master’s degrees, gained valuable work experience and earned relevant certifications, you’re ready to start searching for a job in the healthcare administration field. It’s helpful to narrow down your search to a particular area, like government, hospitals, outpatient clinics or nursing homes. You must decide what work environment aligns best with your career goals and other requirements, such as salary and hours.  Work Settings for Healthcare Administrators. Where do healthcare administrators work? Healthcare administrators are needed in virtually every type of medical facility. However, some settings have advantages over others. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, healthcare administrators working in the government or hospitals earned the highest median salary in 2020 ($116,380 and $112,870, respectively). Workload may be higher in a hospital, nursing home or other facility that is open 24 hours. If you are looking for greater work-life balance, you may prefer an outpatient setting with regular hours. Regardless of where you work, you may need to be on call in case of emergencies. Is healthcare administration a good career choice? Healthcare administration is a rewarding job as explained above. If you pursue this career path, you will perform a vital function for your community by keeping one or more medical facilities running smoothly. Healthcare administrators also have a variety of choices when it comes to work settings since they have the ability to work at different organizations, big and small. Do I have to earn a master’s degree to become a healthcare administrator? While some entry-level jobs only require a bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration, many advanced positions require a master’s degree. Plus, there are topics and skills that you may learn from an MHA program that you may not have learned while getting a bachelor’s degree. For example, how to use statistical and economic analysis to better your organization or gaining knowledge in medical law and pharmaceutical policy. Can I become a healthcare administrator with an MPH degree? A master’s in public health (MPH) is distinct from a master’s in healthcare administration. Either on-campus or online MPH programs focus on community health and epidemiology; most graduates end up working with specific populations to educate them on health. An MHA is recommended for those who want to become a healthcare administrator. You may also earn an MBA in healthcare management, but the difference between MHA and MBA is that an MBA focuses more on business principles than healthcare. How long does it take to become a healthcare administrator? It takes between six and eight years to become a healthcare administrator. You must first earn a bachelor’s degree (four years), and it is highly recommended that you complete a master’s program. Earning your master’s degree takes two to four years, depending on whether you take classes full or part time.  Healthcare Administrator vs. Medical and Health Services Manager Many people believe healthcare administrators and health services managers are the same role, but there are key differences between the two. According to a Florida Tech blog article on the differences and similarities of healthcare management versus healthcare administration, health services managers run the business side of a healthcare operation, while healthcare administrators focus on staffing and healthcare regulations. Information updated as of October 2021 Sponsored George Washington University Earn your Master’s in Health Administration in as few as 24 monthsGRE not required • 50 credits • Live classes Request info from [email protected]
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Result 14
TitleHealth Administrator | explorehealthcareers.org
Urlhttps://explorehealthcareers.org/career/health-administration-management/health-administrator/
DescriptionHealth administrators, also known as health services managers and health care managers, direct the operation of hospitals, health systems and organizations
Date
Organic Position9
H1
H2Working Conditions
Academic Requirements
Resources
H3Salary Range and Outlook
Learn More About a Career as a Health Administrator
H2WithAnchorsWorking Conditions
Academic Requirements
Resources
BodyMake Caring Your Career Sign Up Homepage Careers Health Administration/Management Health Administrator Health Administrator Average Salary $50k - 170k Years Higher Education 4 - 6 Job Outlook Excellent Health care administrators, also known as health services managers and health care managers, direct the operation of hospitals, health systems and other types of organizations. They have responsibility for facilities, services, programs, staff, budgets, relations with other organizations and other management functions, depending on the type and size of the organization. Unlike clinicians, health administrators or managers do not deal directly with patients on a day-to-day basis. Instead, they help to shape policy, make needed changes and lead our nation’s health-related organizations in a way that serves individual patients by helping to improve the health care system. An estimated 300,000 people serve in health administration, from middle management to CEO positions. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment in this career will grow 17% between 2014 and 2024, much faster than average. You can find administrator/managers in hospitals, physician group practices, nursing homes and home health agencies. They also work in the public sector, for example in health departments, or in the private sector, such as with pharmaceutical companies, health insurance providers, consulting firms or companies that make medical supplies and equipment. Some help to shape health care policy by pursuing careers with local, state or federal agencies (such as the Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) or health-related national associations, such as the Red Cross or the American Hospital Association. Careers in this field require professionalism and leadership skills, in-depth knowledge of health care delivery and financial structure, an understanding of medical language and how patient care organizations are structured and operate. Recent graduates can find entry-level jobs in either line management, such as director of admissions or marketing or vice president of human resources, or in staff positions, like managed care analyst, risk management analyst or sales consultant. Opportunities are available across the country, in large cities as well as in small rural communities. Working Conditions | Academic Requirements | ResourcesWorking Conditions. Most health administrators work 40 hours a week, though there may be times that longer hours are necessary. Since the facilities they manage (nursing homes, hospitals, clinics, etc.) operate around the clock, a manager may be called at all hours to deal with issues. Some travel may also be involved, since managers may need to inspect satellite facilities, attend meetings, etc. Salary Range and Outlook. The median salary (half of all salaries fall above this number and half below) for medical and health services managers as reported by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics was $94,500 in May 2015. Salaries will vary according to type of organization, location and experience, among other factors. Generally, health care administrators work in offices. Most work full-time and some are called upon to work more than 40 hours a week. Depending on the position and organization, health care administrators may need to be on call in the evenings and weekends in case of emergencies. Academic Requirements. Degrees in health management/administration are available at the baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels: An undergraduate program provides the basic knowledge, skills and applied studies needed for entry-level positions. Some students may also get an undergraduate degree to qualify to apply to a graduate program. Graduate programs offer students a lot of flexibility, from a master’s degree in health administration, health management, or public health, degrees in business with course concentration in health services management or joint degrees–a master’s degree in both business administration and public health, for example. You can search for a certified undergraduate program on the Association of University Programs in Health Adminstration’s website. You can search for an accredited program on the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education’s website. College graduates can apply for a graduate program, no matter what their undergraduate degree is in, from health care management and business, to biology, sociology, policy, public health, government, social work or allied health professions. Some coursework in economics and statistics is helpful, but not generally a requirement. The Health Administration, Management and Policy Centralized Application Service is a centralized application service designed for students applying to graduate programs in health administration, health care management and health policy. Programs generally last two years and include coursework in health care policy and law, marketing, organizational behavior, health care financing, human resources, and other health care management topics. This program may also include a supervised internship, residency, or fellowship. Health care practitioners may also opt to get an undergraduate or graduate degree in health management/administration in order to prepare for leadership positions within their clinical specialty. Medical and health services managers must be familiar with management principles and practices. A master’s degree in health services administration, long-term care administration, health sciences, public health, public administration or business administration is the standard credential for most generalist positions in this field. However, a bachelor’s degree is adequate for some entry-level positions in smaller facilities, at the departmental level within health care organizations and in health information management. Learn More About a Career as a Health Administrator. Read a brochure (PDF) that describes seven reasons to pursue a career in health care management. Learn more about the career and the education required to pursue it. Watch a video profile of medical and health services managers (in the Business and Administration section). Resources. American College of Healthcare ExecutivesAmerican Public Health AssociationAssociation of University Programs in Health AdministrationAmerican Hospital AssociationCommission on Accreditation Healthcare Management EducationThe Association of University Programs in Health Administration has reviewed this profile. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. OkLearn More
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TitleWhat I Wish I Had Known Before Starting a Healthcare Administration Career | Rasmussen University
Urlhttps://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/health-sciences/blog/healthcare-administration-career/
DescriptionIf you’re considering a healthcare administration career, there’s a lot you can learn from those who are already established in the field. Check out this firsthand advice and insight from seasoned healthcare administrators
DateAug 5, 2019
Organic Position10
H1What I Wish I Had Known Before Starting a Healthcare Administration Career
H29 Things you should know before starting a healthcare administration career
Launch your healthcare administration career with confidence
What Is a Practice Manager? An Expert Look at this Healthcare Management Career
Is Earning a Healthcare Administration Master's Degree Worth It?
Healthcare Management vs. Healthcare Administration: Choosing Your Professional Path
I Want to Work in Hospital Management… Now What?
H31. There are a large number of regulations and policies to adhere to
2. This field has diverse opportunities
3. Getting into “T-shape” will help
4. You’ll benefit from building relationships
5. Change can be slow
6. A senior mentor can make a huge difference
7. Internal politics can be tricky to navigate
8. Mistakes will happen and plans will falter
9. Your desire to learn is an asset—treat it that way
Will Erstad
H2WithAnchors9 Things you should know before starting a healthcare administration career
Launch your healthcare administration career with confidence
What Is a Practice Manager? An Expert Look at this Healthcare Management Career
Is Earning a Healthcare Administration Master's Degree Worth It?
Healthcare Management vs. Healthcare Administration: Choosing Your Professional Path
I Want to Work in Hospital Management… Now What?
BodyWhat I Wish I Had Known Before Starting a Healthcare Administration Career By Will Erstad on 08/05/2019   Flubbed introductions, missed opportunities, silly mistakes—we can all think of a time or two where 20/20 hindsight could have saved us some trouble. While the foul-ups of our past aren’t going anywhere, the beauty of these situations is that they provide an opportunity to learn and grow. And what’s even better than waiting to learn from your own experience? Having the opportunity to learn from those who’ve already walked the walk. This gives you the luxury of gathering the insight without having to learn the lessons the hard way—like they did. If you’re sizing up a healthcare administration career, there’s a lot you can learn from those who are already established in the field. That’s why we asked experienced healthcare administrators to offer up their thoughts on what surprised them about the field and their advice for those getting started in the field. 9 Things you should know before starting a healthcare administration career. Want a sneak peek at the road ahead of you? Here’s what healthcare administrators say they wish they’d known back when they started their careers. 1. There are a large number of regulations and policies to adhere to. While it’s probably not a surprise that the organizations with the power to make life-and-death decisions on a daily basis have some strict rules governing them, you may be caught off guard by their complexity when first starting out. Albert Ho, consultant and founder of Healthcare Heroes, says he was surprised by the number of policies and procedures required to run a hospital. “It is a maze of policies with sometimes opposing recommendations,” Ho explains. As an example, Ho cites a facility’s ban on personal glucose testing devices despite some patients requiring glucose testing up to three times a day. While it may seem contradictory at face value, it takes considering the reasoning behind a policy to understand whether or not it should change. In this case, unknown calibration or improper storage of these devices could lead to errors that could harm patients. “Our staff need to have reliable information to provide care,” Ho says. Policy examples like this may frustrate those who prefer a field where rapid change is made easily. Healthcare administrators will need to pack their patience when coming to work and remember the primary reason why many of those rules and policies are in place—for the good of the patients. 2. This field has diverse opportunities. You might think healthcare administration is limited to managing a small clinic or running a functional area in a hospital, but the skills needed for those roles can be applied much more broadly than you might expect. “Most individuals do not really understand how complex and diverse the field is and how your skills can fit in multiple environments,” says healthcare executive and educator Joe Welfeld. “While many of my colleagues were hospital administrators throughout their careers, I touched almost every aspect of the field—hospital administrator, non-profit management, cancer control management, HMO management, consultant, physician organization executive, healthcare technology executive and academic.” There are several roles available to those equipped with a Healthcare Management degree that aren’t necessarily focused on managing the day-to-day operations of a direct healthcare provider—businesses like insurance providers, pharmaceutical research and other healthcare-adjacent roles can also provide excellent career opportunities. 3. Getting into “T-shape” will help. If you’re unfamiliar with the concept, a “T-shaped” professional is someone with a deep expertise of a single focus area to go along with a less in-depth, but broad knowledge of adjacent focus areas. Healthcare administrators seeking leadership positions will want to strike the right balance and will help with navigating cross-departmental issues or initiatives. You may know how to coordinate a nursing unit like a champion, but if you have a limited understanding of how HR, billing or other key focus areas operate and their needs, you may struggle.  You might not be able to build experience in every facet of healthcare administration, but do what you can to seek out opportunities to learn more about other functional areas. 4. You’ll benefit from building relationships. Just as you should aim to become “T-shaped” in your skills, you’ll want your professional network to take on a similar form. You’ll naturally have a deeper network of connections with the people you work closest with, but don’t neglect building those connections with administrators and employees working in other functional areas. These are the people that can help build your understanding of what issues they face in their daily work, facilitate conversations and potentially even help pave the path for career advancement.  “I recommend actively seeking mentors in your organization, through professional associations, and other networks,” says Gina Calder, Milford campus administrator for Yale New Haven Health System. “The goal is to have multiple mentors that represent diverse perspectives and experience whose advice or guidance gives you broader insight and understanding.” 5. Change can be slow. Healthcare administrators in high-level leadership positions set policies whose ripple effects can impact entire communities. That means sometimes the role is more akin to steering a cruise ship than steering a speed boat. Change comes gradually and only after great effort to get everything moving in the same direction. For instance, Ho points out that it took 10 years for electronic order sets to roll out and become widely implemented due to technical and user challenges. “To this day, there are a small number of physicians that still prefer paper, yet electronic order sets should be faster and easier,” Ho explains. While not every initiative will be an undertaking as big as this, even smaller projects can sometimes get bogged down. Patience—as well as knowing when to take charge—play a big part in your effectiveness in these scenarios. 6. A senior mentor can make a huge difference. There’s serious value in turning to experienced administrators for guidance and advice—and not just through this article. Whether this mentor-mentee relationship is developed through an organized, formal program or just an organic outgrowth from the people you work with, there’s tremendous value in hearing their perspective and getting their feedback on what you should improve. Even if you don’t expect to have a long-standing relationship with a more experienced colleague, it can still be valuable to gather their input—even if some of it may sting a little. “After transferring out to another role, I proactively asked my current supervisor to do an honest critique,” Welfeld says. “With nothing directly at stake, he agreed and I actually cried because he was so tough and brutally honest. It was the best thing that ever happened!” Calder is another firm believer in the value of a mentorship. She says as a master’s student she pleaded with her pastor—who happened to serve on the board of Yale New Haven Hospital—for an opportunity to attend a community reception for the president and CEO of the organization. At the event, she made a positive impression on the CEO, who then helped her secure an internship. Long story short, this bold networking attempt turned into a fruitful, long-term, professional relationship. “This grew into a great mentoring and sponsorship relationship with [the executive] and an amazing career at Yale New Haven Health for 11 years and counting,” Calder says. 7. Internal politics can be tricky to navigate. The severity of this may depend a bit on your role or seniority within an organization, but healthcare administrators should brace themselves for the disruptions that can come with interdepartmental politics. You may have an amazing plan that makes sense on paper, but physicians and other highly educated stakeholders can be a stubborn bunch, and getting them to “play nice” with other stakeholders isn’t always easy. “[In my education] there was very little discussion about the roles of physicians and nurses and the less-than-ideal collaboration found in organizations among these groups and administrators,” Welfeld says. “The politics of the internal process can make or break an organization as can the quality and leadership in the nursing team.” 8. Mistakes will happen and plans will falter. No one likes to have a plan go off the rails or see their best efforts fall flat when it matters most. As a highly motivated person, you’ll probably end up putting a fair amount of pressure on yourself to be an absolutely infallible rock star administrator. While it’s great to strive for this, the reality is that you may be put into impossible situations or won’t always have everything you need to make a perfect plan. Welfeld says often new administrators are used to resolving “textbook” examples of issues that are much less messy or complicated than what their real work calls for. “Very few situations in the real world follow a clear and simple path,” Welfeld says. “You will immediately encounter situations that are not perfect and will need to quickly decide where the attention should be given—if at all—and why. One quickly learns that imperfect decisions are not catastrophic, unless of course they are patient-care oriented.” Calder says it took some time to adjust to the surprise situations that could shake up her plans. “I had to learn to not be so surprised with daily issues, developments, challenges and opportunities,” Calder says. “Anything could and often did happen.” Calder says over time she learned to position herself and lean on the relationships and resources available to her. This helped her become more proactive in anticipating, preventing and effectively responding to potential challenges and issues. 9. Your desire to learn is an asset—treat it that way. Sure, having a natural curiosity and an enthusiasm for learning more is valuable in nearly any role. But it is a particularly worthwhile trait for anyone seeking to tackle a field as expansive as healthcare administration. Simply put, there’s a lot to master. Demonstrating that you want to take on that challenge and embrace learning opportunities is a good way to garner positive recognition. Whether this takes the form of pursuing a graduate degree, seeking out certifications or volunteering to take on “stretch” projects, Calder urges new healthcare administrators to keep learning and continuing education as priorities as they progress through their careers. “Continue to be an avid learner and establish your routine for education and development,” Calder advises. Launch your healthcare administration career with confidence. There’s a lot of unknowns that might surprise you when starting a healthcare administration career. While we can’t cover every unexpected twist you may encounter in this field, after reflecting on the insight of expert healthcare administrators, you should be feeling more confident about what the future may hold for you. One aspect of this career that likely won’t surprise you is the need for a college education to get started. If you think you’re ready to take that first step, visit the Rasmussen University Healthcare Management degree page. Further down the line, you may want to consider pursuing a graduate degree to bolster your resume and potentially open new doors. At Rasmussen University, you can complete an online Master of Healthcare Administration program for under $10,000—an appealing option for anyone looking to advance.1 If you’d like to learn more about where an MHA could help take you, check out our article “6 Healthcare Administration Careers You Could Land with an MHA.” 1Tuition for MBA, MHRM, MHA, and MSN programs is $155 per credit ($125 per credit for MPH), excludes MSN Nurse Practitioner specializations. Students in all programs must maintain continuous enrollment to remain eligible for the tuition pricing of $155/$125 per credit. A student who withdraws and re-enrolls will be required to pay the tuition price offered at the time of their re-enrollment. Students who receive the tuition price of $155/$125 per credit cannot use any additional discounts, grants and/or scholarships. If a student needs to retake one or more courses in the degree program, the total cost of the program will exceed $10,000. Program cost breakdown: $7,440 in tuition + $2,460 in fees = $9,900 in program cost ($7,000 in tuition + $2,870 in fees = $9,870 in program cost for MPH). Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Pinterest Share on LinkedIn Will Erstad . Will is a Sr. Content Specialist at Collegis Education. He researches and writes student-focused articles on a variety of topics for Rasmussen University. He is passionate about learning and enjoys writing engaging content to help current and future students on their path to a rewarding education. Posted in Master of Healthcare Administration healthcare administration healthcare careers Related Content What Is a Practice Manager? An Expert Look at this Healthcare Management Career. Hannah Meinke | 10.04.2021 Is Earning a Healthcare Administration Master's Degree Worth It? Carrie Mesrobian | 08.09.2021 Healthcare Management vs. Healthcare Administration: Choosing Your Professional Path. Hannah Meinke | 01.27.2020 I Want to Work in Hospital Management… Now What? Will Erstad | 06.24.2019 This piece of ad content was created by Rasmussen University to support its educational programs. Rasmussen University may not prepare students for all positions featured within this content. Please visit www.rasmussen.edu/degrees for a list of programs offered. External links provided on rasmussen.edu are for reference only. 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Result 16
TitleCareer Paths in Healthcare Management: An Overview » HospitalAdministration.org
Urlhttps://hospitaladministration.org/potential-career-paths-with-a-hospital-administration-degree/
Description
Date
Organic Position11
H1HospitalAdministration.org
H2
H3Occupational Highlights
Gaining Experience
Healthcare Manager and Healthcare Administrator
Other Career Opportunities
Popular Degree Programs in Healthcare Management and Administration
H2WithAnchors
