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Result 1
Title11 Examples of Professional Goals for Nurses | Indeed.com
Urlhttps://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/examples-of-professional-goals-for-nurses
DescriptionExplore long-term and short-term examples of professional goals for nurses to advance in their careers and get inspired to attain success
Date
Organic Position
H111 Examples of Professional Goals for Nurses
H2Why is it important to set professional goals as a nurse?
How to choose a nursing career goal
7 examples of long-term professional goals for nurses
4 examples of short-term nursing career goals
Related Articles
H31. Ask yourself about your nursing career goals
2. Write and set goals that match your ambitions
3. Check out the educational requirements and the job prospects
1. Get unit-specific certifications
2. Raise your competency level
3. Upgrade your communication skills
4. Get a higher management rank
5. Get an advanced degree
6. Extend your nursing services to remote places
7. Balance professional and personal life
1. Take and pass the NCLEX-RN certification test
2. Gain experience during the training period
3. Keep learning consistently in your practice
4. Join professional organizations
How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps)
12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work
What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples
H2WithAnchorsWhy is it important to set professional goals as a nurse?
How to choose a nursing career goal
7 examples of long-term professional goals for nurses
4 examples of short-term nursing career goals
Related Articles
Body11 Examples of Professional Goals for NursesBy Indeed Editorial TeamJune 17, 2021TwitterLinkedInFacebookEmailCopy to ClipboardAs an individual with a desire to pursue a nursing career or a current nurse who wants to advance in their career, setting professional goals can inspire you to attain success. To achieve these goals, nurses often need a professional development plan, which entails specific career goals and a timeline to define what they desire to achieve by that deadline. After that, nurses can identify strategies to motivate them to work toward fulfilling these goals. In this article, we discuss various examples of professional nursing career goals and why it's important to set professional goals as a nurse.Related: "Should I Be a Nurse?" Factors To ConsiderWhy is it important to set professional goals as a nurse?Whether you're a recent graduate or planning to advance your current skills as a registered nurse (RN), goal setting is an essential element in career development. Professional goals help individuals focus on what is important to them and concentrate on how to achieve them. By working on your objectives, you have a higher likelihood of achieving career satisfaction. Goals also help people use time more appropriately. By acknowledging that they have goals to reach, they work on important tasks during personal and working hours.Related: 15 Nursing Professional Goals (With Tips)How to choose a nursing career goal. Setting graduate nursing goals is advisable for graduates to guide them as they begin their nursing careers, while licensed nurses should have their own professional goals. Here are some steps you can follow to choose a nursing career goal:1. Ask yourself about your nursing career goals. You need to know why you are choosing your goals. For instance, perhaps you desire to travel and work internationally or need to have a flexible schedule to spend time with your family. Some things to consider before setting nursing career goals include:Traveling in the coming years: If you're interested in traveling in the future, you may want to learn a new language, since you could work in a country that primarily speaks an unfamiliar language.Choosing your work settings: Work settings include hospitals, rehabilitation centers, trauma centers and other community settings. Identify which environment interests you and set your goals toward achieving that.Identifying essential nursing features: These features range from values, beliefs, traits, abilities and strengths that interest you. Try to identify outstanding features in your potential work setting.Visualizing your ideal nursing career: This includes the patient population you desire to work with, such as the elderly, adults, children and infants. Research the training and skills required to work with each demographic and incorporate those into your professional goals.Related: Learn About Being a Registered Nurse (RN)2. Write and set goals that match your ambitions. As an individual, you can reflect on your life experiences and make a list of what you want to achieve during your career and areas to improve on. In addition, you may research and get insights on attainable career goals and choose which one suits your preferences. Thereafter, you can classify the goals as short-term nursing goals or long-term nursing goals, depending on the timeframe it will take to accomplish them. Goals attained in about a year or less are short-term goals. Those that take longer are typically considered long-term goals.3. Check out the educational requirements and the job prospects. After listing your goals, you can check your career path's minimum educational and training requirements. Conduct thorough research to know what each area of specialization entails and decide which to pursue. Exploring the job prospects for a specific career helps you learn about the industry and improve your skill set to be competitive. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects employment for registered nurses to grow by 7% by 2029, which is a higher growth rate than average for all jobs.Related: 6 Nursing Strengths To Highlight During Your Job Search7 examples of long-term professional goals for nurses. Below are nursing career goals achievable in 5 years or longer:1. Get unit-specific certifications. Individuals who wish to work in environments like the intensive care unit should gain specialized skills to increase their competency. A majority of hospitals teach technical skill classes internally. They include:Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS)A 12 Lead EKG/ECG classCritical Care Nurse Certification (CCRN)2. Raise your competency level. Almost every unit in the hospital has a specialization, so it's essential to familiarize yourself with your work unit's procedures and aim to become a specialist. Attending classes can help you advance your skills in specific techniques and increase your competency level. Improved competency contributes to patient safety and overall satisfaction.3. Upgrade your communication skills. Communication is a vital skill in nursing as it aids the provision of care and treatment. Possessing excellent communication skills enhances interaction with patients, doctors, lab technicians, nursing assistants, and other staff who assist in overall patient satisfaction, care and experience. Since you interact with patient populations with varying communication skills and levels of education, try to understand their feelings and concerns to give correct recommendations.Related: Communication Skills for Career Success4. Get a higher management rank. Higher ranks signify greater responsibilities that offer an opportunity for career progression and also enable individuals to get a pay raise too. An example of a management position is a head nurse position. A head nurse manages work shift schedules, staffing and resolves problems that could arise during working hours. To become a head nurse, you need five years of experience and a BSN degree, although some hospitals may prefer a post-graduate degree.5. Get an advanced degree. An advanced degree enables you to further your career in specific areas. Advanced training allows a nurse to focus on various patient populations and offer personalized direct care to patients. To choose a specialty, an individual needs to identify which area they feel passionate about or naturally attracts them. It also requires some commitment and time to achieve this goal.Advanced training requires a postgraduate degree or a doctorate for registered nurses. Some specialties in advanced practice include nurse practitioner, physician's assistant, nurse anesthetist and nurse-midwife.Related: What Can You Do With a Nursing Degree?6. Extend your nursing services to remote places. This long-term goal suits individuals who are passionate about charity. Remote areas have little to no access to comprehensive medical facilities and care, therefore, nurses can enroll in programs such as flight care nursing to supplement this need. By participating in such programs, you have various effects on people's lives in remote areas and as a result, you can be eligible for plans that lower your student loan debts.7. Balance professional and personal life. As a nurse, it is often essential to balance your career and your personal life. However, this is a long-term career goal that requires effective time management. You can do this by dedicating some personal time for your friends and family, having a schedule set for your working hours and adhering to it and organizing your priorities.4 examples of short-term nursing career goals. These types of goals are quicker to accomplish and a nurse can often attain them in about a year. They include:1. Take and pass the NCLEX-RN certification test. This is one of the main graduate nurse goals since most employers require it before approving a hire. Passing the NCLEX-RN test is compulsory to propel forward in your nursing career and get certified. Several bodies give certifications to nurses, one example being the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN).Afterward, individuals can update their resumes and apply for nursing position jobs. Applying and getting your first job as a registered nurse is motivating for most people. Thereafter, you will progress and change positions as time goes by through gaining experience. Still, it is a significant step in your nursing career.2. Gain experience during the training period. Most training periods take over four months and during this duration, nurses ought to be curious to get clarity on how things work. This period is exceptional as it's a mark of transition from studying to practicing the taught skills, which provides an opportunity for recent graduates to showcase their skills early in their nursing careers. This short-term goal acts as a base for eventual long-term goals.3. Keep learning consistently in your practice. The healthcare sector is a growing industry that requires an individual to keep learning to stay aware of necessary changes. Nurses should prioritize consistent learning about their profession and find opportunities to gain new knowledge. Nurses should also be technologically competent by learning the latest technological features and advancements to give better care and treatment to patients.4. Join professional organizations. Depending on your area of specialization, you can join several professional associations to progress in your career. These organizations also use evidence-based practice to assist members in being updated on current procedures. The organizations arrange conferences to gain new knowledge on various issues. To propel your nursing career, you can work on panels and in advisory councils.Please note that none of the companies mentioned in this article are affiliated with Indeed.Related Articles. How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps). 12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work. What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples.
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Result 2
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Description
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Result 3
Title15 Nursing Professional Goals (With Tips) | Indeed.com
Urlhttps://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/nursing-professional-goals
DescriptionRead about the importance of nursing professional goals, 15 potential nursing objectives and tips about designing and achieving your professional goals
DateMay 27, 2021
Organic Position2
H115 Nursing Professional Goals (With Tips)
H2Why are nursing professional goals important?
15 professional goals for nurses
Tips for setting professional nursing goals
Related Articles
H31. Increase your technology skills
2. Get certifications
3. Improve your efficiency
4. Further your communication skills
5. Find a mentor
6. Get an advanced degree
7. Become an expert at certain tasks
8. Optimize your patient care
9. Be a mentor
10. Volunteer your time
11. Specialize in a nursing field
12. Lead a balanced life
13. Continue your education on your own
14. Take advantage of in-services
15. Become a nursing advocate
Aim for realistic objectives
Create timelines for your goals
Reevaluate your goals as needed
Choose fulfilling goals
How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps)
12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work
What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples
H2WithAnchorsWhy are nursing professional goals important?
15 professional goals for nurses
Tips for setting professional nursing goals
Related Articles
Body15 Nursing Professional Goals (With Tips)By Indeed Editorial TeamMay 27, 2021TwitterLinkedInFacebookEmailCopy to ClipboardIf you're a current or aspiring nurse, you may want to create career goals for your future. Setting professional nursing goals can help you plan your career, improve your skills and advance into higher positions. In this article, we discuss why nursing professional goals matter, suggest 15 potential nursing objectives you can set and offer advice about designing and achieving your professional goals.Why are nursing professional goals important?Setting professional goals for yourself can provide a variety of benefits, such as:Plan ahead for your career. Knowing what you want to achieve as a nurse allows you to figure out in advance how to reach your goals. For example, if you know you want to become a nurse practitioner, you might set a goal of taking on more leadership roles at your current nursing job to help prepare you for the additional responsibilities of a nurse practitioner.Distinguish yourself as a nursing professional. Nursing and healthcare practices continually change. Setting professional goals to keep developing your skills as a nurse might help you remain competitive.Improve your quality of care. Nurses who continually improve their skills and knowledge can provide higher standards of care for their patients.Increase your earning potential. Many factors influence a nurse's salary, including skill level, education and leadership responsibilities. Professional goals related to furthering your education or honing your abilities may help you negotiate, apply for or receive a higher salary.Motivate yourself to do your best. Long-term professional goals can provide daily inspiration. Nurses with clear objectives for their careers may be more motivated to continue their education, improve their skills or provide quality patient care.Related: 9 Principles for Ethics in Nursing15 professional goals for nurses. Here are 15 professional goals that may increase your motivation, develop your nursing abilities and advance your career:1. Increase your technology skills. Develop your healthcare technology abilities. Nursing practices increasingly involve advanced technical devices and systems. Many medical facilities use electronic health records that nurses create, access or update. Your workplace may also use other technology, such as portable patient monitors or telehealth services. Familiarize yourself with these healthcare technologies so that you can understand and use all of their features proficiently. You might also set a professional goal to become capable of troubleshooting, or problem-solving, issues or errors with your workplace's healthcare technology.2. Get certifications. Receive nursing certifications. Professional nursing organizations often offer a wide variety of nursing certifications. You could pursue a certification that shows you have a specific ability, like first aid or clinical research skills. You might also consider enrolling in a certificate program for a nursing specialty or specific unit, such as pediatrics, oncology or neonatal.3. Improve your efficiency. Become more efficient in your nursing responsibilities. Nurses often balance multiple duties and patients within a day. Having the ability to perform your tasks with optimized efficiency can help ensure that you fulfill all of your shift responsibilities while providing quality patient care.4. Further your communication skills. Hone your ability to communicate effectively with patients, physicians, fellow nurses and others you collaborate with daily. Most nurses communicate through many methods, including written and verbal communication channels. Learn to speak and write as clearly as possible. You can also practice listening actively and reading medical documentation carefully.Nursing communication often involves interpreting body language, too. Pay attention to a patient's or medical professional's physical responses while interacting with them. For example, if you notice your patient tensing their shoulders, ask if they're uncomfortable and if there's a way you can help.Related: Important Nurse Leadership Skills and How To Develop Them5. Find a mentor. A nursing mentor can help you define and achieve your professional goals. Some medical facilities have internal mentorship programs for nurses that you can join. You could also ask a nurse you admire to mentor you without the help of a formal program. A mentorship with a nurse who has more professional experience than you may assist you in creating goals that are more realistic and achievable.6. Get an advanced degree. Earn a higher nursing degree. A more advanced degree can increase your nursing knowledge and skills, give you the legal ability to perform more patient care responsibilities and raise your earning potential. If you currently have an associate degree, think about getting a bachelor's degree in nursing. Earning a bachelor's degree can help you advance to an administrative, leadership or managerial role, such as a charge nurse or unit manager.If you already have a bachelor's degree, consider earning your Master of Science in nursing (MSN). Getting an MSN allows you to become an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). With an APRN license, you can assess, diagnose and devise treatment plans for patients. In some states, you can also prescribe medications. An MSN degree gives you the ability to pursue multiple advanced nursing positions, such as:Clinical nurse specialistNurse practitionerNurse-midwifeNurse anesthetistNurse educatorRead more: Types of Master's Degrees in Nursing7. Become an expert at certain tasks. Try to master a few of your nursing responsibilities. You likely perform a wide range of tasks each day, such as administering IV fluids, helping patients understand their treatment plans, maintaining healthcare records or monitoring vital signs. Set a professional goal to improve your productivity and accuracy at several of these duties.8. Optimize your patient care. Perfect your patient care techniques. One of a nurse's primary goals is to provide quality care to their patients. Think about ways that you could optimize your current patient care tactics or practices. For example, you could work on becoming a stronger advocate for your patient's individualized needs.9. Be a mentor. If you are a more experienced nurse, consider becoming a nursing mentor. Being a nurse mentor can help you make a difference to less experienced nurses. You can serve as a nursing mentor through an official program or simply let newer nurses know they can come to you with questions or for career advice. If you decide to become a mentor through a formal program, you may need to complete nursing mentorship training first.Related: 11 Top Professional Nursing Organizations: Networking, Certifications and More10. Volunteer your time. Sign up for nursing volunteer opportunities. There is often high demand for nurses to volunteer their time at clinics, hospitals and other medical facilities in underserved communities. Organizations may also look for nursing volunteers during or immediately after natural disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes or tornadoes. If you're interested, you can even travel internationally as a nurse and volunteer to help with disaster relief, hygiene protocols and more.11. Specialize in a nursing field. Some nurses choose to specialize in a particular field or type of nursing. If you want to pursue a nursing specialization, start by considering your personal nursing interests and experiences. Nurses who want to work in a specific type of medicine or with a certain kind of patient can pursue many specialties, including:Pediatrics or children's healthcareInfection control and preventionCardiovascular, or care for patients with heart and blood issuesGeriatrics, or care for elderly adultsHolistic carePsychiatric or mental health careOncology, or care for patients with tumorsNeuroscienceDialysis, or the removal of waste from a patient's kidneysMedical-surgicalNeonatal, or care for newbornsAmbulatory careObstetrics, or care for pregnant women and new mothersGastroenterologyOrthopedics, or care for patients with bone and muscle issuesRelated: Advancement Opportunities for Nurses and 8 Jobs To Consider12. Lead a balanced life. Take the time to care for yourself. Between long shift hours, tending to many patients and balancing multiple tasks, the nursing profession can be very busy. Nurses who practice self-care, however, ultimately can perform their duties more efficiently and provide better care for their patients. Maintain your overall well-being by spending time with loved ones, getting enough sleep, hydrating and other self-care tasks.13. Continue your education on your own. Educate yourself on new or developing healthcare technologies, practices and methodologies. Learning about the latest nursing and medical news can help you hone your skills and stay up-to-date on developments within your industry. Set a professional goal to learn something new every week, month or quarter. To practice self-education, consider:Subscribing to nursing journals or digest newsletters that recount recent nursing publicationsGoing to lectures, conferences, workshops and other events for healthcare or nursing professionalsTaking part in a local or national nursing organizationReading the publications from your hospital, unit or clinicTalking with other nurses about the latest healthcare news or nursing developments14. Take advantage of in-services. If your workplace offers in-service classes, workshops or job shadowing opportunities, sign up and attend. In-service training can be a great way to hone your nursing skills, learn new industry practices or develop knowledge about a specialized nursing field. If your current hospital or medical facility doesn't offer in-service training, consider speaking with other nurses and medical professionals at your workplace about working together to develop some in-service opportunities that could benefit all of you.15. Become a nursing advocate. Practice being a nursing advocate. Nurses often have opportunities to advocate for their patients, such as by:Mediating conversations between patients and doctors about treatment plansHelping patients understand medical terminologyUpdating a patient's family members on your patient's progressExplaining to patients their legal rights at both the regional and federal levelTeaching patients how to advocate for their own healthcare services, such as by creating medical summariesCommunicating to physicians or other medical professionals your patient's wishes for their healthcare treatmentYou might also consider being an advocate for policy changes, the nursing profession or your community. For example, you could:Take part in public forums about healthcare protocolsWork with local schools to improve their healthcare servicesOffer expert medical or nursing testimonyWrite to local or national policymakers about healthcare initiatives under considerationTips for setting professional nursing goals. Here is some advice that may help you create and achieve your professional ambitions in your career as a nurse:Aim for realistic objectives. Set goals you can realistically achieve. A goal can be ambitious while still being personally doable for you. Consider using SMART goal strategies to help you design professional objectives that are both attainable and practical.Read more: SMART Goals in NursingCreate timelines for your goals. Figure out timelines so that you can make steady progress toward achieving your goals. You might create sub-tasks for your timeline to help you accomplish smaller objectives related to your more ambitious goals. For example, if one of your nursing professional goals is to get an advanced degree, you could set deadlines for tasks related to that aim, such as researching graduate programs or writing your personal statement.Reevaluate your goals as needed. Sometimes, you might set goals you realize later are too complex or ambitious. Other times, your professional aspirations may change and evolve as you gain more nursing skills and experience. Periodically review your professional goals and see if they align with your current needs, desires and lifestyle. It's okay to realize that you want to change an objective, alter its timeline or create entirely new goals.Choose fulfilling goals. Work toward goals that you find rewarding. Try to create goals that align with your professional interests and experiences, as well as other influencing factors in your life. Making progress toward and achieving your goals may cause stress but should also be personally and professionally fulfilling.Related Articles. How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps). 12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work. What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples.
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Result 4
Title5 Professional Goals for Nurses - American Critical Care Services
Urlhttps://accsnurses.com/5-professional-goals-nurses/
DescriptionNurses in the current work climate must consistently look for ways to remain competitive and abreast of new procedures and expectations in their field
Date
Organic Position3
H1American Critical Care Services
H2
H3Provide Excellent Patient-Centered Care
Increase Technology Skills
Focus On Continuing Education
Develop Interpersonal Skills
Become An Expert
H2WithAnchors
BodyAmerican Critical Care Services Navigation Apply Why Apply? Hospital Staffing Home Health Nurses Companion Care Nurse Testing Employee Forms and Resources Home About Testimonials Contact Us Search Blog 5 Professional Goals for Nurses 5 Professional Goals for Nurses Nurses in the current work climate must be consistently looking for ways to remain competitive and abreast of new procedures and expectations in their field. Nurses work in a variety of settings from hospitals, surgery centers, doctor’s offices, schools, and even large companies, and they all share common goals and objectives. In an effort to be competitive and deliver exceptional care, here are five professional goals for nurses. Provide Excellent Patient-Centered Care. The number one objective for medical personnel is providing excellent care for patients.  “Patient experience and satisfaction is the No. 1 priority for healthcare executives— above clinical quality, cost reduction, and many other burning issues”, (Health Leaders Media Industry Survey 2013) From check-in, vital signs, and administration of medications, to attending to mental and emotional status, nurses are the front-line authority on patient care. They heavily impact the patient experience and satisfaction levels. Increase Technology Skills. Technology changes rapidly. While the latest technological developments enable medical professionals to deliver excellent care to their patients, the ever-evolving technology requires nurses to constantly learn new skills. On top of staying up to date with new technology, nurses must also learn to troubleshoot technology issues that could directly impact patient care in the event of a malfunction. “Nurses and other healthcare providers can be so focused on data from monitors that they fail to detect potentially important subtle changes in clinical status.” (Powell, et al: 2008) Increasing understanding of technology and anatomical/physiological symptoms simultaneously will provide better patient care. Focus On Continuing Education. Nurses must focus on continuing to increase knowledge of pedagogy and evolution of medical techniques. Set a goal to learn something new every quarter, and research ways to better develop technology skills, medical techniques, and recommended delivery of patient care.  Life-long learners will be rewarded with positive feedback and marked improvements in delivery of care. Develop Interpersonal Skills. During an average hospital stay, a patient will see 17-25 different staff. This requires collaboration and communication between all medical staff to deliver excellent care. The nurse assigned to a patient will need to communicate effectively and efficiently in person or via technology with others assessing patient needs. From nursing assistants, lab technicians, pharmacology, doctors, and even housekeeping and nutrition, all staff contribute to the overall patient care, experience, and satisfaction.   Become An Expert. A nurse manages multiple tasks related to patient care throughout his/her day. Administering intravenous fluids and medication, entering patient data, distributing medicine, assessing pain levels, checking patient incisions, dealing with visitors, and juggling multiple orders from physicians are all part of a given shift for a nurse. Focusing on becoming an “expert” on a few of these tasks will enable the nurse to move forward in the specialty area of his/her choice. By honing specific skills to mastery level, a nurse makes herself more marketable and desirable in a given specialty. This level of mastery will also serve to accomplish providing excellent patient care to the continuing education goal mentioned above.    
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TitleProfessional Development & SMART Nursing Goals - Incredible Health
Urlhttps://www.incrediblehealth.com/blog/professional-development-for-nurses/
DescriptionLearn about what professional development for nurses looks like and how to create your own nursing professional development plan
DateDec 3, 2020
Organic Position4
H1Professional Development & SMART Nursing Goals
H2What is professional development for nurses?
