Copywriteroffice

Serp data

Request Result Detail

The request result help you to show your API requests results.

Copywriteroffice - What are the benefits of an associate of science degree? serp result detail
Keyword What are the benefits of an associate of science degree?
Search Urlhttps://www.google.com/search?q=What+are+the+benefits+of+an+associate+of+science+degree%3F&oq=What+are+the+benefits+of+an+associate+of+science+degree%3F&num=30&hl=en&gl=US&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Devicedesktop
Languageen
LocationUS
Search Enginegoogle.com
No. Of Results229000000
RelatedSearch
what is a benefit of getting an associate degree?https://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=what+is+a+benefit+of+getting+an+associate+degree%3F&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAg3EAE
benefits of completing an associate of arts or associate of science degreehttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=Benefits+of+completing+an+Associate+of+Arts+or+Associate+of+Science+degree&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAg2EAE
what bachelor degree can i get with an associate's in sciencehttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=What+bachelor+degree+can+I+get+with+an+associate%27s+in+Science&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAgwEAE
what can i do with an associate of science degree in general studieshttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=What+can+I+do+with+an+Associate+of+Science+degree+in+general+studies&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAgrEAE
benefits of associate of arts degreehttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=Benefits+of+Associate+of+Arts+degree&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAgnEAE
associate of science degree requirementshttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=Associate+of+Science+degree+requirements&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAgmEAE
associate of science majorshttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=Associate+of+Science+majors&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAglEAE
associate of science salaryhttps://www.google.com/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=us&q=Associate+of+Science+salary&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjDkMHN0671AhWEbc0KHbKKDLMQ1QJ6BAgkEAE
Result 1
TitleWhat Kinds of Jobs Can You Get with an Associate of Science Degree?
Urlhttps://tallo.com/blog/associate-of-science-degree-jobs/
DescriptionCurious to know which associate of science degree jobs are in-demand? Visit Tallo and learn more about the many career paths that AS degree holders can take
Date
Organic Position
H1What Kinds of Jobs Can You Get with an Associate of Science Degree?
H2What Is an Associate of Science?
How Long Does It Take to Get an Associate of Science Degree?
The Best Associate of Science Degree Jobs
Reasons to Pursue an Associate of Science
Finding Your Path
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is an Associate of Science?
How Long Does It Take to Get an Associate of Science Degree?
The Best Associate of Science Degree Jobs
Reasons to Pursue an Associate of Science
Finding Your Path
BodyWhat Kinds of Jobs Can You Get with an Associate of Science Degree? July 12, 2020 Thinking about earning an associate degree in a medical- or science-related field? Good for you! Whether you want to enter the workforce immediately or go on to pursue a bachelor’s degree, getting an associate of science (AS) degree can open up a variety of career pathways for you.  How long does it take to get an AS degree and what kinds of associate degree jobs can you get after you graduate? Tallo is here to tell you everything you need to know about AS degrees. What Is an Associate of Science? As you might have already guessed, an associate of science degree is geared towards math and science-related careers. Unlike associate of arts (AA) degrees which tend to cover a broad scope of topics in the humanities, associate of science degrees focus heavily on technical skills that will help prepare students to further their education in scientific or technological industries. Currently weighing your options for degrees? Learn about the many different associate of arts degree jobs you can get with an AA degree on the Tallo blog. From information technology (IT) and web development to healthcare and beyond, there is a wide range of career pathways available to AS degree-seekers. Associate of science degrees can be earned at most community colleges and some universities, although many students decide to transfer their credits to a four-year university to continue their studies. How Long Does It Take to Get an Associate of Science Degree? Associate of science degrees typically require students to complete a minimum of 60 credit hours. Like most types of associate degrees, AS degrees are meant to be obtained in two years or less (four semesters of coursework).  However, this doesn’t mean that you have to complete the program in two years. For instance, do you have a full-time job and/or little kiddos to take care of? You can complete the program at a slower pace to help you juggle your other obligations. There are also accelerated associate degree programs that make it possible to earn your associate degree much faster than usual. The Best Associate of Science Degree Jobs . Contrary to popular belief, bachelor’s degrees aren’t the only undergraduate academic degrees that can help you land a high-paying job. In fact, there are plenty of occupations that offer good salaries for associate degree holders.  What kinds of jobs can you get with an associate of science, specifically? We pulled data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and rounded up 10 well-paying associate science degree jobs that pay $50K per year or more. Dental Hygienist ($76,220) Paralegal and Legal Assistant ($51,740) Architectural Drafter ($56,830) Cardiovascular Technologist ($68,750) Web Developer ($73,760) Occupational Therapy Assistant ($59,200) Radiologic Technologist ($62,280) Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technician ($66,020) Geological and Petroleum Technician ($51,130) Funeral Service Manager ($58,310) Reasons to Pursue an Associate of Science. While there are many advantages to earning your associate of science degree, this career path isn’t right for everyone. Here are a few reasons why you might want to pursue an AS degree. You Want to Work in an In-Demand Field – While nothing is guaranteed after you graduate, getting your AS degree is a safe bet for gaining employment. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, STEM occupations — those related to science, technology, engineering, and math — are expected to grow 8.8 percent by 2028. Plus, you get to work in an evolving industry that challenges you and keeps things interesting! You Want Options – Many AS degree-seekers have one of two options: they can find a job post-graduation or continue their education. Indeed, many associate of science degree programs are intended to be a stepping-stone to a bachelor’s degree.  You Want to Save Money on a Degree – Another reason why some people choose to pursue an associate of science degree is because they want to knock out general education requirements at an affordable community college before they transfer to a costlier university. And like we said, you may decide to call it good after you earn your AS. If you’re on the fence about a four-year university, getting your AS degree is a smart option. Finding Your Path. For many students, earning an associate of science degree is a good way to go. Not only does an AS degree provide you with flexible options post-graduation, it can also help you explore your interests in greater depth without piling on too much student debt in the process. Posted in Blog, Students & Professionals
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 40
  • 1
  • associate
  • 24
  • 1
  • science
  • 19
  • 1
  • associate science
  • 16
  • 1
  • associate science degree
  • 13
  • 1
  • science degree
  • 13
  • 1
  • job
  • 9
  • 1
  • year
  • 7
  • 1
  • associate degree
  • 6
  • 1
  • bachelor
  • 6
  • 1
  • student
  • 6
  • 1
  • option
  • 5
  • 1
  • degree associate
  • 4
  • 1
  • degree job
  • 4
  • 1
  • good
  • 4
  • 1
  • pursue
  • 4
  • 1
  • career
  • 4
  • 1
  • university
  • 4
  • 1
  • program
  • 4
  • 1
  • bachelor degree
  • 3
  • 1
  • degree associate science
  • 3
  • 1
  • earning associate
  • 3
  • 1
  • kind
  • 3
  • 1
  • earning
  • 3
  • 1
  • related
  • 3
  • 1
  • education
  • 3
  • 1
  • complete
  • 3
  • 1
  • reason
  • 3
  • 1
Result 2
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position1
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 3
TitleTop 6 Benefits of Associate Degrees | Post University
Urlhttps://post.edu/blog/top-6-benefits-of-associate-degrees/
DescriptionLearn more about the advantages and benefits of associate degrees to help you decide if this type of degree is right for you
DateNov 5, 2020
Organic Position2
H1Top 6 Benefits of Associate Degrees
H2Post University Blog
Types of Associate Degrees
Explore all of Post's undergraduate and graduate degrees & certificates
Benefits of Earning an Associate Degree
H3Career Opportunities
Education Options
Higher Earnings
Lower Tuition
Flexibility to Work
Less Time to Earn a Degree
Related Posts
Related Posts
H2WithAnchorsPost University Blog
Types of Associate Degrees
Explore all of Post's undergraduate and graduate degrees & certificates
Benefits of Earning an Associate Degree
BodyTop 6 Benefits of Associate Degrees Nov 5, 2020 | Program Insights When you’re making decisions about higher education and an eventual career path, keep in mind that an associate degree can offer some important advantages. These degree programs take less time to complete than a 4-year degree program, but is an associate degree worth it? You might not be aware that earning this kind of degree can lead to more earnings while also helping you keep college costs lower. Learning more about these advantages and other benefits of associate degrees can help you decide if this type of degree is suitable for you. Types of Associate Degrees. Different types of associate degrees are available. The kind you should choose will depend on the type of career you’re interested in, as well as other factors, such as whether or not you plan to pursue a bachelor’s degree afterwards. These are the main types of associate degrees, but keep in mind that there can be several specific degree programs that fall under these broader categories: Associate of Science: An Associate of Science degree includes several courses in science, math, or both, along with any other coursework students need for their particular degree program. For example, students can pursue an Associate of Science degree with a focus on legal studies, early childhood education, criminal justice, marketing, accounting, or management. These degrees are common among students who plan to earn a bachelor’s degree or higher after getting an associate degree. Associate of Arts: This degree is also a common choice for students who want to work toward a higher degree after earning an associate degree, such as a bachelor’s or master’s degree. An Associate of Art degree includes several courses in the humanities, social sciences, or both. Associate of Applied Science: An Associate of Applied Science degree tends to offer more targeted courses based on a student’s major instead of general education courses. Associate of Applied Business: This degree also typically offers courses that are more focused on a student’s major rather than more general college courses. Explore all of Post's undergraduate and graduate degrees & certificates. View Degrees Benefits of Earning an Associate Degree. What kinds of advantages can you expect when you’re working toward an associate degree? The following are some of the top benefits of associates degrees. Career Opportunities. When you have an associate degree, you can expect to find plenty of career opportunities compared to only having a high school diploma. This shows prospective employers that you have the motivation and discipline needed to earn a college degree. Keep in mind that associate degree programs often prepare you for the workplace rather than focusing only on education. You’ll gain valuable skills that benefit you in many types of jobs while also building specific skills needed for your field. With an associate degree, you’ll have a better chance at finding plenty of job opportunities to choose from, no matter what the current unemployment rate is. Whether you plan on starting a new career or advancing in your current career, this kind of degree can open a lot of professional doors for you. Education Options. An associate degree doesn’t necessarily have to be the only degree you earn. You can use this degree as a steppingstone to reach more advanced higher education degrees. For example, you can earn your associate degree, then go on to earn a bachelor’s degree. You will likely be able to transfer some of the credits you earn with your associate degree when you begin a bachelor’s degree program. These education options provide you with more opportunities to explore careers that require more advanced degrees, although you’ll still find many career options with an associate degree. Higher Earnings. When you’ve put in the time and effort to earn an associate degree, you’ll find that you can earn more money than you would with only a high school diploma. In fact, there are several jobs requiring an associate degree that lead to much higher earnings. For example, an occupational therapy assistant can earn a median pay of $59,200 a year or $28.46 an hour, while a computer programmer can earn a median pay of $86,500 a year or $41.61 an hour. While the salary you’ll earn will vary based on the kind of work you do and where you work, you can expect to have higher earning potential with an associate degree. Just how much do people earn with one of these degrees compared to a high school diploma? According to the Census Bureau, adults with an associate degree who work full-time earn at least $5,000 more per year compared to those with a only high school diploma. Those with an associate degree had a median pay of $39,687 per year in 2009, while those with a high school diploma had a median pay of $33,213 the same year. Overall, those with an associate degree earn roughly $400,000 more over their lifetime than those who have a high school diploma. Lower Tuition. The rising cost of tuition for higher education is one of the main reasons for people to think twice about getting a degree. In fact, college costs have gone up 25 percent over the past decade. This increase has been even more significant over the past few decades. For public institutions, the cost of a 4-year degree went from $3,859 in 1985 to $20,050 in 2017. This increase is even higher in private institutions. The cost of a 4-year degree at one of these institutions went from $9,228 in 1985 to $43,139 in 2017, making college a major financial burden for many students. An associate degree program provides a way for you to earn a degree without having to accumulate significant tuition costs. Associate degrees generally cost less than what you might pay for tuition when you join a bachelor’s degree program. You’ll pay even more if you plan on earning a master’s degree or higher. With an associate degree, you can start working in your field earlier without having to shoulder the burden of high tuition costs. This can give you the budget flexibility to begin saving money rather than having to spend years paying off your education. Flexibility to Work. Earning an associate degree gives you the chance to work as needed while getting an education. Other degree programs, such as bachelor’s degree programs, usually don’t leave you with much room to work and focus on education, especially if you need to work full-time. With an associate degree program, you’ll have the ability to continue working part-time or full-time, depending on your situation. You can more easily fit in a full-time education with a part-time job or work on your associate degree while holding a full-time job. This flexibility to work makes it possible to earn a degree for those who need to support a family or those who don’t want to give up a full-time or part-time job for other reasons. Instead of having to put off getting a higher education degree, these individuals can keep working while studying and earning their degree. Being able to work while going to college thanks to associate degree programs also means you can start working in order to pay off college costs as you go. Rather than leaving these costs for when you graduate, you can start paying off college tuition and other expenses while still in school. Less Time to Earn a Degree. One of the main benefits of associate degree programs is that they don’t require as much of a time commitment as other degree programs, such as bachelor’s degrees. Associate degrees typically only take 2 years to complete compared to 4 years for a bachelor’s degree or 6 or more years for a bachelor’s plus a master’s degree. When you want to earn a college degree and get started on your career as soon as possible, associate degrees provide you with a faster way to do so. Taking less time to earn a degree means you don’t have to set aside a few or several years for higher education. Instead, you can begin making plans for building your career within a couple of years. This shorter timeframe can help you focus more on finding job opportunities since your graduation isn’t as far off in the future. With less time to get your degree, you’ll have more time to devote to starting your search for jobs in your area or researching employers you might want to work for in your field. Taking steps toward finding a job now while you’re earning an associate degree can help ensure that you find work right away after you graduate. If you’re eager to begin exploring your associate degree options, please contact Post University. We can help you find the right associate degree program for building the career of your dreams.   Thank you for reading! The views and information provided in this post do not reflect Post University programs and/or outcomes directly. If you are interested in learning more about our programs, you can find a complete list of our programs on our website or reach out directly!  Please note jobs, career outcomes, and/or salaries highlighted in this blog do not reflect jobs, career outcomes, and/or salaries expected from any Post University program. To learn more about Post University’s program and their outcomes, please fill out a form to speak with an admissions representative.   Related Posts. Top 5 Benefits of a Marketing DegreeWhy major in marketing? We’ve compiled a list of the top 5 perks of obtaining… Top 10 Business Benefits of Advanced Microsoft ExcelAdvanced Microsoft Excel improves the analytical skills of employees and helps companies retain top talent.… Top Career Opportunities for MBA GraduatesA valuable marker of leadership potential and management savvy, an MBA can play a key… Related Posts. Top 5 Benefits of a Marketing DegreeWhy major in marketing? We’ve compiled a list of the top 5 perks of obtaining… Top 10 Business Benefits of Advanced Microsoft ExcelAdvanced Microsoft Excel improves the analytical skills of employees and helps companies retain top talent.… Top Career Opportunities for MBA GraduatesA valuable marker of leadership potential and management savvy, an MBA can play a key…
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 100
  • 3
  • associate
  • 49
  • 3
  • associate degree
  • 42
  • 3
  • program
  • 27
  • 3
  • degree program
  • 21
  • 3
  • time
  • 21
  • 3
  • bachelor
  • 20
  • 3
  • year
  • 20
  • 3
  • earn
  • 20
  • 3
  • top
  • 17
  • 3
  • education
  • 16
  • 3
  • benefit
  • 15
  • 3
  • higher
  • 15
  • 3
  • career
  • 15
  • 3
  • high
  • 13
  • 3
  • work
  • 13
  • 3
  • high school
  • 12
  • 3
  • cost
  • 12
  • 3
  • earning
  • 11
  • 3
  • job
  • 11
  • 3
  • higher education
  • 10
  • 3
  • student
  • 9
  • 3
  • college
  • 9
  • 3
  • bachelor degree
  • 8
  • 3
  • post
  • 8
  • 3
  • master
  • 7
  • 3
  • school diploma
  • 7
  • 3
  • earn degree
  • 7
  • 3
  • diploma
  • 7
  • 3
  • tuition
  • 7
  • 3
  • science
  • 7
  • 3
  • opportunity
  • 7
  • 3
  • school
  • 7
  • 3
  • pay
  • 7
  • 3
  • high school diploma
  • 6
  • 3
  • associate degree program
  • 6
  • 3
  • benefit associate
  • 6
  • 3
  • year degree
  • 6
  • 3
  • full time
  • 6
  • 3
  • type
  • 6
  • 3
  • cours
  • 6
  • 3
  • find
  • 6
  • 3
  • full
  • 6
  • 3
  • degree higher
  • 5
  • 3
  • degree associate
  • 5
  • 3
  • degree earn
  • 5
  • 3
  • median pay
  • 5
  • 3
  • post university
  • 5
  • 3
  • earning associate degree
  • 4
  • 3
  • year bachelor
  • 4
  • 3
  • earning associate
  • 4
  • 3
  • career opportunity
  • 4
  • 3
  • compared
  • 4
  • 3
  • top benefit
  • 3
  • 3
  • benefit associate degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • type associate degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • master degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • compared high
  • 3
  • 3
  • earn associate degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • college cost
  • 3
  • 3
  • type associate
  • 3
  • 3
  • associate science
  • 3
  • 3
  • science associate
  • 3
  • 3
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • associate applied
  • 3
  • 3
  • education degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • earn associate
  • 3
  • 3
  • higher earning
  • 3
  • 3
  • part time
  • 3
  • 3
  • time job
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
TitleTop 7 Benefits of an Associate Degree | University of the Potomac
Urlhttps://potomac.edu/benefits-of-an-associate-degree/
DescriptionThe benefits of an associate degree count as many, here’s a list that focuses on the main advantages and info on what an associate degree means
DateMar 20, 2020
Organic Position3
H1Top 7 Benefits of an Associate Degree
H2Types of Associate Degrees
What Is an Associate Degree?
Benefits of an Associate Degree
So, Does an Associate Degree Matter?
H31. Flexibility
2. Cost-effectiveness
3. Likeliness to graduate
4. Job opportunities
5. Specializing in a field
6. You get prepared for actual jobs
7. Higher earning potential
Highest Paying Associate Degree Jobs in 2021
What Comes After Associate Degree: Here Are Your Options
Three Benefits of an Associate Degree
H2WithAnchorsTypes of Associate Degrees
What Is an Associate Degree?
Benefits of an Associate Degree
So, Does an Associate Degree Matter?