BodyHospitalAdministration.org Sign In You are here: Home » Career Paths in Healthcare Management: An Overview Career Paths in Healthcare Management: An Overview The career opportunities in healthcare management are practically endless. Advances in medical technology allow people to live longer than ever before which has resulted in healthcare being one of the fastest growing industries in the United States. With a degree in either healthcare management, healthcare administration, or public health, graduates can pursue a variety of career paths including hospital administration. This is a rapidly changing industry, therefore it is imperative that students and professionals alike continue to enhance their education so as to be at the forefront of their careers. Use the links below to jump to a section: Occupational Highlights Gaining Experience Healthcare Manager and Healthcare Administrator Other Career Opportunities Popular Degree Programs in Healthcare Management and Administration Occupational Highlights. Health managers must have a strong concept of the inner-workings of a business and be fluent in medical jargon and medical legal practices. The need for qualified health managers is growing due to medical advances and healthier lifestyles. If you are pursuing a healthcare administration or related degree, the table below from the Bureau of Labor Statistics provides current annual median salary and projected growth of the major job-categories applicable to your major. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections Data Tools Gaining Experience. To become a healthcare manager or administrator, employers often prefer candidates with an advanced degree and experience in the field. Health administrative and managerial positions involve overseeing both the medical and the business side of the organization. Consequently, experience can come in many forms. Entry-Level Careers. This is an exciting time to enter the healthcare management field. Below are several job possibilities in the health and medical services industry with strong market demand for entry-level talent: Pharmacy Technician – Since this position only requires a high school diploma or GED, it is a great way to receive immediate hands-on training while still pursuing higher education. As a pharmacy technician, you would measure, package, and label prescriptions, and enter information given to you by customers and other healthcare professionals. Health Information Technician – This position requires a post-secondary certificate and/or an associate’s degree in health information technology. Here you will code medical notes using classification software, discuss reported inaccuracies with patients, and organize both physical and electronic client records. Medical Transcriptionist – Either a one-year vocational certification program or an associate’s degree program is required for this position, and some employers may require additional certification. As a transcriptionist, you must be able to work quickly and efficiently. When dictating medical records, you will need to analyze them for inconsistencies in both the speech-recognition software and the report itself. Medical Assistant – Most medical assistants have completed an associate’s or vocational certification program, but some can begin with only a high school diploma or GED and receive training from their employers. You must be able to help the physician with the patient examinations upon intake, and this includes obtaining their vital signs, blood, and personal and family medical history. If none of the above align with your career goals, there are internships and residences that are typically offered to both undergraduate and graduate students. While some of them do not pay, the experience gained is invaluable. Another way to bulk-up your resume is through positions that enhance your understanding of an organization as a business. These are a few entry-level job titles that can help prepare you for the operational tasks expected of a healthcare manager. Receptionist – Only requiring a high school diploma or GED, this position is great for undergraduate students who want to break out into the business world. Receptionists can be found in a variety of businesses including hospitals. Their daily tasks include greeting clients, answering phone calls, taking down and forwarding messages, and confirming appointments and cancellations with the respective parties. Administrative Assistant – A high school diploma or GED may be passable, however many employers prefer those with an associate’s degree or some collegiate background. In addition to the duties of a receptionist, administrative assistants arrange staff meetings, organize and edit company correspondences (memos, mail, finances, reports), perform simple bookkeeping, and organize electronic and physical filing systems. Medical Insurance Claim Examiners and Investigators – Many employers prefer those who have completed either a vocational certificate or associate’s degree program. In this position you would process a claim submitted by a healthcare facility, analyze the cost, decide how much insurance will cover, and determine if the claim is necessary, elective, or fraudulent. Healthcare Manager and Healthcare Administrator. It can be difficult to assess the differences between healthcare administration and healthcare management. These two positions are, in fact, very similar. They both require a bachelor’s degree, and at some smaller healthcare facilities they often combine the responsibilities of the two jobs into one in order to save on hiring costs. However, there are several key differences that make having employees in each of these titles a necessity. Take a look at the chart below to see a side-by-side comparison of each position’s responsibilities. Essentially an administrator focused primarily on short-term operational goals while the manager guarantees the success of the organization through the development of long-term business plans. Each of these positions communicate with each other often, which can blur the line of who is responsible for what. Other Career Opportunities. While you are pursuing a degree in health administration, health management, or public health, you may be unaware of the many other career possibilities that these degree programs prepare you for. Check out some of the career opportunities for those with a public health or healthcare management related degree. Community Health Educator – With more of a focus on public health, this position requires a bachelor’s degree and some employers prefer addition certification. Health educators plan events designed around a specific community’s needs to teach them about various health topics and provide them with the necessary local healthcare services contact information. Community Service Manager – This is another great career for those with a bachelor’s in public health. As a community service manager you will collaborate with other healthcare officials to establish areas of improvement within a community and implement various on-going programs and one-time events. At these events, you are responsible for managing those providing healthcare services to the clients. Insurance Underwriter – Excellent financial skills and a business-centered bachelor’s degree are standard qualifications of an employee in this career. Responsibilities as an insurance underwriter include reviewing insurance applications and evaluating the coverage possibilities, analyze applicants and determine proper coverage plan , and contacting stakeholders for further information about claims and applications. Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) – CEOs can refer to the chief financial officers (CFOs), chief information officers (CIOs), and chief operating officers (COOs) within an organization. These positions all require advanced degrees and job experience. A healthcare manager can be promoted to either a CFO or CIO should they decide to shift their career-focus slightly. However, a COO position is traditionally the next step up for healthcare administrators and managers. Healthcare management is a rapidly growing field with a plethora of promising career opportunities. Whether you are just starting your degree program in public health, health management, or health administration or are a seasoned professional, many exciting opportunities await. Check out other features of this website to learn more about this ever-evolving industry. Popular Degree Programs in Healthcare Management and Administration. In order to work in hospital administration or related field, you’ll need the right credentials in place. The schools listed below offer the education you’ll need to work towards your career goals.SchoolPrograms Purdue UniversityAccreditationHLCNCABS in Healthcare AdministrationMaster of Healthcare AdministrationMBA in Healthcare Management Ashford UniversityAccreditationWASCBA in Health Care AdministrationMA in Health Care Administration Achieve Test PrepHealth AdministrationHealth Management Utica CollegeAccreditationMSAMS in Healthcare AdministrationMBA in Healthcare Management American UniversityAccreditationMSAMS in Healthcare Management Walden UniversityAccreditationHLCNCADBA in Healthcare Management Liberty UniversityAccreditationSACSMS in Healthcare Administration: Strategic ManagementMS in Healthcare Administration: Supply Chain Management and Logistics Northcentral UniversityAccreditationWSCUCMBA in Health AdministrationDBA in Health AdministrationClick here to see more Hospital Administration degrees
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Result 17
Title
Urlhttps://www.villanovau.com/resources/public-administration/healthcare-management-career-job-outlook/
Description
DateOct 6, 2021
Organic Position12
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Bodyessful. Incapsula incident ID: 621000680160320348-353292464937570570
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Result 18
TitleWhat Can I Do with a Degree in Healthcare Management?
Urlhttps://www.herzing.edu/degree/healthcare-management
DescriptionDiscover the different types of jobs you can potentially get after earning a healthcare management degree. Your new career path IS possible
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Organic Position13
H1What Can I Do with a Degree in Healthcare Management?
H2Career possibilities in healthcare management
What jobs can you get with a healthcare management degree?
What type of degree do I need?
Do I need an MBA?
What skills do you need?
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H2WithAnchorsCareer possibilities in healthcare management
What jobs can you get with a healthcare management degree?
What type of degree do I need?
Do I need an MBA?
What skills do you need?
BodyWhat Can I Do with a Degree in Healthcare Management? Program Availability Your Zip Code: 53051 Career possibilities in healthcare management. Healthcare is one of the fastest-growing industries today, featuring many different positions with unique educational requirements.The field of healthcare management offers both a competitive salary and strong job growth, making it an attractive career choice for those interested in both healthcare and business.Whether you are a healthcare professional looking to take the next step, or you are just beginning your healthcare career, a degree in healthcare management can help you unlock the door to many exciting career opportunities.Job outlookAverage salaryAccording to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment in healthcare management is projected to grow 32% from 2019 to 2029, as healthcare organizations strive to adapt to a changing healthcare landscape.* Hospitals and other healthcare organizations will need additional healthcare management professionals to oversee patient and health services. This growth is due in part to an aging baby boomer population that has driven higher demand for healthcare services in recent years.As of May 2019, data from the BLS shows the average salary for healthcare managers was $115,160 per year ($55.37 per hour) across the United States.* This projection is not a typical starting salary for recent graduates of a healthcare management program but is reflective of the national average. Salary will also vary according to state and experience level.What jobs can you get with a healthcare management degree?Many students choose to pursue a health administration degree in order to gain the business skills required for a management role in the healthcare field. Here are some potential jobs you could land with a bachelor’s degree:Healthcare Department Manager. Healthcare department managers oversee a specific department or team within an organization. They may oversee nursing, surgery or physical therapy departments and will have different responsibilities based on their specialty. If you already have work experience as a nurse or medical assistant, for example, becoming a healthcare manager is one way you can advance your healthcare career.Healthcare Finance Manager. Healthcare finance managers are responsible for the day-to-day financial management of a healthcare organization or practice. Specific responsibilities could include managing cash flow, designing budgets and evaluating compensation. They might also track and report on the financial health of the organization or department. If you are interested in the business of healthcare and enjoy working with numbers, this could be a good fit for you.Quality and Improvement Manager. As a quality and improvement manager, you would be responsible for ensuring that your organization complies with current care standards. You might also oversee the evaluation of current processes and determine areas for improvement. Some quality and improvement managers also lead workshops and training seminars to help other members of the healthcare team stay up to speed with best practices. In addition to earning your bachelor’s degree, you will need several years of experience and additional certification to become a quality and improvement manager.Healthcare Administrator. Healthcare administrators might manage one hospital or oversee an entire healthcare system. They are in charge of ensuring smooth operations and can also play a role in long-term planning for the organization. Healthcare administrators must have at least a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s degree in healthcare management is often required for continued career advancement. Nurses considering jobs in healthcare administration can also find unique administrative roles in nursing departments, although specialty degrees such as a Master of Science in Nursing Leadership and Administration can help you qualify best for these roles.Physician Practice Manager. Physician practice managers lead a healthcare organization’s business strategy. Specific responsibilities include managing budgets, developing new strategies to grow the business, and overseeing day-to-day operations. Many employers prefer candidates to have a master’s degree in healthcare or business management for these roles.You can expect these kinds of positions to require applicants to have an associate degree in healthcare administration or management:Administrative Support SpecialistAdministrative CoordinatorMedical SecretaryPatient Service RepresentativeOperations AssistantYour day-to-day tasks will include working and communicating with medical personnel to facilitate the everyday options of the institution, including staffing, patient relations, inventory control and scheduling.What type of degree do I need?Healthcare management is a deep and growing field and Herzing University offers three levels of education in healthcare management to offer students a personalized career path catered to their professional goals. Each program may be completed online and opens a variety of different career paths:Associate Degree in Healthcare Administration. The program can be completed online in as little as 16 months.Bachelor’s Degree in Healthcare Administration. The program can be completed in as little as 32 months.Master of Science in Healthcare Administration. The program can be completed in as few as 16 months.Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Healthcare Management. The program can be completed in as little as 20 months.Explore my options Classes Start February 7thWaived Enrollment Fee Apply Now Request InfoDo I need an MBA?If you are currently a healthcare professional looking to make the jump from clinical practice to management, an MBA in Healthcare Management is the best track for you. Through an MBA program, you will gain the specialized knowledge and expertise in modern healthcare issues, trends and tools that you need to succeed in upper-management roles. Earning your master’s degree in business administration can qualify you for leadership roles in healthcare management, including:Healthcare AdministratorHealthcare ConsultantHealthcare ManagerProgram DirectorChief Executive Officer (CEO)Chief Operations Officer (COO)Chief Compliance Officer (CCO)Development DirectorSeveral years of experience working in the healthcare industry plus an MBA in Healthcare Management will make your resume jump out to potential employers.As a healthcare manager, you’ll learn the inner workings of the healthcare system. Your management skills will allow you to serve as a competent and capable leader, helping hospitals, small practices, insurance companies and a variety of other institutions navigate the changing healthcare environment.What skills do you need?Being successful in the field of healthcare management requires strong leadership qualities and management skills. As with any leadership position, excellent oral, written and interpersonal communication skills are also necessary.If you are interested in learning more about the business side of healthcare and enjoy thinking strategically and making important decisions, healthcare management could be the right career path for you.If you’re interested in pursuing a leadership role within the healthcare industry, healthcare management could be the right path for you. Learn more about the Herzing University Healthcare Administration program. Explore Now * Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook 2020. BLS estimates do not represent entry-level wages and/or salaries. Multiple factors, including prior experience, age, geography market in which you want to work and degree field, will affect career outcomes and earnings. Herzing neither represents that its graduates will earn the average salaries calculated by BLS for a particular job nor guarantees that graduation from its program will result in a job, promotion, salary increase or other career growth.Classes Start February 7thLearn More Today Request Information × Ready to get started?Contact us to request more information Herzing UniversityHi, how can I assist you?Questions?Chat Now Close
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Result 19
TitleFive Emerging Careers in Healthcare Administration
Urlhttps://www.mhaonline.com/blog/five-new-healthcare-administration-careers
DescriptionCheck out five emerging careers in healthcare administration for 2022, including director of telehealth and chief nursing officer, among others
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Organic Position14
H1Five Emerging Careers in Healthcare Administration (2022)
H2Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2022 Edition
Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2021 Edition
Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2020 Edition
Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2019 Edition
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Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2021 Edition
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BodyFive Emerging Careers in Healthcare Administration (2022) MHA Search . sponsored Healthcare is a rapidly changing industry. Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, emerging issues surrounding big data, complications arising through healthcare regulations, and new integrations between healthcare and business are all transforming the way care is delivered. Not to mention the transition to telehealth services precipitated by the pandemic. However, many of these innovations aren’t being implemented by doctors and providers themselves; they’re being implemented by healthcare administrators. Healthcare administration is one of the fastest-growing careers in the US, but in an increasingly complex and fragmented landscape, healthcare administration is becoming more of an umbrella term than a specific career. New innovations in healthcare aren’t simply upgrading the old, they’re entirely reinventing the new, and there are new job titles and career opportunities emerging as a result. And while hospital administrators are, in general, still largely in demand, there’s also a renewed call for specialists in the increasingly complex and separate areas of healthcare innovation. Read on to get a look at the top five emerging careers in healthcare administration. Please note that unless otherwise specified, all salary data is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2022 Edition. Become a Healthcare Human Resources Manager. Managing staff takes expertise and experience. Healthcare organizations frequently have large staffing pools that include everyone from maintenance staff to the CEO. In order to manage employees, healthcare organizations must rely on their human resources departments and the human resources manager. These managers are responsible for many duties, but primarily they are relied upon to ensure the healthcare organization complies with all applicable employment regulations. Aspiring healthcare human resources managers can complete either a master’s of health administration degree or a master’s of business administration in order to have the necessary education to fill this role. There are many online master’s programs to help prepare students for this career, such as the online MBA in human resources at Southern New Hampshire University. This program also offers an MBA in healthcare administration so students can choose to take elective courses that will prepare them for work in healthcare. Healthcare human resource managers work in hospitals, clinics, healthcare facilities, and long-term care centers. Their day to day duties can include: Hiring new staff Writing recruitment plans to find new hires Terminating staff Consulting with leadership staff to ensure staffing goals are met Evaluating benefit plans for staff Running training for new and existing staff Responding to employee concerns Preparing long term strategy plans for recruitment, retention, and hiring Wages for healthcare human resource managers vary based on level of education, years of experience, employer, and location. According to Payscale.com, human resource managers earn an average of $68,856 per year, with the top 10 percent making more than $95,000 and the bottom 10 percent earning $49,000 or less (Dec. 2021). There are no state requirements for licensure in this field at this time. Certification as a healthcare human resource manager is voluntary, although it can be advantageous when applying for jobs or seeking a promotion. The primary certification professionals in this career earn is the American Hospital Association Certification Center (AHA-CC) Certified in Healthcare Human Resources (CHHR). The CHHR demonstrates competency in both human resources and healthcare. Become a Chief Nursing Officer. As healthcare continues to become more complex each year, healthcare leadership has shifted towards relying on subject matter experts to oversee specialized areas. Because of this, the role of chief nursing officer has become more common and widely recognized. This is largely an administrative role that oversees staff and patient care. While chief nursing officers have little to no interaction directly with patients, they must be licensed registered nurses and often have earned an advanced degree. There are many degrees nurses can earn to advance into the role of chief nursing officer. Often it is a combination of work experience and education that will make a candidate eligible for this role. The University of Central Florida College of Nursing offers a five-semester online master’s of science in nursing leadership and management, which can be a stepping stone in a career as a chief nursing officer. The most commonplace for chief nursing officers to be employed is in hospitals, although they can also be found in long-term care facilities and even managing nursing staff in “ask a nurse” call centers. Duties of chief nursing officers include: Recruiting, hiring, supervising, and terminating nursing staff Writing a long term plan for the nursing department Collaborating with nurse managers and shift leads to ensure proper supervision of all staff Communicating with senior leadership staff and physicians Setting and managing a budget Ensuring staff and facilities meet applicable federal, state, and local regulations Providing continuing education opportunities to nursing staff Chief nursing officers must be licensed to practice nursing in the state where they are employed. Licensing requires a combination of education, typically at least an associate’s degree, and passing the National Council Licensure Examination. Each state has its own requirements for nursing licenses, so candidates should contact their local board to ensure they have the necessary qualifications. Aspiring chief nursing officers can earn voluntary certification to demonstrate their competence and leadership skills. Some employers may even require one or more of the following certifications: Certification in Executive Nursing Practice (CENP) from the American Organization for Nursing Leadership (AONL) Nurse Executive, Certification (NE-BC) from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Nurse Manager and Leader Certification (CNML) from the American Organization for Nursing Leadership (AONL) Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Nurse Executive, Advanced Certification (NEA-BC) from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) The job of a chief nursing officer can be quite lucrative. Payscale.com estimates that chief nursing officers earn $135,586 per year, with the bottom 10 percent earning $95,000 or less and the top 10 percent making more than $203,000 per year (Dec. 2021). Become a Director of Telehealth. Telemedicine is not new. For years, physicians have been providing care over the phone or, more recently, through virtual video visits. However, due to Covid-19 and social distancing recommendations, in-person medical visits dropped drastically in March and April of 2020, and subsequently, telehealth visits grew by 4,000 percent. It appears that telehealth is here to stay, and surveys show that at least half of consumers and 92 percent of physicians expect to continue to use telehealth, even after the pandemic wanes. Managing telehealth services has its own set of challenges. Reimbursements by insurance can be lower, there are specific regulatory laws that must be adhered to, and clients, as well as providers, must have a strong internet connection. To help manage virtual services many clinics are hiring directors of telehealth. While there are no degrees in telehealth administration yet, students can pursue a master’s of business administration with an emphasis in health care or a master’s of healthcare administration to prepare them for this career. The University of Delaware offers an advanced telehealth coordinator online certificate that can also help prepare students for this field. This new healthcare administrator role is evolving, and duties can include: Writing policies for delivering telehealthcare Training physicians and staff on how to use telehealth software Keeping up with changing telehealth regulations and implementing policies to stay in compliance Working with vendors to select