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Keyword What is micromanagement?
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Result 1
TitleWhat Is Micromanagement And How To Deal With It?
Urlhttps://www.slingshotapp.io/blog/what-is-micromanagement
DescriptionLearn what micromanage is, why people micromanage, what are the signs of micromanagement, how to deal with micromanaging boss and how to stop yourself managing others
DateJun 11, 2021
Organic Position1
H1What is Micromanagement and How to Deal with it?
H2What Is Micromanaging?
Why Do People Micromanage?
Signs of Micromanagement
How to Deal with a Micromanaging Boss
Be a Leader, Not a Micromanager
How to Replace Micromanagement with OKR
H31. Micromanagers avoid delegation
2. Micromanagers become overly involved in the work of their employees
3. Micromanagers ask for frequent updates and status reports
4. Micromanagers want to be cc’d in every email
5. Micromanagers complain constantly and are never satisfied
6. Micromanagers leave no room for creativity and initiatives & discourage independent decision-making
7. Micromanagers don’t pass on their skills and knowledge
1. Understand the reasons behind a micromanager’s behavior
2. Build trust
3. Share your feelings and start a discussion
4. Set healthy boundaries and realistic expectations
5. Keep up the communication and two-way feedback going
1. Let go of perfectionism
2. Practice delegation
3. Embrace failure
4. Focus on your role and reponsibilities
5. Seek feedback and talk to your team
Contact Sales
Thank you!
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Micromanaging?
Why Do People Micromanage?
Signs of Micromanagement
How to Deal with a Micromanaging Boss
Be a Leader, Not a Micromanager
How to Replace Micromanagement with OKR
BodyWhat is Micromanagement and How to Deal with it? Author Bilyana Petrova Jun 11, 2021 13 min read Nothing is more demotivating than having a micromanaging boss to control every step of your daily workflow. A survey on micromanagement conducted by Trinity Solutions and published in author Harry Chambers’ book My Way or the Highway showed that 79% of respondents had experienced micromanagement. Approximately 69% said they considered changing jobs because of micromanagement and another 36% actually changed jobs. 71% said being micromanaged interfered with their job performance while 85% said their morale was negatively impacted.  Are you part of those statistics? Have you ever been or are you currently being micromanaged? Do you consider that it is possible of being a micromanaging boss yourself? If the answer is yes, then you’ve come to the right place.   In this article, we’ll be discussing micromanagement – what micromanage is, why do people micromanage, what are the signs of micromanagement, how to deal with micromanaging boss and how to stop yourself managing others.   Table of contents: What is micromanaging? Why do people micromanage?Signs of micromanagementHow to deal with a micromanaging bossBe a leader, not a micromanager How to replace micromanagement with OKR What Is Micromanaging? Micromanaging or micromanagement is a negative term that refers to management style. It is very well defined by Gartner: Micromanagement is a pattern of manager behavior marked by excessive supervision and control of employees’ work and processes, as well as limited delegation of tasks or decisions to staff.  Micromanagers generally avoid giving decision-making power to their employees and are typically overly obsessed with information-gathering.   Why Do People Micromanage? There is no straight answer to that question. People micromanage for a variety of reasons. These reasons can include different feelings and emotions such as fear of failure, extreme need for control and domination, inexperience in management, insecurities, unskilled team members, unhealthy ego, etc. Some micromanagers might be driven to act so obsessively due to problems that they have at home and in their personal life.   The most obvious and common reason for people to manage is, however, the lack of trust and respect in the people they work with.   Signs of Micromanagement. If you’re wondering whether you’re being micromanaged or if you’re a micromanager yourself, here is a list of the most common characteristics that prove that:   1. Micromanagers avoid delegation. Since micromanagers don’t believe that anyone can do a decent job, they avoid delegating tasks and doing everything themselves. Of course, that doesn’t work well for anybody, and micromanagers are not superheroes so obviously they need to get back down to Earth and realize that tasks should be delegated to the people that have the specialized skills needed and are qualified to produce the desired results.   2. Micromanagers become overly involved in the work of their employees . Standing over someone’s shoulder watching their every move and checking in on things constantly is not effective – and let’s face it, it’s annoying. Many people freeze or feel a lot of discomfort when they are being constantly watched which results in stress and even errors.   3. Micromanagers ask for frequent updates and status reports. Weekly check-ins and status reports on a reasonable cadence are standard. But, when updates are being asked on a daily basis, you can be sure that either you’re being micromanaged or that you’re being a micromanaging boss yourself. This obsession with constant updates results in wasted time that people spend creating detailed reports than focusing on what were they actually employed to do.   4. Micromanagers want to be cc’d in every email. ‘’And don’t forget to cc’d me in the email’’ – does that sound familiar? If yes, then this is a clear sign that whether you’re being micromanaged or that you are a micromanager yourself. This need to have visibility of every stand of communication at all times usually indicates that the manager is afraid of being left out of the loop, or that he’s thinking that others might be discussing details and making decisions behind his back.   5. Micromanagers complain constantly and are never satisfied . Micromanagers complain about everything even when there’s nothing to complain about. But the thing is that when you’re always looking for mistakes and flaws in others, that’s all that you’ll find. Often these complaints could be about the smallest things that don’t even relate to the execution of tasks. Usually, the micromanagers would think that they only encourage perfection, but what they actually do is drain the motivation out of their employees.   6. Micromanagers leave no room for creativity and initiatives & discourage independent decision-making. Because they don’t trust others to do their job, micromanagers tell employees what to do without leaving room for creativity and initiatives. Especially if your job is in the creative area, being constantly told how exactly a task should be done can be very frustrating and discouraging.  Giving freedom of independent decision making is also unthinkable for micromanagers. While it’s likely that your work must go through some form of approval process, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take some decisions on your own in the process of your work. It is actually the quite opposite – you were hired because you are the most qualified person for that job and because the decisions that you can take based on your expertise could drive business growth.   Steve Jobs says: ‘’It doesn’t make sense to hire smart people and tell them what to do; we hire smart people so they can tell us what to do.’’  7. Micromanagers don’t pass on their skills and knowledge. Managers can act as role models for employees that are just starting out their journey. But if that manager has zero interest in teaching juniors that can be not only disappointing, but also very discouraging and daunting. Typically, after such a horrible experience in which juniors get to learn nothing, but in the meantime receive tons of complaints, that can make them give up or worst turn them into a micromanager in the feature.  How to Deal with a Micromanaging Boss. No one wants to be micromanaged, going to work with despair, stress all day long, and being shouted at. The first step in dealing with micromanaging is understanding the reason behind a micromanager’s behavior. Here’s what else to do:   1. Understand the reasons behind a micromanager’s behavior . As we already mentioned, people micromanage for a number of reasons. To know how to proceed further and deal with your micromanaging boss, you first need to understand what triggers his behavior.   Maybe your manager is under a lot of stress too, maybe he’s had trust issues with previous employees or maybe it’s just his personality. To continue to the next step, you need to find out, so you can build trust and even help him overcome whatever it is that makes him act like that towards you and your team mates.   2. Build trust . Trust is key to any healthy relationship whether that is love, friend, or work relationship, without trust it’s just a waste of time. If you want your boss to stop micromanaging you, you need to win his trust and show him that he can calmly delegate your tasks and give you the freedom of decision-making. Yes, we know that this is easier said than done, but that’s usually the case with trust – it’s hard to build, easy to lose.   You can try to demonstrate to your boss that he can trust you by delivering outstanding work (make sure to double or even triple check everything before you submit) and regularly communicate your progress (don’t wait for him to ask, take responsibility). Sometimes building a personal relationship can also contribute to building and improving trust in the workspace.   3. Share your feelings and start a discussion. That idea might be frightening at first, but one of the most direct approaches to dealing with a micromanaging boss is to simply share your feelings and start a discussion about the situation. Explain how his micromanaging behavior is negatively affecting your performance and overall workflow in an honest, polite, and calm manner. Don’t let anger take over you and don’t try to be defensive as this will not help you to improve the situation.   4. Set healthy boundaries and realistic expectations. As part of the conversation above, it will be great to discuss and set healthy boundaries and realistic expectations. Establish clarity on the roles and responsibilities and expectations of you and your manager so there is no misunderstanding in the work process. Make sure to set boundaries too and let your boss know when he’s crossing them. That might also be frightening at first, but once all those things are communicated and lessons are learned, magical things in the workspace could happen.   5. Keep up the communication and two-way feedback going. Okay, so you’ve understood the reasons behind your manager’s behavior, you shared your feelings, discussed the situation and worked towards building trust – great! But this is not the end. This is an ongoing process; you cannot change things overnight. You should constantly keep up the communication and two-way feedback going, so things don’t return to the way they were. Continue being proactive and talk to your manager to make sure that they’re happy with your output.   Be a Leader, Not a Micromanager. If you started reading this article because you’ve considered the possibility that you might be a micromanaging boss yourself, then by now you should already know the answer. If you’ve concluded that you are a micromanaging boss, don’t lose heart; micromanagement might be a hard habit to break, but with the right guidance, you can do it.   Follow our tips, work hard and the desired results will not be late.   1. Let go of perfectionism . It’s time to face the truth: perfection doesn’t exist. When you realize that, it will be far easier for you to stop micromanaging your team. There are various different methods to do a certain task or a project, so instead of telling your team how to do everything that you consider perfect, empower them to test new approaches and experiment with new ideas – you never know how they can surprise you.   2. Practice delegation. As a manager, you should know the strengths of your team members so you can delegate tasks accordingly. If you are not able to delegate tasks effectively, then this is another reason for you to avoid doing it and micromanage everything that your team does.   In the beginning, you might make mistakes, but remember that practice is the hard part of learning, but also the essence of knowledge.   3. Embrace failure. As hard as it might seem, the world won’t stop spinning if things don’t turn out as planned. Failure is success in progress and could be the best teacher. Don’t be afraid of it, welcome it and instead of blaming and yelling at your team for it, teach them to embrace failure too.   4. Focus on your role and reponsibilities. Your job as a manager comes with its responsibilities. Rather than micromanaging every step of your employee’s workflow because you think that the only one that can complete a specific task successfully is you, give them a chance to prove their skills and focus on the activities that as a manager only you can do. Your job is to set clear objectives and benchmarks and measure performance, and that is what you should do.   5. Seek feedback and talk to your team. If you want to have a strong relationship with your team, don’t be afraid to bring up the topic of your management style. Ask each individual on your team about feedback and ask them how they would like to be managed – maybe some will prefer your current micromanaging style, while others would want more freedom. Understand want your team wants and adjust to these needs.   How to Replace Micromanagement with OKR. Don’t get this article wrong – micromanagers usually have good intentions towards their employees and the work in general. The problem is that their behavior can impact team performance, productivity, and even damage people’s health. That is why things in a micromanagement environment must change.   Objectives and key results (OKR) is a management technique used to set challenging, ambitious goals with measurable results. And although you can do that on a piece of paper, this is usually done with dedicated OKR software.   OKR software gives managers and team members visibility into the entire work process, connecting everyday tasks to the project’s most important objectives. This way, managers can spend less time managing and more time leading.  Slingshot is a productivity tool designed to help teams and organizations produce extraordinary results by improving the workflow efficiency with a rich and robust set of integrated features, aligning teams around opportunities to encourage them to reach their full potential and enable smart, data-driven decision making with advanced analytics.   Here are a few ways in which Slingshot deals with micromanagement:   Drives team and individual accountability by creating a transparent work environment where everything is visible to everyone (that includes the status of who is doing what, key deliverable dates and team goals and metrics).  Provides a single place for collaboration where everyone is on the same page with the same views, tasks, and content.  Motivate managers to spend less time holding team status meetings and spend more time as a mentor and proactively thinking about the business.  If you want to learn more and see how it works, you can try it today for free and see how Slingshot can help your teams deliver extraordinary results that drive business growth.     Categories: Team Productivity, How To, Project Management Your Privacy Matters: We use our own and third-party cookies to improve your experience on our website. By continuing to use the website, we understand that you accept their use. Cookie Policy. Close Privacy Policy Cookies Terms of Use License Agreement Contact Sales. Slingshot is currently in a public preview. If you want to find out more about pricing, our roadmap and launch timing fill out the form below! Thank you! Thank you for reaching out! A Slingshot representative will be in touch with you shortly! © Copyright 2022 INFRAGISTICS. All Rights Reserved. Slingshot and the Slingshot logo are registered trademarks of Infragistics Inc. Back to Top
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Result 3
TitleMicromanager Definition
Urlhttps://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/micro-manager.asp
DescriptionA micromanager is a boss or manager who gives excessive supervision to employees
Date
Organic Position3
H1Micromanager
H2What Is a Micromanager?
Understanding Micromanagers
Signs of Micromanagement
Ways to Reform a Micromanager
H3Key Takeaways
Related Terms
Related Articles
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H2WithAnchorsWhat Is a Micromanager?
Understanding Micromanagers
Signs of Micromanagement
Ways to Reform a Micromanager
BodyMicromanager By Julia Kagan Full Bio Julia Kagan has written about personal finance for more than 25 years and for Investopedia since 2014. The former editor of Consumer Reports, she is an expert in credit and debt, retirement planning, home ownership, employment issues, and insurance. She is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College (A.B., history) and has an MFA in creative nonfiction from Bennington College. Learn about our editorial policies Updated July 11, 2021 Fact checked by Yarilet Perez Fact checked by Yarilet Perez Full Bio Yarilet Perez is an experienced multimedia journalist and fact-checker with a Master of Science in Journalism. She has worked in multiple cities covering breaking news, politics, education, and more. Her expertise is in personal finance and investing, and real estate. Learn about our editorial policies Business Leaders Entrepreneurs Rich & Powerful CEOs Warren Buffett Math & Statistics What Is a Micromanager? . A micromanager is a boss or manager who gives excessive supervision to employees. A micromanager, rather than telling an employee what task needs to be accomplished and by when—will watch the employee's actions closely and provide frequent criticism of the employee’s work and processes. Key Takeaways. A micromanager adopts a corporate management style that focuses on the day-to-day performance of individual teams and workers.While micromanagement may produce some immediate response, it tends to lower company morale and creates a hostile workplace.Once identified, a micromanager can take steps to improve their leadership style and adopt a more macro approach. Understanding Micromanagers . Micromanagement is a form of leadership that may produce results in the short-term, but it hurts employee and company morale over time. Usually, micromanaging has a negative connotation because an employee may feel that a micromanager is being condescending towards them, due to a perceived lack of faith in the employee's competency. Also, a manager who implements this management style creates an environment where their team develops insecurity and a lack of confidence in its work. In the absence of the manager, the team may find it difficult to function. A micromanager will usually use up most of their time supervising the work of their direct reports and exaggerating the importance of minor details to subordinates; time that could have been used to get other important things done. Although micromanagement is easily recognized by others in the firm, the micromanager may not view themselves as such. In contrast to a micromanager, a macro manager is more effective in their management approach. Macro-managing defines broad tasks for direct reports to accomplish and then leaves them alone to do their work. Macro managers have confidence that the team can complete the same task without being continually reminded of the process. Signs of Micromanagement . Signs of micromanagers include but are not limited to: Asking to be CC’d on every emailOccupying themselves with the work assigned to others, thereby, taking on more work than they can handle because they believe they can do it betterLooking over the team’s shoulders (both literally and figuratively) to monitor what each member is working onConstantly asking for updates on where things standWanting to know what each team member is working on all the timeDelegating not only what needs to be done, but how it should be done, leaving no room for the team to take their own initiativeNever being satisfied with the deliverablesFocusing on details that are not important From the list provided above, it is easy to understand that a micromanager struggles with meeting deadlines since work has to be redone repeatedly, and valuable time is spent poring over inconsequential details. Team members eventually become frustrated and resentful as their work is undermined at every stage, and they have no autonomy over how to run an assigned project. Because team members' skills and development on the job are stunted, the micromanaging style of leadership is ineffective. Ways to Reform a Micromanager . A micromanager who has identified themselves as such can take a number of steps to break this habit: Set a couple of metrics that define success for any given project. Ignore every other detail that is not defined.Delegate “what” needs to be done and leave out the “how.”Have an open-door policy for members of the team to use for coaching or further guidance if and when they want it.Set a deadline for each stage of an assigned project, after which a meeting with a reasonable time limit should be conducted to receive updates on the work. Take the Next Step to Invest Advertiser Disclosure × The offers that appear in this table are from partnerships from which Investopedia receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where listings appear. Investopedia does not include all offers available in the marketplace. Service Name Description Related Terms. What Is a Macro Manager? A macro manager is a boss or supervisor who lets employees do their jobs with minimal supervision. more Least-Preferred Coworker Scale The least-preferred coworker scale, developed by Fred Fiedler, identifies whether a leadership style is relationship-oriented or task-oriented. more How a Holacracy Works A holacracy is a system of governance where members of a team or business form autonomous yet symbiotic teams to accomplish tasks and company goals. more Branch Managers: A Demanding and Highly Visible Job A branch manager is an executive who is in charge of the branch office of a bank or financial institution. more Scope Scope is a project management term for the objectives necessary to complete a project, allowing managers to estimate costs and time required. more Soft Skills Soft skills are character traits and interpersonal skills that characterize relationships with other people and complement hard skills in the workplace. more Partner Links Related Articles. 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Result 4
TitleMicromanagement - Wikipedia
Urlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micromanagement
Description
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H1Micromanagement
H2Contents
Definition[edit]
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BodyMicromanagement From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the management style in business. For micromanagement in video gaming, see Micromanagement (gameplay). In business management, micromanagement is a management style whereby a manager closely observes and/or controls and/or reminds the work of their subordinates or employees. Micromanagement is generally considered to have a negative connotation, mainly because it shows a lack of freedom in the workplace.[1][2] Contents. 1 Definition 2 Symptoms 3 Compared with mismanagement 4 Causes 5 Effects 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links Definition[edit]. Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary defines[3] micromanagement as "manage[ment] especially with excessive control or attention on details". Dictionary.com defines micromanagement as "manage[ment] or control with excessive attention to minor details".[4] The online dictionary Encarta defined micromanagement as "atten[tion] to small details in management: control [of] a person or a situation by paying extreme attention to small details".[5] The notion of micromanagement can extend to any social context where one person takes a bully approach in the level of control and influence over the members of a group. Often, this excessive obsession with the most minute of details causes a direct management failure in the ability to focus on the major details.[1] Symptoms[edit]. Rather than giving general instructions on smaller tasks and then devoting time to supervising larger concerns, the micromanager monitors and assesses every step of a business process and avoids delegation of decisions.[6] Micromanagers are usually irritated when a subordinate makes decisions without consulting them, even if the decisions are within the subordinate's level of authority. Micromanagement also frequently involves requests for unnecessary and overly detailed reports ("reportomania"). A micromanager tends to require constant and detailed performance feedback and to focus excessively on procedural trivia (often in detail greater than they can actually process) rather than on overall performance, quality and results. This focus on "low-level" trivia often delays decisions, clouds overall goals and objectives, restricts the flow of information between employees, and guides the various aspects of a project in different and often opposed directions. Many micromanagers accept such inefficiencies as less important than their retention of control or of the appearance of control. It is common for micromanagers, especially those who exhibit narcissistic tendencies and/or micromanage deliberately and for strategic reasons, to delegate work to subordinates and then micromanage those subordinates' performance, enabling the micromanagers in question to both take credit for positive results and shift the blame for negative results to their subordinates.[7] These micromanagers thereby delegate accountability for failure but not the authority to take alternative actions that would have led to success or at least to the mitigation of that failure. The most extreme cases of micromanagement constitute a management pathology closely related to workplace bullying and narcissistic behavior. Micromanagement resembles addiction in that although most micromanagers are behaviorally dependent on control over others, both as a lifestyle and as a means of maintaining that lifestyle, many of them fail to recognize and acknowledge their dependence even when everyone around them observes it.[1] Some severe cases of micromanagement arise from other underlying mental health conditions such as obsessive–compulsive personality disorder. (Renee Kowalski) Although micromanagement is often easily recognized by employees, micromanagers rarely view themselves as such. In a form of denial similar to that found in addictive behavior, micromanagers will often rebut allegations of micromanagement by offering a competing characterization of their management style such as "structured", "organized", or "perfectionistic". Compared with mismanagement[edit]. Micromanagement can be distinguished from the mere tendency of a manager to perform duties assigned to a subordinate. When a manager can perform a worker's job more efficiently than the worker can, the result is merely suboptimal management: although the company suffers lost opportunities because such managers would serve the company even better by doing their own job (see comparative advantage). In micromanagement, the manager not only tells a subordinate what to do but dictates that the job be done a certain way regardless of whether that way is the most effective or efficient one or if such instruction is necessary. Causes[edit]. The most frequent motivations for micromanagement, such as detail-orientedness, emotional insecurity, and doubts regarding employees' competence, are internal and related to the personality of the manager. Since manager-employee relationships include a difference in power and often in age, workplace psychologists have used models based on transference theory to draw analogies between micromanagement relationships and dysfunctional parent-child relationships, e.g., that both often feature the frequent imposition of double binds and/or a tendency by the authority figure to exhibit hypercriticality.[1] However, external factors such as organizational culture, severe or increased time or performance pressure, severe demands of the regulatory environment, and instability of managerial position (either specific to a micromanager's position or throughout an organization) may also play a role. In many cases of micromanagement, managers select and implement processes and procedures not for business reasons but rather to enable themselves to feel useful and valuable and/or create the appearance of being so. A frequent cause of such micromanagement patterns is a manager's perception or fear that they lack the competence and creative capability necessary for their position in the larger corporate structure. In reaction to this fear, the manager creates a "fiefdom" within which the manager selects performance standards not on the basis of their relevance to the corporation's interest but rather on the basis of the ability of the manager's division to satisfy them. Such motivations for micromanagement often intensify, at both the individual-manager and the organization-wide level, during times of economic hardship. In some cases, managers may have proper goals in mind but place disproportionate emphasis on the role of their division and/or on their own personal role in the furtherance of those goals. In others, managers throughout an organization may engage in behavior that, while protective of their division's interests or their personal interests, harms the organization as a whole. Micromanagement can also stem from a breakdown in the fundamentals of delegation. When a task or project is delegated in an unclear way, or where there is a lack of trust between the manager and the person doing the work, micromanagement naturally ensues. Clearer delegation, with a well defined goal, clear vision of the constraints and dependencies, and effective oversight, can help prevent micromanagement.[8] Less frequently, micromanagement is a tactic consciously chosen for the purpose of eliminating unwanted employees: A micromanager may set unreachable standards later invoked as grounds for termination of those employees. These standards may be either specific to certain employees or generally applicable but selectively enforced only against particular employees. Alternatively, the micromanager may attempt by this or other means to create a stressful workplace in which the undesired employees no longer desire to participate. When such stress is severe or pervasive enough, its creation may be regarded as constructive discharge (also known in the United Kingdom as "constructive dismissal" and in the United States as "constructive termination"). Effects[edit]. Regardless of a micromanager's motive for their conduct, its potential effects include: Creation of ex post resentment in both vertical (manager-subordinate) and horizontal (subordinate-subordinate) relationships Damage to ex ante trust in both vertical and horizontal relationships Interference with existing teamwork and inhibition of future teamwork in both vertical relationships (e.g., via malicious compliance) and horizontal relationships (e.g., exploitation of moral hazard created by poorly proportioned effort-reward structures). Because a pattern of micromanagement suggests to employees that a manager does not trust their work or judgment, it is a major factor in triggering employee disengagement, often to the point of promoting a dysfunctional and hostile work environment in which one or more managers, or even management generally, are labeled "control freaks."[9] Disengaged employees invest time, but not effort or creativity, in the work in which they are assigned. The effects of this phenomenon are worse in situations where work is passed from one specialized employee to another. In such a situation, apathy among upstream employees affects not only their own productivity but also that of their downstream colleagues. Severe forms of micromanagement can eliminate trust, stifle opportunities for learning and development of interpersonal skills, and even provoke anti-social behavior. Micromanagers of this severity often rely on inducing fear in the employees to achieve more control and can severely affect self-esteem of employees as well as their mental and physical health. Occasionally, and especially when their micromanagement involves the suppression of constructive criticism that could otherwise lead to internal reform, severe micromanagers affect subordinates' mental and/or physical health to such an extreme that the subordinates' only way to change their workplace environment is to change employers or even leave the workplace despite lacking alternative job prospects (see constructive discharge, supra). Finally, the detrimental effects of micromanagement can extend beyond the company itself, especially when the behavior becomes severe enough to force out skilled employees valuable to competitors. Current employees may complain about micromanagement in social settings or to friend-colleagues (e.g., classmates and/or former co-workers) affiliated with other firms in a field. Outside observers such as consultants, clients, interviewees, or visitors may notice the behavior and recount it in conversation with friends and/or colleagues. Most harmfully to the company, forced-out employees, especially those whose advanced skills have made them attractive to other companies and gained them immediate respect, may have few reservations about speaking frankly when answering questions about why they changed employers; they may even deliberately badmouth their former employer. The resulting damage to the company's reputation may create or increase insecurity among management, prompting further micromanagement among managers who use it to cope with insecurity; such a feedback effect creates and perpetuates a vicious cycle. It may follow the forced-out employee to the new job and create an environment of new micromanagement. See also[edit]. Abusive power and control Blame in organizations Control freak Machiavellianism in the workplace My way or the highway Narcissism in the workplace Narcissistic leadership Overparenting Psychopathy in the workplace Seagull manager Setting up to fail Toxic leader Toxic workplace References[edit]. ^ a b c d Chambers, Harry (2004). My Way or the Highway. Berrett Koehler Publishers, San Francisco. Retrieved on 20 June 2008. ^ "Micromanagement", Small Business Resource Centre (2006), archived from the original on 24 July 2008 ^ "Micromanage", via Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary. ^ Dictionary.com (2008). Definition of micromanage. Retrieved on 21 June 2008. ^ Encarta Dictionary (2008). Definition of micromanage. Retrieved on 21 June 2008. Archived 2009-11-01. ^ McConnell, Charles (2006). Micromanagement is Mismanagement. National Federation of Independent Business. Retrieved on 20 June 2008. ^ Thomas, David. Narcissism: Behind the Mask (2010) ^ Canner, Niko; Bernstein, Ethan (17 August 2016). "Why is Micromanagement So Infectious?". Harvard Business Review. Retrieved 23 August 2016. ^ Bielaszka-DuVernay, Christina (2008). Micromanage at Your Peril Archived 7 July 2012 at archive.today. Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation. Retrieved on 23 June 2008. Further reading[edit]. Harry Chambers: "My Way or the Highway: The Micromanagement Survival Guide", Berrett-Koehler Publishers (2004), ISBN 978-1-57675-296-8 Niko Canner and Ethan Bernstein: "Why is Micromanagement So Infectious?", Harvard Business Review, 17 August External links[edit]. Softpanorama micromanagement page Organizational Realities - Micromanagement: What It Is and How to Deal with It The Real Cost of Micromanagement vteNarcissismSimilar personality concepts Egomania Egotism God complex Healthy narcissism Hubris Machiavellianism Messiah complex Narcissus (mythology) Superiority complex In society Collective narcissism Don Juanism In the workplace Leadership Me generation Parents Pathological narcissism Narcissistic personality disorder history Dark triad Dorian Gray syndrome Malignant narcissism Narcissistic... injury neurosis elation mortification supply withdrawal Narcissistic Personality Inventory Related psychology concepts Compensation Empathy Entitlement Grandiosity Category vteAspects of workplacesTopics Absenteeism Abusive supervision Aggression Anti-pattern Bullying Computer surveillance Conflict Control freak Counterproductive behaviour Coworking Culture of fear Democracy Deviance Discrimination Diversity Divide and rule Drug tests Emotions Employee assistance Employee engagement Employee experience Employee monitoring Employee morale Employee recognition Employee silence Employee surveys Empowerment Evaluation Feminisation Fit in or fuck off Generations Gossip Happiness Harassment Health surveillance Hostile work environment Humor Incivility Inequality Intervention Jargon Kick the cat Kiss up kick down Listening Machiavellianism Menopause Micromanagement Mobbing Narcissism Office politics Performance appraisal Personality clash Phobia Positive psychology Privacy Probation Profanity Psychopathy Queen bee syndrome Rat race Relationships Revenge Robotics safety Role conflict Sabotage Spirituality Strategy Stress Toxic workplace Toxic leader Training Turnover Undermining Violence Virtual Wellness Work–family conflict Workload Workwear See also Corporation Employment Factory Job Office Organization Whistleblower Templates Aspects of corporations Aspects of jobs Aspects of occupations Aspects of organizations Employment Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Micromanagement&oldid=1059819149" Categories: ManagementNarcissismPejorative termsWorkplaceWorkplace bullyingWaste of resourcesHidden categories: Webarchive template archiveis linksUse dmy dates from December 2020 Navigation menu. 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TitleWhat Is a Micromanager? Definition and Signs | Indeed.com
Urlhttps://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/micromanager
DescriptionLearn 25 different signs that you—or someone you know—is a micromanager. Discover the advantages and disadvantages that accompany this style of leadership
DateSep 7, 2021
Organic Position5
H1What Is a Micromanager? Definition and Signs
H2What is a micromanager?