Expert advice from nurses like you
Expert advice from nurses like you
Professional development goals for nurses
Creating a nursing professional development plan with SMART goals
Examples of SMART Goals
How do your business goals overlap with your personal goals?
Final thought
Earn your CEUs free
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H3Why is it important for nurses to set SMART goals?
NURSES
EMPLOYERS
COMPANY
H2WithAnchorsWhat is professional development for nurses?
Expert advice from nurses like you
Expert advice from nurses like you
Professional development goals for nurses
Creating a nursing professional development plan with SMART goals
Examples of SMART Goals
How do your business goals overlap with your personal goals?
Final thought
Earn your CEUs free
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BodyProfessional Development & SMART Nursing Goals No matter the career field you pursue, it’s crucial to come up with your own professional development goals. You may change some of these goals as you reassess them every few years to ensure they’re aligned with your overall life goals, but having goals set in place is the foundation of your potential success.  What is professional development for nurses? In 1985, the Journal for Nurses in Staff Development was first published. Only four years later, it was incorporated with the National Nursing Staff Development Organization, which is now known as the Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD). Throughout the 1990s, there was a massive increase in nursing professional development (NPD) activity and publications, and in 2016, ANPD defined NPD as: A specialized nursing practice that facilitates the professional role development and growth of nurses and other healthcare personnel along the continuum from novice to expert. Expert advice from nurses like you. Join the free Incredible Health Nurse Community to get career advice, support, and tips from experienced fellow nurses. Connect now Expert advice from nurses like you. Join the free Incredible Health Nurse Community to get career advice, support, and tips from experienced fellow nurses. CONNECT NOW Professional development in any line of work tends to evolve as time passes, and the specialty of nursing is no different. This is largely due to the rapid technological advancements that have occurred over the past few decades. As technology and diagnosis and treatment capabilities continue to become more advanced, so do professional development goals for nurses.  Professional development goals for nurses. No doubt about it, a lot of us have a strong desire to advance in our careers. However, when we take a second to reflect, there’s only a blurry picture of what we see ourselves doing in the future. Some of us may not know the exact job title we want to achieve, and there’s a lot of us with no solid plans in place to help us develop on a professional basis. This is why nurses NEED to create professional goals for themselves.  When it comes to setting nursing goals, it’s important to choose ones that YOU want to achieve. Don’t think about what everyone else wants you to do.  Also, keep in mind that professional development isn’t necessarily all about the money, but do remember that when advancing professionally, you usually get opportunities to make more money. So, if you prefer to advance as far as you can go with financial gain being your primary motivator, then definitely take a look at salary estimates for nurses in your specialty and at different locations. You may find that part of your professional development goals require you to move to a new location, and it’s important to prepare for these kinds of changes as early as possible in your career so you can eventually get settled.  Some of the more common professional development goals that nurses set for themselves are: Acquire advanced technology skillsMaintain continuing education unit (CEU) requirementsRefine interpersonal skillsHone specific skill set to mastery/expert levelTake a management positionObtain professional certifications Top nurse jobs on Incredible Health. 🏥 Registered Nurse - Med / Surg Allentown, PA | $60k-$90k/year 🏥 Registered Nurse - Critical Care / ICU Jacksonville, FL | $40k-$90k/year Get interview requests from top hospitals for hundreds more jobs like these. Join free Creating a nursing professional development plan with SMART goals. Nursing SMART goals help nurses identify their goals and come up with a plan of action. SMART is an acronym that nurses can use when mapping out their goals. The SMART acronym stands for the following: S: SpecificMeasurableAttainableRealisticTimely Why is it important for nurses to set SMART goals? Nurses who set smart goals have a much better chance of advancing their careers and reaching new heights. Additionally, nurses who set SMART career goals can provide better care for the patients as they are motivated and encouraged to continue making progress as a nurse. When nurses are incentivized internally it makes everyone’s jobs a bit easier and improves nursing care overall. Be specific: Try and create a goal that is concrete and detailed. If you set a goal that’s too wide in scope, you might get pulled in many different directions. Say for instance, that you are charting goals and want to advance as a nurse. Simply having a goal as advancing as a nurse would be to vague and broad. This could happen in so many ways. Try instead something like: obtain my Master of Science in Nursing degree.Make it measurable: To achieve your short and long-term goals, it’s important to know how to gauge your progress. This allows you to stay motivated and keep working toward your goals.Keep it attainable: Not everyone can become the president of the American Nurses Association, however, there are unique goals that you can achieve. You want to create a practical goal that you can set out to accomplish.Be realistic: Similar to the last specification, it’s important to have goals that are indicative of your capabilities. Though it’s important to have ambition, you don’t want a goal that you can’t possibly achieve either.Make it timely: Creating goals won’t work if they don’t have time stamps or deadlines. For example, if you want to get your MSN, choose a date to get it by. Choosing a date will give you a sense of urgency and will help motivate you to get it done. Examples of SMART Goals. Now that you understand what the definition of SMART goals is, it’s time to give some examples of them. Become a nurse practitioner within three years: This goal is concrete and has a timestamp. The nurse will have a firm understanding of what they want to achieve and when they want to achieve it.Earn a Master of Science in Nursing Degree in the next two years: With this goal, you are able to grow as a nurse. The goal works because it’s specific and has a timestamp as well.Find a nurse to mentor within the next year: Finding an opportunity to mentor another nurse is a great way to help improve your job satisfaction and help someone else. This is a great, SMART goal because it’s easily attainable, realistic, and time-sensitive.Earn certification in the next two years: Nurses who pursue certification have a better chance of retaining their jobs or finding another one if necessary. It gives them a unique competitive advantage. This SMART goal works because it’s specific and attainable. Nurses benefit extensively from a professional development plan or SMART goals. This is mostly because the industry’s highest-performing organizations show great favor to those with verification of their advanced skill sets (and there is much assessment and verification of skills made during professional development).  Nurses can begin their professional development plan as soon as they like. The earlier a nurse starts in their career with professional development, the greater the possibilities become.  How do your business goals overlap with your personal goals? When coming up with your business or professional goals as a nurse, it’s important to investigate your personal goals as well. Sometimes, these two things can conflate. Aligning your personal goals with your business goals can bring you a greater sense of joy. At the end of the day, nursing can become more than a job but a vocation. When you are able to make a vocation out of a job, then you are investing in your spirit long term. As Minority Nurse puts it: Personal goals for you as a nurse take some reflection of the kind of nurse you want to be and what kind of legacy you want to leave from your career. What will make you most satisfied at the end of your career? Will it be starting a clinic halfway around the world, advocating for nursing in the highest government echelons, or being the steadfast patient advocate in the maternity department where you’ll be happy to spend your entire career? These goals help you assess how to improve your nursing style, tweak your approach to patients, or even adapt your home life with the rigorous demands of your career. Your personal goals might reflect on nurses you admire for their bedside manner or for their relentless promotion of the nursing profession. Setting your personal nursing goals helps you figure out the necessary changes you need to make for career satisfaction. Having fulfillment in both your nursing life and personal life can enrich your life. If you are still thinking about nursing goals, try to write them in ways that capture your life passions as well. [More: Top Nursing Conferences for 2021] Final thought. Professional development for nurses can take your nursing career to places you never thought possible. From entering new nursing specialties to managing more than a hundred nurses as a facility supervisor, your nursing career possibilities are as wide open as you make them.  No matter the professional development plan you put into place, you’ll need to maintain an active nursing license to achieve your goals. Check out these free nursing CEUs to get you started on meeting your state’s CEU requirements.  Earn your CEUs free. Our easy online CE courses are ANCC-accredited and 100% free for nurses. Get started Footer. 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Title10 Achievable Examples of Nursing Career Goals – RNlessons
Urlhttps://rnlessons.com/10-achievable-examples-of-nursing-career-goals/
DescriptionGoals setting is an important part of any career. Whether you are still in nursing school or you already graduated, it is always a good…
Date
Organic Position5
H110 Achievable Examples of Nursing Career Goals
H2Examples of Professional Goals for Nurses (5 to 10-Year Goals)
Examples of Short-Term Nursing Career Goals
H3Acquire unit-specific certifications
Upgrade your nursing competencies
Improve your communication skills
Climb the professional ladder
Earn an advanced degree
Maintain a healthy distance
Pass your boards on the first try
Find a great nursing job position
Excel in your preceptorship
Continue to learn every day
Recent Posts
H2WithAnchorsExamples of Professional Goals for Nurses (5 to 10-Year Goals)
Examples of Short-Term Nursing Career Goals
Body10 Achievable Examples of Nursing Career Goals Written by RNlessons in Blog Goals setting is an important part of any career. Whether you are still in nursing school or you already graduated, it is always a good idea to work toward a goal to further your career.  This article will provide you with nursing career goals examples that you can use for inspiration when planning your own.  Examples of Professional Goals for Nurses (5 to 10-Year Goals). Acquire unit-specific certifications . If you want to work in a specialty such as the ICU or other intensive care units, always be on the lookout for ways to increase your knowledge and credentials. Unit specific certifications tremendously increase your competency levels as a nurse. The more knowledge and skills you acquire, the more valuable you will become.  Most hospitals will offer these classes in-house. All you need to do is sign up. If you have trouble with and don’t know where to start, you can always talk to your unit educator or unit manager.  Here are some examples: Critical Care Registered Nurse certification (CCRN) Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) 12 Lead ECG/EKG class ECG/EKG rhythm class  Upgrade your nursing competencies . Every unit in the hospital is somewhat specialized. Become a specialist at what you do by being involved in the procedures your unit has to offer. Are there in-services you could attend? Any check-offs you could get under your belt? Does your unit offer classes to advance your knowledge for specific procedures?  Take as many classes as possible and shadow other nurses.  Improve your communication skills . Nursing is a very interactive profession. Communication is key when it comes to patient care and treatments. Not only do you need excellent communication skills for your patients but co-workers, doctors, and other interdisciplinary team members.  All these groups of people have different education levels and communication skills. You, as the nurse, have to have the skills to bring them all together. You have to be able to educate patients who don’t have a medical background and communicate with the physician simultaneously.  Climb the professional ladder. You don’t have to stay at the bedside as a nurse. If you want to step away into a management position, you can start small and work your way up. Most unit managers began their careers at the bedside.  Start with a charge nurse position. As a charge nurse, you have to be resourceful and handle different issues beyond taking care of a set number of patients.  You will have to manage staffing, shift schedules, and solve more complicated matters that arise during your shift. The charge nurse’s role is a significant precursor role from that of a unit manager.  Nurse manager positions require at least five years of nursing experience, and administrative knowledge is a big plus. Some hospitals require a bachelor’s degree while others require a master’s degree.  A fair amount of responsibility comes with being a nurse manager; something a nurse should consider before applying for a position. While administrative positions remove the nurse from the bedside and direct patient care, it is still a critical nursing job with a considerable pay raise and bankers’ hours. Many nurses who have families enjoy the idea of an administrative position.  Related Reading: 25+ Examples of SMART Goals for NursesHow to Write an Essay on Nursing Career Goals Earn an advanced degree . It is always wise to further your career. If you have an associate’s degree, work on a bachelor’s degree. A bachelor’s degree allows you to work in magnet status hospitals and also acquire management positions.  Another option is advanced practice. This path requires either a master’s degree or a Ph.D. This allows the nurse to have a more one on one care relationship with the patient.  Nurse practitioners can choose almost any specialty they would like, have much better hours, and a very nice pay raise. Some nurses decide to go on to be a physician’s assistant as well or even a doctor. Here are the most common paths for advanced practice: Nurse practitioner Nurse Anesthetist Nurse Midwife Physician Assistant Maintain a healthy distance . Many nurses struggle with keeping their nurse life and personal life separate. It is vital to balance your career and your personal life. Maintaining a healthy life outside of work and not being consumed by a job and career has to be a professional goal.  Being able to balance both career and personal life will help with your nursing career. It will keep you motivated to take on new challenges.  These career goals are long-standing goals that might take time to accomplish.  Next are career goals that are achievable much faster.  Examples of Short-Term Nursing Career Goals . These kinds of goals are faster to attain. You can usually reach them in less than a year.  Pass your boards on the first try . Passing the NCLEX is the most pertinent goal to move forward in your career as a nurse. To practice as a nurse, you have to pass your boards. All other plans build on this achievement.  The most important thing is that you don’t cram. Start studying early and set up a study plan that gives you enough time to look over all the material and allows for breaks and time to yourself, especially right before the test. Related Reading: 7 Examples of Leadership Smart Goals in Nursing Find a great nursing job position . Landing your first job position is special. Consider the direction you want to take in nursing when deciding between different job opportunities.  Your first job often won’t be what you imagined, and you would like to move on to a different position. Remember that you will gain experience in any nursing job. Sometimes it may take a while until you land your dream job. Excel in your preceptorship . Most training periods span over three months. This is the time to ask as many questions as you can. Your training time is unique because you transition from studying nursing to actually doing it. This is an excellent short-term goal for a nurse, especially a new grad. It offers a perfect opportunity to show how invested you are in this profession. Goals like these build an excellent foundation for your long term goals. It takes great effort and resilience to achieve 5 to 10-year nursing career goals.  Continue to learn every day. Healthcare is an ever-changing and evolving field. Even after your training, there are many opportunities to learn.  Make learning about your profession a lifelong practice. It’s easy to learn something new in nursing each and every day. That is the reason why this point belongs to the short-term goals in nursing. Find opportunities every day to learn something new about nursing, and you’ll reach one of your goals every single day. Image: Cathy Yeulet/123RF RNlessons Recent Posts. link to Osteomyelitis Nursing Diagnosis & Care Plan Osteomyelitis Nursing Diagnosis & Care Plan Osteomyelitis Nursing Diagnosis & Care Plan. Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone that mainly affects children but can also affect adults. It can be an acute and also chronic condition. Continue Reading link to Diverticulosis Nursing Diagnosis & Care Plans Diverticulosis Nursing Diagnosis & Care Plans Diverticular disease is an outpouching of the intestinal mucosa through the colon wall. This clinical manifestation can occur in any part of the intestine but most commonly occurs in the Sigmoid...Continue Reading
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Title5 Achievable Examples Of Nursing Career Goals - NurseChoice
Urlhttps://www.nursechoice.com/blog/profiles-and-features/5-examples-of-nursing-career-goals-that-are-achievable/
Description5 Achievable Examples Of Nursing Career Goals · 1. Advance your Degree · 2. Take a Management Position · 3. Become a Specialist · 4. Obtain ...
DateApr 13, 2019
Organic Position6
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Title15+ Career Goals For Nurses - GenTwenty
Urlhttps://gentwenty.com/career-goals-for-nurses/
DescriptionHere are 15 career goals for nurses that will allow you to grow in your career as a nurse while helping others at the same time
DateSep 15, 2021
Organic Position7
H115+ Career Goals For Nurses
H215+ Career Goals For Nurses
H3Advance your degree
Improve your patient care techniques
Be a team player
Take on more responsibilities
Strengthen your interpersonal skills
Obtain professional certifications
Work in a rural area or be a travel nurse
Become a nurse educator
Take on administrative responsibilities
Learn leadership skills
Teach others about your favorite healthcare specialty area if it interests you
Volunteer in a community organization
Specialize in a field
Do in-service sessions
Find a mentor, be a mentor
Stay up-to-date on medical technology and research
Diversify your knowledge
H2WithAnchors15+ Career Goals For Nurses
Body15+ Career Goals For Nurses By: Author Nicole Booz Posted on Last updated: September 15, 2021 0 Comments Categories Career Nurses and nurse practitioners are an important part of our healthcare system. It is the job of nurses to provide medical care for patients, educate people on how to manage their health, and help people who do not have access to quality healthcare. If you are a nurse practitioner or registered nurse looking for career goals and professional goals, this blog post is just what you need! Even as a nurse, it’s is important to have a professional development plan with achievable goals. Setting SMART goals will help you advance your career in a realistic and targeted way. The first step is to decide what you want to work towards.  Here are 15 career goals that will allow you to grow in your career as a nurse while helping others at the same time. 15+ Career Goals For Nurses. Advance your degree. Most nurses start out in an entry-level position as their first job. A master’s degree can complement your bachelor’s degree and add to your understanding of human physiology, as well as help you be more effective in the workplace. A higher level of education may improve your nursing knowledge and abilities, give you the legal authority to serve more patient care responsibilities, and boost your salary potential. A nurse practitioner (NP) is a nurse with a graduate degree in advanced practice nursing. If you already have a bachelor’s degree, consider earning your Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). An APRN license allows you to assess, diagnose, and develop treatment plans for patients. An advanced degree can up-level your long-term goals in the nursing profession. Improve your patient care techniques. One of a nurse’s first aims is to offer high-quality care to their patients. Consider how you might improve the way you deliver current patient care or procedures. You may, for example, strive to be a better advocate for your patient’s particular requirements. You can also improve your career prospects by working on how you work with other members of the healthcare team. Be a team player. A successful nurse is able to function as part of their medical care team and integrate seamlessly into new situations, whether they are caring for one patient or many at once. Working well within the existing system proves that you are able to adapt quickly and work with others. Take on more responsibilities. Nurses can improve their career prospects by taking on more responsibilities within the hospital, clinic, or other healthcare facility where they work. You may be given new tasks that you need to complete successfully before receiving greater responsibility in the future. Or you may be able to complete tasks in addition to your regular job. Strengthen your interpersonal skills. Improve your communication skills with patients, doctors, and other nurses you collaborate with on a daily basis. The majority of nurses use many channels to communicate, including written and verbal conversations. Learn to express yourself as clearly as possible. You may also practice paying attention while listening and reading medical records carefully. Pay attention to a patient’s or medical expert’s physical reactions when interacting with them. If you notice your patient tensing their shoulders, inquire whether they’re uncomfortable and whether there is anything you can do to assist. Obtain professional certifications. Obtain nursing certifications. Professional nursing organizations frequently provide a wide range of nursing qualifications. A certification that demonstrates your mastery of a certain skill, such as first aid or clinical research techniques, is an option. You could look into enrolling in a certificate program that focuses on a particular nursing specialty or unit, such as pediatrics or oncology. You could also work in an emergency room and intensive care unit for more varied experience. Work in a rural area or be a travel nurse. A career as a travel nurse can present many benefits. You will gain valuable experience, while having the chance to explore different areas of the country and world! Travel nurses have unique experience in adaptability, balancing their personal life, and working in specific areas. Work in an area with limited access to healthcare. By working for organizations like Doctors Without Borders or providing volunteer work through your local Red Cross chapter you can help people get access to quality medical care. Become a nurse educator. The career of a nurse educator is one that requires you to be an effective communicator and teacher, as well as possessing strong technical knowledge from your own nursing career. If this sounds like the career path for you then consider enrolling in an MSN program with a focus on education or taking on a career as an adjunct faculty member at your local college or university. Take on administrative responsibilities. You can improve your career prospects by taking on administrative responsibilities within the hospital, clinic, or other healthcare facility where you work. You may be given new tasks that you need to complete successfully before receiving greater responsibility in the future. Or you may be able to complete tasks in addition to your regular job. Learn leadership skills. As a career nurse you can improve career prospects by learning leadership skills, which enhances the value of other nursing qualifications and experience that comes from being part of an organization’s management or administration team. Having strong leadership skills will make you stand out, especially as you progress in your career. Taking on a leadership role can also help you connect with people in the nursing field which can help you advance your career. Teach others about your favorite healthcare specialty area if it interests you. If teaching is something that interests and excites you, consider becoming an instructor for continuing education classes or seminars on medical topics of interest to other nurses so they can increase their career prospects. Many nurses are committed to lifelong learning – and this is a way to pay it forward. Volunteer in a community organization. Consider volunteering for community organizations while you’re working as a career nurse. Your experience will be beneficial to your career prospects and can help you develop new skills that may lead to career advancement opportunities down the road. Specialize in a field. Nurses can specialize in any area of nursing that interests them, including emergency care or critical care. You might also consider specializing in an area that you have experience with to grow your career options even more. Explore career development opportunities at the hospital where you work. If there are training programs available for nurses who wish to develop their skills further, you could ask your employer if they are available to you. Work in a hospital that specializes in your favorite healthcare discipline. If you want to work with children but don’t think there are any pediatric hospitals near where you live and work then look into the possibility of working at a hospital that specializes in a career discipline you would enjoy. You might be surprised at what you find! Do in-service sessions. Attend any in-service sessions, workshops, or job shadowing events if they are available at your workplace. In-service training may help you improve your nursing abilities, learn new industry standards, or gain knowledge about a special nursing discipline. If your present hospital or medical center doesn’t provide in-service courses, speak with other nurses and healthcare professionals to see if they have any suggestions for continuing education opportunities. Look into career development courses or workshops at your local college or university. Even though the career path of a nurse is very different from that of an academic, you can still benefit by learning about business management skills and administration in order to improve career prospects down the road. Find a mentor, be a mentor. Mentorship doesn’t have to be formal to be valuable. Work with someone a few years ahead of you and a few years behind you to establish a relationship, trust, and future goals together. The person ahead of you can help lead your career while you help lead the career of the person behind you. It’s a win-win-win all around. Stay up-to-date on medical technology and research. Keep up with the latest medical technology and research to continue improving career prospects as a nurse. By regularly checking out industry magazines, newsletters, and online resources you can update yourself on new treatments for different conditions or procedures that may improve patient care outcomes. Diversify your knowledge. Consider working in an area of healthcare outside your primary focus. If you’ve been working exclusively in one area of nursing, such as cardiac care or mental health, consider moving to an entirely different department for career advancement opportunities. Being a nurse is a special and unique career path. You help people through some of their most physically and emotionally vulnerable times. The care you provide matters. Setting nursing career goals may seem overwhelming at first, but by setting short-term goals first, you’ll be on your way to a higher position. About the Author. Nicole Booz is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of GenTwenty, GenThirty, and The Capsule Collab. She has a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and is the author of The Kidult Handbook (Simon & Schuster May 2018). She currently lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and two sons. When she’s not reading or writing, she’s probably hiking, eating brunch, or planning her next great adventure. Website: genthirty.com twitter pinterest Click here to cancel reply.   Loading Comments...  
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Result 9
TitleGoals for Nursing - Montefiore Nyack Hospital |
Urlhttps://www.montefiorenyack.org/goals-nursing
DescriptionCaring for patients with acute and chronic illnesses; facilitating discharge planning; providing palliative care; and offering patient education; illness ...