products to use to deliver telehealthcare Formulating, developing, and executing new procedures for better patient care Communicating with clinical staff, physicians, and leadership This job is so new there are presently no certifications available. In order to demonstrate proficiency in healthcare administration and business, aspiring directors of telehealth can earn complimentary certifications such as Certified Medical Manager (CMM) through the Professional Association of Health Care Office Management (PAHCOM) or Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives (FACHE) through the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). The American Board of Telehealth (ABT) offers online courses and certificates for clinical staff and medical providers looking to gain competency in this field. Glassdoor.com, a website that aggregates salary information, reports that directors of telehealth make $96,092 per year on average. This data is based on 1,177 self-reported salaries. Wages ranged from $44,000 to $209,000 per year (Dec. 2021). Become a Product Manager. While some product managers may create physical products, they can also create programs, insurance policies, and technologies. In healthcare, this can look like a new wellness program, software to manage chronic disease, or a targeted insurance plan. In order to get these products from inception to the end consumer, healthcare companies hire product managers who have experience designing, building, implementing, and selling a healthcare product. There are several educational paths to start a career as a healthcare product manager. Some students may opt for a master’s of business administration degree in order to gain the business acumen necessary for this job. Other students may pursue a master’s in healthcare administration, which combines leadership, healthcare, and business. Short courses such as the online professional certificate in product management from Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management can prepare anyone from students to seasoned healthcare professionals to step into this role. One of the primary roles of a product manager is to have a keen understanding of the client, their motivations, and their needs. Other duties of healthcare product managers include: Writing the vision and strategy for a particular healthcare-related product Breaking product development into a manageable timeline Acting as the point person for product details Coordinating with various departments to ensure individual aspects of product development are on schedule Creating a marketing plan for the product launch Meeting with stakeholders to ensure everyone is on the same page Interviewing potential clients to ensure the product meets their needs Executing a strong product launch Monitoring product performance and adjusting the product as necessary. Certification as a product manager is a voluntary step but can help with employment and advancement. One common certification earned is the Certified Product Manager (CPM) credential through the Association of International Product Marketing and Management (AIPMM). Presently, there are no state licensing requirements to work as a healthcare product manager. Payscale.com estimates that product managers earn between $58,000 to $125,000 per year, with the average salary being $87,307 per year (Dec. 2021). Become a Training and Development Director. Cohesive company culture and knowledge are essential to smooth-running healthcare businesses. In order to accomplish this, staff must receive adequate training to do their job well. Training and development directors in healthcare are critical to ensuring staff knows what their role and responsibilities are, how to perform their duties, and how the healthcare company functions. Most healthcare training and development directors have completed a master’s of science in training and development, such as the one-year online program at the University of St. Francis. Most master’s of science in training and development programs do not have a specific healthcare focus, so work experience or additional education may be required. Typical job duties of healthcare training and development directors can include: Writing training programs for staff Overseeing training delivery by other staff members Delivering training Assessing employees need for training Creating and managing training budgets Selecting training products from vendors Evaluating and updating existing training as necessary Determining the effectiveness of training programs based on staff evaluation There are several voluntary certification options for healthcare training and development directors who are looking to demonstrate their competency in this field. They include Certified Developer of Training (CDT) from the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) or the Certified Professional in Training Management (CPTM) from the Training Industry. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (May 2020), the 42,100 training and development managers in all industries in the Us earn $115,640 per year on average. Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2021 Edition. Become a Nursing Home Manager. The healthcare needs of aging people are on the rise. To meet the unique social and medical needs of older people, an increasing number of individuals and families are choosing to live in assisted living facilities. In order to make decisions that best serve their residents, most facilities are seeking nursing home managers with bachelor’s or master’s degrees in healthcare administration. Those wanting to specialize in this field are encouraged to pursue an online master’s in gerontology (the field that studies aging) and nursing home administration. Healthcare administration degree programs are open to two types of students: those with clinical and non-clinical backgrounds. In 2021, more and more employers are searching for candidates with master’s degrees to oversee the teams providing health insurance reimbursement, patient care management, patient safety, accounting, and clinical healthcare to residents and patients. Previous clinical experience is preferred and nursing home facilities are seeking candidates who have registered nurse or medical assisting and administration experience. Responsibilities of a nursing home manager include: Managing caregivers Onboarding patients and their families to the facility Communicating with clinical teams and families Staying aware of local, state, and federal regulations Ensuring facility meets accreditation standards Hiring and training new employees According to Payscale.com, the average annual salary for a nursing home manager is $55,481 (Dec. 2021). Salaries are determined by several factors including the size of the facility and scope of responsibilities. An early-career nursing home manager with one to four years of experience earns an average salary of $30,000, while an experienced nursing home manager with 10-19 years of experience earns an average salary of $75,000 per year. Licensure for nursing home managers, also known as long-term care administrators, is required in all 50 states and can be pursued through the National Association of Long Term Care Administrator Boards. Become a Diagnostics & Laboratory Managers. Scientific breakthroughs in medicine and medical research happen as a result of well-managed teams of scientists. A laboratory manager is in charge of directing teams of life scientists to further medical research and development projects. Laboratory managers lead teams developing new vaccines, medical devices, and researching pharmaceutical drug effects. Laboratory managers have a range of scientific and engineering degrees at the bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral levels. Those seeking advanced management degrees can seek out professional science master’s degrees (PSM) like the one offered at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Laboratory managers work in a variety of public and private institutions including manufacturing, state and federal government, and scientific management and consulting firms. Most spend the majority of their time in offices and conference rooms meeting with government or corporate executives and in laboratories overseeing the work of research scientists. Typical daily tasks of laboratory managers are: Working with company executives and government officials Researching and developing new projects Allocating financial, personnel, and laboratory resources to specific projects Overseeing the progress of scientific research teams Writing and submitting operational and audited reports Taking inventory of laboratory supplies Following regulations set forth for human subjects compliance and laboratory animal research Ensuring that laboratory safety accreditation standards are followed Communicating research conclusions and project status reports to management teams The median annual salary for natural sciences managers (a similar occupational title) is $154,930 per year (May 2020). This career is projected to grow steadily from 2020 to 2030 at a rate of 6 percent which is slightly slower than the national average for all occupations at 8 percent. In the same decade, an estimated 4,500 new positions will be needed nationally. Certification is not typically required for laboratory managers although most laboratories require scientists to hold laboratory certification such as the Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS) certification given by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Depending on the specialization of the laboratory, certifications such as the Certified Manager of Animal Resources (CMAR) are given by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science. Become a Wellness Program Administrator. For those who desire to affect change in their communities, becoming a wellness program administrator is a great career option. Also known as social and community service managers, professionals in this role are most often found leading public health initiatives. By targeting specific populations and demographics such as children or homeless people, wellness program administrators see to it that public and private organizations meet their targeted goals which can be preventive or corrective. Examples of public health wellness program initiatives include addressing chronic hunger, child obesity, diabetes prevention, mental health support, or services to veterans. To meet these large and specific goals, wellness program administrators must juggle many duties: Oversee administrative requirements for initiatives Review policy proposals Develop project implementation plans Manage teams of employees working in public health or private organizations Write grant proposals to secure funding Analyze project efficacy using surveys and other data collection methods Solicit community feedback Prepare needs assessments Manage community outreach efforts Gather data to assess efficacy before and after a project The median salary for social and community service managers is $75,140 (BLS May 2020). Careers in this field are growing at a staggering 15 percent, which is much faster than the national average for all occupations (8 percent). The BLS estimates that 26,400 new social and community service manager positions will be created between 2020 and 2030 and shows that the typical entry-level education for these positions is a bachelor’s degree. To prepare wellness program managers to combine data-driven decision-making with a community’s needs at the forefront, Walden University offers a bachelor of science in healthcare administration as well as a master’s of healthcare administration. Another popular public health degree option is a master’s of public health (MPH). Earning these degrees helps wellness program administrators create effective healthcare changes in their communities. While licensure is not typically required for social and community service managers, certifications are available. The Chapman Institute offers four levels of Certified Wellness Program certifications which are available online or in-person. As well, the National Wellness Institute offers two certifications: Worksite Wellness Specialist (CWWS) for all who want to gain insights into worksite wellness and Worksite Wellness Program Manager (CWWPM) for those with three years of corporate wellness management. Become a Healthcare Writer. While medical research is technical by nature, its implications are lost on the people who need it most when it’s hidden behind peer-reviewed journals and written in scientific jargon. Enter healthcare writers: professionals who unpack complex ideas and simplify them for laypeople. By communicating the takeaways of complex medical processes, healthcare writers empower people to understand more about their medical needs or insurance coverage. Empowered with contextualized information, patients can make better-informed decisions about their healthcare. As well, healthcare writers attract future talent to a growing industry by creating career guides and promoting educational programs through blog posts and marketing materials. In short, healthcare writers take the hard work out of researching complicated information and use credible sources to authenticate their message. Depending on their areas of specialization, healthcare writers create informative or investigative content. To create content that connects with readers, healthcare writers need to be skilled in the following areas: Know what information their audiences need Use specific language that’s relevant to targeted audiences Be familiar with the types of content already available Comprehend healthcare-related topics Write in a style that is authoritative, relatable, and objective Knowledge of search engine optimization and analytics Strategic use of keywords throughout an article Organization of article and headings based on keywords Keep content up-to-date for relevancy Share content across targeted social media platforms Also known as technical writers, healthcare writers earn median salaries of $78,590 per year (BLS May 2020). As the demand for healthcare careers and services increases, this profession is projected to grow at a rate of 12 percent which is faster than the national average for all occupations (8 percent). Between 2020 and 2030, the BLS estimates approximately 6,100 new positions will be needed. Most technical writers work for professional, scientific, and technical services companies and others work in manufacturing, administrative, and publishing industries. Most positions require a bachelor’s or advanced degree in English, communications, or relevant experience. Some technical writing positions may require a degree in science, medicine, or computer science. Certification isn’t required for all positions, but the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) offers continuing education and certificates in medical writing. To be eligible for the certification exam, applicants must have a bachelor’s degree in any field and at least two years of paid work experience in medical communication. Become a Biomedical Engineer Manager. For those who are ready to pivot their biomedical engineering experience into leadership positions, earning an MBA with a healthcare specialization or a master’s degree in healthcare innovation (MHI). Biomedical engineers are responsible for creating and testing medical devices such as pacemakers, minimally invasive surgical equipment, and prosthetics which help people live longer and recover from medical procedures with less pain and fewer complications. Because of their work, patients can access much-needed medical care and healthcare facilities and insurance companies lessen their liability and save time and money. With a master’s degree in healthcare administration or innovation, bioengineers are equipped to apply their technical backgrounds to meet healthcare-specific administrative needs. With a healthcare leadership degree, biomedical engineers can efficiently lead teams of researchers and developers and create more cutting-edge life-saving technologies. The duties of a biomedical engineer manager are commonly split between laboratories and board rooms and typically include the following responsibilities: Design new technologies such as artificial internal organs, prosthetics, and more efficient and less invasive medical equipment Repair or coordinate technical support for biomedical equipment Evaluate design proposals submitted by research teams Hire and train biomedical engineers and laboratory staff Ensure that procedures and plans are well-documented prior to testing Publish technical reports and research papers with conclusive findings Make presentations and progress reports to healthcare facility management teams Communicate technical information in non-technical terms Coordinate with teams responsible for securing and sustaining funding for research and development In 2020, biomedical engineers earned a median annual salary of $98,340. The BLS (May 2020) shows that between 2020 and 2030, this field is projected to grow by 6 percent and estimates 1,100 new biomedical engineering positions will be needed in the same decade. Since most biomedical engineers require a bachelor’s degree, it can be assumed that with a master’s degree, leaders in this innovative field can earn higher salaries depending on the industry that employs them. Most biomedical engineers work in medical equipment and supplies manufacturing. The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) provides certification for engineers. All 50 states accept the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) or the Principles and Practice of Engineer (PE) certification as valid proof of credentials. Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2020 Edition. Become a Health Insurance Specialist. With Americans spending more than ever on healthcare services, insurance is critical. It can reduce out-of-pocket costs and make essential medical treatments affordable. However, getting insurance to pay for treatments can be cumbersome and complicated. Many clinics now hire health insurance specialists to assist with medical coding, billing, and managing the claims process. While this job has been done by entry-level professionals, increasingly the role is becoming more complicated and employers are requiring the expertise learned while earning an MHA. While this job is frequently performed in the back office, these professionals also interface with clients in person, via email, or over the phone. Excellent customer service skills are a must as is a problem-solving attitude. Professionals in this field are required to strictly adhere to state and federal insurance laws in addition to insurance policies and clinic procedures. Attention to detail and the ability to adhere to rules are very important. Often this role can also be referred to as a claims adjuster or insurance adjuster. Responsibilities of health insurance specialists include: Access patient medical records Code medical procedures Communicate with insurance companies and clients Analyze claims Verify medical coverage File registration forms with insurance providers Record charges and payments on patient records According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS May 2020), insurance and claims adjusters earn $70,650 per year on average. An MHA degree can help prospective professionals in the field be competitive when seeking work. Many MHA programs offer courses such as healthcare management and policy, healthcare reimbursement, and healthcare economics, which provide the necessary background to excel in the field. Professionals seeking to set themselves apart can also pursue medical coding certifications such as the one offered by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC). Become a Social Welfare Administrator. Social welfare administrators, often also called community service managers, are integral to any social service program. These programs work with specific populations such as children, seniors, low-income citizens, to provide them access to resources they may need including housing, healthcare, or education. While this career can be very demanding and challenging because of the lack of resources, many professionals find it to be very rewarding. Programs that employ social welfare administrators include government agencies, nonprofits, and religious organizations. Within these programs, administrators are the link that ensures things run smoothly by providing direct services to clients and also managing the program as a whole. Leadership skills are essential as these professionals are responsible for the direction and course of an agency. Other necessary skills include the ability to manage staff effectively, good problem-solving abilities, skilled networkers, and the ability to analyze data and performance. Typical job duties of a social welfare administration include: Establish and oversee procedures and policies for the department or program Apply for and administer grants Meet with clients to assist them with accessing services Train and supervise staff and volunteers Plan and manage outreach activities Participate in advocacy activities with the local and national government Analyze data to determine the effectiveness of the program Social and community service managers earn $69,600 per year on average, according to the BLS (May 2020). Professionals in this field have work experience in social services and have obtained an MHA or related degree such as a master’s in social work. Sometimes significant work experience can be substituted for a degree. Those who have already obtained a graduate degree can earn a certificate in social work administration at San Diego State to further hone leadership and management skills and be more competitive in the job market. Become a Social Media Director. While marketing may not be the first job that comes to mind when thinking of working in healthcare, it is increasingly important for clinics, hospitals, and care centers to manage their social media. As more and more patients and their families utilize Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, they can be leveraged as powerful tools. While some clinics hire this service out, many are not creating dedicated marketing roles such as social media directors. Social media directors in healthcare utilize social media tools to communicate with patients, share information on new research, and engage the public. As directors, professionals in this field are responsible for charting the course for their company’s social media strategy including establishing policies for posting and determining how to handle complaints or disagreements. Creativity, quick decision-making, flexibility, strong communication skills, and good organization are all critical to being successful in this role. Job duties for social media directors include: Write posts for social media channels Manage advertising budget Respond to posts on social media Meet with senior-level staff Develop the social media strategy Craft and implement campaigns for events, awareness, or other activities to meet goals Analyze data to measure the effectiveness of social media campaigns Hire and oversee staff While salary can vary widely depending on the size of the clinic and job duties required, advertising and marketing directors—including those in social media—earn an average of $154,470 per year according to the BLS (May 2020). While many professionals in this role have earned at least a bachelor’s degree in advertising, marketing, or a related field, a master’s is required for more senior roles. An MHA can give professionals the unique advantage of not only understanding how to leverage social media but also having a strong background in healthcare. Those wishing to enter this field should concentrate on taking courses in marketing, public relations, and advertising while pursuing their degree. Become a Pharmaceutical Project Manager. Many conditions and diseases can be treated with medicines, but there are many more that still do not have treatments. Pharmaceutical companies and scientists are researching these conditions in order to develop new drugs to help patients recover from an illness or manage chronic conditions. The development process of these new drugs is overseen by pharmaceutical project managers. Pharmaceutical project managers’ roles are varied and require individuals who are flexible and creative. A background in clinical research helps significantly as does previous experience in healthcare settings. Strong leadership skills are a must as these project managers are tasked with managing a team of researchers and other staff. They also must be astute at managing budgets, timelines, and expectations as developing a new pharmaceutical product requires many moving parts and targets. The role of pharmaceutical project managers include: Manage a team of engineers, researchers, and doctors to develop a new product Specify project steps Set measurable, incremental goals and measure outcomes towards goals Oversee clinical trials Set and manage a budget Hire staff as needed Create status reports to communicate progress with senior staff Working as a pharmaceutical project manager can be lucrative as they earn on average $94,869, according to PayScale (Dec. 2021). Education requirements for this career vary but most professionals have earned at least an MHA or related degree. A certificate in project management, such as the one offered at California Southern University, can provide targeted education to make an applicant more competitive in the job application process. The Project Management Institute (PMI) also offers certifications that, when obtained, demonstrate knowledge and expertise in the field. Become a Healthcare Brand Manager. Managing the perception of a brand in the market is a full-time job that requires expertise and craft. Initially, brand manager positions emerged in product companies, retail or marketing firms but as markets have grown and adapted, it has become critical for hospitals, clinics, and even physicians to hire brand managers. Good brand managers set companies apart by building customer devotion through images and key messaging. In healthcare, this is seen as patients and clients feeling confident that they will receive quality care if they chose a given facility, retention of patients, or trusting a practitioner to provide excellent service. Healthcare brand managers are responsible for charting the course for the brand of a healthcare entity. They are creative, driven, and well versed in the newest brand strategies. As communication is essential to this role, professionals who hold these positions are adept at conveying difficult concepts in simple terms that are accessible to everyone. Healthcare brand manager responsibilities and duties include: Defining the brand Develop and manage a brand strategy Utilize the strategy to guide marketing efforts Report to senior staff on trends utilizing data gathered from customers and the industry Set strategic goals for the brand such as engagement, perception, or status Coach staff, volunteers, and senior staff on how to communicate using the brand strategy Work with designers, writers, and advertisers to craft collateral materials and ads that are on-brand Direct research to provide data for brand decision making Depending on education and expertise brand managers can anticipate earning $71,135 per year, according to PayScale (Dec. 