25 signs of a micromanager
Advantages
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Related Articles
H3Highly-involved and highly-engaged
Influence business-critical tasks
Get the best out of their team
Add value to any department
Know to whom they should delegate
Develop empathy naturally
Waste time
Reduce job satisfaction
Lower creativity and efficiency
Reduce employee motivation
How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps)
12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work
What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a micromanager?
25 signs of a micromanager
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BodyWhat Is a Micromanager? Definition and SignsBy Indeed Editorial TeamSeptember 7, 2021TwitterLinkedInFacebookEmailCopy to ClipboardWhile micromanagers usually have the best of intentions, their behavior can impact team morale and performance. It can also slow down productivity because a manager doesn't fully trust their team to perform their jobs. Recognizing whether you are micromanaging your team requires an honest and thoughtful self-assessment of your own behavior. In this article, we discuss 25 signs that someone may be a micromanager and share the benefits and disadvantages of micromanaging a team.Related: Management Skills: Definition and ExamplesWhat is a micromanager?A micromanager is a manager who closely observes the work of their team members. They often have good intentions and micromanage to improve the performance of everyone on the team. However, their behavioral tendencies can impact their team's ability to develop their own strong leadership behaviors.Related: Guide to People Management: Definition, Tips and Skills25 signs of a micromanager. Below is a list of the most common characteristics of a micromanager and signs that you or someone you know may be one: Resist delegating workBecome overly involved in the work of their employeesDiscourage independent decision-makingAsk for frequent updatesExpect overly-detailed reports on a regular basisLook at every detail rather than focusing on the bigger perspectivePrefer to be cc'd on every emailHave an unusually high turnover of employeesAre rarely satisfied with deliverablesSuggest unrealistic deadlinesRoutinely ask employees to stop their work to take care of emergency workBecome irritable when decisions are made independently without their inputFind that team members are usually demotivatedFeel that if a task is to be done right, you/they should do it themselvesTake on the role of the project manager, even when a PM has already been assignedTell employees exactly how tasks should be done, leaving no room for creativity or initiativeContinually monitor the behavior and activities of employees to see what they are working onFocus on unimportant detailsInsist that all work processes are documentedRe-do the work of employees after it has been finishedCommunicate with employees outside of business hours via textRequire weekly and monthly activity reports from every employeeBelieve that team members never take initiative or come up with new ideasTheir/Your employees are never allowed to attend meetings on your behalfMeasure and monitor everythingRelated: 6 Management Styles To Lead Effectively: Overview and ExamplesAdvantages. Since micromanagers usually have the best of intentions, there are some advantages to micromanagement. Here are some positive characteristics of micromanagers:Highly-involved and highly-engagedInfluence business-critical tasksGet the best out of their teamAdd value to any departmentKnow to whom they should delegateDevelop empathy naturallyHighly-involved and highly-engaged. By having a very hands-on leadership style, your employees are more likely to perform the tasks as you want them done. This can even be a necessary leadership approach with employees who prefer direction in their work. Micromanagers know their people and the work they do and often have exceptional communication skills to provide guidance and ensure outstanding results.Influence business-critical tasks. Staying closely involved with tasks and processes allows you to ensure things go according to plan, especially with business-critical tasks and key clients. They can also take care of details and prevent possible negative outcomes.Get the best out of their team. Micromanagers generally behave the way they do to control the outcome, not their team. They want to ensure everything is taken care of and at the same time, teach, mentor and enhance the skills of their teams.Add value to any department. Any micromanager will generally go over every detail, investigating a situation until they discover the root of a problem. Then, they take whatever steps necessary to resolve the problem. Good micromanagers can be an asset to any department.Know to whom they should delegate. Micromanagers usually know their team members better than anyone and when they recognize that work must be delegated, they know exactly who they should delegate to have the work completed. In many cases, the manager has also done the tasks before themselves, which means they know who has the skills and abilities to see the task through to the end, successfully.Develop empathy naturally. Since they usually know the work that's involved to get a task done, they can very successfully empathize with other people. They usually understand the strengths, weaknesses and skills of others and can use this understanding to know when they should push each person and when they should take a step back.Disadvantages. Here is a look at some negative characteristics of micromanagers:Waste timeReduce job satisfactionLower creativity and efficiencyReduce employee motivationWaste time. Micromanagers spend a significant portion of their time overseeing the work of others, time that could be spent on more productive endeavors, such as developing systems or creating new processes. Micromanagers often inundate themselves with details that their team members are often capable of handling independently.Related: Time Management Skills: Definition and ExamplesReduce job satisfaction. Micromanaging can create stress for both the manager as well as the employee. The micromanager can become frustrated by employees who aren't completing tasks as they were instructed and the employees can feel that they are not trusted to do their jobs. This can create a self-perpetuating cycle, where managers become increasingly frustrated and employee performance decreases because they are unhappy in their roles.Lower creativity and efficiency. Micromanagers often give specific directions about how they believe tasks should be accomplished. While this can work well with new employees or those who are not comfortable self-directing, it can also limit the employee's ability to develop new, efficient, creative ways of performing the tasks associated with their roles. Employees are also denied the sense of accomplishment that accompanies finding better ways to do their jobs.Reduce employee motivation. Since micromanagers struggle to let go, employees can become demotivated and less confident in their own abilities. They feel their work will never live up to standard and so they become less productive and create a less successful product.Related Articles. How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps). 12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work. What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples.
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TitleWhat is Micromanagement? | HRZone
Urlhttps://www.hrzone.com/hr-glossary/what-is-micromanagement
DescriptionMicromanagement definitionMicromanagement is a negative term that refers to a
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BodyWhat is Micromanagement? Micromanagement definition Micromanagement is a negative term that refers to a management style characterised by extremely close supervision and control of the minor details of an individual’s workload and output. Micromanagers generally avoid delegating decision-making power to employees and may be overly obsessed with information-gathering by forcing employees to produce regular, detailed reports that are often superfluous. Extreme cases of micromanagement may be pathological i.e. involve serious workplace bullying and certain personality traits, such as narcissism. Academic research around micromanagement might focus on the relationship between manager and subordinate; some theorists suggest the relationship is a dysfunctional parent-adult relationship. For more information on parent-child constructs, read The Games People Play by psychiatrist Eric Berne. Causes of micromanagement are either personal or institutional. Certain personality traits in managers, such as perfectionism and insecurity, may predispose them to micromanagement. The relationship between the manager and the subordinate, particularly a lack of trust or respect or if the manager feels the subordinate lacks competence, can also encourage micromanagement. Institutional causes could include intense downward pressures on managers to achieve results. The negative effects of micromanagement are broad, including worker disengagement, breakdown of the manager-subordinate relationship, worker apathy, reduced productivity, and reduced self-belief in the individuals being micromanaged. Organisations may experience attrition of talent if micromanagement is part of the culture. Advertisement
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TitleWhat is micromanaging? 6 warning signs | monday.com Blog
Urlhttps://monday.com/blog/project-management/micromanaging/
DescriptionLearn what micromanaging is, how it affects your organization negatively, how to recognize it in your business, and how to stop it
DateJul 1, 2021
Organic Position7
H1The complete guide to end micromanaging in your organization
H2What is micromanaging?
6 warning signs of micromanaging behavior
5 ideas to stop micromanagement in your business
Ready to get rid of micromanaging?
One platform for better teamwork
H3Why do people micromanage?
1. Inability to see the bigger picture
2. Paying extreme attention to superfluous details
3. An obsession with reports
4. Difficulty with setting priorities
5. Unable to set clear expectations
6. An ingrained belief that no one else is good enough
1. Centralizing your workspace
2. Setting deadlines with quantifiable, actionable deliverables
3. Setting clear communication channels
4. Using automations to streamline updates and repetitive tasks
5. Embracing a Work OS to better manage your team
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6 warning signs of micromanaging behavior
5 ideas to stop micromanagement in your business
Ready to get rid of micromanaging?
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BodyThe complete guide to end micromanaging in your organization All of us at monday.com| 13 min read|Jul 1 2021 Link Copied! Have you ever had a boss who you felt was always looking over your shoulder, waiting for you to make the smallest misstep?That’s micromanaging in its purest expression.Micromanagement is dangerous for your organization, and it hurts productivity.In this article, we’ll show you exactly what micromanagement is, as well as how to avoid it in your organization.Let’s start with a basic question.Get started with monday.comWhat is micromanaging?Micromanagement is a term used to describe a management style, often characterized by an excessive level of control and close supervision of the small details.Some of the main traits of a micromanager may include:Lack of satisfaction: they never seem satisfied with other people’s work.Obsession with updates and reports: micromanagers use these tools to “look over the shoulders of their employees” and compulsively monitor what they’re doing.Rarely show appreciation: they rarely say “thank you” or “you did a great job,” but often express what you did “wrong.”Try to control everything: micromanagers think that “control is better than trust” and struggle delegating tasks.Underestimate timing: for them, everything seems to be a priority, and they often set extreme deadlines.Micromanagers focus too much on controlling rather than empowering — which often leads to more stressed teams.This can be truly harmful to the organization’s performance.Research has found that roughly 4 out of 10 employees state that stress reduces their productivity.Sadly, micromanagers are rarely aware of their nitpicking behavior and often don’t realize they’re slowing down their teams.You may be thinking: “Well, a team leader should understand who’s doing what and when, right?”But the problem with micromanagement lies not in supervision itself, but in the level of oversight and negative compulsive behavior involved.Micromanagers simply don’t trust their teams.(Image Source)We’ll show you specific ideas to deal with micromanagement in your organization a bit later, but first, let’s answer a crucial question.Why do people micromanage?You see, micromanagers aren’t bad people.Deep down in their hearts, they want to do their jobs in the best way possible.The problem is that they fear no one else will be able to do the work with the same level of quality they’d do it.Humans want to control the output of their work.That’s our nature.When we lose that control, we feel a bit lost.For example, let’s imagine that you start selling lemonade.In the beginning, you control the whole process. From cutting the lemons to mixing the ingredients, and even decorating your lemonade stand.When you start growing and hire a team, though, you lose control over your processes. Perhaps your employees might add a bit more sugar to the lemonade than you used to. Or they jazz up the lemonade stand with some decorations that aren’t to your taste.You can’t fully control the outcome of the work anymore — and it makes you uncomfortable.That’s when micromanagers are born.Of course, you could standardize the way you work so that others can replicate it, but micromanagers don’t see it that way.They live with a constant fear that others might do something wrong.The worst part?For a micromanager, “wrong” isn’t directly tied to achieving the objective.Micromanagers label things as “wrong” whenever a team member doesn’t meet the exacting demands they’re making, even when such demands aren’t that relevant to the task in question.That’s the reason they focus so much on the superfluous details, such as font type in a presentation.Lack of trust is one of the most common reasons why people micromanage.Other important reasons may include:Fear of losing control: micromanagers think that losing control is losing authority.An unskilled team: a brand new or incompetent team may “force” leaders to start micromanaging.A strong ego: managers who regard themselves as “the only trusted experts in the field” can easily turn into micromanagers.Inexperience in management: sometimes leaders simply think that micromanagement is how you should lead a team.Seeking familiarity: when competent operational employees are promoted, they often prefer to keep doing what they’re good at rather than delegating work and managing people.Get started6 warning signs of micromanaging behavior. Now that you understand what micromanagement is and how it can affect your organization negatively, the question becomes: how can you identify a micromanager?Here are 6 warning signs:1. Inability to see the bigger picture. Micromanagers spend most of their working time dealing with day-to-day administration rather than focusing on the organization’s crucial activities.They rarely work in strategy or goal-setting because they “don’t have the time.”They’re too busy doing somebody else’s work, reading status reports, or looking over the shoulders of their employees.They can’t see the big picture nor how they’re affecting the productivity of their teams.2. Paying extreme attention to superfluous details. Don’t get us wrong — it’s the manager’s responsibility to supervise their employees.The problem is when they try to control every little step in the process.When a team doesn’t have the freedom to explore and discover their own methods and ways to achieve a specific outcome, they’ll probably feel pretty demotivated.Besides, when a manager constantly checks every little detail in their employees’ work, that person makes it clear that they don’t trust their employees.With this behavior, the team might grow incompetent in the long run. They’ll depend on the manager’s instructions.3. An obsession with reports. Since micromanagers want to control everything, they’ll want their teammates to send constant reports and updates for the projects they’re working on.Asking for reports and updates isn’t bad, per se.An obsession with them is.For example, a micromanager may force their teammates to CC them in every single email.Again, micromanagers have a compulsive obsession with control, and they’ll try to oversee and manage every detail, which can slow down the team’s progress.4. Difficulty with setting priorities. Micromanagers struggle to define clear priorities.For them, everything seems to be crucial and urgent. They want the work done by yesterday and don’t take into consideration their team’s workload.This makes it difficult for teams to prioritize and classify tasks and activities.5. Unable to set clear expectations. Micromanagers often don’t give clear directions.Instead, they spend most of their time talking about small details or vague ideas.This behavior isn’t only harmful to employees, but also to the micromanager.Since the manager spends lots of time “correcting” other people’s work, they eventually become a bottleneck in the organization, which stifles productivity.6. An ingrained belief that no one else is good enough. This is one of the root causes of micromanagement.Micromanagers don’t trust their team. They believe no one else is capable of completing the tasks the way “they’re supposed to.”For example, they may delegate a task to an employee. But when they experience the slightest feeling that the employee isn’t following their exact instructions or processes, they might intervene — without waiting to see the actual outcome.5 ideas to stop micromanagement in your business. Micromanagement is a real issue within modern organizations.The good news is that you can prevent or reduce it.Some ways to do so include:1. Centralizing your workspace. By centralizing your collaboration channels, you reduce the need to be constantly checking updated statuses or sending frequent reports.In a centralized workplace, the manager can oversee the progress of every project with precision and ensure everything’s on schedule.The best part?Managers can do it without disturbing their employees, which can increase productivity.For example, with monday.com, you can bring in your entire team from the start, assign responsibilities to each team member, and see how things are going in a single place.This way, you can avoid disparate information and keep everyone updated in detail along the way.Thanks to our advanced reporting dashboards, managers can understand who’s doing what and when, as well as keeping track of quality standards with ease.These dashboards are fully customizable, and you can visualize the information that’s most relevant to your team.For example, if you’re a sales manager, you could “build” a dashboard that tells you the exact revenue specific sales reps have generated, how many sales conversations they’ve had, and even the top lead sources.Or, if you’re an HR manager, you could create a dashboard that helps you measure things like “employee satisfaction” or “cultural needs in the organization.”This level of detail helps managers better understand the performance of their teams and reduces the need to micromanage.2. Setting deadlines with quantifiable, actionable deliverables. One of the best ways to reduce micromanagement in your organization is to get rid of situations that evoke this type of behavior.By setting deadlines with quantifiable, measurable, and actionable deliverables, you help your team better understand what they should be doing to achieve the goals you’re looking for.For example, instead of saying “we need to ramp up our content production,” say “we need to produce 3 long-form pieces per week, starting next month.”This will help the team complete actual tasks instead of guessing what you want.Comprehensive project management software can be helpful to achieve this.For example, with monday.com, you can structure your organization into projects. Each monday.com board would represent a project, and each “item” would represent a deliverable.Then, you can add a “Status” column to track the status of each deliverable and a “Progress tracking” column to oversee the progress in a percentage format.This can help managers get a more complete picture of what’s going on with each project and make sure everyone’s working properly.3. Setting clear communication channels. Email can be enough to manage short conversations with 1 or 2 people, but when you’re dealing with a large team, email falls short.To increase your efficiency, you need to remove silos between departments and establish a single channel for communication — one that helps you communicate in context and centralizes your information into a single place.With monday.com, for example, you can not only manage your entire team in the same workspace but also add context to each item and communicate in real-time, which helps you stay in the loop on every detail.Some of the top monday.com’s communication features include:Built-in messaging: add context to each item and brainstorm ideas with your team with more ease.Video conferencing: integrate video conferencing apps like Zoom and turn meetings into items to increase attendance.Tagging: tag specific team members within items and make sure nothing slips through the cracks.Notifications: notify team members whenever a task is completed and receive notifications for important events in your organization.Besides, thanks to our “Activity Log” feature, you can visualize the entire history you’ve had with a specific teammate or client.This can help you have even more context of every situation and better handle your team.Get started4. Using automations to streamline updates and repetitive tasks. Sending constant reports and updates can be time-consuming and challenging for most teams.Here’s where automations can help.Recent studies from McKinsey, a leading management consulting firm, suggest that 3 out of 10 activities can be fully automated in 60% of all occupations, including reports and status changes.With monday.com, streamlining the reporting process is pretty straightforward.Thanks to our automations center, you can build “If this, then that” automations that help you automate any type of status change or report.For example, you could set an automation so that every time a task is completed you receive a notification straight to your email.Or you could set an automation that tells you whenever a task is stuck.Other things you can automate include:Task creation: create any type of task automatically.Dependencies: set dependencies between activities and define clear priorities.Recurring activities: automate recurring tasks and repurpose that time into more productive initiatives.Custom: build custom automations to streamline any type of process or workflow.This way, you can reduce the need to micromanage and still oversee the progress of your team’s work with ease.In fact, monday.com helps you automate over 250,000 human actions, so the sky’s the limit.To get a better understanding of our automations center, we suggest you watch this short video overview.It’ll give you a taste of what to expect.5. Embracing a Work OS to better manage your team. Finally, the best way to reduce micromanagement in your organization is by adopting the right technology. In this day and age, there’s no need to manually oversee your team or waste time assigning tasks or measuring performance. The right Work OS can increase your efficiency through a centralized workspace where you can “do it all.”Here’s where monday.com comes in handy.monday.com is a true Work OS used by more than 100,000 teams to manage their work.With monday.com’s fully customizable interface, you can design a platform to streamline any type of process and manage any type of team, regardless of its size or complexity.To be precise, here’s what monday.com brings to the table:Project management: manage projects with ease, assign tasks and responsibilities, and track progress in a single place.Templates: get over 200 customizable templates for any use case or industry.Reporting: get access to your most valuable data and streamline your reporting process.Integrations: seamlessly integrate over 40 of your favorite apps and tools.Security: protect your information with enterprise-level security features.Collaboration: centralize your communications and collaborate with your team in the most effective way possible.And many more.All these features will help you better manage your team and get the most out of your resources while reducing friction and misunderstandings.Ready to get rid of micromanaging?Micromanagement can be dangerous for both employees and managers.By identifying some of the warning signs outlined in this post and implementing some of the recommendations, you’ll be able to reduce micromanagement and improve the way your organization works.To get started, look for a system that streamlines your communication and gets rid of the need to constantly oversee teammates.We suggest you try out our fully customizable team task management template. It’ll help you better organize your work and improve your collaboration.Get started One platform for better teamwork. with monday.com Work OS. Get started Having problems signing up? Contact us, we're here, 24/7 Project management Get started for free
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Result 8
TitleMicromanage Definition & Meaning - Merriam-Webster
Urlhttps://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/micromanage
DescriptionThe meaning of MICROMANAGE is to manage especially with excessive control or attention to details. How to use micromanage in a sentence
Date
Organic Position8
H1micromanage
H2Definition of micromanage
Other Words from micromanage
Examples of micromanage in a Sentence
First Known Use of micromanage
Learn More About micromanage
The first known use of micromanage was in 1976
Dictionary Entries Near micromanage
Statistics for micromanage
English Language Learners Definition of micromanage
H3
H2WithAnchorsDefinition of micromanage
Other Words from micromanage
Examples of micromanage in a Sentence
First Known Use of micromanage
Learn More About micromanage
The first known use of micromanage was in 1976
Dictionary Entries Near micromanage
Statistics for micromanage
English Language Learners Definition of micromanage
Bodymicromanage verb Save Word mi· cro· man· age | \ ˌmī-krō-ˈma-nij \ micromanaged; micromanaging; micromanages Definition of micromanage. transitive verb : to manage especially with excessive control or attention to details intransitive verb : to direct or conduct the activities of a group or an enterprise by micromanaging them Other Words from micromanage Example Sentences Learn More About micromanage Other Words from micromanage. micromanagement \ ˌmī- krō- ˈma- nij- mənt \ noun micromanager \ ˌmī- krō- ˈma- ni- jər \ noun Examples of micromanage in a Sentence. He micromanaged every detail of the budget. Recent Examples on the Web This leaves Connor, the oldest and somehow dumbest of the four, to micromanage the RECNY event like he’s Ace Rothstein in Casino, demanding the chef put an equal amount of blueberries into each muffin. — Scott Tobias, Vulture, 20 Dec. 2021 The federal government elites in Washington cannot micromanage citizens' personal choices without a legitimate basis in law and the Constitution ... — Ledyard King, USA TODAY, 9 Dec. 2021 Republicans have argued those bills were an attempt to micromanage state and local elections. — Los Angeles Times, 9 Dec. 2021 One of the easiest ways to have employees feel ownership of their jobs and of the organization as a whole is to not micromanage them. — Expert Panel, Forbes, 2 Nov. 2021 Don’t micromanage your outsourcing workforce or there will be no point in outsourcing. — Shane Barker, Forbes, 5 Nov. 2021 Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has denounced the Lewis bill and other failed voting rights bills as an attempt to micromanage state and local elections. — Los Angeles Times, 3 Nov. 2021 Rebell said the plaintiffs aren’t trying to micromanage schools. — BostonGlobe.com, 29 Oct. 2021 McConnell denounced the bill as a Democratic attempt to micromanage local elections. — Los Angeles Times, 20 Oct. 2021 These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'micromanage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback. See More First Known Use of micromanage. 1976, in the meaning defined at transitive sense Learn More About micromanage. Share micromanage Post the Definition of micromanage to Facebook Share the Definition of micromanage on Twitter Time Traveler for micromanage The first known use of micromanage was in 1976. See more words from the same year Dictionary Entries Near micromanage. micromachining micromanage micromanipulation See More Nearby Entries  Statistics for micromanage. Last Updated 1 Jan 2022 Look-up Popularity Cite this Entry “Micromanage.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/micromanage. Accessed 13 Jan. 2022. Style: MLA MLA Chicago APA Merriam-Webster More Definitions for micromanage micromanage verb English Language Learners Definition of micromanage. : to try to control or manage all the small parts of (something, such as an activity) in a way that is usually not wanted or that causes problems See the full definition for micromanage in the English Language Learners Dictionary More from Merriam-Webster on micromanage Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for micromanage Nglish: Translation of micromanage for Spanish Speakers WORD OF THE DAY . meritorious . See Definitions and Examples » Get Word of the Day daily email! Test Your Vocabulary . Name that Thing: Flower Edition Name that flower hydrangea chrysanthemum amaryllis hyacinth Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge! TAKE THE QUIZ A daily challenge for crossword fanatics. TAKE THE QUIZ Love words? Need even more definitions? Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! Merriam-Webster unabridged Words at Play “In Vino Veritas” and Other Latin Phrases to Live By Top 10 Latin Phrases Winter Vocab and Other Words for Snow Because 200 seemed like overkill ‘Phase’ vs. ‘Faze’ Don't be fazed by these homophones. Merriam-Webster's Words of the Week - Jan. 7 From the week ending 1/7/2022 Ask the Editors 'Everyday' vs. 'Every Day' A simple trick to keep them separate What Is 'Semantic Bleaching'? How 'literally' can mean "figuratively" Literally How to use a word that (literally) drives some pe... Is Singular 'They' a Better Choice? The awkward case of 'his or her' Word Games Do You Know These Formidable Words? New Year, Recondite Vocabulary Take the quiz Advanced Vocabulary Quiz Tough words and tougher competition. Take the quiz Name That Thing Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question ... Take the quiz
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Result 9
TitleWhat Is Micromanagement? Who Is A Micromanager? | Feedough
Urlhttps://www.feedough.com/micromanagement/
DescriptionMicromanagement is a management style characterized by excessive control and attention to details to the works of subordinates or employees
DateSep 28, 2021
Organic Position9
H1What Is Micromanagement? Who Is A Micromanager?