BodyTop 7 Benefits of an Associate Degree Written by Potomac IT [email protected] ARTICLE TABLE OF CONTENTS ShareThere are many reasons why students choose to enter an associate degree program. Maybe they want to advance their skills and get a better position in their workplace, specialize in a field, change their career path, go from a low paying job to a career, or something else. Whatever the reason may be, sometimes an associate degree can turn your life around. There are many paths you can follow with an associate degree program, and specialize in what you want. Types of Associate Degrees. ARTICLE TABLE OF CONTENTS Based on what they aim to achieve and their methods, associate degrees are divided into four types. The four types of associate degrees are: AA Degree – Associate of Arts, AS Degree – Associate of Science, AAA Degree – Associate of Applied Arts, and AAS Degree – Associate of Applied Science. The most significant difference between these types of associate degrees is that the applied arts and science take a more practical turn, bringing the focus to perfecting vocational skills. Meanwhile, an AS degree and an AA degree give attention to theory as well and are frequently aimed at students who want to continue their education with a bachelor’s degree program. Interested in pursuing an Associate's Degree? Fill out the form and get all the detailed information regarding your chosen program. What Is an Associate Degree? An associate degree, much like other degrees, is an academic award given to students upon the completion of an undergraduate program that generally lasts about two years. The level of qualification falls somewhere between the high-school diploma and that of a bachelor’s degree. However, an associate degree is an effective way of getting into the job market fast and with adequate skills. An associate program aims to equip students with the basic academic and technical knowledge needed to further their employment. These programs often focus on transferable skills, so students can find it easier to find their way in the workforce or if they choose to further their study plan. Many students use an associate degree as a stepping stone to a bachelor’s degree. This could happen for a number of reasons, most of them being personal. But, a significant factor in this leap is the fact that the credits you get from an associate degree are transferable, and you might not have to retake classes. Although, that also depends on the university or college. Benefits of an Associate Degree. There are many advantages to getting an associate degree, whether they’re related to time-saving, cost-effectiveness, or flexibility. This can especially come in handy to those who can’t or don’t want to commit to a four-year program. So, with the advantages of an associate degree being many, it comes as no surprise that such programs have been embraced by colleges and universities alike. Many students turn to associate’s degree programs because they want a quicker way in the job market, and it’s a perfect way to acquire all the skills needed to further their careers. 1. Flexibility. An associate degree program offers flexibility in more than one way. For instance, there are many online options for getting an associate degree, which can save time for those who don’t have the luxury of free time and have to maintain busy schedules. The flexibility factor plays a vital role in decision making, especially with those who are trying to achieve education while maintaining a family or a job. It can be hard to juggle a university and other responsibilities, which is the reason an associate degree seems desirable. 2. Cost-effectiveness. The effect an associate degree has on cost is closely related to the amount of time it takes to acquire the degree and how quickly you can get a job with it. Since an associate degree program takes less time to finish, it tends to cost less than others, and as such, saves you money. Plus, with it being a more short-term commitment, it can be easier to pay off the student debt if you start earning a salary earlier. Many students find this particularly useful when trying to decide what kind of academic program they want to choose and how they want to further their education. 3. Likeliness to graduate. Since associate degree programs usually take less time to finish and they focus more on skills, students will be more likely to get to the end-point. As opposed to a bachelor’s degree, which takes a long-term commitment, it is less likely that you will drop-out of this program if you have other time-consuming duties on your hand. So, if you are someone who isn’t sure how much time they can reserve for studies, an associate degree could be a fantastic option for you. And, even if that doesn’t describe you, it can always serve as a safe step towards a bigger goal. 4. Job opportunities. An associate degree says you have skills valuable to employers. A person with a degree nearly always has an advantage over someone without a degree both in the hiring process and the promotion process. An associate degree says you are willing to work hard to meet your goals. It shows that you know what you want, and you are willing to do the work to get there. An associate degree says you are serious about your career and willing to get the education needed in order to stay up-to-date in your field. Companies look for employees who are not only employable but who keep their knowledge base current and are willing to upgrade their skills periodically through continuing education courses or degree programs. Technology changes, so it is essential for employers to have knowledge of new programs and practices. 5. Specializing in a field. Associate degree programs tend to focus on a specific field, making it highly valuable to students who are interested in specializing in a particular field. If you are someone who wants to jump straight from the classroom to a workplace, then entering this program would be an excellent solution. Having an associate degree in your resume is likely to impress any hiring manager, so long as it is compatible with the job that you are trying to get. Employers can look at your transcript to know exactly what skills you bring to the position; whereas, it is harder to document the skills of someone without verifiable education. 6. You get prepared for actual jobs. When thinking of getting an associate degree, you should keep in mind what job you are going after. An associate degree does prep you with the skills needed to land a job as soon as you have a diploma in your hands, but the requirements change depending on the field and the organizations themselves. However, it is most likely that an entry-level job will be well within your reach once you’ve gotten a hold of these credentials. And, there are many careers you can follow without a need to strive for a bachelor’s degree because it isn’t needed in a specific job market. 7. Higher earning potential. It is worth noting that having an associate degree will significantly increase the chances of getting employed, rather than only having a high school diploma. Not only that, but your salary is likely to increase with post-secondary credentials in your CV. Even if you are already employed, you can always opt for an online program that offers more flexibility and rewards you with a promotion or a raise. So, Does an Associate Degree Matter? When considering this educational path, you are likely to calculate whether associate degrees are worth it, or not. While there is no clear-cut answer, as that largely depends on your desired career and the time you are willing to put in, an associate degree is definitely a powerful tool when it comes to making your way in the workplace. Whether you’re considering an associate degree program as a first step towards a more long-term academic plan, or it’s the program most compatible with your financial situation, there are many benefits to it. An associate degree holds weight, mainly in entry-level jobs, and it can also prove invaluable when entering a four-year program. However, it doesn’t mean that you can’t have a lifelong career from your associate degree. Mainly, what you do after an associate degree depends on your personal choices and what your field requires. When entering the workforce, having a degree will help you navigate. There are many benefits to it, from the fact that it takes little time to complete, to the skill perfecting program it offers. Whether it is the right qualification for you or not depends on your preferences, circumstances, and chosen field. Anyhow, we wish you luck with your degree, whatever your choice may be! Originally published March 20, 2020 11:16 am, updated November 20, 2020 Topics: Written by Potomac IT Highest Paying Associate Degree Jobs in 2021 . Career Advice View More | 5 min read Written by Potomac IT What Comes After Associate Degree: Here Are Your Options . Academic Advice View More | 5 min read Written by Potomac IT Three Benefits of an Associate Degree . Academic Advice | 1 min read Questions? Feedback? powered by Olark live chat software
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 67
  • 4
  • associate
  • 49
  • 4
  • associate degree
  • 43
  • 4
  • program
  • 25
  • 4
  • job
  • 15
  • 4
  • degree program
  • 12
  • 4
  • skill
  • 12
  • 4
  • student
  • 11
  • 4
  • bachelor
  • 10
  • 4
  • time
  • 10
  • 4
  • career
  • 9
  • 4
  • degree associate
  • 8
  • 4
  • education
  • 8
  • 4
  • field
  • 8
  • 4
  • associate degree program
  • 7
  • 4
  • min read
  • 6
  • 4
  • min
  • 6
  • 4
  • benefit
  • 6
  • 4
  • flexibility
  • 6
  • 4
  • academic
  • 6
  • 4
  • bachelor degree
  • 5
  • 4
  • benefit associate
  • 5
  • 4
  • cost
  • 5
  • 4
  • needed
  • 5
  • 4
  • benefit associate degree
  • 4
  • 4
  • job market
  • 4
  • 4
  • written potomac
  • 4
  • 4
  • entering
  • 4
  • 4
  • advice
  • 4
  • 4
  • written
  • 4
  • 4
  • potomac
  • 4
  • 4
  • reason
  • 4
  • 4
  • type
  • 4
  • 4
  • focu
  • 4
  • 4
  • depend
  • 4
  • 4
  • take
  • 4
  • 4
  • type associate degree
  • 3
  • 4
  • degree associate degree
  • 3
  • 4
  • type associate
  • 3
  • 4
  • aa degree
  • 3
  • 4
  • program offer
  • 3
  • 4
  • term
  • 3
  • 4
  • long
  • 3
  • 4
  • employer
  • 3
  • 4
  • read
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
TitleAssociate of Science | AS Degree | CollegeAtlas
Urlhttps://www.collegeatlas.org/associate-of-science.html
DescriptionThe Associate of Science (AS) is a two-year undergraduate transfer degree that is primarily intended as a stepping stone into a bachelor's degree program. Associate of Science degrees are offered at community colleges and vocational schools, as well as a few four-year colleges and universities
DateJun 24, 2014
Organic Position4
H1Associate of Science (AS) Degree
H2College Degree Finder
What Is An AS Degree?
What Are the Benefits of An Associate of Science (AS) Degree?
What’s the Difference Between an AS and an AA Degree?
Will My Associate of Science Credits Transfer?
Associate of Science (AS) Degree Requirements
Career Opportunities For AS Degree Holders
Featured Schools that Offer Associate Degrees
College Degree Finder
H3Other Stories You May Be Interested In Viewing
Enjoy this post? Don't forget to share
H2WithAnchorsCollege Degree Finder
What Is An AS Degree?
What Are the Benefits of An Associate of Science (AS) Degree?
What’s the Difference Between an AS and an AA Degree?
Will My Associate of Science Credits Transfer?
Associate of Science (AS) Degree Requirements
Career Opportunities For AS Degree Holders
Featured Schools that Offer Associate Degrees
College Degree Finder
BodyAssociate of Science (AS) Degree College Degree Finder. Sponsored Schools Posted Jun 24th, 2014 , Updated Apr 30th, 2018 by College Atlas What Is An AS Degree? An AS Degree is an associate of science. Like the Associate of Arts (AA), the Associate of Science (AS) is a two-year undergraduate transfer degree that is primarily intended as a stepping stone into a bachelor’s degree program. Associate of Science degrees are offered at community colleges and vocational schools, as well as a few four-year colleges and universities. The AS helps students develop useful skills and knowledge that will help them qualify for entry-level career positions in business, government, and social service. Benefits of an Associate of Science (AS) Degree The Difference Between an AS and an AA Degree Will My Associate of Science Credits Transfer? Associate of Science (AS) Degree Requirements Career Opportunities For AS Degree Holders What Are the Benefits of An Associate of Science (AS) Degree? There are several benefits to earning a two-year Associate of Science (AS) degree: The credits earned via an AS degree at a community college are usually much less expensive than comparable credits earned in a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college or university. If you earn your AS at an accredited school or one that has articulation agreements in place, you can save yourself the high cost of attending a four-year college for the first two years of your undergraduate education. A well-planned AS is an excellent way to prepare yourself for a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college. If you didn’t have the best grades in high school, performing well in your AS program will show college admissions officers that you have what it takes to be successful in a bachelor’s degree program. An AS degree will give you the chance to learn more about yourself, your interests, and explore various career options. So if you’re not ready for a four-year college and don’t what you want to major in, an AS degree might just be your best option. What’s the Difference Between an AS and an AA Degree? The AS and AA Degrees differ in the focus of their coursework. Where the AA focuses primarily on liberal arts, AS coursework focuses on the sciences. Although their core focus is different, both are intended as transfer degrees that launch students into a bachelor’s degree program. Students who intend on entering the workforce immediately after graduating with an associates should consider other degree options including the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree. Will My Associate of Science Credits Transfer? As the AS is designed to prepare students for a bachelor’s degree program at an accredited college or university, it’s important to make sure that you earn your AS from a reputable institution that is either (1) regionally accredited or (2) has articulation agreements in place with four-year colleges or universities you wish to attend. The majority of four-year colleges and universities are regionally accredited and only accept transfer credits from other regionally accredited institutions. Unfortunately, a lot of community colleges are nationally accredited. If you earn your AS at a nationally accredited community college or vocational school there’s a high probability that the credits you earn may not be transferable to the college or university where you want to pursue a bachelor’s degree. However, some community colleges have articulation agreements in place with four-year colleges that guarantee admission of their student and transferability of credits earned upon graduation. For example, Tohono O-Odham Community College in Sellz, Arizona has articulation agreements in place with several four-year colleges and universities in Arizona, whereby ensuring that its students upon graduation will automatically be accepted to these institutions and their credits will transfer. It’s also important to make sure that the courses you take, both general education and major specific, are in-line with the major you want to pursue and that they meet the general education requirements for the bachelor’s degree programs you plan on attending. No matter where you earn your degree it’s important to meet with a transfer counselor before starting your AS program, as credit transfer and college admissions policies vary from school to school. Associate of Science (AS) Degree Requirements. It usually requires 48 to 60 semester hours to complete an Associate of Arts (AS) degree, although completion time will vary from school to school. While an AS degree allows students to take several elective courses, it has had a standard core curriculum which essentially includes the basic first-year and second-year offerings appropriate for the first two years of many bachelor degree programs. Required fields of study usually include communications (writing and oral), humanities and social sciences (art, music, business, economics, etc.), natural sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, etc.) and mathematics. A typical Associate of Science program will include about 18 to 20 hours of elective coursework and 35 to 50 hours of required coursework. Career Opportunities For AS Degree Holders. As previously mentioned, an Associate of Science degree is designed primarily as a transfer degree. However, students will acquire new knowledge and develop skills such as critical thinking, analytical problems solving and communication that can be applied in entry-level jobs across various industries. Featured Schools that Offer Associate Degrees. Request Info Southern New Hampshire University You have goals. Southern New Hampshire University can help you get there. Whether you need a bachelor's degree to get into a career or want a master's degree to move up in your current career, SNHU has an online program for you. Find your degree from over 200 online programs. Learn More > Other Stories You May Be Interested In Viewing. Associate of Applied Science (AAS Degree)Online Associate (AA, AS, AAS, AOS) DegreeAssociate Degrees in PsychologyGraphic Design Associate DegreeAssociate of Arts (AA) DegreeAssociate Degrees (AA, AS, AAS, AAA) Enjoy this post? Don't forget to share. College Degree Finder. Sponsored Schools Types of College Degrees. Associate Degrees Associate of Arts (AA) Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Bachelor's Degrees Bachelor of Arts (BA) Bachelor of Science (BS) Master's Degrees Doctoral Degrees (PhD) Guides, Infographics, Rankings. Guides and Articles Education Infographics College Rankings
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 60
  • 5
  • year
  • 30
  • 5
  • associate
  • 24
  • 5
  • college
  • 24
  • 5
  • bachelor
  • 21
  • 5
  • science
  • 21
  • 5
  • year college
  • 18
  • 5
  • associate science
  • 14
  • 5
  • aa
  • 14
  • 5
  • school
  • 12
  • 5
  • bachelor degree
  • 11
  • 5
  • degree program
  • 11
  • 5
  • program
  • 11
  • 5
  • transfer
  • 9
  • 5
  • university
  • 9
  • 5
  • credit
  • 9
  • 5
  • associate science degree
  • 8
  • 5
  • science degree
  • 8
  • 5
  • accredited
  • 8
  • 5
  • student
  • 8
  • 5
  • agreement place
  • 7
  • 5
  • college university
  • 7
  • 5
  • place
  • 7
  • 5
  • art
  • 7
  • 5
  • community college
  • 6
  • 5
  • community
  • 6
  • 5
  • career
  • 6
  • 5
  • year college university
  • 5
  • 5
  • regionally accredited
  • 5
  • 5
  • articulation agreement
  • 5
  • 5
  • degree associate
  • 5
  • 5
  • articulation
  • 5
  • 5
  • education
  • 5
  • 5
  • earn
  • 5
  • 5
  • articulation agreement place
  • 4
  • 5
  • aa degree
  • 4
  • 5
  • credit transfer
  • 4
  • 5
  • institution
  • 4
  • 5
  • regionally
  • 4
  • 5
  • agreement
  • 4
  • 5
  • coursework
  • 4
  • 5
  • applied
  • 4
  • 5
  • degree associate science
  • 3
  • 5
  • associate applied science
  • 3
  • 5
  • applied science aa
  • 3
  • 5
  • place year
  • 3
  • 5
  • college degree
  • 3
  • 5
  • associate art
  • 3
  • 5
  • art aa
  • 3
  • 5
  • transfer degree
  • 3
  • 5
  • credit earned
  • 3
  • 5
  • associate degree
  • 3
  • 5
  • associate applied
  • 3
  • 5
  • applied science
  • 3
  • 5
  • science aa
  • 3
  • 5
  • important
  • 3
  • 5
  • hour
  • 3
  • 5
  • include
  • 3
  • 5
  • degreeassociate
  • 3
  • 5
Result 6
TitleWhat are the benefits of completing the Associate in Arts (AA) degree or the Associate in Science (AS) degree? - Black Hawk College
Urlhttps://www.bhc.edu/ufaqs/benefits-completing-associate-arts-aa-degree-associate-science-degree/
Description
Date
Organic Position5
H1What are the benefits of completing the Associate in Arts (AA) degree or the Associate in Science (AS) degree?
H2Martin Luther King Jr. Day – College closed
Alumni Night at BHC basketball games – POSTPONED
Celebrate the dream, the purpose, the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.
H3Related
Share this:
Related
Black Hawk College
NEWS & EVENTS
QC Campus students join Phi Theta Kappa honor society – Fall 2021
Gropel named new BHC volleyball coach
GED®, ESL classes begin Jan. 19 in Kewanee
H2WithAnchorsMartin Luther King Jr. Day – College closed
Alumni Night at BHC basketball games – POSTPONED
Celebrate the dream, the purpose, the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.
BodyWhat are the benefits of completing the Associate in Arts (AA) degree or the Associate in Science (AS) degree? A What are the benefits of completing the Associate in Arts (AA) degree or the Associate in Science (AS) degree? . If you complete an AA or AS degree you will have the benefit of compact and/or course equivalency agreements which have been negotiated with four-year colleges and universities that allow you to transfer as a junior. AA degree completion also fulfills the lower division general education courses of most transfer schools. The AS degree contains additional math and science requirements. In most cases, students transferring to an Illinois 4-year college or university will complete the lower division general education courses after transfer (one additional course in Humanities or Fine Arts and one additional course in Social and Behavioral Sciences). Related. Category: Transfer FAQs Share this:. Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)MoreClick to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Save as PDF (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window) Related. Black Hawk College. Quad-Cities Campus District Office 6600 34th Avenue Moline, IL 61265 309-796-5000 East Campus 26230 Black Hawk Road Galva, IL 61434 309-854-1700 Locations & Maps » NEWS & EVENTS. Jan Mon 17 Martin Luther King Jr. Day – College closed . January 17 Jan Thu 20 Alumni Night at BHC basketball games – POSTPONED . January 20 @ 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm CST Jan Wed 26 Celebrate the dream, the purpose, the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. . January 26 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm CST View More… QC Campus students join Phi Theta Kappa honor society – Fall 2021. Gropel named new BHC volleyball coach. GED®, ESL classes begin Jan. 19 in Kewanee.   Black Hawk College - Illinois community college – Quad-Cities Campus in Moline and East Campus in Galva Address: 6600 34th Ave, Moline, IL 61265 Phone: (309) 796-5000 Resources Give to BHC Library Bookstore Order Transcripts Board of Trustees Stay in Touch Contact Us Social Media Directory News & Events Maps and Locations Employee Directory Info For: Students Veterans Alumni Faculty Businesses Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube 2022 Copyright Black Hawk College Student Right to Know Employment
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • open
  • 13
  • 6
  • share
  • 12
  • 6
  • open windowclick
  • 11
  • 6
  • windowclick
  • 11
  • 6
  • open windowclick share
  • 9
  • 6
  • windowclick share
  • 9
  • 6
  • degree
  • 7
  • 6
  • college
  • 7
  • 6
  • campu
  • 5
  • 6
  • aa degree
  • 4
  • 6
  • black hawk
  • 4
  • 6
  • associate
  • 4
  • 6
  • aa
  • 4
  • 6
  • science
  • 4
  • 6
  • transfer
  • 4
  • 6
  • student
  • 4
  • 6
  • black
  • 4
  • 6
  • hawk
  • 4
  • 6
  • jan
  • 4
  • 6
  • pm
  • 4
  • 6
  • black hawk college
  • 3
  • 6
  • hawk college
  • 3
  • 6
  • benefit
  • 3
  • 6
  • art
  • 3
  • 6
  • additional
  • 3
  • 6
  • moline
  • 3
  • 6
  • il
  • 3
  • 6
  • 309
  • 3
  • 6
  • january
  • 3
  • 6
  • bhc
  • 3
  • 6
Result 7
TitleWhat are the benefits of earning an Associate of Science degree in Criminal Justice: Corrections?