2021). Healthcare employers are looking for professionals who have experience in marketing, clinic management, and strategy. Most professionals in this field have earned at least a master’s degree. An MHA, with courses in marketing and advertising, can be very valuable as it provides the necessary education with the necessary emphasis on healthcare. Emerging Healthcare Administration Careers: 2019 Edition. Become a Healthcare Data Scientist. Healthcare is poised to be one of the largest beneficiaries of the AI revolution, with applications in disease detection, drug discovery, and care delivery. It’s already being used to optimize facility workflow, image analysis, and clinical diagnostics. But that artificial intelligence requires some very keen data science in order to develop effective learning algorithms. And with billions of investment dollars flowing in, healthcare data scientists are already in high demand. Using mathematics, programming, and visualization, healthcare data scientists mine raw data for trends, and then find applications for those trends, putting them to work in learning algorithms. Their roles are often client-facing, meaning that they must communicate with their customer on a consistent basis to define the pertinent questions they face, so to best design an applicable solution using a rigorous set of hypotheses. On a technical level, data scientists need to have comfortability with extracting raw data and manipulating it into actionable insights, often through a programming language such as Python or R. Analytic skills-based in machine learning require a working knowledge of statistics, logistic regression, and neural networks. Typical responsibilities for healthcare data scientists include: Extracting data from primary sources Utilizing data visualization software to deduce trends Communicating with colleagues and customers to determine pertinent issues Writing and testing software in a variety of platforms Applying statistical models and machine learning to draw scientific conclusions Comparing and synthesizing multiple data sets to reach a peak accuracy According to Payscale.com (Dec. 2021), an employment data aggregator, the average salary for data scientists is $96,719 a year. The educational requirements for this position can be steep, though they do vary from employer to employer. While some positions may require only a bachelor’s degree, a master’s or PhD in data science is generally preferred, and specialized programs in health data science have already sprouted up, like the MS program at Harvard. Prospective and current healthcare data scientists can look to the Healthcare Data and Analytics Association (HDAA) as a resource for collaboration and professional development. Become a Healthcare Information Administrator. Healthcare’s going increasingly digital, and healthcare facilities are facing a data tsunami. According to IDC (Nov 2021), a research firm, the amount of healthcare data created for each consumer over a lifetime will be an estimated 270 GB. This data not only helps physicians care for patients, but it also can give administrators valuable insights into trends, the ability to project needs, and information to make data-informed decisions. While data scientists sift through that data and work it into actionable insights, healthcare information administrators are in charge of securing, managing, and optimizing the systems which collect and hold that data. Healthcare information administrators can be parsed into several job titles. Their primary responsibilities will vary based upon the particular needs of the facility for which they work. Some administrators may specialize in the implementation of new IT and data collection infrastructures, while others may focus on the management and operations of those infrastructures. Further sub-specialties exist within that split as well, with compliance, education, and revenue cycle all being areas of expertise for healthcare information administrators. Some key responsibilities of healthcare information administrators include: Analyzing health records for accuracy Ensuring compliance with HIPAA regulations Securing sensitive health data against privacy breaches Creating a standard language for data interoperability Improving data literacy among a medical facility’s staff and patients The average salary for healthcare information administrators, according to Indeed (Dec. 2021), is just $75,718 a year, based on over 609 survey respondents. A bachelor’s degree, preferably in health information management, is the bare minimum for many employers, although there is a strong trend pushing for master’s level education, such as an MHA with an informatics focus. The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) is the go-to professional resource for health information administrators, and their certifications are well recognized in the industry, often leading to a significant boost in salary. Become a Healthcare Policy Specialist. Even as President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA) saw a sizable increase in the number of newly insured Americans, a debate has persisted over who exactly has been helped by what. The ambition of this massive healthcare legislation has come with an equally massive dose of complexity: some 10,000 pages of policy. The introduction of the American Health Care Act (ACA), which repeals and replaces parts of the ACA, has only increased the complexity and confusion further. And while healthcare policy specialist is by no means a new career title, it has taken on a new focus and renewed importance in the national landscape. Healthcare policy specialists can work for government organizations, charities, think tanks, insurance companies, medical facilities, and elsewhere in the private sector. A great deal of specialization exists, and a healthcare policy specialist focus in a specific area such as Medicaid, lobbying, education, or community outreach. Healthcare policy specialists will need a solid understanding of the legislation as it applies to their area of specialty, along with sound research, analysis, and communication skills. Typical responsibilities of a healthcare policy specialist may include: Researching updates to existing healthcare policy Analyzing impacts of new legislation upon a company or community Advocating for policy adjustment at a state or federal level Developing strategies for compliance with existing legislation Conducting site visits to assess the operations of a healthcare facility Collaborating with healthcare administrators to implement policy changes According to PayScale (Dec. 2021), an employment data aggregator, health policy analysts earn an average of $64,022 a year. A bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement for some entry-level positions, but graduate-level education is increasingly preferred. An MHA with relevant specialization, an MPH, or even a law degree may be required for certain positions. The American Public Health Association (APHA) houses a Center for Public Health Policy, where healthcare policy specialists can network, share resources, and collectively advocate for policy changes and implementation that better serve the wider population’s collective health. Become an On-Site Clinic Administrator. An increasing trend of concern for employee health has resulted in the rise of onsite clinics, where a wide variety of medical and wellness services are provided directly at a place of work. In 2020, two-thirds of large employers (those with 5,000 or more employees) offered general medicine worksite clinics, a significant increase over the just one-third that offered them in 2017. Customized to meet the needs of a very specific population, on-site clinics can range in scope of services, from acute care to primary care to general wellness services and everything in between. But the need for healthcare administrators is doubly important in an on-site clinic, where one must stand up a medical facility within the walls of a non-medical environment. On-site clinic administrators work in much the same capacity that off-site clinic administrators do, working to ensure the day-to-day operations of a healthcare facility. But on-site administrators are also working with a very specific population of working-age adults, and need to coordinate their care to match the needs of a particular parent corporation. Integrating health and wellness within the culture of the workplace is a top priority, and close coordination with the management of the business as a whole is a critical function of on-site clinic administrators. Typical responsibilities for on-site clinic administrators include: Instituting a culture of health and wellness within the employee community Designing and maintaining an on-site clinic’s budget Managing the staffing and scheduling of clinical staff Coordinating with company directors to procure and distribute clinical resources Squaring a clinic’s care offerings with the parent company’s health plans Optimizing wellness services for the employee population According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (May 2020), the average salary for medical and health services managers was $118,800 per year. The bare minimum for entry-level positions is a bachelor’s degree in a related field, but the trend for healthcare administrators is pushing for master’s level education, either through an MHA or an MBA with a healthcare focus. Professional resources include the National Association of Worksite Health Centers (NAWHC), the Health Care Administrators Association (HCAA), and the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), the latter of which offers certification in compliance and revenue cycle specialties. Additionally, the American Hospital Association (AHA) offers certification as a healthcare facility manager (CHFM). Become a Healthcare Consultant. Healthcare is one of the fastest-changing industries in the world, but it’s also a disaggregated one, where a state-of-the-art hospital and a paper-based medical clinic may exist on the same street. And while healthcare administration is one of the more in-demand careers of the moment, many facilities are still looking to bring someone in part-time to help them manage the transition from the 20th to 21st century, enough so that healthcare consultancy is a multi-billion dollar industry. Healthcare consultants shepherd medical facilities, pharmaceutical companies, and insurance companies through transitions and updates to their practices. While their exact roles and responsibilities will vary based upon the client they are contracted with, it is largely up to a consultant to determine what a client needs, and thereby come up with what needs to be done to improve it. A consultant may specialize in a specific subcategory, such as IT or finance, but they will almost certainly work with a wide variety of clients in the course of their career. Some typical responsibilities for a healthcare consultant may include: Developing a needs assessment with the client Streamlining a client’s management structure and staffing Upgrading a client’s IT and data-sharing capabilities Introducing cost-effective and efficient new business models Adapting modern, industry-wide best practices in isolated settings Educating staff and execs throughout the course of a transition period According to PayScale (Dec. 2021), healthcare consultants earn over $79,015 a year, on average. There are many educational pathways to becoming a healthcare consultant, but most will have graduate-level education in the form of an MBA with a healthcare focus, and MHA, or an MPH. Work experience in related fields is at a premium for healthcare consultants, who are often primarily managing other managers in the course of their work. Certain specialized certifications with particular hardware and software clients (such as Epic, a healthcare software service) may be at a premium, depending upon a consultant’s focus. The National Society of Certified Healthcare Business Consultants (NSCHBC) is a professional organization that allows for networking, collaboration, and continuing education amongst healthcare consultants. It also offers pathways to professional certification. Kimmy Gustafson Writer Kimmy Gustafson is a freelance writer with a passion for sharing stories of bravery. Her love for world-traveling began when her family moved to Spain when she was six and since then, she has lived overseas extensively, visited six continents, and traveled to over 25 countries. She is fluent in Spanish and conversational in French. When not writing or parenting she can be found kiteboarding, hiking, or cooking. Related Programs. 1 Online Bachelor’s in Health Information Management (HIM) 2 Online Bachelor’s in Healthcare Administration 3 Online Graduate Certificates in Health Informatics 4 Online Master of International Health Management 5 Online Master’s Degrees in Food Safety – Regulatory Affairs & Quality Assurance Related FAQs. 1 How Do I Become a Certified Health Data Analyst (CHDA)? 2 Are there 100 Percent Online MS in Health Informatics Programs? 3 Are there Online MS in Healthcare Informatics Programs That Waive or Do Not Require the GRE? 4 How Do I Become a Health Insurance Underwriter? 5 What Can You Do With a Master’s Degree in Bioinformatics? Related Posts. 12 February 2019 Ten Trends Driving Growth in Healthcare Jobs. Innovations in healthcare are pointing to an increasing need for healthcare administration, healthcare IT, and healthcare policy professionals. But the underlying trends are intertwined, and interdisciplinary partnerships are necessary to redesign a modern vision of healthcare. 23 April 2021 Healthcare Documentation Integrity Week: An Expert’s Guide on What to Know. This year’s Healthcare Documentation Integrity Week (HDI Week) takes place May 16-22, 2021. It’s a weeklong celebration of the contributions healthcare documentation specialists make toward ensuring complete and accurate patient records. Previously known as medical transcriptionist week, it has transitioned to its current title in order to better recognize the wide spectrum of healthcare professionals who contribute to the integrity of the medical record. In an age of increasing digitization and data analytics, this has never been more important. 1 March 2021 Healthcare Debates: Should Health Insurance Cover Dentistry? Considering the benefits to having dental care and the linkages between oral health and overarching health, this article explores why dental care isn’t covered by health insurance—and whether or not integration should occur. 22 January 2019 Universities with an Outstanding Health Informatics Faculty. Check out exceptional health informatics faculty members at four notable universities: Boston University's Metropolitan College, the University of Scranton, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the University of Cincinnati. 2 January 2019 Specialists Wanted: In-Demand Skills for Healthcare Administrators. Healthcare is the biggest industry in the United States. While the number of physicians has grown in tandem with the growth in population since the 1970s, the number of healthcare administrators has risen by 3,200 percent in the same timeframe, and that number is still set to grow further.
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Result 20
TitleExploring Career Opportunities in Healthcare Administration
Urlhttps://www.citycollege.edu/career-opportunities-healthcare-administration/
DescriptionAdministration is one of the many healthcare careers in demand now, and City College offers a Bachelor's degree in Healthcare Administration
Date
Organic Position15
H1Exploring Career Opportunities in Healthcare Administration
H2Clinical Manager – Running the Show
Assistant Administrator – Entry-Level Management
Nursing Home Administrator – Protecting the Vulnerable
Health Information Manager – Working with Data
Health and Social Services Manager – Working in the Community
Other Options for a Healthcare Administration Degree
H3Insurance underwriter
Hospice administrator
Home healthcare administrator
Human resources
H2WithAnchorsClinical Manager – Running the Show
Assistant Administrator – Entry-Level Management
Nursing Home Administrator – Protecting the Vulnerable
Health Information Manager – Working with Data
Health and Social Services Manager – Working in the Community
Other Options for a Healthcare Administration Degree
BodyExploring Career Opportunities in Healthcare AdministrationA career in healthcare is a popular choice as this industry continues to grow. The strong growth, which is expected to be 18 percent and much faster than average job growth through 2026, means that there are a lot of opportunities for people interested in any type of healthcare job. There will be thousands of new positions opening up now and in the coming years as the aging population demands more healthcare services.If you want to get in on the healthcare boom as a way to enjoy a rewarding career that is also stable and allows you to earn a good income, administration is an option to consider. This is a great choice for someone who wants to be in healthcare but isn’t so sure about working with patients in a hands-on way. Administration is one of the many healthcare careers in demand now and all you need to get into the field is a degree in healthcare administration.It may seem like a big commitment to get that degree, but once you do, there will be several choices for your future career in healthcare. From working as the manager of a small private practice with a few physicians to working behind the scenes at a large hospital to manage patient records or even becoming and assistant administrator to the person in charge of the entire medical center, this one degree gives you a lot of options.Clinical Manager – Running the Show. A clinical manager is a broad job title that refers to healthcare administrators that manage a medical facility or department within a larger facility. The types of facilities they may manage include physician offices and private practices, residential care facilities, health clinics, hospitals, and departments within hospitals. The only educational requirement for working as a clinical manager is a bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration, although most managers need to get some experience in smaller departments or offices before landing jobs managing large facilities or hospital departments.As a clinical manager you would be expected to ensure that a facility or department runs smoothly, develop and set goals and objectives for improvement, keep up to date with healthcare regulations, hire and train staff, manage finances and budgets, make the work schedules for staff, keep and manage records, and communicate regularly with physicians and other staff members.Healthcare management is lucrative, with a starting salary range of $36,000 – $81, 000 and even more for top earners. This is also one of the most in demand health careers with 20 percent growth in coming years. This is a career for someone dedicated to healthcare and good at leadership. It requires managing a lot of people and knowing that the well-being of patients depends on that leadership.Assistant Administrator – Entry-Level Management. If your dream is to become a top clinical manager, you may want to start out as an assistant administrator. Right out of college with a degree in healthcare administration, you are more likely to get this kind of position so that you can get more on-the-job experience in managing and leading in a healthcare setting. The responsibilities for an assistant administrator are similar to those of a clinical manager.Just like clinical managers, assistant administrators work in a variety of settings, from small offices to large hospitals. The assistant, though, reports to a manager or administrator in larger facilities. An assistant administrator may be in charge of one office or department but still report to another administrator. The average salary for an assistant administrator is just over $63,000 per year.Nursing Home Administrator – Protecting the Vulnerable. With a degree in healthcare administration you can find jobs in specific settings, like in nursing homes. As the population ages, nursing homes are becoming more important settings for healthcare. These facilities need educated and trained administrators to manage staff and budgets, to keep operations running smoothly, to recruit the best staff, and to ensure that they are operating within state and federal regulations and providing the best care to vulnerable residents.Nursing home administration is a specialty field and there are a lot of regulations determining how these facilities operate. They are in place to protect patients and because of them states require some type of certification for administrators in nursing homes. A good degree program in healthcare administration should qualify you to get certified and land a job in this field. Health Information Manager – Working with Data. Also known as a medical records or health information technician, a health information manager is a professional who manages and organizes all the data related to patients in doctor offices, hospitals, nursing homes, and other types of medical facilities. Some examples of the duties they are responsible for include:Organizing and managing the data in clinical databases.Keeping patient records safe and confidential.Recording data electronically.Collecting and storing patient data.Analyzing and reporting on patient information.Tracking the outcomes for patients to monitor and asses the quality of care.Monitor and review patient records, looking for errors or omissions.Communicating with nurses and doctors about patient records.As with other healthcare careers, positions for health information managers are increasing in number. These professionals made an average salary of $38,040 in 2016 and those in the top tier earned nearly $60,000 that year. Most health information managers work in hospitals and physicians offices and work typical, full time hours. Health and Social Services Manager – Working in the Community. With a degree in healthcare administration you can put your training to use managing, coordinating, and supervising social service and public health programs. They often work for the local, state, or federal government and for social service programs and community health organizations. These may include general programs or those that aim to provide services for specific groups, like veterans, children, or the homeless.Social service managers work with community members and stakeholders to manage and develop programs and services, design and lead programs, monitor services and programs and analyze them for effectiveness, and plan outreach programs to help target and assist more community members. They write proposals to get grant money to fund services and assess the effectiveness and reach of programs, seeking to make improvements where possible. These healthcare professionals can earn up to $100,000 or more, but they typically have years of experience in healthcare before landing these lucrative jobs. Other Options for a Healthcare Administration Degree. Working as a clinical manager, assistant administrator, records manager, or social services manager are just some of the opportunities you have with a healthcare administration. These are the positions that many people with this education choose, but your options aren’t limited to the obvious. There are some other jobs that your degree will prepare you for:Insurance underwriter. With a degree that trains you in both healthcare and business administration, you’ll be in high demand with health insurance companies. An underwriter reviews insurance claims and determines if they can be accepted or should be rejected according to the terms of the plan.Hospice administrator. Like a nursing home administrator, this type of professional manages a specific type of healthcare facility. Hospice care is an essential and compassionate type of care that helps terminal patients enjoy a good quality of life.Home healthcare administrator. Receiving healthcare in the home is a popular choice for people who can no longer be independent but do not want to go to a nursing home. Companies that provide these services need trained and educated healthcare administrators.Human resources. With your degree you will have all the skills needed to work in the human resources department of a hospital or medical facility, combining your knowledge of healthcare and managing staff.Working in healthcare is a great choice if you want to contribute and have a career that is meaningful and helps people. Not everyone is cut out for the hands-on work that nurses and allied health professionals do, but with good management skills and knowledge of healthcare, you can make a real difference working as an administrator. These professionals are crucial for ensuring that medical facilities operate as they should and that patients get the benefit of high quality care.To get into this field and have access to all these diverse career choices, all you need to do is earn your bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration. A good program will teach you about the U.S. healthcare system, finance, healthcare laws, marketing, information management, and more. You can find a program that offers all the training you need as well as affordable tuition and a flexible course schedule so you can learn while still working or taking care of your family. Check out the options you have for healthcare administration degrees in Florida. Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinRECENT POSTS. Veteran's Day 2021 12th November, 2021 City College Celebrates Constitution Day! 17th September, 2021 EMS 20th January, 2020 Dr. Amanda Little, National Medical Assistants Week 23rd October, 2019 National Veterinary Technician Week: Meridith Mahunik, Hollywood Instructor 15th October, 2019 National Veterinary Technician Week: Molly Garcia, Hollywood Instructor 15th October, 2019 National Veterinary Technician Week: Bianca Graves, Hollywood Instructor 15th October, 2019 National Veterinary Technician Week: Dr. Watson, Hollywood Instructor 15th October, 2019 National Veterinary Technician Week: Kim Augustin, Hollywood Program Chair 15th October, 2019 National Veterinary Technician Week: Hunter Martin, CVT, Gainesville Instructor 14th October, 2019 Archives. 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Result 21
TitleWhat Can You Do With A Healthcare Administration Degree?
Urlhttps://www.phoenix.edu/blog/what-can-you-do-with-a-healthcare-administration-degree.html
DescriptionInterested in a healthcare administration degree? Learn about the many career opportunities available, their salaries, and their requirements. Read now!
DateApr 15, 2021
Organic Position16
H1What can you do with a Healthcare Administration Degree? Careers, tips and more
H2At a glance
How do I start a career in healthcare administration?
What is a Healthcare Administration Degree?
What Can I Do with a Healthcare Administration Degree?
How to find a job in healthcare administration
Healthcare administration careers
What you’ll learn with a Healthcare Administration Degree at UOPX
Get started with your Health Administration Degree
H3Healthcare management
Medical records manager
Healthcare administrator
Program manager
H2WithAnchorsAt a glance
How do I start a career in healthcare administration?
What is a Healthcare Administration Degree?
What Can I Do with a Healthcare Administration Degree?