H2What Is Micromanagement?
What Is Micromanagement? Who Is A Micromanager?
H3Who Is A Micromanager?
Signs Of Micromanagement
Effects Of Micromanagement
Examples Of Micromanagement
How To Avoid Micromanagement?
Industries Where Micromanagement Is Suited
Go On, Tell Us What You Think!
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Micromanagement?
What Is Micromanagement? Who Is A Micromanager?
BodyWhat Is Micromanagement? Who Is A Micromanager? September 28, 2021 by Aashish Pahwa Directing the efforts of the team towards a definite purpose or a goal involves the use of many managerial styles and strategies. These styles involve setting up a vision, mentoring, directing or setting high goals by being an expert.One such managerial style is the micromanagement style where the manager micromanages every aspect of their subordinates’ work. Contents show 1 What Is Micromanagement? 1.1 Who Is A Micromanager? 1.2 Signs Of Micromanagement 1.3 Effects Of Micromanagement 1.4 Examples Of Micromanagement 1.4.1 Asking employees to take permission for everything 1.4.2 Constantly asking for updates on work even when the deadline isn’t near 1.4.3 Overseeing every work 1.5 How To Avoid Micromanagement? 1.6 Industries Where Micromanagement Is Suited What Is Micromanagement?Micromanagement is a management style characterised by excessive control and attention to detail to the works of subordinates or employees. It is a state where the manager closely observes and controls everything a subordinate or an employee does in the organisation.Usually, micromanagement is said to be a characteristic of a directive manager and is considered to have a negative connotation. Nevertheless, it is one of the most common management styles found in organisations all over the world.Who Is A Micromanager?A micromanager is someone who lacks trust and micromanages every activity of their subordinate or employee. They are an autocratic manager who:Strongly believes in a top-down decision-making processGets too involved in the work of their subordinatesIs hardly satisfied with the subordinates’ outputsWants the subordinates to follow “do it as I say approach”Asks for frequent updates on the taskGive a lot of attention to the detailsFinds correcting others funSigns Of Micromanagement. Checking that the subordinates and employees are doing the right thing and making sure that the work is getting done is an important task of every manager. But paying attention to even irrelevant details and making sure the work is getting done every time and at every place is one of the signs of micromanagement. The other signs of micromanagement are:Focusing more on details rather than the end productPushing aside the qualification and experience of othersFailing to delegate most of the workGetting too involved in the work of the subordinates or employeesDemotivating the team over petty issuesFinding it fun to correct othersEffects Of Micromanagement. Applying the same level of scrutiny, intensity and forcing the subordinates to follow the do-as-I-say approach harms productivity and demotivates the employees. In fact, micromanagement is one of the key reasons why employee resigns from the organisation. There are many negative effects of micromanagement:Low employee moraleHigh employee turnoverEmployees tend to depend more on the managerLess productivityLess creativity in the organisationEmployees lose the trust in the managerJob dissatisfaction among employeesLow scope of learning for employeesExamples Of Micromanagement. There are many situations in the life of a manager where they have to micromanage. However, an excess of micromanagement leads to its negative effects. Here are the following examples of micromanagement:Asking employees to take permission for everything. It’s important for the manager to know what’s going on in the organisation but asking the employees to take permission before every step is a sign of micromanagement.Constantly asking for updates on work even when the deadline isn’t near. Micromanagers pay too much attention to detail and give very little autonomy to their subordinates. They want the work to be done in a way they would have done it.Overseeing every work. Micromanagers make themselves the beginning, centre, and end of every interaction. They want every work to be overseen by them which, most of the time, hamper the productivity of the team as they have to wait for hours to get the manager’s approval.How To Avoid Micromanagement?Even though it is hard for many but there are ways to avoid micromanaging. These include:Proper delegation of tasksFocusing on the end result rather than the minute detailsBelieving in the qualification and experience of the teamDevelop a solid line of communication with the teamIgnore some minor employee errorsDevelop a work policy or work procedure manualIndustries Where Micromanagement Is Suited. Micromanagement is advantageous in some short-term situations like crises and emergencies, and also in many industries like mining, manufacturing plants, military, etc. where close supervision is important for the well-being of the organisation and the employees.Go On, Tell Us What You Think!Did we miss something?  Come on! Tell us what you think about our article in the comments section.Aashish PahwaA startup consultant, digital marketer, traveller, and philomath. Aashish has worked with over 20 startups and successfully helped them ideate, raise money, and succeed. When not working, he can be found hiking, camping, and stargazing. Close XMoSCoW Method ExplainedManagement EssentialsBusinesses which considers customers' requirements and priorities when they manufacture and deliver their products fare better than the ones which don…What Is Micromanagement? Who Is A Micromanager?by Aashish Pahwa  XCustomer Relationship Management: The Ultimate Guide To CRM…Marketing EssentialsThanks to the ever-increasing competition, wooing customers is now a fact of marketer's life. They make sure that they acquire new customers effective…
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Result 10
TitleWhat is Micromanagement and How To Deal With It?
Urlhttps://www.game-learn.com/en/resources/blog/what-is-micromanagement-and-how-to-deal-with-it/
DescriptionKnowing how to deal with micromanagement is essential for the productivity of our organization and our leadership. How to deal with it?
DateSep 23, 2015
Organic Position10
H1What is Micromanagement and How To Deal With It?
H2
H3What are micromanagers?
What do micromanagers usually do?
How to deal with micromanagement?
Are you a micromanager?
H2WithAnchors
BodyWhat is Micromanagement and How To Deal With It? Gamelearn Team 23 Sep / 2015 If we take a look around, it is very likely for us to come across a “micromanager“. Knowing how to deal with micromanagement is essential for the good of our organization and our leadership. But first things first: What are micromanagers? That is the name we give to people who focus all their attention on controlling unimportant details, ignoring what is truly relevant for their company. This lack of perspective and strategic vision happens more often than we would think. The worst thing about micromanagers is that they often work in management positions, which means they are in charge of teams despite their evident inability to manage them. What do micromanagers usually do? Have you ever received an email with “URGENT” as the subject, written in capital letters, and it actually was not such a pressing issue? It was probably sent by a micromanager. These are the features that characterize them: They are never satisfied with the final results. If the task has not been performed exactly the way they had asked for, they will never show their satisfaction. They want to know, at all times, where their team members are and what they are working on, constantly. They persistently ask for reports on the status of projects. They ask to be sent copies of all emails, an unequivocal sign of their obsession for control. They want to be sent even the most irrelevant emails. They are not aware of how much they stand in the way of the productivity of their teams and their own. Of course, a manager has the obligation of supervising things and demanding a high level of performance from the people working with them. However, micromanagers cross that line and, what is worse; they often do not play by their own rules. How to deal with micromanagement? Coexisting with micromanagement is not the most desirable situation neither for our personal productivity nor our professional efficiency. People suffering its effects often experience frustration and a feeling of discouragement. We can help you deal with micromanagers: 1. Eliminate any situation which encourages micromanagement. If you are forced to work with a micromanager whose maximum concern is control, make it easier for them your own way. Offer them detailed reports and anticipate possible tasks they can ask you to do. Have it all in writing for their peace of mind, and yours, in case of conflict. Micromanagers usually ask for tasks we already know we have to do, so they just “remind” us to do them. Doing them in advance, therefore, should not be such a big effort for us and, in return, we will get some confidence from our manager. 2. Report proactively. Micromanagers want to be involved in each and every step of the implementation of a project. Request for changes and updates on how the process is going will be the constant. To avoid micromanagement from causing you stress, again we recommend you to get ahead and offer information on how you are performing your tasks in a proactive way, that is, before being asked to. For example, you can send an email in the morning stating what you have done so far and what you plan to complete during the day. This way, your micromanager will know exactly what your workload is and will postpone their usual question “attack”. 3. Make them know how their decisions affect your productivity. Face to face is the easier way to maintain a sensible conversation with a micromanager. Carefully explain that their insistence has negative effects on your productivity, which can ultimately affect your commitment to the common project of the company. Delicately ask them to let you do your work your own way. It is not likely that you will get a categorical “yes”, but you will have stated your opinion and perhaps your micromanager will now be aware of the real situation, which they may have not been fully conscious of otherwise. You may be interested: A productivity tool for your business: self-management 4. Offer alternatives. Always with total respect, you can propose to perform a task without their supervision and offer them the possibility of reviewing the whole process when you finish. You will be letting them know that you can and want to work more independently, while you offer them the chance to review for any errors. If they agree, you must of course warmly thank them for their confidence; this way the micromanager will be aware of the positive effect delegating tasks has on you. By doing this you will be acting like a leader who works to inspire change and, what is more important, you will be fighting micromanagers. Are you a micromanager? If after reading this post you identify yourself with micromanagers, do not worry. It is not the end of the world. Leaders are made, not born. All you have to do is get down to work and improve your leadership every day. Do not make the mistake of thinking that your role as a leader means to control and monitor all the details. This excessive zeal on control will only drive you to suffocate your collaborators’ attitude and any attempt at creativity will probably get frustrated. Micromanagers fear change, leaders seek for it. Leaders encourage self-management, while micromanagers try by all means to run and control everything. What any team in a company of the XXI century really needs is a leader who tells them clearly what is expected of them. In short: a leader who knows how to communicate ideas. You may be interested: 10 leadership skills every leader needs to success Learn how to communicate your messages with accuracy and simplicity. Focus on the “what” and “why” and not on the “how”. You have to be able to explain to your team what you want from them. Work on your communication skills to become a good leader. It is not about communicating “more” or “constantly” (you also have to let your team time to “do”). “More” is not the same as “better.” Information overload is the result of poor communication and, in general, it reflects a lack of knowledge about the “what”. When you stop to think “what” you want and “why” you want it, surely you will realize that what you initially thought was very important, was not so much really. If you make this reflection, it will be easier for you to inform the other members of your team with clarity and effectiveness. Without realizing it, you will have stopped being a micromanager to become a good leader. Related posts. How to reduce the costs of your corporate training Serious Games, Serious Impact: presenting online training that truly makes an impact What rugby can teach us about leadership How to improve team communication when it doesn’t seem like there’s anything to improve
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Result 11
TitleWhat is Micromanagement and How to Deal With It | Hygger.io
Urlhttps://hygger.io/blog/what-is-micromanagement/
Description✅What is Micromanagement and How to Deal With It - Read Article by Autor Pavel Kukhnavets. ➤See also other materials in Collaboration category at Hygger.io Blog
DateMay 6, 2020
Organic Position11
H1What is Micromanagement and How to Deal With It
H2What is Micromanagement?
Pros and Cons of Micromanagement
What Are the Ways to Deal with Micromanagement?
Quick Tips on How to Run Effective All-Hands Meetings
What Team Effectiveness Model Will Make a Team Perform Better?
How Communication Styles Affect Team Management and Business Environment
Try for FREE!
H3Who is a micromanager?
Cons of micromanagement
Pros of micromanagement
1. Try to eliminate situations that encourage micromanagement
2. Report proactively
3. Try to show them how their decisions affect productivity
4. Ask for the alternative
Related posts:
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H2WithAnchorsWhat is Micromanagement?
Pros and Cons of Micromanagement
What Are the Ways to Deal with Micromanagement?
Quick Tips on How to Run Effective All-Hands Meetings
What Team Effectiveness Model Will Make a Team Perform Better?
How Communication Styles Affect Team Management and Business Environment
Try for FREE!
BodyWhat is Micromanagement and How to Deal With It Pavel Kukhnavets  / May 6, 2020 Hygger > Blog > What is Micromanagement and How to Deal With It Contents hide What is Micromanagement? Who is a micromanager? Pros and Cons of Micromanagement Cons of micromanagement Pros of micromanagement What Are the Ways to Deal with Micromanagement? 1. Try to eliminate situations that encourage micromanagement 2. Report proactively 3. Try to show them how their decisions affect productivity 4. Ask for the alternative The term “micromanagement” associates with demoralizing, frustrating, and demotivating. It is always tough to deal with a controlling boss who doesn’t trust you. Micromanagement is a strongly controlling management style that is demoralizing and counter-intuitive. The desire to control everything to make sure processes go according to the plan may create more problems in the long-term. Micromanagement may lead to long-term issues and bad habits such a system creates. Even if a team is rather small, leaders who addicted to micromanagement run the risk of alienating employees, diminishing their trust, making them dependent on micromanagement, and causing individuals to burn out. In this post, we define the pros and cons of micromanagement and propose some basic tips on how to deal with it.   What is Micromanagement? Micromanagement is a negative management style that is characterized by extremely close supervision and control of the minor details of an individual’s workload. A micromanager typically avoids delegating decision-making power to employees. He/she can be overly obsessed with information gathering, forcing team players to produce regular reports that often seem superfluous. Micromanagement can be pathological including serious workplace bullying and specific personality traits, such as narcissism. In some cases, it can be useful, for example, in small-scale projects, but most people used to associate the term of micromanagement with harm. If you feel that someone is always tracking your work and picking apart every mistake, your boss is probably a micromanager.   Who is a micromanager? A micromanager is a person who focuses all his/her attention on controlling unimportant details, ignoring what is really relevant for the company. These managers are usually characterized by a lack of perspective and strategic vision. They are often in charge of teams despite their evident inability to manage them. Many employees often receive emails with “URGENT” as the subject, written in capital letters, but they were actually not such a pressing issue. There are many chances that such emails were sent by micromanagers. What are the features that characterize them? Here’re some of them: They always want to know where their team members are and what they are working on, constantly.  They are never satisfied with the results. You will never see their satisfaction if the task has not been performed exactly the way they had asked for. They ask to send them copies of all emails, even the most irrelevant emails. They think that they care but they are not aware of how much they stand in the way of the productivity of their team members.   Feel free to also read our relevant article “How to Easily Recognize that Your Boss is a Micromanager?“   Pros and Cons of Micromanagement. As we have mentioned above that micromanagement is a negative thing, it is logical to start with its cons.    Cons of micromanagement. Here are the key reasons we often think of “micromanage” as a bad thing: Micromanagement often annoys employees It makes managers lose sight of the big picture It leads to team members’ burnouts It is vulnerable to human errors It damages employee trust It may increase the employee turnover rate It can cause employees to become dependent on micromanagement Micromanaging people means that you’re telling them that you don’t trust them enough to work on their own and still produce good results. It leads to employees getting annoyed with managers and damaging the trust they have. Micromanagement also discourages decision-making in any team. Employees don’t just breed resentment, it makes them dependent on further micromanagement to perform their jobs.   Pros of micromanagement. Micromanagement isn’t always about bad things. Constant operations tracking and thorough managing them is useful when teams are still small. While the negative quickly stack up, it serves a real purpose in smaller teams and specific situations, for example: It provides better control over operations It makes complex operations more reliable to execute It provides better awareness of metrics It helps to onboard employees Micromanagement meant total control, so the manager makes everyone reporting with frequent status reports, letting him/her check that everything is being done to their standards. This is actually great for guiding small teams and new employees. Micromanagement can also benefit when dealing with highly complex or customizable orders. Such orders often require a lot of instructions, which can be provided and tracked if a micromanage style approach is taken.     What Are the Ways to Deal with Micromanagement? If you care about your personal productivity and the global efficiency of your team, you should understand that coexisting with micromanagement is not the most desirable solution. You will definitely suffer from its effects and one day you will experience frustration and a feeling of discouragement.  There are some ways that can help you to deal with micromanagement. The following tips will be relevant for team members who have a problem of cooperation with a micromanager.   1. Try to eliminate situations that encourage micromanagement. If you work in the micromanagement environment and every day face maximum control, make it easier for you. Provide your micromanager with detailed reports and try to anticipate possible tasks he/she can ask you to do. Have all the reports in writing form for their peace of mind.   2. Report proactively. As micromanagers want to participate in every step of the project implementation, do not limit them. Their requests for changes and updates on how the process is going will be the constant. In order to avoid stress because of micromanagement, try to get ahead and propose information on how you are performing in a proactive way. Just before being asked to. Send a morning email where you state what you have done so far and what you plan to complete or use online to-do lists that modern project management tools propose to inform your boss. Your micromanager will be aware of what your workload is and perhaps will forget about you for some time.   3. Try to show them how their decisions affect productivity. The best way to maintain a sensible conversation with a micromanager is to arrange a face-to-face meeting. What you should definitely do is to explain that the insistence of the micromanager has negative effects on your productivity that can directly affect your commitment to the common project. Try to carefully ask he/she to let you perform your work your own way.   4. Ask for the alternative. You may also propose to do your tasks without their supervision and suggest the possibility of reviewing the whole process when you finish. Perhaps, letting them know that you can work more independently will ensure them to leave you alone. If you persuade them, warmly thank micromanagers for their confidence. They will be aware of the positive effect delegating tasks have on you. Just as no employee wants to be micromanaged, no one leader wants to be a micromanager. However, focusing on the big picture and on motivating employees, managers can redirect their efforts to be the most effective leader they can be. Have you ever encountered micromanagement? What methods did you use to combat this? Feel free to comment below! Related posts:. Bad Apple: How to Deal with Negative Agile Team Members 3 Ways to Deal with Overly-Engaged Project Sponsors How to Identify Dark Scrum and Deal With its Effects? Importance of Teamwork: Key Benefits for Product Teams How to Easily Recognize that Your Boss is a Micromanager? management styles, micromanagement, team management Try the Best ProjectManagement Toolfor Remote Teams Sign up to Hygger: Recommended Posts Quick Tips on How to Run Effective All-Hands Meetings. Any business meeting is an effective way for companies to share valuable information in person. Meetings can be comprised of small groups, involving specific departments or management. Read More What Team Effectiveness Model Will Make a Team Perform Better? Choosing the best models and approaches for team effectiveness is the issue that product managers and team leaders have been trying to figure out for a long time. Read More How Communication Styles Affect Team Management and Business Environment. Clear communication is an easy way to boost productivity, reduce workplace stress, and create better relationships with coworkers.  Read More Plan Prioritize Do what really matters START FOR FREE Try for FREE! Please use your work email address to sign up. Confirmation email was sent to Check your inbox. 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Result 12
TitlePoisoning the well: Why micromanagement is bad for business
Urlhttps://blog.runrun.it/en/micromanagement/
DescriptionEspecially in this age where the ideal workplace is one that respects individual talent, micromanagement is the anathema to productivity as we know it
Date
Organic Position12
H1Poisoning the well: Why micromanagement is bad for business
H2Why micromanagement pulls down organizations instead of lifting them up
Understanding micromanagement and spotting a micromanager
Dealing with micromanagement in the workplace
H3Define micromanagement, communicate!
Foster an environment conducive to learning and developing leadership skills
Have the right tools to help support and supplement your workflow and productivity
H2WithAnchorsWhy micromanagement pulls down organizations instead of lifting them up
Understanding micromanagement and spotting a micromanager
Dealing with micromanagement in the workplace
BodyPoisoning the well: Why micromanagement is bad for business Micromanagement is a management style characterized by leaders and / or managers who closely monitors subordinates’ work, often frequently adding his or her own input and constantly changing the final output. Micromanagers obsess about the smallest details and are seemingly incapable of delegation — they always need to do everything themselves. Micromanagers also often display a lack of trust in their co-workers and subordinates, and often also work poorly with others. Micromanagement is all about excessive control and is often associated with a lack of freedom and creativity in the workplace. In this article, we seek to discuss the following: How micromanagement destroys organizations from withinUnderstanding micromanagement and spotting a micromanagerDealing with micromanagement in the organization   Micromanagement generally refers to taking control of a task or project down to the smallest most mundane detail, often resulting in hampered progress and stunted productivity. The practice of micromanagement also often ignores larger and more impactful policies and strategies in favor of obsessing about smaller issues — which can often be resolved without managerial intervention. Micromanagers needlessly and unnecessarily complicate and lengthen processes while at the same time often frustrating co-workers and subordinates because of their over-management, over-scrutinization, and failure to fall back a little and trust their fellow employees more. Especially in today’s complex operations and workplaces, the boss who constantly changes decisions subordinates make and creates mountains out of molehills is more than just a nuisance — they cost the company money and productivity. Not to mention that they are HORRIBLE for morale in general. One might even hazard to say that tolerating micromanagement can run the risk of the company eventually failing due to high staff turnovers, lack of talent retention, poor productivity, poor creativity, and the like.   Despite the fact that many today generally frown upon the practice of micromanagement, many managers are still guilty of this and many organizational decision-makers often neglect to correct it. Why micromanagement pulls down organizations instead of lifting them up. Theodore Roosevelt once said, “The best executive is one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.” This is as accurate a description of what micromanagement can do and how negatively it will impact the organization. Studies have shown that micromanagement has a detrimental effect on employees — the Journal of Experimental Psychology reported that employees who feel that they are being micromanaged perform at a much lower level. Another study, this time by FranklinCovey Solutions, indicated that global employees believed that micromanagement was the biggest obstacle to their success, growth and career development. Micromanagement is so bad for the organization that in fact, Harvard Business School professor Teresa Amabile and psychologist Steven Kramer released the results of a joint study showing that micromanagement “stifles creativity and productivity in the long run.” Among other things, micromanagement:   Creates a significantly more stressful working environment. Which in turn may lead to health issues.May very well cause employee demotivation, possibly an increase in staff turnover, resulting in any learned knowledge getting lost to the competition.Discourages creativity and critical thinking.Goes against organizational success due to lack of cooperation and a lack of trust.Causes innovation to be delayed.Causes poor communication all throughout the organization.   Understanding micromanagement and spotting a micromanager. Part of the steps organizations and leadership should take when dealing with micromanagement is to spot micromanagers. It’s the first step in taking corrective action and pursuing coaching in order to help that manager develop true and better leadership skills and foster a stronger concept of teamwork. Mind you, not all micromanagers know that they’re at fault. For many, it comes naturally, and many still do it unconsciously. Micromanagement can, and does, in many cases, fall within a compulsive behavioral disorder not unlike addiction — oftentimes, micromanagers cannot help themselves and rationalize their actions by constantly being in denial about their behavior. Micromanagers are often the last to realize that they are, in fact micromanagers. Many times as well, micromanaging stems from a lack of decisional confidence, as well as uncertainty. Newly-promoted rank-and-file employees often practice micromanagement unknowingly since they are used to dealing with smaller issues and cannot step back and look at the bigger picture as they are supposed to. In the extreme spectrum of things, micromanagers do not take responsibility for their actions, instead opting to pass blame and accountability to subordinates. Subordinates in turn, learn very little and are often exploited since they constantly need to tweak processes and outputs based on the often fickle tastes and wants of one man. Creativity is stifled. It’s also important to understand and be able to spot micromanagement in practice so that interventions can be arranged where and when needed, and leaders are better equipped to develop true leadership skills and/or set up sessions where others can learn about proper management and leadership. Nevertheless, here are a couple of telltale signs that someone is a micromanager. Has no little to concept of delegating work — micromanagers are always under the impression that they know what they’re doing, so task fulfillment becomes a “my way or the highway” process. This lack of delegation severely narrows the lens through which projects are viewed and assessed. This lack of ability to delegate also prevents others from making important decisions, since every decision will need to be dependent on the micromanager. Thus, employees always second-guess themselves and become discouraged from developing critical thinking skills because everything marches to the beat of the micromanager’s proverbial drum.Sticks their fingers into other’s tasks — in the same vein, micromanagement also often steps out of their assigned tasks. Many micromanagers will meddle with the way other processes and tasks (that are assigned to OTHER PEOPLE) are done. This is also done often without consultation with team or person to whom the tasks are originally assigned to, which results in needless conflict that can severely delay production or worse, grind progress to a screeching halt.Sweats the small stuff too much — micromanagement sees the small things too much and obsesses about the details to an unhealthy level. This comes as a detriment to the overall purpose of the project or task. For example, a magazine editor who micromanages every aspect of production may very well cause the publication to miss its publication schedule; plus the constant change of details can result in a veering away from editorial layout standards or an agreed upon theme or direction.Ignores the value of teammates and subordinates — the constant need to be the only approving entity devalues the capabilities and skills the micromanagers’ colleagues and even subordinates. More often than not, micromanagers don’t really factor in the experience or validity of a subordinate or colleagues input and instead rely on their own judgement alone.     Dealing with micromanagement in the workplace. It’s hard to stay productive, motivated, and engaged when once is micromanaged. It’s important for all the parties involved to have an action plan to deal with micromanagement in the workplace. Preventing and eliminating micromanagement in the workplace can keep employees happy, motivated, and creative. Define micromanagement, communicate! We mean not the definition per se, but set the right limits as to what would be considered the proper management and what line would be needed to cross to what would constitute micromanagement. Remember that people have different thresholds; while others may not mind having a minder or supervisor present all the time, but others can feel much more pressured — which in turn negatively impacts their output — at even the smallest monitoring action. It’s also important to put together employees and their supervisors / officers so that managers will have a better understanding of each subordinate’s pace, attitudes, and mindsets, and act accordingly during oversight. Foster an environment conducive to learning and developing leadership skills. This means creating a culture where everyone’s input is valued but also keeping a firm position on who has the final say. This also means that the workplace should be made more transparent, so that everyone from the leaders and decision-makers to the rank-and-file folks have a better sense of what’s happening in the macro sense. Good ideas should always be rewarded and the originator credited for the idea and given the right recognition and appreciation. This way, others will also be encouraged to speak up and contribute to the organization in a positive manner. Have the right tools to help support and supplement your workflow and productivity. One of the ways to minimize micromanagement in the workplace is to be equipped with the necessary tools that make it easier for rank-and-file employees to track the progress and schedule of their work, and for managers and leaders to look at the larger issues at play in the workplace. Runrun.it’s suite of innovative workflow enhancement solutions are customizable and can be adjusted to fit clients’ needs. The system is largely transparent, thus helping decision-makers better oversee workflow and productivity while at the same time having access to real-time generated data that helps them make more informed decisions. This transparent nature also works well for collaboration efforts, as people can step in to help each other when needed and have a clearer picture of how the project is going. To see how Runrun.it can impact your organization for the better, check out the free trial here. micromanagement [https://blog.runrun.it/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/05.paz-espírito-gif-CTA-eng.gif]
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Result 13
TitleDo You Lead or Manage? 6 Symptoms of a Micromanager - Weekdone
Urlhttps://blog.weekdone.com/lead-or-manage-6-symptoms-micromanager/
Description79% of employees have been micromanaged at one point or another. Avoid these 6 symptoms of a micromanager to keep your people happy and motivated
Date
Organic Position13
H1Do You Lead or Manage? 6 Symptoms of a Micromanager
H2What is micromanagement anyway?