Urlhttps://www.sjvc.edu/blog/what-are-the-benefits-of-earning-an-associate-of-science-degree-in-criminal-justice-corrections/
DescriptionTh
DateMay 7, 2020
Organic Position6
H1What are the benefits of earning an Associate of Science degree in Criminal Justice: Corrections?
H2Learn More About A Career In Criminal Justice: Corrections
You might also like
Request Information
H3“Everything I experienced throughout my program at SJVC prepared me to be a better candidate,” says Carter. “The education, the physical training, and the various written and physical tests I took throughout the program all helped lay a solid foundation that provided a real sense of confidence. I visited a border control facility, a prison, a jail, and a youth detention program. I also learned about evidence collection and preservation. I learned how to handle weapons, how to defend myself, and how to diffuse potentially volatile situations.”
“Our program is designed to prepare students for successful careers in corrections,” says Chivington. “Associate degrees are required by some agencies to apply for their promotions. It will most definitely set them apart from other applicants. We place a strong emphasis on ethics, discipline, education, and training. During the process of earning their AS degree, students also develop valuable experience and analytical skills that can help in the job application process.”
More stories about
H2WithAnchorsLearn More About A Career In Criminal Justice: Corrections
You might also like
Request Information
BodyWhat are the benefits of earning an Associate of Science degree in Criminal Justice: Corrections? May 7, 2020 Read our guide on Criminal Justice: Corrections Are you considering a career as a Detention or Correctional Officer?   It can be a highly competitive field, and the hiring process can be comprehensive and lengthy.   During that time, what can you do to position yourself as a more viable, appealing candidate to prospective employers?   For Destiny Carter, 23, earning her Associate of Science degree in Criminal Justice: Corrections from San Joaquin Valley College provided the education, training, and experience she needed to excel during a rigorous employment process.   Carter graduated from SJVC’s Temecula campus—one of 10 SJVC campuses offering the accelerated, in as few as 14-month Criminal Justice: Corrections AS degree—in July, 2019.   Less than a month later, she was hired by the Arizona Department of Corrections and moved 350 miles from her home in Hemet, CA to begin the department’s training academy near Phoenix. She’s now employed full time as a Correction Officer 2 at the Arizona State Prison Complex-Lewis in Buckeye.   “Everything I experienced throughout my program at SJVC prepared me to be a better candidate,” says Carter. “The education, the physical training, and the various written and physical tests I took throughout the program all helped lay a solid foundation that provided a real sense of confidence. I visited a border control facility, a prison, a jail, and a youth detention program. I also learned about evidence collection and preservation. I learned how to handle weapons, how to defend myself, and how to diffuse potentially volatile situations.”.   By the time she graduated, Carter says she knew she could—and would—excel in the field of corrections.   “I felt like I had a solid advantage,” she recalls. “I think the focus, commitment, and self-confidence I developed while earning my degree really helped me interview well. I knew what to expect throughout the process. In fact, the written and physical tests we practiced in class were even more demanding than the ones required to get the job.”   Kent Chivington, program director of the Criminal Justice: Corrections department at the San Joaquin Valley College campus in Temecula, says Carter’s experience is not unique.   “Our program is designed to prepare students for successful careers in corrections,” says Chivington. “Associate degrees are required by some agencies to apply for their promotions.  It will most definitely set them apart from other applicants. We place a strong emphasis on ethics, discipline, education, and training. During the process of earning their AS degree, students also develop valuable experience and analytical skills that can help in the job application process.”.   Chivington says the program provides a solid foundation that serves students well.   “Our program includes instruction in criminal law, evidence collection and preservation, report writing, institutional corrections, physical agility training, defensive tactics, and weaponless defense,” Chivington explains. “During the program, students also learn arrest and control techniques, courtroom procedures, CPR and first aid, and firearms* use.”   Graduates earn their Associate of Science degree in Criminal Justice: Corrections and also earn certification in Standards and Training for Corrections (STC) Adult Core Academy, which includes 8-hour Baton training. Graduates also receive Bureau of Security and Investigative Services (BSIS) certified training in Powers to Arrest, Weapons of Mass Destruction, Firearms*, Baton, Chemical Agents, Public Relations, Observations and Documentation, Communications and its Significance, and Liability and Legal Aspects, resulting in (BSIS) Security Guard card and (BSIS) Security Guard Exposed Weapons permits.* Students also earn certification in CPR/First Aid.   The program is STC certified to provide instruction by the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC)/Standards & Training for Corrections (STC) and the Bureau of Security and Investigative Service (BSIS).   For more information go to our Criminal Justice: Corrections Program Page   * Effective January 1, 2020, BSIS Exposed Firearms Permits may only be issued to applicants who are 21 years of age or older. Individuals who do not meet the new age requirement will be provided alternate training during the firearm sessions, and are welcome to pursue the certification after they meet the age requirement. Learn More About A Career In Criminal Justice: Corrections. Criminal Justice: Corrections can open doors to work in private, state, federal prisons or local jails as well as in private security in California. Learn how to join this exciting career and why you should pursue a correctional officer degree. Learn More You might also like. All Stories > Grad Q&A with Criminal Justice Corrections graduate Keishawn Abney Faculty Q&A with CJC Instructor Jesse Embry Local Community News Highlights Criminal Justice: Corrections Instructor from SJVC Bakersfield More stories about. Faculty Spotlights Grad Success News and Events Resource Student Spotlights Request Information. Our RN to BSN program is a Bachelors degree completion option for Registered Nurses.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • correction
  • 21
  • 7
  • justice correction
  • 12
  • 7
  • criminal
  • 12
  • 7
  • criminal justice correction
  • 11
  • 7
  • criminal justice
  • 11
  • 7
  • training
  • 11
  • 7
  • justice
  • 11
  • 7
  • program
  • 11
  • 7
  • degree
  • 10
  • 7
  • carter
  • 6
  • 7
  • student
  • 6
  • 7
  • sjvc
  • 5
  • 7
  • firearm
  • 5
  • 7
  • process
  • 5
  • 7
  • security
  • 5
  • 7
  • bsi
  • 5
  • 7
  • experience
  • 4
  • 7
  • department
  • 4
  • 7
  • graduate
  • 4
  • 7
  • earning
  • 4
  • 7
  • associate
  • 4
  • 7
  • career
  • 4
  • 7
  • physical
  • 4
  • 7
  • chivington
  • 4
  • 7
  • learn
  • 4
  • 7
  • associate science degree
  • 3
  • 7
  • science degree criminal
  • 3
  • 7
  • degree criminal justice
  • 3
  • 7
  • associate science
  • 3
  • 7
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 7
  • degree criminal
  • 3
  • 7
  • state
  • 3
  • 7
  • prison
  • 3
  • 7
  • solid
  • 3
  • 7
  • weapon
  • 3
  • 7
  • earn
  • 3
  • 7
  • certification
  • 3
  • 7
  • stc
  • 3
  • 7
  • age
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
TitleIs an Associate Degree Worth It?
Urlhttps://www.snhu.edu/about-us/newsroom/education/is-an-associate-degree-worth-it
DescriptionThe benefits of earning an associate degree include higher earning potential, better job security and opportunity, as well as advancement
DateOct 22, 2021
Organic Position7
H1Is an Associate Degree Worth It?
H2Apply Now
Online Students
International Students
Campus Students
How Many Credits is an Associate Degree?
What Can I Do with an Associate Degree?
Getting Good Jobs with an Associate Degree
What’s the Best 2-Year Degree?
15 of the Biggest Misconceptions About Online College Courses
What is a Bachelor's Degree? The Difference Between Bachelor’s and Master’s
How Many Years is a Bachelor's Degree?
H3
H2WithAnchorsApply Now
Online Students
International Students
Campus Students
How Many Credits is an Associate Degree?
What Can I Do with an Associate Degree?
Getting Good Jobs with an Associate Degree
What’s the Best 2-Year Degree?
15 of the Biggest Misconceptions About Online College Courses
What is a Bachelor's Degree? The Difference Between Bachelor’s and Master’s
How Many Years is a Bachelor's Degree?
BodyIs an Associate Degree Worth It? The benefits of earning an associate degree can include higher earning potential, better job security and opportunity, as well as advancement. Alexa Gustavsen October 22, 2021 Start Your Associate If you’re considering advancing your education, you might wonder what degree best matches your plans for the future. You have specific skills, career goals and interests. That means there are a number of factors to consider in thinking about whether an associate degree is right for you. So, how can you tell if it makes sense to pursue an associate degree online? Let’s start with the basics. How Many Credits is an Associate Degree? Associate degrees are considered 2-year degrees, though some students move faster or slower depending on what else is going on in their lives and how much time they want to devote to schoolwork. Generally, associate degrees require 60 credits of coursework, which translates to 20 college courses. That’s half the academic requirements of a bachelor’s degree as a Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) is typically 120 credits during a 4 year period. For the average U.S. worker, there’s a clear benefit to getting a 2-year associate degree. According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in 2020 workers with an associate degree had median weekly earnings of $938, compared with $781 for people with just a high school diploma. People who have an associate degree vs. a high school diploma were also more likely to be able to find a job. What Can I Do with an Associate Degree? . Those who can best benefit from an associate degree tend to fall under two categories: those who are still exploring their options, and those who have a definite game plan and are ready to get started. In the first group are people who know they want to continue their education beyond high school but aren’t sure what education or career path they ultimately want to follow. “It allows students to dip their toes into the educational pool per se, and/or it allows someone to obtain a specific skill set in a shorter amount of time for less money than a BA,” said Kelli Estepp, a career advisor at Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU).    If you’re in this group, you may best benefit from an: Associate degree in liberal arts Associate degree in business Associate degree in criminal justice These are types of associate degrees that set a solid base for future education and career opportunities while allowing you to explore what interests you. This process can be particularly beneficial if you want to pursue your education in a cost-effective way. An associate degree is about half the cost of a bachelor's degree, and, if you're transferring in other credits, it's even less. So, if you choose to go on to pursue a bachelor’s degree, you may already be more than halfway there. At the same time, if you end up stopping or pausing your educational career after finishing the 2-year degree, it will provide benefits that you wouldn’t get if you entered a bachelor’s program and then took a break halfway through earning your degree. According to the BLS, people with associate degrees have better prospects for employment and earnings than those who have taken some college courses but haven't received a degree. If you didn’t do quite as well in high school as you now realize you could have, an associate degree program is a great starting point. Courses within a two-year program can fill gaps in your education and give you a chance to raise your GPA before applying to a competitive bachelor’s program. Getting Good Jobs with an Associate Degree. In the second group of students well-suited for an associate degree are those who have already begun their career and know what they need to advance – or who just have a very clear vision of their future. “An associate degree can be a faster, cheaper and more specific kind of education than a bachelor’s degree,” said Grace Dugan, a military career advisor at SNHU. “An associate degree can have very specific utility, so it is important to make sure it is an appropriate credential for the kind of job you want.” Estepp said there are plenty of fields looking for employees with an associate degree, like a dental hygienist, radiation therapist or web developer. Jobs may be easier to find with the extra two years of education, and it may be easier to move up the career ladders in these industries. “An associate degree helps best with advancement in a current field, and you would like the opportunity to show that you are committed to that field and ready to grow to the next level,” said Dugan. What’s the Best 2-Year Degree? Just as with any kind of degree, the financial benefit of earning an associate degree depends on what you choose to study. For example, according to compensation analysis firm PayScale, workers who majored in information technology earn a median early-career salary of $44,400, and that rises to $70,700 in their mid-careers. Associate degrees in fields like accounting, business administration and fashion merchandising also lead to entry-level jobs paying more than $30,000 with significant growth opportunities. In many cases, an associate degree can do double duty, demonstrating skills to an employer while also offering a stepping stone to a bachelor's degree. Of course, college isn’t just about increasing your earnings potential. It’s also about satisfying your curiosity, becoming a more well-rounded person and developing expertise in an area you care about. Whatever your chosen field is, there are steps you can take before, during and after earning an associate degree that can help you reach your goals: Before enrolling: Do your research. It’s easy to find the requirements for jobs in your industry on the government website BLS or job-listing sites like Glassdoor. These websites can give you a better sense of what the requirements are and the salary you can expect. During your time in college: Get experience. Many associate degree programs require that students complete internships, but, even if they don’t, they are a great way to gain experience and build your network. If you are already working in your field of study it is a great way to build on skill sets. “If you work at an IT Help Desk, gaining an associate degree in IT could help you obtain a credential that could offer you some internal job growth,” said Dugan. After earning your degree: Build your brand. It is important to show your learned skills like teamwork, creativity and written and verbal skills. Depending on your field, an associate degree may let you meet the minimum requirement for many jobs, but actually landing a good spot on your career ladder of choice takes more than that. With an associate degree in hand, you may also want to consider advancing to the next college degree level. So, is an associate degree worth it? With the earnings and opportunities it offers and the relatively small commitment of time and money it demands, the answer for many students is a definite yes. Alexa Gustavsen '21 is a writer at Southern New Hampshire University. Connect with her on LinkedIn. 15 of the Biggest Misconceptions About Online College Courses . December 28, 2021 If going to college is a goal of yours, but attending classes in person just doesn’t seem optimal, taking college classes online is a way to boost your education while balancing your other priorities. Here are 15 misconceptions about online college courses that may be on your mind. What is a Bachelor's Degree? The Difference Between Bachelor’s and Master’s . December 15, 2021 Bachelor’s degree and master’s degree programs differ in the number of credit hours required and in their depth of content focus. A master's degree can build upon the skills you learned in your bachelor's degree and help you advance your career in many fields. How Many Years is a Bachelor's Degree? . December 13, 2021 Your personal preferences, the time and resources you can put toward your coursework and any credits you’ve already earned are all factors that will impact how quickly you can reach your educational goals. An online bachelor’s degree program can help you fit your learning into a busy schedule.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 62
  • 8
  • associate degree
  • 35
  • 8
  • associate
  • 35
  • 8
  • bachelor
  • 24
  • 8
  • year
  • 14
  • 8
  • career
  • 12
  • 8
  • bachelor degree
  • 11
  • 8
  • job
  • 11
  • 8
  • earning
  • 10
  • 8
  • program
  • 9
  • 8
  • education
  • 9
  • 8
  • college
  • 9
  • 8
  • field
  • 8
  • 8
  • master
  • 7
  • 8
  • benefit
  • 7
  • 8
  • credit
  • 7
  • 8
  • skill
  • 7
  • 8
  • year degree
  • 6
  • 8
  • degree program
  • 6
  • 8
  • student
  • 6
  • 8
  • cours
  • 6
  • 8
  • time
  • 6
  • 8
  • person
  • 6
  • 8
  • opportunity
  • 5
  • 8
  • online
  • 5
  • 8
  • college cours
  • 4
  • 8
  • high school
  • 4
  • 8
  • december
  • 4
  • 8
  • 2021
  • 4
  • 8
  • specific
  • 4
  • 8
  • goal
  • 4
  • 8
  • requirement
  • 4
  • 8
  • high
  • 4
  • 8
  • school
  • 4
  • 8
  • build
  • 4
  • 8
  • earning associate degree
  • 3
  • 8
  • an associate degree
  • 3
  • 8
  • earning associate
  • 3
  • 8
  • an associate
  • 3
  • 8
  • 15
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleAssociate in Science | Paradise Valley Community College
Urlhttps://www.paradisevalley.edu/degrees-certificates/associate-science-8600-as
Description
Date
Organic Position8
H1Associate in Science
H2
H3Details
H2WithAnchors
BodyAssociate in Science   The Associate in Science (AS) degree is designed for students planning to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. In general, the components of the degree meet requirements for majors with more stringent mathematics and mathematics-based science requirements. Generally, the degree will transfer as a block without loss of credit to Arizona`s public universities and other institutions with district-wide articulation agreements.In most cases, courses used to satisfy the MCCCD Associate in Science (AS) will apply to general university graduation requirements of the majors that align with the AS degree; however, students need to be aware of any specific requirements of their intended major at the university to be sure they select courses that will meet them. Information regarding the articulation of the AS with majors at the Arizona public universities can be accessed via the following website: www.aztransfer.comIt is recommended that students select courses that meet more than one general education and/or awareness area requirement. Doing so will maximize the number of math and science electives the student can take as part of his/her Associate in Science degree.The AS degree requires a minimum of 60 semester credits for the program of study; minimum total credits vary by specific emphasis (for example, Associate in Science, Emphasis in Physics). Refer to the Program (Degree) Search at https://curriculum.maricopa.edu for credit minimums for individual degree programs by emphasis.Students desiring to transfer are encouraged to select an emphasis. Details. Important information you’ll need when applying for admission: Academic Plan:  Associate in Science (DEG) Type:  Associate Degree Academic Plan Code: 8600 Total credits required:  60 Effective term:  Fall 2021 Award prerequisites Program prerequisites for the Associate in Science degree vary by specific emphasis, and are not required without a specific emphasis selected. Refer to the Program (Degree) Search at https://curriculum.maricopa.edu for specific courses and credit minimums by emphasis. Required courses Required (major-specific) courses for the Associate in Science degree vary by specific emphasis, and are not required without a specific emphasis selected. Refer to the Program (Degree) Search at https://curriculum.maricopa.edu for specific courses and credit minimums by emphasis. Restricted Electives Restricted Electives for the Associate in Science degree vary by specific emphasis, and are not required without a specific emphasis selected. Refer to the Program (Degree) Search at https://curriculum.maricopa.edu for specific courses and credit minimums by emphasis. Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC) AGEC-SCredits: 36*-52 *The AGEC-S requires a minimum of 36 credits (33 if student has transfer credit from ASU, NAU or UAZ for a single course that meets FYC in full). A single course with an [HU], [SB], or [L] designation may also be used to satisfy the Oral Communication, Critical Reading, or Awareness Area ([C], [G] and/or [H]) requirement(s). A single course with both the [HU] and [L] designations may be used to satisfy both of these areas. A single course with both the [SB] and [L] designations may be used to satisfy both of these areas. See the AGEC matrix on aztransfer.com for course designations.   First-Year Composition [FYC]Credits: 6* ENG101First-Year Composition (3) OR ENG107First-Year Composition for ESL (3) AND ENG102First-Year Composition (3) OR ENG108First-Year Composition for ESL (3) 6* *FYC may be met with fewer than 6 credits if student has transfer credit from ASU, NAU or UAZ for a single course that meets FYC in full.   Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L]Credits: 0-3** Recommend selecting a course that satisfies [L] Literacy and Critical Inquiry and [SB] Social-Behavioral Sciences or [L] Literacy and Critical Inquiry and [HU] Humanities, Arts & Design or [L] Literacy and Critical Inquiry and (COM) Oral Communications or [L] Literacy and Critical Inquiry and CRE101 requirements simultaneously. **0 credits only if shared with [HU] or [SB]   Mathematics [MA]Credits: 4-5 MAT220Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (5) OR MAT221Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4) OR Higher approved general education course in the Mathematical Applications [MA] area for which MAT22+ is a prerequisite. (4-5)4-5   Humanities, Arts and Design [HU]Credits: 6 Any approved general education courses in the Humanities, Arts and Design [HU] area.   Social-Behavioral Sciences [SB]Credits: 6 Any approved general education courses in the Social-Behavioral Sciences [SB] area.   