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Organic Position8
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TitleSMART Goals for Nursing With Over 20 Clear Examples
Urlhttps://normalnurselife.com/smart-goals-for-nursing/
DescriptionThere is a method called the SMART goal that is used by a lot of people to guide them in setting their goals. Learn how to set SMART Goals for Nursing right!
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Organic Position9
H1SMART Goals for Nursing With Clear Examples
H2Examples of SMART goals for nursing
Examples of SMART goals for nursing students
Examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioners
Examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioner students
Examples of SMART goals for nurse managers
Examples of SMART goals for nursing care plans
More tips in creating SMART goals
Conclusion: SMART goals for nursing
H3#1 Safety
#2 Patient Care
#3 Efficiency
#4 Accuracy
#5 Professional Development
The Art of Setting Smart Goals
H2WithAnchorsExamples of SMART goals for nursing
Examples of SMART goals for nursing students
Examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioners
Examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioner students
Examples of SMART goals for nurse managers
Examples of SMART goals for nursing care plans
More tips in creating SMART goals
Conclusion: SMART goals for nursing
BodySMART Goals for Nursing With Clear ExamplesBy Ida Koivisto Goals provide a keen sense of motivation, direction, clarity and a clear focus on every aspect of your career or (nurse) life. You are letting yourself have a specific aim or target by setting clear goals for yourself. There is a method called the SMART goal that is used by a lot of people to guide them in setting their goals. In this article, you are going to learn how to set up SMART goals for nursing with plenty of examples of SMART goals for nursing. But first, let me tell you what SMART goal is in generally speaking. The acronym SMART stands for the terms Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-Bound. All these five elements are the main parts of the SMART goal. This simple yet powerful method brings structure and ensures that your goals are within reason and are attainable. SMART goal helps you in defining how the “future state” of your goal would look like, and how it is to be measured. SMART goals are: Specific – clear, unambiguous and well definedMeasurable – has a criterion that helps you measure your progressAttainable – beyond reach and not impossible to achieveRelevant – realistic and has relevance to your life or careerTime-Bound – well defined time, has a starting date and an ending date Often, people or businesses set unrealistic goals for themselves that only leads to failure. For instance, you may be a nurse practitioner and you set goals such as “I will be the best at _____.” This specific type of goal is vague and has no sense of direction in it. Here is a thorough video from DecisionSkills that I encourage you to watch before continuing reading. After the video, you’ll have a much better understanding of setting SMART goals for nursing. Now it’s time to give you a couple of examples of SMART goals for nursing. Table of Contents Examples of SMART goals for nursing. In this fast-paced and busy day-to-day life, the job of a nurse can get stressful and overwhelming–with all the workloads and patients emerging from left to right. SMART goals are especially helpful in nursing as it helps in defining a developmental framework and helps you see your progress towards your goal. Example: SafetyPatient CareEfficiencyAccuracyProfessional Development Next, a more specific answer to each category. #1 Safety. Today, I will construct a checklist for an updated patient and staff safety and hazard. I will use our ward policy guidelines in constructing this checklist. I will let every staff nurse check this list based on a once-a-month rotation. I shall complete the checklist by the end of the month of September and have it measured monthly. #2 Patient Care. I shall hand over the assessment notes, care instructions, and patient details to the next shift nurse as I complete my shift. I have to finish this before the break time so that the details of the patients would be noted and important instructions would be followed. #3 Efficiency. I will document the additional tasks following the timetabling meeting weekly so that I can efficiently balance my time and be able to manage all my duties. This will benefit me as it improves my overall time management. #4 Accuracy. I will record all my notes about the patient as soon as I leave his or her room, while the information is still fresh and complete in my mind. This will help in ensuring the accuracy of the information before I proceed to my next endeavor. #5 Professional Development. By the end of this year, I shall attend two workshops that will help me with my specialty or another field that will help me for the betterment of my profession as a nurse. Next, I’m going to give you examples of SMART goals for nursing students. Examples of SMART goals for nursing students. Scenario: you’re a 1st-year college student who’s taking up nursing. Your professor in one of your major subjects has announced that you’ll be having your final examination at the end of the month. You know that this subject is critical, and you want to pass this subject no matter what. SIMPLE GOAL I want to pass our final examination. SMART GOAL I will finish reading three chapters of our book within this day. I’ll write down every important terminology and its definition in my notebook. I will also take a 15-minute break in every hour of studying. For tomorrow, I will make flashcards that will help me easily retain this information and terminologies better. On the day before our examination, I will make sure to have sufficient rest and enough amount of sleep. Related articles: Is Nursing for Me With QuizHow to Become a Registered NurseHow to Become a Respiratory TherapistHow to Become a Neonatal Nurse Let’s move on to examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioners. Examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioners. Scenario: you’re a nurse practitioner, but your monthly salary is not enough since you’ll be having to pay for your loans and other payable. So, your perceived solution for this problem is to strive and get promoted in the acute care facility which gives a higher pay than your current position. SIMPLE GOAL I want to be promoted to a higher position and make more money. SMART GOAL I will work harder so that my chances of getting promoted in the acute care facility would be higher. This new job pays me an amount of $30 per hour, including a night differential. I will aspire to be a better nurse practitioner day by day, so that by August 30th, my manager would see my potential, and get me promoted. Examples of SMART goals for nurse practitioner students. Scenario: you’re a nurse practitioner student who’s failing in his/her exams and got the lowest grade in your class. You know to yourself that something is wrong with your study methods because even if you study hard, you don’t see the fruit of your labor. SIMPLE GOAL I want to learn the other nurse practitioner students’ study methods. SMART GOAL I will improve my study methods by asking my fellow nurse practitioner students how they prepare for tasks and exams. Today, I will talk to one of my fellow nurse practitioner students, and ask them if we could have a group study together as we prepare for the upcoming examination. Examples of SMART goals for nurse managers. Scenario: you’re the department manager and you’re assigned to handle the nurses in the hospital. You notice that the work environment is getting unhealthy, and the nurses in your department are uncomfortable with each other and towards you. SIMPLE GOAL I want to improve my relationship with the nurses that I handle. SMART GOAL I will make sure to promote a healthy working environment by having a meeting once or twice a month to discuss prevailing and relevant issues in our department and hear some constructive feedback from the nurses that I handle. I will make sure to treat them all equally and with the utmost respect regardless of their age or gender. But I will also set professional boundaries among the nurses that I handle, and I will make sure that I lay these limits very clearly so that no one will violate them. Examples of SMART goals for nursing care plans. Scenario: you’ve learned from a workshop that by showing compassion and empathy to your patient, they will adhere better to the medications which would lead to quicker recovery. See also: Compassion in Nursing SIMPLE GOAL I want to show more empathy to the patients that I’m handling. SMART GOAL I will make sure to spend an extra 5-10 minutes with each of my new patients. I will ask them questions about their interests and hobbies so that I can distract them from their health condition. Also, I will make sure to put myself into their position by thinking about what they must be feeling about the situation. My way of communicating with them should be as if I’m just having a conversation with a friend, but of course with respect and boundaries. More tips in creating SMART goals. Pursuing an “I will” statement is more effective than an “I want” statement. As you create your own SMART goals, remember to ask yourself these following questions: How is my goal specific? Where is the focus?How is my goal measurable? How will I be able to track my progress?How is my goal achievable? Are my resources enough to achieve this goal?How is my goal relevant? How will this help in my career as a nurse?Is my goal time-bound? Is my goal set in a realistic time frame? TIP #1 Aside from the 5 elements comprising SMART goals, it is important to have a model and visualization of your goals as if you have already achieved your goal. Not only will this motivate you, this will also give you the feeling of success that comes from achieving that specific goal of yours. TIP #2 Release any doubts that you have. Those doubts whispering that you’re not enough, or those negative thoughts that kept you awake all night. Let those negative self-talk go. The more you say something to yourself, the more likely these things will happen in reality. So, it is always best to talk nicely to yourself. TIP #3 While releasing your doubts and visualization of your goals are both effective, all these things will only matter once you take consistent action towards your desired goal to progress each day. Things may get overwhelming and you may not know where to start, so it is advisable to do one task at a time. It may seem hard at first, that’s just how things are. But as you keep going, you will get closer and closer to your goal. We’re an affiliateAs an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you if you use our links, we really appreciate it! 🙂 If these tips were not enough for you, I highly recommend you to check out more about smart nursing goals from Anisa Marku‘s book. The Art of Setting Smart Goals. Check the Latest Price Conclusion: SMART goals for nursing. By setting SMART goals for nursing students, nursing practitioners, nursing practitioner students, nurse managers, and nursing care plans, you are setting a clear focus for your ideas and efforts that will allow you to reach your goals in a much shorter period of time. See also: 5 Rights of Delegation in Nursing But you should also take note of the possible drawbacks to SMART goals that may hinder you from achieving your goals. At this point, you should have a clear understanding of how to set SMART goals for nursing. If you would like to learn some more check out these articles of ours: The 7 Ethical Principles in NursingTop 10 Qualities of a Nurse with ExplanationsDo Nurses Make Good Money?Neonatal Nurse SalaryDo Nurses Relieve Patients?How to Address a Nurse Practitioner I’d be happy if you could give this article a star rating. It only takes a couple of seconds. Thank you in advance! How useful was this post? Click on a star to rate it! Submit Rating Average rating 4.8 / 5. Vote count: 305 No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post. We are sorry that this post was not useful for you! Let us improve this post! Tell us how we can improve this post? Submit Feedback
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Result 11
Title8 SMART Goals Examples for Your Nursing Career
Urlhttps://www.developgoodhabits.com/smart-goals-nursing/
DescriptionThese smart goals for nursing examples will help you keep focused and motivated and also ensure that you actually complete your objectives
DateNov 22, 2021
Organic Position10
H18 SMART Goals Examples for Your Nursing Career
H2What Are SMART Goals?
Why SMART Goals Are Important for Nurses
8 SMART Goal Examples for Nurses
Final Thoughts on SMART goals for Your Nursing Career
H31. Improve Communication Skills
2. Improve Time Management
3. Be More Accurate
4. Develop Professionally
5. Explain Things to Patients
6. Stress Less
7. Stay Healthy
8. Be More Compassionate
H2WithAnchorsWhat Are SMART Goals?
Why SMART Goals Are Important for Nurses
8 SMART Goal Examples for Nurses
Final Thoughts on SMART goals for Your Nursing Career
Body8 SMART Goals Examples for Your Nursing Career November 22, 2021 RedditPocketShareBufferTweetPinThere might be affiliate links on this page, which means we get a small commission of anything you buy. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. Please do your own research before making any online purchase. Pursuing a nursing career requires plenty of discipline and effort. You have to learn how to care for a sick or injured person and comfort them when they feel at their weakest. When pursuing a nursing career, your physical and mental health are put at risk. So it’s vital to develop skills that will help you stay organized and efficient to stay motivated and succeed at work – like creating SMART goals. Nursing becomes much more fulfilling when you know how you can achieve your aims. (Side note: One of the best ways to get what you want from life is to create and set SMART goals. To get started, check out this post, which provides a step-step blueprint on setting SMART goals.) What You Will LearnWhat Are SMART Goals?Why SMART Goals Are Important for Nurses8 SMART Goal Examples for Nurses1. Improve Communication Skills2. Improve Time Management3. Be More Accurate4. Develop Professionally5. Explain Things to Patients6. Stress Less7. Stay Healthy8. Be More CompassionateFinal Thoughts on SMART goals for Your Nursing Career What Are SMART Goals? Most people create goals to help them achieve the desired outcome. But very few stick to them until the end. This is because they approach goal setting the wrong way. Have a look at these two statements: I want to pass my exam.To pass my exam, I will study every day for at least 20 minutes and reread the chapters as I complete them. The first statement is a goal nursing students may typically set. The second one is a SMART goal. Other than stating what the goal is, a SMART goal also includes instructions on how to achieve it. This is the only way an action plan can work. “SMART” stands for “Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound.” Here’s what each segment means in practice. S: Specific Being specific is crucial for achieving both short- and long-term goals. The questions your goal should answer are “What?” “Who?” “When?” “Where?” “Which?” and “Why?” Then, once you reach a specific milestone or the final deadline, you’ll be sure you achieved the goal. M: Measurable Measurable goals have a precise time, amount, or another unit of measurement built into them. It’s easy to track your progress if the goal has metrics. For example, if the objective is to read 20 pages of a book each day or to spend 15 minutes doing yoga, it’s easy to measure how much of the activity you actually did. A: Attainable Goals that aren’t attainable often lead to frustration. When creating a goal, examine your current life situation and aim for objectives that aren’t beyond your reach. Otherwise, failure can be discouraging. Imagine setting a goal to get a nursing job in the most elite private hospital right after graduation. Although not impossible, it’s doubtful that a person can master everything it takes to become a highly skilled nurse practitioner so early in their career. R: Relevant Relevant goals are about what you really need and want. Your goals should align with what you hold dear and value in life. You probably have more than one goal in life. Focusing on all of them at once is highly unlikely to bring success. Instead, shift your attention to the goals that are most relevant to your current life situation. T: Time-Bound Time-bound goals are about setting deadlines. When creating a goal, you want to set a target date to achieve it. When you look at your goal, the outcome should be clear. And as the deadline approaches, it will be visible whether or not you are on track to succeed. An essential part of setting goals is the wording. You can achieve fantastic results when you focus on the right things. However, when you don’t, it’s only a matter of time before your motivation dies. This is why it’s best to shift your attention from the outcome goals to the process goals. You can learn more about the difference in this blog post. And to learn more about SMART goals, check out this post. Why SMART Goals Are Important for Nurses. According to the American Association of Colleges and Nursing (AACN), over 250,000 students are enrolled in a program preparing new registered nurses at the baccalaureate level. There was a surprising 5.6% increase in 2020. Setting SMART goals will ensure you actually complete your objectives. To compete with your peers in nursing school or as a practitioner, you need to give your maximum to succeed. The best way of doing so is by setting goals that will keep you focused and motivated. Setting SMART goals will ensure you actually complete your objectives. 8 SMART Goal Examples for Nurses. 1. Improve Communication Skills. To improve my communication skills, I will listen closely to what others are saying to me. If I can’t keep up, I will ask them to clarify. Finally, I will ask people whether they understood me after I’ve spoken. I should become a better communicator by the end of the year. S: This goal explains precisely how to improve your communication skills.M: By asking for clarity anytime you don’t understand something, you can measure your progress based on how often you have to ask in a given day or month.A: This is a reasonable, attainable goal you can start doing anytime, anywhere.R: The goal is relevant to becoming a better nurse since communication is vital in this field.T: At the end of the year, you can compare your communication skills before starting this process-oriented goal. 2. Improve Time Management. I will document all tasks following a weekly timetable during my workday to balance my time and accomplish my duties more efficiently. I will do this for two weeks to improve my overall time management. S: This goal explains precisely what you can do to improve your time management as a nurse.M: You can measure the number of tasks you documented, as well as measure how much more efficient you’ve become by the extra time you have for other jobs.A: This goal is attainable and straightforward.R: Having strong time management skills is crucial when you’re a nurse. This goal is relevant to your nursing career.T: You should document the tasks each week following the timetable. You can create an additional sense of urgency by deciding that you have to complete the documentation before returning to work. Two weeks is enough time to see if the strategy is working for you. 3. Be More Accurate. To become more accurate as a nurse, I will write all notes about my patient the moment I leave the room, while my memory is still fresh. Then, after one week, I should have more accurate notes. S: Compared to “I want to be more accurate,” this is a rather specific goal describing how you can achieve it.M: You can measure this goal in terms of how many notes you got down. It’s not good to skip a bunch of notes – the point is to get ALL of them down right away.A: You can squeeze in a minute after leaving a patient room to take notes, so this goal is highly attainable.R: This goal is relevant to you wanting to become more accurate at nursing.T: The sense of urgency is created by “the moment I leave the room,” so you know you should act fast to complete your goal. In a week, you can see the difference this strategy makes in your accuracy. 4. Develop Professionally. I will attend two nursing workshops or webinars per year to help my professional development. S: Instead of saying, “I want to develop my career,” you state the exact activity that will help you do so.M: The goal is to attend two events per year, so it’s easy to measure your progress.A: Given that you may have to work more than usual this year, anything more than two webinars per year might be hard to achieve.R: The goal is directly relevant to you advancing your nursing career.T: The goal resets at the end of the year, so you want to plan your time wisely. 5. Explain Things to Patients. I will learn to use plain language so I can communicate better with my patients. Whenever I learn a new medical term in the next three months, I’ll find a simpler way to explain it. S: This is a specific goal about changing how you explain things to your patients. M: The goal progress can be measured by the number of new medical and laymen’s terms you learned. A: This goal is attainable, and it’s a win-win both for you as a nurse and for your patients. R: This is a highly relevant goal in anyone’s nursing career. T: After three months, you’ll see a difference in how you communicate with your patients. 6. Stress Less. To combat stress at work, I will practice stress management. I will exercise, meditate, listen to music, or take some time off for myself every day for one hour. I’ll get more sleep in and talk to friends and family about what’s troubling me. Then, after two weeks, I’ll re-assess. S: Instead of saying, “I want to stress less,” you can give specific details about how you can achieve that. M: You can measure your progress by the number of hours you spent on self-care. Also, you can measure how doing these activities impact your response to stressful situations at work compared to before. A: You may feel pushed for time, but an hour per day for yourself is not that much. If you can’t make it an hour straight, you can split the activities into two sessions of thirty minutes. R: Doing what you love releases tension and stress you may feel at work, so it’s like performing a small reset after a tiresome workday. You’ll start fresh tomorrow, which is relevant to managing stress at work. T: After two weeks, you can decide if your quality of life has improved. 7. Stay Healthy. To stay healthy, I will practice healthier habits. For the next month, I will work out every other day and meal prep in advance to ensure my diet is healthy and balanced. In addition, I will eat more raw foods and avoid sugars and soda. S: This goal describes in detail what you can do to stay healthy. M: You can measure the goal by how many workouts you got in or how many healthy meals you prepared over the week. A: Working out can take as little as 15 minutes of your time, and meal prep can be done once for the rest of the week, so both goal segments won’t be too time-consuming. R: Being a nurse in these hectic times is challenging. To keep your immune system up, you have to take extra care of your health. T: Working out every other day means you need to find time off and squeeze in a workout long before it’s time for bed. Also, you can assess how you feel at the end of the month. 8. Be More Compassionate. To be more compassionate, I will spend two to five minutes asking each new patient about their lives and learning more about their interests. Then, I will discuss their interests with them to distract them from stressing out about their condition. By next week, I will be a more compassionate caregiver. S: Instead of saying, “Be more compassionate,” you specify how exactly you can achieve that. M: If you have never spent time discussing your patients’ interests before, doing so for two to five minutes is a way to measure your progress. A: This goal takes just minutes to complete, and you can do so whenever you find it convenient. R: This goal is relevant to you becoming a more compassionate nurse practitioner. T: In just one week, you can decide if this strategy helped achieve your goal. Final Thoughts on SMART goals for Your Nursing Career. Regardless of where you are in your life right now, you can always rely on SMART goals. Nursing doesn’t have to be so challenging when breaking each challenge into smaller objectives and facing them one at a time. Plus, you can use this free printable SMART goals worksheet to make your goal-planning even more straightforward. If you're an occupational therapist, check out this post about SMART goals for occupational therapy. Finally, if you want to take your goal-setting efforts to the next level, then be sure to check out this post that provides a step-by-step blueprint for setting SMART goals for all seven areas of your life. RedditPocketShareBufferTweetPin
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TitleAdvancing and Managing Your Professional Nursing Career
Urlhttp://samples.jbpub.com/9781284078329/9781284083231_ch07_pass04.pdf
Descriptionby ML Coyne — Do you view nursing as a career or a job? What are your professional goals related to nursing? V. 186. CHAPTER 7 Advancing and Managing Your Professional ...
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TitleMy Professional Goals of Nursing - Sarah Ashour's Professional RN Portfolio
Urlhttps://sarahashoursportfolio.weebly.com/my-professional-goals-of-nursing
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BodySarah Ashour's Professional RN Portfolio Home USF Diploma (Magna Cum Laude) My Professional Goals of Nursing Resume Achievements Certifications Clinical Experience professionalgoals.docxFile Size: 109 kbFile Type: docxDownload File                                                                                                                Professional Goals Of Nursing                                                                                                                                     (Essay)                Like many of us, choosing nursing as a career was brought on by past experiences that made me appreciate the field and its merits. As the oldest of five girls and living in a single-parent household, I was taught responsibility from a very early age. New to this country sixteen years ago, my mom depended on me to run the house and take care of my sisters, while she worked two jobs to support my family. Rather than veering the wrong way, like statistics show occurs with the impact of single parenting, I was determined to find a balance to successfully thrive and live a lucrative life. Through my high school years, I began to realize that the same qualities and actions in my personal life would prove me successful in the field of nursing. I not only upheld a nurturing personality, but I also had the endurance, strong grades, and always conveyed the motto, “Don't put off until tomorrow what you can do today.” This meant making the best out of my time and optimizing the workload as much as possible in any given moment. As a result of my past, I am able to manage stress in a healthy way and believe the rigorous and intense demands of nursing match my capabilities. Today, as a newly Registered Nurse graduate, I have essential goals that I hope to undertake for as long as I am a nurse. One of my most important goals is to attain core characteristics that define a successful nurse. My second goal is to commit myself to lifelong learning. Third, I want to provide ongoing community service to those in need of medical assistance.               According to the American Nurses Association, nursing is defined as, “Protection, promotion, and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations” (American Nurses Association, 2001, p. 7).  A nurse should also be able to explain in her own words what she believes demarcates success in her career. It is my belief that nursing deals with the whole person—body, mind, and soul. It is without a doubt a physically demanding job, but equally as important is the demand for emotional input. My past academic performance, as well as my personal qualities, provides the foundation for my career. A core characteristic needed in the nursing field is teamwork and just as vital is the remembrance that nurses are the liaison between the patients and the doctors. Not only is it important to work well in a team, but it is also significant to seek out help when necessary. Another important quality is the understanding of diversity and the importance of acknowledging and honoring, rather than judging or ignoring, what makes people different. Lastly, the saying, “Measure twice, cut once” goes a long way when discussing safety in nursing. Regardless of how stressed or overwhelmed a person might feel, it is imperative to pay attention to detail to avoid sentinel events or near misses. These are crucial qualities that I hope to attain as a nurse and important goals to conform to throughout my years as a registered nurse.                My second goal is to commit myself to lifelong learning. I strongly believe that education doesn’t end at graduation, rather it continues for as long as you are in the nursing profession. Although I am in no hurry to complete my Masters’ degree due to my decision to acquire nursing experience first, it is part of my plans in the future. Part of being a nurse is the application of knowledge and the continuation of learning. My goal is to make it a point to stay current on education by taking courses, attending conferences, obtaining certifications, as well as joining meaningful nursing organizations. It is also a goal of mine to be a competent nurse. By this I mean to understand the rationale behind everything I do. I believe it is important for a nurse to strive for no medication errors or math errors, for example. This will give a nurse the confidence and the ability to think twice and reduce any nurse slip-ups. By completing this goal, I am advancing my career and expanding my effectiveness as a prosperous nurse.               My third and last goal is to provide ongoing community service to those in need of medical assistance and are less fortunate. It has always been a wish for me to give back to the community or even to travel to impoverished countries to lend a hand. Once I have attained enough nursing skills, I plan to register with disaster registries as well as disaster response organizations. It would be an honor for me to serve deprived and needy people, a way to further define my own meaning of being a registered nurse. Not only am I providing others with comfort, but I am also enhancing my aptitude and preparation in the medical field. This allows me a chance to interact with various people from different backgrounds and provides me with assurance to why I do what I do.                 Conclusively, choosing nursing as a career was a result of past experiences, which allowed me to obtain essential qualities to what I believe ascertains a successful nurse.  With that being said, I established important goals to remain on this path for success.  One of my most important goals is to attain core characteristics that define a successful nurse. My second goal is to commit myself to lifelong learning. Third, I want to provide ongoing community service to those in need of medical assistance. With these goals of attaining important qualities, continually learning, and volunteering, I hope to acquire the characteristics needed to provide my patients satisfaction with their care. Not only am I responsible for coordinating their care, through assessment and identification of their needs, but it is also my duty to become an advocate for my patients. Resource: American Nurses Association, 2001.  Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. 