6 symptoms of a micromanager
Tips For Micromanagers
10 Infographics That Will Make You a Better Leader
H3Avoids delegation
Control-obsessed
Dictate everything
Suffers from reportomania
Detail-orientedness
Discourages independent decision making
1. Refrain from meddling
2. Focus on employee projects and KPIs, not expected tasks
3. See the forest through the trees
H2WithAnchorsWhat is micromanagement anyway?
6 symptoms of a micromanager
Tips For Micromanagers
10 Infographics That Will Make You a Better Leader
BodyDo You Lead or Manage? 6 Symptoms of a Micromanager Külli Koort Team Leadership & Management For close to 10 years, Weekdone has been at the forefront on bringing team management tools into the pocket of every leader. If you haven't, check out our weekly team planning and reporting software here for free. The line between an effective leader and a micromanager can be thin. Where does the line between being detail-oriented or obsessive lie? Or between being overly controlling or sufficiently constructive? Although the line can seem hazy for you, chances are your employees easily recognize micromanagement. Yet, managers rarely view themselves as such. According to a survey 79% of employees claimed they'd been micromanaged at one point or another. What is more, 91% of managers were unaware of employees changing their job due to their micromanagement behaviors. 79% of #employees have been #micromanaged at one point or another. Have you?Click To Tweet What is micromanagement anyway? Taking the easiest definition into account, micromanagement is a management style whereby a manager closely observes the work of employees. I am not trying to say that micromanagement is all bad. Micromanagers usually have all the best intentions, but they just drive their people crazy. They usually try to be perfect, which makes them over-controlling and prevents them from using empowering leadership behaviors. According to Robert Hurley's research paper 30 to 35% of executives succeed as managers but stumble when they find themselves in a higher-level position that requires leadership, but they respond with management. Up to 35% of #managers stumble when they find themselves in higher-level position.Click To Tweet Taking together these recent surveys, it is evident that  a lot of managers are unaware of their micromanagement behaviors and their employees are too shy to give feedback. How do you improve something you have no idea about? 6 symptoms of a micromanager. Summing up various surveys and researches, here are 6 symptoms of a micromanager and their cures. Are there any familiar behavioral patterns you or your manager might use every now and then? Avoids delegation. A micromanager often believes no one could do a better job, which is why they find themselves doing the work of others. They might be successful in short-run, but over time the workload keeps growing and everyone's performance suffers.  As a result, good people leave or stop taking initiative and the manager will feel overwhelmed. 48% of companies surveyed were concerned about employees’ delegation skills, but only 28% offered any training. Delegation is a skill like any other. It demands time and practice to be mastered. Our Weekdone progress report users have been able to assign tasks to each other with just one click. Although delegating tasks this way is effortless, it still demands letting go of the control. What could be the cure? Assigning one full task, not just pits and parts, but the full task. It might be painful, but it's necessary. Control-obsessed. Another symptom that signals you might be dealing with micromanagement is if a person feels constant urge to send countless emails to check employees progress. After delegating a full task to someone, it's natural to feel the need to keep checking on the status. Everything has its limits. What is more, micromanagement is believed to be one of the most significant barriers U.S workers face in completing most important tasks. How to control the control-obsessed behaviors? There are smarter ways to keep an eye on the progress. Hassle-free ways that give the micromanager a full picture of what's going on without having to send several emails or keep dropping by the desk. One such clever method is the PPP process  – weekly reporting on progress, plans and problems. Dictate everything. Micromanagers also love to give exact directions on how to complete a task. I recently happened to read an amusing blog post how one employee found a task list that was pages long on her table, each morning. It's easier and probably takes as much time to finish the task than write exact directions. According to a survey, 55% admit micromanaging decreases productivity, 68% say it decreases morale. What could be the solution? It's difficult to change something you're not aware of. That's why reflection is important, take the leadership assessment test in leadsmarter.co. Suffers from reportomania. What in the world is "reportomania"? No worries, it's not a deadly diseases, but it's an annoying habit to request unnecessary and overly detailed reports. It's closely connected to being control-obsessed and needing to possess every information detail. Although it might be doable with a team of 5 people, it gets overwhelming with a team of 15. There is always more information out there, than one can possibly consume. Fun fact: 38% of employees would rather do unpleasant activities than sit next to their micromanaging boss. What to do? Well, this solution is quite evident, try Weekdone and start receiving reports that include the information connected to long-term objectives. What Is Weekdone for Managers & Leaders? Video Guide And BenefitsWatch this video on YouTube Detail-orientedness. A typical micromanager corrects tiny details before seeing the big picture. This in return will lead to losing site of the larger strategic issues. 9 out of 10 managers admit decisions made in the past three years would have been better if they’d let in more information. It's impossible to let more meaningful information in, if you're stuck with details. What's the easy fix? It's important to admit that mistakes do happen and sometimes bad decisions are made. But it's not okay to loose your focus from long-term objectives. Publishing your objectives and key results is a step towards the right direction. Discourages independent decision making. A micromanager is usually irritated when an employee makes a decision without consulting them first. That's true even if the decision is within their level of expertise! A good percentage of employees feel that managers don’t help them perform at their best. Discouraging people to make decisions and take responsibility is demotivating. The cure? Giving employees the autonomy they deserve. If a person was hired to do a certain job, let them shine. Here's a slideshow we put together to help as well: Now more than ever, employees desire empowerment, inspiration, and autonomy. Although it's difficult to give up control and fully trust someone else to get the job done, it's absolutely necessary. Failure to delegate and empower can lead to unwanted employee turnover and under-developed staff. Let these 6 symptoms guide the way to self-reflection and a happier workplace. Tips For Micromanagers. 1. Refrain from meddling. The best way to avoid meddling in the middle of your employees' work is to assign tasks based on your employees' strong suits. Maintaining self restraint and avoiding over-managing and frustrating employees is far easier when you can trust that your employees are doing work in their best fields. It's easier to admit that, in those circumstances, they probably know better than you and will come to you if any problems emerge. 2. Focus on employee projects and KPIs, not expected tasks. Second guessing low-risk decision making is a one way ticket for employees to perform worse. On the one hand, if your employees are independent and understand their work, they'll be frustrated that you don't trust them. In the case of those who are more insecure of their work, they'll become more disheartened and aquire a defeatist attitude even with the most basic or mundane of tasks. Focus on big picture ideas when meeting with employees. No one benefits if you fret over the font size used in private correspondance, for example. You don't need to monitor how and when your employee answers emails as long as they give you consistent project updates and are making good time on their deadlines. Don't search for problems, wait for your employees to come to you with their problems first. 3. See the forest through the trees. This old turn-of-phrase highlights the key problem with micromanagement. Being detail oriented is fine, obsessing about details hurts you as well. Not only should you be focused on employee projects instead of tasks, but you, yourself, should focus closely on connecting everything to larger team and company goals. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email 10 Infographics That Will Make You a Better Leader .  We gathered the best 10 infographics that we believe to be simple, practical and proven to make you a better leader. Continue reading This website uses cookies to improve your experience. 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TitleHow Micromanagement Is Harming Your Company | Guide | Effects +Tips
Urlhttps://blog.vantagecircle.com/micromanagement/
DescriptionMicromanagement is a management style that harms a company in many ways, or so it is believed. But, is this true? Today, let's understand the concept better
DateDec 2, 2021
Organic Position14
H1How Micromanagement Is Harming Your Company? (Mini Guide)
H2What is Micromanagement?
Signs of a Micromanager in the Workplace
Effects of Micromanagement
The Negative Effects of Micromanagement
The Positive Effects of Micromanagement
Micromanagement vs. Macromanagement
Micromanagement Quotes
Is Micromanagement Effective?
How to deal with Micromanagement?
Conclusion
Employee off-boarding- Do's And Dont's
Top 10 Employee Advocacy Tools That You Need
How Technology Has Helped HR In Organizations [Part-1]
H3Bookmarks
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Social
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1. Damages trust
2. High Attrition Rates
3. High Burnout
4. Dependent Staff
5. Narrow Vision And Scope
1. Greater Control
2. Get New Hires Up To Speed
3. Delegation Of Work is Easier
4. High Engagement With the Team
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H2WithAnchorsWhat is Micromanagement?
Signs of a Micromanager in the Workplace
Effects of Micromanagement
The Negative Effects of Micromanagement
The Positive Effects of Micromanagement
Micromanagement vs. Macromanagement
Micromanagement Quotes
Is Micromanagement Effective?
How to deal with Micromanagement?
Conclusion
Employee off-boarding- Do's And Dont's
Top 10 Employee Advocacy Tools That You Need
How Technology Has Helped HR In Organizations [Part-1]
BodyHow Micromanagement Is Harming Your Company? (Mini Guide) Management 10 min read Last Updated on 02 December 2021 One of the clear statements about micromanagement is that micromanagers control outcomes and not people. It might be valid to some extent, but we believe in looking at things from different perspectives. The common belief is that the word "micromanagement" has a negative connotation. And why not? It is frustrating and demotivating. As if dealing with a tough job wasn't enough, you now have to deal with a nagging micromanager. Table of Contents Micromanagement in the Workplace What is Micromanagement? Signs of a Micromanager in the Workplace Effects of Micromanagement The Negative Effects of Micromanagement The Positive Effects of Micromanagement Micromanagement vs. Macromanagement Micromanagement Quotes Is Micromanagement Effective? How to deal with Micromanagement? Conclusion What is Micromanagement? Micromanagement or micromanaging is a management style where the manager monitors their subordinates and team members extensively. This means being fully involved in their work, limiting the workforce's creativity, autonomy, and input. It often harms employee engagement and experience, mostly resulting in attrition. Signs of a Micromanager in the Workplace. Here are the common signs of a micromanager in the workplace: Being too involved in every step of the way that a worker takes in his/her work. Reluctant to trust in the capabilities of a workforce to do their task well. They need their team to take approval for everything they do. They are always on the lookout for perfection. While this pursuit is not wrong, you must understand that you cannot get perfection in everything. Getting less input from workers because managers don’t trust them enough to come up with good ideas Always impatient to get work done well and quickly at the same time, a combination that does not go well together. For the work to get over properly, you must give your staff time. A micromanager is often of the opinion that he/she is all-knowing. In this belief, they think no one else can do a better job than them. It results in a low delegation as an example in this case. Focusing more on criticizing what people are doing wrong rather than developing strengths. They don't give public praise and recognition to their team. Micromanagement can have a cascading effect on the way workplaces function. When leaders put extreme pressure on managers for goals, the managers transfer that pressure to the front lines. This is detrimental to the overall organizational performance. Effects of Micromanagement. In a rational sense, the effects of micromanagement are dreadful in the current industry. It is because employees feel suffocated in such a work environment, which harms their experience and performance. But let's look from the perspective of a manager. It must be frustrating to watch someone fall behind when you very well know how to avoid the pitfalls. It gets hard not to keep silent when someone is making a mistake on your project in such a scenario. But is that a license for management positions to practice micromanaging? And does it work to improve the situation? Let's start our pursuit of the answers by looking at the negative and positive effects of micromanaging. The Negative Effects of Micromanagement. 1. Damages trust. It is probably the most damaging aspect of micromanaging your staff. Your workforce no longer sees you as a knight in shining armor leader but rather as a brute boss. This nagging attention to small details destroys the trust that exists between you and your subordinates. Lack of trust between you and your workers can have two consequences. Either it can result in a loss of motivation or, worse, loss in personnel. Yes, employee attrition is a real problem. You may lose many high-performing workers due to practicing a micromanager style. Trust is a mutual emotion. Your subordinates will trust you only as much as you trust them. Therefore, you must drop this management style to create an environment of trust in the company. 2. High Attrition Rates. Without beating around the bush, it's a fact that people don't like bossy individuals. It means by being one, your workers will only lead to frustration and a dip in productivity, and finally an increase in turnover rates. Paying attention to insignificant and minute details rob your workers of their freedom. Which ultimately destroys morale and affects the momentum of your company. Even from a financial point of view, it doesn't seem to make much sense. High turnover rates ultimately diminish any monetary gains from your pursuit of perfection. 3. High Burnout. The irony is that this is not just about your employees but also your problem too. Here's a simple fact: Micromanaging is exhausting. Treating your staff like kids and looking at all employees' work every step of the way will soon burn you out. Burnout will soon lead to you hating your job and the very company you are in employment. We have seen countless managers leaving their job due to burnout. A lousy role makes you hate not only your company but also the position. Very often, we have seen people not willing to go back to any management role. This burnout usually affects the ones beneath you as well. Most managers end up venting their frustration on their subordinates. It again leads to burnout and frustration in the workforce. Burnout is a vicious cycle, and it takes a toll on both your physical and mental health. Sometimes it's easier and better for everyone if you take a step back and leave some room to breathe for both your workers and yourself. 4. Dependent Staff. One unseen effect of this management style is that your subordinates or workers become dependent. Your workers steadily lose their confidence and ability to work on a project when you fail to delegate work with autonomy. And of course, it doesn't make sense. You hired talents because they bring something fresh and exciting to the table. What's the point if you are going to dictate and kill their creativity? We believe that when people are given the right amount of freedom in their work, magic happens. Just look at some of the world's biggest companies, and you will notice that they are not very strong advocates of such management styles. Coincidence? 5. Narrow Vision And Scope. Another very neglected effect is the loss of control and vision. When managers demand frequent updates from their subordinates, it is an indication that they are losing sight of the big picture and focus solely on only short-term gains. Also, when a manager closely observes a team, the management tools become very limited. Slowly the only management tool at disposal is sole control. An interesting fact about control is when it is the only management tool exercised; people usually lose it. And of course, another pungent effect is that your vision becomes the team's or company's vision. Your workers lose their creativity and ultimately lose the ability to bring anything new to the table. The Positive Effects of Micromanagement. 1. Greater Control. Let's face it. It is one of the most apparent reasons why managers engage in this kind of management style. They want greater control over the operations and results of the project. The bottom line is if you are a paranoid perfectionist, then closely overseeing and paying attention to small details is one of the more attractive perks. Since a manager is more experienced than their subordinates, he is more likely to foresee and avoid any process's adverse outcome. 2. Get New Hires Up To Speed. It's difficult for new hires to understand our trade tricks, more so if your new talent has no prior experience and is a fresher. Closely monitoring your new employees' activities is a great way to bring your new employees up to speed. It makes it easier for new hires to add value to their departments because of the intense onboarding process. 3. Delegation Of Work is Easier. Since you have been closely observing your team, the delegation of work is far more comfortable. In any case, a delegation of work is easier. Since a micromanager is doing most of the work, he/she will be the perfect person to delegate any project task. 4. High Engagement With the Team. One thing you cannot accuse a micromanager of is not engaging with its team. They have better communication skills than a macro manager and highly engage with the team. Any problem in the group is aptly dealt with by the manager without any second thought. They take upon their shoulders the task of delivering outstanding results and usually do not fail very often. Micromanagement vs. Macromanagement. While micromanagement looks at the smallest of things and practices rigid scrutiny, macromanagement is the opposite. Macromanagement works by looking at the big picture and giving workers the freedom to work by themselves. Since these are such vast contrasting subjects, one can often draw a comparison between them. So, let's point out certain situations in which the two of these work better. For higher job satisfaction, macromanagement is the way forward as it provides a better employee experience. By micromanaging, you can only ruin a workforce's morale. For better control of the projects, micromanagement is much better. It is so because this management style gives more control of the work. This means the manager can steer the ship; however, he/she deems fit. For better trust in the workplace, you must practice macromanagement. The whole concept of this approach is built on trust and hence will give you much better results. On specific procedures like onboarding, you may need to practice micromanagement. It is because new workers may not know the work and your company. In this regard, they need someone to guide them through. Being self-sufficient is crucial in the corporate world today. Workers must be able to handle their tasks by themselves rather than having someone look over them 24x7. To instill this attribute in your workforce, you must opt for macromanagement to let them learn to work by themselves. In some instances, communication is vital. For having the best communicating managers, micromanagement can help you to an extent. It is because it relies on continuous communication between the subordinates and managers. This makes for better practice. For having a better working environment, macromanagement is always a much safer option than micromanagement. The latter reduces motivation, morale, employee satisfaction, employee engagement, and so on. In specific high-priority time-sensitive projects, you may need to practice micromanagement to ensure things get complete in time. In this aspect, one must be sure not to overdo it. We hope by reading our piece thus far, you are getting a fair idea about what this management style is all about. Now, let's bring a few outside perspectives into the topic and understand what some personalities have to say about the management style that we have been discussing till now. Micromanagement Quotes. Micromanage the process, not the people – Joe Apfelbaum Invariably, micromanaging results in four problems: deceit, disloyalty, conflict, and communication problems. – John Rosemond Micro-managing creativity kills it. – Stewart Stafford None of us should wait to be told what to do, or how to do it. Micromanagement kills initiative, judgment, and creativity. – David H. Maister A boss who micromanages is like a coach who wants to get in the game. – Simon Sinek Micromanaging erodes people's confidence, making them overly dependent on their leaders. – Diane Dreher Micromanaging is ridiculous. There's always a certain amount of dynamic tension, which is good because it stimulates creative thinking. – Karin Uhlich Now, let's bring this towards an end with the most important question; does it work? Is Micromanagement Effective? There is one thing you must understand that everything has its positives and negatives. Similarly, micromanagement also has some positives and scenarios in which it is useful, as discussed above. Now, the situation comes down to how you handle it. If you use it in the correct must-have situations, then yes, it will work. But, if you overdo it at every step of the way, it won't be effective. So, in short, it all comes down to how you implement it in the workplace. How to deal with Micromanagement? The first step to deal with micromanagement is to identify and accept that there is micromanagement. The signs of a micromanager outlined above can help you identify this. Once acknowledged, we can now work on how to tackle it. Here are some ways that can help address micromanagement at the workplace: Micromanagers feel they can’t trust others’ decisions or abilities, so they choose to keep a watch at all times. Establishing the right communication is critical to building this trust. Assure them that you know what you are doing and will do whatever it takes to achieve the goals. Check-in with them regularly to let them know how things are going. Encourage your manager to create checklists with objectives, milestones, and measurable outcomes. Managers can review the performances during check-in meetings. But get them to agree to not interfere during the interim period. Managers can set deadlines for deliverables and review the progress of projects during periodic check-ins. Keep all communication channels open to help and guide the team in the right direction. We need to understand that micromanagement can be a result of deeper issues. It can be a sign of a fear of failure or insecurities of not doing well enough. This could be the first time they are leading and may not know any other way of management. Maybe they find it hard to give up control or maybe that is how they measure their worth. It is critical to develop empathy if we want to effectively solve the issues of micromanagement. Teach managers about delegation— how it can make their work easier as well as contribute to their success. Conclusion. The bottom line is that every CEO dreams of having a manager whom he can rely upon and who has great attention to detail. Micromanagement is a sensitive issue and must fall into cautious hands. There is a fragile line between achieving outstanding results and inducing attrition through it. The idea is to find where the line is. This article is written by Jyoti Prakash Barman. He is an in-house Content Marketer at Vantage Circle with interests in music and automobiles. For any related queries, contact [email protected] Share this article. Employee recognition now made easy! To automate, simplify and streamline all types of recognition and rewards into one easy-to-manage system. Learn more Join our network of 1M+ HR Professionals Get Exclusive HR content delivered right into your inbox! We safeguard your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Policy You might also like. Management Employee off-boarding- Do's And Dont's. Give your employees the best off-boarding experience with this brief guide on Dos and Dont's of employee Offboarding. Read more Management Top 10 Employee Advocacy Tools That You Need. Here is a list of Top 10 Employee Advocacy Tools that you will need to increase your brand marketing in social media. Read more Management How Technology Has Helped HR In Organizations [Part-1]. The emergence of AI or Artificial Intelligence has helped organizations on many fronts. But which are the critical areas they cover? Let us have a look at it. Read more 25 Leadership Qualities that Makes You a Great Leader Download this free guide to deliver more into what it takes to be a great leader for driving effective teamwork within the organization. 5k+ Downloads by HR professionals across the globe!