Natural Sciences [SG]/[SQ]Credits: 8-10 Students must complete eight to ten (8-10) credits of General Chemistry, University Physics, General Biology for Majors, or Geology. CHM150General Chemistry I (4) OR CHM151General Chemistry I (3) AND CHM151LLGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory (1) OR CHM150AAGeneral Chemistry I (5) OR CHM151AAGeneral Chemistry I (4) AND CHM152General Chemistry II (3) AND CHM152LLGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory (1) OR CHM152AAGeneral Chemistry II (4)8-9 OR PHY115University Physics I (5) OR PHY121University Physics I: Mechanics (4) AND PHY116University Physics II (5) OR PHY131University Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (4)8-10 OR BIO181++General Biology (Majors) I (4) AND BIO182++General Biology (Majors) II (4)8 OR GLG101Introduction to Geology I - Physical Lecture (3) AND GLG103Introduction to Geology I - Physical Laboratory (1) OR GLG101INIntroduction to Geology I - Physical (4) AND GLG102Introduction to Geology II - Historical Lecture (3) AND GLG104Introduction to Geology II - Historial Laboratory (1) OR GLG102INIntroduction to Geology II - Historical (4)8   Subject OptionsCredits: 6-10 Refer to transfer resources, including academic advisement and transfer guides, to select six to ten (6-10) additional math and/or science credits that meet requirements for selected major. Select Mathematics (MAT) course(s) above Calculus I and/or Computer Science (CSC) course(s) and/or Science courses from the following disciplines: Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Engineering, Environmental Science, Geology, Physical Geography, Physics, Zoology (MCCCD prefixes AST, BIO (except BIO174), CHM, ECE, EEE, ENV, GLG, GPH, and/or PHY)   Awareness AreasCredits: 0-6 These requirements may be shared with other AGEC requirements. See the AGEC matrix on aztransfer.com for course designations.   Cultural Diversity in the US [C]Credits: 0-3 0-3   Historical/Global Awareness [H]/[G]Credits: 0-3 Any approved general education course in the Historical [H] or Global [G] area.   MCCCD Additional Requirements MCCCD Additional RequirementsCredits: 0-6 Some courses in this area have [SB] and [L] designations and may also be applied to the corresponding AGEC requirements. See the AGEC matrix on aztransfer.com for course designations.   Oral CommunicationCredits: 0-3 COM100Introduction to Human Communication (3) OR COM110Interpersonal Communication (3) OR COM225Public Speaking (3) OR COM230Small Group Communication (3)0-3   Critical ReadingCredits: 0-3 CRE101College Critical Reading and Critical Thinking (3) OR Equivalent as indicated by assessment (0)0-3 General Electives Select courses 100-level or higher if needed to complete a minimum of 60 semester credits but no more than a total of 64 semester credits, which is the maximum number of credits accepted toward most degree programs at Arizona`s public universities. Ideally, students should select courses that meet requirements for their major/area of interest and transfer institution. See General Associate Degree Academic Policies for further details, limitations, and guidelines.Maricopa courses and external courses evaluated as Maricopa equivalents, departmental electives (e.g., HISELC for a history elective), or general electives (GENELC) that are numbered 100 level or higher, and completed with a grade of "C" or higher, may be applied in the elective area, regardless of potential transferability to other institutions. It is recommended, however, that students planning to transfer to a baccalaureate-granting institution meet these general elective requirements with courses that are transferable and applicable to their intended university degree. Transfer and major guides are accessible on the following websites: aztransfer.com, maricopa.edu/transfer/partners, as well as those of individual universities. For appropriate course selection, students should consult with an academic advisor. At Maricopa, we strive to provide you with accurate and current information about our degree and certificate offerings. Due to the dynamic nature of the curriculum process, course and program information is subject to change. As a result, the course list associated with this degree or certificate on this site does not represent a contract, nor does it guarantee course availability. If you are interested in pursuing this degree or certificate, we encourage you to meet with an advisor to discuss the requirements at your college for the appropriate catalog year. Read the official MCCCD award description.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • cours
  • 21
  • 9
  • credit
  • 20
  • 9
  • science
  • 20
  • 9
  • degree
  • 20
  • 9
  • requirement
  • 18
  • 9
  • general
  • 15
  • 9
  • chemistry
  • 14
  • 9
  • area
  • 13
  • 9
  • specific
  • 12
  • 9
  • emphasi
  • 12
  • 9
  • designation
  • 11
  • 9
  • ii
  • 11
  • 9
  • transfer
  • 11
  • 9
  • major
  • 11
  • 9
  • associate
  • 11
  • 9
  • andor
  • 10
  • 9
  • critical
  • 10
  • 9
  • student
  • 10
  • 9
  • literacy critical
  • 9
  • 9
  • associate science
  • 9
  • 9
  • sb
  • 9
  • 9
  • agec
  • 9
  • 9
  • university
  • 9
  • 9
  • meet
  • 9
  • 9
  • program
  • 9
  • 9
  • year
  • 8
  • 9
  • physic
  • 8
  • 9
  • minimum
  • 8
  • 9
  • geology
  • 8
  • 9
  • approved general
  • 7
  • 9
  • year composition
  • 7
  • 9
  • specific emphasi
  • 7
  • 9
  • select
  • 7
  • 9
  • designation satisfy
  • 6
  • 9
  • general education
  • 6
  • 9
  • electif
  • 6
  • 9
  • required
  • 6
  • 9
  • literacy critical inquiry
  • 5
  • 9
  • public university
  • 5
  • 9
  • geology physical
  • 5
  • 9
  • critical inquiry
  • 5
  • 9
  • associate science degree
  • 4
  • 9
  • vary specific emphasi
  • 4
  • 9
  • refer program degree
  • 4
  • 9
  • program degree search
  • 4
  • 9
  • degree search httpscurriculummaricopaedu
  • 4
  • 9
  • approved general education
  • 4
  • 9
  • behavioral science
  • 4
  • 9
  • humanity art
  • 4
  • 9
  • art design
  • 4
  • 9
  • approved
  • 4
  • 9
  • biology major
  • 4
  • 9
  • chemistry ii
  • 4
  • 9
  • science degree
  • 4
  • 9
  • select cours
  • 4
  • 9
  • vary specific
  • 4
  • 9
  • refer program
  • 4
  • 9
  • program degree
  • 4
  • 9
  • degree search
  • 4
  • 9
  • search httpscurriculummaricopaedu
  • 4
  • 9
  • credit minimum
  • 4
  • 9
  • emphasi required
  • 4
  • 9
  • specific cours
  • 4
  • 9
  • literacy
  • 4
  • 9
  • 10
  • 4
  • 9
  • laboratory
  • 4
  • 9
  • select cours meet
  • 3
  • 9
  • science degree vary
  • 3
  • 9
  • degree vary specific
  • 3
  • 9
  • specific emphasi required
  • 3
  • 9
  • emphasi required specific
  • 3
  • 9
  • required specific emphasi
  • 3
  • 9
  • specific emphasi selected
  • 3
  • 9
  • emphasi selected refer
  • 3
  • 9
  • selected refer program
  • 3
  • 9
  • search httpscurriculummaricopaedu specific
  • 3
  • 9
  • httpscurriculummaricopaedu specific cours
  • 3
  • 9
  • specific cours credit
  • 3
  • 9
  • cours credit minimum
  • 3
  • 9
  • credit minimum emphasi
  • 3
  • 9
  • sb designation
  • 3
  • 9
  • agec matrix aztransfercom
  • 3
  • 9
  • matrix aztransfercom designation
  • 3
  • 9
  • social behavioral science
  • 3
  • 9
  • humanity art design
  • 3
  • 9
  • meet requirement
  • 3
  • 9
  • cours meet
  • 3
  • 9
  • semester credit
  • 3
  • 9
  • degree vary
  • 3
  • 9
  • required specific
  • 3
  • 9
  • emphasi selected
  • 3
  • 9
  • selected refer
  • 3
  • 9
  • httpscurriculummaricopaedu specific
  • 3
  • 9
  • cours credit
  • 3
  • 9
  • minimum emphasi
  • 3
  • 9
  • agec matrix
  • 3
  • 9
  • matrix aztransfercom
  • 3
  • 9
  • aztransfercom designation
  • 3
  • 9
  • social behavioral
  • 3
  • 9
  • communication
  • 3
  • 9
  • geology ii
  • 3
  • 9
  • degree certificate
  • 3
  • 9
Result 10
Titleassociate of science (as) vs associate of applied science (aas)
Urlhttps://www.aarc.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Degree_Definitions.pdf
DescriptionAn Associate of Science (AS) degree is a 2-year degree offered by most community colleges and some 4- year colleges. The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) ...
Date
Organic Position9
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 11
TitleWhat is an Associate's Degree in Science? - College Values Online
Urlhttps://www.collegevaluesonline.com/associates-degree-in-science-explained/
DescriptionWhat is an Associates Degree in Science? Find out more about the degree
Date
Organic Position10
H1What is an Associate’s Degree in Science?
H2
H3Ready to find the perfect college degree?
Is an associate of science degree worth it?
Benefits of an Associate of Science Degree?
What is the difference between an A.S. and A.A. degree?
Types of Associate of Science Programs
What Are the Requirements for an Associate of Science Degree?
What will you learn in an Associate of Science Program?
Concentrations to choose in an associate degree in science program
What is the career outlook for an associate of science degree?
Ready to find the perfect college degree?
H2WithAnchors
BodyWhat is an Associate’s Degree in Science? Last updated: January 11, 2022 Ready to find the perfect college degree? Contents Is an associate of science degree worth it? Benefits of an Associate of Science Degree? What is the difference between an A.S. and A.A. degree? Types of Associate of Science Programs What Are the Requirements for an Associate of Science Degree? What will you learn in an Associate of Science Program? Concentrations to choose in an associate degree in science program What is the career outlook for an associate of science degree? An associate of science is a two-year undergraduate degree that provides college-level training in fields like science, business, engineering, allied health, and related STEM fields. Associate’s degrees are usually offered by community colleges and take two years to complete. Associate of applied science jobs are plentiful, and students with degrees in the above fields are in high demand. Prospective students can refer to rankings about the best associates degrees to find the right fit for their career goals.  Most colleges and universities have generous credit transfer policies for students with an associate degree and allow them to complete a four-year bachelor’s degree in two years. They are available on campus as well as online. Students who are working and need a more flexible schedule often opt for an online associate degree. Affordable community colleges and some universities offer them programs that are affordable and set students up for success. An associate of science degree is designed to provide students with foundational knowledge and prepare them to transfer to a 4-year institution. Students looking to get onto the workforce and a quick start to their careers should consider an associate degree in science and its many benefits. Associate degree in science also prepares students to pursue a bachelor’s degree in STEM fields. Some students may even take less time to complete or, depending on the flexibility of the program offered by the college, take a little more time if they need to stretch the program.  Many students wish to enter the workforce right after completing high school but need to continue with their education at the same time. With an associate degree in science, students are prepared for jobs in multiple industries. Usually offered through community colleges, these provide them with a quick-start career as they earn a degree in two years or less. It is a basic degree that provides foundational knowledge for the field students are interested in and helps them find a job in their field. During the two-year associate program, students can set the path to an excellent career that matches that budget as well as interests. They can take courses on topics like mathematics, materials science, management, chemistry, and healthcare.  Is an associate of science degree worth it? An associate of science degree helps students set the path to professional success, teach and increase their skills, qualify them for job opportunities with good earning potential. It provides training for a wide range of careers with competitive salaries and prepares graduates for jobs in multiple industries. There are many entry-level roles that do not require advanced degrees, making it easy for many students to get into the workforce early and start earning. It is a lucrative alternative to the four-year undergraduate approach, making it a worthwhile investment, and overall, it is a good way to start a career,  Benefits of an Associate of Science Degree? An associate of science degree offers several professional benefits, including specialized training and higher earning potential. Specialized training for in-demand careers.Online AS programs provide the flexibility to help students balance their studies with other work-life obligations.AS degree credits seamlessly transfer to bachelor’s programs, allowing students to earn their bachelor’s degree faster and cheaper. Online AS programs allow students to attend a school of their choice without relocating.Students with an associate degree benefit from a higher median salary. What is the difference between an A.S. and A.A. degree? An Associate in Science (AS) degree is specific to STEM and its related fields, covering a broad range of topics. A.S. majors include science, business, engineering, and allied health. They are great fit students who wish to pursue advanced STEM education and are looking for foundational knowledge. An Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree offers wide-ranging courses that can include history, art, music, literature, writing, P.R., and communication. The broad curricula touch upon many subjects, thus preparing students for a wide range of careers and bachelor’s degrees. They offer immense potential for students. A.A. majors include communication, English, and liberal studies. A.A. degrees typically require fewer math and science courses than AS programs. Then there are Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degrees that are great for students who want to earn a degree and get into a specific career path immediately. Typically, these are more technical or vocational degrees and could include programs like Web development & design, Nursing, Accounting, Teaching assistant, Paralegal, and Respiratory care, etc. Types of Associate of Science Programs. Students looking to earn an associate of science degree may specialize in disciplines like allied health, business, science, or engineering. These programs emphasize problem-solving and analytical skills. Computer and Information Science – An AS program in computer and information science covers topics like web development, programming languages, coding, and computer science. Graduates with this degree can pursue roles like web developer, computer programmer, and computer support specialist.Dental Hygienist – Dental hygienist programs train students in anatomy, oral health, and periodontics. Graduates with an associate degree in the field can work as dental hygienists with a median annual salary of $76,220.Business Administration – Business administration AS degrees cover study topics like finance, accounting, communications, and management. This AS degree leads to career opportunities in marketing, sales, finance, administrative assisting, and project management.Engineering – An engineering degree at the associate level helps students build basic technical and problem-solving skills. They complete courses on topics like civil engineering, materials science, and electrical engineering.Biology – An AS in Biology covers topics like biological systems, basic anatomy, and laboratory science. Graduates can work as biology technicians or use AS credits to transfer to a bachelor’s program. What Are the Requirements for an Associate of Science Degree? Most associate science degrees require a high school diploma or the equivalent. Some schools may also require SAT or ACT scores, but it is not prevalent. Most of the time, this requirement is more common for bachelor’s degree programs. Applicants may also need to submit recommendation letters, a resume, and a statement of purpose. Requirements for completing an AS degree include completing major courses and general education requirements, along with electives. There may also be laboratory or practicum requirements to give students hands-on experience. All in all, they usually need to complete 20 courses or around 60 credit hours to earn an associate degree. What will you learn in an Associate of Science Program? Associate of Science degrees may focus on fields like natural sciences, allied health, engineering, business, and mathematics. It focuses on technical skills to help prepare students to further their education and careers in scientific or technological industries.  Most programs also incorporate math courses. Associate of science courses builds strong analytical and critical thinking skills. Some examples include: Introduction to ChemistryIntroduction to PhysicsIntroduction to Engineering Sciences Biology Introduction to Computer ScienceGeneral Education StatisticsGeneral Education MathematicsFinite Math for Business & ManagementEarth Science Applied Physical Science Concentrations to choose in an associate degree in science program. Students can select a concentration to tailor their general associate degree in science program to match their career goals and interests. Depending on their goals, they can choose between computer science, biology, physics, engineering, health sciences, and chemistry, among others. However, if they opt for an Associate of Applied Science degree, then they can already benefit from specialized programs like dental hygiene, nursing, or emergency medical services. At times, they may take longer to complete than a general associate degree program. Still, they allow for more generous credit transfers to a bachelor’s degree program or find jobs upon graduation. What is the career outlook for an associate of science degree? According to the BLS, associate degree graduates may earn over $800 per week on average. The median salary for associate degree holders is $47,078 per year. Graduates with an associate of science degree can pursue engineering technician, dental hygienist, and web developer roles. Some degrees in engineering fields or dental hygiene can lead to higher salary potential. Students can also transfer to a bachelor’s program with their AS degree credits and complete that degree in less than four years.  Associate’s degrees provide the skills one needs to get started in a good career. Some of the best associate degrees lead to jobs that pay well, with careers that best align with one’s interests and educational aspirations. Some of the associate degrees that pay well lie in the area of skilled trades. AS degree holders can go into careers like lawyers, doctors, engineers, or therapists; however, they may need an advanced degree to grow in these fields.  Some of the best associate degrees lie in healthcare and related fields with immense opportunities for students. Jobs like radiology technicians, dental hygienists, respiratory therapists, medical assistants, occupational and physical therapy assistants, and surgical technologists require only an associate degree. Students who are interested in becoming registered nurses can earn an associate degree to become an R.N., start practicing, and then move on to a bachelor’s degree as they pursue advanced studies. The sky’s the limit for these students, for they pursue a master’s in nursing or healthcare management for more administrative and leadership positions.  Demand is high for people with specialized knowledge and skills, whether they have AS or AAS degrees. This includes many careers in manufacturing like machining, welding, automation, mechanics, industrial maintenance, and construction. Other associate’s degree jobs in the skilled trades area include: Maintaining electrical and natural gas lines.Installing and maintaining home heating.Cooling.Ventilation systems.  Associate degrees that pay well lie in the field of information technology as well. Careers in computer repairs, maintaining computer hardware, and managing computer networks begin with an associate degree in science. Students who wish to be software developers, computer programmers, and network troubleshooters will find many opportunities available for them. However, they may have to get an advanced degree to grow in these fields.  There are many opportunities available in the agriculture-related field and agri-businesses. Students can find jobs in farms, cooperatives, horticulture services, implement dealers, greenhouses, and agriculture consulting firms. Opportunities abound in regular business areas like accounting, management, marketing, and other entry-level roles with an AS degree. A closer look at some of the high growth sectors for students with an associate of science degree include: Healthcare The medical field or healthcare is one of the fastest-growing sectors with a massive demand for medical workers. These frontline workers, from nursing aides to personal care providers have saved millions of lives during the pandemic. One can secure a top-quality job with an associate’s degree but may need an advanced degree to grow in the field.  Some high-growth jobs that require an associate’s degree are: Radiologic and MRI TechnologistNuclear Medicine TechnologistDental HygienistRegistered NurseMedical SonographerPersonal Care AidesHome Health AidesMedical or Nursing Assistants Information Technology  Software and I.T. jobs are increasing every day. There is a rising need for people with knowledge of computers, networks, and new programs to set up these technologies and implement them effectively. Some high-growth jobs in the area that require an associate’s degree are: Web DevelopersComputer Programmers Computer Network SpecialistsComputer Support SpecialistsComputer System AnalystsNetwork and Computer System Administrators Network EngineerOperations or I.T. manager Other associates of science degree jobs include: Veterinary Technologist Chemical Technician Physical Therapist Assistant Geological and Petroleum Technician Medical Transcriptionist PhlebotomistMedical assistant Emergency Medical technician (EMT)Medical BillerPharmacy TechnicianLaboratory Assistants Engineering Technician College debt and expenses can be hard to bear. Affordability is a significant benefit of associate degrees. Completing an associate degree takes less time and money than a bachelor’s degree. An associate’s degree in science can be beneficial in many ways as it prepares students to start working and gaining hands-on industry experience right after high school. It allows students to work and support themselves and prepares them for varied jobs and higher education. Since public community colleges mostly offer them, students can pay much lower tuition rates than public or private four-year colleges. Students who wish to grow in their careers and learn more can apply to four-year undergraduate programs after earning their associate degrees. They can get a prestigious bachelor’s degree with just two additional years of study and at a lesser cost.  Sources:. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U.S. News & World ReportYahoo.comSalary.com Payscale.com Related Resources:. Fastest Associate’s Degree Online ProgramsThe Highest Paying Trade School ProgramsCheapest Associate’s Degrees OnlineBest Scholarship WebsitesOnline Associate’s Degrees Maxim SorokopudAuthor Melissa AndersonExpert Julie McCaulleyEditor-in-Chief Ready to find the perfect college degree?