How to find a job in healthcare administration
Healthcare administration careers
What you’ll learn with a Healthcare Administration Degree at UOPX
Get started with your Health Administration Degree
BodyWhat can you do with a Healthcare Administration Degree? Careers, tips and more By Brian Fairbanks April 15, 2021 • 6 minute read At a glance. Healthcare administration graduates are typically responsible for managing or directing at medical facilities to improve overall efficiency. The demand for healthcare administrators is high. The BLS projects 32% job growth through 2029. According to BLS, the median annual wage for medical and health services managers is $104,000 as of May 2020. There are many opportunities for continuing education and advancement in healthcare administration careers. Healthcare administration is one of the fastest-growing employment sectors in the U.S.[1] and critical to the effective functioning healthcare systems. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), management careers in medical and health services are expected to grow by 32 percent between 2019 and 2029.[2] And one way to pursue a career in public health, nursing, or healthcare is by completing a relevant degree program. Earning a degree can lay the groundwork for a number of careers in the medical field. It’s also a great option for those without a lot of time to go back to school as these degree programs can often be completed in fewer than four years. Once you have a healthcare administration degree and relevant work experience, opportunities might include positions that are responsible for managing, directing, and planning and coordinating business activities. Depending on your career path, you’ll work at hospitals, insurance companies, clinics, and/or doctors’ offices. It can even be the first step on the path toward a career in nursing or related healthcare fields. How do I start a career in healthcare administration? The best and most common pathway way to enter the healthcare administration field is to earn a Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration. For others, having a professional background and relevant experience in medicine or business may help them transition into healthcare administration. What is a Healthcare Administration Degree? At the University of Phoenix, a Health Care Administration Degree is a four-year, 120 credit program that’s offered entirely online. Students will take 15 general education courses, 17 core education courses focused on improving their healthcare understanding, and 3 electives of their choice. Once their core courses are complete, students focus on their healthcare interests by selecting an elective track in one of the following: Health Administration Lifespan Management Retail Health Management Health Information Systems. A Health Care Administration Degree is for students interested in business management and healthcare policies. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and an aging baby-boom generation, healthcare services and administrators that manage them are in high demand. What Can I Do with a Healthcare Administration Degree? There are numerous benefits to having a health care administration degree, especially for those pursuing a career in administration. Mastering skills like management, leadership, and leveraging data and technology can help prepare degree holders for careers in the dynamic and evolving healthcare industry. How to find a job in healthcare administration. When looking for employment in healthcare administration, it can be effective to search for terms like health services manager healthcare administration healthcare administrator healthcare executives healthcare manager nursing home administrator While the list is far from exhaustive, it’s a good place to start your search. The healthcare industry, after all, includes many different career paths worth exploring. Keep in mind that many careers require a bachelor’s degree for entry-level positions and at least five years of experience for middle management roles. A master’s degree in healthcare administration can help graduates enter this upper tier more quickly and open the door for even higher-level roles. Healthcare administration careers. We’ve already established that earning your bachelor’s or master’s degree can be a great way to get your foot in the door, but what healthcare administration careers are available to you once you enter the field? Below is a summary of several positions you can obtain with a degree in healthcare administration. Healthcare management. Overview: Do you like the idea of overseeing a cozy but busy medical office? Healthcare managers have the important job of managing medical offices, including a nursing home’s office or a large medical center’s administrative department. This role involves keeping an eye out for any billing problems, personnel issues, and dwindling medical supplies, as well as supervising the office budget and making sure departmental spending is on target. National Average Salary: The median annual wage for healthcare managers was $104,280 in May 2020. However, it depends on where you work. Healthcare managers can potentially earn a median salary of about $86,820 while working in a nursing home or assisted-living facility; $91,600 while working in a doctor’s office; or $95,320 in an outpatient clinic. Education Requirements: Medical and health services managers typically need a least a bachelor’s degree for entry-level and mid-level positions. A master’s degree may be preferred by employers seeking to fill upper healthcare management roles. Job Outlook: 32% from 2019-2029 Medical records manager. Overview: A medical records manager, or a health information manager, protects and oversees patient health data. This involves managing a clinical database, documenting a patient’s information, and reviewing medical records. Most medical records and health information specialists work full time. In healthcare facilities that are always open, such as hospitals, specialists may work evening or overnight shifts. National Average Salary: According to Indeed, the national average salary for a medical records manager is $59,892 per year. Education Requirements: A bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration. Further certification in health information technology may also be required by employers. Job Outlook: 8% from 2019-2029 Healthcare administrator. Overview: Healthcare administrators plan, direct, and coordinate activities that help hospitals and offices run efficiently. These managers are responsible for making essential purchases, so the building never runs out of lifesaving and other important supplies. They also process paperwork, including confidential and sensitive data such as patient records. Working in hospital administration is similar to working in a medical office, except that the experience is amplified. This role specifically involves more employees, more patients, and more work. National Average Salary: The median annual wage for healthcare administrators was $87,970 in May 2020. Education Requirements: A healthcare administration degree. Job Outlook: 6% from 2019-2029. Program manager. Overview: Healthcare program managers are not as well-known among the healthcare professions, but they are crucial to medical offices, hospitals, and any public health company. A program manager keeps track of all healthcare operations in the building, makes sure medical staff are assigned the correct patients, and ensures personnel have the equipment they need to deliver effective healthcare services. A program manager also keeps tabs on all departments to make sure they are following local and federal laws, as well as state-mandated guidelines. Ultimately, this role involves looking at the data to make sure everything is operating efficiently, checking that supplies are well stocked, and ensuring that anyone undergoing an operation or other medical treatment has adequate staff taking care of them. National Average Salary: According to the BLS, coordinating business activities for a healthcare firm commanded a median salary of $100,980 in 2019. Education Requirements: As Zip Recruiter and other sources note, a healthcare administration employer in the healthcare administration industry may require a master’s degree. However, most will only require a business or healthcare administration degree. Job Outlook: 32% from 2019-2029 What you’ll learn with a Healthcare Administration Degree at UOPX. Pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration online at University of Phoenix can help you embark on a new, rewarding career path in healthcare administration and healthcare administration. As a healthcare administration student, you’ll learn all about these key healthcare concepts: Electronic health records Medical terminology Business communications Organizational behavior Healthcare accounting Get started with your Health Administration Degree. Frequently asked questions Q: Can I get my health care administration degree online? A: The BHSA and MHA degree programs at University of Phoenix are available 100-percent online and may be available at some campus locations. Q: Why should I get a degree from University of Phoenix? A: Graduates of our Bachelor of Science in Health Administration degree program—or any other program we offer—receive Career Services for Life™ from University of Phoenix! It’s just one of the many ways we help support our graduates as they embark on their unique career paths. We offer exceptional flexibility! If you have a job (or multiple jobs), children, take care of older family members, live out of commuting distance or have any other complication that prevents you from attending in-person classes every day for multiple semesters, you may benefit from the convenience of online classes. We keep schedules flexible so you can get your degree quickly. We want to make sure you get your Bachelor of Science in Health Administration or healthcare administration degree online—and as soon as possible. Best of all, in most cases, you’ll be able to earn your healthcare administration degree without starting from scratch. We offer the opportunity to turn your real-life work experience into college credit. Click here to learn how you can save money with this exciting option. Q: How much do healthcare administration majors typically make? A: University of Phoenix does not guarantee job or salary outcomes. Salaries are dependent on characteristics specific to the individual, including geographic location, experience, and competition, among other factors. However, as stated above, a healthcare administration major BLS reports that the 2020 median salary for medical and health services managers is between $73,000 and more than $131,000, depending on industry, location, and experience. A Bachelor of Science in Health Administration degree from University of Phoenix can open the door to this field where the rewards are as diverse as the roles. [1] [2] https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm Program Finder Chat 844.YES.UOPX Call Us Request Info Apply Now Apply close Transcript: close modal
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Title7 Careers for Health Service Administration Graduates | Scranton Univ
Urlhttps://elearning.scranton.edu/resources/article/7-careers-for-health-service-administration-graduates/
DescriptionWhen you’ve graduated with your health administration degree, what career options are obtainable beyond the hospital arena? We're here to tell you
Date
Organic Position17
H17 Careers for Health Service Administration Graduates
H2What is Health Services Administration?
Entry and Mid-Level Management Positions:
Advance your career in Healthcare
Career Options for Health Service Administration Graduates:
Get Started
Related Articles
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat is Health Services Administration?
Entry and Mid-Level Management Positions:
Advance your career in Healthcare
Career Options for Health Service Administration Graduates:
Get Started
Related Articles
Body7 Careers for Health Service Administration Graduates Recent transformations within the health care industry have given healthcare executives the opportunity to consider more diverse career options. An increase in the shift from medical procedures being done in a hospital setting to them being performed in private practices has created the need for health services administrators to manage these practices as successful businesses.  What is Health Services Administration? Healthcare administration careers integrate business, policy and science to manage the fiscal and human resources that are necessary to deliver valuable health services. These services may include:1.    Managing a clinic’s database2.    Directing hospital services3.    Creating budgets for the health department4.    Designing policies for health insurance companies If you choose this profession, you could work in resource development, administration or in public or private sectors. Although health services administrators frequently find employment in hospitals and medical centers, there are opportunities in nursing homes, retirement communities, and physician practices.    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) lists other facilities where healthcare executives can find employment opportunities, some of which include: Home health agenciesOutpatient facilitiesHealthcare associationsConsulting firmsIntegrated Delivery Systems (IDS)Managed care organizations:Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO)Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO)Research institutions and universitiesThe Public Health Department Entry and Mid-Level Management Positions:. If you decide on a career in healthcare management, you may begin your career in an entry- or mid-level management position. This position may concentrate on a specific area, such as: Government relationsFinanceHuman resourcesNursing administrationMedical staff relationsPatient care services According to a healthcare study, these professionals spend a great deal of time, and place a high value on, problem solving, communicating, collaborations with other disciplines, making decisions, containing costs, and developing their staff’s skills. Advance your career with The University of Scranton Advance your career in Healthcare. MHA Dual MBA – MHA Health Administration Executive Certificate Career Options for Health Service Administration Graduates:. The “Traditional” Administrator Individuals who begin their health administration career with an associate’s degree frequently find employment as traditional administrators. These administrators order supplies and organize schedules. They also navigate medical software to bill patients, access patient records, and perform other management functions.    Assistant Manager/Administrator An experienced administrator may be given the responsibility of overseeing a facility’s employees, finances, and procedures. This allows health administrators to obtain higher paying positions. Responsibilities will include: Balancing each department’s budget Managing group practices with numerous locations Reviewing projects It is also possible to find an assistant manager position with a nonprofit group, a local health agency, as well as with a state or national health agency. Clinical Research Manager Reinforcement from scientific advancements has helped the field of clinical research continue to grow. The complexity of clinical research requires coordination of researchers, study participants, physicians and pharmaceutical executives. Federal oversight measures must also be addressed. Individuals who choose to pursue a degree in health service administration and become clinical research managers must also be proficient with financial management and budget planning.    Social Media Directors, Health Facility Marketing Managers or PR Social media campaigns and public relations are a fundamental aspect of the healthcare business. To become a social media director, PR specialist, or health facility marketing manager, health administration students need to study health marketing or health communications. Nursing Home Administration To become an administrator in a nursing home, you should consider taking courses in gerontology. Courses such as this can help prepare you for the administration aspect of your career, as well as offer you insight into the special needs of the patients you are helping. Clinical Leader/Manager A professional that has knowledge relating to a specific clinical area is referred to as a clinical leader or clinical manager. Specific clinical areas include neonatal care and radiology. Once a clinician earns their health administration leadership degree, they may be hired as a clinical leader in their department. Health Information Managers Health information managers are responsible for maintaining and securing patients’ electronic medical records. These managers may also supervise a team of medical coding employees or work with IT professionals to make sure that all the records are legally compliant, accurate, and easily accessible. The field of healthcare management requires talented individuals who can assist in introducing and managing the many changes that are taking place within the healthcare industry. As a healthcare executive, you can make a substantial contribution to improve the health of the residents in the communities you serve. Get Started. Related Articles. Forging a Personalized Career Path with a Degree in Health Informatics Health Informatics: The Marriage of Healthcare, IT, Big Data, and Analytics The Power of Big Data: Career Opportunities in Health Informatics The Benefits of Enrolling in a CAHME-Accredited MHA Program Why You Should Start Your Career in Hospital Administration View All
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Result 23
TitleIs Healthcare Administration a Good Career Choice?: Pros & Cons — Pacific College
Urlhttps://www.pacific-college.edu/blog/is-healthcare-administration-a-good-career-choice
DescriptionIs healthcare administration a good career choice for you? We have listed some of its pros & cons to help you decide whether this field of work is the right fit
DateAug 18, 2021
Organic Position18
H1Is Healthcare Administration a Good Career Choice?: Pros & Cons
H2What is Healthcare Administration?
Is Healthcare Administration a Good Career Choice?: Pros
Cons of Healthcare Administration Careers
H3Plenty of career paths
In-demand and growing field of work
Competitive salaries
Fast-paced work environment
Career satisfaction
Strict regulations
Longer hours
Prone to stress
H2WithAnchorsWhat is Healthcare Administration?
Is Healthcare Administration a Good Career Choice?: Pros
Cons of Healthcare Administration Careers
BodyIs Healthcare Administration a Good Career Choice?: Pros & Cons Making career decisions is often one of the most difficult choices one has to make, especially in today’s shifting labor market. However tough it is to decide, having a set career choice will give you a sense of direction and clarity toward the next step in your career. While it is not all plain sailing, with a clear vision in mind, establishing yourself in the profession you desire will become a less challenging task.If you’re considering a career in healthcare administration, but you’re in a quandary about whether this is the career for you, we have listed some of the pros and cons of working in this field to help you make more informed decisions. But first, let’s define healthcare administration, so you are best prepared for the demands of this profession. What is Healthcare Administration?Healthcare administration and management are growing fields in the healthcare industry that are crucial for the effective functioning of healthcare facilities. If you choose to be a healthcare administrator, you will be in charge of the management of either an entire facility, a specific department, or a medical practice. In this case, the definition of “management” can vary depending on the size of the facility and whether it is an entry-level management role or one in which you take on more responsibility. However, the typical duties of a healthcare administrator include:Improving the delivery of healthcare services,Setting departmental or organizational goals, Keeping up to date with laws and regulations that apply to the healthcare industry and ensuring compliance, Preparing work schedules for staff, Drafting budgets and monitoring them, Organizing and monitoring patient records, etc. Is Healthcare Administration a Good Career Choice?: Pros. If you’re still skeptical about whether healthcare administration is the right career choice for you, here are some of its pros and cons to consider and evaluate.Plenty of career paths. If you are one who likes variety, a profile in healthcare administration is the perfect first step toward plenty of choices for career paths. While all of the jobs listed below are leadership roles in healthcare, you can take your pick depending on your interests and preferences. Some of the many jobs that you will qualify for with a degree in healthcare administration include: Hospital manager/CEO, Nursing home manager,Diagnostics laboratory manager,Healthcare marketing manager,Health insurance specialist,Medical equipment manager,Wellness program administrator. Interested in pursuing a Healthcare Administration degree in California? Fill out the form and get all the detailed information you need regarding your chosen program. In-demand and growing field of work. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment in healthcare administration is growing much faster than the average rate for all occupations. These statistics project a 32 percent growth from 2019 to 2029 for the health care administrator job outlook. This demand for healthcare administration and management roles comes from a number of different factors such as the ageing baby boomer generation and the increasing longevity, which have consequently grown the need for more healthcare services.Competitive salaries. Jobs in the healthcare industry are known for their stability and domination in the salary ladder. Healthcare administration, as well, is a lucrative career path with quite the responsibilities, but that is worth the challenge. According to the BLS, in May 2020, the median healthcare administration jobs salary was $104,280. Fast-paced work environment. While a fast-paced work environment may not be everyone’s cup of tea, if you enjoy the challenge of switching between work environments, a career in healthcare administration is the choice for you. This path is also great for people who have an affinity for working in healthcare yet are not cut for or don’t prefer directly working with patients. Instead, this field of work involves the management of almost everything that makes a healthcare facility, nursing staff and doctors included. This makes for a challenging but exciting work environment that consists of working in an office setting, but often involves face-to-face interactions with the facility’s staff, meeting with investors (if it’s a private facility), board meetings, etc. Therefore, it is safe to say that work as a healthcare administrator will never get boring. Career satisfaction. Being a healthcare administrator or manager means your job will directly impact the community you live in and contribute to the improvement of healthcare services that your facility offers. While you will not be working with patients, your work will help both them and the medical staff to have optimal conditions for receiving and offering treatment. Knowing that the way you manage a department or entire facility will have such a great impact and allow you to give back makes this career path a highly satisfactory one.Cons of Healthcare Administration Careers. While this career is ideal for many, it does come with some downsides.Strict regulations. The healthcare industry is one of the most regulated in the U.S., seeing that numerous regulatory bodies and programs apply to various aspects and activities of this industry. As a healthcare administrator, you will have to stay up to date with each law and regulation that concerns the healthcare industry. Moreover, you have to ensure that the facility or department you manage is compliant with each of the aforementioned. This can be a demanding responsibility, but that is absolutely crucial to the success of a healthcare facility. Longer hours. While most healthcare administrators and managers work a 40 hour week, it often occurs that they will have to work more than that. Healthcare facilities such as hospitals and nursing homes are typically open 24/7; therefore, healthcare administrators may need to be on call and available in case of emergencies. These settings may also require working at irregular hours such as during evenings or weekends.Prone to stress. Seeing as the fate of a hospital, nursing home, or any other facility you work for will ultimately depend on your management, this job does come with its fair share of stress and challenges. It often happens that healthcare administrators take the stress of their work to their homes, which can significantly affect their personal lives as well. While the rewards of this job are definitely worth the while, finding coping mechanisms and strategies to deal with stress from the job is also crucial.These were some of the possible advantages and disadvantages to expect from working in healthcare administration. It is now up to you to evaluate whether you are up for both the challenges and gratification that come with this career path. Faton SopaAugust 18, 2021 Facebook0 Twitter LinkedIn0 Reddit Tumblr Pinterest0 0 Likes
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Result 24
TitleJobs and Career Outlook | Master of Health Administration | Purdue - Department of Public Health - Purdue University
Urlhttps://www.purdue.edu/hhs/public-health/graduate/graduate-degrees/mha-online/job-outlook.php
DescriptionDemand for health services managers is projected to grow 32 percent in the next decade. Find out more about career opportunities for MHA degree holders
Date
Organic Position19
H1Online MHA Program: Job Outlook
H2Get training for leadership roles in health administration
H3Explore diverse career opportunities as a health administrator
H2WithAnchorsGet training for leadership roles in health administration
BodyOnline MHA Program: Job Outlook Get training for leadership roles in health administration. The senior positions in health administration require professionals with interdisciplinary degrees that span deep understanding of organization operations, finances, management, and the healthcare landscape. Due to increasing demand for hospitals and clinics to provide quality and affordable care for larger numbers of patients, hospital administration jobs are also growing to meet that demand. Explore diverse career opportunities as a health administrator. Per the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of medical and health services managers is projected to grow 32 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. As the large baby-boom population ages and people are embracing healthier lifestyles, a better life expectancy will continue to increase demand for healthcare services. Nationally, the average income for Hospital CEOs’ is $153,084, Practice Managers is $98.714, and Insurance Directors is $105,514. Among other positions, the online master’s degree in healthcare administration prepares students to work as: Hospital CEO Hospital Administrator Clinical Director Clinical Informatics Manager Insurance Director Practice Manager Home Health Administrators Medical and Health Service Manager Practice Administrator Master of Health Administration (Online) Overview Cost Courses Job Outlook Admissions Virtual Events Faculty FAQs Request for Information
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Result 25
TitleHealthcare Administration Career Opportunities - Valdosta State University
Urlhttps://www.valdosta.edu/colleges/business/graduate/our-programs/mba-hcad/healthcare-administration-career-opportunities.php
DescriptionHealthcare Administration Career Opportunities
Date
Organic Position20
H1Healthcare Administration Career Opportunities
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyHealthcare Administration Career Opportunities Sector GrowthThe health care sector is a large component of the US economy. Expenditures on health care account for a growing share (almost 14%) of the US Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Currently 1 in 6 new jobs in the American economy is in the health care sector. While the majority of these new jobs are for actual care givers, an ever-increasing share of these jobs are going to health services managers. In 2012, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that employment of medical and health services managers is expected to grow much faster than average (increase 23%) with an average salary of more than $88,000 annually. Given an aging population, as well as population increases from immigration, there is no reason to believe there will be a reversal in these trends. Opportunities for managers will be related to the areas of growth in the industry. Job growth is forecasted to be particularly good in home healthcare, long-term care, managed care organizations, and consulting firms. The BLS reported that in the year 2012 medical and health services managers accounted for 315,500 jobs and will add 73,300 jobs by 2022.  In Georgia’s “Hot Careers to 2020”, prepared by the Georgia Department of Labor, the health services sub-sector is projected to grow by 120,000 jobs and employ nearly 540,000 personnel by 2020. Job SettingsHealth services managers can work in organizations where either health care is delivered or organizations that support the delivery of health care.  Health services managers can expect to hold positions such as supervisor, clinic or program coordinator, and department manager in larger organizations, or managing directors of smaller organizations. The potential for job advancement is great because many health care organizations are large, with multiple levels of management responsibility through the chain of command. Some examples of the settings where graduates work are: Hospitals and hospital systems Physician practices and clinics Long-term care facilities Home healthcare agencies Hospices Community health centers                                                                  Managed care organizations Health Science centers Medical supply/equipment manufacturers Pharmaceutical firm Biotechnology companies Consulting firms Local/State/Federal health Agencies Health insurance companies Career InformationExplore the field of health services management by visiting the following sources. American College of Healthcare Executives ACHE Directory of Post Graduate Fellowships Hospital Administration - American Hospital Association Health Finance - Healthcare Financial Management Association Information Systems - Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Supply Chain - Association for Healthcare Resource & Materials Management Long-Term Care - International Association of Homes and Services for the Aging Managed Care – America’s Health Insurance Plans Office Practice Management - Medical Group Management Association Public Health - American Public Health Association Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook for Medical and Health Services Managers Contact Us Additional Links MBA in Healthcare Administration Healthcare Administration Career Opportunities MBA-HCAD Program of Study FAQs 229.333.5241 229.259.5504 Campus Address Rea and Lillian Steele North Campus Pendleton Drive Valdosta, GA 31698 Mailing Address 1500 N. Patterson St. Valdosta, GA 31698 Monday-Thursday8:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Contact Us Valdosta State University1500 N. Patterson St.Valdosta, Georgia 31698 General Information229-333-5800 VSU Facebook VSU Twitter VSU Instagram VSU Youtube Newsroom Safety Information Employment Ethics Hotline Accessibility Privacy Statement Clery Reporting Apply Text Only Request Info Visit Give Now © 2018 Valdosta State University - A Comprehensive University of the University System of Georgia
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Result 26
TitleMaster of Health Administration: Career Opportunities | Hofstra University
Urlhttps://www.hofstra.edu/master-health-administration/career-opportunities.html
Description
Date
Organic Position21
H1Career Opportunities
H2Search
Significant Career Growth and Opportunities
H3
H2WithAnchorsSearch
Significant Career Growth and Opportunities
BodyCareer Opportunities Graduates of the Master of Health Administration go on to careers in health services and as healthcare administrators in a number of diverse settings, including: Hospitals Managed care organizations Medical group practices Ambulatory care Long-term care Home healthcare facilities Insurance and pharmaceutical firms Consulting firms Government agencies Nonprofit organizations Positions can be held in the following areas: Finance and budgeting Forecasting Scheduling Capital improvements Human resources Operations management Quality control and improvement Health technology Policy Information technology Strategic planning Moreover, health and healthcare administrators are in many cases central to the implementation and management of new policies and procedures meant to address trends in the dynamic health services landscape. Significant Career Growth and Opportunities. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job prospects for medical and health service managers are likely favorable. The BLS estimates a 32% increase in employment for medical and health service managers from 2019-2029. Notably, the BLS states that "candidates with a master's degree in health administration or a related field, as well as knowledge of IT systems, will likely have the best prospects." Growth in the demand for medical and health services managers is not limited to hospitals, as the BLS notes. For instance, as baby boomers age, demand for nursing home administrators should increase and as medical group practices grow, demand for managers of these practices should increase as well.