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Result 15
Title"Am I being micromanaged?" – 8 Signs you work for a micromanager
Urlhttps://www.honestly.com/blog/how-to-deal-micromanager-part1/
DescriptionFeel like you are being micromanaged or are you unsure if you are a micromanager yourself? Learn about the signs of micromanagement in part 1 of our series
DateMar 11, 2019
Organic Position15
H1“Am I being micromanaged?” – 8 Signs you work for a micromanager
H2It might not be micromanagement, even if it feels like it
Common signs your boss is micromanaging:
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H2WithAnchorsIt might not be micromanagement, even if it feels like it
Common signs your boss is micromanaging:
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Body“Am I being micromanaged?” – 8 Signs you work for a micromanager by Diana Bailey - March 11, 2019 Afraid you’re being micromanaged at work? You’re not alone. In his book My Way or the Highway, leadership guru and owner of Trinity Solutions consulting firm Harry Chambers shares details from his company’s survey that showed 79 percent of respondents had experienced micromanagement during their careers thus far. Want to find out how to empower employees and improve performance management? Check out our case study While micromanagement might be common, that doesn’t mean it should be accepted. In many cases, micromanagement is a symptom of weak leadership, rather than the strong leadership it’s meant to present. Don’t be surprised if your domineering manager is relatively new to the ranks of management. When supervisors are unsure of themselves and their team, they inevitably try to maintain as much control over the work output as they can. They believe that they need to know every detail in order to perfect their end product. Unfortunately, that same study from Trinity Solutions showed that 70% of people who reported being micromanaged had considered quitting their job because of it. Over 30% of respondents actually did. Though a certain level of stress is to be expected at work, micromanagement multiplies a normal level of stress by every action an employee undertakes. Instead of worrying about making a deadline or handing in subpar work, now an employee has to second-guess every choice they make during the course of a day. That kind of anxiety builds up quickly and has serious physical consequences, like heart trouble or even death. The level of focus necessary to ensure that your work not only meets your own expectations, but also some unknowable ideal of your supervisor’s, is incredibly draining. Risk-taking and innovation are impossible under the close watch of a judgemental boss. It’s likely that you’ve already experienced micromanagement during your career. We often mythologize micromanagers as visionary perfectionists, whose guidance on every small detail brings an extraordinary idea to life. Steve Jobs’s compulsive perfectionism was famous (or infamous). In his biography, Walter Isaacson wrote of how, in the hospital near the end of his life, Jobs ripped off his oxygen mask because it was ugly. “[He] mumbled that he hated the design and refused to wear it. Though barely able to speak, he ordered them to bring five different options for the mask and he would pick a design he liked.” We’ve all been exposed to the idea there is something inherently noble about demanding perfection, so occasionally it can be hard to know if your boss’s attention is inspiring or toxic. Attending to a supervisor’s every wish can take up so much of your focus that you might not realize micromanagement when it happens. It could look like it’s just part of the job, or that your boss is testing your abilities. If you are in a junior position, you might mistake micromanagement for mentorship. In Part 1 of our two-part series on micromanagement, we’ll help you identify the signs that your boss is crossing boundaries in their leadership style. It might not be micromanagement, even if it feels like it. There are times when you might feel suffocated by an overbearing manager. That doesn’t necessarily mean it’s micromanagement. For instance, you might be receiving emails or messages from your boss after work hours or on the weekend. No one likes to get a work-related notification on their phone while they are out enjoying their free time. It may feel like you are expected to respond immediately. But that may not be the case. If your boss is a workhorse, they might not keep the same hours as you. He or she might have had other obligations that kept them from addressing the topic during normal working hours. They might not expect a reply, but wanted to send something while it was still fresh in their mind. Broaching the topic with your boss will clarify what their expectations are of your responsiveness. In turn, you can set your own boundaries about when your boss can, and cannot, expect a reply from you. “Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” – George S. Patton Common signs your boss is micromanaging:. They avoid delegation Since micromanagers can’t believe anyone else will do a decent job, the only solution is… to do everything themselves. While they might get the results they want at first, this can’t possibly last. Eventually, they’ll come to discover that there are only 24 hours in a day. Without assigning tasks to others with specialized skills, supervisors will inevitably take on work that they aren’t as qualified to produce. If your boss is a micromanager, they might also think it’s faster to revise your work than to give you feedback on what could be improved. You’re constantly making reports Even a company’s CEO has to report to a board of directors, but working for a micromanager can make it seem like the reporting is the job. As they can’t trust their employees’ work and dedication enough to leave well enough alone, a micromanaging boss is constantly asking you for updates. The thing about spreadsheets is, they won’t show any progress if the only progress you’ve made is on your latest spreadsheet. You’re not allowed to make decisions If you feel like you’ve got to ask permission to go to the bathroom, you probably work for a micromanager. While it’s likely that the product of your work has to go through some approval process, you should be able to make decisions about how that product gets made. You were hired because you were the most qualified person for your role and you should able to bring your expertise to your work. If even the smallest tasks require sign off from your supervisor, it could be a red flag. They complain constantly The funny thing about mistakes is, if they’re all you look for, they’re all you’ll find. A boss that doesn’t trust their employees is always going to look for evidence that validates their paranoia. And they’re going to find it, even if it’s a typo in a calendar reminder you only sent to yourself. This type of manager can find fault in anything, no matter how inconsequential. While they might tell themselves that they are pushing for excellence, they are only sapping the motivation of their staff. They won’t pass on their skills or knowledge It’s inspiring to work for a boss that you feel you can learn from. Supervisors can act as role models for junior employees who are starting their careers. For a fresh new employee, finding out that your boss has little interest in mentoring you can be a crushing disappointment. To these micromanagers, knowledge is currency. If they share that knowledge, they’re depleting their own value. They may never verbalize their reluctance to teach you, but they may say that they’re just way too busy. If your manager never follows up on your requests for guidance or mentorship, they may be avoiding the critical skill-sharing that you need to develop in your role. They don’t see the forest for the trees A good manager knows that effort is a valuable, finite resource that needs to be well-protected. A micromanager loses sight of the big picture–the relative relationship between effort and reward–to focus narrowly on small details. For example, instead of updating an existing brochure with more current facts, a micromanager might ask for a whole new brochure to be created. These decisions could jeopardize an important deadline simply to satisfy the whims of one person in a powerful position. Feedback falls on deaf ears While a normal boss-to-employee relationship should have feedback flow in both directions, a micromanager is more interested in a one-way conversation. Because they’ve put themselves under enormous pressure, they are more irritable and explosive when faced with criticism. They might respond to your critique with some variation of, “Well, that’s just how things work here.” Micromanagers aren’t interested in what they can do to improve–they only look for the weakness in others. Projects drag on forever Since your boss seems to be the only one who’s allowed to make any decisions, get any work done, or even decide what the work is, their incredibly-busy schedule will set the pace for everything there is to do. Micromanagers are blockers that keep projects delayed while everyone awaits their approval. The revision process can also extend far beyond what was scheduled as a micromanager gives a piece of feedback, changes their mind, and eventually settles on the first suggestion they had. Does this sound like someone you work with? If the markers we’ve outlined here ring true for you, you are likely working for a micromanager. However, there are proactive strategies you can use to set healthier boundaries around your work. A feedback solution allowing you to anonymously communicate to your manager that his way of handling things is not helping the team at all is one of them. Next week, we’ll tackle how to deal with a micromanager in Part 2. If you want to see a prime example of how one of our clients used our solution to empower their managers and include employees in decision-making processes, check out this case study and see if this is something you would be interested in. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE. How to Fail Your Employee Survey Really Hard: A Beginner’s Guide. There are already many companies out there today who have mastered the art of creating employee surveys so complicated you need an advanced degree in literature to figure out the wording and a Ph.D. in philosophy to figure out why this survey is relevant at all. We have created this […] Read more How to Host a Hackathon at Work. Have you noticed how much has changed in the past couple of months? I mean, apart from “Sorry, bad connection, can you please repeat that?” being the most used business phrase of 2020, work-life in general seems to have evolved from its previous, office-bound self, into a more digital and […] Read more Back to Work – 9 Steps to a Safer Workplace. Since we returned back to work in our office, we have put many different safeguards in place in order to keep ourselves and others healthy. We have been asked by several customers about what extra safety measures we have taken and decided to sum them up in this blog article. […] Read more Subscribe. Back to top close Employee Engagement Customer experience YOU’RE IN GOOD COMPANY Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [/images/google.png] Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [/images/daimler.png] unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [/images/upload/unicredit-grey.png] lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [/images/lufthansa.png] continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [/images/continental.png] europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [/images/europarl.png] close honestly [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]honestly [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]honestly [/images/logo.png] Talk to a sales representative YOU’RE IN GOOD COMPANY Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [/images/google.png] Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [/images/daimler.png] unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [/images/upload/unicredit-grey.png] lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [/images/lufthansa.png] continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [/images/continental.png] europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [/images/europarl.png] close honestly [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]honestly [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]honestly [/images/logo.png] Sign up for a free trial YOU’RE IN GOOD COMPANY Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [/images/google.png] Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [/images/daimler.png] unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [/images/upload/unicredit-grey.png] lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [/images/lufthansa.png] continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [/images/continental.png] europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [/images/europarl.png] close honestly [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]honestly [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]honestly [/images/logo.png] Request a demo YOU’RE IN GOOD COMPANY Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Google [/images/google.png] Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Daimler [/images/daimler.png] unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]unicredit [/images/upload/unicredit-grey.png] lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]lufthansa [/images/lufthansa.png] continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]continental [/images/continental.png] europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]europarl [/images/europarl.png]
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TitleWhat is exactly meant by micromanagement? - Quora
Urlhttps://www.quora.com/What-is-exactly-meant-by-micromanagement
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TitleDon’t Micromanage: How It Destroys Your Team and How to Avoid It | Process Street | Checklist, Workflow and SOP Software
Urlhttps://www.process.st/micromanage/
DescriptionIt's tempting to micromanage, but this post will show you why doing so will cause major problems. You'll also be shown a much better alternative!
DateOct 29, 2021
Organic Position17
H1Don’t Micromanage: How It Destroys Your Team and How to Avoid It
H2What is micromanagement?
To micromanage, not not to micromanage? (Pros and cons)
Spot the micromanager: Common traits to look out for
Offset micromanagement with OKRs
Avoid the need for micromanagement with process management
Micromanagement isn’t worth the hassle it creates
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H3Pros of micromanagement
Cons of micromanagement
Getting started with process management
Tell the world!
Ben Mulholland
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H2WithAnchorsWhat is micromanagement?
To micromanage, not not to micromanage? (Pros and cons)
Spot the micromanager: Common traits to look out for
Offset micromanagement with OKRs
Avoid the need for micromanagement with process management
Micromanagement isn’t worth the hassle it creates
Get our posts & product updates earlier by simply subscribing
Get a free Process Street account and take control of your workflows today
BodyDon’t Micromanage: How It Destroys Your Team and How to Avoid It Ben Mulholland October 29, 2021 Business Operations, Management, Project Management It’s hard watching someone make mistakes, especially if you already know how to avoid them. Staying silent while they slip up (or even do things in ways you would not) is harder. That doesn’t mean you have an excuse to micromanage them. Micromanagement is the ultimate controlling management style. It’s demoralizing and counter-intuitive, as the desire for control to make sure everything goes to plan only creates more problems in the long-term. That’s why in this Process Street article, we’ll be looking at: What is micromanagement? The pros and cons of micromanagement How to spot a micromanager How to offset micromanagement with OKRs Using process management to remove the need for micromanagement Let’s get started. What is micromanagement? (Source by Carbon Tippy Toes, used under license CC BY-SA 2.0) Micromanagement is exactly what it sounds like; someone trying to personally control and monitor everything in a team, situation, or place. While this is sometimes useful (in small-scale projects), this usually results in the manager losing track of the larger picture and annoying the team by being overly-controlling. Let’s say that you’re told to complete a task. Usually, this would mean that your manager assigns you the job, asks if you need anything and states when it is needed, and then pretty much leaves you to complete the operation. They should be available to talk to without interfering with the work directly and slowing the operation down. If they instead micromanage, they would either watch your every move or demand progress reports more often than is necessary. They would likely chastise you for the slightest mistake or for carrying out a task differently to how they would have done it. If there are seemingly countless revisions requested, endless status reports being demanded more often than necessary, and an apparent lack of trust in other members of the team to get on with their work and do their job, then you may be in the presence of a micromanager… To micromanage, not not to micromanage? (Pros and cons). That said, sometimes what we call “micromanagement” is the result of a genuine effort to oversee a team’s successful function; in other words, the manager’s heart might be in the right place, but the execution of their managerial style may benefit from some improvements. Sometimes it’s useful (or even necessary) to closely track and monitor work; for example, when onboarding new employees, or when carrying out experimental or sensitive work. Problems can arise if this approach is not properly kept in check; it’s impossible to scale micromanagement and that’s when growing teams may run into problems, because managers can no longer effectively keep up with all of the elements they are trying to micromanage. Pros of micromanagement. (Source by Klean Denmark, used under license CC BY-SA 2.0) Some say that micromanagement is never a good thing. While it may be true that the term has garnered a negative connotation, sometimes, projects or teams will benefit from a high-touch management style. Whether or not this is really “micromanagement” is up for debate, but a high-touch approach can be useful for: Operations where greater control or expert guidance is required Training & onboarding new employees Complex processes where instructions need to be clearly communicated, and there is an expectation of a steep learning curve Another way of thinking about it: To micromanage is to attempt to retain as much control over an operation as possible. The micromanagement style, or more specifically, keeping close tabs on what work is being done, how it is being done, and the quality of the output, can certainly be used effectively, as long as scalability is considered alongside the impact that such a management style will have on employee wellbeing & psychological safety, as well as the broader workplace culture. Maybe the manager has everyone reporting back to them with frequent status reports, letting them check that everything is being done to their standards. Again, this can be useful for guiding smaller teams and new employees, where there will be a clear knowledge gap. And it’s definitely true that extra instruction and guidance can help to improve the onboarding experience. In general, you could make the argument that a micromanagement approach could be used for onboarding within smaller teams to benefit from more high-quality 1:1 guidance from their managers, without putting too much strain on the manager. Just be sure to consider scalability, because in the long run, however you look at it, micromanagement does not lend itself to scalability. Cons of micromanagement. Now we get to the negatives – the main reasons we often think of “micromanage” as a dirty word. Put bluntly, micromanagement: Annoys employees Is vulnerable to human error on both sides Isn’t scalable at all Makes managers lose sight of the big picture Damages employee trust Leads to burnout in managers and teams alike Can cause employees to become dependent on micromanagement Increases employee turnover rate You can probably recall an instance of micromanagement that you’ve experienced in your life. Try and remember how it made you feel. Were you on the receiving end, or were you doing the micromanagement? The points above are clearly focused around the experience of the team or employee being micromanaged, which, alongside scalability considerations, is arguably the area where micromanagement can do the most damage. When you micromanage you’re telling the employee that you don’t trust them enough to work on their own and still produce good results. Sometimes that’s justified, e.g. in the case of an untrained employee, or for more sensitive workflows. But there are better ways to teach employees the skills they need to do their job; micromanagement is what leads to employees getting frustrated with management, increasing workplace anxiety and damaging the trust they have in leadership. Unchecked micromanagement can also discourage any kind of independent work and decision-making in the team. After all, you are unlikely to build confidence in your actions or choices if everything you did is scrutinized and “corrected”. In other words, micromanaging employees doesn’t just breed resentment. It makes them dependent on further micromanagement to do their jobs. And of course, micromanagement isn’t in any way scalable. Think about it – someone is having to spend every moment of their day reviewing the fine details of what their team is doing. Scaling up means that said team would either grow or take on new duties. Either would mean a huge increase in the information available. At some point the micromanager themselves can’t keep up with everything, leading to either mistakes due to oversight or burnout. Spot the micromanager: Common traits to look out for. (Source by Infusionsoft, used under license CC BY-SA 2.0) Despite covering the pros and cons of micromanagement, it’s not always easy to see when the practice is being used. This is especially true if you’re the one micromanaging (or being micromanaged). You can’t weed a garden with your eyes closed. You need to be able to see and identify the problem or risk doing more harm than good. To this end, most micromanagers share a few (although not always all) of the following traits: They don’t delegate Any delegated work is taken over again if a mistake is spotted They hate decisions being made without them Focus is on the little details rather than the big picture Most (or all) of their time is spent overseeing others They ignore the opinion and/or experience of others Frequent updates are requested by them (even if the project isn’t relevant to them) They often find deliverables unsatisfactory Managing positions are, understandably, the first port of call for scrutiny. This is doubly so in a team that’s recently grown. Remember, if the team is small enough to micromanage then these traits aren’t necessarily a bad thing. The problem comes when the team expands and their managing techniques don’t adapt to the new scale of operations. Delegation is a great signifier too, as most micromanagers will either not delegate tasks that they shouldn’t be doing any more or take back delegated duties if they aren’t satisfied with the results. This approach is tempting and can be seen in many startup founders as their company grows. They start out doing the things they’re good at (such as coding) but when the company grows they have to bite the bullet and delegate that work, even if they loved doing it. Offset micromanagement with OKRs. (Source by Corey Seeman, used under license CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) is a management technique which provides all of the useful elements of micromanagement without the need for total control. OKRs are generally set every quarter, allowing the team to refocus on key objectives and how to reach them. This is done by: Setting a couple (not usually more than 5) objectives relevant to the audience, be it a team or an individual Making sure that objectives are actionable, quantifiable, have a deadline, and are a little ambitious Define up to 4 measurable results for each objective Results should be difficult but achievable, measurable, and lead to objective progress On setting OKRs that will work, Process Street’s own Jay Hanlon, Chief of Staff and VP of People & Operations told me: “In selecting OKRs, you want to focus on big, impactful objectives — the things you believe you can do in a given period of time that will really matter. For key results, the most important thing is that they’re what are sometimes called ‘SMART’ goals, meaning they’re Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Relevant, and Time-bound.” — Jay Hanlon You could use a dedicated people & performance management software like 15Five to keep track of your OKRs. You could also Process Street Pages to track all of the OKR-related info and data, on top of tracking the progress of each OKR. (Source from Weekdone) Once all of these have been set regular meetings can be held (say, once or twice a week) for everyone to present their progress and give feedback on their OKRs. Note that I said feedback. This isn’t a one-way street in the same way micromanagement is. It’s also not a technique about setting high goals and expecting them to be completed. Objectives are ideally a stretch, but that’s to get the most out of your team’s efforts – they’re not supposed to be entirely completed. To that end, if an objective is 75-80% complete, it can usually be considered as being achieved. If anything reaches 100%, try setting the bar higher next time. “The biggest challenge is often making them measurable. It’s great when the goal is a number, like ‘Hit 1MM in ARR.’ Or a simple fact, like ‘Roll out our new OKR system to the whole company.’ But some goals may be harder to measure, with more qualitative requirements, like when you need to design a plan to improve employee morale, say. But even those can have defined ways you’ll determine success, like, ‘Write and circulate a plan to improve employee morale that gets full buy-in from the leadership team.’” — Jay Hanlon Avoid the need for micromanagement with process management. So we’ve established that micromanagement can be good in theory, but in practice it often results in employees feeling like there is no trust or that they are being overly scrutinized and under-appreciated. Solution? Use a modern process management solution like Process Street. Workflows allow you to keep track of exactly what work is being done, and who is doing the work. Pages empower you to build and share internal company knowledge to streamline onboarding so that micromanaging doesn’t need to happen. For example, you need only point the new employee to the Pages containing the relevant onboarding information, and have the HR manager assign them to the new employee onboarding Workflow Run, and you keep all of the benefits of micromanagement with none of the downsides. And you can still incorporate frequent stand-up or one-to-one meetings so that the manager has is fully involved in the process, but in a leaner, more efficient capacity that allows employees to do their work to the best of their ability. Micromanagement is tempting because of the feeling of control it provides. Whoever’s in charge needs to focus on high-level strategy, but they don’t want to give up the ability to check in on individual team members and project progress. Recording a method to complete common tasks gives everyone specific instructions to follow. This eliminates any confusion surrounding their tasks while reassuring managers that things are being completed to their standards. Worried about how long it will take or how hard it will be to write and formalize your processes? Don’t worry. That’s why Process Street exists. Getting started with process management. Process Street lets you quickly build out a process with our Workflows feature. You can include as much or as little detail as you like with supporting images, videos, form fields (to capture extra information), and much more. Once finished, your Workflows can be run as individual Workflow Run, which will guide you along your tasks as you complete them and record your progress as you go. We describe a Workflow as a set of instructions, or as the master blueprint of a process, which outlines exactly how a specific process should be completed. A Workflow Run, on the other hand, is an individual instance of that Workflow. Think of it as a parent/child relationship. Managers then have access to previously completed (as well as currently in-progress) workflows via our Reports feature, seen below: I haven’t even gotten into the advantages of business process automation (e.g. the power to automate recurring manual tasks & hook up your workflows to your favourite business software) or our premade workflow template library (ready-made processes which you can import, use, and edit for free), but I think you get the picture. Another great alternative to micromanagement is documenting your workflows. Combined with OKRs (or even largely on its own), this technique can completely eliminate the need and desire to micromanage a team due to the benefits it brings. Don’t let your team fall victim to someone who likes to micromanage. Use the best business process management on the market by grabbing a free account with Process Street today. Micromanagement isn’t worth the hassle it creates. Even in situations where the pros of micromanagement are allowed to shine through, it ultimately isn’t worth the long-term issues and bad habits such a system creates. Despite having a team small enough to effectively micromanage, you still run the risk of alienating employees, diminishing their trust in you, making them dependent on micromanagement and causing team members to burn out. That’s why documenting your processes is so much more effective. Even if you’re small-scale, documenting processes gives you all of the benefits of micromanagement with practically none of the negatives. Instructions are given to guide employees but they retain enough autonomy to feel independent. What are you waiting for? Try it out for free at Process Street. Do you have any micromanagement horror stories? Let me know in the comments below. Tell the world!TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditEmail Get our posts & product updates earlier by simply subscribing. Thanks for subscribing to the Process Street Blog! Failed to subscribe. Please, try again later. Ben Mulholland . Ben Mulholland is an Editor at Process Street, and winds down with a casual article or two on Mulholland Writing. Find him on Twitter here. 7 Comments. If you have to Micromanage, you have the wrong staff in place with the wrong skill sets. When you hire PM’s you better make sure that these people can handle, are familiar, have experience with your vertical and the challenges that come with it. I as a business owner do not run a not for profit company. The projects we handle as with any business unless your building sandcastles, require employees that dont need to be watched. From A-Z in the project they only need to provide status reports. Not need to be under the watch of a day care provider. If you want to train them then run them through an intern program, AGAIN you will be micromanaging them, until they are competent to perform at an independent status. Bottom line Hire the right people and micromanaging won’t exist. if so barely. Reply First of all MM should never ever be used. PM’s often NEVER know how to manage any project correctly. Management is useless in general and unnecessary always. Managers are the look at me brown nosers that were hired on that particular embarrassing trait and will in turn only hire the next person that shoves their nose up the next @ss… it a vicious cycle. If normal ppl were allowed to be managers the dynamic would be changed for the absolute best, but good luck. Reply The lead person at work will tell at employees especially new hires .and he really doesn’t like me at all .at work I have a set of machines to run them they added 3 more machines. One person runs them on 1 st shift and someone was running them on 3rd shift and I was running those machines and my machines until I said something about it. I told him if it’s a job on 1st and a job on 3rd then it’s a job on 2nd.this man can be a real jerk.i told him it wasn’t right that I run those and my machines . Then when the person was trained for 2nd shift the l.b was had him walking around helping other machine operators so here we go again. So when he put the other Operator over we were helping one another.i ask could we not give each other a break and of course he said no that I could go on that job but sure didn’t have a problem me running those machines and mine .I’m really considering suing. Thanks cant take much more. Reply This was great learning. The pros and cons of micromanagement are so well explained. In our career, we have seen multiple people who used to believe in micromanagement. They used to believe that they are making people more productive with the restricted instructions. Thank you for the great post. Reply I had to deal with this every day and not only did I have to create a checklist for my 10+ clients that had atleast 3 entitieseach, I also had to fill out a excel template that showed how many invoices I did in a week. I had to deal with 5 different supervisors at one time and they all wanted things done their way. If that’s not micromanaging, I dont know what is. Reply You should try working for Royal Mail. I’m surprised that they haven’t got someone monitoring how many toilet breaks you take. Or perhaps they have. God knows! It’s perfectly reasonable for managers to MANAGE. That’s their fundamental role. I don’t begrudge them that in the slightest. However, micromanaging employees takes it up another level. How would managers like it if every single thought or action of theirs was fully scrutinized by us employees? What if we could place camera’s in their offices and independently employ someone (outside of the company) to fully scrutinize the video evidence at the end of the day – just to see how exactly they’ve been spending their time? When the shoe is on the other foot – and the transgressor becomes the transgressed – it’s very surprising how quickly people change their attitudes. Management is necessary. Micromanagement is not necessary – unless you’re a control freak of the first order. Reply In my experience PM should be limited on a their involvment cause they are prone not managing the bigger project but micromanaging, and the worst thing is that here we all talk about them and there is not a single article how to deal with PM who MM. What is the solution? I am never fro fiering people cause that is not a solution but PM role is so protected that is never questioned. For example in every 4 months I am reviewed by my PM but I can’t review her, and I think that feedback would be usefull in the end for dealing the situation my team is. I know my PM didn’t work as a PM before but ai still can’t bolieve they don’t see (the upper managment) what is going on. Sure (I am a designer) all the design team leads know it but PMs are upper in the chain. And in the end what do we have on a project that is slowing us down: – I am 2 years on a project (and at the moment am onboarding my replacement), but the bigger problem is that my PM came 2 months before me and 7 designers requested to be moved from the project (I would be the 8 one) and on a project scale we had a lot of waste in investing in people on a project that would leave other projects – two other PMs left the team cause they where conflicted with her methods – we waste our time on sync cause she wants to be involved in something she doesn’t understand – having syncs everyday is contraproductive especialy combined with VS is not the focus and it takes time – lack of Knowledge (using design terminology but when asked doesn’t know what it is) – not respecting other roles, experience or skills – giving feedback but not realy looking or reading what you wrote – not respecting the proces of the design cycle – switching workflow just to impress clients and not to focus on the quality output – imapcting on the team moral – impacting on the project quality and timeline – pressing me to rearange the wireframe flow just cause it would look better to her and not following the logic of it – pressing other teammates to MM people who fight to be MM – checking your social media activity so by the end of the meeting can say why where you awake at 2 am So what is the cost and value of one person vs 8 that we lost 1 junior PM < 3 team leads, 2 seniors, 2 mid and 1 junior designer Reply Leave a comment . 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Result 18
Title7 signs you're dealing with a micromanager (and how to manage them)
Urlhttps://www.breathehr.com/en-gb/blog/topic/health-and-wellbeing/8-signs-youre-dealing-with-a-micro-manager-and-how-to-manage-them
DescriptionMicromanagement can have severe effects on an employee. Here's my experience, as well as why people micromanage and how you can manage it
DateJul 24, 2019
Organic Position18
H17 signs you're dealing with a micromanager (and how to manage them)
H2Micromanagement: My own experience
Why do people micromanage?
7 signs of micromanagement
How to manage a micromanager
The importance of workplace culture
Technology and effective management
You might also like
H3Are you being micro-managed?
Trying to manage a micromanager?
Not seeing the wood for the trees
Every task needs approval
An obsession with constant updates
Difficulty delegating
The need to be cc’d into every single email
Over complicates instructions
The belief that no one is else is capable
Work burnout: what is it and how do you prevent it?
How to support employees returning to work
Why is health and safety important in the workplace?
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H2WithAnchorsMicromanagement: My own experience
Why do people micromanage?