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 113
  • 11
  • associate
  • 77
  • 11
  • science
  • 53
  • 11
  • student
  • 39
  • 11
  • associate degree
  • 36
  • 11
  • program
  • 31
  • 11
  • associate science
  • 25
  • 11
  • bachelor
  • 24
  • 11
  • year
  • 20
  • 11
  • science degree
  • 19
  • 11
  • career
  • 19
  • 11
  • associate science degree
  • 18
  • 11
  • field
  • 18
  • 11
  • job
  • 16
  • 11
  • computer
  • 14
  • 11
  • degree science
  • 11
  • 11
  • college
  • 11
  • 11
  • engineering
  • 11
  • 11
  • include
  • 10
  • 11
  • bachelor degree
  • 9
  • 11
  • transfer bachelor
  • 8
  • 11
  • degree associate
  • 8
  • 11
  • science program
  • 8
  • 11
  • complete
  • 8
  • 11
  • business
  • 8
  • 11
  • high
  • 8
  • 11
  • cours
  • 8
  • 11
  • associate degree science
  • 7
  • 11
  • find
  • 7
  • 11
  • benefit
  • 7
  • 11
  • aa
  • 7
  • 11
  • health
  • 7
  • 11
  • education
  • 7
  • 11
  • earn
  • 7
  • 11
  • skill
  • 7
  • 11
  • require
  • 7
  • 11
  • assistant
  • 7
  • 11
  • technician
  • 7
  • 11
  • year undergraduate
  • 6
  • 11
  • aa degree
  • 6
  • 11
  • dental
  • 6
  • 11
  • medical
  • 6
  • 11
  • degree program
  • 5
  • 11
  • require associate
  • 5
  • 11
  • program student
  • 5
  • 11
  • associate science program
  • 4
  • 11
  • degree associate science
  • 4
  • 11
  • degree year
  • 4
  • 11
  • degree offer
  • 4
  • 11
  • degree pursue
  • 4
  • 11
  • benefit associate
  • 4
  • 11
  • allied health
  • 4
  • 11
  • community college
  • 4
  • 11
  • advanced degree
  • 4
  • 11
  • degree include
  • 4
  • 11
  • dental hygienist
  • 4
  • 11
  • degree science program
  • 3
  • 11
  • science degree associate
  • 3
  • 11
  • associate applied science
  • 3
  • 11
  • bachelor program
  • 3
  • 11
  • advanced degree grow
  • 3
  • 11
  • degree grow field
  • 3
  • 11
  • associate applied
  • 3
  • 11
  • applied science
  • 3
  • 11
  • credit transfer
  • 3
  • 11
  • foundational knowledge
  • 3
  • 11
  • start career
  • 3
  • 11
  • prepare student
  • 3
  • 11
  • student pursue
  • 3
  • 11
  • high school
  • 3
  • 11
  • find job
  • 3
  • 11
  • student earn
  • 3
  • 11
  • related field
  • 3
  • 11
  • earn associate
  • 3
  • 11
  • degree grow
  • 3
  • 11
  • grow field
  • 3
  • 11
  • computer network
  • 3
  • 11
  • high growth
  • 3
  • 11
Result 12
TitleAssociate in Science - South Piedmont Community College
Urlhttps://spcc.edu/en/areas-of-study/university-transfer-programs/associate-in-science/
Description
Date
Organic Position11
H1Associate in Science
H2Student Panel
Program Description
Employment Opportunities
Educational Opportunities
Contact Information
H3
H2WithAnchorsStudent Panel
Program Description
Employment Opportunities
Educational Opportunities
Contact Information
BodyAssociate in Science Home » Areas of Study » University Transfer Programs » Associate in Science Program Description. The Associate in Science degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit (SHC) of college transfer courses. Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic computer use.The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) and the Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (ICAA) enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year associate in science programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina and to Signatory Institutions of North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities to transfer with junior status.Community college graduates must obtain a grade of “C” or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in order to transfer with a junior status. Courses may also transfer through bilateral agreements between institutions.Click here to view the full Associate in Science degree plan. Employment Opportunities. Graduates can transfer to a four-year college or university to receive a bachelor’s degree in a number of career fields, including agriculture, biology, chemistry, computer science, education, emergency medical services, engineering, health sciences, mathematics, physical therapy, physics, and more. Educational Opportunities. Associate in Science Degree – 2 Years to Complete Contact Information. Catherine Holl-CrossChair, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences704-290-5082 © 2022 | Website by AndiSites Inc. | All rights reserved.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • science
  • 8
  • 12
  • degree
  • 7
  • 12
  • transfer
  • 7
  • 12
  • associate science
  • 6
  • 12
  • year
  • 6
  • 12
  • associate
  • 6
  • 12
  • program
  • 5
  • 12
  • college
  • 5
  • 12
  • science degree
  • 4
  • 12
  • graduate
  • 4
  • 12
  • university
  • 4
  • 12
  • associate science degree
  • 3
  • 12
  • north carolina
  • 3
  • 12
  • institution
  • 3
  • 12
  • opportunity
  • 3
  • 12
  • agreement
  • 3
  • 12
  • north
  • 3
  • 12
  • carolina
  • 3
  • 12
Result 13
TitleCCC-Associate Degree for Transfer | CSU
Urlhttps://www.calstate.edu/apply/transfer/pages/ccc-associate-degree-for-transfer.aspx
Description
Date
Organic Position12
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Bodyx ‹ › Close Map
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 14
TitleAssociate Degree and University Transfer - Associate in Science (AS-T) | Pierce College District
Urlhttps://www.pierce.ctc.edu/ast
DescriptionThe Associate of Science degree (AS-T) is for students who plan to transfer to science programs at four-year institutions after completing the first two years at Pierce College
Date
Organic Position13
H1Associate Degree and University Transfer - Associate in Science (AS-T)
H2Associate in Science (AS-T)
Course and Career Information
Associate in Science (AS-T) Degree Track #1 and Track #2 Outcomes
H3Associate in Science (AS-T) Track 1
Associate in Science (AS-T) Track 2
Core Abilities Outcomes
Fundamental Areas of Knowledge Outcomes
H2WithAnchorsAssociate in Science (AS-T)
Course and Career Information
Associate in Science (AS-T) Degree Track #1 and Track #2 Outcomes
BodyAssociate Degree and University Transfer - Associate in Science (AS-T) Image Associate in Science (AS-T). The Associate in Science degree (AS-T) is designed for students who plan to transfer to science programs at four-year institutions after completing the first two years of study at Pierce. The degree enables students to fulfill the undergraduate general education requirements of most four-year science degree programs. Students are responsible for checking specific major requirements of baccalaureate institutions in the year prior to transferring. There are two degree track options: Track One is for science students who wish to focus on biological and environmental/resource sciences, geology and earth science, or chemistry. Track Two is for students who wish to focus on engineering, computer science, physics, or atmospheric science. Course and Career Information. Associate in Science (AS-T) Track 1. Career Pathway Course Map Career Roadmap - Information about career prospects with this degree. Associate in Science (AS-T) Track 2. Career Pathway Course Map Career Roadmap - Information about career prospects with this degree. Associate in Science (AS-T) Degree Track #1 and Track #2 Outcomes. General Education at Pierce College prepares graduates to live and work in a dynamically changing world by emphasizing whole student development through fundamental areas of knowledge and the college five core abilities. Core Abilities Outcomes. Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking. Graduates will evaluate, analyze, and synthesize information and ideas in order to construct informed, meaningful, and justifiable conclusions. Responsibility. Graduates will be able to critically examine the relationship between self, community, and/or environments, and to evaluate and articulate potential impacts and consequences of choices, actions, and contributions for the creation of sustainable systems. Information Competency. Graduates will be able to seek, find, evaluate and use information and employ information technology to engage in lifelong learning. Effective Communication. Graduates will be able to exchange messages in a variety of contexts using multiple methods. Multiculturalism. Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of diverse ideas, cultures, and experiences, and develop the ability to examine their own attitudes and assumptions in order to understand and work with others who differ from themselves. Fundamental Areas of Knowledge Outcomes. Communication. Graduates identify, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies in one's own and other's writing in order to communicate effectively. Humanities. Graduates acquire skills to critically interpret, analyze and evaluate forms of human expression, and create and perform as an expression of the human experience. Social Sciences. Graduates use social science research methods and/or theory in order to analyze and interpret social phenomena. Natural Sciences. Graduates use the scientific method to analyze natural phenomena and acquire skills to evaluate authenticity of data/information relative to the natural world. Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning. Graduates utilize mathematical, symbolic, logical, graphical, geometric, or statistical analysis for the interpretation and solution of problems in the natural world and human society.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • track
  • 17
  • 14
  • science
  • 16
  • 14
  • a
  • 12
  • 14
  • graduate
  • 11
  • 14
  • science a
  • 10
  • 14
  • career
  • 9
  • 14
  • degree
  • 9
  • 14
  • associate
  • 8
  • 14
  • associate science
  • 7
  • 14
  • information
  • 7
  • 14
  • year
  • 6
  • 14
  • student
  • 6
  • 14
  • evaluate
  • 6
  • 14
  • associate science a
  • 5
  • 14
  • analyze
  • 5
  • 14
  • outcome
  • 4
  • 14
  • order
  • 4
  • 14
  • natural
  • 4
  • 14
  • world
  • 3
  • 14
  • knowledge
  • 3
  • 14
  • ability
  • 3
  • 14
  • method
  • 3
  • 14
  • human
  • 3
  • 14
  • social
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
Title5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree | UW Extended Campus
Urlhttps://uwex.wisconsin.edu/stories-news/5-reasons-to-earn-an-associate-degree/
DescriptionFive reasons why earning an associate degree can help your career, increase earning potential, be a step to a bachelor's degree, satisfy a goal or more
DateMay 7, 2020
Organic Position14
H15 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree
H2
H31. Higher Earning Potential
2. Path to a Higher Degree
3. Career Advancement Opportunities
4. Finish What You Started
5. Accomplish Your Goal
H2WithAnchors
Body5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Colleen Barrett ● May 7, 2020 Home » Stories & News » 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Returning to school to earn a degree is a major decision. What will you study? Where will you go? How will you fit your studies into your already busy life? How will you pay for it? What is the long term benefit? Maybe you’re not ready for the commitment of earning a bachelor’s degree, yet many of the benefits experienced by bachelor’s degree holders are also true with an associate degree. Associate degrees are often more affordable and more accessible than bachelor’s degrees. What can earning an associate degree do for you? Here are five reasons to earn an associate degree.  1. Higher Earning Potential. Can you get a good job without a degree? Yes, but having a degree can increase your earning potential. According to a special report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2017, earning an associate degree can provide a salary boost. An associate degree holder’s—aged 25 or older and working full time—median weekly salary is 7.4 percent more than those with some college credit and 14.9 percent more than those with only a high school diploma.  2. Path to a Higher Degree. An associate degree is often a less expensive stepping stone to earning a bachelor’s degree. Earning it online is also a convenient way to satisfy general education credits before transferring to a bachelor’s degree program—online or on campus. (If you choose this route, it’s important to check to see if the courses you are taking will transfer to the institution where you plan to complete your bachelor’s degree. In addition, if you know what area you want to earn your bachelor’s degree in, check to see which courses you can take to satisfy requirements or prerequisites.) 3. Career Advancement Opportunities. Having an associate degree can make a difference in getting promoted. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, earning an associate degree can open up opportunities in management. Looking at full-time workers aged 25 or older, nearly 38 percent of associate degree holders work in management positions, compared to 29 percent of those with some college credit but no degree. Only 16.2 percent of those with a high school diploma alone hold management positions. 4. Finish What You Started. After high school you enrolled in college like many of your friends and completed a semester or two, possibly more. Or you started a degree program but life got in the way, and you stopped to work full time. You may be able to use college credits you’ve already completed to help you earn your degree. Check with the admission office at the school where you want to earn your associate degree. They can review all of your credits and see how many can be used toward the associate degree.  5. Accomplish Your Goal . You set a goal to complete your associate degree, but between personal and professional commitments, you haven’t completed it yet. Now it’s easier than ever to accomplish that goal through the 100 percent online University of Wisconsin Associate of Arts and Sciences degree. This 60-credit program features a broad based liberal arts and sciences curriculum. You’ll be able to access your classroom anytime, anywhere, and from nearly any device, which helps you fit learning into your busy life. A simple web interface makes it easy to access your courses, connect with instructors and classmates, check your grades, and get support when you need it, helping you to crush your goal!  Ready to earn your associate degree? Contact an enrollment adviser Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT; or by appointment. Call 608-262-2011 (1-877-895-3276) or send an email to [email protected] Filed Under: Careers Tags: associate degree, general education credits online, general education degree, online associate degree, online degree, online University of Wisconsin associate degree, online UW associate degree, online UW degree, online UW degrees, UW general education credits onlinePrograms: Associate of Arts
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 48
  • 15
  • associate degree
  • 22
  • 15
  • associate
  • 22
  • 15
  • bachelor
  • 14
  • 15
  • online
  • 10
  • 15
  • earn
  • 8
  • 15
  • earning
  • 8
  • 15
  • credit
  • 8
  • 15
  • bachelor degree
  • 7
  • 15
  • degree online
  • 6
  • 15
  • percent
  • 6
  • 15
  • earn associate degree
  • 5
  • 15
  • reason earn
  • 5
  • 15
  • degree holder
  • 5
  • 15
  • earn associate
  • 5
  • 15
  • reason
  • 5
  • 15
  • school
  • 5
  • 15
  • general education
  • 4
  • 15
  • holder
  • 4
  • 15
  • college
  • 4
  • 15
  • general
  • 4
  • 15
  • education
  • 4
  • 15
  • check
  • 4
  • 15
  • goal
  • 4
  • 15
  • uw
  • 4
  • 15
  • reason earn associate
  • 3
  • 15
  • earning associate degree
  • 3
  • 15
  • general education credit
  • 3
  • 15
  • associate degree online
  • 3
  • 15
  • degree online uw
  • 3
  • 15
  • earning associate
  • 3
  • 15
  • full time
  • 3
  • 15
  • college credit
  • 3
  • 15
  • high school
  • 3
  • 15
  • education credit
  • 3
  • 15
  • online uw
  • 3
  • 15
  • life
  • 3
  • 15
  • full
  • 3
  • 15
  • time
  • 3
  • 15
  • high
  • 3
  • 15
  • program
  • 3
  • 15
  • cours
  • 3
  • 15
  • management
  • 3
  • 15
  • completed
  • 3
  • 15
  • art
  • 3
  • 15
Result 16
TitleChoosing a Program - Associate in Science (AS) degrees and Stackable Credentials | Programs | School of Global Business, Trade and Transportation | Miami Dade College
Urlhttps://www.mdc.edu/globalbusiness/as-ccc-bas.aspx
Description
Date
Organic Position15
H1Global Business
H2Programs
H3Choosing a Program - Associate in Science (AS) degrees and Stackable Credentials
Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS)
H2WithAnchorsPrograms
BodyGlobal Business Miguel B. Fernandez Family School of Global Business, Trade and Transportation Toggle Global Business navigation Home About Us Programs Labs and Tutoring Student Involvement Contact Us Programs . Choosing a Program - Associate in Science (AS) degrees and Stackable Credentials. College credit certificates and associate degrees may be earned on their own, or they can be stacked to form a path leading to a four-year degree. The benefit of stacking is that as you progress along your path, you earn additional credentials while saving time by only taking courses that lead directly to your intended degree. An Associate in Science degree is ideal for those who intend to enter the workforce after two years. Graduates who earn this degree are prepared for employment and their course credits are easily transferable to a Bachelor of Applied Science in their field of interest. Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS). Supervision and Management Accounting Concentration Human Resources Management Concentration Hospitality Management Concentration Supply Chain Management Copyright © Miami Dade College Privacy Policy Consumer Information Equal Opportunity Programs/ADA Jobs at MDC Human Resources Site Feedback Accreditation Miami Dade College is an equal access/equal opportunity institution which does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, marital status, age, religion, national origin, disability, veteran’s status, ethnicity, pregnancy, sexual orientation or genetic information. Additional information may be obtained by contacting the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs/ADA Coordinator/Title IX Coordinator, at (305) 237-2577 (Voice) or 711 (TTY) Florida Relay Service. View our Equal Access/Equal Opportunity Policy.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 6
  • 16
  • science
  • 4
  • 16
  • management
  • 4
  • 16
  • equal
  • 4
  • 16
  • opportunity
  • 4
  • 16
  • global business
  • 3
  • 16
  • global
  • 3
  • 16
  • business
  • 3
  • 16
  • program
  • 3
  • 16
  • associate
  • 3
  • 16
  • college
  • 3
  • 16
  • concentration
  • 3
  • 16
  • information
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
Title5 Major Advantages of Associates Degrees | Associates Benefits
Urlhttps://www.elearners.com/online-degrees/associates/advantages-of-associates-degrees/
DescriptionDiscover the major advantages of associates degrees! Associates degree advantages include flexibility, length of the program, and cost effectiveness
Date
Organic Position16
H1Advantages of Associates Degrees
H2Associates Degrees are Flexible
Associates Degrees are Career-focused
AA Degrees Are Within Reach
Advantages of Associates Degrees: An Associate Degree is May Be Cost Effective
More Advantages of Associates Degrees
Ten Colleges That Offer Flexible Online Associate’s Degree Programs
Find Online Associate’s Degree Programs
H3
H2WithAnchorsAssociates Degrees are Flexible
Associates Degrees are Career-focused
AA Degrees Are Within Reach
Advantages of Associates Degrees: An Associate Degree is May Be Cost Effective
More Advantages of Associates Degrees
Ten Colleges That Offer Flexible Online Associate’s Degree Programs
Find Online Associate’s Degree Programs
BodyAdvantages of Associates Degrees Sponsored7 Online Programs Available EducationDynamics maintains business relationships with the schools it features From 1999 to 2009, the number of students completing associate degrees increased by more than 40 percent. [1] Once perceived as second-tier, “night school” degrees, the 2-year credential is now experiencing a revival, thanks to dynamic, career-track programs and tailored offerings that serve growing numbers of adult and first-generation college students.  As our nation looks to extend postsecondary studies to all citizens, the advantages of associates degrees can’t be ignored:Associates Degrees are Flexible.In a 2003 edition of Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Olivia Crosby noted, “the hallmark of associate degrees is flexibility, both in what to study and how to study it.” [2] Going forward, more associate degrees will include online classes or fully online programs. Indeed, 66 percent of associate degree-granting institutions report that online education is a key part of their long-term strategies (as compared with 33 percent of bachelor’s degree-granting schools). [3]Associates Degrees are Career-focused.Associate degree programs prepare students for actual jobs, which is one of the major advantages of associates degrees. Researchers at Marquette University recently found that students who match their degree to an occupation earn 30 percent more than those whose majors are of little relevance to their job (e.g. philosophy majors working at the Post Office). [4] Granted, not all associate degrees are vocational. Some are designed to segue into bachelor degree programs, addressing general education requirements along the way. But for students who want to know exactly what they’re working toward, career-track associate degrees are smart routes and one of the major advantages of associates degrees.AA Degrees Are Within Reach. Associate degree grads earn higher median salaries than college dropouts or those who’ve only completed “some college.” [5] This is a crucial consideration, as more and more students heed the advice to pursue higher education and assume it should be at the bachelor level. Nontraditional students (who are more likely to work while in college and less likely to have completed college prep coursework in high school) struggle to finish 4-year programs; only 9 percent of “non-recent” high school graduates earn a bachelor degree within 6 years of starting.[6] In other words, an associate degree is almost always a better investment than a failed attempt at a bachelor degree, which adss that to the list of advantages of associates degrees. Advantages of Associates Degrees: An Associate Degree is May Be Cost Effective. On average, associate degree graduates finish school with nearly half the debt accumulated by bachelor degree students. [7] Not only do associate degree students pay for 2 less years of school, they also return to the workforce that much quicker, which means they start earning money sooner, climbing the career ladder sooner, and paying back interest-accruing loans 2 years sooner. More Advantages of Associates Degrees. Most importantly, associate degrees are the gateway to dozens of careers. All of the following professionals may choose an associates degree to succeed in their chosen fields:Registered nurses- According to a policy brief released by the American Association of Community Colleges, associate degrees in nursing (ADN) programs are integral preparation routes for America’s nursing workforce. Two-year nursing degrees prepare the majority of our country’s new nurses, including 55 percent of minority RNs. As the nursing shortage continues, and as BSN programs struggle to staff their departments, students pursuing associate degrees can bypass the waiting lists and qualify for RN status after paying less than half the tuition of a BSN program. [8]Veterinary technicians- Vet techs and technologists work in veterinary offices, animal hospitals, and laboratories, and their role in the business of animal healthcare is increasing, just as nurses and medical assistants are undertaking more clinical work with human patients. The American Veterinary Medical Association accredits 172 vet tech programs, including 9 with online education offerings, and the vast majority of them are associate degree programs. [9]Environmental engineering technicians- Growing populations and an increased reliance on chemical substances have seriously impacted the world’s soil, waterways, and landfills. Environmental engineers test conditions and propose waste management solutions for corporations, conservation organizations, and government agencies. Environmental engineering technicians assist in these efforts, often securing entry-level jobs with an associate of applied science (AAS) degree in environmental engineering technology. Other types of online associate degree are also available in environmental science.Systems administrators- Senior systems administrators often hold bachelor’s degrees, but many entry-level professionals are hired with an associate degree in information technology and relevant experience, reports the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. According to the source, opportunities for systems administrators are “projected to increase by 30% from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations.” Ambitious students are advised to join LOPSA  (the League of Professional Systems Administrators), where they can search job posts, network with industry professionals, and even request personal mentoring on school assignments or work-related projects. [10]Occupational therapy assistants- Occupational therapy (OT) helps patients to improve their basic life skills after an injury or in response to a disabling condition. OT may involve a series of physical exercises, strengthening routines, and mental exercises designed to bolster coordination and problem solving. Occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) facilitate recovery by charting patient progress and supervising exercise plans. Government projections indicate that jobs for OTAs will grow much faster than average in the coming years. [11] In order to be licensed, OTAs must complete an ACOTE-accredited associate degree, many of which are partially available via distance education.Paralegals- Paralegals aren’t just law office administrators. Increasingly, they’re assuming niche roles and practicing specialties – including e-discovery, intellectual property, and collections/foreclosure – that directly impact policy work and litigation. Today’s law firms prefer to hire paralegals with technical skills and legal software familiarity.  