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Title5 Examples Of Nursing Career Goals That Are Achievable
Urlhttps://www.thegypsynurse.com/blog/nursing-career-goals/
DescriptionAs a travel nurse continuing to have goals in your career is important. Here are 5 examples of nursing career goals that are achievable
DateApr 23, 2021
Organic Position13
H15 Examples Of Nursing Career Goals That Are Achievable
H2The Main Achievable Goals For Travel Nurses
5 Achievable Examples Of Goals In Nursing Career
The Bottom Line
Join The Gypsy Nurse Nation
H3Continuing Education
Effective Patient-Centered Care
Sustain Modern Technology Skills
Hone Interpersonal Skills
Stay Opened To New Challenges
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H2WithAnchorsThe Main Achievable Goals For Travel Nurses
5 Achievable Examples Of Goals In Nursing Career
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Body5 Examples Of Nursing Career Goals That Are Achievable Posted on April 23, 2021May 19, 2021 by Sandra Manson Travel nurses in the modern world have to be competitive and go on one step with the newest technologies. Apart from traditional skills, travel nurses have to know one more issue. How to become competitive in the labor market when there are thousands of travel nurses like you? There are several effective recommendations. The Main Achievable Goals For Travel Nurses. The profession of travel nurses is based on great skills and knowledge. It is worth mentioning; the travel nurses teach them how to bring pills, inject her, give the first aid for several years. Still, like in different professions, it is not enough to complete the work duties during the whole life. The travel nurses ought to learn something new all the time.  On one side, it is easy to say but hard to complete. On the other side, when you know which steps are better to take, all will be easy. There are a lot of goals to achieve. However, start from the basic goals, which will lead you to a successful nursing career. These five attributes to remember in completing the goals. They will manage the performance of basic goals.  Specific. Choose one clear area and work on it. There is no matter to choose altogether and do not succeed in anyone.Measurable. Your goal has to be real with a certain result.Achievable. The number of resources and capabilities is enough to reach the goal. In each case, it depends on the person.Relevant. For instance, the travel nurse in the local city hospital cannot put the goal to learn Chinese. The goal should be attached to the organization and sphere of work.Timely. Put the deadline for yourself to reach the goal in a certain period. Do not make illusions and spread them for the whole life.  Together those goals are called SMART. Use the recommendations above to reach the achievable goals below.  5 Achievable Examples Of Goals In Nursing Career. Continuing Education. Some travel nurses find this point very boring, while others are fond of it. Still, education includes several issues. Learning medical techniques in generalUnit-specific certificates These two points are similar but diverse simultaneously—the evolution of medical techniques and pedagogy demands from travel nurses the continuing learning and acquisition with new challenges. Keep your hand on the pulse and learn something new every week. Read the useful updates for the travel nurses. Life-learners have more positive feedback than those who work with the old techniques. Talking about the unit-specific certificates, consider where you work or will be in the future. There are a lot of different certificates for travel nurses. Of course, specialists who work in the intensive care units and cosmetology have different knowledge. Apart from the general techniques, adapt new helpful skills from the certificates. Nowadays, it is easy to achieve success in learning. Subscribe to different online Telegram channels, Facebook accounts, and other blogs to see what is going on in the medical world. Nowadays there are great online sources and platforms for everything, from online dating to getting nursing knowledge. Even 15-20 minutes on the regarded platforms every day will make your perspectives better. Ask yourself all the time: “What should I learn today?” Effective Patient-Centered Care. Excellent care for patients is task number one for medical workers. Travel nurses are the authority in communication with the patient. They complete all the decisions of the doctors and cure the patients. Apart from the technical part of work, travel nurses face moral tasks as well.  Needless to say, the moral part is the most difficult and worried at the same time. The travel nurses face the patients at the first turn. They try to keep ill people in good conditions and balance their moral state. The key and achievable goal are to learn fast methods to help patients and make their position better. The nursing career of a travel nurse has a great impact. The satisfaction of patients in different spheres of medicine can lead you to a higher position. Humanity can make you more brightful and put you in the shadow of your colleagues. Ask yourself all the time: “Who are my patients?” Sustain Modern Technology Skills. For sure, there is a noticeable development of technology skills every day. The new updates help travel nurses to update their skills and improve the patient’s states. Whom does the medical sphere demand? Of course, the workers, who go together with the technology changes and implement them in the daily work duties. Saying in touch with new technologies travel nurses have to learn how to troubleshoot the potential problems with patients. All the notions should be learned in detail. Spend time on it to overcome all the difficulties and get into the online world of medicine. Use the same blogs and useful resources to get more information. Show your interests and perceive new updates quickly to stay beyond the competition. Ask yourself all the time: “How can I optimize the work?” Hone Interpersonal Skills. The profession of the travel nurse is social first of all. To reinforce the nursing career flow, build your reputation. The average patient faces a large number of professionals in the hospital. Collaboration and highly effective communication among workers is key to getting over the illnesses and providing excellent care.  The cooperation between travel nurses, lab workers, technicians, pharmacy professionals, and doctors depends on the patients’ satisfaction. As no one from the list above, the travel nurse should develop interpersonal connections on the professional level.  Actually, it is essential to maintain a healthy distance among colleagues and personal life. Private life is better to keep apart from work relationships. Remember this rule and set it like a goal. As soon as you complete it, your outstanding among colleagues will raise a lot.  Ask yourself all the time: “How can I help my colleague?” Stay Opened To New Challenges. Sometimes people believe the work of travel nurses includes only taking care of the patients. Besides, it is not so at all. Travel nurses have to complete the patients’ data, distribute medicine, control the level of pain of the patients and others.  The list of duties is huge. The key point is to feel free about the new tasks and challenges. Sometimes they can be difficult. By the way, when you perceive them, your skills are getting better—the focus on becoming an expert of your work setting you on the best scenario in the specialty.  Ask yourself all the time: “When would  I face a new challenge?” The Bottom Line. Now you have the list of the best 5 examples of travel nursing career goals, which will help you get into a higher position on the career ladder. The question of time is still open. It depends on your life values and effort towards the goals.  The regarded nursing career goals will keep you inspired and motivated even on the busiest days at work. The nursing career’s goals can be unlimited with space. Make your best to achieve positive results in the career of nursing.  Facebook Notice for EU! You need to login to view and post FB Comments! Related Posts. August 31, 2018Do You Live in a ‘Box’? A Stepping-Out Success Story.April 15, 20195 Tips to Bolster your Travel Nurse Resume. August 8, 2018Step #23 Travel Nurse Contract – 8 Weeks to go…. Sign Up For Article Alerts Content Alerts Sign Up Categories. Agency Perspectives Charting COVID-19 Education/CEUs Exercise & Fitness General Health & Wellness Holidays/Events Housing/RV Living Insurance/Benefits International Experiences Lifestyle Mental Health New to Travel Nursing Packing Tips for Assignments Personal Finances Press Releases Tax and Legal Technology in Healthcare The Gypsy Nurse News Travel Nurse Adventures Travel Nurse Contracts Travel Nurse Destinations Travel Nurse Licensure Travel Nurse Resume Travel Nurse Specialties Travel Nurse Tips Travel Nursing Travel Nursing During a Natural Disaster Travel Nursing Guide Travel Nursing Industry Info Travel Nursing with a Family Travel with Pets Hot Jobs. Travel RN. Floating, KS 67735 Tri-State Staffing Nurse Supervisor. Floating, KS 67735 Tri-State Staffing X-Ray Technician. Hixson, TN Medical Edge Recruitment, LLC See All Jobs Recent Articles. How to Begin Travel Nursing Banish a Bad Day: Fun and Lively Activities to Do When Feeling Down 7 Tips to Succeed as a Travel Nurse Join The Gypsy Nurse Nation. Discover new jobs, subscribe to customized job alerts and unlock unlimited resources for FREE.Join our travel nursing community today!Join Now You have successfully shared your topic idea with The Gypsy Nurse Event Coordinator. Sign up for Event Alerts to stay informed about upcoming events. × Success! As a new member, log into the Member Center to add/edit/delete alerts. Check out other Member Benefits; Jobs (saved / recommended / applied), Events (sign up / access), and Discounted Education/CEUs. ×
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Result 15
TitleThe Importance of Setting Nursing Goals | Post University
Urlhttps://post.edu/blog/setting-nursing-goals/
DescriptionNursing students and professional nurses can benefit from setting goals. Learn more about short and long-term goals for nurses
DateAug 10, 2021
Organic Position14
H1Setting Goals to Ensure Success for Nursing Students and Professional Nurses
H2Post University Blog
Why Is It Important for Nurses to Set Short-Term Goals?
Tips for Short-Term Nursing Career Goals
Why Setting Long-Term Goals Is Important for Nurses
Tips for Long-Term Nursing Career Goals
H3Pass the NCLEX
Discover Your Interests
Find a Nursing Job Position
Develop Your Interpersonal Skills
Continue to Learn
Be Sure to Set SMART Goals
Determine Educational Requirements for the Next Step
Build Clinical Experience
Earn Your MSN Degree
Differentiate Yourself
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Why Is It Important for Nurses to Set Short-Term Goals?
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BodySetting Goals to Ensure Success for Nursing Students and Professional Nurses Aug 10, 2021 | Nursing, Program Insights Whether you’re a nursing student or a nurse, having goals is an important part of this career path. Short-term nursing goals can help you focus on the present, while long-term nursing goals can help you plan for the future. Keep the following information in mind on goals for nursing students, so you can enjoy success in school and in your profession. Why Is It Important for Nurses to Set Short-Term Goals? Short-term goals provide you with a way to work toward long-term goals, so you can keep feeling motivated to achieve them. Setting goals to work toward on a short-term basis can help you break long-term goals down into more manageable steps. These goals can also give you an opportunity to improve your current situation when you’re earning a nursing degree or working as a professional nurse. Tips for Short-Term Nursing Career Goals. When you’re setting short-term nursing career goals, focus on goals that you can achieve now or in the near future. Keep these goals smaller in scope, so you won’t end up feeling overwhelmed about reaching them. Think of these goals as steps toward reaching larger or more long-term goals or ways to improve the quality of your career overall. Pass the NCLEX. When you graduate from nursing school, you’ll need to pass the NCLEX to become a registered nurse. Having a studying plan and taking practice exams can help you prepare for this test. Look for NCLEX test prep resources, such as guidebooks that help you learn more about what to expect on this exam. Work on managing stress as well through deep breathing, exercise or other ways, so you’ll feel focused and calm while taking the test. Discover Your Interests. Knowing your interests can help you determine what kind of nursing job you would like. Think about what you enjoy doing and how you like to spend your time. For example, you might find that you have a strong interest in helping children, which might mean that becoming a pediatric nurse is the right career path for you. Keep your interests in mind when deciding what type of nursing career you should pursue. Find a Nursing Job Position. Depending on your long-term goals or interests, you might not find the exact position you want when you’re just getting started. However, you can get your foot in the door by checking with local hospitals and other medical facilities for available nursing positions. Taking an entry-level position at one of these facilities can help you gain experience in the nursing field. You can then use this experience to apply for positions that fit better with your career goals. Develop Your Interpersonal Skills. Strong interpersonal skills are an important part of being a nurse since you’ll be communicating with patients and their families, supervisors, fellow nurses, and other professionals. Work on your interpersonal skills, such as your listening skills, on a day-to-day basis as you interact with other people. Keep in mind that you can develop your interpersonal skills through interactions with friends and family, as well as at school. Continue to Learn. Keeping your nursing skills up-to-date and learning new ones as needed can help you thrive in your career. You should plan to attend conferences and other nursing events to continue learning. You might also take time to learn how to use the latest healthcare equipment or learn the latest procedures in your area of nursing. Why Setting Long-Term Goals Is Important for Nurses. Long-term professional goals for nurses can help you determine where you want to be years from now in terms of your career. When you set these goals, keep the distant future in mind rather than focusing on the present or near future. Think about which direction you want your nursing career to go in, so you can set goals accordingly. Tips for Long-Term Nursing Career Goals. Setting long-term goals for your nursing career should involve determining your ideal position in this field. For example, you might want to become a nursing director at a local hospital. However, remember that these goals should be flexible since you might change your mind about your career path somewhere along the way. As an example, you might decide that you want to teach nursing rather than continue working in a hospital or physician’s office. Be Sure to Set SMART Goals. SMART goals stand for goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely. When it comes to nursing, your SMART goals might focus on professional development, patient care and safety. You might also set SMART goals with a focus on improving your accuracy and efficiency. You should reassess your SMART goals from time to time to help you stay on track or make adjustments as needed. Determine Educational Requirements for the Next Step. When you’re planning your long-term goals as a nurse, look into the educational requirements you might need to meet. For example, check these requirements if you have an undergraduate degree and want to pursue a graduate degree. You might also want to look into certification options for your area of nursing. Certifications can help you gain advanced knowledge and skills needed for your career. Build Clinical Experience. Clinical experience over the years can help you advance your career in order to achieve long-term goals. Doing volunteer work, finding employment at a local medical facility or shadowing nursing professionals all provide ways for you to build clinical experience. This experience offers many benefits, such as helping you learn to handle different nursing situations, while also being required for earning advanced degrees. Earn Your MSN Degree. A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree isn’t required to be a nurse, but it can provide you with a higher number of opportunities. You might find nursing positions that pay better or offer a more rewarding career. When you earn your MSN degree, you’ll also be learning new skills and improving skills you’ve already learned. Since working toward this degree takes time, keep it in mind when setting your long-term career goals as a nurse. Differentiate Yourself. Setting yourself apart from those around you in the nursing field can help you achieve success as part of your long-term goals. You might do this by specializing in a certain field that fits your career goals, such as oncology, gerontology or mental health. You can also differentiate yourself by networking with other professionals in your field and striving to provide outstanding service on the job. If you’re planning to advance your nursing career, American Sentinel College of Nursing and Health Sciences at Post University offers high-quality nursing degree programs. Please contact us to find out more about our Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program or our Master of Science in Nursing program. Related Posts. Geriatric Nursing: A Promising Field for BSN NursesIf you enjoy working with seniors and have a strong desire to make their lives… Nursing Sensitive Indicators: Why They're Important and What They Mean for Nurses and PatientsLearn what nursing sensitive quality indicators are and why they are so important for tracking… What Life Is Really Like For NursesNursing is a deeply rewarding profession, but it comes with its fair share of challenges.… Related Posts. Geriatric Nursing: A Promising Field for BSN NursesIf you enjoy working with seniors and have a strong desire to make their lives… Nursing Sensitive Indicators: Why They're Important and What They Mean for Nurses and PatientsLearn what nursing sensitive quality indicators are and why they are so important for tracking… What Life Is Really Like For NursesNursing is a deeply rewarding profession, but it comes with its fair share of challenges.…
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TitleList of Personal & Professional Goals for a Nursing Student | Career Trend
Urlhttps://careertrend.com/info-8498963-list-professional-goals-nursing-student.html
DescriptionNursing students are the future of the nursing profession. Within a relatively short time nursing students are required to successfully achieve a lot: clinical internship, theory, exams and of course, the licensing examination. To make sure you are successful, it is necessary to set some goals
DateDec 28, 2018
Organic Position15
H1Get the Job
H2Resumes and CVs
Applications
Cover Letters
Professional References
Interviews
Networking
Professional Licenses and Exams
Get a Promotion
Negotiation
Professional Ethics
Professionalism
Dealing with Coworkers
Dealing with Bosses
Communication Skills
Managing the Office
Disabilities
Harassment and Discrimination
Unemployment
Compare Careers
Switching Careers
Training and Certifications
Start a Company
Internships and Apprenticeships
Entry Level Jobs
College Degrees
Lifelong Learning
Competency
Patient Advocacy
Apply Theoretical Knowledge
I Need Ideas for Goals for a Nursing Portfolio→
Define Professionalism in Nursing→
What is Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing?→
Job Description of a Nurse Counselor→
How Long Can a Graduate Nurse Work Without a License?→
How to Become an Independent Nurse Provider→
H3Related Articles
H2WithAnchorsResumes and CVs
Applications
Cover Letters
Professional References
Interviews
Networking
Professional Licenses and Exams
Get a Promotion
Negotiation
Professional Ethics
Professionalism
Dealing with Coworkers
Dealing with Bosses
Communication Skills
Managing the Office
Disabilities
Harassment and Discrimination
Unemployment
Compare Careers
Switching Careers
Training and Certifications
Start a Company
Internships and Apprenticeships
Entry Level Jobs
College Degrees
Lifelong Learning
Competency
Patient Advocacy
Apply Theoretical Knowledge
I Need Ideas for Goals for a Nursing Portfolio→
Define Professionalism in Nursing→
What is Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing?→
Job Description of a Nurse Counselor→
How Long Can a Graduate Nurse Work Without a License?→
How to Become an Independent Nurse Provider→
BodyGet the Job Resumes and CVs. Applications. Cover Letters. Professional References. Interviews. Networking. Professional Licenses and Exams. Get Ahead Get a Promotion. Negotiation. Professional Ethics. Professionalism. Dealing with Coworkers. Dealing with Bosses. Communication Skills. Managing the Office. Disabilities. Harassment and Discrimination. Unemployment. Career Paths Compare Careers. Switching Careers. Training and Certifications. Start a Company. Students Internships and Apprenticeships. Entry Level Jobs. College Degrees. Get the Job Resumes and CVs Applications Cover Letters Professional References Interviews Networking Professional Licenses and Exams Get Ahead Get a Promotion Negotiation Professional Ethics Professionalism Dealing with Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Communication Skills Managing the Office Disabilities Harassment and Discrimination Unemployment Career Paths Compare Careers Switching Careers Training and Certifications Start a Company Students Internships and Apprenticeships Entry Level Jobs College Degrees Share It Tweet Post Email Print Aunice Reed - Updated December 28, 2018 List of Personal & Professional Goals for a Nursing Student Share It Tweet Post Email Print Growth Trends for Related Jobs. Genetic Counselors $74,120/year /> 2012-2016 +29.2% Veterinary ... $25,250/year /> 2012-2016 +14.2% nathaphat/iStock/GettyImages Nursing students are the future of the nursing profession. Within a relatively short time nursing students are required to successfully achieve a lot: clinical internship, theory, exams and of course, the licensing examination. To make sure you are successful, it is necessary to set some goals. Goal setting does not only apply to school, but also after you have obtained your nursing license and degree. Nurses make commitments to the profession, many of which are ethical in nature. Other commitments to the profession involve taking care of yourself personally and career advancement. Lifelong Learning. Be committed to lifelong learning. Education doesn't end at graduation from nursing school or after passing the licensing exam. It continues for as long as you are in the nursing profession. Make it a point to stay current through taking courses, attending conferences, obtaining certifications, and reading trade journals like American Journal of Nursing, Minority Nurse Magazine, and Nurse Management Magazine. Join member organizations such as the American Nurses Association and Oncology Nursing Society. Join organizations while still a student nurse. Competency. Make it a personal mission statement to understand the rationale behind everything you do. Nurses must be competent and responsible patient care providers in all aspects of the profession regardless of the setting. Make it a policy to strive for no medication errors. Read your texts thoroughly, watch what your instructors do, make index cards, learn about the drugs and strive for no mistakes when calculating drugs. Competency will make you confident that you know what you are doing. If something is not clear to you, don't assume. Ask questions. Patient Advocacy. Help patients get the care needed at the lowest possible cost. This is an important objective for student nurses. Nurses are often responsible for coordinating patient care. Collaborate with other healthcare team members and locate resources through social service organizations. Be able to assess and identify patient needs and goals as well as plan care. Apply Theoretical Knowledge. Understand the various nursing theories and information from research.Then apply this understanding to practice in all phases of the nursing process: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation and evaluation. This is essential because the nursing process applies across all practice settings. Related Articles. I Need Ideas for Goals for a Nursing Portfolio→. Define Professionalism in Nursing→. What is Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing?→. Job Description of a Nurse Counselor→. How Long Can a Graduate Nurse Work Without a License?→. How to Become an Independent Nurse Provider→. Resources National Student Nurses Association Writer Bio Aunice Reed is a medical science writer living in Los Angeles, Calif. With over 10 years previous nursing experience, Reed has been writing for over six years and has attended University of Northern Iowa, University of California, Los Angeles and Los Angeles Harbor College. Photo Credits nathaphat/iStock/GettyImages Share It Tweet Post Email Print Get the Job Resumes and CVs Applications Cover Letters Professional References Interviews Networking Get Ahead Get a Promotion Negotiation Professional Ethics Professionalism Dealing with Coworkers Dealing with Bosses Career Paths Compare Careers Switching Careers Training and Certifications Start a Company Students Internships and Apprenticeships Entry Level Jobs College Degrees Job Descriptions Law Enforcement Job Descriptions Administrative Job Descriptions Healthcare Job Descriptions Sales Job Descriptions Fashion Job Descriptions Education Job Descriptions Salary Insights Journalism Salaries Healthcare Salaries Military Salaries Engineering Salaries Teaching Salaries About Us Accessibility Terms of Use Privacy Policy Copyright Policy Contact Us Find a Job Manage Preferences Copyright 2022 Leaf Group Ltd. / Leaf Group Media, All Rights Reserved.