7 signs of micromanagement
How to manage a micromanager
The importance of workplace culture
Technology and effective management
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Body7 signs you're dealing with a micromanager (and how to manage them) 7 min read  |   24 July, 2019   By Nick Hardy      I’ll put this bluntly: if an employer has allowed a toxic culture to develop where managers micromanage their team members, then they shouldn’t be in business. I would argue that micromanagement is one of the worst, most damaging and morale-sapping ways of managing people, that can seriously affect productivity, employee retention and ultimately, damage people’s health. A manager's job is to provide guidance and support. It's facilitating a healthy environment where employees can perform at their best. Micromanagers achieve the opposite. In this article, I talk about: My own experience of micromanagement Why do people micromanage? 7 signs of micromanagement How to manage a micromanager The importance of workplace culture How technology can help  . Micromanagement: My own experience. Most of us have experienced micromanagers at some point in our careers, and I’m one of them. Several years ago I left a company where after a number of years I was basically a broken version of the confident and cheerful person I’d always been. It took me a while to recover and the stress - for a while – took a very heavy toll. But, if any evidence is needed that people can (and do) recover from stress, anxiety and depression caused by micromanagement, I’m very happy to put my hand up. Are you being micro-managed? If you’re reading this and in a dark place as a result of being micromanaged, please be strong and seek help as soon as you can. When you’re being micromanaged - and I’ll move on to the signs and symptoms shortly - one of the worst things is the drain in self-confidence. It can be incredibly difficult to put your hand up and ask for help.  But help is available, and you may be surprised at who in the organisation is there for you and genuinely has your best interests at heart. This (luckily) turned out to be the case for me. Trying to manage a micromanager? Do you employ people to manage your wider teams? If the answer's yes, the rest of this piece is for you. Micromanagers, through surface-level diligence, commitment and attention to detail may seem like model managers, but often use this to hide in plain sight and disguise working practices which – if you had visibility that they were going on – would probably horrify you. Keep reading to discover the key symptoms of micromanagement and what you as a leader can do to alleviate the situation.  Serious about your company culture?  Join the Breathe Culture Pledge today and commit to putting your people first.  Why do people micromanage? According to the Harvard Business Review, the two main reasons managers micromanage are: They want to feel more connected with lower-level workers They feel more comfortable doing their old job, rather than overseeing employees who now do that job Leadership expert and best-selling author, Mark Murphy, adds a third dimension: fear. He argues that many micromanagers are terrified that their team members will do something to tarnish their hard-earned reputation. Where a micromanager felt secure in a high-performing but non-supervisory role where the quality of their work resulted in a promotion, they fear their abilities as a manager will be poorly perceived if their team members fail to measure up or make mistakes – even small ones. But the fear most responsible for causing bosses to micromanage is that 48% of bosses like to be seen as experts and authority figures. More than 5,000 leaders have taken the online test “Are You Motivated By Power Or Achievement?” And based on the results of the test, we know that about 41% of leaders have a very strong desire for power. This isn't always a bad thing - but when managers get carried away, that's when it becomes a problem.  We need to remind ourselves that the role of a manager is to be the team leader, the decision maker, and the coach, not to oversee every step taken by an employee. Henry Stewart, business author and CEO of Happy has noted that in his eyes, the number one frustration employees experience is micro-management. He suggests that managers take steps to “make clear the guidelines and what you want people to achieve. And then give people the freedom to work out how to achieve that”. And Stewart’s comments are in line with our own research. Our Culture Economy Report revealed that 21% regard micro-management as a reason for distrust.   7 signs of micromanagement. Not seeing the wood for the trees . Micromanagers have a tendency to become bogged down in the minutiae of individual project strands, losing the ability to see the bigger picture. Every task needs approval . For many micromanagers, the idea of giving their team members control is unthinkable. They often believe that they are the only one capable of effective decision-making. People find themselves having to request approval about everything, rapidly diminishing self-confidence.   An obsession with constant updates . This can result in people spending more time producing detailed updates than focusing on what they are employed to do. With people feeling the constant need to justify themselves comes the feeling that they are not trusted to do their jobs. Difficulty delegating. This causes two big problems. Firstly, a micromanager's team members wonder whether they are actually allowed to do to the work for which they were originally employed to do. In turn, the micromanager becomes so overloaded with another person’s work that they fail to do their own. The need to be cc’d into every single email. The need to have visibility of every strand of communication at all times. This indicates a fear of being left out of the loop and obsession that people are discussing details and making decisions outside of their control. Over complicates instructions . An obsession with even minor details means that even straight-forward projects become ridiculously over-complicated. Instructions are so detailed and convoluted that they end up becoming incomprehensible. The belief that no one is else is capable. Micromanagers often believe that they are in a management position over lesser talented people because only they can be trusted to work as effectively. How to manage a micromanager. Once a business-leader has identified a micromanager, it’s time to take immediate steps to deal with them in order to mitigate the damage they are doing to people, their productivity and ultimately the company itself. It’s not the place of this article to talk about the HR policies and procedures that businesses need to follow in order to deal with micromanagers, especially in extreme and ultra-sensitive situations where disciplinary action may be required. This is where an HR professional would come in. Micromanagers could become difficult to manage and resent what they see as an intrusion eve if, ironically, it’s senior managers that they are looking to impress. Managing micromanagers takes tact and careful thought. It’s very possible that business leaders show guidance and a little tough love could help turn a micromanager around and set them on a new path where they focus on becoming a positive rather than a malign influence. Which brings us to the subject of business culture. The importance of workplace culture. The culture of a business permeates everything it does and stands for. It’s the way people treat each other, how they espouse company values and standards, it’s the feel of the work environment and it underpins how things get done. The Breathe Culture Economy Report that last year alone poor company culture cost the UK economy more than £23.6 billion.   Business leaders who focus on creating open, positive workplace cultures where people feel supported and appreciated, with their achievements recognised by their peers and managers create an environment where its almost impossible for micromanagers to thrive. It’s when openness becomes diluted and business leaders lose sight of how their managers are treating people that the rot sets in. This can all too easily create the toxic culture in which micromanagers thrive, and at the expense of the people they are supposed to be guiding and supporting. Last year, we launched the Breathe Culture Pledge to encourage other UK SMEs to commit to their culture and put their people first. So far over 370 businesses have joined us, and if you take your culture seriously we'd love for you to do the same. Click here to find out more. Technology and effective management. These days more businesses than ever before are harnessing technical tools which automate time-consuming manual tasks. These tasks can otherwise take over and prevent managers from spending time on helping their people grow and develop. This applies to businesses of every size and every department. HR management systems like Breathe are now an essential part of the tech mix as they reduce admin, improving productivity and efficiency as a result. This means that HR managers and their teams can focus on personal development initiatives that bring out the best of people. This also means that they will have more time to help micromanagers re-think their practises and work more fairly, ethically and effectively. Why not try Breathe and get started today? Your free 14-day trial is waiting for you here. Posted on 24 July, 2019 By Nick Hardy in Health and wellbeing Health and wellbeing Back to listing Hide Comment (1) You might also like. Work burnout: what is it and how do you prevent it? Health and wellbeing 24 December, 2021 by Rachael Down How to support employees returning to work. Health and wellbeing 17 December, 2021 by Aimee O'Callaghan Why is health and safety important in the workplace? Health and wellbeing 9 December, 2021 by Sarah Benstead Back to the blog listing Sign up to get the latest HR and people management insights straight to your inbox.
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Result 19
TitleEnd Micromanagement: 6 Signs To Spot It and How To Stop It
Urlhttps://unito.io/blog/micromanagement-signs/
DescriptionLearn what qualifies as micromanagement, why it’s so detrimental in the workplace, and wow to fix micromanagement tendencies
DateMar 19, 2021
Organic Position19
H1End Micromanagement: 6 Signs of Micromanagement (and What To Do Instead)
H2What is micromanagement?
Why micromanagement is harmful
How to manage micromanagement
How managers can quit micromanagement
Take the micro out of manager
What’s next?
H3Signs of micromanagement
Over-communicate your progress
Mention it in your one on one
Get help
Instead of approving every piece of content, use Areas of Responsibility
Instead of asking for constant updates, use a cross-departmental tool
Instead of owning every project, delegate with RACI
Instead of expecting instant responses, use asynchronous communication
H2WithAnchorsWhat is micromanagement?
Why micromanagement is harmful
How to manage micromanagement
How managers can quit micromanagement
Take the micro out of manager
What’s next?
BodyEnd Micromanagement: 6 Signs of Micromanagement (and What To Do Instead) Unito home / Blog / End Micromanagement: 6 Signs of Micromanagement (and What To Do Instead) Published in Leadership on 19/03/2021, last updated 22/11/2021. Does this sound familiar? Managers are more involved with their employees than ever, yet reports seem disgruntled, unhappy, and less productive than usual. Check-ins seem to go unappreciated or unanswered. No one seems receptive to feedback. What’s going on? Well, your workplace may be poisoned by micromanagement. While micromanagement might feel like good-natured extra diligence — and the best way to keep teams on track — it’s actually a highly toxic workplace issue that will do more harm than good.  Continue reading to find out: What qualifies as micromanagementHow to deal with a micromanagerWhether you’re a micromanagerHow to fix micromanagement tendencies  What is micromanagement? . Micromanagement, when used in the context of a business, is a situation in which managers (or anyone responsible for leading other people) are overly controlling of work or processes. Researchers have found that this response is largely driven by a mix of fear and a desire for power.  For example, say your graphic designer Lisa is working on a new Facebook ad for the business. If you’re a micromanager, you’d ask for constant updates, ask to be in every meeting regarding the Facebook ad, ask to be cc’d on every relevant email, and probably make regular trips over to Lisa’s desk (or schedule regular video calls) to see how the task is progressing. At that point, you’d also make numerous suggestions, provide unsolicited design advice, and might even take a stab at designing the ad yourself. If you’ve ever been on the receiving end of this kind of micromanagement, you know exactly how bad this feels.  Signs of micromanagement . Still not sure if you’re a micromanager yourself? Here are some clear things managers do and say that land them in micromanager territory. Every task needs your approval . Before any work gets marked complete, you make sure that you’ve seen it, made your edits, and finally provided your approval. Micromanagers can’t stand the thought of letting their team have complete control and ownership over their work, which is — as you might have guessed — a problem.  You need to be cc’d on every email. Conversations cannot be happening without your knowledge, and you feel anxious at the thought of being left out of work-related emails and correspondence. You feel a need to know what is happening at all times, and believe that being cc’d on all emails, or a part of all Slack channels related to your work, is the best way to go about this.  You’re hyper-aware of your employees whereabouts . Josh stepped out for lunch at 12:03, but it’s now 1:27 and you haven’t seen him return. Or, Teresa is working from home and you noticed that she’s taken more than ten minutes to respond to your latest Slack message. If you stress about where your employees are at every moment of the day, or find yourself getting frustrated when they don’t immediately respond to your messages, there’s a good chance you have (at least some) micromanager tendencies.  You love editing employee work . If you get a thrill from finding grammar mistakes in your copywriter’s work, or love the feeling of fixing code in your software developer’s work, you might want to consider whether you have other micromanager qualities as well.  You hate delegating tasks. “If you want something done properly, do it yourself,” said every micromanager everywhere. If you think that you’re the best person to do any job your team members are doing, take a step back and consider if this is true — or if this gives your employees the opportunity for growth. You sweat the small stuff . Micromanagers love to stress and obsess over every tiny detail of a project. They’re spending valuable time reconsidering color choice, rather than trusting their team to submit quality work. A manager is meant to act as a team leader, large decision maker, and general overseer of projects — not dissect every component of every task. Why micromanagement is harmful. If you realize you’re guilty of micromanaging, you’ve probably already recognized many of the reasons why this is a harmful, and potentially toxic, workplace behaviour. Let’s take a closer look at some of these key reasons.  Damages employee trust and morale. A survey conducted by Trinity Solutions and published in author Harry Chambers’ book My Way or the Highway showed that 85 percent of respondents felt that their morale was negatively impacted due to experiencing micromanagement. If you’ve ever been micromanaged yourself, you know this to be true from firsthand experience.  Employees who are micromanaged lose a sense of autonomy, which results in decreased motivation and desire to go the extra mile. When they feel as if any work they do is going to be highly criticized, edited, or questioned, there’s less of an inclination to put effort in in the first place.  Increases employee turnover. The same survey conducted by Trinity Solutions discovered that 79 percent of participants had experienced micromanagement, and 69 percent considered changing jobs because of it. There’s no question: people don’t like to be micromanaged. The next time you’re thinking of hovering over an employee’s desk to ask for yet another update on a small project, consider whether it’s worth damaging your relationship with that person.  Invites burnout. According to a study by Collins and Collins, employees who are micromanaged are three times more likely to experience burnout. Micromanagement directly causes burnout not only in your employees who have to constantly work hard to keep you happy, but in yourself. When you’re constantly obsessing over minute details, checking up on your team members, and worrying about meetings you may or may not need to be in, you’re wasting precious energy that could be used in much more productive ways.   Discourages creativity. When people are boxed in by strict rules, there’s not a lot of opportunity for creativity and innovation. If you are constantly correcting everything your employees do and watching them like a hawk, they’ll be so afraid to step out of line and do something that elicits a negative response that they’ll never attempt anything original.  Creates dependent employees. When employees find that no matter how hard they work, their work will always be edited and changed by their (micro)manager, they become dependent on this person. When you act as if nothing can be done without your input, your staff will start to lose confidence and feel as if they truly can’t do anything without you. And, according to research by Great Place to Work, millennials are looking for leaders who “share the best interests of employees, particularly in their long-term growth,”  — not leaders who block employee growth with dependent relationships.  Hinders productivity . According to a study conducted by staffing agency Accountemps, more than 55 percent of respondents said that micromanagement hurt their productivity. When micromanagers are constantly requiring check-ins and edits at every phase of the project, they create a bottleneck that slows down processes and progress.  How to manage micromanagement. Are you an employee dealing with a micromanager? You might be feeling like you’re unable to get your work done efficiently because someone’s constantly hovering over you. It can seem daunting to approach your manager — or some other stakeholder — to tell them you need some space, but it can be done! Here are a few things you can try to deal with a micromanager. Over-communicate your progress. Are you constantly interrupted by emails and messages asking for a status update? How are you supposed to stay in the zone when this happens? While the burden of finding the right balance between checking in too much and not enough is on your manager, you can nip the problem in the bud by communicating more. Set up a regular reminder for yourself to give your manager an update on your projects. Work with them to find a format that suits them, and you’ll find that the requests will drop significantly. Mention it in your one on one. If you have regular one on ones with your manager — and you should — you should bring up your concerns with micromanagement then. It can feel stressful to even consider giving your manager criticism, but remember that they have a vested interest in keeping your relationship positive. Find a way to approach the subject with tact, like citing specific examples of micromanagement and how they affect your work. If your manager is an open, receptive person, they’ll take your feedback to heart and work on improving. When dealing with other micromanagers that aren’t your direct manager, try to find a time to speak with them about this directly. Get help. You’ve tried to make changes in your behavior to improve the situation and brought it up with the micromanager directly and nothing happened. What can you do now? Bring it up with someone else. If being micromanaged makes you feel uncomfortable and hampers your performance, you can bet someone at your organization will want to hear about it. Start by looking through your company’s official documentation; there’s probably already a process in place for this. If not, you can start by finding someone on your team you can trust and tell them what’s going on. A more senior member of the team will probably know who you can go to. Alternatively, you can try going to HR directly, or to your manager’s manager. How managers can quit micromanagement. Are you a manager and identified some micromanager habits in yourself? Do you want to fix them? Reflect on and follow the below tips and strategies for fixing this behavior.  Instead of approving every piece of content, use Areas of Responsibility . Areas of Responsibility, or AoRs, “are a way of capturing the distribution of responsibility within your company.” With AoRs, responsibilities and authority can be split between different members rather than being distributed to you.  They help you delegate responsibility effectively, removing tasks and requests from your plate. Instead of assuming that you’re the one who will be approving a task or piece of content, AoRs ensure that everybody in the organization can check and know exactly who on the team to reach out to.  Instead of asking for constant updates, use a cross-departmental tool . Countless meetings and requests for updates exhaust both you and your team. Fight your desire for constant check-ins by using a tool such as Wrike or Basecamp where you can monitor the status of a project without having to interfere or directly communicate with anyone.  You’ll be able to see when files are uploaded and other discussions related to the project or task take place, without feeding your need for intense, repetitive updates. And if your team uses multiple tools, you can use Unito to optimize reporting updates, no matter your tool of choice. This will undoubtedly help your team feel much more trusted and autonomous, while helping you keep your micromanagement tendencies at bay.  Instead of owning every project, delegate with RACI. While it might sound fun in theory, being in charge of every project isn’t a valuable use of your time. Enter: the RACI chart.  A RACI chart (or matrix) is a tool that helps the project manager map out roles and responsibilities of everyone involved in a project. RACI stands for Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed, with each section of the chart covering one of these areas. As a manager, you will not need to be accountable or responsible in the context of most projects. Instead, your responsibilities will usually fall under the ‘Informed’ category. You can be kept in the loop regarding major updates to the project, but don’t need to be consulted, responsible, or accountable in these cases.  Instead of expecting instant responses, use asynchronous communication . Micromanagers are sticklers for time and watching the clock. If an employee’s Slack icon shows them as idle or inactive for long periods of time, a micromanager is going to notice.  As a manager, you have to ask yourself: Is the work getting done? If so, there’s truly no reason to be eagle-eyeing the clock or tracking your employee’s hours closely. If you need some help changing your mindset with this, consider using asynchronous communication methods.  Synchronous communication is correspondence done in real-time, such as phone, one on one meetings, video conference, or in-person conversations. Asynchronous communication, however, allows for time to pass in between the sending of the message and the receiving of a response. These formats include email, tasks within project management tools, and comments within documents.  This takes the pressure off of your team to respond right away, and helps manage expectations on your end.  Take the micro out of manager. As you now know, micromanagement can have disastrous results for your company, your team, and yourself. With the techniques and tools above, you can identify micromanaging tendencies and find solutions before they get out of control.  What’s next? 1. Find out why syncing your tools can be one of the best ways to kill micromanagement2. See the power of Unito in action.3. Ready to start? Try Unito free for 14 days! Used to determine if footer.php has loaded for integration tests Used to indicate the current page id hidden We use cookies to provide and improve our services. Learn more about our use of cookies. Accept and close
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Result 20
TitleMicromanagement: Reasons, Causes & What to do against it | Management 3.0
Urlhttps://management30.com/blog/micromanagement/
DescriptionWhat Is Micromanagement, what are the reasons why managers micromanage and how you can deal with it? This article is all about micromanagement
DateSep 28, 2021
Organic Position20
H1Stop Micromanagement: It Destroys your Team
H2What Is Micromanagement?
What Causes Micromanagement?
How micromanagement destroys your team: Psychological effects of micromanagement
How to deal with micromanagement?
Have you already read these?
H3#1 Build trust within your team to combat micromanagement
#2 Leadership cultural change against micromanagement
#3 Delegation of roles and responsibility to hinder micromanagement
#4 Proper communication to minimize micromanagement
How Leaders Can Temper Their Tempers
How Leaders Can Make Use Of Language When Promoting Products
What type of problem-solver are you?
Leadership: How To Bring Out The Best In People
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Micromanagement?
What Causes Micromanagement?
How micromanagement destroys your team: Psychological effects of micromanagement
How to deal with micromanagement?
Have you already read these?
BodyStop Micromanagement: It Destroys your Team Home » Blog » Leadership » Stop Micromanagement: It Destroys your Team September 28, 2021 - Leadership . An article by Management 3.0 Facilitator Henrique Mata from Brazil who believes in better management and great leaders without micromanagement. Quick Links: What Is Micromanagement?What Causes Micromanagement?Psychological effects of micromanagementHow to deal with micromanagement? If we talk about Management 1.0 we are referring to an old-fashioned management style. In the past, few educated people were in charge of thinking, the others had to implement it. And due to the prevailing image of man, the how was specified exactly and the results were controlled. It’s like cooking with my mum. When every few minutes she checks actions I have taken and suggests what to do next. Without being asked 🙂Kasia Więckowska replying to How would you explain “micromanagement” to a 9-years old? on LinkedIn This approach is far away from our modern interpretation of management and leadership, where individual engagement and empowerment is becoming more and more important. But in today’s offices micromanagers still exist. These micromanagers interfere in all matters. Like a shadow, they follow the employees every step of the way, prescribe, correct and judge. Micromanagement has a very negative impact on employees and organizations, and there is a dark side to it all, so let’s look at how to combat micromanagement around the world! No one likes a micromanager. How maximizing talent rather than focusing on growth is the most important skill we can learn to combat the struggles of remote work.Listen to: The secret to conscious teams What Is Micromanagement? The Micromanagement Trap When we talk about micromanagement, we have the lack of leadership and trust of the micromanager. It’s the stereotype of a boss leading by command and control who knows nothing about motivation or delegation. Micromanagers try to keep as many balls in the air as possible and make themselves indispensable. They interfere in all decisions, take care of every little detail and also take over tasks from employees.  Do you remember when we were driving to see grandmother and you constantly asked “are we there yet?”Olli-Pekka Manninen replying to How would you explain “micromanagement” to a 9-years old? on LinkedIn Not all of them do this with the aim of increasing power and making themselves indispensable. Some micromanagers really try to do the right thing. They have good intentions but simply internalize wrong assumptions and beliefs. Ultimately, this behavior not only leads to the inability to make a difference for micromanagers, but also to the demotivation of employees, who are also less and less productive and effective. This is a vicious cycle that ensures even more is given and controlled. I would like to encourage managers around the globe who are managing employees, not to fall into the micro-management trap. Don’t be so stressed that your team becomes distributed. Do your best to support teams so that they can deliver, don’t overload them with reporting and monitoring. COVID-19 will be over soon, but our teams are with us for the long run. Rest assured that the teams are looking carefully at how managers operate during this period.Read on: Shifting work and life into a new corona reality What Causes Micromanagement? Often the main cause of micromanagement is the lack of leadership skills and trust in employees. In addition, the fear of losing power and position often plays a major role. Such an environment generates contradicting energies and, according to Tuckman’s law, is always on the storm scale, where team building and empowerment have no place. I see five common habits of a micromanager: A Micromanager thinks he can do a better job at the same time.A Micromanager thinks he can do more at the same time.A Micromanager likes to correct employees.A Micromanager always wants to know who is doing what, where and when.A Micromanager thinks employees don’t know as much as him. What type of manager are you? Do you like to micromanage? Or prefer a hands-off approach? How emotionally invested do you get with your colleagues? Take our quiz and find out what your style is and how that might be perceived from people you work with. Management 3.0 Module: Delegation and Empowerment for the Leaders of tomorrow How micromanagement destroys your team: Psychological effects of micromanagement. There are some serious psychological effects to teams which are constantly controlled. Micromanaged people tend to be less productive, because they always feel controlled and corrected. They are constantly being shown that they are not living up to the boss’ expectations. What if we just explain to them what we’re doing: ‘Did you wash yourself? Did you brush your teeth? Did you clean up your room? Is your homework finished? Really? Are you sure? Can I trust you? You’re not lying?….Bart Cornelissens replying to How would you explain “micromanagement” to a 9-years old? on LinkedIn Many people who live in such a toxic environment have very poor personal and professional performance. This is a result of a lack of motivation, a lack of transparency and recognition, and a lack of psychological balance. How to deal with micromanagement? Managers who have fallen into the micromanaging trap need to realize that they shouldn’t be managing the people, but the system around them. Here are some starting points that can help create a motivating and engaging framework in which employees can do what they’re hired to do: Their jobs. #1 Build trust within your team to combat micromanagement. Trust is the basis for everything but especially when it comes to trust in your team members. Management 3.0 offers a whole toolkit of practices to achieve that. Trust comes from knowing the capabilities of your team members. Therefor try out the Team Competency Matrix with your team and make it visible to everyone.  Trust is one of the most important ingredients on any team. See why micromanaging can harm #team dynamics and how you can earn employee trust with these helpful tips. #2 Leadership cultural change against micromanagement. We cannot change culture directly, but we can make sure that we behave according to clearer and more common principles that lead to culture change. Through delegation and the distribution of responsibility, people learn that each individual is responsible for success and can and must take responsibility. Conversely, this means that people also have the freedom to decide for themselves, to make mistakes and to learn. If people are to feel responsible, we really have to give them responsibility, with all the consequences that come with it. An important part of managing a remote team is making sure that you prioritize team bonding and spirit building so that employees can work easily together.Continue reading: Do’s and Don’ts for Remote Leaders #3 Delegation of roles and responsibility to hinder micromanagement. This is one of the most challenging and at the same time fascinating tasks we have, because once this vicious cycle of micromanagement is broken, the productivity and happiness of the workers will increase. This is where Delegation Poker comes in: This practice helps each employee have their objectives and tasks mapped out, according to the level of the delegation imposed in a collaborative way. We can also use it for groups or teams, always in collaboration with the manager. It is important to point out that we will need autonomy and capacity to achieve maximum efficiency and power among teams, changing the whole corporate climate. Do you still tend to micromanage? At Management 3.0 we aim for a more powerful system, not better-controlled people. Have you seen our module on Emotional Intelligence? #4 Proper communication to minimize micromanagement. How to give feedback is one of the most important topics for leaders. Making suggestions right and discussing improvements instead of giving orders. Next time you talk to your employee about their work, try the Feedback Wrap and or the Improvement Dialogue to enhance communication. By building on each other’s contributions, respecting what others have said and responding positively, the discussions are more likely to succeed and bring out the best in everyone. You can’t really micromanage a team when you’re working from home, you really have to build a foundation of trust.Listen to Oncalo, CTO of Doist on the Management 3.0 Podcast In a successful company, we have to think that all employees are leaders, and that managers are mentors in their careers, always encouraging and strengthening their team. A good leader is capable of leading his or her team and organization just by using the fundamentals of leadership, autonomy and constant development. Nephew, micromanagement is when you ask me to prepare pão-de-queijo and every five minutes you question: “Aunt, is it ready?” “And now aunt, is it ready?” And don’t stop to look at the oven. The pão-de-queijo needs his own time to be perfectly ready, crunchy and gold. He will be ready when was the right time, with no pressure.Ingrid Souza replying to How would you explain “micromanagement” to a 9-years old? on LinkedIn Header Photo by Anita Jankovic (Unsplash) Next post › ‹ Previous post Have you already read these? How Leaders Can Temper Their Tempers. How Leaders Can Make Use Of Language When Promoting Products. What type of problem-solver are you? Leadership: How To Bring Out The Best In People. . Every worker deserves a cookie and privacy! Sadly these cookies aren't the yummy kind, but the kind that help improve your website experience. By clicking “Accept”, you consent to the use of ALL the cookies.Cookie settingsACCEPTManage consent Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may affect your browsing experience. Read More Necessary Necessary Always Enabled Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information. Non-necessary Non-necessary Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. SAVE & ACCEPT Sign Up for our Engaging Newsletter Turn your workplace into a happy workplace! 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Result 21
TitleWhat is micromanagement? - Definition from WhatIs.com
Urlhttps://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/micromanagement
DescriptionWhat is micromanagement? This definition explains what micromanagement is and how it hampers employee engagement and productivity. Learn about alternative approaches to employee oversight
Date
Organic Position21
H1micromanagement
H2
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H2WithAnchors
Bodymicromanagement By Ivy Wigmore, Content Editor Micromanagement is a style of employee oversight characterized by excessive observation and control.  Because the implication is that the manager has no faith in employees’ ability to do their jobs, micromanagement tends to erode workers’ self-confidence and lead to a lack of initiative and engagement, which tends to hamper productivity. Other effects on staff include increases in stress levels, absenteeism, burnout and high turn-over.  The characteristics of a typical micromanager may include perfectionism, high stress levels, insecurity and a lack of emotional intelligence. On the other hand, micromanagement may also be a function of a rigidly hierarchical corporate culture, which overemphasizes the need for  structure, rules and top-down control to guide business practices and activities. In such a corporate culture, managers themselves may be micromanaged; the effects filter down to the managers' subordinates. Danny Crenshaw discusses micromanagement vs. efffective management: This was last updated in November 2014 Continue Reading About micromanagement . How to manage a micromanager Micromanagers: Flushing companies down the toilet, one detail at a time Related Terms. chief risk officer (CRO) The chief risk officer (CRO) is the corporate executive tasked with assessing and mitigating significant competitive, regulatory ... See complete definition Gantt chart A Gantt chart is a horizontal bar chart developed as a production control tool in 1917 by Henry L. Gantt, an American engineer ... See complete definition What is DevOps? The ultimate guide The word 'DevOps' is a combination of the terms 'development' and 'operations,' meant to represent a collaborative or shared ... See complete definition SearchCompliance ISO 31000 Risk Management The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ... pure risk Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain. risk reporting Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes. SearchSecurity Rijndael Rijndael (pronounced rain-dahl) is an Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm. Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS) Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS) are a set of standard protocols, numbered from 1 to 15. honeynet A honeynet is a network set up with intentional vulnerabilities hosted on a decoy server to attract hackers. SearchHealthIT protected health information (PHI) or personal health information Protected health information (PHI), also referred to as personal health information, is the demographic information, medical ... digital health (digital healthcare) Digital health, or digital healthcare, is a broad, multidisciplinary concept that includes concepts from an intersection between ... HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) is United States legislation that provides data privacy and security ... SearchDisasterRecovery What is risk mitigation? Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business. fault-tolerant Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ... synchronous replication Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ... SearchStorage kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi and exbi Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi and exbi are binary prefix multipliers that, in 1998, were approved as a standard by the ... holographic storage (holostorage) Holographic storage is computer storage that uses laser beams to store computer-generated data in three dimensions. content-addressed storage (CAS) Content-addressed storage (CAS) -- also called content-addressable storage -- is a method for storing fixed content as objects ... Close
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Result 22
Title6 Warning Signs That You Are Micromanaging Your Team
Urlhttps://inside.6q.io/micromanaging-your-team/
DescriptionThere's nothing quite as frustrating and soul destroying as a boss who is always micromanaging you and the team. Read more on the topic
Date
Organic Position22
H16 Warning Signs That You Are Micromanaging Your Team
H2If a badge of infamy was to be given to bad managers, “micro-manager” would be the label. What if you are given the badge? It’s not easy to be a manager, so it might be that you are micromanaging, but of course, that should not be the case. Here’s what you should learn about micromanagement.