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Result 27
Title
Urlhttps://www.michiganstateuniversityonline.com/resources/healthcare-management/reasons-to-choose-a-career-in-healthcare-management/
Description
DateDec 14, 2020
Organic Position22
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Bodyessful. Incapsula incident ID: 621000680160321253-131769570912178438
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Result 28
TitleCareers | Master of Healthcare Administration | Utica College
Urlhttps://programs.online.utica.edu/programs/mha-health-care-administration/career-outlook
DescriptionUtica's online MHA prepares you to implement strategies, analyze health care accounting processes, and more. Learn about health administration careers
Date
Organic Position23
H1Master of Healthcare Administration (MHA): Career Outlook
H2Lead health care organizations to an efficient and effective future
Request More Information
Key Skills Employers Need
Beyond the Degree
Sources
H3One-on-One Mentors
Job Search Assistance
Career Counseling
Handshake
H2WithAnchorsLead health care organizations to an efficient and effective future
Request More Information
Key Skills Employers Need
Beyond the Degree
Sources
BodyMaster of Healthcare Administration (MHA): Career Outlook Lead health care organizations to an efficient and effective future. Whether you’re looking for a new career in health care or want to advance your current position, Utica College’s Master of Healthcare Administration (MHA) online program will give you the education, training, and experience necessary to obtain management and executive-level positions in health care administration. IN 2019, THE TOP 10% OF HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATORS EARNED $189,000 ANNUALLY132% JOB GROWTH PROJECTED FROM 2019 TO 20291HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATORS WITH MASTER’S DEGREES EARN 9% MORE THAN THOSE WITH BACHELOR’S DEGREES2 Earning your MHA online will prepare you to oversee the administrative aspects of a health care organization, liaise with insurance companies, stakeholders, and the community. You’ll also assist in the transition to paperless records, respond agilely to changing laws and regulations, advocate for patients, and recruit employees. In other words, you’ll graduate ready to work as a versatile health care services manager. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), health care administration positions are projected to increase at a rate of 32 percent from 2019 through 2029 due to an aging population and diversification in the industry.1 While the hospital sector will have the largest employment base, it is projected to grow more slowly due to the proliferation of clinics and outpatient care. Fortunately, there is a growing need for qualified health care administrators in other sectors of the medical field, including emergency preparedness. Our core MHA courses are designed to provide the skills you need to excel in a variety of health care settings. As a health care administrator, you could earn more than $100,980 on average and take advantage of 555,500 job opportunities by 2029.1 You’ll be qualified for specific roles such as: ANCILLARY SERVICES DIRECTOR $96,681/year Ancillary services directors are responsible for the oversight of multiple services/departments within an acute care facility. They are involved in strategy, business operations, fiscal/budgetary management, human resource management, regulatory compliance, and more.3 CLINICAL PROJECT MANAGER $90,680/year Clinical project managers are responsible for planning and scoping projects, tracking project metrics, and developing and implementing project milestones. This can be in the context of clinical trials or other projects within a variety of service organization settings, including government, insurance, corporate, or research agencies.4 NURSING HOME ADMINISTRATOR $90,542/year Nursing home administrators are responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of nursing homes. They manage and develop staff, budget and utilize operational resources, ensure compliance and professional standards are upheld, and more.5 Additional roles: Direct Care CoordinatorInformatics DirectorCompliance OfficerResearch DirectorDirector of Nursing ServicesFacilities ManagerMarketing Director Request More Information. We’d love to get to know you and hear more about your educational and professional goals. If you’d like to learn more about one of our programs, fill out this form and we’ll be in touch: Note: All fields required. Key Skills Employers Need. Identify, articulate, and exhibit leadership attributes in professional work forumsApply systems-thinking applications in personal, team, and health care organization settingsApply best practices in critical-thinking application and creativity in guiding applied research in health care organizationsInterpret and master project management design, development, and evaluation strategies in project workIdentify and discern stakeholder interests in competitive and collaborative health care initiatives Beyond the Degree. We have the tools to help you make your next career move: One-on-One Mentors. Work with your program director and professors for professional mentorship and support. Job Search Assistance. Build your résumé, do mock interviews, and find new opportunities in your area. Career Counseling. Have our experts review your résumé and LinkedIn and learn to stand out from the crowd. Handshake. Register for events, create a visual profile for employers, and apply for jobs and internships through our online portal. Sources. Medical and Health Services Managers. (Sept. 1, 2020). Retrieved Sept. 8, 2020, from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htmMaster’s in Health Care Administration Career Outlook. (2018). Burning Glass Labor Insights. Retrieved Dec. 3, 2018, from https://www.burning-glass.com/products/labor-insight/Average Director of Ancillary Services Salary. (2020). PayScale. Retrieved Sept. 8, 2020, from https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Director_of_Ancillary_Services/SalaryAverage Clinical Project Manager Salary. (2020). PayScale. Retrieved Sept. 8, 2020, from https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Clinical_Project_Manager/SalaryAverage Nursing Home Administrator Salary. (2020). PayScale. Retrieved Sept. 8, 2020, from https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Nursing_Home_Administrator/Salary
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Result 29
TitleChoosing a Career Path in Healthcare Administration - Top Master's in Healthcare Administration
Urlhttps://www.topmastersinhealthcare.com/faq/choosing-a-career-path-in-healthcare-administration/
Description
Date
Organic Position24
H1Choosing a Career Path in Healthcare Administration
H2
H3Top Master's in Healthcare Administration
Health Care Administration: Career Overview
Health Care Administration: Educational Requirements and Available Programs
Health Care Administration: Required Certifications
Health Care Administration: Salaries
Health Care Administration: Job Outlook
Health Care Administration: Getting Started and Moving Forward
Final Remarks
H2WithAnchors
BodyChoosing a Career Path in Healthcare Administration According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the healthcare industry currently employs over 16 million people across the wide range of health-related occupations, and this total is expected to exceed 22 million by 2020. Additionally, the health-related employment opportunities are in no way restricted only to individuals interested in the art of medicine itself. In fact, given the enormous size of the industry and its expected future growth, the field is currently experiencing a demand for capable health care administrators, who help ensure that medical facilities – from small clinics to world-renowned teaching hospitals – operate in an efficient way. Resources: The Top 10 Best Online Master's in Healthcare Administration Programs (MHA) 2016 Top 10 One-Year Online MHA Programs 2016 Health Care Administration: Career Overview. The healthcare industry is so vast and so important to the well-being of the U.S. economy that it should not come as a surprise that it requires competent administrators able to manage the day-to-day operations of a medical facility, as well as provide leadership to the staff. In fact, healthcare administration shares many similarities with other large-scale business structures that require their mid-level managers and executives to lead, and make difficult decisions when such needs to be done. However, in addition to knowledge of accounting, budgeting, and leadership principles, healthcare administrators also need to have an understanding of the healthcare industry as a whole, and their own role in the complex process of providing medical services to patients. Prospective health care administrators can find themselves employed at various positions in the sector. Experienced health managers will easily find employment at large hospitals, smaller clinics, group medical practices, nursing homes, medical research labs, and other organizations specializing in providing medical services. In addition, state and federal health agencies – including, but in no way limited to the United States Department of Health, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Veterans Affairs – are in demand for skilled health care managers, offering a wide range of fellowship and internship opportunities to attract candidates. Finally, they are also sought by various healthcare-related businesses like life and health insurance companies, or international pharmaceutical corporations. Ultimately, the employment possibilities are endless, and individuals that decide to pursue a career in health management will find plenty of room for career advancement. Health Care Administration: Educational Requirements and Available Programs. Over the last several decades, healthcare administration has developed from an addendum to curriculums required for business degrees, into its own unique field of study. As a result, individuals interested in this career path, who may be in the process of applying to institutions of higher learning, can now select healthcare administration as their undergraduate major at many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. While the bachelor's degree in the field is the perfect first step and may result in an employment offer by itself, the sector offers far more opportunities to individuals willing to obtain a post-graduate degree, typically at master's level. There are several different graduate programs in healthcare management accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) – the accrediting organization for master's level degrees in healthcare administration in both the United States and Canada. These programs may grant such diverse degrees as the Master of Public Health(MPH), the similar-but-different Master of Health Administration (MHA) and Master of Health Services Administration (MHSA), and Master of Science in Health Policy and Management. While the above degrees will offer similar opportunities in the field, Master of Health Administration programs tend to concentrate more on the economic and numerical aspects of healthcare management, placing special emphasis on such subjects as accounting, budgeting, cost analysis, and financial planning, how they pertain to individual healthcare facilities. On the other hand, Master of Public Health and Master of Science in Health Policy and Management programs tend to promote a broader approach to the healthcare industry, examining healthcare management not from the point of view of individual medical facilities, but that of entire districts, states, or even countries. However, the majority of the curriculum will overlap, and choosing an MPH instead of an MHA will not disqualify individuals from any employment positions in healthcare administration, but different programs may better prepare them for their future work responsibilities. Health Care Administration: Required Certifications. In addition to the above education requirements, many jurisdictions require certain health care administrators to receive a state license. Currently, all states have this requirement for administrators of nursing homes and nursing care facilities, and some extend this requirement to assisted-living facilities. However, the majority of graduate programs in health management offer help to their current students and alumni in obtaining the required licenses. Health Care Administration: Salaries. Individuals interested in pursuing a graduate degree in healthcare administration, will be happy to find out that the majority of jobs in the field come with high salaries and excellent benefits. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2010 median pay of medical and health services managers was $84,270. However, the above rate takes into account individuals working in the field with only a bachelor's degree, as well as entry-level public health administrators bound by the federal and state pay schedules. The median salary of experienced healthcare administrators with graduate degrees was calculated to be $98,000, with those in senior positions earning over $400K. Finally, those who select a U.S. civil service position and have a master's-level degree, do not fare any worse earning around$70,000 after five years, plus locality adjustment as high as 25% for metropolitan areas like New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles. Health Care Administration: Job Outlook. The current and future employment opportunities for individuals trained in healthcare management and administration are presently well above market average, and this trend has been continuing for quite a while now. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the timeframe between January 2011, and January 2012 alone, over 300,000 healthcare jobs were added to the economy, representing a sixth of all new jobs. This has sharply increased the need for more healthcare administrators. The most recent statistics predict growth rate of 22% over the 2010-2020 decade, translating into almost 70,000 new positions. The above figures do not include additional positions in sectors that have an economic relationship with the healthcare industry. Health Care Administration: Getting Started and Moving Forward. For most individuals, their best route to a successful career in health care administration path will begin with higher education. As already emphasized, applicants with master-level degrees will find more entry-level opportunities, as well as more room for future career advancement. Given the current demand, many applicants will find themselves presented with several open employment positions to choose from. The selection process will often be influenced by personal beliefs regarding healthcare management, and some candidates may seek positions at large hospitals, while others may join one of the public health agencies. The field offers numerous paths for individuals looking to specialize, as it does for those that believe in a more general approach to health care. However, jobs in health care administration require sacrifice and commitment, and the ability to make tough choices that may not be in the best interest of certain patients, but allow the medical facility under their management to continue providing medical care. Many health care administrators strongly identify with their occupations, spending countless hours working on budget projections, new staff schedules, responding to patients' requests and complaints, and addressing many other issues commonly brought to their attention. Efficient health care administrators will possess strong analytical and communication skills, have knowledge of current health regulations, and be able to organize and lead the staff. Final Remarks. Health care administration is without question an excellent career path, given the current demand for healthcare managers, and the above-average job outlook for the next decade. The wide range of employment positions all come with reasonably high salaries and great benefits, and the field offers enormous potential for advancement to motivated and over-achieving individuals.
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Result 30
TitleCareer Outlook | FAU Business
Urlhttps://business.fau.edu/undergraduate/majors/health-administration/career-outlook/
Description
Date
Organic Position25
H1Career Outlook
H2
H3Career Opportunities for Health Administration Majors
Education and Training
How much does the job pay?
How many jobs are there?
What about the future?
Additional Resources
FAU Resources
Undergraduate Programs
Graduate Programs
AACSB Accreditation
Top-50 in Entrepreneurship
Best International Business
Best Undergrad. Business
Best Part-Time MBA
Best MBA in Sport Management
Best Online Bachelor's in Business
Best Online Grad. Business
Best Online MBA
Best Online MBA for Veterans
ACTA Oases of Excellence
FT Executive Education Rankings
H2WithAnchors
BodyCareer Outlook Career Opportunities for Health Administration Majors. Healthcare is a business and, like every business, it needs good management to keep the business running smoothly. Medical and health services managers, also referred to as healthcare executives or healthcare administrators, plan, direct, coordinate, and supervise the delivery of healthcare. These workers are either specialists in charge of a specific clinical department or generalists who manage an entire facility or system. Education and Training. Medical and health services managers must be familiar with management principles and practices. A master's degree in health services administration, long-term care administration, health sciences, public health, public administration, or business administration is the standard credential for most generalist positions in this field. However, a bachelor's degree is adequate for some entry-level positions in smaller facilities, at the departmental level within healthcare organizations, and in health information management. Physicians' offices and some other facilities hire those with on-the-job experience instead of formal education. How much does the job pay? Median annual wages of medical and health services managers were $94,500 in May 2014. The middle 50 percent earned between $62,170 and $104,120. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $56,230, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $165,380. How many jobs are there? Medical and health services managers held about 333,000 jobs in 2014. About 38 percent worked in hospitals, and another 19 percent worked in offices of physicians or in nursing and residential care facilities. Many of the remainder worked in home healthcare services, Federal Government healthcare facilities, outpatient care centers, insurance carriers, and community care facilities for the elderly. What about the future? Employment is projected to grow faster than the average. Job opportunities should be good, especially for applicants with work experience in healthcare and strong business management skills. Employment of medical and health services managers is expected to grow 17 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. The healthcare industry will continue to expand and diversify, requiring managers to help ensure smooth business operations. Additional Resources. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook Research Jobs and Majors U.S. News & World Report Careers FAU Resources. Employment Opportunities LearnHowToBecome.org Contact Us Dr. Pierre Alexandre,Director. 777 Glades RoadBoca Raton, FL 33431email: [email protected] p: (561) 297-3198 office: FL(24) 311 Undergraduate Advising. Mon/ Tue/ Wed/ Fri - Please schedule an appointment on StarfishThursday - Walk-in advising available 8:30am - 4:30pm email: [email protected] p: (561) 297-3688 office: (FW) 102 Related Links Academic Calendar Advising Resources Canvas C.L.A.S.S. Center for Learning and Student Success College of Business Academic Integrity Policy Course Catalog Course Descriptions Course Schedule FAU Career Center FAU Libraries Faculty Profiles Health Administration Faculty Profiles Student Accessibility Services Student Handbook RELATED PROGRAMS Undergraduate Programs. Bachelor of Health Administration Minor in Health Services Minor in Healthcare Information Systems Certificate in Healthcare Information Systems Graduate Programs. Master of Business Administration (MBA) Traditional MBA - Health Administration Master of Health Administration (MHA) Executive Master of Health Administration (EMHA) Accreditation & Rankings AACSB Accreditation. Proud member of AACSB, the premier accreditation agency for business schools Top-50 in Entrepreneurship. Third consecutive ranking from The Princeton Review Best International Business. #19 undergrad. by U.S. News & World Report Best Undergrad. Business. Recognized for best undergrad. business Best Part-Time MBA. Ranked among the best part-time MBA programs Best MBA in Sport Management. Top-20 in the world according to SportBusiness Best Online Bachelor's in Business. #27 for best online bachelor's in business Best Online Grad. Business. Selected among the best online master's in business (non-MBA) Best Online MBA. Ranked for best online MBA programs Best Online MBA for Veterans. Honored as a best online MBA program for veterans ACTA Oases of Excellence. Phil Smith and Adams Centers named ACTA Oases of Excellence FT Executive Education Rankings. #11 (U.S.) and #1 (Florida) in the Financial Times rankings Rankings Page ©
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Result 31
TitleMasters in Healthcare Administration Jobs | Careers to Pursue
Urlhttps://www.franklin.edu/blog/masters-in-healthcare-administration-jobs
DescriptionHealthcare administration is a rapidly growing field, but what are the specific jobs, employers and opportunities to pursue with a master's degree?
Date
Organic Position26
H1Master’s in Healthcare Administration Jobs: Top Career Paths To Pursue
H2Request Information
Popular Posts
Related Articles
H3We're Sorry
Where Can You Work With A Master’s in Healthcare Administration?
Career Opportunities With Healthcare Providers
What matters most when choosing a master’s program? Compare features, benefits and cost to find the right school for you
Job Prospects in Government Agencies
Career Paths in the Private Sector
Healthcare Administration Careers at Nonprofit Organizations
Job Opportunities at Colleges and Universities
Top 5 Fast-Growing Jobs for Healthcare Administrators
Is a Master’s Degree in Healthcare Administration Worth It?