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Result 17
TitleSMART Goals in Nursing: 5 Examples
Urlhttps://www.peoplegoal.com/blog/smart-goals-in-nursing-examples
DescriptionSMART goals in nursing examples to construct your own meaningful, relevant objectives that drive your career forward
DateAug 21, 2019
Organic Position16
H1SMART Goals in Nursing: 5 Examples
H2What are SMART Goals?
How can SMART Goals be used in Nursing?
5 SMART Goals in Nursing Examples
Further Reading
Ready to see PeopleGoal in action?Start your free trial today
H31. Safety
2. Patient Care
3. Efficiency
4. Accuracy
5. Learning and Development
20 Examples of SMART Goals for Employees
5 SMARTER Goal Examples
How to Write SMART Goals Using 5 Whys
It Is Time for SMARTER Goals Setting
SMART Goals for Work: Examples and Tips
How to Create SMART Goals for Marketing: Examples and Tips
H2WithAnchorsWhat are SMART Goals?
How can SMART Goals be used in Nursing?
5 SMART Goals in Nursing Examples
Further Reading
Ready to see PeopleGoal in action?Start your free trial today
BodySMART Goals in Nursing: 5 Examples SMART goals in nursing examples to construct your own meaningful, relevant objectives that drive your career forward.by Kylie Strickland#employee-performance-management#smart-goalsThe importance of good goal-setting is often overlooked in a busy, stressful healthcare environment. We have many nursing, homecare and health providers who've identified the importance of communicating clear objectives and use PeopleGoal to set the strategic framework, track and align their organizational goals. We'll take you through the SMART goals methodology, give you a template to create your own objectives and show you five SMART goals examples in nursing.What are SMART Goals?Setting SMART goals is the first step of continuous performance management. The SMART methodology helps you to construct clearly defined goals using five attributes:Specific: This goal covers one clearly-defined area that's direct and easy to understand.Measurable: The goal has measurable outcomes that indicate when you've achieved the goal.Achievable: The goal is challenging but realistically achievable for your skills, resources and capabilities.Relevant: The goal supports the broader needs of the ward, department and organization.Timely: There's a clear due date by when the goal needs to be achieved.Learn more about the history of SMART goals and why they're important with our Essential Guide to SMART goals.How can SMART Goals be used in Nursing?As a nurse, setting good goals is critical as they help you to define your development framework and keep you on track with your progress. Goals can help you stay focused and keep you motivated when things get stressful and overwhelming. This is particularly important in banded organisations such as the NHS where your skills and responsibilities are clearly defined at each level. Documenting your own progress and achievements is a big step forward in proving you're ready to move to the next level in your nursing career.Setting objectives is a great exercise in autonomous self-development, but it's also a chance to open up a conversation with your manager or clinical lead to identify further goals you may not even have thought of. The NHS has a great set of both clinical and non-clinical SMART goals for you to see how other departments structure their team development, employee engagement, patient care and leadership objectives.5 SMART Goals in Nursing Examples. The key areas you should focus on when setting SMART goals in nursing are:SafetyPatient CareEfficiencyAccuracyProfessional Development1. Safety. I will use the ward policy guidelines to construct an updated patient and staff safety and hazard checklist. This list needs to be checked by every staff nurse on a rotating basis once per month. I will complete the list by the end of September and measure monthly whether it is being completed by all team members.Ask yourself, "How is this goal specific?"The objective focuses on one clear outcome (an updated safety and hazard checklist).2. Patient Care. I will hand over patient details, care instructions and assessment notes to the next shift nurse before completing my shift. I need to do this before every break to ensure patient details are noted and specific instructions are followed. Additionally, this will help all nursing staff to understand areas of interest for patients to built a rapport and help take their mind off of medical issues.Ask yourself, "How is this goal measurable?"The handover needs to happen every single time. You can use a checklist to be signed by both the departing and arriving nurses to make sure you're following protocol every time you end your shift.3. Efficiency. Following the weekly timetabling meeting I will document my additional tasks so that I can effectively divide up my time to manage all my duties. This will help me to improve my time management and delegate or ask for help whenever the ward becomes too busy.Ask yourself, "Is this goal achievable?"Taking ten minutes following a meeting where you're already dividing up tasks is achievable within your resources, and will save plenty of time in knowing exactly where you need to be and when.Check out our list of inspiring SMART goals verbs to help you kickstart your own objective setting.4. Accuracy. As soon as I leave a patient I will chart all my notes about our interaction while they're still fresh in my mind. This will help streamline the shift handover and ensure I'm not forgetting to make important notes before I'm taken to my next task.Ask yourself, "Is this goal relevant?"Accuracy is extremely relevant to delivering the best patient care and minimising the risk of safety issues.5. Learning and Development. By the end of the year I want to attend three half-day workshops geared towards my current specialty, another field suggested by my manager and one field I know nothing about.Ask yourself, "Is this goal time-bound?"You'll need to assess whether it's realistic to attend three workshops by the end of the year.Ready to set your own SMART goals in nursing now? Use our SMART goal setting template for Word and Google Docs to build on these examples and to construct your own meaningful, relevant objectives to move your career forward.Build any HR process on PeopleGoal.Create an account and start building on the PeopleGoal platform. All accounts start with a 7-day free trial and can be cancelled at any time.Start your 7-day free trialFurther Reading. Related articles from our blog, read on20 Examples of SMART Goals for Employees. Examples of SMART goals for employees can help you to effectively set goals that will not only help your professional development but also organizational growth.Dominika CechovaNov 22, 2019·3 min read5 SMARTER Goal Examples. What are SMARTER goals? We take a look at the new approach and give you some industry SMARTER goal examples to help you develop your own.Joseph GarveyNov 09, 2019·8 min readHow to Write SMART Goals Using 5 Whys. Writing SMART goals can be challenging. The methodology requires a certain level of detail and focus to set them effectively. Therefore, you need to understand the reasoning behind why the goal is worth setting in the first place.Dominika CechovaNov 06, 2019·4 min readIt Is Time for SMARTER Goals Setting. SMARTER goals setting allows you to make the most of SMART methodology and continually improv performance. How to do so and what the SMARTER acronym stands for?Joseph GarveyNov 04, 2019·5 min readSMART Goals for Work: Examples and Tips. SMART goals for work are essential for individual development as well as the overall performance of an organization. The SMART goals methodology allows you to set clear goals for individuals as well as teams and achieve business growth. Dominika CechovaOct 04, 2019·3 min readHow to Create SMART Goals for Marketing: Examples and Tips. Setting SMART goals for marketing can help you develop an effective marketing strategy and set your team up for success. Dominika CechovaOct 03, 2019·4 min readReady to see PeopleGoal in action?Start your free trial today.Sign upBook a demo© 2022 PeopleGoal, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Result 18
TitleExample of a Career Objective for a Registered Nurse | Work - Chron.com
Urlhttps://work.chron.com/example-career-objective-registered-nurse-29305.html
DescriptionExample of a Career Objective for a Registered Nurse. Whether it’s a question on a resume or a decision about where you want your nursing career to be in 10 years, career objectives are an important part of being a registered nurse. Your objectives are likely to change over the years. Some typical objectives might ..
DateJun 27, 2018
Organic Position17
H1Example of a Career Objective for a Registered Nurse
H2Nursing Career Goals Examples
Including Career Objectives on Your Resume
Answering Questions About Career Objectives
What Kind of Work Does a Pediatric Nurse Do?
Interview Tips for a New Graduate in Nursing
Job Description for a Registered Nurse in an Acute Care Hospital
An Example of Short Term Goals to Becoming a Nurse Educator
Registered Nurse Job Interview Questions
How to Prepare a Nurse Cover Letter for Employment
How to Become a Maternity Nurse
How to Become a Pediatric Oncology Nurse
How Long Does it Take to Be a Pediatric Nurse?
Objectives for Nurse Resumes
How Much Money Do Pediatric Nurses Earn?
How Much Does a Neurosurgery Nurse Make?
H3Related Articles
H2WithAnchorsNursing Career Goals Examples
Including Career Objectives on Your Resume
Answering Questions About Career Objectives
What Kind of Work Does a Pediatric Nurse Do?
Interview Tips for a New Graduate in Nursing
Job Description for a Registered Nurse in an Acute Care Hospital
An Example of Short Term Goals to Becoming a Nurse Educator
Registered Nurse Job Interview Questions
How to Prepare a Nurse Cover Letter for Employment
How to Become a Maternity Nurse
How to Become a Pediatric Oncology Nurse
How Long Does it Take to Be a Pediatric Nurse?
Objectives for Nurse Resumes
How Much Money Do Pediatric Nurses Earn?
How Much Does a Neurosurgery Nurse Make?
BodyExample of a Career Objective for a Registered Nurse Work | Careers | Other Jobs By Leslie Bloom Updated June 27, 2018 Related. Objectives for Nurse Resumes How Much Money Do Pediatric Nurses Earn? How Much Does a Neurosurgery Nurse Make? Nursing Jobs That Are Less Stressful and Demanding How to Become a Perioperative Nurse Whether it’s a question on a resume or a decision about where you want your nursing career to be in 10 years, career objectives are an important part of being a registered nurse. Your nursing career goals are likely to change over the years. Some nursing career goals examples include gaining clinical skills, becoming specialized or certified, and getting furthering your education. Nursing Career Goals Examples. Career goals for nurses depend on the individual. Some aim to work in pediatric nursing, while others want to do trauma work. Some seek the adventure of a traveling nurse, and others value the stability of working their way up at the local hospital. Career goals for nurses depend on how seasoned the nurse is. A new nurse looking for a job is going to have different nursing career objectives and goals than one who has worked for decades. Some examples of nursing career goals include the following: Working at an organization with a formal residency or internship program for new graduates Becoming a specialist in a field such as cardiac nursing, geriatrics or trauma Being certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Critical Care Nurses Obtaining an advanced degree to become an advanced practice registered nurse Taking on a nursing management position at a new or growing medical practice Take some time to think about your career objectives before writing a resume or going in for an interview. Including Career Objectives on Your Resume. Putting your goals and objectives into words can be harder than you think, but it forces you to clarify your nursing career goals. If you include career objectives on your resume, consider the position you are applying for. You want to let an employer know succinctly and directly why you are the best person for the job and what you hope to achieve at the position in the long term. When you apply for jobs early in your career, your nursing career goals and objectives may lean toward just getting a job. In this case, you want to indicate the strengths you can offer as a new nurse and what you want to achieve at that particular employer. Examples: Empathic and dedicated nurse looking for a position at a hospital with a specialty in pediatric care. Completing nursing degree with pediatric certification in the fall. Tireless and caring professional seeks opportunity at a clinic for geriatric medicine. If you are an experienced nurse, your goals and objectives are likely to look at bit different. You should play up your experience and show how you can apply it to the position you’re seeking. Examples: Experienced and compassionate nurse looking to apply more than 15 years of knowledge to a teaching position at a local university. Seeking to apply my management and administrative skills to a nurse management position. Graduating with a certificate in management in the summer. Answering Questions About Career Objectives. When interviewing for a nursing position, you should have answers about your nursing career goals that are more detailed than those listed on your resume. If you have nursing experience, be prepared to highlight it with details about your strengths and weaknesses. Discuss any training and certification you have completed or plan to do to make you more valuable in the position. Play up your experience and give specific examples of successes you’ve had. If you’re going on interviews early in your career, you will not have nursing experience to fall back on. Let your interviewer know which courses or internships were most interesting to you during school and why. Explain why you want to go into a certain specialty and the steps you plan to take to get there. Let the employer know exactly why you want the position and how it fits into your long-term goals and objectives. References Nurse.org: This One Resume Tip Could Get You the Job You Want Monster: Nursing Resume Objective Examples Writer Bio Leslie Bloom is a Los Angeles native who has worked everywhere from new start-ups to established corporate settings. In addition to years of business and management experience, she has more than 20 years of experience writing for a variety of online and print publications. She holds degrees in both journalism and law. Related Articles. What Kind of Work Does a Pediatric Nurse Do? Interview Tips for a New Graduate in Nursing. Job Description for a Registered Nurse in an Acute Care Hospital. An Example of Short Term Goals to Becoming a Nurse Educator. Registered Nurse Job Interview Questions. How to Prepare a Nurse Cover Letter for Employment. How to Become a Maternity Nurse. How to Become a Pediatric Oncology Nurse. How Long Does it Take to Be a Pediatric Nurse? Objectives for Nurse Resumes. How Much Money Do Pediatric Nurses Earn? How Much Does a Neurosurgery Nurse Make? Most Popular. 1 What Kind of Work Does a Pediatric Nurse Do? 2 Interview Tips for a New Graduate in Nursing 3 Job Description for a Registered Nurse in an Acute Care Hospital 4 An Example of Short Term Goals to Becoming a Nurse Educator
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Title15 Ambitious & Achievable Career Goals for Nurse Practitioners
Urlhttps://www.nursingprocess.org/career-goals-for-nurse-practitioners.html
Description
Date
Organic Position18
H115 Ambitious and Achievable Career Goals for Nurse Practitioners
H2Why Goal Setting Is So Important For Your Career As A Nurse Practitioner?
WHAT ARE THE TOP CAREER GOALS FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS?
Conclusion
H31. Complete National Certification Board Exam
2. Learn Your Passion and Do Not Be Afraid To Specialize
3. Do Not Be Afraid to Challenge Yourself
4. Continue To Develop New Skills
5. Advance Degree To Terminal Degree, If You Have Not Done So Already
6. Start Your Own Practice
7. Stay Current With Trends and Practices in Medicine by Delivering Evidence-Based Care
8. Correctly Assess, Diagnose and Treat Disease In Patients
9. Individualize The Care You Deliver
10. Involve Your Patient in the Decision-Making Process of Their Care
11. Advocate For Interdisciplinary Care
12. Share Knowledge With New NPs and NP Students
13. Build Your Network
14. Become Active In A Leadership Role
15. Find Work-Life Balance and Practice Self-Care
H2WithAnchorsWhy Goal Setting Is So Important For Your Career As A Nurse Practitioner?
WHAT ARE THE TOP CAREER GOALS FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS?
Conclusion
Body15 Ambitious and Achievable Career Goals for Nurse Practitioners Written By: Kasee Wiesen DNP, APRN, FNP-C Congratulations on completing your degree as a nurse practitioner! You worked hard to get to this point in your career, including earning your BSN, gaining knowledge and experience by working as a BSN-prepared nurse, and finally completing your advanced degree. Have you now wondered what is next for you? As a nurse practitioner (NP), it is important to set ambitious and achievable goals as these will help guide you in your career. Below, I have compiled a list of 15 ambitious and achievable goals for nurse practitioners, including career and developmental goals. I have also provided a brief description of why this applies to you as a nurse practitioner and how to achieve each goal. Why Goal Setting Is So Important For Your Career As A Nurse Practitioner? So first, why is it important to set goals? Simply because setting professional and development goals for nurse practitioners is a vital component of ongoing improvement. Writing your goals using the SMART goal template will allow you to clarify your purpose, focus your thoughts and increase your chance of achieving your goals. Evaluating your nurse practitioner career goals quarterly, mid-year, and annually is a vital component to ensure you are achieving everything you want to in your NP career. WHAT ARE THE TOP CAREER GOALS FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS?(Following are the 15 Ambitious Career Goals every Nurse Practitioner should set and aim to achieve.) 1. Complete National Certification Board Exam. I believe, one of the top nurse practitioner career goals is to obtain board certification in your specialty. Graduating from an accredited NP program does not allow a nurse to start practicing as an NP. Most states require NPs to become board certified by completing an exam from a specific certification body before a state-issued NP license can be obtained. There are multiple certification bodies for NPs, depending on your specialty (focus population), which include: The American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Certification Board (AANPCB), The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), The Pediatric Nursing Certification Board (PNCB) and National Certification Corporation. Each certification body varies in the specialties they certify and the process to obtain the certification. Specific information regarding each certification can be found on their respective website. 2. Learn Your Passion and Do Not Be Afraid To Specialize. There are many career goals for nurse practitioners, but one of the most important goals will undoubtedly be to specialize in an area of your interest. For example, you could specialize in women’s health, geriatrics, acute care, psychiatric, or family practice. One of the above specialties will be declared while you're in school because it will affect the APRN board you sit for. Each specialty has unique employment opportunities and allows you to work in a variety of settings. If you specialize in one area but decide you want to take a different path, you can always dual certify/specialize. For example, if you are initially a board-certified family practice nurse practitioner (FNP), you can return to school and specialize in acute care, allowing you to obtain both your FNP license and acute care license. While this does require more school and sitting for another state board test, it can provide more opportunities and career satisfaction. Once you have passed your state board, you can also branch out, which is one of the many reasons NP is such an excellent career path. There are many unique NP career options, such as forensic NP, legal consultant, and aesthetic NP. The sky's the limit when it comes to opportunities for the nurse practitioner; if you are not afraid to branch out, follow your passion. 3. Do Not Be Afraid to Challenge Yourself. An NP never stops improving, and this can be done by challenging yourself. Therefore, do not be afraid to set this as one of your nurse practitioner career goals, and challenge yourself and step outside your comfort zone. This can lead to many benefits, including growing your self-confidence in your daily practice and life. By challenging yourself, regardless if you succeed or not, you will learn something new. This new knowledge will help you further develop your personality, career goals, and practice style, which will help you continue to succeed as an NP. You may learn that you have a knack for leadership, prefer working in a different environment such as urgent care vs. a clinic, or find that you want to focus on research. This is a very broad career goal that can be interpreted in many different ways. Therefore, it is essential to narrow it down and determine what challenges you want to attempt in your career. The next 3 ambitious and achievable NP goals I discuss, tie in with this career goal. 4. Continue To Develop New Skills. Another crucial professional development goal for nurse practitioners is to develop new skills. This is a vital component of a practicing NP in providing evidence-based medicine. Regardless of your specialty, healthcare is always changing, whether it is treating an illness/disease, tools/techniques to complete a procedure, or medications available to treat health conditions. Learning a new skill makes you confident as you are building on your knowledge and practice to further meet the needs of your patient or client population. While this career goal could mean advancing your degree, obtaining dual certification, or changing your practice setting entirely, it can also be as simple as learning a new technique. Regardless, learning new skills will ensure you are achieving professional development to provide the best care possible to meet the needs of the population you serve. 5. Advance Degree To Terminal Degree, If You Have Not Done So Already. To practice as an NP, a master of science in nursing (MSN) degree is required, but many more NPs are obtaining a doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) for one reason or another. A possible career goal for an NP is to get a DNP. There are many similarities between these two degrees, and it is important to first understand the similarities, before determining if advancing your degree, or starting with a DNP program is the right path for you. There are benefits, though, to obtaining a DNP. ◦ A DNP is a terminal degree which means you have obtained the highest level of education possible for a nursing professional ◦ A DNP typically makes more money than an MSN. The average salary for a DNP prepared NP is $117,000 compared to an MSN prepared NP whose average salary is $ 112,000 ◦ A DNP curriculum prepares the NP to seek out leadership roles, quality improvement, application of evidence-based medicine into practice, and make changes within the health system ◦ A DNP is a preferred hire in most University settings, including BSN programs. 6. Start Your Own Practice. Before knowing if this is an achievable nurse practitioner career goal, you must first know if your practicing state allows an NP to work independently and own their practice--this is called a Full Practice State. If it does, this may be a very ambitious NP career goal for you. If you practice in a Full Practice State, you can evaluate patients, diagnose, order and interpret diagnostic tests; and initiate and manage treatments, including prescribing medications and controlled substances, under the exclusive licensure authority of the state board of nursing. Practicing in a Full Practice State is very appealing to many NPs as it opens the door to many new opportunities. NPs can own their own practice/clinic, creating flexibility, independence, and the ability to practice to their potential. At the same time, this can also be very intimidating to many NPs, especially new graduates. It is not uncommon for your state’s licensure board to require new graduate NPs to work with a supervising physician for the first two years of their career (or so many hours) to gain experience. It is also not uncommon, if you work for an organization, to work with a supervising physician within the clinic. For more information regarding if your state is a Full Practice State or not and the requirements to work independently, contact your state board of nursing. 