In Summary
H3What is micromanagement?
Improve your employee engagement in less than two minutes
You don’t follow the 70% rule
You don’t see the forest for the trees
You suffer from report mania
You oversee a co-worker several times in a day
You obsess about the process
You hate decisions being made without you
About the Author
Related articles
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H2WithAnchorsIf a badge of infamy was to be given to bad managers, “micro-manager” would be the label. What if you are given the badge? It’s not easy to be a manager, so it might be that you are micromanaging, but of course, that should not be the case. Here’s what you should learn about micromanagement.
In Summary
Body6 Warning Signs That You Are Micromanaging Your Team If a badge of infamy was to be given to bad managers, “micro-manager” would be the label. What if you are given the badge? It’s not easy to be a manager, so it might be that you are micromanaging, but of course, that should not be the case. Here’s what you should learn about micromanagement. . Have you ever overheard the term, “helicopter parents”? According to Wikipedia, a helicopter parent is a parent who pays close attention to a child’s experiences and problem, overseeing every aspect of their child’s life regularly. Well, that’s what micro-managers are to their teams.  What is micromanagement? Let’s start with a definition of micromanagement. Micromanagement is a management style whereby a manager closely observes and controls the work of his/her subordinates or employees. A person who has to have their hands into anything.  Micromanaging occurs when the manager is too involved in the details. It is a state where the manager is obsessed over every minor detail and closely observes everything a subordinate or an employee does. Nevertheless, it is one of the most common management style. Micromanagement breeds discontent, disloyalty, and unengaged employees. If you hired someone, it means you believe they are capable of doing the job, then why micromanagement? Trust them to get it done.  Micromanagement is a killer. Perhaps, one research from Harvard Medical School instructor Jonathan D. Quick, says that “the management qualities of ‘bad’ bosses over time exert a heavy toll on employees’ health. Not just this, micromanaging influences employee satisfaction.  In My Way or the Highway: The Micromanagement Survival Guide, a book by Harry E. Chambers’, 85% of survey respondents said their morale was worsened by the effects of micromanagement. If this sounds like you, you got to find the right give and take. Your team members will probably be afraid to punch you in the face (telling you that you are a micro-manager), you can know it yourself.  Improve your employee engagement in less than two minutes. Get started for free today. Free sign up How do you know if you are a micro-manager? Well, if you are not sure that you are a micro-manager, read on to identify your habits and what you can do to address them. You don’t follow the 70% rule. Are you the type of person who thinks that the only way the task can be done right is if you do it yourself? You think no one can do it better than you – you are micromanaging. Because of this at the end of the day, you may feel like you just don’t have enough hours in the day to do everything, despite juggling well through your responsibilities.  Quick fix. Trust is an important factor when it comes to delegation. Smart managers use the “70 percent rule”. This means, if you believe, that the person will be able to perform 70% of the task, you should delegate it. This art of delegation involves letting go and trusting that your team members will take the ball, without expecting “perfection” (the way you would do it). You can use an online work management tool to delegate tasks to specific people as per their skills and availability, they will discover new ways to do things. You don’t see the forest for the trees. Micro-managers spend more time looking at the trees and lose sight of the big forest they’re managing. You are more focused on managing a particular person or one group that you completely forget the rest of the team. For example, instead of updating an existing document with current facts, a micro-manager will ask a person to create a whole new document. These decisions mean you’re not using the best of your resources, that is leading you in circles instead of moving you forward. Quick fix. Take time to access your responsibilities as a manager. Reevaluate your and your team’s priorities because you should understand that every effort is valuable and needs to be protected. Make a schedule on a calendar to focus on higher-level thinking and the big picture to not to get caught up in the little details.  You suffer from report mania. You’re overwhelmed with status reports and updates if you are asking your team members for daily “plan of the day” and “end of day report”.  Particularly, unnecessary and detailed reports. If you see yourself doing this often, you’re surely micromanaging because you don’t trust your employees’ dedication. You don’t give them a chance to grow (the personal autonomy they need) and keep on asking for reports just to serve your anxiety about progress.  Quick fix. Asking for reports is fine if you want them to include the information connected to long-term objectives, but daily reports, twice a day, is frustrating. Simply set up key goals that confirm that the work is done to achieve the milestones. When you see the goals are met, you can track the progress.  Image: Unsplash You oversee a co-worker several times in a day. Micromanagers are often dropping-in to check on their team or on employees’ desks to question them with something (ask them about progress every time). Your employees will need your input but it’s a different thing if you’re bothering them to check up on progress. All in all, you display the traits of “control freak”. Quick fix. Don’t interrupt them with their tasks, instead, focus on the outcomes and goals, then ask your employees how they would approach the situation. Allow your employees to make mistakes, because this is the way you’re helping them grow. You can also make it clear during meetings how you’d want the progress to be communicated, instead of always, “Just checking in on this?” You obsess about the process. This is another sign that you are micromanaging – being control-obsessed. You are always seen as giving instructions for even simple tasks. When you give directions on how to complete tasks throughout the process, this slips the chance for your team to be creative or innovative. They will feel their creative freedom being violated.  Quick fix. Rather than being obsessed about every step, clearly communicate your expectations and gather the entire team on the same page using a project management tool to have a look for the progress, plans, and problems without inundating them throughout the process.  You hate decisions being made without you. You’ve hired people because of their qualifications and skills and if you react or feel irritated whenever they do not ask you for every small decision, it could be a red flag. Micro-managers indirectly resent the ideas or decisions that are made without involving them (even if they completely like what has been decided).  Quick fix. Allow them to bring their expertise to the work. Stop interrupting in every smallest task. Give employees the autonomy they expect and deserve. You’ve hired them for the job, let them grow.  In Summary. Micromanagement isn’t worth the hassle. If this sounds like you, don’t be hopeless! Good that you now know that you were micromanaging. You can change your ways by a little bit of strategising and a whole lot of self-awareness. No one wants micromanagement! Get on the path to be a productive leader. Good luck.    About the Author. Vartika Kashyap is the Marketing Manager at ProofHub – a simple project management tool and a powerful Asana alternative. This Asana alternative not only simplifies project management but also aims to increase team productivity with quick team collaboration. Vartika likes to write about productivity, team building, work culture, leadership, entrepreneurship among others and contributing to a better workplace is what makes her click. Related articles. Our New Role: Bringing Kindness To Work6 Interesting Human Resource Trends to Watch in the Year AheadWhy You Should Invest in Your Employees’ Growth Post navigation. ← The Weekly Check-In: How to Do It and Why They Are So Effective 5 Things Successful Companies Do to Retain Their Top Talent →
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Result 23
TitleWhat Is Micromanagement in the Workplace? (Definition & Examples)
Urlhttps://www.wikijob.co.uk/content/jobs-and-careers/employment/micromanagement
DescriptionFind out about micromanagement and explore its pros and cons, with key examples. All your questions answered
DateSep 30, 2021
Organic Position23
H1What Is Micromanagement?
H2What Is Micromanagement?
What Are the Pros and Cons of Micromanagement?
Why Does Micromanaging Occur?
Micromanagement vs Macromanagement
How Micromanagement Can Be Avoided
Final Thoughts
Read This Next
H3In this article Skip to section
Pros
Cons
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Micromanagement?
What Are the Pros and Cons of Micromanagement?
Why Does Micromanaging Occur?
Micromanagement vs Macromanagement
How Micromanagement Can Be Avoided
Final Thoughts
Read This Next
BodyWhat Is Micromanagement?Updated 30 September 2021Written by Vicky MillerIn this article Skip to section. What Are the Pros and Cons of Micromanagement?ProsConsWhy Does Micromanaging Occur?Micromanagement vs MacromanagementHow Micromanagement Can Be AvoidedFinal Thoughts In the workplace, the specific way a manager conducts themselves and handles their team is known as their management or leadership style. This can include the way they plan and organize, assert their authority, give feedback and ensure goals or objectives are achieved. Some managers insist on being more heavily involved in the workplace than others. While it can be helpful for a team to know that they have the support of their manager, constant supervision and interference can become overbearing. Managers who feel compelled to control every aspect of their team’s work are known as micromanagers. Your boss may be showing signs of micromanagement if you notice that they: Obsess over the tiny details of a project (especially if they lose sight of the bigger picture) Avoid delegating tasks to other members of the team Have the mindset that the whole enterprise would fall apart without them Discourage initiative or creative thinking in a team; they believe their way of thinking is the only way Are very report-orientated, wanting constant updates and detailed data to be presented at unrealistic intervals Seem to have no concept of ‘office hours’ and feel that employees should be available to discuss work by phone/email at any time they wish Have a tendency to overreact, especially to minor setbacks, or consider everything to be an emergency Interfere in employees’ work and are overly critical (often with little substance to what they are actually saying) Become extremely frustrated if decisions are made without them or they are not included in conversations or email exchanges Have an unwavering belief in a ‘top down’ management approach What Are the Pros and Cons of Micromanagement? Although not typical of an effective leadership style in business, there can be some positive outcomes to being a micromanager. Pros. Micromanagers are usually very results focused and will often strive to achieve positive outcomes for themselves. They are often highly aspirational leaders. By being so involved with their teams on a day-to-day basis, micromanagers can be very empathetic and able to understand their employees well, identifying their strengths, weaknesses and key skills and utilizing them to attain positive results for the business. They will often show high levels of engagement in tasks and are willing to make sacrifices to get good results, such as working long hours or continuing to focus on their projects outside of the workplace. Higher management will often favor the dedication of the micromanager to the tasks at hand. Cons. The obsessive attention to detail and constant scrutiny that is typical of the micromanager can cause employees to feel stressed and demotivated. This can result in lower output, increase the frequency of mistakes and cause a loss of morale within the team. As micromanagers are so reluctant to delegate or allow others to have responsibilities, staff often feel undervalued and disrespected by them. As a consequence, micromanagers often have a high turnover of staff and have specific problems with recruiting and retaining skilled and experienced workers. The approach of the micromanager does not encourage creativity or critical thinking. Employees are not challenged to solve problems or overcome issues that they are faced with if they are continuously told to follow instructions and not deviate from their manager’s way of doing things. This fails to prepare workers for promotion and causes the enterprise to lose out on hearing innovative ideas. Micromanagers are often not effective users of time, either through wasting time by insisting on overseeing everybody else’s work or because they have unrealistic expectations. This can mean that work is being rushed and having to be redone later, or submitted before it is complete. Why Does Micromanaging Occur? Managers may micromanage their team for a number of reasons. Although it often has a negative impact on the workforce, this approach can sometimes be well intentioned. Micromanagers may feel that their output is highly valuable and that they are helping their team to achieve great results by becoming so heavily involved. Some micromanagers have a deep-seated fear of failure. They will scrutinize small details and interfere with other colleagues’ work because they are either extremely anxious about attaining the desired results, or under extreme pressure to produce data that quantifies these results. This can result in them having disproportionate reactions to small ‘failures’, which then causes them to intervene too frequently in their employees’ work. Learned experience can also play a significant role in micromanagement. Sometimes, a manager who has had an entirely different leadership style may lapse into micromanagement following a failure, an instance where they feel their team ‘let them down’, a demotion or negative feedback about their own performance from higher management. A narcissistic personality type is sometimes associated with micromanagement. These types of managers will use micromanagement as a way to establish control over their employees and they will often micromanage in a very strategic and deliberate way. By doing this, they are able to identify potential scapegoats to take the blame if projects do not work out, as well as to claim their colleagues’ success as their own when things do go well. By micromanaging in this way, narcissistic bosses have the perfect setup to avoid accountability. Micromanagement vs Macromanagement. While micromanagers focus on details and giving their team constant direction, macromanagers allow their employees to work more independently. These two opposing management styles have their positive points, as well as their drawbacks. While a micromanager might insist on being cc’d in every email, leading each team meeting and overseeing each team member’s outputs during a project, a macromanager would allow them to work with minimal supervision and an abundance of creative freedom, providing they had a cohesive goal in mind.What Is Micromanagement?Micromanagers are focused on identifying (and creating) short-term problems and solutions; macromanagers focus on a long-term objective. For employees who value autonomy and are confident working independently with very little direct supervision, a boss who exercises a macromanagement style would be ideal. For those workers who perform best under instruction and require regular feedback, or who struggle with decision-making, having this type of manager could leave them feeling overloaded and directionless. Macromanagers will often focus on strategizing and may choose to delegate influential or decision-making roles to subordinate members of their team who they trust will share their objectives. Rather than focusing on the intimate details of a project, a macromanager will see the broader view while in the planning phase of their strategies in business. They often concentrate on a conclusion or objective, allowing others to use their initiative and find solutions to the problems that may occur at the different stages of implementing their strategy. The macromanager’s approach can create distance between themselves and their teams, which in some ways can lead to enhanced objectivity, but can also lead to problems if they are not immediately aware of issues that are occurring. In this instance, a team may struggle to enact a solution to a problem that could have been pre-empted or seen earlier by their manager if they had been more involved on a day-to-day basis. For a micromanager, in a similar instance, they would have been looking for solutions to problems that did not exist or that their team could easily deal with. Both the micromanager and macromanager can encounter issues when it comes to problem-solving in business. The distance and objectivity a macromanager develops can sometimes lead to solutions being delayed. Conversely, the micromanager becomes too invested in subjective detail and refuses to use the knowledge base within their team, which also leads to solutions being delayed. How Micromanagement Can Be Avoided. If you have a job that you are really passionate about and a team that you enjoy working with, it is a shame to allow it to be made difficult by a micromanaging boss. Although the problem is rarely about output or results, but more about the boss’s own personality or learned experience, it might be possible to take back some control of the situation by adapting your own behavior. Take a step back – Sometimes it is hard to see what is going on when you are too close to a project. By taking a step back and encouraging others to, it can be easier to see exactly what is taking place and how to address it. Set boundaries – Be clear about your expectations and limitations. If you are uncomfortable taking work-related calls out of office hours or feel that deadlines are unrealistic and reports unnecessary, it is vital to speak up. It is also helpful to ask your colleagues to support you if they are feeling the same way. Be intuitive – Micromanagers often react badly to being overtly told they are micromanaging. Try to communicate with your boss by suggesting that you would like more responsibility or that you feel you really proved yourself on a certain project and would like to take a more autonomous role on the next one. Look for the cause – Understanding why your boss is micromanaging will help to inform the way in which you decide to proceed. If it is because they are under extreme stress or because they are anxious about a recent failing, a team meeting where this can be discussed openly may help. If it is due to them having a controlling or narcissistic personality this is far more difficult to deal with. Delegate tasks – Micromanagers are often reluctant to delegate tasks out to others. Delegating tasks gives other employees responsibility and makes them feel included and valued. By giving tasks to others and proving they are being done successfully, you develop a proven track record to challenge your micromanaging boss with when they refuse to delegate. Try to make pre-emptive strikes – If possible, try to stay a step ahead. You can learn your boss’s pattern of behavior and have items ready before they have a chance to ask for them or start interfering. If they are very data-orientated, you could take the time to produce a report on the progress of a project so they can see that everything is going well. By demonstrating that you are on track for success, they may start to focus their attention elsewhere. Arrange regular updates – It might help to suggest regular check-in times to meet to discuss your progress. That way, if you are approached in the meantime, you can say confidently, “Let’s discuss that at my next check-in appointment”. The guarantee that they will be receiving regular updates may encourage a micromanaging boss to take a step back. You could also start to introduce the idea of only needing to update on the important milestones of a project, rather than each minor detail. Take ownership – Employees who are willing to be held accountable for their work (both good and bad) and accept genuine feedback are more difficult to micromanage. As a team, be willing to celebrate your successes and openly discuss and learn from failures. Be organized – Micromanagement can cause chaos within a team as employees become unsure of what their role actually is, and what precisely they should be doing, as their manager tries to make every job seem like their own. The more organized and structured you are able to be, demonstrating that you work cohesively as a team, the less opportunity the micromanager will have to cause disruption. Final Thoughts. Micromanagement occurs for a variety of reasons, but more often than not results in negative consequences for the workforce. Although at the root is the desire for control, micromanaging often provides only the illusion of control and will, in fact, cause workers to feel undervalued and stressed, often leading to disorganization and a lack of direction within a team. With effective communication and understanding it is possible to stop being micromanaged; this will be significantly easier if your boss is open to appraising and reevaluating their own management style and behavior.How strong is your CV/Resume ?Read This Next. You might also be interested in these other WikiJob articles:Teamwork SkillsProblem Solving Skills & ExamplesCommon Leadership StylesLeadership SkillsKorn Ferry Leadership Potential Assessment (KFALP) – Tips for 2022The Best Free University and College Courses for LeadershipWhat Is a Manager?Intrinsic RewardsOr explore the Jobs & Careers / Employment sections.
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Result 24
TitleWhat is Micromanagement? - 9P Online
Urlhttps://9principles.com/learning/what-is-micromanagement/
Description
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Organic Position24
H1Are We Over-Generalizing the Term Micromanagement?
H2What is Micromanagement?
Catastrophizing Micromanagement
H3Latest In
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H2WithAnchorsWhat is Micromanagement?
Catastrophizing Micromanagement
BodyAre We Over-Generalizing the Term Micromanagement? Support people to be successful and achieve results. by Huron Education Add to Collection Mark Complete Share What is Micromanagement? Loading...Rate This When we think of micromanaging, it typically has a negative connotation. But the reality is, extra supervision and coaching are sometimes necessary before some individuals are ready to leave the nest. In this podcast episode, Quint Studer and Dr. Janet Pilcher dive into the topic—discussing what micromanaging is, when it’s necessary, and how leaders can communicate effectively with employees who may need extra support and supervision. This episode addresses questions, such as: How can we have productive conversations with our supervisor if we feel micromanaged? Why is micromanaging not always a bad thing? What can leaders do to help employees feel supported, rather than micromanaged? Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. Catastrophizing Micromanagement. “If you’re feeling you’re micromanaged, you owe it to yourself and your boss to figure out: why do you feel that way? Is it real or not real? And to what extent is it? And then, what are the things you are not being micromanaged on? I guarantee you there are so many things you’re not being micromanaged on, until you take the time to realize that, you just take those one or two examples and throw the blanket over the whole environment.” – Quint Studer Latest In. Performance Management Feedback is a Gift…or is it? Provide Specific and Simple Feedback Related To. Develop Leaders Creating a Culture of Shared Leadership. Listen to People to Continuously Improve The Power of Pause. Use Pause to Lead with Relentless Resilience Need a subscription? Create a collection of the pages you’d like to visit again when you sign-up for a free 9P account. Save your progress and pick up where you left off by creating a free 9P account. Create a Free Account Need Help Useful Links. Contact Privacy Statement Terms of Use © 2020 Huron Consulting Group Inc. and affiliates. Huron is a global consultancy and not a CPA firm, and does not provide attest services, audits, or other engagements in accordance with standards established by the AICPA or auditing standards promulgated by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”). Huron is not a law firm; it does not offer, and is not authorized to provide, legal advice or counseling in any jurisdiction. Huron is the trading name of Pope Woodhead & Associates Ltd. Log in with your credentials. or     Create an account Forgot your details? Create Account.