H2WithAnchorsRequest Information
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BodyMaster’s in Healthcare Administration Jobs: Top Career Paths To PursueMaster of Healthcare AdministrationMaster's DegreeHealthcare ProgramsCareersAs healthcare continues to grow and evolve, the industry needs leaders to balance patient needs with fiscal responsibility, as well as understand and adapt to changing laws, regulations and technology. For these reasons, healthcare administration is a rapidly growing field.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job prospects for medical and health services managers is expected to grow by 20% by 2026, which is much faster than average.One of the best ways to advance in this sector is to get a Master of Healthcare Administration degree (MHA). An MHA will not only prepare you for leadership roles, it will increase your job prospects and help raise your profile when seeking new opportunities.In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top industries and jobs for master’s in healthcare administration graduates.Where Can You Work With A Master’s in Healthcare Administration?The growing demand for healthcare administrators opens the doors to a wide variety of careers across public, private, government and nonprofit organizations.Career Opportunities With Healthcare Providers. The most common career path for healthcare administrators is working for a healthcare provider. However, there are still significant opportunities to work in different care settings within this sector. Let’s look at the range of opportunities in more detail. . What matters most when choosing a master’s program? Compare features, benefits and cost to find the right school for you. Hospitals and Health NetworksAccording to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 36% of healthcare administrators work in hospitals—ranging from small, private hospitals to large public hospitals and health networks.Hospital administrators work to solve three of the most pressing challenges in this care setting:Process Improvement: From coordinating with leadership and hospital boards on strategic plans to executing tactical ways strategy comes to life, hospital administrators are involved in process development, improvement and implementation at all levels.Risk Management: Healthcare administrators work to ensure high-quality patient care, financial stability, and an excellent public and professional image. Doing all of this requires in-depth knowledge of healthcare policy and regulations, and developing smooth operational process within the hospital.Staff Management: Acting as a liaison between nurses, physicians, and other hospital staff, healthcare administrators direct, supervise, and coordinate activities that support a hospital’s strategic plan to provide cost-effective, quality care.Hospital administrators can work to accomplish these goals at the department, hospital or hospital system level.Physician OfficesThe second-largest work environment for MHA graduates is physician offices, accounting for 11% of healthcare administrators. Most of the time, these offices are part of a large practice or physician group, where patients can see a primary care doctor in addition to a multitude of specialists. Healthcare administrators are vital in managing the day-to-day operations of these multi-functional organizations.Long-term Care FacilitiesNursing and residential care facilities make up 10% of employers for healthcare administrators. As the baby boomer population ages, opportunities to work in this care setting will only continue to increase. These organizations require dedicated administrators to help keep the quality of care high, while continuing to attract and retain new patients and residents.Outpatient Care FacilitiesOutpatient care centers account for 7% of employers for healthcare administrators. One of the fastest growing workplaces is urgent care facilities. Health insurers now offer greater incentives to seek out urgent care over hospitals and urgent care facilities offer shorter wait times for similar treatments. This swing puts healthcare administrators in demand to create streamlined processes for maximizing both patient care and profit margins.Job Prospects in Government Agencies. While healthcare providers make up the majority of employers, graduates of master’s in healthcare administration programs can also apply their knowledge and skills to a range of other industries—the largest of which is government employers at 8%.Healthcare administrators commonly work in agencies from the local to federal level—with two of the largest employers being the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Health and Human Services.If you’re looking to advance healthcare policy and regulation, setting precedent for some of the most important healthcare decisions, a career in government may be right for you.Career Paths in the Private Sector. Private sector companies continue to play a pivotal role in the healthcare industry. This environment creates a wealth of opportunities for healthcare administrators outside traditional patient care settings.Insurance CompaniesInsurance companies need experienced healthcare administrators to understand the ever-changing healthcare regulations, as well as navigate continually rising healthcare costs.As a healthcare administrator working at an insurance company, you can expect to research and evaluate the cost of providing healthcare. You’ll also be at the forefront of proposing new strategies or policies that help insurers stay profitable and competitive with other insurance providers.Pharmaceutical Companies Perhaps a lesser known employer, pharmaceutical companies hire healthcare administrators to work as project managers and quality managers.Project managers aid in moving a new drug through all phases of development by managing teams, allocating tasks and determining completion dates for each stage of the process.Quality managers ensure the proper systems are in place so all drugs comply with regulations and the products are safe for patient consumption.Consulting FirmsWorking at a dedicated healthcare consultancy gives healthcare administrators the opportunity to broadly apply their knowledge of the industry to a range of healthcare organizations.As a consultant, you’re tasked with addressing integral challenges that require deep knowledge of the foundation of healthcare management. You also need the ability to analyze data and identify trends within the industry and individual organizations. Then, you’re responsible for designing processes and solutions to address the organization’s challenges, and helping to implement these improvements on a large scale.Healthcare Administration Careers at Nonprofit Organizations. For healthcare administrators who want to make a difference in healthcare quality and equality, nonprofits offer another route of advocating for patient rights and high-quality care.Healthcare Policy OrganizationsHealthcare policy organizations are nongovernmental organizations that work to influence, reform and provide practical solutions to improve healthcare—from making it more affordable and improving the quality of care to spurring innovation within the industry.Advocacy or International Aid GroupsPatient advocacy groups help patients receive appropriate and timely care and financial assistance, as well as provide their families with educational opportunities for navigating the complex healthcare system.International aid groups work to provide healthcare to underserved and developing countries, where healthcare administrators can help ensure funds are making the largest impact possible.Job Opportunities at Colleges and Universities. For some healthcare administrators, getting their master’s in healthcare administration is an opportunity to transition to academia. They’re able to take their real-world experience and combine it with new knowledge and leadership skills to help prepare the next generation of healthcare administrators to provide solutions in this challenging industry.Top 5 Fast-Growing Jobs for Healthcare Administrators. With all of these opportunities available, there is no shortage of jobs for master’s in healthcare administration graduates. Here are five of the most popular and profitable jobs in the healthcare industry for healthcare administrators.Operations ManagerA healthcare operations manager is the liaison between clinical staff and the recipients of healthcare services. They oversee the general functioning of a healthcare facility, including managing finances, implementing policy and overseeing the medical and non-medical staff.Average Salary*: $63,777Program DirectorProgram directors act as a department manager, supervising the organization’s operations, coordinating activities of department employees and collaborating with other departments. Some program managers oversee functional operations, like managing personnel or patient records systems.Average Salary*: $80,520Hospital AdministratorHospital administrators play a large role in overseeing the staff of a hospital—from identifying performance gaps and instituting employee training policies to making sure budgets are being used efficiently without sacrificing quality. Their processes and standards are guided by the organization’s mission and must adhere to all relevant regulations.Average Salary*: $88,586Healthcare ConsultantHealthcare consultants bring their expertise in healthcare management to organizations facing significant challenges. They evaluate issues and trends, and help find ways to address them in a way that’s most beneficial for the organization, its staff and its patients.Average Salary*: $76,663Hospital Chief Executive Officer (CEO)The highest level healthcare administrator, a hospital CEO is responsible for overall efficiency, managing both day-to-day operations as well as leading the strategic initiatives of the hospital to ensure long-term success and financial stability.Average Salary*: $166,586*Average salaries based on available data on Payscale.comIs a Master’s Degree in Healthcare Administration Worth It?The combination of growing job prospects, high salary potential and engaging and rewarding work make a master’s in healthcare administration an extremely valuable degree. It’s even been ranked by Forbes magazine as one of the top-10 master's degree programs that lead to robust careers.If you’re looking to advance your career in healthcare administration, Franklin University’s Master of Healthcare Administration provides an flexible, online program built for working professionals. It combines cutting-edge curriculum with instruction from experienced industry professionals to give you the knowledge and skills you need to advance as a leader in the healthcare industry.Free Report:Download NowTop 10 Master's DegreesDiscover 10 of the most in-demand master's degrees based on salary and job growth.Related Articles. What is the Average Master in Healthcare Administration Salary?MHA vs. MBA: How To Choose The Right Degree For A Future In Healthcare ManagementIs a Master's in Healthcare Administration Worth It?Ways to Gain Business Leadership Skills in HealthcareOptions for Executive Education in HealthcareDegreesMicrocredentials & CertificatesAdmissionsTuition & Financial AidTransferring CreditThe Franklin ExperienceAbout UsSafety & SecurityPolicy InformationPrivacy StatementTerms of UseCareers At FranklinSitemapFranklin University Founded in 1902, Franklin is an accredited nonprofit university offering flexible college degrees online and at locations in Ohio and the Midwest. Franklin University201 S Grant Ave.Columbus, OH43215 Local: (614) 797-4700 Toll Free: (877) 341-6300 [email protected] Copyright 2022 Franklin University
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Result 32
TitleHow to Become a Healthcare Administrator - Career Path, Salary and Job Description | UniversityHQ
Urlhttps://universityhq.org/how-to-become/healthcare-administrator-careers/
Description
Date
Organic Position27
H1Becoming a Healthcare Administrator Careers & Salary Outlook
H2What is a Healthcare Administrator?
Steps to Becoming a Healthcare Admin
Skills to Acquire
Alternative Paths
Healthcare Administrator Careers & Salary
Find Healthcare Admin Jobs Near You
Frequently Asked Questions
sources:
H3Search Programs
Search Programs
Step 1: Earn Your Degree
Step 2: Get Experience
Step 3: Internship
Step 4: Earn Certification/License
What Does a Healthcare Administrator Do?
Where Might You Work?
Potential Career Paths
Earning Potential by Occupation
Career Outlook
Advancing From Here
What can I do with a healthcare administration degree?
What skills does a healthcare administrator need?
How much do healthcare administrators make?
Where do healthcare administrators work?
What is the The American Hospital Association?
Search Programs
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Healthcare Administrator?
Steps to Becoming a Healthcare Admin
Skills to Acquire
Alternative Paths
Healthcare Administrator Careers & Salary
Find Healthcare Admin Jobs Near You
Frequently Asked Questions
sources:
BodyBecoming a Healthcare Administrator Careers & Salary Outlook Search Programs. Expand in page Navigation Overview Skills to Acquire Alternative Paths Career & Salary FAQs What is a Healthcare Administrator? . A healthcare administrator is a professional with a complex blending of professional skills. They may have begun working in a healthcare field, then decided to advance by earning their degree and moving into the administration side of healthcare. These professionals are also called Healthcare Managers or Healthcare Executives. They may have earned an MBA, which allows them to work in the highest positions in a healthcare facility. They may become closely involved with community meetings that concern healthcare. These professionals can work in hospitals, nursing homes, insurance companies, or at behavioral health facilities. Overview Skills to Acquire Alternative Paths Career & Salary Find Jobs FAQs Search Programs. Steps to Becoming a Healthcare Admin. Examine the offerings of each university you may be interested in. This includes looking at BBA and MBA offerings to determine if they offer a healthcare administrator major. Some do, others don’t. Once you have narrowed down your choices, get all your paperwork in order. You’ll have to submit official transcripts from your previous college (community or four-year) and send in your ACT or SAT scores. If you are applying for a master’s degree, you will have to take and submit your Graduate Record Exam (GRE) results. If you are trying to advance from a nursing or medical career into administration, let the schools know. Step 1: Earn Your Degree Step 2: Get Experience Step 3: Internship Step 4: Earn Certification/License Step 1: Earn Your Degree. Earn your bachelor’s or master’s degree, depending on your previous educational experience. A bachelor’s degree offers a healthcare-based program that helps you to develop your skills so that, when you are offered a job, you’ll feel comfortable in your day-to-day role. Your health administration program will require that you complete your general education classes (for a bachelor’s degree), then core classes that are related to nursing or another discipline, such as healthcare informatics. Your health administration curriculum should be designed for versatility so that you can gain the ability to adapt yourself daily to your required work responsibilities. You will also take leadership courses and courses that will help you develop an analytical mind for health administration. Step 2: Get Experience. If you can apply for a position working in a doctor’s office, behavioral health facility, or a nursing facility, you will be able to add to your experiences. Let hiring managers know that you are a student looking to gain more paid experience in health administration. You may be offered a job in the billing department of a hospital or doctor’s office. Or you may work in the office manager’s office, assisting the manager with their work. Wherever you see entry-level work that does not require a bachelor’s degree, apply for the position. Step 3: Internship. Begin a health administration internship. This gives you needed work experience that will serve you well in your first postgraduate job. For instance, you may begin working in the billing department of a hospital or public health clinic. You may also accept a health administration internship in a pharmaceutical company. Both of these give you the exposure you need on the administrative side of healthcare. Try to pursue several internships. The more experience you can get, the better and some of the internships available may be very competitive. Step 4: Earn Certification/License. In healthcare administration, you will be required to hold certification that shows you have the professional knowledge to do your job. Before you earn the certificate or license, you’ll take an exam that shows you whether you are qualified to hold that certificate. In your first health administration job, you will hold a provisional license that legally allows you to do the work you are doing. Once you pass the exam, you’ll receive your first official license. The Professional Association of Health Care Office Management gives the Certified Medical Manager (CMM) certification. Likewise, the American College or Health Care Administrators offers certifications for assisted living administrators and nursing home administrators. What Does a Healthcare Administrator Do? As a health administration management professional, you are responsible for the smooth running of a healthcare organization where patients are seen for illnesses and other health conditions. As a healthcare administrator, you need to understand the regulations that dictate how your organization functions. You need to know which private and governmental entities are involved in the operation of your facility, as well as what their roles are. Your duties in health administration include communicating well regarding incoming policies and procedures to everyone responsible for healthcare. You will take part in strategic operational planning, and help to communicate with healthcare providers and caregivers about new regulations. If this involves training, you will explain this as well. You will also help to formulate a master budget, then allocate funds within that budget, develop an emergency plan for unexpected adverse events, introduce measures to improve productivity, create and maintain a compliance program so that facilities remain accredited, provide management of any outsourced business services and communications with service providers and third parties, manage the human resources department, and manage and introduce all new technological updates (new software that handles record management, for instance). Skills to Acquire. Even though you’ll be mostly focused on business administration as a healthcare administrator, you will be working with the public health of individuals. This makes your role vital to the smooth functioning of your facility, be it a behavioral health facility, doctor’s office, dental office, hospital, or nursing home facility. You need several specific skills: Detail oriented Strong analytical skills Adapt easily to new healthcare regulations Strong leadership Strong interpersonal skills Highly developed technical skills Strong affinity for financial matters Healthcare administration is growing rapidly, with new technological advances happening frequently. This means that you need to be able to learn and adapt to those new developments and changes within your facility. The nature of your work environment means that you will be required to learn and understand local, state, and federal laws pertinent to all healthcare organizations. Compliance with every law is vital to the continued operation of your healthcare facility. If you neglect to obey a law, you run the risk of your facility being shut down. You will also have oversight of your facility’s human resources office. Along with hiring the right personnel, you need to ensure that human resources operates so that it is meeting all acceptable HR practices. Alternative Paths . While there is no acceptable substitute for a strong education in healthcare administration, you can begin with an entry-level position. By starting as a medical office administrator in a medical practice, you will get a behind-the-scenes opportunity to learn about healthcare administration as a profession. Because this is an entry-level position, you will take care of accounts receivable, answer phones, get in touch with insurance companies, deal with contracts, and hire and manage staff members. If you manage the human resources office, you will be close to the heartbeat of a medical practice. The job responsibilities and skills you will assume are highly similar to those of a hospital administrator. Health administration professionals will direct several administrative functions. As a medical executive assistant, you will be able to work directly with the C-suite executives. Here, you will have an eyes-on view and gain experience as you manage projects. You may also write grant proposals. Don’t forget about on-the-job training via internships. These opportunities give you the chance to work in several areas of healthcare, learning the administrative functions. Healthcare Administrator Careers & Salary. Where Might You Work? . Upon your graduation and once you obtain your license to work in health administration, you will be able to work in several healthcare areas. For instance, you may work for a pharmaceutical company, directing market research for drugs that are in development. You help to establish policies for research methodology and data collection. Or you may accept a position as a director of healthcare quality of a hospital association. You may assume this position with an advisory group, advising on quality improvement. You may work as a nursing home administrator, running a nursing home or other facility that helps to care for people with disabilities or long-term injuries. You will recruit new personnel, take part in training and management, and supervise financial matters and ongoing medical care. Clinic Administrators oversee department managers. You may be responsible for staffing, scheduling, and carrying out staff meetings. You will implement policies, oversee billing, and supervise facility maintenance. Health Information Managers organize and secure patient records. You will work with IT professionals researching federally compliant software that aids in storing electronic patient information. Department of Public Health & Human Services Healthcare Administrators work for the federal government, helping to protect the well-being of every American. Your work can help to influence healthcare worldwide. Potential Career Paths . Health administration career options are wide open. You may work as a health information manager, CEO of a healthcare system, or as the director of healthcare quality for an entire hospital administration. You should have at least a bachelor’s degree and some experience in leadership to work in this field. If you have a master’s degree, you may be able to work in higher levels of healthcare administration. Your knowledge, expertise, and work ethic all help you to keep your healthcare organization running efficiently. If you work outside a true healthcare setting, you’ll still likely work in a field affiliated with healthcare. Healthcare Administration/Business Leadership: Receive advanced training via the Leadership Academy. Here, you will refine your skills and sharpen your knowledge so that, when you accept a healthcare administration position, you will be able to perform at your highest potential. The first stage is a six-week program focusing on contemporary leadership and management skills. In stage two, you will be placed in a residency placement in specially selected centers within the organization. You should have a master’s in Business Administration (preferred, but not mandatory). If you successfully complete this academy, you may be required to relocate based on company needs. Project Analyst: This position focuses on facilities and construction. You will be responsible for spearheading integrated or cross-departmental global projects, or you may manage ongoing maintenance of a group of several related activities. You will have to provide input into the policies associated with the job’s purpose and essential responsibilities: Collaborating with director, manager, physician leadership, and some internal/external stakeholders. Maintain active working knowledge of in-country demands, needs, and environment so you can place and manage physicians, programs, and staff assignments efficiently. Establish a recruitment timeline, ascertain funding streams, determine needs, create project plans, and carry out work team meetings. Manager of Practice Operations—Department Specific: Hold a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or a related field. You are required to have a bachelor’s in healthcare administration or six years’ directly related healthcare administration experience. You will be responsible for assisting the area director in developing and implementing procedures and processes that are related to functions and operations issues. Duties include work plan development, facilitating process improvement, and communication to various sites. You are a resource to backfill open positions for key roles connected to operations. Inventory Analyst: Your work extends across all of an organization’s healthcare entities so that inventory standards and process flows are aligned with the organization. You are the supply chain facilitator and liaison between ITS applications, clinical and inventory users, and CareConnect so you can troubleshoot and design solutions related to a particular inventory module. You will also act as the inventory module lead for all inventory module project work. This will be for entities that are new to the inventory module. Research Associate: You will be working within a research service for a specific office within this organization. Your assignment could be in the Clinical Epidemiology program (CEP), which is a dedicated research group that includes epidemiologists, analysts, and statisticians, or in another specialty. You and your group will cultivate collaborative projects intended to advance patient-centered research that is derived from Veterans Health Administration (VHA) data. Your section’s primary research interests could be in vaccine and drug safety, and efficacy, focusing on healthcare disparities and resource allocation. Manager Practice Operations—Emergency Department: A bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration is essential. If you have six years of directly related work experience, this may suffice. You will assist with the development of procedures and standardization of referral and authorization process and assist area director with operational and standardization efforts as needed. You’ll also serve as liaison between site staff and organization’s administrative departments and maintain general knowledge of area operations and specific functions related to process improvement efforts. You might conduct site visits to confirm processes are in place and followed consistently based on procedures, serve as a liaison to physician and clinic staff as related to clinics operations when assigned, and work with the Human Resources Department in managing personnel issues (hiring, orientation, staffing, monitoring, and making recommendations for disciplinary actions). Earning Potential by Occupation. Occupation Entry-Level Mid-Career Late-Career Community Support Manager $40,000 $50,000 $56,000 Training and Development Manager $55,000 $77,000 $88,000 Hospital CEO $72,000 $153,000 $306,000 Health Insurance Specialist $47,000 $60,000 $102,000 Human Resource Manager $48,000 $68,000 $95,000 **Salary info provided by PayScale Career Outlook . Healthcare management is a vital service for people’s wellbeing. Therefore, it’s no surprise to see that the employment of medical and public health services managers is projected to grow 20% between 2016 and 2026. This is much faster than the average for all other occupations in the United States. As the general population maintains an active lifestyle into their later years and the Baby Boomer population ages, the demand for effective healthcare management services will only increase. There will be an ever-expanding demand for doctors and other healthcare workers, which means a growing need for managers who are responsible for managing medical information, healthcare management staff, and organizing all of these entities. Employment growth should be the highest in healthcare practitioners’ offices. Advancing From Here. If you begin your healthcare administration career working as an administrator of a nursing home or a private practice, then the next natural step for you would be to administer within a hospital. If you enjoy the idea of international healthcare practice, consider joining up with the American Red Cross, the Peace Corps, or Doctors without Borders. Here, you will stretch your knowledge of healthcare administration, working with an international group. Finally, you could move into clinical research as a manager. This complex specialization means you’ll coordinate study participants, researchers, doctors, and pharmaceutical executives. Find Healthcare Admin Jobs Near You . Frequently Asked Questions. Expand All Collapse All What can I do with a healthcare administration degree? Some common healthcare administration careers include: hospital administrators, health care organizations, healthcare professionals, healthcare consultants, and medical professionals. You could also look into leadership positions such as health services managers, community service managers, or hospital managers. What skills does a healthcare administrator need? Leadership skills, communication skills, and teamwork skills are all important in healthcare administration careers. Business administration skills, budgeting, organization, quality assurance and an understanding of patient care are all important skills for healthcare administration.  How much do healthcare administrators make? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, you can make around $104,000 per year in healthcare administration. Where do healthcare administrators work? Healthcare administration jobs can be in nursing homes, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, community health centers, pharmaceutical companies, assisted living facilities, or educational settings such as teaching hospitals. What is the The American Hospital Association? The American Hospital Association is national organization that serves all types of healthcare companies. The American Hospital Association helps regulate rules around hospital administration. sources:. https://online.maryville.edu/online-masters-degrees/health-administration/careers/hospital-administrator/ https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/business/blog/how-to-become-healthcare-manager/ https://www.waldenu.edu/online-masters-programs/master-of-healthcare-administration/resource/what-does-a-healthcare-administrator-do https://onlineprograms.ollusa.edu/mba/resources/5-entry-level-jobs-start-healthcare-management-careers https://www.columbiasouthern.edu/how-to-get-internships-in-healthcare-administration Browse All CareersHealthcare Career Paths Search Programs. ✖
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Result 33
TitleHealth Administration Careers | Healthcare Administration Degrees
Urlhttps://www.healthcareadministrationdegrees.org/careers-for-students/
DescriptionHealth Administration Career Guide, including the top 5 career options in healthcare administration, job descriptions, and salary ranges
Date
Organic Position28
H1Healthcare Administration Career Guide
H2Health Administration Careers
Educational Requirements
What is Healthcare Administration?