7. Stay Current With Trends and Practices in Medicine by Delivering Evidence-Based Care. One of the essential professional development goals for nurse practitioners is to stay current and deliver evidence-based care. The delivery of evidence-based care is the gold standard in healthcare and ensures we are providing the best care possible to our patients. According to Dr. Bernadette Melnyk, Ph.D., RN, APRN-CNP, FNAP, FAANP, FAAN, the use and application of evidence-based care can be very empowering and lead to overall better outcomes for our patients. While we know that implementing evidence-based care is the best for our patients, many don’t know how to go about doing this. Completing continuing education (CE) courses every year is the first step. Most of us know about CE courses because we have to complete them to maintain our nursing license—the same is true for your NP license. CE can come in many forms, such as conferences, webinars, and online courses. While it is easy to go to a conference solely based on location or complete a webinar due to the convenience, it is vital to find CE courses that apply to your daily practice. There are also a lot of online tools available, including online databases such as UptoDate, that can be accessed daily while at work to ensure the care you provide is following evidence-based guidelines. Lastly, joining professional organizations, reading research articles, and networking with other healthcare providers will ensure you stay relevant with the latest trends in advanced practice nursing. 8. Correctly Assess, Diagnose and Treat Disease In Patients . This goal should be a top career goal for nurse practitioners—we should always be striving to correctly assess, diagnose and treat our patients. While this sounds simple to do, it is not always the case. This goal ties in perfectly with Goal #1 and # 7 discussed above. No one is perfect, not even those who work in healthcare. It is important to remember this, and it is even more important to deliver the best care possible every day. Goals #1 and #7 help us achieve this goal by providing the foundation needed to correctly assess, diagnose, and treat disease. Becoming board certified in your specialty indicates a solid foundation for the specialty. Besides, Goal #7 will help you in your day-to-day practice, ensuring you are staying current with information in healthcare and providing appropriate, up-to-date care. 9. Individualize The Care You Deliver. One of the ambitious but achievable career goals for nurse practitioners is to tailor the care they deliver to the individual. What I mean by this is to treat each person as an individual. Every person is unique, and what works for one person may not work for another. When interacting with the patient, do not go into the room with assumptions but instead ask questions to get to know the patient, their condition, and their goals for treatment. I read an article recently that said to treat a patient how you want to be treated—and this stuck with me. By treating each person as an individual, you are likely to have higher patient satisfaction, leading to greater compliance with the treatment plan—which is the ultimate goal. You want your patients to trust and believe in the care/treatment you are giving. Therefore, taking an extra 5 minutes to understand fully is sometimes needed to ensure the patient experiences the best possible outcomes. 10. Involve Your Patient in the Decision-Making Process of Their Care. This goal ties in perfectly with Goal #9—individualize the care you deliver. Having a person feel that they play an active part in the decision-making process leads to higher patient satisfaction and greater compliance with the treatment plan. Patients have voiced frustration that they feel they are being told what to do instead of feeling included and involved in making decisions regarding their health and lives. They are told they have hypertension and need medication, but hypertension is not explained to them, nor do they understand what lifestyle changes they could make to improve their health without medication. As an NP, a career goal would be to include your patient in the decision-making process. Explain the illness, or provide a handout, and allow the patient to ask questions or return to the clinic for a follow-up to discuss further. Do not force a treatment plan or medication, but instead explain “why” it will benefit them. As I stated above, taking a few extra minutes to explain the “why” will often lead to higher compliance and satisfaction with care. 11. Advocate For Interdisciplinary Care. The next attainable career goal for nurse practitioners should include advocacy for interdisciplinary care. This means working together with other disciplines to ensure the best care possible is being delivered to our patients. This could consist of working with physical therapy (PT) or occupational therapy (OT), consulting a specialist such as cardiology, or working alongside a care/case manager to provide resources to the patient. This will look different for each patient depending on their medical history, if they’re outpatient or inpatient, and resources available. For the interdisciplinary care team to be successful, communication between the disciplines must occur to ensure the patient’s goals are being met and the appropriate disciplines are involved. This is a revolving care team for most patients and should be updated as needed. While I do think this goal is incredibly important, I do understand based on a person’s work environment/community, all of these resources may not be available and is not always an easily attainable goal. 12. Share Knowledge With New NPs and NP Students. As an NP, we all started as a nurse, and remember how challenging it can be. For those NPs who have been practicing for a couple of years, you probably also remember how challenging and scary starting your practice can be. Therefore, one of the career goals for nurse practitioners should be the willingness to share knowledge with both new NPs and NP students. I know precepting is not for everyone, and that is okay. But what you can do, is if you see a student precepting with another NP in your practice, and you have an exciting patient or a procedure, invite the student to discuss the patient or watch/assist with the procedure. This will have a great impact on the student and provide them a learning opportunity that can better prepare them for their practice. In regards to new NPs, could you do the same with them? We all know in nursing school and in NP school, you typically don’t get to see everything you will see in practice. So be kind to those who ask you a question or bounce an idea off of you because, to be honest, you will probably want to bounce an idea off of them at some point as well. 13. Build Your Network. Networking allows you to build relationships with others who work in the same field as you. While this may not seem like an important nurse practitioner career goal, these relationships can often lead to great opportunities. Networking can lead to a new job and volunteer opportunities to improve your practice and build on your skills. Networking can also help ensure you are practicing evidence-based care. It can keep you informed of changes occurring in practice or other aspects of healthcare that could impact the way you practice. It can also help build interprofessional relationships that can have a profound impact on your patients. Lastly, it can lead to advocacy for our patients and our profession as well. Networking can be completed through your NP programs and alumni gatherings. It can also be achieved through meetings that are held at your organization or just even working side by side with other disciplines. Most recently, networking has started to occur more online—which can include LinkedIn or other social media platforms. Regardless of the method you use, networking is an achievable goal for nurse practitioners that can certainly lead to awesome opportunities. 14. Become Active In A Leadership Role. It is not uncommon for an NP to find themselves in a leadership role, regardless if it was a goal or not. This role may be your daily role as an NP in the practice, especially if you work alongside a physician and they are not there for a day. You may choose to take on a management position—which can include anything, from being the manager of a clinic to playing the CNO of a hospital. Becoming an educator in a University setting is also a leadership role you can aspire to where you will guide and educate the future nurses, APRNs, etc., to provide high-quality care. Fortunately, your education does prepare you for leadership more than you realize. Good NP leaders demonstrate strong communication and listening skills, use evidence-based care, and are proficient at decision-making. They also practice self-care, create learning environments, and support staff. Therefore, without even realizing it, this NP career goal can most certainly be achieved by all practicing NPs. 15. Find Work-Life Balance and Practice Self-Care. This goal is incredibly important—and while I feel it is one of the most important career goals for nurse practitioners, it tends to be one of the most challenging. To successfully care for others, you must first take care of yourself! Work-life balance means you take time for your family as much as you can—you find the balance between work and home. Our job is important, but so is our family. We need to identify the importance of leaving work at work--or setting aside a designated time at home to work, and once the timer goes off, you stop and spend time with family. It is easy to get wrapped up in caring for our patients and their concerns, but we must make our families a priority! And to do that, we must care for ourselves as well. This may look different for everyone. It could include taking a nap, a relaxing bath, reading a book, or going for a run. Regardless, make sure you intentionally make time for family and yourself—I cannot express how important this is! To go along with this goal, we often talk about nurse burnout, but this can also happen to NPs. Taking steps to prevent burnout, identifying the symptoms of burnout, and knowing about resources available to help with burnout is critical. This will help ensure you are providing the best care possible to your patients. Conclusion. Goal setting is very personal, takes time, and is constantly evolving. I hope the 15 career goals for nurse practitioners discussed above have sparked some ideas to advance and build on your career. So, I ask you, what are the most ambitious and achievable nurse practitioner career goals you plan to set for your career? Kasee Wiesen DNP, APRN, FNP-C Kasee Wiesen is a practicing family nurse practitioner. Her nursing background includes emergency medicine, pediatrics and peri-op. Education is a passion of Kasee’s, and she has taught BSN, RN-BSN and DNP students, and has enjoyed every moment of it! Copyright © 2022 Nursingprocess.org All Rights Reserved. About us | Our Contributing Writers | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertising Disclosure | Contact us
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Result 20
TitleNursing Goals that can Separate You from the Crowd
Urlhttps://medicalandhealthcare.com/articles/nursing/examples-of-nursing-goals-that-can-separate-you-from-the-crowd.html
DescriptionDo you want to become a nurse? Here is a list of nursing goals that will help separate you from the crowd
Date
Organic Position19
H1Examples of Nursing Goals that can Separate You from the Crowd
H2Short Term Nursing Goals
Nursing Scholarships
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H3Search for school
Long Term Nursing Goals
CHOOSE A PROFESSION
Search for school
H2WithAnchorsShort Term Nursing Goals
Nursing Scholarships
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Why Taking a NCLEX Refresher Course is Important
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BodyExamples of Nursing Goals that can Separate You from the Crowd Find a school A career in nursing is as much a calling as it is a career. People who go into nursing tend to have a deep care for other people as well as a desire to help minimize suffering in the world. They also have a strong interest in helping expedite the healing process, sometimes in new and innovative ways. It is a commendable choice to go into the nursing field. Among the other more practical requirements of study for this field is the need for a defined set of nursing goals. Nursing goals help set the course for a nursing career and help keep you on track with the type of nurse you would like to be. Nursing goals are generally put forth in three categories, emphasizing the short term, long term and also on a more personal level. Short Term Nursing Goals. Short term nursing goals generally deal with practical matters of study and getting one’s career off the ground. Passing exams, landing an internship or position in one’s field of choice, and generally getting your nursing career on track and headed in the right direction all fall into the category of short term nursing goals. Short term nursing goals can also include educational milestones and receiving letters of recommendation that will open doors and get your career on track and off on the right foot. Long Term Nursing Goals. With longer term goals, you’re invited to look down the road and decide where you’ll want to be in five years, ten years, and beyond. Some long term nursing goals could include attending specific types of seminars, joining the American Nurses Association or other professional organizations, and lobbying or becoming an advocate for specific causes within the nursing field. Other long term goals could include advanced degrees and working your way up to other desired positions in your field. Long term nursing goals provide the framework for the unfolding of a nursing career, including promotions, desired accolades, accomplishments and association memberships. You can also set your sights on the type of work you would like to be doing for the majority of your career, even if more schooling and experience is required. Setting such goals greatly increases the likelihood of reaching them, and a five and ten year plan are a powerful way to set your course for success and fulfillment as a nurse. Personal Nursing Goals. On a personal level, nursing goals tend to be less about specifics and more about intentions for your work and life as a whole. Personal goals for a nurse include the type of nurse you want to be, how you aim to treat your patients and how you might contribute to the field. Personal goals can help your work and home life to be more integrated and harmonious. Through your personal goals, you can strive to leave your mark on the nursing field through your own personal beliefs and style of care. Personal nursing goals are as diverse and unique as each nurse is as a person, and this is your chance to put forward your style, beliefs, and inner connection to people and the nursing field. Personal goals should come from the heart and allow a nurse to feel genuinely connected to their work and their clients in a way that goes beyond just specific skill sets or memberships in professional organizations. Nursing Goals that can set you Apart While each nurse will set goals that are specific to their chosen career and help their career arc to manifest, there are ways to set goals that can truly help you stand out from the crowd. While a number of nursing goals tend to be the same or similar among most nurses, it is in the areas of long term and especially personal goals that you can truly set yourself apart. The key to successful goals setting is to make sure all of your goals come from a genuine and heartfelt place. Don’t choose goals just from a desire to please others or impress someone. Ultimately, it’s your career and your life, make the most of it. If you follow your heart, the rest is likely to just fall into place. Nursing Scholarships. American Assembly for Men in Nursing (AAMN) American Cancer Society Doctoral Degree Scholarships in Cancer Nursing Gallagher Student Health Careers Scholarship The Gates Millenium Scholars (GMS) National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA) New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) Nurse Corps Scholarship (NCS) Nurses of Tomorrow Nursing Economics Foundation Tylenol Future Care Scholarship American Holistic Nurses Association No schools found or there was a problem, please try again later. (error: 6, http code: 0)No schools found or there was a problem, please try again later. (error: 6, http code: 0) Related Post. How to Obtain a Career in Correctional Nursing. Choosing to become a corrections nurse is a decision that should not be taken lightly. A corrections nurse is responsible for attending to inmates at correctional facilities across the country. Why Taking a NCLEX Refresher Course is Important. Every licensed nurse in the United States has gone through the grueling experience of taking the National Council Licensure Examination, or NCLEX, and most likely every nurse can verify that an NCLEX Forensic Nursing: How to Become a Forensic Nurse. Forensic nursing is the nursing subspecialty that is currently growing most rapidly. CHOOSE A PROFESSION. Counseling Dentistry Nursing Nutrition / Dietitian Pharmacology Psychiatry Psychology Social Work Surgeon Therapy Veterinary / Zoology Search for school. Sign Up for Our Newsletter to Get the Latest Updates. Share on Social Media. © 2022 Medical and Healthcare. All rights reserved. | DMCA Notices | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | Sitemap
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Result 21
TitleHow to Achieve Your Long-Term Nursing Goals | Duquesne University
Urlhttps://onlinenursing.duq.edu/blog/achieve-long-term-nursing-goals/
DescriptionFour tips for nurses to help set long term career goals, how to achieve them, and how Duquesne University online can help!
Date
Organic Position20
H1How to Achieve Your Long-Term Nursing Goals
H21. Have a Clear Vision
Differentiate Yourself
Earn Your MSN Degree
Look into Certifications
About Duquesne’s Online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Program
H3Sources
H2WithAnchors1. Have a Clear Vision
Differentiate Yourself
Earn Your MSN Degree
Look into Certifications
About Duquesne’s Online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Program
BodyHow to Achieve Your Long-Term Nursing GoalsMay 20, 2020View all blog posts under Articles | View all blog posts under Doctor of Nursing Practice | View all blog posts under Master of Science in Nursing | View all blog posts under MSN Post-Master's Certificates Where do you see yourself in five years? This isn’t just a question that future employers will be asked to assess your drive and interests; it’s something that all professional nurses should think about. Many registered nurses are seeking ways to set themselves apart in this growing field, one way to do that is to advance your career as a professional nurse. Earning an MSN degree is a great way to advance your nursing career and find a specialty within nursing that you’re interested in. To determine where you might be in five years, it will be important to set long-term goals and establish objectives to guide you throughout your nursing career. There are a few steps that you can take to achieve your long-term nursing goals, here are 4: 1. Have a Clear Vision. Take a minute to remember your initial motivations for being a nurse. What career aspirations did you have when you first began your nursing career?  If your current role seems like a platform to something else, what can you do to get to where you want to be? These considerations will help form your goals and provide a clear career roadmap. For example, if you want to gain more expertise in specialized areas, what steps must be taken to achieve this target? If you’re not sure what you want to do, you can still create actionable goals to advance your career. Some people prefer to write down these benchmarks in order to stay organized and on track. Creating a list of goals will help you understand your interests and strengths and align your objectives with those specific traits.  Your goals should be SMART. Specific. Measurable. Attainable. Realistic. Time-based. For example, you might look to learn how to use an intravenous fusion pump within a week. This specificity anchors your goals to a particular schedule and is easily achievable. Differentiate Yourself. To achieve your long-term goals and open up future career opportunities, it will be important to set yourself apart from your peers. One direct way to do this is to become trusted and well-respected within your current job. Individuals who provide excellent service and consistently work hard are highly sought-after and often earn recognition from their superiors. These characteristics can help you become a leading candidate for new opportunities that arise. Building a solid network will be essential to helping you stand out and further your goals. Nursing professionals should look to foster as many positive relationships as possible. These connections can be forged within your facility as well as within communities and national associations designed to connect nurses. Teaming up with a more experienced mentor will help you grow and learn the necessary skills to keep up with emerging techniques. A mentor can also be a key ally when applying for a new position. Specialization in a field can also help move closer toward long-term goals. If you have a specialty in mind, find out what type of training and skills are necessary to get into that practice area. Using mentors and connections in that field can reveal what steps must be taken and any advice needed to reach your objective. Earn Your MSN Degree. A bachelor’s degree can open the door for entry-level positions, but a Master of Science in Nursing can provide a number of opportunities to grow in your career. In fact, most unit management and supervisory jobs require an MSN degree, according to Nurse.org. Obtaining this degree can yield a number of significant benefits and help you reach your long-term nursing goals. An MSN grants a greater number of career choices. On the job, an MSN proves that you can work with less supervision and are capable of making critical decisions, according to Nurse Journal. Earning an MSN may grant you additional benefits outside of reaching your long-term nursing goals. For example, nurses with their MSN can usually expect an increase to base salary or the possibility of bonuses. Registered nurse professionals should look into MSN programs to learn how they can improve their skills and meet future needs. In fact, it may someday be required for registered nurses to work toward an MSN degree to retain their license, Nurse Journal stated. There are also more program options than ever, enabling nurses to obtain their degree while still working. Specialty concentrations, such as those offered by the Duquesne University Master of Science in Nursing online program, can be done completely online. This will allow you to keep your current work and family commitments while pursuing higher education. Setting your long-term nursing goals can be a major motivator for your career prospects. By establishing a clear vision, looking into certifications, differentiating yourself, and pursuing an MSN degree, you will take a significant step toward your objectives. Look for opportunities to learn and challenge yourself to keep up on new patient care techniques. This lifelong mindset to expanding knowledge will provide a precedent for constant improvement and goal advancement. Reaching your long-term nursing goals doesn’t stop at earning your MSN, as a nurse, part of your job is continuous learning, earning your MSN is just one step of the process. Look into Certifications. Becoming certified demonstrates that you have expert knowledge in a particular field and can help to improve patient satisfaction and lower error rates across the board. As the number of registered nurses with certifications increases, it will be important to obtain these credentials to fill specialty needs, remain competitive, and meet long-term goals. When you’re interested in a specialty, there are three online Post-Master’s Certificates offered at Duquesne: Family Nurse Practitioner: The FNP program is offered full-time or part-time, and trains nurses for the American Association of Nurse Practitioners Certification Program (AANPCP) exam or the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Family Nurse Practitioner exam. Forensic Nursing: Forensic nurse career outcomes include sexual assault nurse, nurse coroner, nurse investigator, and more. This certification is recognized by the International Association of Forensic Nurses. Nursing Education and Faculty Role: This certificate program educates nurses on current trends and modern evolutions in nursing, in order to best serve future generations of students. Career outcomes include clinical faculty members, online educators, lab directors, or higher education faculty members. The certifying body is the Certification for Nurse Educators – National League for Nursing. Pursuing certification will help you gain the skills necessary for a specialty and open up new career opportunities. About Duquesne’s Online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Program. The Duquesne University School of Nursing is top-ranked in U.S. News and World Report’s 2017 Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs. The MSN program offers three areas of specialization: Forensic Nursing, Family Nurse Practitioner, and Nursing Education and Faculty Role. Sources. Nurse.com, “4 steps for taking charge of your career” Elizabethscala.com, “Goal Setting in Nursing” Nurse.org, “Nurse Manager Salary and Career Opportunities” Nurse Together, “6 Tips to Keep Your Network Strong and Boost Your Nursing Career” Nurse Journal, “25 Reasons Why To Get a Masters in Nursing” Nurse Journal, “5 Most Common Types of Nursing Certifications You Should Have” Learn more about our MSN programs. Get Program Details X X Get Program Details This will only take a minute.