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Title7 Dangers of Micromanagement | Pluralsight
Urlhttps://www.pluralsight.com/blog/business-professional/why-micromanagement-is-bad
DescriptionWhat are the dangers of micromanagement and how it can negatively affect your company? Learning to trust your employees can help you reduce micromanagement
DateJan 5, 2015
Organic Position25
H17 Big Dangers of Micromanagement
H2Danger 1: Loss of Control
Danger 2: Loss of Trust
Danger 3: Dependent Employees
Danger 4: Your Own Burnout
Danger 5: High Turnover of Staff
Danger 6: Lack of Autonomy
Danger 7: No Innovation
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H2WithAnchorsDanger 1: Loss of Control
Danger 2: Loss of Trust
Danger 3: Dependent Employees
Danger 4: Your Own Burnout
Danger 5: High Turnover of Staff
Danger 6: Lack of Autonomy
Danger 7: No Innovation
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Body7 Big Dangers of Micromanagement - select the contributor at the end of the page - Updated 12/5/2019 Micromanagement: Everyone knows the term. Some fear and even avoid any company that’s associated with the word. But what is micromanaging, really? By definition, micromanagement is a management style where a manager closely observes or controls the work of subordinates or employees. Micromanagement generally has a negative connotation. In reality, most of us see it as management’s attempt at digging its fingers deep into the pie of those actually doing the work.  So why do people micromanage? Micromanaging is a way for management to ensure that tasks are performed in a very precise manner—in other words, management’s way. Problem is, it isn’t always the right or most productive way of doing things. And, that’s just one of the dangers of micromanagement. Let’s take a look at some of the other dangers that come along with this style of management and why you should avoid it. Danger 1: Loss of Control. When you micromanage your staff, you limit yourself by which management tools you have at your disposal until the only tool you have in reach is control. And, the funny thing about control is that when it’s your only means of management, you usually end up losing it. Rather than gaining control over your team and product, you lose control and time in trying to micromanage your team. It’s important to realize that there are many valid management styles and every staff member reacts differently to each.  Takeaway: When you drastically limit your style you also limit your ability to communicate and, in the end, your ability to manage. Danger 2: Loss of Trust. Micromanagement will eventually lead to a massive breakdown of trust between you and your staff. Your staff will no longer see you as a manager, but a despot whose only desire is to wall up its staff. This crushing act breaks what little trust already exists between employee and manager. When trust is gone, two things can happen: a serious loss of productivity and loss of employees. Yes, the latter is a worst-case scenario, but it happens.  Takeaway: Remember, trust is a two-way street. Your staff must be able to trust you as much as you trust them. Micromanagement destroys trust. Danger 3: Dependent Employees. After being micromanaged, your staff will begin to depend on you, rather than having the confidence to perform tasks on their own. Micromanagement makes your team feel like they must have your constant guidance. Dependent employees take more time and effort to manage, which can take a toll on your schedule and energy. You have to remember that those employees were initially hired because they brought something to the table: skills, talents, and insights all unique to each and every staff member. When your employees aren’t dependent upon you, they’ll continue to think on their own—and when employees have the freedom to think on their own, great things can happen.  Takeaway: If you micromanage too much, your employees’ skills, talents, and insights can fall to the wayside, leaving you with a team that only knows how to do what it's told. You must allow your employees the freedom to think and act on their own. Danger 4: Your Own Burnout. Micromanaging is downright exhausting. Looking over so many shoulders every day will very quickly burn you out. Eventually, you’ll grow to hate your job, straight down to the very company that employs you. If you hate it enough, you may even end up leaving it, and possibly never wanting to revisit a management role again.  Sure, burnout is always a danger in any job, but the energy burned while micromanaging will ignite that wick faster than anything. This feeling of burnout can affect not only your work life but can stretch into your home life and cause anxiety and depression. And don’t forget, that burnout can infect those beneath you. Managers are not the only victims of burnout; as you flame out, you will very likely take your staff with you.  Takeaway: Micromanagement is not only bad for your employees, but it can take a terrible toll on your physical and mental health. Take time to step back, breathe, and realize that your team can handle its tasks without you constantly hovering over shoulders. Danger 5: High Turnover of Staff. Simply put, most people don’t take well to being micromanaged. When employees are micromanaged, they often do one thing—quit. Considering the reasons why managers micromanage (ego, insecurity, inexperience, perfectionism, arrogance), it’s simply not worth the high turnover rate. Having to constantly train and retrain staff not only robs your department of momentum, it makes your company lose the skilled and effective employees it once had for second runner ups and under-qualified people, which then affects the company’s bottom line and destroys morale. Friendships are made and destroyed, and eventually, this will crush the spirit of your staff.  Takeaway: Micromanagement leads to employees quitting. Danger 6: Lack of Autonomy. When you micromanage, your employees begin to feel like they’re losing their autonomy. When this happens, they’ll slowly lose the desire to do anything but that which you demand, and little more. No one will step outside the proverbial box or go the extra mile for a task. You hand those same people a certain level of autonomy and they will take pride in what they do and how they do it.  Takeaway: A lack of autonomy will squelch growth in your employees. One of the goals of management should be to see staff members rise in the ranks. Danger 7: No Innovation. One of the biggest dangers of micromanaging is crushing your employees’ creative spirit. Your team is on the front lines of your project and they know what is happening better than anyone else, including you. While some innovations that they bring to the table might not always be winners, crushing innovation and creativity destroys all chances of the good ideas coming out and being shared. By refusing to take risks in innovation, you’re also refusing the potential for progress.  Takeaway: Innovation is the key to progress. Micromanaging your team ruins any chance of growth or progression.  If you find yourself micromanaging, you can fix it. You have to have trust and faith in the people that you work with, and believe that they can get the job done even without your constant oversight. With more freedom, they will surprise you with an increase in creativity, innovation, and productivity.  Get our content first. In your inbox. . 1229 Redirect Link Contributor. Jack Wallen. Jack Wallen is an award winning writer of technical content and fiction. He has been covering Linux and open source since the late '90s and just about every conceivable topic since. His fiction breaks ground in the post apocalyptic genre as well as horror, thriller, and science fiction. For more information on Jack, check out his site, Get Jack'd at getjackd.net. Ready to skill upyour entire team? 10 Subscriptions Need more subscriptions? Contact sales. Continue to checkout Continue to checkout Cancel With your Pluralsight plan, you can:. With your 14-day pilot, you can:. Access thousands of videos to develop critical skills Give up to 10 users access to thousands of video courses Practice and apply skills with interactive courses and projects See skills, usage, and trend data for your teams Prepare for certifications with industry-leading practice exams Measure proficiency across skills and roles Align learning to your goals with paths and channels Ready to skill upyour entire team? 10 Subscriptions Need more subscriptions? Contact sales. Continue to checkout Cancel With your Pluralsight plan, you can:. With your 14-day pilot, you can:. Access thousands of videos to develop critical skills Give up to 10 users access to thousands of video courses Practice and apply skills with interactive courses and projects See skills, usage, and trend data for your teams Prepare for certifications with industry-leading practice exams Measure proficiency across skills and roles Align learning to your goals with paths and channels Solutions . Pluralsight Skills Pluralsight Flow Government Gift of Pluralsight View Pricing Contact Sales Skill up for free Platform . Browse library Role IQ Skill IQ Iris Authors Professional Services Technology Index Company . About us Customer stories Careers Blog Newsroom Resource center Guides Resources . Download Pluralsight Events Teach Partners Affiliate Partners PluralsightOne.org Subscribe Support . Contact Help center IP whitelist Sitemap Deutsch English French Copyright © 2004 - 2022 Pluralsight LLC. All rights reserved Terms of Use Privacy Policy Modern Slavery Act Transparency Statement We use cookies to make interactions with our websites and services easy and meaningful. For more information about the cookies we use or to find out how you can disable cookies, click here. You have disabled non-critical cookies and are browsing in private mode. For the best possible experience on our website, please accept cookies. For additional details please read our privacy policy. Allow Decline
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Result 26
TitleUrban Dictionary: micromanagement
Urlhttps://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=micromanagement
Description
Date
Organic Position26
H1micromanagement
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodymicromanagementIn business management, micromanagement is an example of poor management where the manager over-manages people unnecessarily. Instead of giving people general instructions and then allowing them to do their job, the micromanager monitors and assesses every step. The manager may be motivated by concern for details. The effect, however, may be to de-motivate employees and create resentment.- en.wikipedia.org“Finally, this supervisor is holding himself back. By continuing to micromanage his staff, he is insuring that they don't develop. If there is no one to replace the superintendent, then he, in turn, cannot advance. Some people mistakenly think that, by not developing their subordinates, they are maintaining job security for themselves. In fact, what they're doing is hurting the company.” -www.sideroad.comby Adam Carlton May 04, 2005FlagGet a micromanagement mug for your Facebook friend Rihanna.micromanagementThe term essentially means to supervise every small step in the workflow process -- hence the 'micro.' In today's workplace, micromanaging is responsible for many bad bottom lines, poor performances and bankruptcies.-www.dealconsulting.comTim Burgin-he is insuring that they don't develop. In fact, what he doing is hurting the company.by Adam Carlton May 04, 2005FlagGet a micromanagement mug for your guy Bob.micromanagerA person who is driven by fear and anxiety into mettling with others' work. Micromanagers are bosses or peers who constantly seek to usurp the decision rights of others. Their excessively insecure and competitive nature causes them to react negatively to ideas and efforts not their own. If they possess authority, they will aggressively use it to control the way work gets done around them. They are typically focused on process rather than results. They criticize others far more frequently than they praise them. A micromanager is motivated by a fear of receiving blame for "mistakes" made on their watch. They will try to reduce risk by squelching the initiative of others and they will try to insure no mistakes are being made by insisting on reviewing and "approving" work. Frequently, they will make unnecessary requests for more work and will provide repeated edits. Almost all micromanagers are workaholics with codependent relationships in the organization. They surround themselves with bureaucrats when they can. Their relationship to their boss is far more important to them than their relationship to their staff or peers. If a micromanager has been in their position for a long time and are perceived as successful, then the organizational disfunction is institutional. Many organizations succeed by utilizing micromanagers to "ensure quality" or to make other employees depart. The typical experience for an employee working for a micromanager is repleat with frustration and runs the risk of demoralizing the individual and impacting their self esteem. Confident employees of micromanagers will often develop effective means for managing upward, but the majority of staff who are micromanaged will modify their behavior in negative ways: 1) slacking - avoiding the manager and reducing output 2) facilitating - giving up decision rights and following orders 3) rebelling - pushing back in career-destroying ways Micromanagers know the rules and are very good at avoiding putting themselves into a position where they will be vulnerable to disciplinary action. Though their actions reduce productivity, their long list of efforts that they control looks highly productive to their superiors. Though not all sycophants are micromanagers, all micromanagers are sycophants. Workers faced with a micromanaging boss would be well advised to develop a clear, thorough strategy for coping with the situation. Leaving the position or the company should be viewed as a reasonable solution. My boss is a classic kiss-up-kick-down micromanager who won't allow me to do my job without constant interference.by leap4rog September 16, 2007FlagGet a micromanager mug for your mate Rihanna.MicromanagePaying attention to things that don't really matter, to manage or control with excessive attention to minor details.Max: I gave my boss the billing report but all he cared about was that i did it in the wrong font. Sam: Wow, he needs to learn how to not micromanageby Max Burch July 11, 2008FlagGet a Micromanage mug for your fish Zora.MicromanagerSomeone who overanalyzes things and can at times be extremely petty about it. Paying attention to minute details that are a waste of time and energy. Has a tendency to accuse others of possible wrong doing just to have someone to be the scape goat to their insecurity and constant need to control something or somebody.Dan is constantly accounting for every pencil and paper clip and has to nit pick about who spent the last $800 and isnt satisfied if the explaination doesnt fit his mold of what the money was used for even if the evidence is presented proving that the money was spent wisely. Dan always has this micromanager mentality which is highly annoying.by Queenbee7519 August 31, 2009FlagGet a Micromanager mug for your mother-in-law Rihanna.MicromanagementMicromanagement is a term which describes the management of many small details in computer games. It has at least two senses, one referring to economic management and the other to combat tactics. Micromanagement has been a controversial aspect of game design for many years - some games minimize it while others treat it as an important skill.Shove that micromanagement up your ass! I'm getting a different RTS.by fredmeepbob November 20, 2007FlagGet a Micromanagement mug for your buddy Sarah.MicromanagementA form of management practiced by neurotic, uptight and middle-aged white males. This form of management often involves nonsensical and brandish displays of masculinity. In addition to this, it is often characterized by repetitive and demeaning orders as well as the occasional scolding.See: Mushroom Management for further reading.Micromanagement in your life:Manager: Hey, I'm gonna need you to go ahead and skip your lunch and re stack everything in isles 12-16.Employee: But I just stacked them this morning.Manager: And when you get done that it's your turn to clean the public restroom, have it done before the end of your shift.by Silence DogoodINGTON December 10, 2011FlagGet a Micromanagement mug for your daughter Yasemin.12Next ›Last »
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Title5 telltale signs of micromanagement | Range
Urlhttps://www.range.co/blog/how-to-manage-your-micromanaging-boss
DescriptionWhat is a micromanaging boss, 5 reasons your micromanaging boss is micromanaging you and how to work toward greater autonomy, and 5 signs of a micromanager
DateNov 11, 2021
Organic Position27
H15 telltale signs of micromanagement
H2Why does micromanagement happen?
Signs of micromanagement
How to put an end to micromanagement
Strategies for dealing with a micromanaging boss
How Range can help
H3How to stop micromanagement tendencies before they become a major problem
1. Familiar territory feels good
2. Need for control
3. Lack of trust
4. Poor or low-context hiring processes
5. “How else will things get done?”
1. Unable to delegate
2. Obsessed with ad-hoc updates
3. The instant check
4. Over-focus on process
5. Hyper-focused on the small stuff
Letting go of micromanagement tendencies
1. Talk to them directly about it and propose a plan
2. Talk to colleagues about how they've handled it
3. Talk to other managers
4. Go above them
5. Leave
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H2WithAnchorsWhy does micromanagement happen?
Signs of micromanagement
How to put an end to micromanagement
Strategies for dealing with a micromanaging boss
How Range can help
Body5 telltale signs of micromanagementHow to stop micromanagement tendencies before they become a major problem. November 11, 20219 minutes readModern management is a bit like the tale of Goldilocks and The Three Bears.When a manager’s not involved enough, they’re quickly seen as an absentee manager who ignores their employees until a problem arises (and then often calls them out for said problem).When a manager’s overly involved, they’re viewed as a micromanager – breathing down the necks of employees for endless updates, ready to chime in with their two cents.Of these two management styles, neither does the employees any favors. But micromanagement can be especially detrimental to employee morale, engagement, and physical and mental health. It causes unnecessary stress for everyone involved and has been linked to increased staff turnover rates, not to mention shorter life spans for employees (yikes).Micromanagement is also an incredibly vicious cycle. When a leader micromanages their team, folks don’t feel like they have any autonomy or power over their work. Motivation and output can take a hit since nobody wants to go the extra mile when you’re being hounded for frequent updates 24/7. In this scenario, folks might even become dependent employees — who no longer feel empowered to take action on their own and are constantly awaiting manager approval to move work forward. So the manager feels the need to step in constantly to help things along.Most managers don’t intentionally set out to micromanage their teams, so how does all this happen in the first place?In this article, we’ll explore the psychological, behavioral, and other factors behind micromanagement, and discuss ways you can recognize it on your own team. Whether you’re a manager or an IC, keep on reading — we’ve got strategies to help everyone stop micromanagement in its tracks.Source - Bizzaro.comWhy does micromanagement happen?The need for a leader to micromanage can come from a number of places — anxiety, low self-esteem, and the desire to simply do it all can most certainly contribute to the tendency to want to be overly involved. Here are five more common reasons micromanagement tends to slip in.1. Familiar territory feels good. As managers get promoted and move up to higher levels of management, it can be difficult for many to let go of their old job or their old ways of doing things. (Especially if these were the things that landed them the promotion in the first place.) However, at higher levels, leaders usually need to focus more of their time on strategic work and less on the operational side of things. For many, this is a completely new way of spending the work day, and it can be challenging to remove yourself from day-to-day operations if it’s something you’re comfortable with and confident in.2. Need for control. Most everyone likes to be in control to some degree, especially when it comes to our jobs. When we’re in control, it signals stability and can make us feel a sense of calm. For managers though, part of the job description is nurturing and growing reports in their careers – which innately means giving up some of that control to empower them. Plus, excessive control in the workplace undermines teamwork and trust, and tends to get in the way — especially if you work at a fast-growing company where things are constantly changing. Being a control freak doesn't work in a highly adaptive environment.3. Lack of trust. Only 49% of people say they trust the people working alongside them. If you don’t have a strong foundation of trust on your team and a culture that supports it, it can lead to micromanagement. Especially if trust is not something already being displayed by folks at the leadership and management level.4. Poor or low-context hiring processes. When you don’t have strong, open communication between managers and the recruiters from day one of the hiring process, things can get messy. This happens all too often on busy, fast-growing teams. When a recruiter doesn’t have full clarity on the specs for the role and a manager doesn’t have time to get deeply involved, folks might move through the hiring process that wouldn’t be a strong fit otherwise. If you bring in someone without the right skills and the manager immediately realizes it, micromanagement is usually the next step.5. “How else will things get done?”. This is a common refrain from micromanagers about why they do what they do. This is largely the result of people wanting to feel relevant at work, which is only natural as we spend so many hours a day there.Signs of micromanagement. Now that we’ve got a sense of what causes micromanagement, let’s take a look at some of the common micromanager tendencies – how can you tell if you or your boss is doing it?1. Unable to delegate. When a micromanager delegates something, they have a tendency to instantly become involved in the work too – even the minor details. (Which isn’t really delegation at all.) This is unfortunate not just for the direct report, who might feel frustrated or undervalued, but actually for the manager too...in some unexpected ways. Turns out: more effective delegation actually leads to a higher lifetime salary for managers. Feels like a missed opportunity to us!2. Obsessed with ad-hoc updates. Effective teamwork should obviously be rooted in solid communication – but there’s a big difference between status updates for alignment and those for the sake of satisfying a micromanager. If you’re working with a micromanager, they’ll want to know every little detail of every little thing, and they’ll usually ask for constant updates. (We once worked with a manager who’d ask for an update deck multiple times per day.) You’ll often see micromanagers lurking in your docs at all hours of the day or commenting and offering feedback before you’re ready for it.3. The instant check. Micromanagers thrive off of being involved early and often. Picture this: A new project is assigned to you, detailed, and downloaded. As you walk back to your desk to digest the new information and figure out what your next steps are — there’s your manager. Swooping in with advice or an immediate need to check in. If someone’s on you before you’ve even started work on a project, it usually means they’re micromanaging.4. Over-focus on process. Process is great for organizations, and is one of the most important steps to scaling a business. At the same time, process can be a weapon when used incorrectly, as many managers unfortunately do. Micromanagers love process. And worse yet, they typically love process for the sake of process, which refers to processes that don't actually improve the efficiency of work getting done. They exist because they've always existed and no one has stopped to question it.5. Hyper-focused on the small stuff. Many micromanagers will over-focus on relative minutiae — a grammar error or a tiny mistake within a document — instead of trying to resolve the big picture around what needs to be done.Remember: typos aren't ideal, yes, but ultimately a lot of the stuff that companies care about internally is not stuff that customers will ultimately care about. Look at the big picture and the end game. Micromanagers usually look at the details they can immediately control.How to put an end to micromanagement. Letting go of micromanagement tendencies. Broadly and above all, realize that good leadership is about letting go. Research shows that people who believe they're constantly being micromanaged perform poorly overall in their job. So while you might think you're doing your team members a great service and teaching them “the right way,” in reality you're likely tanking the productivity of your entire team.Admittedly it requires some self-awareness to see the difference, and admittedly not every person who becomes a manager has that ability. So take a step back and look at your team. Do they seem fearful of you or connected to you? Fear can be a powerful motivator, yes, but it doesn't work nearly as well in the professional realm.Becoming a better manager is very hard, and it's a long road to get there. One way to avoid both being a micromanaging boss and being an absentee manager is to find more ways to build trust across your team, which is a mix of small gestures and conversations and bigger elements, like gradually increasing the responsibilities of different team members.📕 Read our guide on how to build a culture of trust on your team in just a few minutes a dayThe Coddling Of The American Mind authors Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt often reference this phrase:“Prepare the child for the road, not the road for the child.”They're talking about parenting, but it can apply to management too. Give your team the basic skills they need and knowledge they seek, and then sit back and see what happens. If they fail, it's fine. Come in, course correct, and then let them try again on their own. This is all part of professional development.The road will always be littered with challenges, difficult clients, partnerships gone awry, and so much more. As a manager, you can't control for all of that reality. However, if you let your team try to succeed or fail without your constant intervention, you'll build trust and ultimately be seen as an effective manager, rather than a micromanaging boss.Strategies for dealing with a micromanaging boss. This is a little bit tougher, but here are some strategies and ideas to help you work better together with your manager.1. Talk to them directly about it and propose a plan. Ask your boss for a bit more autonomy. Remind them of projects you've successfully completed on your own. And, to ease them into this, try “How about I work on this project for a week? After that I'll offer a full debrief of where everything stands in the format you prefer on Thursday at 3PM.”2. Talk to colleagues about how they've handled it. Veteran coworkers or teammates who’ve worked with or under your manager longer might know what words, ideas, and proposals resonate the most with your micromanaging boss.3. Talk to other managers. “How best can I work with them? I know they want the best for our team and that they're a stickler for details, but I think this micromanaging is preventing me from being truly productive.”4. Go above them. This is a second-to-last resort because going above a manager can cause lots of issues with trust. But if the micromanagement never seems to stop, go talk to their boss and lay out exactly what is happening. Be honest: Have you messed up on projects? Do you need more guidance? What would an ideal week look like in terms of project check-ins for you?5. Leave. This is the last resort, and we don't necessarily endorse it. However, there are some micromanaging bosses who are unlikely to change. That's the sad reality of the situation.If you find yourself reporting to one of those bosses, nothing else seems to be working, and your stress levels are up while productivity is down, it might be time to begin a new job search and look elsewhere for a manager and team that will make you happy.How Range can help. With work and teams, the ultimate goal is for everyone to be connected and productive, managers and employees alike. Everyone ought to be in sync (knowing what other people are doing) and the whole team should be in alignment (people understand where the true priorities lie, and there's a line of sight around multiple projects).Check-ins with Range — think asynchronous daily standups with your whole team — make sharing a daily and weekly work plan possible in just a few minutes.When a manager can look at a tool like Range and know where things stand instantly, there's less of a psychological pull to be a micromanager, and the behavioral tendencies of micromanaging bosses can most certainly be improved. When priorities and line of sight are clearer, and when the status of work is visible for all to see, making improvements to your team and management skills (or your working relationship with your manager) can more easily become a reality.Try Range for free on your team todayWhy does micromanagement happen?Signs of micromanagementHow to put an end to micromanagementStrategies for dealing with a micromanaging bossHow Range can help5 telltale signs of micromanagementMore Related ArticlesCulturePrepare for your best year yet with 150+ team reflection prompts. ‘Tis the season for reflection and planning with your teamRead More...CultureSaying thanks: How to practice gratitude with your team. And how we developed a practice of gratitude in the workplaceRead More...CultureHow to build a culture of gratitude. Gratitude is extremely powerful when done wellRead More...Subscribe. 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Title4 Signs Your Boss Is A Micromanager And How To Challenge Them
Urlhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/heidilynnekurter/2021/02/28/4-signs-your-boss-is-a-micromanager-and-how-to-challenge-them/
DescriptionLinkedIn reported that 79% of employees have been micromanaged at least once in their career
DateFeb 28, 2021
Organic Position28
H14 Signs Your Boss Is A Micromanager And How To Challenge Them
H2
H3More From Forbes
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Body4 Signs Your Boss Is A Micromanager And How To Challenge ThemHeidi Lynne KurterSenior ContributorOpinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.CareersCreative strategies, engaging workplaces.Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to Linkedin While micromanagers may have good intentions, their management tactics infect the workplace culture ... [+] and productivity of the team. getty A common misconception about micromanagers is that they’re condescending, bad-tempered and inherently nasty individuals. The truth is, most micromanagers have the best intentions for their team but have developed poor habits resulting in micromanaging tactics. As such, they perpetuate the cycle of micromanaging as they’re demonstrating this is the way to lead others. Likewise, employees are not set up for success because they’re disempowered to make decisions on their own. Therefore, an employee’s leadership skills are limited because they’ll always rely on their manager. For this reason, micromanagers are detrimental to the success of a business and the mental health of everyone involved. LinkedIn reported that 79% of employees have been micromanaged at least once in their career. Oxana Razumova, co-founder of Sensemakers, explained, “micromanagement is not just an unpleasant trait of a manager, it’s a strictly controlling management style, in which the boss doesn’t leave independence to employees.” As a result, employees disengage, feel demoralized and their creativity is stifled. Consequently, this prevents the team from flourishing. Moreover, it increases stress, destroys happiness and decreases productivity and drives burnout. Thus leading to unhealthy habits such as poor eating, increased drinking, irritability, lack of sleep and long-term health issues. Here are four signs your boss is a micromanager and how you can challenge them. They’re Obsessed With Knowing Everything Managers often have a hard time delegating responsibilities and trusting in their team to complete tasks. This is because they believe they can do the task better or that nobody else will work as hard as them. Rather than provide clear expectations and trust that employees will do what’s expected of them, micromanagers require constant updates even on small tasks, want access to everything and check-in multiple times asking for the same information that was already provided. MORE FROMFORBES ADVISORBest Travel Insurance Companies. ByAmy DaniseEditorBest Covid-19 Travel Insurance Plans. ByAmy DaniseEditor Clinging onto every piece of information not only holds the manager and team back from being successful, but it pushes quality people away. Managers can say they trust their employees, but if their actions contradict their words, employees will quickly lose trust and become disconnected. Instead of focusing on high-level, strategic tasks, managers often end up overwhelmed with low-priority activities. This narrow focus prevents them from being available to their team. Furthermore, this micromanaging tactic of needing to know everything sends the message that the employee isn’t trusted to get the job done. An example of this is requiring employees to keep a detailed record of how every minute is spent through spreadsheets, calendar time blocking or a shared document. Sam Lowy, CEO of Life Insurance Star, shared, “this younger generation of employees prefers working independently with enough autonomy to make decisions on their own. It shows a level of trust that motivates them to do better.” Without trust, employees feel powerless and question their position at the company. As a consequence, they disengage, grow resentful and lose loyalty to the company. Employees can mitigate this by requesting a weekly check-in where they share updates, challenges and get the support they need. In addition, they can propose a shared spreadsheet that’s updated in real-time. Employees can set a boundary using phrases such as, “I don’t think this is the best use of your time” or “in order for me to be the most productive...” Their Ego Makes Them Fearful Of Losing Control Micromanagers are the biggest bottleneck to a team's success due to requiring excessive meetings, gatekeeping and stifling creativity, agility and innovation. Additionally, expectations aren’t shared, demands are made without context, little support or advice is offered and there’s unnecessary stress. As such, employees are unsure of whether they should act before receiving a task or assert their independence to start working. Furthermore, they may delegate tasks to their team but end up redoing the finished work to do it the way they want it done. Employees become disengaged when they know they’re not trusted to do their job well. Rather than giving employees ownership to make decisions themselves, micromanagers require that each decision first be approved by them. Keesjan Engelen, CEO of Titoma, said, “this desire to achieve perfection through other people’s performance, the lack of confidence in your own team, and the ability to let your team work independently shows a lack of emotional intelligence.” The most innovative companies are the ones who give their employees the autonomy to take risks and challenge the status quo. Rolf Bax, chief human resources officer at Resume.io, shared “when a manager resorts to micromanaging out of fear, what often ends up happening is they alienate the people who are crucial to their success.” Tyler Parris, Hudson-certified executive coach and founder of Chief of Staff, provides a few ways for employees to challenge their micromanager: I heard you say Mike was going to own this project, but then I noticed you drove the entire conversation in that meeting, is that what you intended? I noticed you've asked the team for a status multiple times a day this week, but we have a dashboard that shows the status in real-time. May I ask what's going on for you there? Are you worried about something specific? I'm wondering if all those requests are taking the team out of their flow or focused time to do their work? They Believe They Know Better Than Everyone Else Many managers operate from the mindset that they know best and they’re smarter than everyone else. Leo Young, founder and editor of Optimized Family said, “this influence can be fatal to the creativity, innovation and performance” of the workplace.” When employees lack the autonomy and space to develop their expertise, learn from their mistakes to improve processes and grow, they start shutting down because they don’t feel like their contributions are valued. Knowledge sharing is designed to be a collaborative method not a one-way approach. Each person has different knowledge, experience, opinions, perspectives and ideas. Thus, every individual on a team has something valuable to contribute. The worst thing a manager can do is neglect what their team brings to the table and speak to them as if they’re inexperienced. An example of this is constantly reminding employees of your experience in the industry or position when they try to share their ideas or opinions. Another example is always needing to have the last word. This creates a fear-based environment where employees refrain from speaking up. Accordingly, innovation disappears. To challenge this, employees should create more awareness around how their manager’s behaviors and words impact them. This starts by having an open and respectful conversation with their manager. Using an “I feel” statement with specific examples, such as “I feel like you don’t trust me when you X”, is a great starting point. Also, if a micromanager focuses on criticizing what’s done wrong without acknowledging strengths and achievements, let them know how you prefer feedback delivered and what type of employee-manager relationship you want. It’s important to note that some micromanagers lack the emotional intelligence and self awareness to change their ways. If it’s clear that they’re not going to change even after expressing your needs and going to human resources, it’s time to consider if this something you can handle for the long-term. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website. Heidi Lynne KurterPrintReprints & Permissions
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