Healthcare Administration Career Guide
Where Can You Work with a Degree in Healthcare Administration?
What Other Areas of Specialization Are There for a Degree in Health Administration?
Degree is Necessary Regardless of the Career in Health Admin
A Note on Online Programs in Healthcare Administration
Top 5 Jobs in Healthcare Administration
The Top 5 Careers in Healthcare Administration
Quick Guide for Healthcare Administration
Employer Considerations
Types of Healthcare Administration Positions
Which Healthcare Careers Is The Best For You?
Top Health Admin Programs
H3Health Administration Focus Areas
Consider the Job by Education Level
Educational Requirements for Healthcare Administrators
1. Social and Community Support Manager
2. Training and Development Manager
3. Health Insurance Specialist
4. Human Resource Manager
5. Hospital CEO
Clinical/Patient Care Route vs. Healthcare Management
Health Administration Schools by State
H2WithAnchorsHealth Administration Careers
Educational Requirements
What is Healthcare Administration?
Healthcare Administration Career Guide
Where Can You Work with a Degree in Healthcare Administration?
What Other Areas of Specialization Are There for a Degree in Health Administration?
Degree is Necessary Regardless of the Career in Health Admin
A Note on Online Programs in Healthcare Administration
Top 5 Jobs in Healthcare Administration
The Top 5 Careers in Healthcare Administration
Quick Guide for Healthcare Administration
Employer Considerations
Types of Healthcare Administration Positions
Which Healthcare Careers Is The Best For You?
Top Health Admin Programs
BodyHealthcare Administration Career Guide ADConsider an Online Program Currently Accepting Applicants School Level Program Admissions George Mason University Master Master of Health Administration in Health Systems Management Website American University Master Online MS in Health Care Management Website Methodist University Bachelor BS in Health Care Administration Website Illinois College Bachelor BA in Healthcare Management Website George Washington University Bachelor BSHS in Clinical Operations and Healthcare Management Website Click to search for online health administration programs that are currently taking applications. Healthcare administration is a growing career, as with many management and executive level career paths. The healthcare field is becoming more and more competitive every day - an Online MHA degree can help you stand out, especially if you are looking to advance within the private healthcare sector. There are other Health Administration Degrees available depending on which career path you are looking at. Our team of experts has arranged this guide to help you learn more about this field and what it can mean for upcoming professionals. Read along below to see the benefits of choosing this field and what type of work you could be involved with on a daily basis.Health Administration Careers. Below, you can view the top careers in health administration, including health administration salary and job duty information, and see which healthcare administration degrees you need to work as an executive or other careers within healthcare. In recent years, technology has contributed monumental changes to the field of education. With these changes, more people have been given convenient access to college education. This change has not only affected the lives of individuals seeking further education, but it has also had a huge effect on the job market. As more people are given the opportunity to graduate with college degrees, more graduates are competing for open positions in the field. Educational Requirements. For those with bachelor's degree, the increase in new graduate can mean that there is only one option to move forward in their career path - getting a higher degree. Obtaining a higher level degree not only increases earnings, but also increases career potential in all. Those with master's degree will find that employers are more than willing to hire them. The medical field is no different. As one of the most popular careers paths for individuals, the medical field is constantly gaining new professionals. What is Healthcare Administration? Take a moment to consider what goes in to the daily operations of a healthcare facility. There are hundreds of patients seen daily in busy hospitals, large numbers of employees carrying out their required duties and unseen policies in play to ensure that people receive a great quality of service. Also, things that may not be so apparent are the behind-the-scenes practices that ensure that patient data is stored correctly, scheduling and training for employees is completed timely and decisions about change are made by hospital officials. Professionals that are interested in healthcare administration may play a role in ensuring that these duties are carried out accurately and within certain time frames. The field of healthcare administration can include concepts such as hospital management, finance, informatics and general communication. Each of these skills can contribute to how well you manage your daily duties in a healthcare setting, even in positions that are specific to each of these areas. The administrative side of healthcare may also include a look into the planning and coordination of healthcare activities at the state and local levels, which can mean influential career options for those that complete the degree program. If you have an interest in becoming a part of one of the largest career fields in the U.S., health administration may be the right degree direction for you. In this field, you can potentially influence the quality of healthcare organizations in your area, making for a great quality of service for people around you. Healthcare Administration Career Guide. The bachelor's level is the most popular for individual in healthcare administration, meaning that it takes some extra effort to stand out from the crowd. Those that work hard to obtain a Master's degree in Healthcare Administration can absolutely bypass the common crowd and be subjected to even more open doors throughout their professional journey. Every state has a master's program in this area, making it a convenient choice for students with traditional or online learning goals. Click to search for online health administration programs that are currently taking applications. Where Can You Work with a Degree in Healthcare Administration? There is a lot to be known about the healthcare field. Beginning with health policy, professionals in this field must know what is required of medical professionals and organization, as well as how to operate accordingly. In addition to policy, medical personnel must also maintain a high standard of care when working with patients in a clinical setting. Behind the scenes, financial data is stored and processed and employees are constantly being hired and trained. All of these topics may bring to light the diverse nature of this field and the many different professionals that are involved with ensuring that healthcare organizations operate according to plan. If you want to know which fields are most common for healthcare administration graduates, take a look at the example list below this section. Medical Hospitals/Laboratories: Obtaining a degree in healthcare administration can potentially set you up for careers in leadership in the healthcare field. While this may seem pretty straightforward, there are many diverse options within the healthcare field for you to choose from. Graduates of healthcare administration can become management professionals in medical hospitals, dental care centers or even specialty care clinics that focus on dentistry or ophthalmology. Government Agencies: Healthcare is one of the largest employers in the country. Not only is it a popular place for upcoming professionals, but it is also a branch of society that receives a lot of attention from the U.S. Government. There are branches of the government that are concerned with public health, epidemiology, healthcare planning, insurance and wellness. Each of these departments require educated professionals that can provide leadership and direction to large teams of professionals. Private Businesses: Businesses that provide healthcare supplies and insurance are important to the healthcare field. Blending health-related care with the field of business often requires education in both fields. Students that are interested in working with organizations that complement the healthcare field could benefit from achieving a degree in healthcare administration. What Other Areas of Specialization Are There for a Degree in Health Administration? The best way to jump-start your career in healthcare administration is to choose a specialization that is closest to your interests. There are many sub-fields that are present within the field of healthcare administration, each requiring a diverse set of skills for those that are involved with them. One of the most popular concentration options for upcoming students is within the area of management, since this is where the higher paying positions often reside. Specialty fields such as technology and finance are also popular options for professionals that are interested in being a part of this incredibly influential field. As you read through the specialization examples below, try to consider what would be a better fit for what you are skilled in or what seems interesting to you. Health Administration Focus Areas. Informatics: Technology has played a role in the further development of the healthcare field. Computer programs and tools are available in the clinical setting, which can make patient records and billing much easier for professionals working in this domain. Choosing a degree specialization in informatics can help you learn more about these technologies and how to work with them on a day-to-day basis. Those that choose to go this route can work as leaders with extra expertise with healthcare software and troubleshooting. Finance: One vital aspect of the healthcare field that can make or break an organization is finance. There is money constantly coming in and out of hospitals, both through patient payments and regular overhead. Specializations in finance can help professionals understand how money management, budgeting and tax preparation can help keep a medical facility on track throughout the years. Professionals in this field can be a part of human resources teams or work in the financial departments of large hospitals and medical facilities. Hospital Management: A lot of people enrolling in healthcare administration degree programs may be interested in pursuing management positions in the healthcare field. Hospital management specializations can provide information that is relevant to the regular maintenance and leadership within hospitals, providing a well-rounded knowledge in employee management, finance and organizational policies. Degree is Necessary Regardless of the Career in Health Admin. Having a degree in healthcare administration will provide career opportunities for a lifetime. Those in this field have found that there are career openings in various aspects, dealing with the many different topics included in the healthcare field. Graduates seeking career opportunities working in development or implementation of employee-related strategies will find a fitting career in human resources or employee training. Individuals with an interest in patient relations will be fitting for community health or insurance specializations. There is truly a career for people of every personality. Work experience paired with an accredited degree program will provide for even more opportunities as an individual progress through their professional career. The most popular career positions with a degree in healthcare administration vary in their overall job responsibilities and requirements. Since this degree program provides a versatile set of skills, there are numerous possibilities for graduates. Depending on their desires, there are careers from entry-level to top-level positions seeking qualified professionals with the most preferred education. For those interested in a medical career outside of traditional nursing or doctoring, a career in healthcare administration is definitely an excellent choice. Consider the Job by Education Level. Your level of education can say a lot about the types of jobs you can pursue in this field. Bachelors degree earners are best suited for entry-level positions in the healthcare field, since most graduates at this level are just getting started in the field and are in need of professional work experience. Those that pursue masters level or above may have the option to pursue more profitable options, such as leadership positions in the healthcare field. Our team of educational experts has provided a list of common career titles by degree level below for you to review. Bachelors: Hospital Financial Analyst – $84,300 on average per year (BLS). Masters: Medical and Health Services Managers – $98,350 on average per year (BLS). Doctoral: Administrative Services Managers – $94,020 on average per year (BLS). Educational Requirements for Healthcare Administrators. The educational foundation for healthcare administration is highly diverse. Students in healthcare administration master’s programs will find that they are highly concentrated on both employee and patient relations. These two different aspects are the most vital for this career field, since employees and patients are the main source of movement through medical facilities. A middle party is needed to ensure that patients are being treated fairly and ethically while employees are receiving ample support throughout their careers. This field is highly focused on management as a primary source of concern. During a master’s program, students will be trained to effectively manage and lead a team of several employees. Since this program has such a leadership-oriented curriculum, jobs in management and leadership are a likely draw for master’s level graduates. A Note on Online Programs in Healthcare Administration. Since the beginning of educational programs, people in society have been looking for ways to make the degree-earning process easier. It is not always convenient for students to set aside years of their lives to pursue a degree. Technology and human advancement has made convenience a better path to degree acquisition, through the use of computer systems and the internet. In this day and age, more professionals are taking these alternative routes for their education. There are many convenient options for pursuing a meaningful degree other than the traditional means that most people are familiar with. Online degree programs in healthcare administration are a great way for you to become educated in this highly regarded field without having to sacrifice your precious time at work or with your family. If you are looking for good quality online degree programs, you can start by reviewing the list below to see if you might be interested in the schools provided. Southern New Hampshire University – Online BS in Healthcare Administration Penn State University – Online MS in Healthcare Administration A.T. Still University – Online Doctor of Health Administration See the Online MHA page for detailed info on the online Master of Health Administration. Top 5 Jobs in Healthcare Administration. Healthcare administration is a career field that goes beyond the scope of traditional medical field opportunities. Healthcare administration specialists work hard to ensure that proper procedures are followed for patients and employees alike. These professionals are trained in some of the most effective management strategies in the country. The knowledge of the healthcare field paired with a management specialization paves the road to success for thousands of graduates each year. In this field, professionals will be subjected to the many different aspects of the medical field, including patient information, employee relations, and healthcare/insurance maintenance. Individuals with degrees in healthcare administration are found in many different areas throughout a medical facility. Since this degree program provides such varying information, professionals in this field are a great fit in many different positions. Some of the most popular choices for professionals include those that work with patient health, employee maintenance, and overall supervision. The curriculum in this field focuses heavily on management and maintenance of important information. Those in this field are the best at the creation and implementation of strategies to improve the overall quality of a workplace and the effectiveness of its employees. The most popular careers for individuals with degrees in healthcare administration are listed below. The Top 5 Careers in Healthcare Administration. 1. Social and Community Support Manager. Community health is a huge aspect of the medical field. Social and Community Support Managers work alongside doctors and outside community support services to ensure that programs are created that encourage good health throughout the community. These programs can be a part of educational institutions or for public health in general. These professionals are called upon by companies and organizations to provide insight into different health-oriented practices that will contribute to health lifestyles for everyone. According to the BLS, professionals in this specialization earn around $62,740 per year on average. Most employers require that professionals have at least a Bachelor’s degree in Healthcare Administration prior to applying for this position. Social and Community Support Manager Career 2. Training and Development Manager. Healthcare administration specialists are needed in varying aspects of the medical field, including employee relations. In order to properly train the influx of new medical professionals, medical facilities employ training and development managers to develop and implement important training practices. As new employees enter the workforce, managers will provide important training materials or on the job training that will contribute to more effective workers overall. These professionals are vital to the success of upcoming healthcare professionals. The BLS reports that training and development managers can earn around $101,930 per year on average, making this a highly sought out field for upcoming healthcare administration degree holders. The minimum requirement for this field is a bachelor’s degree. Training and Development Manager Career 3. Health Insurance Specialist. As one of the most popular positions for entry-level professionals, health insurance specialists work with patients to ensure that medical procedures and office visits are reported accurately to insurance agencies. Health insurance specialists meet with patients to discuss the proper procedures for reporting claims to insurance and determining payment plans or methods. These professionals are a very important part of the financial branch of the medical field. Specialists in this field must have in-depth knowledge of medical terminology and important health care codes. Professionals working in this division of the medical field can expect to earn around $35,900 per year on average (BLS, 2015). Although most organization require that applicants hold at least a bachelor’s level degree, there are some organizations that readily accept associate’s level professionals. Health Insurance Specialist Career 4. Human Resource Manager. As a specialist in both healthcare and employee management, those with degrees in healthcare administration are a perfect fit for human resource managers. Working in hospitals or other medical facilities, these professionals assist employees with benefits, pay, and training requirements. These professionals provide first hand support to employees throughout a medical facility. Professionals working in this field earn $102,780 per year on average according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Salary varies depending on location and experience. The minimum requirement to obtain a career at this level is a bachelor’s degree. Some organizations require that applicants hold at least a master’s degree if no previous experience has been acquired. Human Resource Manager Career 5. Hospital CEO. As one of the highest medical positions available at the administrative level, Hospital CEOs are typically healthcare administration specialists. This position usually requires years of experience working in the healthcare field, alongside a bachelor’s or higher degree in healthcare administration. This is one of the highest positions available in medical facilities, providing management to all departments within. Since this degree program includes the business and medical aspect of the medical field, its graduates are first to be considered for positions this high. In this position, professionals will oversee the entire operation of hospitals or medical facilities. As a CEO, aspects from business to patient care are considered equal priorities that are vital to the success of hospitals. These professionals earn around $102,750 per year according to the BLS. Hospital CEO Career Quick Guide for Healthcare Administration. Below, we have assembled a “quick glance” of resources for anyone considering healthcare administration. Top Skills & Understandings. Interest in patient relations Ability to understand the use of technology in healthcare Understanding of healthcare processes, systems, and laws Personnel Management and scheduling Ability to forecast projections for the future Top Health Administration Organizations. Professional Association of Health Care Office Management Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education American Health Information Management Association Association of University Programs in Health Administration American Medical Student Association Top Healthcare Administration Associations. American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management Health Care Administrators Association Association for Healthcare Administrative Professionals American College of Healthcare Executives American Hospital Association National Association of Health Services Executives Top Online Health Administration Degrees. Online Health Administration Programs Bachelor’s Degrees in Health Administration Master’s Degrees in Health Administration Employer Considerations. Where would you work with a degree in healthcare administration? This is the question that most upcoming professionals want to answer before entering into this degree program. The truth is that you can find a career in many unique healthcare-oriented organizations with this type of degree. Some of the most popular positions in healthcare administration are located in busy hospitals or specialty care clinics. However, professionals that choose to work in this field are not limited to just the clinical setting. There are numerous positions in local government that are concerned with creating healthcare programs and services for the public. At the national level, government positions may be open to students that have completed this degree program and have some experience working in the healthcare field. The top 3 settings for healthcare administration graduates can be found below. Major Hospitals/Healthcare Centers Specialty Clinics (i.e. Dental Offices, Eye Care & Retirement Homes) National Government Employers are more likely to consider a graduate level professional in comparison to undergraduate applicants. Human resource managers deal directly with employees of a medical facility. They provide a direct source of information for employment-related concerns such as compensation, benefits, and training. These professionals contribute to a successfully operating business as a whole. Training managers are also a huge part of the employee-focused sector of the healthcare field. These managers handle new hires and provide helpful training tools and techniques that will assist them in becoming effective employees. With a Master’s degree in Healthcare Administration, professionals have many different options depending on their personal interests. Types of Healthcare Administration Positions. Employee-focused positions are not the only source of employment for healthcare administration professionals. For graduates considering more patient/community-focused positions, a master’s degree can contribute to highly involved careers. During the educational program, students are also introduced to community health procedures and patient health systems. This knowledge contributes greatly to how professionals handles sensitive information and also create helpful community programs. With this type of curriculum, graduates are qualified to take part in positions dealing with patient and community health as a whole. Community health managers work alongside hospitals and community organizations to design and implement health programs for their designated areas. These programs are helpful in that they assist with a broader aspect of health, rather than just individuals. The programs implemented by these professionals are used in educational programs, government programs, and even influence health policies. Master’s level graduates can also assist with individual health plans by partnering with social service agencies and state departments. With experience, master’s level professionals will find that the opportunity for advancement will greatly increase. Most higher tier positions request that applicants have at least a master’s degree before applying for positions. Hospital chief officers run entire facilities, overseeing the processes of the hospital as a whole. Since educational programs in healthcare administration provide valuable insight into the social and business aspects of the medical field, master’s level graduates are a great fit for these higher positions. Which Healthcare Careers Is The Best For You? College is full of difficult decisions. Finding a degree path that will contribute to a better way of life is not always an easy task. In the medical field, students can be assured that their degrees will continue to provide for them throughout the duration of their lifetime. Deciding to pursue a graduate degree in healthcare administration is a decision that will truly contribute to a great career overall. Individuals working at this level will be subject to more providing career opportunities in a variety of different aspects. Whether an individual wishes to work in patient health or the business aspect of the healthcare field, there are positions readily available to those with a master’s degree. Clinical/Patient Care Route vs. Healthcare Management. Patient-oriented professionals provide excellent programs and support to community organizations interested in bettering the health of society as a whole. Employee-oriented professionals work hard to ensure that employees receive the best training and support during their careers in a medical facility. Each of these directions provides an irreplaceable service to medical facilities. It is unlikely that a hospital would be able to function effectively without the help of education healthcare administrators. Throughout their careers, professionals in this field have found that their versatile degree choice provides well for them, with management salaries around $92,810 per year on average (BLS, 2015). A higher degree is the best choice in the medical field. The growth of this field and the continuing innovation contribute to a widely popular degree option for upcoming students. The best option to stand apart from the crowd and have access to higher level positions is to go forward into a master’s degree program. A Master’s degree in Healthcare Administration is the best choice for individuals wanting to take part in the continuously growing medical field. Top Health Admin Programs. Online Health Administration Programs BHA Programs MHA Programs MHA No GRE DHA Programs Medical Informatics Health Services Administration Clinical Nursing Administration Nursing Administration Financial Management Hospital Human Resources Patient Advocacy Hospital Management Administrative Management Health Administration Schools by State. All Health Admin Programs Online MHA Programs Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware D.C. Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming
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