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Result 22
TitleSetting Goals for Better Nursing
Urlhttps://www.chausa.org/publications/health-progress/article/may-june-2010/setting-goals-for-better-nursing
Description
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Organic Position21
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Bodyame src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-55S2XJ" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden">
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Result 23
TitleNursing Resume Objectives: 18 Examples submitted by Nurses
Urlhttps://www.greatsampleresume.com/blog/resume/objectives/nursing
DescriptionCareer Summaries for Nurses of all Qualifications. User-submitted examples can be used as your own, or serve as inspiration to create yourself a powerful resume
Date
Organic Position22
H1Nurse Resume Objectives
H2Example Nurse Resume Objectives
H3
H2WithAnchorsExample Nurse Resume Objectives
BodyNurse Resume Objectives The field of nursing is widely varied and the types of positions more numerous than can be individually addressed. However, no matter the particulars of the area in which you are interested, the need for a strong objective statement that indicates what you bring and what you are looking for remains the same. Whether you are looking for your first nursing position, or a new position after receiving certification or relocating, or simply advancing your career as an experienced health care practitioner, we hope you will find just the right statements or the inspiration to create a powerful statement that suits you. Choose from a variety of objective statement examples, and feel free to alter the details to create a powerful nurse resume. SHARE Example Nurse Resume Objectives . LIKED 486 LIKES A position as a Registered Nurse in a Health Care facility where I can make the most of my nursing education and training, in addition to my interpersonal skills to provide the highest level of patient care. Hsin Tseng – Longview, TX LIKED 361 LIKES To obtain a position in a Health Care Facility where I can utilize my skills, knowledge and experience to provide quality health care. Marilyn Morgan – Hutchins, TX LIKED 215 LIKES Seeking a Registered nurse position which will give me an opportunity to expand my practical experience at the same time as providing quality health care to residents. Debra Bryant – Maitland, MO LIKED 95 LIKES To secure a position with a well established organization with advancement opportunities utilizing my skills in the field of medical billing and coding. Susan Watson – Surprise, AZ LIKED 93 LIKES Fresh but enthusiastic RN with ability to stay calm and intervene during crises seeking job in a hospital to make use of the knowledge acquired at the High Nursing Academy. Jessica Young – Elizabethtown, KY LIKED 87 LIKES As a beginner in the field of medical science, with my good interpersonal and communication skills, I will be able to confidently deal with all the level of people working in the organization. I would put all my efforts in research and development of present health care system. Michelle Torres – New York, NY LIKED 85 LIKES RN position that will expand my nursing education, skills and knowledge and utilize it to reinforce the facility’s operations. Zi Kang – West Sacramento, CA LIKED 58 LIKES Secure a fulfilling CNA position in a hospital setting and continue to utilize my knowledge in First Aid, patient care and hygiene, and standard medical emergency procedures. Beverly White – Florence, SC LIKED 54 LIKES With a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a two-year experience in behavioral health, my objective is to continue my profession in the field of psychiatric nursing and obtain a full-time position at any Ohio-based facility. Michelle Symba – Akron, OH LIKED 51 LIKES As an experienced medical professional, I would like to use my extensive clinical experience working as a physician in the field of medical science. My quality of being helpful, self-motivated would insist me to take care of the poor people and provide special medical facilities for poor and economically weaker section. Kevin D. Verret – Garden City, NY LIKED 45 LIKES To obtain a position as a RN with ABC Clinic that will enable me to be befit my employers professionally and give the highest level of comfort and care to patients. Yan Pai – Tucson, AZ LIKED 37 LIKES With over 4 years of professional experience as a CNA, my goal is to continue my passion in medicine, assist doctors and registered nurses, and help in caring for patients. Strong background in nutrition and training with American Red Cross. Amy Williams – Stamford, CT LIKED 35 LIKES With an associate’s degree in nursing and valid Texas RN licensure, my goal is to find a rewarding position as a pediatric nurse at a hospital or pediatrician’s clinic. Interned with an OB/GYN and pediatrician for two consecutive years. Rosa Bischoff – Houston, TX LIKED 34 LIKES To obtain a certified nursing assistant position in a Michigan-based assisted living facility that focuses in providing seniors with privacy, medical care, and companionship. Helen K. Speidel – West Point, MS LIKED 33 LIKES Dedicated registered nurse certified in mental health willing to obtain a position in a reputed health care facility. Linnie Brown – Charleston, WV LIKED 30 LIKES Trained as a registered clinical nurse at the emergency department of California’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, my goal is to continue to provide critical nursing services to patients upon my relocation to NYC. Holds over 5 years of hands-on nursing experience. Recently obtained New York licensure to practice. Marge M. Berg – NY LIKED 27 LIKES To work as an ophthalmic assistant or administrator in hospitals, or with professionals as surgeons or physicians with a specialty. Katrina C. Richards – Concord, NC LIKED 27 LIKES As an intern, I would be using my knowledge of medicines and would work under senior medical health professional and help poor people by giving them knowledge about health care facilities. I would make use of my helpful and sacrificing nature in providing healthcare and medical facilities to the poor and downtrodden. Anne Washington – Chicago, IL X Close
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Result 24
TitleNursing Learning Goals and Objectives | Eastern University
Urlhttps://www.eastern.edu/academics/colleges-seminary/college-health-and-sciences/departments/school-nursing/majors-11
Description
Date
Organic Position23
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H2Learning Objectives of the BSN Program
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H2WithAnchorsLearning Objectives of the BSN Program
BodySkip to main content About About COVID-19 GuidanceAccreditations & AuthorizationsAlumniCampus & SitesCampus CalendarDiversity, Equity, & BelongingEastern MagazineVision, Mission & FaithHistoryNational RecognitionNews & EventsOffices & CentersStrategic Alliances & PartnershipsEU in Motion: Strategic Plan 2019-2022Student Consumer InformationUniversity LeadershipContact UsVision, Mission & FaithCourage StoriesAcademics Academics Majors and ProgramsUndergraduate: TraditionalAdult UndergraduateGraduateOnline ProgramsSummer Online CoursesColleges & SeminaryTempleton Honors CollegeLibraryOur FacultyGeneral EducationProgram FinderFaculty DirectoryStudent Life Student Life Around the AreaCareer DevelopmentCommuter ServicesCounseling & Academic SupportFaith & PracticeInternational Student ServicesLeadership Fellows ProgramGoode Scholars ProgramMulticultural OpportunitiesResidence LifeStudent ActivitiesStudent DevelopmentCurrent StudentsParentsClubs & OrganizationsFaith & ServiceAthletics Athletics Men's SportsWomen's SportsEsportsAthletics PhotosAthletics VideosLivestreamFitness CenterAthletics ScheduleAdmissions & Financial Aid Admissions & Financial Aid Undergraduate AdmissionsAdult Undergraduate & Graduate AdmissionsTransfer Student AdmissionsFinancial Aid OfficeMilitary StudentsProspective StudentsVisitApplyEastern FastPass!Contact AdmissionsVisit Eastern University Search Full Menu For Prospective Students For Current Students For Parents For Faculty/Staff For Alumni Work at Eastern Apply Visit Request Info Give COVID-19 Apply Visit Request Info Give Alumni Eastern University / Academics / Colleges & Seminary / The College of Health and Sciences / Departments / School of Nursing / Majors & Programs in School of Nursing / BS in Nursing / Nursing Learning Goals and Objectives Nursing Learning Goals and Objectives The BSN Graduate will be able to: 1. Practice safe professional holistic nursing care. 2. Integrate Christian values and ethics into professional nursing practice. Learning Objectives of the BSN Program . Demonstrate the art and science of professional caring incorporating the professional values of the discipline of nursing. Model critical thinking within the practice of professional nursing. Appraise listening, oral, nonverbal, written, and visual communication skills for efficacy. Demonstrate utilization, integration and application of knowledge generated through research as evidence in practice. Perform a comprehensive assessment of individuals, families and aggregates utilizing current technologies when needed. Practice safe evidence based nursing care. Promote health through education, risk reduction, and disease prevention. Appreciate human diversity and the implications of a global health care environment. Acknowledge and assess the spirituality of self and others. Use information and communication technologies to care for the patient and to enhance one's own professional knowledge. Evaluate therapeutic nursing care for individuals, families and aggregate groups in a dynamic, multi-faceted health care system according to accepted standards of practice. Explain the multiple roles of the professional nurse as a leader. Explicate the characteristics of holistic nursing practice within a Christian worldview. Apply to nursing practice an ethical framework that incorporates Christian worldview, moral concepts, professional ethics, law and respects diverse values and beliefs. Develop personal goals for continued professional development, self-care, and lifelong learning. The baccalaureate nursing programs at  Eastern University are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street, NW Suite 750, Washington, D.C. 20001, (202) 887-6791. 1300 Eagle Road St. Davids, PA 19087-3696 610-341-5800 Apply Visit Contact Admissions Contact Us Emergency Information Employment Give News & Events Offices & Centers Social Media Website Feedback Eastern University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarships, loan programs, athletic and other programs. Read Nondiscrimination Policy. © 2022 Eastern University Website Policies Privacy Statement Site by: Eastern Standard
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Result 25
TitleProfessional Nursing Goals
Urlhttps://www.slideshare.net/pennermk/professional-nursing-goals
DescriptionProfessional Nursing Goals MARGARET PENNER
Date
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H1Professional Nursing Goals
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BodyProfessional Nursing Goals Download Now Download Download to read offline Feb. 06, 2012 26,968 views pennermk Follow Recommended. Goals of Clinical Nursing Education bodo-con Goals of clinical nursing education Mae Aguilar Goal setting in clinical practice liwegner My Professional Goals 2005-06 Deborah Newhouse, CPC, CEMC Nursing performance appraisal examples zulmaweber 13-14 SMART Goals and Action Plans Jay Marino Band 5 staff nurse performance appraisal libertymichel112 Nursing as a profession BP KOIRALA INSTITUTE OF HELATH SCIENCS,, NEPAL Nursing evaluations ppt Jamie Saltkill Nursing guide to preceptorship Dr. Kawther Ali Related Books. Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd. 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So you do not need to waste the time on rewritings. 1 month ago KalumeUledi 1 year ago Auie Jonathan at Armed Forces Hospital King Abdulaziz Airbase 4 years ago Jean Macato 4 years ago Views Total views 26,968 On SlideShare 0 From Embeds 0 Number of Embeds 28 Actions Shares 0 Downloads 24 Comments 0 Likes 4 No notes for slide Professional Nursing Goals . 1. Professional Nursing Goals MARGARET PENNER 2. Be a competent, compassionate nurse leader Patients are the most important reason I am a nurse. My first goal as a graduate is to become an expert bedside nurse, providing the best care through evidence-based technical proficiency, patient-centered teamwork, and therapeutic relationships. 3. Affect positive, patient-centered change in my unit and institution. I am dedicated to patient advocacy, championing evidence-based interventions for individual patients as well as systemic support for patient safety, satisfaction, and outcomes. I utilize national networks as resources to learn and share best practices. 4. Promote women’s health and provide women’s cancer care. Personal experience has given me a big heart for the care of patients with female-specific cancers. My ultimate goal is to become a nurse practitioner in oncology. CindyBrown82 . Nov. 29, 2021 KalumeUledi . Dec. 4, 2020 Auie04 . Dec. 26, 2017 JeanMacato1 . Feb. 5, 2017 Views. Total views 26,968 On Slideshare 0 From embeds 0 Number of embeds 28 Actions. Downloads 24 Shares 0 Comments 0 Likes 4 4 Likes Statistics Notes × Share Clipboard. × Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Link Public clipboards featuring this slide. × No public clipboards found for this slide Select another clipboard. × Looks like you’ve clipped this slide to already. Create a clipboard You just clipped your first slide! Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later. Now customize the name of a clipboard to store your clips. 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TitleProfessional Development | Transitions to Professional Nursing Practice
Urlhttps://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-delhi-professionalnursing/chapter/professional-development/
Description
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H2Professional Development
Professional Nursing Roles
Creating a Professional Development Plan
Benefits of Professional Development
Mentoring
Networking
H3Chapter 2
Job Opportunities
Fulfilling Lifelong Learning Goals
H2WithAnchorsProfessional Development
Professional Nursing Roles
Creating a Professional Development Plan
Benefits of Professional Development
Mentoring
Networking
BodySkip to main content Chapter 2. Professional Development. A rapidly expanding and complex healthcare environment requires nurses with advanced knowledge, skills, and competencies to meet the growing demand for a highly skilled workforce. Nurses also need to bolster their existing practice to ensure progress and readiness for future challenges and maximum growth. Through professional development activities, nurses are able to reach their professional goals for growth and development, and at the same time meet the needs of a demanding healthcare environment. Creating a professional development plan (PDP) is an integral part of professional nursing practice, and planning should begin as early as possible in one’s career. Professional development includes activities such as specialty certification, additional degrees, attending conferences, publishing scholarly work, committee membership, and more. Planning one’s professional development requires planning and goal setting. Contemplating a realistic timeline, financial resources, time management, and other considerations is a very important part of the plan. Professional growth and development are an expectation set forth in the American Nurses Association (ANA, 2015c) Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice. Standard 12, Education, states “The registered nurse seeks knowledge and competence that reflects current nursing practice and promotes futuristic thinking” (p. 76). The Standard lists the competencies required by the registered nurse. The list below shares a few of the competencies for professional growth and development: Demonstrates a commitment to lifelong learning through self-reflection and inquiry for learning and personal growth. Identifies learning needs based on nursing knowledge and the various roles the nurse may assume. Facilitates a work environment supportive of ongoing education of healthcare professionals (ANA, 2015c, p. 76) Professional development is an essential task for every nurse, whether the goal is to seek a new nursing role or to remain at a current position. Regardless of the long-term goal, PDPs are focused on enhancing one’s career, planning for the future, paving the way towards a new job and career that meets your personal and professional goals. Creating PDPs gives nurses the momentum and excitement to reach new, stimulating opportunities, leading to a successful and satisfying career (Öznacar & Mümtazoğlu, 2017). Evaluating a PDP on a regular basis gives nurses control over their practice, and ultimately, their future. Nurses have the power to free themselves from a job where their knowledge and skills may feel stagnant or there is no opportunity for advancement. A PDP offers nurses opportunities that build on strengths and passions, leading to a more gratifying and rewarding career. Professional Nursing Roles. The nursing profession offers a wide array of job opportunities. Nurses can choose to work in a variety of practice settings that fits one’s goals. In order to keep current with the changing healthcare environment and achieve a satisfying nursing career, creating a PDP is key. See Table 1 for a brief list of professional nursing roles with education requirements and associated certifications. Table 1 shares professional nursing roles with degree requirements and certifications Table 1: Professional Nursing Roles Nursing Roles Minimum Education Certifications Diabetic Nurse Educator BSN preferred Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) Nurse Midwife Masters Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM) Pediatric Nurse BSN preferred Pediatric Nursing (RN-BC) Forensic nurse BSN preferred Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Medical/Surgical Nurse BSN preferred Medical/Surgical Nurse (RN-BC) Nurse Anesthetist Masters or DNP Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse BSN preferred Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse (CWOCN) (different levels of WOCN cert.) Case manager BSN preferred Nursing Case Management (RN-BC) Clinical Nurse Specialist (choose setting) Masters or DNP Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS-BS) Hospice/Palliative Care Nurse BSN preferred Certified Hospice/Palliative Nurse (CHPN) Nurse Educator (academic or clinical) Masters, DNP or PhD Certified Nurse Educator (CNE) Director of Nursing DNP or PhD Nurse Executive Certification Advanced (NEA-BC) Nurse Manager BSN or Masters Nurse Executive Certification (NE-BC) School Nurse BSN preferred National Certified School Nurse (NCSN) Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Masters, DNP or PhD Certified Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP-BC) BC = Board Certified Creating a Professional Development Plan. Creating a PDP takes time to reflect on one’s life and experiences. The first step is to refer to one’s personal nursing philosophy where values, inspirations, beliefs, reasons for entering the profession, and other ideas can be used to create goals. Reflecting on aspects of a workday that are pleasing or enjoyable also assist with creating goals for a PDP. In addition, comprehensive research will need to be completed if interested in a specific nursing role. Researching a potential role will include learning about required education/certification, years of experience, cost of education, availability of scholarships and other funding opportunities, and more. Consider the following questions while pondering career goals: What part of nursing practice inspires you? Why did you enter the nursing profession? Is there a particular work setting or specialty that you are drawn to? Are there activities in your current role that excite you? What are your strengths? Do you enjoy working with technology? Do you enjoy understanding how science and research impacts care? Do you enjoy teaching patients or coworkers? Are you interested in policy, improving practice for the profession as a whole? What elements of nursing practice are you are passionate about? Chang (2000) writes about following one’s passion, stating passion elicits feelings about the world being filled with possibilities. Passion is defined as “activities, ideas, and topics that elicit the emotions.” (Chang, 2000, p. 19). Chang (2000) further defines passion as an intensity, a force that fuels our strongest emotions. Think about activities of nursing practice that illicit passion, follow your heart when making decisions. Following one’s passion helps find meaning in practice. Think back to the enthusiasm and feelings of excitement and fulfilled purpose that led to entering nursing school. When nurses create their PDP by following their passions, the task becomes promising and positive, rather than overwhelming and frustrating. Creating a PDP requires time and thought, a process that cannot be rushed. Staying focused on the end goal of creating a future that melds with lifelong goals can overshadow any difficulties you may incur throughout the reflection, research, and planning phases. Consider including some of the following activities in a PDP: Participate on a hospital committee Participate in shared governance in your unit Present updated evidence-based practice topic to unit staff monthly or quarterly Organize a unit committee based on a specific need Offer to be a mentor or preceptor for novice nurses on your unit Membership in professional organizations Similar to a nursing philosophy, a PDP is dynamic and changes over time. Goals will be met at varying stages throughout one’s career, and long-term career goals are bound to change as experience impacts knowledge and thinking. The desire to work on a medical/surgical unit now may be very different 10 years from now. Over time nurses learn more about themselves and their strengths and passions will inevitably change. The opportunities in nursing practice are endless, it’s one of the countless benefits of working in this remarkable profession. Bulletin board with stickie notes saying “make things happen” Benefits of Professional Development. Job Opportunities. Since the nursing profession offers multiple paths to licensure, nurses with varying types of degrees often compete with each other for certain nursing positions (acute care is one example). Depending on location, many employers require a baccalaureate degree (or working towards one) to be considered for hire. In addition, now that the BSN in 10 law has passed, current students entering nursing schools in NY will be required to earn a baccalaureate degree, adding more baccalaureate prepared nurses, and competition, into practice. Creating a PDP with the job market and competition for nursing positions in mind, nurses can form a strategy for positions that may not have been available unless planning had been in place. Furthermore, nurses who include additional professional growth opportunities, such as certification or mentoring, in their PDP will be recognized for their added accomplishments. sign: we are hiring Echevarria (2018) states membership in professional organizations helps nurses market themselves for future job opportunities. Sharing professional development activities on one’s resume or curricula vitae (CV) demonstrates to potential employers the nurse’s commitment to lifelong learning and advocacy for the professional. Participation in professional development opportunities meets competencies within Standard 8, Education, from the ANA (2015c) Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, stating, “Maintains professional portfolio that provides evidence of individual competence and lifelong learning” (p. 76). Recruiters seek out nurses who are actively seeking out professional development and often advertise job openings on professional organization sites. Depending on the organization, members may gain additional benefits with career development tools, such as writing a resume, mock interviews, and posting resumes to a job board (Echevarria, 2018). Fulfilling Lifelong Learning Goals. Lifelong learning is an expectation of all nurses. Through professional development planning nurses can tailor learning activities to meet a variety of goals. Learning opportunities may be planned for license renewal or to meet a PDP goal. Planning a timeline to meet goals will ensure goals are met. Nurses need to be open to learning about an assortment of new knowledge, and accept constructive criticism (Mustafa, 2017). Continuing education on a variety of topics increases one’s control over practice, ultimately leading to a satisfying job and career. thinking about learning Mentoring. Mentoring unites colleagues together, helping each other grow professionally. Whether it’s a novice nurse just entering the profession or an experienced nurse learning about a new specialty role, mentoring is an important way nurses can help each other with role transitions. Through mentoring, nurses are empowered by sharing their knowledge, which in turn strengthens the profession by securing competent practitioners and nurse leaders (Vance & Olsen, 1998). In addition, mentoring has been found to improve job satisfaction, and reduce the stress of working in a challenging environment (Jones, 2017). Mentoring helps nurses gain clinical knowledge and advice at a time when confidence and decision-making abilities are in the beginning stages. Nurses helping nurses is the foundation of professional practice. Some of the qualities and duties of mentors includes the following: Role model professional behaviors Offer career development advice Inspire others Encourage and support novice nurses Provide wisdom and share stories from their experience Trustworthy, confidants Mutual respect Open attitude mentor name badge Mentoring activities meets the competencies within Standard 12, Leadership, from the ANA (2015c) Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, stating, “The registered nurse leads within the professional practice setting and the profession” (p. 75). Mentoring may occur as a formal role, where a mentor and mentee have an official relationship or connection. Though nurses can mentor each other informally, by assisting others in need of advice and encouragement. The mentoring relationship is beneficial to both the mentor and the mentee, where both nurses benefitted from the process, stating they found their jobs more meaningful and satisfying (Malloy et al., 2015). Healthcare organizations offer preceptors, mentoring, and residency programs for graduate nurses. Residency programs differ from other forms of mentoring or coaching where such programs offer organized educational sessions with assigned preceptors. Hospitals may create their own residency programs, though some private companies have created evidence-based residency programs used in healthcare organizations. For example, Vizient, a private organization, has teamed up with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN, 2019) and created a Nurse Residency program. Vizient’s residency program, supported by The Joint Commission, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and others, found participants had higher retention rates (93%) compared to the national average (83%) (AACN, 2019). Additionally, participants in the program led to achieving Magnet status in their workplace. For more information about the Nurse Residency program, visit the AACN website. Nurse residency programs are essential for new nurses entering the healthcare field. The growth of residency programs is encouraging for nurses, employers, and ultimately, patient care. Establishing residency programs fulfills the third recommendation set forth by the IOM (2010) where healthcare organizations were tasked with supporting nurses to complete a transition-to-practice programs. Professional organizations offer tools to help organizations create mentoring programs, such as the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses (AMSN). The AMSN offers guides tailored for mentors and mentees, and guidelines on how to create an environment where learning and sharing can occur. The mentorship program teaches nurse leaders how to match up mentors and mentees, tips for mentoring novice nurses, characteristics of successful mentoring, problems that may arise, how to evaluate the mentoring program, and more (Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, 2018). For more information about the AMSN mentoring program, visit the AMSN website. The American Nurses Association (ANA, 2018) offers a mentoring program as a benefit of being a member of the organization. The program is designed to help new nurses acclimate to their new role and the nursing profession. The program is virtual, with mentors and mentees meeting each other online or via phone. The mentoring process begins with joining the mentoring program, then further details are shared with matching up a mentor to a mentee. For more information about the AMSN mentoring program, visit the ANA website. Networking. Creating professional networks or connections with groups of healthcare professionals within and outside one’s workplace helps nurses be cognizant of new career opportunities, advance quality patient care, and more (Sherman, 2018). Networking also offers nurses advice on how to overcome challenges and meet other nurses who have had similar experiences. Professional networking assists nurses with developing relationships that offer professional growth and clinical knowledge to inform personal practice. Nurses who do not put forth the effort to network with peers and other healthcare professionals risk working in a silo, where care practices can become stagnant, risking the feeling of being in a “rut.” Sherman (2018) explains the benefits of networking for career opportunities, stating recruiters may not always advertise job openings, instead relying on referrals from professionals they work with, whose judgment they trust. Creating and sustaining a professional network is key to advancing your career and finding new opportunities. Nurses can find a plethora of networking opportunities through national and specialty professional nursing organizations. Professional organizations offer many opportunities for professional growth, such as developing leadership skills, continuing education/certifications, resources for career development, and more (Echevarria, 2018). Networking meets the following competencies in Standard 8, Education, from the ANA (2015c) Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice: Seeks experiences that reflect current practice to maintain and advance knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, and judgment in clinical practice or role performance Participates in ongoing educational activities related to nursing and interprofessional knowledge bases and professional topics. Shares educational findings, experiences, and ideas with peers (ANA, 2015c, p. 76) networking, everyone is connected Planning short- and long-term goals helps nurses locate the most relevant, robust network of colleagues who can assist with seeking out new job opportunities. Many opportunities exist for networking within one’s institution, such as presenting a new evidence-based practice at a unit meeting or volunteering for an institutional-wide committee. Social media is another way to network with other healthcare professionals, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Most professional organizations have their own Facebook and Twitter pages/feeds, making it easier for nurses to connect with other healthcare professionals that have similar interests and goals. Creating a LinkedIn account offers nurses opportunities to find mentors and colleagues who have similar interests as well. While at a conference or other gatherings with healthcare professionals, Sherman (2018) encourages nurses to begin a conversation by asking any of the following questions: How did you get started in your role? What are your challenges? What significant changes are you seeing in your environment? What’s the most innovative thing that’s happening in your organization? What do you think will happen with healthcare reform? What trends do you see happening in nursing today? What advice would you give to an emerging nurse leader? How can I help you? Who else at this meeting would be helpful for me to speak with? Sherman (2018) offers some additional advice about networking: Networking is about planning, developing the relationship over time. Do not inquire about a job too quickly. Build a community of colleagues, think about what you can do for others first. Volunteer to offer your assistance with setting up for a conference or sharing an article on a clinical procedure. Having an up-to-date LinkedIn page is essential, including a professional email address, outgoing phone message, and business cards. Always carry your business cards with you. Prepare for networking opportunities. Think about (and write down) topics to discuss or introductory questions. Be excited, and positive, to those you network with. Refrain from complaining about anything. Stay focused on building relationships. Relationship building begins with listening. Ask other people about themselves and their careers. Offer your ideas and ask questions, though be sure your personal dialog does not take up the entire conversation. Follow up with new relationships, whether it’s sending a thank-you note or responding promptly to a request. Cultivate new relationships. Networking is an ongoing investment in professional development. Licenses and Attributions CC licensed content, OriginalTransitions to Professional Nursing Practice. Authored by: Jamie Murphy. Provided by: SUNY Delhi. Located at: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-delhi-professionalnursing. License: CC BY: Attribution Privacy Policy
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TitleExamples Of Professional Goals In Nursing - 724 Words | 123 Help Me
Urlhttps://www.123helpme.com/essay/Examples-Of-Professional-Goals-In-Nursing-716105
DescriptionA career in the medical field is always evolving, and always needing more hands. I knew from a young age that helping people is what I was meant to do, and..
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H1Examples Of Professional Goals In Nursing
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Nursing As A Career In The Mary Denton Story
Nursing As A Career In The Mary Denton Story
A Career: My Choice Of Nursing As A Career
A Career: My Choice Of Nursing As A Career
My Career As A Nursing Career
My Career As A Nursing Career
BodyExamples Of Professional Goals In NursingGood Essays724 Words2 PagesOpen DocumentEssay SampleCheck Writing QualityA career in the medical field is always evolving, and always needing more hands. I knew from a young age that helping people is what I was meant to do, and from then on out every step I took was the way to a successful career in nursing. It is a profession that allows you to see people at their worst, all while helping them become their best. The most important task for nursing students is to create a clear pathway for our education, and to be sure to follow that plan accordingly. When choosing this career, I had to access my own strengths and weaknesses and really establish clear goals for myself and evaluate if I had what it takes to be a part of this diverse and skilled profession. I also decided not only not only do I need to set professional goals for this career, personal goals are important as well. Upon being accepted at the Georgia Military College, I determined that I would spend my two years retaining everything I could in order to successfully become a registered nurse. Not only does getting my associates degree in Science and Pre-Nursing get all of my prerequisites out of the way, it is preparing me for my further education afterwards. In high school, every career goal test and…show more content…It is one I know I will love and will be much more than just a job. It gives ordinary people the opportunity to be a proponent for every patient especially those who may fall through the cracks of the health care system. With that being said, I established important goals to remain on this path for success. By the end of my career I hope to be ultimately satisfied with my choices and following the realistic and clear career goals I have put out with myself, I hope to acquire the characteristics needed to become a successful perioperative nurse and become not only a healthcare provider, but an advocate for my patients and to have the education needed to give them the care and dedication each patientGet AccessRelatedSatisfactory Essaysbsn. 648 Words2 Pagesbsn. I’m looking forward to preserve strong knowledge base, leadership skills and improve the evidence based practice skills to deliver positive patient outcomes. Caring is the best promising care you can provide for the patient. Every time nurse to patient contact is made, caring in nursing profession takes place. Caring is all about taking time to get to know your patient. Sadly ... ... middle of paper ... ...the knowledge and wisdom with others.648 Words2 PagesSatisfactory EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysImportance Of A RN Resident. 834 Words2 PagesImportance Of A RN Resident. 1. Describe the qualities that you possess that will enable you to be a successful RN Resident. Being very dedicated to learning, I am also very passionate about whatever I set out to do. I would like to think I am caring, as well as friendly, and try to be as wonderful a nurse as I can. I am insatiable about bringing my best to patient care.834 Words2 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreBetter EssaysA Career: A Registerd Nurse And A Registered Nurse. 1840 Words4 PagesA Career: A Registerd Nurse And A Registered Nurse. Succeeding in this career means following all of the personal and professional characteristics and developing the ones that are a little weaker. I plan on doing this whole heartedly because I want to be in a situation where I can benefit and help people. After more research into being a Registered Nurse I feel that I am a great fit for the job and have a solid plan on how I am going to get there and achieve1840 Words4 PagesBetter EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysCareer Statement For Nursing. 1176 Words3 PagesCareer Statement For Nursing. When I was introduced to nursing, I was intrigued of the many opportunities the career entailed, the ways I would help people, and how I could make an impact in someone’s life. As I continued the path through nursing school, I encountered times of frustration, struggle, and giving up. Though I had times like those, I made sure that I kept on going and fight my way to achieve my goal of being a nurse. My family has high hopes for me to succeed in my future as a nurse; my family’s support is my motivation through every step of my journey in nursing school. When I got into nursing, I knew that I wanted to help people and make them feel comfortable in their time of illness.1176 Words3 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysNursing Essay: My Personal Philosophy Of Nursing. 735 Words2 PagesNursing Essay: My Personal Philosophy Of Nursing. Building therapeutic relationships allows the patient to feel supported and understood and may help to provide health information, which may otherwise be held in a nontherapeutic relationship. Other values I practice often are advocating, listening, autonomy, and beneficence. I truly believe everyone is an expert in their own health and deserve the time to express their concerns. I also feel very strongly about people having the right to be in charge of their health. In my nursing practice, I vow to always listen to my clients and advocate to promote a holistic well-being of the individual.735 Words2 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysNursing Career Essay: A Career As A Nurse. 1070 Words3 PagesNursing Career Essay: A Career As A Nurse. Becoming a nurse practitioner will grant me the autonomy of leading the care of my patients while simultaneously have the ability to seek out the guidance of the physicians when needed. I will be able to broaden my scope of medical practice while still applying my principles of nursing to patient care. I want to be the best skilled, most competent and empathetic nurse simply because I want to bring the safest and highest quality of care to my patients. More often than not, patients voice out that no one listens to them, not even their own doctors. This concern further inspires me to become a nurse practitioner that will provide quality care by understanding my patient as a person.1070 Words3 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreSatisfactory EssaysProfessional Values In Nursing. 1346 Words3 PagesProfessional Values In Nursing. I became a nurse because I wanted to find a stable and fulfilling career. I started out, as a License Vocational Nurse to see if being a nurse was what I really wanted to be. I found that I enjoyed taking care of patients and being a part of a team that makes people feel better. I went back to school and became a registered nurse because I wanted to be more involved with my patients care and make a difference. Nursing is about having a positive attitude to help and accepting help from others when needed and making a difference in others lives.1346 Words3 PagesSatisfactory EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysNursing As A Career In The Mary Denton Story. 1004 Words3 PagesNursing As A Career In The Mary Denton Story. Mary Denton story has taught me so much such as the difference one person can make in someone’s live. I use a patient-centered approach to care, which encompasses the total needs of the patient; I also encourage the family to become closely involved in patient’s health care. As all these factors plays an integral role in the patient’s recovery. Florence Nightingale understood very well the psychological connection to healing and actually believed that nurses should always speak up when things were unacceptable or inadequate. Florence Nightingale has paved the way for nurses more than we will ever known.1004 Words3 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysA Career: My Choice Of Nursing As A Career. 1024 Words3 PagesA Career: My Choice Of Nursing As A Career. Committing myself to lifelong learning is my second goal. Nurses need to cultivate and internalize a passion for learning throughout their careers, which provides a foundation for excellence in practice. I would like to become a Critical Care nurse since I work as a Health Technician in the ICU at the VA Hospital –Madison. I love taking care of people at their sickest. The intensity of the care and challenges presented at the job excite and motivate me.1024 Words3 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreGood EssaysMy Career As A Nursing Career. 889 Words2 PagesMy Career As A Nursing Career. No matter where life takes us, there are always obstacles everywhere we turn. This is where motivation takes its course and leads us to the right path in reaching our true potential. Although there are many responsibilities to take care of, I am able to push myself simply because of one thing: motivation. As an aspired nurse practitioner, I plan to pursue my education through graduate school and eventually, serve my community as a healthcare professional. My interest in nursing began after I received an emergency appendectomy during my sophomore year in high school.889 Words2 PagesGood EssaysRead MoreRelated Topics. NursingMedicineBachelor's degreeBachelor of Science in NursingNeedGoalGet Access
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Title3 Components of Professional Development for Nurses | Relias
Urlhttps://www.relias.com/blog/3-components-of-professional-development-for-nurses
DescriptionOrganizations recognize the importance of professional growth for nurses. Learn more about critical components of professional development plans for nurses
DateSep 14, 2018
Organic Position28
H13 Critical Components of Nursing Professional Development Across the Care Continuum
H2The Importance of Professional Development for Nurses
How does your organization stand up to these three critical components of professional development for nurses?
Final Thoughts on Nursing Professional Development
H31) Dedicated professional development resources for nurses
2) Customized professional development for nurses throughout the career lifespan
3) Measuring the Effectiveness of a Professional Development Program
Subscribe to Relias’ Impact Blog
Recent Blog Posts
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Can You Show the Impact of Your Professional Development Program? Most Can’t
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H2WithAnchorsThe Importance of Professional Development for Nurses
How does your organization stand up to these three critical components of professional development for nurses?
Final Thoughts on Nursing Professional Development
Body3 Critical Components of Nursing Professional Development Across the Care Continuum By Felicia Sadler, MJ, BSN, RN, CPHQ, LSSBB, on September 14, 2018 The nursing workforce constitutes the largest group in healthcare today. Healthcare organizations understand the importance of retaining competent and confident nurses, who can adapt and meet the increasing demands of providing safe and effective care for complex patient populations. The nursing workforce is experiencing an influx of millennials and a larger corresponding exit of retiring baby boomers, leading to a loss in valuable expertise and staff shortages. In addition to this shift in the ranks, the average RN turnover rate is 17% in hospitals and rises to 34% in nursing homes. The Importance of Professional Development for Nurses. The importance of professional development for nurses is that high-performing organizations recognize the significance of professional development plans for new and incumbent nurses. The IOM’s Report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, highlights the importance of lifelong learning and the need for a process designed to promote areas of improvement for nurses such as patient care and population health. More and more, organizations across the continuum of care are recognizing the impact of nurse competency and satisfaction on patient care and outcomes, as well as the bottom line. Furthermore, nurses should increasingly anticipate ongoing professional development throughout their careers and consider lifelong learning to be a part of a healthy work environment. In especially trying times, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare leaders can lose sight of the important role professional development can play in terms of a support system for nurses. It becomes imperative in times of crisis for organizations to ensure their staff have the much-needed support to provide safe and effective care, especially when faced with a pandemic and managing a crisis.  Professional development can play a key role in providing opportunities to learn about managing new disease processes and complex patient populations.  In addition, organizations can further promote learning opportunities regarding self-care and avoiding burnout, especially during a crisis. Therefore, it is important for organizations to prioritize professional development across each nurse’s different career stages, from new graduates to seasoned veterans. Long-standing hiring and onboarding programs remain crucial, as well as innovative ways to adapt lifelong education to individual needs, which changes behavior and promotes continuous professional development. How does your organization stand up to these three critical components of professional development for nurses? While consulting a sample professional development plan for nurses might be a helpful starting point, most organizations will benefit from formalizing a professional development program and accurately tracking its results to adjust as necessary. Organizations should focus on three critical components of professional development for nurses including: having dedicated resources in place a customized professional development plan for nurses encompassing the career continuum an effective measurement system process in place to identify areas of improvement for nurses 1) Dedicated professional development resources for nurses. Having an organized, ongoing professional development program as a nurse is critical to centralizing, operationalizing, and organizing quality standards. As such, it is important to allocate appropriate resources for lifelong learning. This includes: dedicated personnel responsible for assessing and meeting the professional development needs of nursing staff resources to support their initiatives and goals (including mental health support, especially during high-stress times, such as the COVID-19 pandemic) Healthcare organizations across the care continuum vary in size and ability to allocate resources toward professional development.  In today’s healthcare landscape, professional development is not an option but an imperative. An individual serving as a Professional Development Practitioner can impact an organization’s strategic goals when it comes to ensuring staff are providing safe and effective care, and they are well-adjusted to the needs of the organization. An individual serving as a Professional Development Practitioner can impact an organization’s strategic goals when it comes to ensuring staff are providing safe and effective care, and they are well-adjusted to the needs of the organization. The role of professional development leaders and senior leadership. Leading a successful professional development initiative is possible with an engaged Senior Leadership team.  The role of the professional development practitioner is critical to this process.  In addition to aligning with the organization’s strategic priorities and goals, they must be able to demonstrate a business case that yields value and ROI for the allocated time and resources to further gain buy-in and support.  Professional development leaders can engage nursing leaders and front-line staff across the organizations in the journey to embrace evidence-based practice and impact clinical outcomes. 2) Customized professional development for nurses throughout the career lifespan. Nursing professional goals vary across the career lifespan. A one-size-fits-all approach limits an organization’s workforce capabilities, especially when it comes to identifying areas of improvement for nurses. Nursing professional development leaders have a challenging task to meet the basic needs of the organization by preparing new nurses to be ready for safe, independent practice, while simultaneously ensuring competency of all staff nurses.  Providing meaningful opportunities for continuing education, and developing future leaders requires developing a meaningful strategy focused on each of these opportunities. At all phases in a nursing career, first experiences do matter. If the experience or perception of the newly hired nurse is one where he/she feels ill prepared or unsupported, the risk of turnover can most certainly increase.  Whereas, an onboarding experience that goes beyond the traditional one-size-fits-all model to personalize a development plan based on assessed proven competencies, skills, and personality traits is likely to increase engagement and job satisfaction. Increasing nurse staff development and professional growth. Healthcare organizations can promote high levels of clinical workforce engagement by providing learning opportunities that reinforce new knowledge/skills and foster professional growth. Taking a collaborative approach can further augment an organization’s commitment in the continual development of their workforce. By engaging nurses in their personal and professional growth, a plan that includes the unique needs of the learner and one that is aligned to the needs of the organizations can have a positive impact on both patient outcomes and clinical workforce engagement. Many organizations offer learning opportunities to their clinical workforce. It is essential to ensure nurses are aware of these opportunities, especially newly licensed nursing professionals. Meeting the needs of continual learning. Here are a few ways organizations are meeting the continual learning needs of their clinical workforce: Tuition reimbursement to encourage BSN, MSN, or doctorate degrees Encourage participation in local and national nurse associations Providing in-house continuing education opportunities, including those that enhance interdisciplinary awareness Offering access and review of targeted evidence-based literature For mid-to-late career nurses, include them in the same opportunities as early career nurses, but also focus on leadership development and more autonomy to self-direct education based on the individual’s interest. Delivering time-sensitive clinical training, such as COVID-19 protocols and treatment Diversifying professional development plans. Job satisfaction for mid to later-career nurses will be influenced by nursing professional development plans that include: Opportunities to be recognized for their experience, contributions, and accomplishments Leadership training and management courses Autonomy to choose their own continuing education opportunities accompanied with a hassle-free approval process Retirement planning 3) Measuring the Effectiveness of a Professional Development Program. As healthcare continues to transition to a pay-for-performance system, the inclusion of evidence-based practice is a key component to an organization’s success.  The professional development program’s areas of improvement for nurses should be aligned with the strategic goals of an organization. Furthermore, a structured program should have the ability to measure and track key performance metrics.  A few metrics might include: nurse satisfaction retention engagement newly-acquired knowledge/skills patient/resident satisfaction clinical outcomes Nursing leaders can explore even more progressive and innovative ways to measure the effectiveness of nursing staff professional development initiatives. Depending on the practice setting, there are also advanced analytic and education tools available to measure learning that includes comparative analytics. Certainly, a robust system can be used to improve specific clinical outcomes that meet the needs for both quality care and the organization’s key performance metrics for their clinical workforce. Final Thoughts on Nursing Professional Development. Nursing professional development plays a critical role to ensure quality care, career satisfaction, and a solid pipeline for tomorrow’s leaders. By committing to the practice of these three critical components, your organization will lead the charge to create an engaged, proficient, and motivated nursing workforce ready to take on the challenges of an ever-changing healthcare landscape. Organizations will undoubtedly benefit from having a solid nursing professional development program in place—and by first identifying areas of improvements for nurses, leaders can develop the most appropriate professional nursing goals for the organization. Understanding that nursing professional development programs can’t afford to fall by the wayside, even in times of budget constraints or unprecedented events (COVID-19) is also key for healthcare leaders. If anything, the existence of professional development programs is needed now more than ever to help support the nursing community in an especially difficult environment.  Ideally, the following examples of professional goals for nurses will support the overarching aims of most hospitals and health systems. In alignment with your organization’s goals, here are five examples of professional goals for nurses: Pursue advanced certifications (relative to clinical practice area) Remain focused on career path Seek advancement opportunities Prioritize continuing education and advanced learning opportunities Lead a quality improvement or patient safety initiative Share: Back To Blog Next Post Subscribe to Relias’ Impact Blog. Get the latest articles straight to your inbox and better navigate the ever-changing healthcare landscape. Recent Blog Posts. The Importance of Nurse Certifications. Nursing certification empowers nurses and the institutions they work for to provide higher quality care and improve patient satisfaction. Learn More Can You Show the Impact of Your Professional Development Program? Most Can’t. To ensure the success of professional development programs, leaders need to be able to demonstrate the ROI and value of their programs to key stakeholders. Learn More Connect with Us. to find out more about our training and resources Get Started
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TitleWhat is Nursing? | American Nurses Association | ANA
Urlhttps://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/workforce/what-is-nursing/
DescriptionWhat is Nursing? What do Nurses do? Let ANA show you the many types of Nurses, their wide range of responsibilities, and how important they are to your health
Date
Organic Position29
H1What is Nursing?
H2ANF "Nurses as Leaders"
H3What exactly do nurses do?
What types of nurses are there?
Registered Nurses
Advanced Practice Registered Nurses
APRNs Practice Specialist Roles
Licensed Practical Nurses
What is the nursing process?
Nurses are Key to the Health of the Nation
Career Center
Honor a Nurse
Join ANA
Advocacy
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H2WithAnchorsANF "Nurses as Leaders"
BodyWhat is Nursing? 21st Century nursing is the glue that holds a patient’s health care journey together. Across the entire patient experience, and wherever there is someone in need of care, nurses work tirelessly to identify and protect the needs of the individual.   Beyond the time-honored reputation for compassion and dedication lies a highly specialized profession, which is constantly evolving to address the needs of society. From ensuring the most accurate diagnoses to the ongoing education of the public about critical health issues; nurses are indispensable in safeguarding public health. Nursing can be described as both an art and a science; a heart and a mind. At its heart, lies a fundamental respect for human dignity and an intuition for a patient’s needs. This is supported by the mind, in the form of rigorous core learning. Due to the vast range of specialisms and complex skills in the nursing profession, each nurse will have specific strengths, passions, and expertise. However, nursing has a unifying ethos:  In assessing a patient, nurses do not just consider test results. Through the critical thinking exemplified in the nursing process (see below), nurses use their judgment to integrate objective data with subjective experience of a patient’s biological, physical and behavioral needs. This ensures that every patient, from city hospital to community health center; state prison to summer camp, receives the best possible care regardless of who they are, or where they may be. What exactly do nurses do? In a field as varied as nursing, there is no typical answer. Responsibilities can range from making acute treatment decisions to providing inoculations in schools. The key unifying characteristic in every role is the skill and drive that it takes to be a nurse. Through long-term monitoring of patients’ behavior and knowledge-based expertise, nurses are best placed to take an all-encompassing view of a patient’s wellbeing. What types of nurses are there? All nurses complete a rigorous program of extensive education and study, and work directly with patients, families, and communities using the core values of the nursing process. In the United States today, nursing roles can be divided into three categories by the specific responsibilities they undertake. Registered Nurses. Registered nurses (RN) form the backbone of health care provision in the United States. RNs provide critical health care to the public wherever it is needed. Key Responsibilities. Perform physical exams and health histories before making critical decisions Provide health promotion, counseling and education Administer medications and other personalized interventions Coordinate care, in collaboration with a wide array of health care professionals Advanced Practice Registered Nurses. Advance Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) hold at least a Master’s degree, in addition to the initial nursing education and licensing required for all RNs. The responsibilities of an APRN include, but are not limited to, providing invaluable primary and preventative health care to the public. APRNs treat and diagnose illnesses, advise the public on health issues, manage chronic disease and engage in continuous education to remain at the very forefront of any technological, methodological, or other developments in the field. APRNs Practice Specialist Roles. Nurse Practitioners prescribe medication, diagnose and treat minor illnesses and injuries Certified Nurse-Midwives provide gynecological and low-risk obstetrical care Clinical Nurse Specialists handle a wide range of physical and mental health problems Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists administer more than 65 percent of all anesthetics Licensed Practical Nurses. Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN), also known as Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs), support the core health care team and work under the supervision of an RN, APRN or MD. By providing basic and routine care, they ensure the wellbeing of patients throughout the whole of the health care journey Key Responsibilities. Check vital signs and look for signs that health is deteriorating or improving Perform basic nursing functions such as changing bandages and wound dressings Ensure patients are comfortable, well-fed and hydrated May administer medications in some settings What is the nursing process? No matter what their field or specialty, all nurses utilize the same nursing process; a scientific method designed to deliver the very best in patient care, through five simple steps. Assessment – Nurses assess patients on an in-depth physiological, economic, social and lifestyle basis. Diagnosis – Through careful consideration of both physical symptoms and patient behavior, the nurse forms a diagnosis. Outcomes / Planning – The nurse uses their expertise to set realistic goals for the patient’s recovery. These objectives are then closely monitored. Implementation – By accurately implementing the care plan, nurses guarantee consistency of care for the patient whilst meticulously documenting their progress. Evaluation – By closely analyzing the effectiveness of the care plan and studying patient response, the nurse hones the plan to achieve the very best patient outcomes.  Nurses are Key to the Health of the Nation. There are over 4 million registered nurses in the United States today. That means that one in every 100 people is a registered nurse. Nurses are in every community – large and small – providing expert care from birth to the end of life. According to the January 2012 “United States Registered Nurse Workforce Report Card and Shortage Forecast” in the American Journal of Medical Quality, a shortage of registered nurses is projected to spread across the country between 2009 and 2030. In this state-by-state analysis, the authors forecast the RN shortage to be most intense in the South and the West Nurses' roles range from direct patient care and case management to establishing nursing practice standards, developing quality assurance procedures, and directing complex nursing care systems. ANF "Nurses as Leaders". 2012 ANA HOD video The nursing profession was founded to protect, promote, and improve health for all ages. ANA has been helping American nurses improve our nation's health since 1896. Learn more Career Center . Honor a Nurse . Join ANA . Advocacy . You are now leaving the American Nurses Foundation. The American Nurses Foundation is a separate charitable organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The Foundation does not engage in political campaign activities or communications. The Foundation expressly disclaims any political views or communications published on or accessible from this website. Continue Cancel Item(s) added to cart. 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  • united
  • 4
  • 30
  • practice
  • 4
  • 30
  • american
  • 4
  • 30
  • foundation
  • 4
  • 30
  • registered nurse
  • 3
  • 30
  • american nurs
  • 3
  • 30
  • administer
  • 3
  • 30
  • medication
  • 3
  • 30
  • licensed
  • 3
  • 30
  • plan
  • 3
  • 30
  • shortage
  • 3
  • 30
  • ana
  • 3
  • 30