While earning your associate degree in paralegal studies, you may learn the underpinnings of legal practice, plus interesting electives in areas like trial graphics or how to collect evidence from defendants’ emails and hard drives. Ten Colleges That Offer Flexible Online Associate’s Degree Programs. Check out these ten colleges and universities offering online associate’s degree programs that may interest you. Or, fill out our form to get matched.1. Saint Leo UniversityFounded in 1889, Saint Leo University is the oldest Catholic institution of higher education in the state of Florida. They’ve offered online programs since the 1990s, and currently serve over 15,000 students around the world.Saint Leo’s offers 100%-online associate’s degree programs that are grounded in the liberal arts, similar to the first two years of a bachelor’s program. And, with six eight-week terms per year, students may be able to get started at Saint Leo’s right away.Potential programs: A.A. Business Administration, A.A. Liberal Arts, A.A. in Cybersecurity, and others2. Liberty UniversityThe largest private, nonprofit university in the U.S. and the largest Christian university in the world, Liberty University has a lot to brag about. They are comprised of 17 different colleges and schools, and they offer online programs in over 250 areas of study.Liberty University Online strives to offer high-quality, industry-relevant associate’s degree programs in a variety of fields. And, students may be able to transition into an online bachelor’s program, if desired.Potential programs: Associate of Arts in Accounting, Associate of Arts in Psychology, Associate of Arts in Early Childhood Education, and many more3. Keiser UniversityKeiser was founded in 1977 with the mission of helping adult students prepare for career paths. Today, the university serves about 20,000 students. Keiser has campuses in 18 Florida metropolitan areas and communities, in addition to locations around the globe.The Fort Lauderdale campus is home to Keiser’s online division, which gives students access to on-campus resources even as they enjoy the flexibility of online learning. Associate’s programs in a variety of academic and professional areas are offered.Potential programs: AA in Paralegal Studies, AA in General Studies, AS in Medical Administrative Billing & Coding, and more4. Indiana Wesleyan UniversityIndiana Wesleyan University is a private Christian college that focuses on liberal arts and professional education. They were founded in 1920, and added an adult education program in 1985. Today, IWU serves over 10,000 adult learners both on campus and online.IWU offers online programs with capped class sizes, emphasizing a learning experience that is both intimate and dynamic. They are currently home to three online associate’s degree programs.Potential programs: Online associate’s degree programs in Accounting, Business, and Computer Information Technology5. Southern New Hampshire UniversitySouthern New Hampshire is a private, nonprofit university offering over 200 degree programs. Though SNHU is home to about 3,000 students on its Manchester, NH campus, it serves an additional 80,000 learners through its innovative online programming.Designed for adult learners, SNHU’s 60-credit online associate’s degree programs feature flexible learning, with the support of academic and career advisors. Students may also be able to transition into an online bachelor’s program.Potential programs: AS in Marketing, AA Digital Photography, AS Fashion Merchandising, and more6. Laurus CollegeLaurus College is committed to helping students pursue excellence and strive for new career goals. (Fun fact: Laurus comes from the Latin word for “success.”) Students may choose from four campus locations in California, in addition to online programs.Laurus is home to a variety of occupational associate’s degree programs that offer small class sizes, real-time attention from instructors, and exciting, career-focused curricula.Potential programs: Associates degree programs in Medical Billing & Coding, Web Design, Professional Business Systems, and others7. Medaille CollegeMedaille College is a private four-year college that serves Western New York and beyond. A community-oriented institution, they focus on practitioner-based learning environments and helping students learn by doing. Medaille offers both undergraduate and graduate programs in flexible formats.In addition to offering associate’s degree programs at the Buffalo and Rochester campuses, Medaille currently offers three associate’s programs in an online format.Potential programs: Associate in Science in Business, Associate in Science in General Studies, Associate in Applied Science in Veterinary Technology8. Bryan University Bryan University was founded in 1982 with the goal of educating future travel industry professionals. Today, they offer career-focused programs in many occupational areas. Their emphasis is on accessible education for students with family responsibilities, a military career, or other needs.In addition to traditional programs at one of several campus locations in Arkansas, Kansas, and Missouri, Bryan University offers online associate’s degree programs in diverse fields.Potential programs: Associate’s degrees in Business Administration & Management, Criminal Justice, Exercise Specialist, and more9. University of Massachusetts – UMass OnlineThe University of Massachusetts is a public university system with a focus on research, academics, and public service. For students seeking alternatives to studying at one of UMass’s five campuses, UMass Online offers high-quality, flexible programs that harness the university’s resources and commitment to excellence.UMass offers fully online and blended programs at various degree levels. They currently offer two online associate’s degree programs.Potential programs: Associate of Science in Information Technology, Associate of Science in Sustainable Food and Farming10. Grantham UniversityGrantham University was founded in 1951, with a campus in Southern California. In the 1990s, they made the switch to offering degree programs 100% online. Students can choose from over 50 degree and certificate programs in four different colleges.In addition to bachelor’s, master’s, and certificate programs, Grantham offers online associate’s degree programs in career-oriented disciplines.Potential programs: Business Administration (Associate of Arts), Computer Science (Associate of Science), Engineering Management Technology (Associate of Arts), and othersFind Online Associate’s Degree Programs. Now that you’re clear on some of the advantages of earning an associate’s degree, explore our sponsored listings for online associate’s programs that may help you launch your new career goals. Or, fill out our form to be matched.[1] nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_fsu.asp  |  [2] bls.gov/opub/ooq/2002/winter/art01.pdf  |  [3] sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/index.asp  |  [4] epublications.marquette.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1051  | [5] nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/pdf/coe_er2.pdf  |  [6] chronicle.com/blogs/brainstorm/college-grad-rates-stay-exactly-the-same/29394  |  [7] finaid.org/loans/  |  [8] aacc.nche.edu/Publications/Briefs/Pages/pb03222011.aspx  |  [9]  avma.org/education/cvea/vettech_programs/vettech_programs.asp | [10] bls.gov/oco/ocos305.htm | [11] bls.gov/oco/ocos166.htm  Degree LinksAssociates Degree ProgramsAdvantages of Associates DegreesAssociates or Bachelors Degree First? Find Schools
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 83
  • 17
  • associate
  • 81
  • 17
  • program
  • 59
  • 17
  • associate degree
  • 47
  • 17
  • online
  • 35
  • 17
  • degree program
  • 28
  • 17
  • student
  • 26
  • 17
  • online associate
  • 24
  • 17
  • university
  • 19
  • 17
  • bachelor
  • 18
  • 17
  • year
  • 16
  • 17
  • college
  • 16
  • 17
  • offer
  • 15
  • 17
  • career
  • 14
  • 17
  • percent
  • 10
  • 17
  • school
  • 10
  • 17
  • study
  • 9
  • 17
  • advantage
  • 9
  • 17
  • education
  • 9
  • 17
  • bachelor degree
  • 8
  • 17
  • campu
  • 8
  • 17
  • business
  • 8
  • 17
  • professional
  • 8
  • 17
  • science
  • 8
  • 17
  • art
  • 8
  • 17
  • advantage associate
  • 7
  • 17
  • aa
  • 7
  • 17
  • program associate
  • 6
  • 17
  • occupational
  • 6
  • 17
  • offering
  • 6
  • 17
  • advantage associate degree
  • 5
  • 17
  • online program
  • 5
  • 17
  • offer online
  • 5
  • 17
  • associate art
  • 5
  • 17
  • associate science
  • 5
  • 17
  • job
  • 5
  • 17
  • work
  • 5
  • 17
  • administrator
  • 5
  • 17
  • system
  • 5
  • 17
  • area
  • 5
  • 17
  • addition
  • 5
  • 17
  • saint leo
  • 4
  • 17
  • associate program
  • 3
  • 17
  • offer online associate
  • 3
  • 17
  • system administrator
  • 3
  • 17
  • liberal art
  • 3
  • 17
  • business administration
  • 3
  • 17
  • bryan university
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleAssociate in Science - Surry Community College
Urlhttps://surry.edu/areas-of-study/programs/associate-in-science
Description
Date
Organic Position17
H1Associate in Science
H2COVID-19: Spring 2022 Semester Guidelines
Program Overview
Degree Curriculum
Learning Outcomes
Program Costs
Program Facts
Want to Learn More?
H3Academic Transition
UGETC-Universale General Education Transfer Component (34 Credit Hours)
English Composition
Communication/Humanities/Fine Arts (Select One Course)
Literature Requirement (Select One Course)
Social/Behavioral Science (Select One Course)
History Requirement (Select One Course)
Mathematics (Select Two Courses)
Natural Sciences (Select A Two Course Sequence)
General Education Courses (11 Credit Hours)
Select at least 8 hours from any of the previous math and science courses and/or from the following list
Additional General Education Courses - Select 3 hours from any of the previous course listings and/or from the following list. Choose courses based on your intended major
Elective/Pre- Major Courses (14 Credit Hours)
Math/Science Courses (Select 8 hours from the list below and/or from the previous Math/Science courses.)
Select 6 hours from any of the previous course listings and/or from the following. Choose courses related to your major
H2WithAnchorsCOVID-19: Spring 2022 Semester Guidelines
Program Overview
Degree Curriculum
Learning Outcomes
Program Costs
Program Facts
Want to Learn More?
BodyAssociate in Science Degree, On Campus Program Overview. The Associate in Science degree is designed for students interested in transferring to a four-year institution and majoring in a STEM subject (science, technology, engineering, and math, including science and math education). Students who complete the associate’s degree are considered to have fulfilled the institution-wide, lower division requirements of the receiving institution. Graduates of the Associate in Science degree program (60-61 semester hour credits) will be eligible to transfer to all constituent institutions of the University of North Carolina with junior status if admitted into the institution. Students should select courses based on their intended major and transfer university requirements. The same course cannot be counted in more than one category. Students must meet the receiving institution's foreign language and/or health and P.E. requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer. A minimum grade of C is required in all courses counted toward graduation and to ensure course transferability to the University of North Carolina system. Students interested in taking advanced Spanish language courses may also be interested in adding the Spanish Language Certificate to the Associate in Science degree. Degree Curriculum. Academic Transition. ACA-122 College Transfer Success 1 Open This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections UGETC-Universale General Education Transfer Component (34 Credit Hours). English Composition. ENG-111 Writing and Inquiry 3 Open This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-112 Writing and Research in the Disciplines 3 Open This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and writing strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing information and ideas and incorporating research findings into documented writing and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using documentation appropriate to various disciplines. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Communication/Humanities/Fine Arts (Select One Course). COM-231 Public Speaking 3 Open This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-111 Art Appreciation 3 Open This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-114 Art History Survey I 3 Open This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-115 Art History Survey II 3 Open This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MUS-110 Music Appreciation 3 Open This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MUS-112 Introduction to Jazz 3 Open This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHI-240 Introduction to Ethics 3 Open This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on moral theories such as consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to moral issues such as abortion, capital punishment, poverty, war, terrorism, the treatment of animals, and issues arising from new technologies. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Literature Requirement (Select One Course). ENG-231 American Literature I 3 Open This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-232 American Literature II 3 Open This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-241 British Literature I 3 Open This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-242 British Literature II 3 Open This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Social/Behavioral Science (Select One Course). ECO-251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 Open This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ECO-252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Open This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections POL-120 American Government 3 Open This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy process. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-150 General Psychology 3 Open This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-210 Introduction to Sociology 3 Open This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections History Requirement (Select One Course). HIS-111 World Civilizations I 3 Open This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-112 World Civilizations II 3 Open This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-131 American History I 3 Open This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-132 American History II 3 Open This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major American wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Mathematics (Select Two Courses). MAT-171 Precalculus Algebra 4 Open This course is designed to develop topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-172 Precalculus Trigonometry 4 Open This course is designed to develop an understanding of topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-263 Brief Calculus 4 Open This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-271 Calculus I 4 Open This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-272 Calculus II 4 Open This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Natural Sciences (Select A Two Course Sequence). BIO-111 General Biology I 4 Open This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND BIO-112 General Biology II 4 Open This course is a continuation of BIO 111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-151 General Chemistry I 4 Open This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND CHM-251 Organic Chemistry I 4 Open This course provides a systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers; further topics include isomerization, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of covered organic topics as needed in CHM 252. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-151 College Physics I 4 Open This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND PHY-251 General Physics I 4 Open This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-251 General Physics I 4 Open This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND PHY-252 General Physics II 4 Open This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections General Education Courses (11 Credit Hours). Select at least 8 hours from any of the previous math and science courses and/or from the following list. BIO-110 Principles of Biology 4 Open This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-111 General Biology I 4 Open This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-112 General Biology II 4 Open This course is a continuation of BIO 111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-120 Introductory Botany 4 Open This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-130 Introductory Zoology 4 Open This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-140 Environmental Biology 3 Open This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues.This course has been approved to satisfy the Scholars of Global Distinction Program. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND BIO-140A Environmental Biology Lab 1 Open This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-131 Introduction to Chemistry 3 Open This course introduces the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry. Topics include measurement, matter and energy, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, stoichiometry, chemical formulas and reactions, chemical bonding, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of chemistry as it applies to other fields. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND CHM-131A Introduction to Chemistry Lab 1 Open This course is a laboratory to accompany CHM 131. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHM 131. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic laboratory procedures and apply them to chemical principles presented in CHM 131. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-132 Organic and Biochemistry 4 Open This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-151 General Chemistry I 4 Open This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-152 General Chemistry II 4 Open This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-152 Statistical Methods I 4 Open This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-171 Precalculus Algebra 4 Open This course is designed to develop topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-172 Precalculus Trigonometry 4 Open This course is designed to develop an understanding of topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-263 Brief Calculus 4 Open This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-271 Calculus I 4 Open This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-272 Calculus II 4 Open This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-273 Calculus III 4 Open This course is designed to develop the topics of multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, solid analytical geometry, vector valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-151 College Physics I 4 Open This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-152 College Physics II 4 Open This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-251 General Physics I 4 Open This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-252 General Physics II 4 Open This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Additional General Education Courses - Select 3 hours from any of the previous course listings and/or from the following list. Choose courses based on your intended major. ANT-210 General Anthropology 3 Open This course introduces the physical, archaeological, linguistic, and ethnological fields of anthropology. Topics include human origins, genetic variations, archaeology, linguistics, primatology, and contemporary cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the four major fields of anthropology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CIS-110 Introduction to Computers 3 Open This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections DRA-111 Theatre Appreciation 3 Open This course provides a study of the art, craft, and business of the theatre. Emphasis is placed on the audience's appreciation of the work of the playwright, director, actor, designer, producer, and critic. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a vocabulary of theatre terms and to recognize the contributions of various theatre artists. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections DRA-126 Storytelling 3 Open This course introduces the art of storytelling and the oral traditions of folk literature. Topics include the history of storytelling, its value and purpose, techniques of the storyteller, and methods of collecting verbal art. Upon completion, students should be able to present and discuss critically stories from the world's repertory of traditional lore. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ECO-151 Survey of Economics 3 Open This course, for those who have not received credit for ECO 251 or 252, introduces basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions for economic problems faced by private and government sectors. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections EGR-150 Intro to Engineering 2 Open This course is an overview of the engineering profession. Topics include goal setting and career assessment, ethics, public safety, the engineering method and design process, written and oral communication, interpersonal skills and team building, and computer applications. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the engineering process, the engineering profession, and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-113 Literature-Based Research 3 Open This course, the second in a series of two, expands the concepts developed in ENG 111 by focusing on writing that involves literature-based research and documentation. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and thinking and the analysis and interpretation of prose, poetry, and drama: plot, characterization, theme, cultural context, etc. Upon completion, students should be able to construct mechanically-sound, documented essays and research papers that analyze and respond to literary works. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 Open This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-131 Introduction to Literature 3 Open This course introduces the principal genres of literature. Emphasis is placed on literary terminology, devices, structure, and interpretation. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and respond to literature. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-261 World Literature I 3 Open This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their literary beginnings through the seventeenth century. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-262 World Literature II 3 Open This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the eighteenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections GEO-111 World Regional Geography 3 Open This course introduces the regional concept which emphasizes the spatial association of people and their environment. Emphasis is placed on the physical, cultural, and economic systems that interact to produce the distinct regions of the earth. Upon completion, students should be able to describe variations in physical and cultural features of a region and demonstrate an understanding of their functional relationships. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-110 Technology and Society 3 Open This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-115 Critical Thinking 3 Open This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-120 Cultural Studies 3 Open This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-122 Southern Culture 3 Open This course explores the major qualities that make the South a distinct region. Topics include music, politics, literature, art, religion, race relations, and the role of social class in historical and contemporary contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the characteristics that distinguish Southern culture. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-130 Myth in Human Culture 3 Open This course provides an in-depth study of myths and legends. Topics include the varied sources of myths and their influence on the individual and society within diverse cultural contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a general familiarity with myths and a broad-based understanding of the influence of myths and legends on modern culture. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-220 Human Values and Meaning 3 Open This course presents some major dimensions of human experience as reflected in art, music, literature, philosophy, and history. Topics include the search for identity, the quest for knowledge, the need for love, the individual and society, and the meaning of life. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize interdisciplinary connections and distinguish between open and closed questions and between narrative and scientific models of understanding. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MUS-210 History of Rock Music 3 Open This course is a survey of Rock music from the early 1950's to the present. Emphasis is placed on musical groups, soloists, and styles related to the evolution of this idiom and on related historical and social events. Upon completion, students should be able to identify specific styles and to explain the influence of selected performers within their respective eras. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PHY-110 Conceptual Physics 3 Open This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections AND PHY-110A Conceptual Physics Lab 1 Open This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-239 Psychology of Personality 3 Open This course covers major personality theories and personality research methods. Topics include psychoanalytic, behavioristic, social learning, cognitive, humanistic, and trait theories including supporting research. Upon completion, students should be able to compare and contrast traditional and contemporary approaches to the understanding of individual differences in human behavior. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-241 Developmental Psychology 3 Open This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-281 Abnormal Psychology 3 Open This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections REL-110 World Religions 3 Open This course introduces the world's major religious traditions. Topics include Primal religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections REL-211 Introduction to Old Testament 3 Open This course is a survey of the literature of the Hebrews with readings from the law, prophets, and other writings. Emphasis is placed on the use of literary, historical, archeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and understand Old Testament literature. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections REL-212 Introduction to New Testament 3 Open This course is a survey of the literature of first-century Christianity with readings from the gospels, Acts, and the Pauline and pastoral letters. Topics include the literary structure, audience, and religious perspective of the writings, as well as the historical and cultural context of the early Christian community. Upon completion, students should be able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and understand New Testament literature. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections REL-221 Religion in America 3 Open This course is an examination of religious beliefs and practice in the United States. Emphasis is placed on mainstream religious traditions and non-traditional religious movements from the Colonial period to the present. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and appreciate the diversity of religious traditions in America. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-213 Sociology of the Family 3 Open This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-220 Social Problems 3 Open This course is an examination of religious beliefs and practice in the United States. Emphasis is placed on mainstream religious traditions and non-traditional religious movements from the Colonial period to the present. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and appreciate the diversity of religious traditions in America. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-225 Social Diversity 3 Open This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-230 Race and Ethnic Relations 3 Open This course includes an examination of the various aspects of race and ethnicity and how these lead to different experiences, opportunities, problems, and contributions. Topics include prejudice, discrimination, perceptions, myths, stereotypes, and intergroup relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze relationships among racial and ethnic groups within the larger society. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-111 Elementary Spanish I 3 Open This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-112 Elementary Spanish II 3 Open This course is a continuation of SPA 111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 Open This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-212 Intermediate Spanish II 3 Open This course provides a continuation of SPA 211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Elective/Pre- Major Courses (14 Credit Hours). Math/Science Courses (Select 8 hours from the list below and/or from the previous Math/Science courses.). BIO-143 Field Biology Mini-Course 2 Open This course introduces the biological and physical components of a field environment. Emphasis is placed on a local field environment with extended field trips to other areas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the biological and physical components of the specific biological environment. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-145 Ecology 4 Open This course provides an introduction to ecological concepts using an ecosystems approach. Topics include energy flow, nutrient cycling, succession, population dynamics, community structure, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of basic ecosystem structure and dynamics. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-146 Regional Natural History 4 Open This course is an interdisciplinary and historical analysis of the natural resources of the region. Emphasis is placed on geology, climate, forest systems, watersheds, water resources, and fish and wildlife resources of the region. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of the natural history and the integration of the natural resources of the region. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-155 Nutrition 3 Open This course covers the biochemistry of foods and nutrients with consideration of the physiological effects of specialized diets for specific biological needs. Topics include cultural, religious, and economic factors that influence a person's acceptance of food, as well as nutrient requirements of the various life stages. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the functions and sources of nutrients, the mechanisms of digestion, and the nutritional requirements of all age groups.This course has been approved for transfer under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement as a pre-major/elective course. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology 5 Open This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 4 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-168 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 Open This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-169 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Open This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-250 Genetics 4 Open This course covers principles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell genetics. Emphasis is placed on the molecular basis of heredity, chromosome structure, patterns of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, evolution, and biotechnological applications. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and describe genetic phenomena and demonstrate knowledge of important genetic principles. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 4 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BIO-275 Microbiology 4 Open This course covers principles of microbiology and the impact these organisms have on man and the environment. Topics include the various groups of microorganisms, their structure, physiology, genetics, microbial pathogenicity, infectious diseases, immunology, and selected practical applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills including microscopy, aseptic technique, staining, culture methods, and identification of microorganisms. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-251 Organic Chemistry I 4 Open This course provides a systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers; further topics include isomerization, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of covered organic topics as needed in CHM 252. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CHM-252 Organic Chemistry II 4 Open This course provides continuation of the systematic study of the theories, principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and mechanisms of aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines and heterocyclics; multi-step synthesis will be emphasized. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of organic concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-167 Discrete Mathematics 3 Open This course is designed to develop problem-solving and reasoning skills using an algorithmic approach. Topics include sets, number theory, numeration systems, linear programming, traditional and propositional logic, truth tables, Venn diagrams, elementary proofs, and Boolean algebra. Upon completion, students should be able to apply logic and other mathematical concepts to solve a variety of problems. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-280 Linear Algebra 3 Open This course provides an introduction to linear algebra topics. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, multi-dimensional linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization and orthogonality. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to linear algebra-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections MAT-285 Differential Equations 3 Open This course provides an introduction to topics involving ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for first-order and linear higher-order differential equations, systems of differential equations, numerical methods, series solutions, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and LaPlace transforms. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to differential equations-related problems with and without technology. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Select 6 hours from any of the previous course listings and/or from the following. Choose courses related to your major. ACC-120 Principles of Financial Accounting 4 Open This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ACC-121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 4 Open This course includes a greater emphasis on managerial and cost accounting skills. Emphasis is placed on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts including product-costing systems. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-121 Two-Dimensional Design 3 Open This course introduces the elements and principles of design as applied to two-dimensional art. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements, the principles of visual organization, and the theories of color mixing and interaction. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and use critical and analytical approaches as they apply to two-dimensional visual art. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-122 Three-Dimensional Design 3 Open This course introduces basic studio problems in three-dimensional visual design. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements and organizational principles as applied to mass and space. Upon completion, students should be able to apply three-dimensional design concepts. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-131 Drawing I 3 Open This course introduces the language of drawing and the use of various drawing materials. Emphasis is placed on drawing techniques, media, and graphic principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of graphic form and various drawing processes. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-132 Drawing II 3 Open This course continues instruction in the language of drawing and the use of various materials. Emphasis is placed on experimentation in the use of drawing techniques, media, and graphic materials. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased competence in the expressive use of graphic form and techniques. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-140 Basic Painting 2 Open This course introduces the mechanics of painting. Emphasis is placed on the exploration of painting media through fundamental techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding and application of painting. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-214 Portfolio and Resume 1 Open This course covers resume writing, interview skills, and the preparation and presentation of an art portfolio. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of a portfolio of original artwork, the preparation of a photographic portfolio, approaches to resume writing, and interview techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to photograph and present a digital portfolio and write an effective resume. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 1 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-215 Visual Art Portfolio 3 Open This course covers the organization of a comprehensive body of work designed to showcase the visual artist's competencies in selected media and is intended for college transfer or professional advancement. Emphasis includes preparation for gallery exhibition, creation of a digital portfolio, and development of materials associated with best practices for showcasing artistic works, skills, and experience. Upon completion, students should be able to display a professional arrangement of work designed for entry into an advanced visual arts program, application for employment, or presentation to juried gallery exhibitions. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-240 Painting I 3 Open This course introduces the language of painting and the use of various painting materials. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and use of various painting techniques, media, and color principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of creative processes directed toward the development of expressive form. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-241 Painting II 3 Open This course provides a continuing investigation of the materials, processes, and techniques of painting. Emphasis is placed on the exploration of expressive content using a variety of creative processes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the expanded use of form and variety. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-244 Watercolor 3 Open This course introduces basic methods and techniques used in watercolor. Emphasis is placed on application, materials, content, and individual expression. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a variety of traditional and nontraditional concepts used in watercolor media. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-264 Digital Photography I 3 Open This course introduces digital photographic equipment, theory and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, computer photo manipulation and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, digitally manipulate, and print a well-conceived composition. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-281 Sculpture I 3 Open This course provides an exploration of the creative and technical methods of sculpture with focus on the traditional processes. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills as they pertain to three-dimensional expression in various media. Upon completion, students should be able to show competence in variety of sculptural approaches. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-283 Ceramics I 3 Open This course provides an introduction to three-dimensional design principles using the medium of clay. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals of forming, surface design, glaze application, and firing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in slab and coil construction, simple wheel forms, glaze technique, and creative expression. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-284 Ceramics II 3 Open This course covers advanced hand building and wheel techniques. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, surface design, sculptural quality, and glaze effect. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a high level of technical competence in forming and glazing with a development of three-dimensional awareness. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-285 Ceramics III 3 Open This course provides the opportunity for advanced self-determined work in sculptural and functional ceramics. Emphasis is placed on developing the technical awareness of clay bodies, slips, engobes, and firing procedures necessary to fulfill the student's artistic goals. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of materials and techniques necessary to successfully create original projects in the clay medium. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 6 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ART-286 Ceramics IV 3 Open This course provides the opportunity for self-determined work in sculptural and functional ceramics. Emphasis is placed on developing the technical awareness of glaze materials, glaze formulation, and firing techniques necessary to fulfill the student's artistic goals. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of materials and techniques necessary to successfully create original projects in the clay medium. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BUS-110 Introduction to Business 3 Open This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BUS-115 Business Law I 3 Open This course introduces the student to the legal and ethical framework of business. Contracts, negotiable instruments, the law of sales, torts, crimes, constitutional law, the Uniform Commercial Code, and the court systems are examined. Upon completion the student should be able to identify legal and ethical issues that arise in business decisions and the laws that apply to them. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections BUS-137 Principles of Management 3 Open This course is designed to be an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Upon completion, students should be able to work as contributing members of a team utilizing these functions of management. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CJC-111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 Open This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate career options. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CJC-121 Law Enforcement Operations 3 Open This course introduces fundamental law enforcement operations. Topics include the contemporary evolution of law enforcement operations and related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to explain theories, practices, and issues related to law enforcement operations. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CJC-141 Corrections 3 Open This course covers the history, major philosophies, components, and current practices and problems of the field of corrections. Topics include historical evolution, functions of the various components, alternatives to incarceration, treatment programs, inmate control, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the various components, processes, and functions of the correctional system. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CSC-134 C++ Programming 3 Open This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CSC-139 Visual Basic Programming 3 Open This course introduces computer programming using the Visual BASIC programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CSC-151 JAVA Programming 3 Open This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion students should be able to design, code, test, debug JAVA language programs. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections CSC-239 Advance Visual Basic Programming 3 Open This course is a continuation of CSC 139 using the Visual BASIC programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test, debug, and implement objects using the appropriate environment. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections EDU-144 Child Development I 3 Open This course includes the theories of child development, observation and assessment, milestones, and factors that influence development, from conception through approximately 36 months. Emphasis is placed on knowledge, observation and assessment of developmental sequences in approaches to play/learning, emotional/social, health/physical, language/communication and cognitive domains. Upon completion, students should be able to compare/contrast typical/atypical developmental characteristics, explain biological and environmental factors that impact development, and identify evidence-based strategies for enhancing development for children that are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections EDU-145 Child Development II 3 Open This course includes the theories of child development, observation and assessment, milestones, and factors that influence development, from preschool through middle childhood. Emphasis is placed on knowledge, observation and assessment of developmental sequences in approaches to play/learning, emotional/social, health/physical, language/communication and cognitive domains. Upon completion, students should be able to compare/contrast typical/atypical developmental characteristics, explain biological and environmental factors that impact development, and identify evidence-based strategies for enhancing development for children that are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections EDU-216 Foundations of Education 3 Open This course introduces the examination of the American educational systems and the teaching profession. Topics include the historical and philosophical influences on education, various perspectives on educational issues, and experiences in birth through grade 12 classrooms. Upon completion, students should be able to reflect on classroom observations, analyze the different educational approaches, including classical/traditional and progressive, and have knowledge of the various roles of educational systems at the federal, state and local level. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections EDU-221 Children With Exceptionalities 3 Open This course covers atypical patterns of child development, inclusive/diverse settings, evidenced-based educational/family plans, differentiated instruction, adaptive materials, and assistive technology. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of exceptionalities and delays, early intervention/special education, transitions, observation, developmental screening, formative assessment of children, and collaborating with families and community partners. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize diverse abilities, describe the referral process, identify community resources, explain the importance of collaboration with families/professionals, and develop appropriate strategies/adaptations to support children in all environments with best practices as defined by laws, policies and the NC Foundations for Early Learning and Development. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-125 Creative Writing I 3 Open This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice the art of creative writing. Emphasis is placed on writing, fiction, poetry, and sketches. Upon completion, students should be able to craft and critique their own writing and critique the writing of others. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-126 Creative Writing II 3 Open This course is designed as a workshop approach for advancing imaginative and literary skills. Emphasis is placed on the discussion of style, techniques, and challenges for first publications. Upon completion, students should be able to submit a piece of their writing for publication. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections ENG-272 Southern Literature 3 Open This course provides an analytical study of the works of several Southern authors. Emphasis is placed on the historical and cultural contexts, themes, aesthetic features of individual works, and biographical backgrounds of the authors. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and discuss selected works. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HEA-110 Personal Health/Wellness 3 Open This course provides an introduction to basic personal health and wellness. Emphasis is placed on current health issues such as nutrition, mental health, and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the factors necessary to the maintenance of health and wellness. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-145 The Second World War 3 Open This course covers the period of the Second World War from 1919 to 1945. Topics include the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of totalitarian regimes, the origins of the war, the major military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, and the aftermath. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, military, socioeconomic, and cultural developments that influenced the Second World War. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-163 The World Since 1945 3 Open This course surveys world developments since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, nationalism, colonialism, the Third World, the arms race, and global capitalism and regionalism. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the world since 1945. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-221 African-American History 3 Open This course covers African-American history from the Colonial period to the present. Topics include African origins, the slave trade, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow era, the civil rights movement, and contributions of African Americans. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the history of African Americans. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-226 The Civil War 3 Open This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War's socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-227 Native American History 3 Open This course surveys the history and cultures of Native Americans from pre-history to the present. Topics include Native American civilizations, relations with Europeans, and the continuing evolution of Native American cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments among Native Americans. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-237 The American Revolution 3 Open This course introduces the political, socioeconomic, religious, and ideological forces that led to the American Revolution, and the courses and consequences of the conflict. Topics include the prewar situation, wartime internal dynamics, international diplomacy, military strategy, tactics, and campaigns, and the Revolution?s impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, religious, ideological, international, and military developments in the United States during the Revolutionary Era. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HIS-262 Middle East History 3 Open This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the development of civilization in Mesopotamia to the present. Emphasis is placed on social, political, economic, religious, and governmental structures in the Middle East. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the Middle East. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-123 Appalachian Culture 3 Open This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the unique features of Appalachian culture. Topics include historical, political, sociological, psychological, and artistic features which distinguish this region. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a broad-based awareness and appreciation of Appalachian culture. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-180 Internat Cultural Explor 3 Open This course provides a framework for students to visit, examine, and analyze a country/region outside the United States to learn about the place and people. Emphasis is placed on the distinctive cultural characteristics of a country or region. Upon completion, students should be able to identify similarities/differences, analyze causes/effects, and clearly articulate the impact of one or more cultural elements. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 2 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections HUM-230 Leadership Development 3 Open This course explores the theories and techniques of leadership and group process. Emphasis is placed on leadership styles, theories of group dynamics, and the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a personal philosophy and style of leadership and integrate these concepts in various practical situations. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections JOU-110 Intro to Journalism 3 Open This course presents a study of journalistic news, feature, and sports writing. Emphasis is placed on basic news writing techniques and on related legal and ethical issues. Upon completion, students should be able to gather, write, and edit news, feature, and sports articles. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-110 Fit and Well for Life 2 Open This course is designed to investigate and apply the basic concepts and principles of lifetime physical fitness and other health-related factors. Emphasis is placed on wellness through the study of nutrition, weight control, stress management, and consumer facts on exercise and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to plan a personal, lifelong fitness program based on individual needs, abilities, and interests. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 1 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-111 Physical Fitness I 1 Open This course provides an individualized approach to physical fitness utilizing the five major components. Emphasis is placed on the scientific basis for setting up and engaging in personalized physical fitness programs. Upon completion, students should be able to set up and implement an individualized physical fitness program. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-112 Physical Fitness II 1 Open This course is an intermediate-level fitness class. Topics include specific exercises contributing to fitness and the role exercise plays in developing body systems. Upon completion, students should be able to implement and evaluate an individualized physical fitness program. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-117 Weight Training I 1 Open This course introduces the basics of weight training. Emphasis is placed on developing muscular strength, muscular endurance, and muscle tone. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement a personal weight training program. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-118 Weight Training II 1 Open This course covers advanced levels of weight training. Emphasis is placed on meeting individual training goals and addressing weight training needs and interests. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement an individualized advanced weight training program. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-119 Circuit Training 1 Open This course covers the skills necessary to participate in a developmental fitness program. Emphasis is placed on the circuit training method which involves a series of conditioning timed stations arranged for maximum benefit and variety. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and appreciate the role of circuit training as a means to develop fitness. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-120 Walking for Fitness 1 Open This course introduces fitness through walking. Emphasis is placed on stretching, conditioning exercises, proper clothing, fluid needs, and injury prevention. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in a recreational walking program. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-142 Lifetime Sports 1 Open This course is designed to give an overview of a variety of sports activities. Emphasis is placed on the skills and rules necessary to participate in a variety of lifetime sports. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an awareness of the importance of participating in lifetime sports activities. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-143 Volleyball-Beginning 1 Open This course covers the fundamentals of volleyball. Emphasis is placed on the basics of serving, passing, setting, spiking, blocking, and the rules and etiquette of volleyball. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational volleyball. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-144 Volleyball-Intermediate 1 Open This course covers more advanced volleyball techniques. Emphasis is placed on refining skills and developing more advanced strategies and techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in competitive volleyball. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-148 Softball 1 Open This course introduces the fundamental skills and rules of softball. Emphasis is placed on proper techniques and strategies for playing softball. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational softball. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-150 Baseball - Beginning 1 Open This course covers the fundamentals of baseball. Emphasis is placed on skill development, knowledge of the rules, and basic game strategy. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational baseball. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-151 Baseball/Intermediate 1 Open This course covers more advanced baseball techniques. Emphasis is placed on refining skills and developing more advanced strategies and techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to play baseball at a competitive level. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 3 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-165 Sport Science As a Career 3 Open This course provides students with foundational knowledge about the study of physical activity and career opportunities within the discipline. Emphasis will be placed on the role of physical activity, the subdisciplines of the field, and possible career choices. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of the subdisciplines and employment opportunities within an Exercise and Sport Science program. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-170 Backpacking 1 Open This course covers the proper techniques for establishing a campsite, navigating in the wilderness, and planning for an overnight trip. Topics include planning for meals, proper use of maps and compass, and packing and dressing for extended periods in the outdoors. Upon completion, students should be able to identify quality backpacking equipment, identify the principles of no-trace camping, and successfully complete a backpacking experience. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-171 Nature Hiking 1 Open This course provides instruction on how to equip and care for oneself on the trail. Topics include clothing, hygiene, trail ethics, and necessary equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully participate in nature trail hikes. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-252 Officiating Baseball and Softball 2 Open This course introduces the rules and techniques for sports officiating in baseball and softball. Emphasis is placed on officiating fundamentals and responsibilities. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proper mechanics and knowledge of officiating procedures in baseball and softball. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 1 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PED-256 Coaching Baseball 2 Open This course introduces the theory and methods of coaching baseball. Emphasis is placed on rules, game strategies, and selected techniques of coaching baseball. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competent coaching skills in baseball. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 1 Lab Hours: 2 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-231 Forensic Psychology 3 Open This course introduces students to concepts which unite psychology and the legal system. Topics include defining competency, insanity, involuntary commitment, as well as introducing forensic assessment techniques, such as interviewing process, specialized assessments, and collecting collateral information. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge in areas of forensic psychology: risk assessment, criminal competencies, insanity, psychopathology, and mentally disordered offenders. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-243 Child Psychology 3 Open This course provides an overview of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from conception through adolescence. Topics include theories and research, interaction of biological and environmental factors, language development, learning and cognitive processes, social relations, and moral development. Upon completion, students should be able to identify typical and atypical childhood behavior patterns as well as appropriate strategies for interacting with children. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections PSY-263 Educational Psychology 3 Open This course examines the application of psychological theories and principles to the educational process and setting. Topics include learning and cognitive theories, achievement motivation, teaching and learning styles, teacher and learner roles, assessment, and developmental issues. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the application of psychological theory to educational practice. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-234 Sociology of Gender 3 Open This course examines contemporary roles in society with special emphasis on recent changes. Topics include sex role socialization, myths and stereotypes, gender issues related to family, work, and power. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze modern relationships between men and women. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SOC-244 Sociology of Death & Dying 3 Open This course presents sociological perspectives on death and dying. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the different death rates among various groups, races, and societies, as well as various types of death. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the rituals of death, both cultural and religious, and examine current issues relating to death and dying. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-141 Culture and Civilization 3 Open This course provides an opportunity to explore issues related to the Hispanic world. Topics include historical and current events, geography, and customs. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss selected topics and cultural differences related to the Hispanic world. Course Prerequisites: None Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-221 Spanish Conversation 3 Open This course provides an opportunity for intensive communication in spoken Spanish. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary acquisition and interactive communication through the discussion of media materials and authentic texts. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss selected topics, express ideas and opinions clearly, and engage in formal and informal conversations. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections SPA-231 Reading and Composition 3 Open This course provides an opportunity for intensive reading and composition in Spanish. Emphasis is placed on the use of literary and cultural materials to enhance and expand reading and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate in writing an in-depth understanding of assigned readings. Course Prerequisites: Yes Classroom Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Clinical Hours: 0 View Available Sections Learning Outcomes. Graduates of the Associate in Science program will be able to: Demonstrate thinking that is clear, accurate, precise, relevant, logical, deep, broad, and fair, while analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating – Critical Thinking Apply college-level mathematical concepts and methods to understand, analyze, and communicate in quantitative terms – Quantitative Literacy Effectively use technology as a tool for research, problem-solving, communication and career enrichment – Technology Skills Many Associate in Science courses are also available online. Program Costs. Degree In-State Out-of-State Tuition and Fees $4,400.00 $15,000.00 Books and Supplies $3,000.00 $3,000.00 Total Cost $7,400.00 $18,000.00 Program Facts. Students attending Surry Community College for two years instead of going straight to a four-year college or university typically save $25,000 On average students who transfer from a community college outperform students who go straight to a four-year school. I have saved a lot of money starting my bachelor’s degree at Surry Community College. Some ask why community college? I saw my parents struggle, and that's why I started here. There’s nothing wrong with starting at a community college. Maria “Lupita” Guadalupe Alvarez SCC Graduate Want to Learn More? Choosing a college is an important decision, and we’re pleased that you’re interested in Surry Community College.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • hour
  • 1104
  • 18
  • lab hour
  • 546
  • 18
  • clinical hour
  • 546
  • 18
  • lab
  • 370
  • 18
  • open
  • 367
  • 18
  • clinical
  • 365
  • 18
  • classroom hour
  • 364
  • 18
  • view section
  • 364
  • 18
  • view
  • 364
  • 18
  • student
  • 197
  • 18
  • section
  • 186
  • 18
  • classroom
  • 184
  • 18
  • prerequisite classroom hour
  • 182
  • 18
  • hour lab
  • 182
  • 18
  • hour clinical
  • 182
  • 18
  • hour view
  • 182
  • 18
  • completion student
  • 182
  • 18
  • prerequisite classroom
  • 182
  • 18
  • completion
  • 182
  • 18
  • prerequisite
  • 182
  • 18
  • emphasi
  • 113
  • 18
  • topic
  • 106
  • 18
  • open introduce
  • 92
  • 18
  • include
  • 81
  • 18
  • demonstrate
  • 76
  • 18
  • topic include
  • 75
  • 18
  • student demonstrate
  • 70
  • 18
  • completion student demonstrate
  • 68
  • 18
  • introduce
  • 58
  • 18
  • development
  • 56
  • 18
  • open cover
  • 54
  • 18
  • principle
  • 50
  • 18
  • understanding
  • 49
  • 18
  • technique
  • 46
  • 18
  • concept
  • 44
  • 18
  • cultural
  • 43
  • 18
  • art
  • 42
  • 18
  • basic
  • 38
  • 18
  • open designed
  • 36
  • 18
  • problem
  • 36
  • 18
  • history
  • 35
  • 18
  • world
  • 34
  • 18
  • fundamental
  • 34
  • 18
  • analyze
  • 33
  • 18
  • study
  • 32
  • 18
  • related
  • 31
  • 18
  • demonstrate understanding
  • 30
  • 18
  • student demonstrate understanding
  • 29
  • 18
  • ii open
  • 25
  • 18
  • ii
  • 25
  • 18
  • open survey
  • 22
  • 18
  • view section art
  • 19
  • 18
  • section art
  • 19
  • 18
  • completion student analyze
  • 18
  • 18
  • view section ped
  • 18
  • 18
  • student analyze
  • 18
  • 18
  • section ped
  • 18
  • 18
  • open continuation
  • 16
  • 18
  • cultural context
  • 16
  • 18
  • view section bio
  • 15
  • 18
  • open introduction
  • 15
  • 18
  • section bio
  • 15
  • 18
  • view section mat
  • 14
  • 18
  • section mat
  • 14
  • 18
  • completion student identify
  • 13
  • 18
  • technology prerequisite classroom
  • 13
  • 18
  • student identify
  • 13
  • 18
  • technology prerequisite
  • 13
  • 18
  • view section eng
  • 12
  • 18
  • american history
  • 12
  • 18
  • section eng
  • 12
  • 18
  • introduce fundamental
  • 12
  • 18
  • open designed develop
  • 11
  • 18
  • student analyze significant
  • 11
  • 18
  • analyze significant political
  • 11
  • 18
  • select model technique
  • 11
  • 18
  • model technique finding
  • 11
  • 18
  • technique finding solution
  • 11
  • 18
  • related problem technology
  • 11
  • 18
  • problem technology prerequisite
  • 11
  • 18
  • world topic include
  • 11
  • 18
  • designed develop
  • 11
  • 18
  • analyze significant
  • 11
  • 18
  • significant political
  • 11
  • 18
  • political socioeconomic
  • 11
  • 18
  • select model
  • 11
  • 18
  • model technique
  • 11
  • 18
  • technique finding
  • 11
  • 18
  • finding solution
  • 11
  • 18
  • related problem
  • 11
  • 18
  • problem technology
  • 11
  • 18
  • fundamental concept
  • 11
  • 18
  • world topic
  • 11
  • 18
  • problem solving
  • 11
  • 18
  • significant political socioeconomic
  • 10
  • 18
  • socioeconomic cultural development
  • 10
  • 18
  • view section hi
  • 10
  • 18
  • view section phy
  • 10
  • 18
  • anatomy physiology
  • 10
  • 18
  • student select
  • 10
  • 18
  • socioeconomic cultural
  • 10
  • 18
  • cultural development
  • 10
  • 18
  • section hi
  • 10
  • 18
  • section phy
  • 10
  • 18
  • understanding principle
  • 10
  • 18
  • political socioeconomic cultural
  • 9
  • 18
  • completion student select
  • 9
  • 18
  • student select model
  • 9
  • 18
  • view section chm
  • 9
  • 18
  • introduce fundamental concept
  • 9
  • 18
  • physical world topic
  • 9
  • 18
  • view section hum
  • 9
  • 18
  • organic chemistry
  • 9
  • 18
  • civil war
  • 9
  • 18
  • selected work
  • 9
  • 18
  • calculu emphasi
  • 9
  • 18
  • section chm
  • 9
  • 18
  • physical world
  • 9
  • 18
  • section hum
  • 9
  • 18
  • topic completion student
  • 8
  • 18
  • level prerequisite classroom
  • 8
  • 18
  • based mathematical model
  • 8
  • 18
  • mathematical model introduce
  • 8
  • 18
  • model introduce fundamental
  • 8
  • 18
  • fundamental concept describe
  • 8
  • 18
  • concept describe physical
  • 8
  • 18
  • describe physical world
  • 8
  • 18
  • demonstrate understanding principle
  • 8
  • 18
  • understanding principle involved
  • 8
  • 18
  • principle involved display
  • 8
  • 18
  • involved display analytical
  • 8
  • 18
  • display analytical problem
  • 8
  • 18
  • analytical problem solving
  • 8
  • 18
  • problem solving ability
  • 8
  • 18
  • solving ability topic
  • 8
  • 18
  • ability topic covered
  • 8
  • 18
  • topic covered prerequisite
  • 8
  • 18
  • covered prerequisite classroom
  • 8
  • 18
  • program prerequisite classroom
  • 8
  • 18
  • differential equation
  • 8
  • 18
  • programming
  • 8
  • 18
  • physical fitness
  • 8
  • 18
  • weight training
  • 8
  • 18
  • topic completion
  • 8
  • 18
  • demonstrate knowledge
  • 8
  • 18
  • level prerequisite
  • 8
  • 18
  • based mathematical
  • 8
  • 18
  • mathematical model
  • 8
  • 18
  • model introduce
  • 8
  • 18
  • concept describe
  • 8
  • 18
  • describe physical
  • 8
  • 18
  • principle involved
  • 8
  • 18
  • involved display
  • 8
  • 18
  • display analytical
  • 8
  • 18
  • analytical problem
  • 8
  • 18
  • solving ability
  • 8
  • 18
  • ability topic
  • 8
  • 18
  • topic covered
  • 8
  • 18
  • covered prerequisite
  • 8
  • 18
  • program prerequisite
  • 8
  • 18
  • object oriented
  • 8
  • 18
  • prose poetry drama
  • 7
  • 18
  • view section psy
  • 7
  • 18
  • view section soc
  • 7
  • 18
  • related topic completion
  • 7
  • 18
  • chemistry topic include
  • 7
  • 18
  • view section spa
  • 7
  • 18
  • community college
  • 7
  • 18
  • emphasi historical
  • 7
  • 18
  • prose poetry
  • 7
  • 18
  • poetry drama
  • 7
  • 18
  • section psy
  • 7
  • 18
  • section soc
  • 7
  • 18
  • related topic
  • 7
  • 18
  • chemistry topic
  • 7
  • 18
  • section spa
  • 7
  • 18
  • dimensional
  • 7
  • 18
  • emphasi historical background
  • 6
  • 18
  • historical background cultural
  • 6
  • 18
  • background cultural context
  • 6
  • 18
  • cultural context literary
  • 6
  • 18
  • context literary analysi
  • 6
  • 18
  • literary analysi selected
  • 6
  • 18
  • analysi selected prose
  • 6
  • 18
  • selected prose poetry
  • 6
  • 18
  • poetry drama completion
  • 6
  • 18
  • drama completion student
  • 6
  • 18
  • historical cultural context
  • 6
  • 18
  • psychology open
  • 6
  • 18
  • student demonstrate knowledge
  • 6
  • 18
  • student demonstrate comprehension
  • 6
  • 18
  • physic open
  • 6
  • 18
  • open opportunity
  • 6
  • 18
  • historical background
  • 6
  • 18
  • background cultural
  • 6
  • 18
  • context literary
  • 6
  • 18
  • literary analysi
  • 6
  • 18
  • analysi selected
  • 6
  • 18
  • selected prose
  • 6
  • 18
  • drama completion
  • 6
  • 18
  • historical cultural
  • 6
  • 18
  • analyze respond
  • 6
  • 18
  • psychology
  • 6
  • 18
  • demonstrate comprehension
  • 6
  • 18
  • understanding fundamental
  • 6
  • 18
  • physic
  • 6
  • 18
  • current circuit
  • 6
  • 18
  • literature open
  • 5
  • 18
  • completion student interpret
  • 5
  • 18
  • student interpret analyze
  • 5
  • 18
  • history open
  • 5
  • 18
  • designed develop topic
  • 5
  • 18
  • chemistry open
  • 5
  • 18
  • demonstrate understanding fundamental
  • 5
  • 18
  • topic include unit
  • 5
  • 18
  • include unit measurement
  • 5
  • 18
  • unit measurement vector
  • 5
  • 18
  • linear kinematic dynamic
  • 5
  • 18
  • kinematic dynamic energy
  • 5
  • 18
  • dynamic energy power
  • 5
  • 18
  • energy power momentum
  • 5
  • 18
  • fluid mechanic heat
  • 5
  • 18
  • mechanic heat completion
  • 5
  • 18
  • heat completion student
  • 5
  • 18
  • open calculu
  • 5
  • 18
  • open calculu based
  • 5
  • 18
  • calculu based mathematical
  • 5
  • 18
  • completion student recognize
  • 5
  • 18
  • completion student participate
  • 5
  • 18
  • student participate recreational
  • 4
  • 18
Result 19
TitleAssociate of Science | Clark State College
Urlhttps://www.clarkstate.edu/academics/degrees-and-certificates/math-and-sciences/associate-of-science/
Description
Date
Organic Position18
H1Associate of Science
H2Career Information
Outcomes and Curriculum
Transfer Information
H3
H2WithAnchorsCareer Information
Outcomes and Curriculum
Transfer Information
BodyAssociate of Science This program is available at the Beavercreek, Online and Springfield - Leffel Lane locations. The Associate of Science General Transfer degree provides the foundational knowledge and skills in general education that are often required to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Courses in this program focus on the areas of English, communication, literature, arts, humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and natural sciences. As a part of the degree, students will also choose electives based on interest and any requirements of the transfer institution. Any elective hours should be planned carefully with an advisor to ensure transferability. Focused pathways within the Associate of Science are currently available in biology, business, economics, geology, mathematics, and psychology to help focus the elective courses within this program. To explore different pathways and focus areas, go to https://www.ohiohighered.org/OGTP. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for seamless transfer into a Bachelor of Science program, particularly at state institutions in Ohio. Global AwarenessIn recognition of the growing importance of global awareness, the Associate of Science degree requires students to take at least four courses with significant international content. Courses meeting this requirement are identified in the College catalog and are fulfilled as a part of the requirements within the concentration or elective area.Advanced CoursesAll students pursing the Associate of Science degree are required to complete at least nine credit hours in courses numbered 2000 or higher. These classes are taken as a part of the requirements within the concentration or elective area. Career Information. Career Coach Outcomes and Curriculum. Upon completion of an  Associate of Science degree, a graduate will be able to: Write clearly and accurately in a variety of contexts and formats. Speak clearly and accurately in a variety of contexts and formats. Use critical thinking and problem solving to draw logical conclusions. Use numerical data to solve problems, explain phenomena and make predictions. Successfully transfer to a baccalaureate degree program. Expand for curriculum Course Title Credits Fall FYE 1100 College Success 1 ENG 1111 English I 3 -- Math Elective 5 -- Social Sciences Elective 3 -- Concentration/Elective 3   Spring ENG 1112 English II 3 -- Communication Elective 3 -- Social Sciences Elective 3 -- Literature Elective 3 -- Concentration/Elective 3   Fall -- Natural Science Elective 4 -- Social Sciences Elective (2000 level) 3 -- History or Philosophy Elective 3 -- Concentration/Elective 3 -- Concentration/Elective 3   Spring -- Natural Sciences Elective 4 -- Advanced Elective 3 -- Literature, Arts & Humanities Elective 3 -- Concentration/Elective 3 -- Concentration/Elective 1     Total credit hours 60 Math electives: MTH 1070, 1280, 1340, 2100, 2200, 2220, 2242, 2430, 2530, STT 2640, 2650 Social Sciences electives from at least two different areas: ECO 1100, 2210, 2220, GEO 1100, 2200, PLS 1100, 1300, 2300, 2400, PSY 1111, 2223, 2230, RST 2700, 2800, SOC 1110, 2220, 2230, 2240, 2250 Communication electives: COM 1110, 1120, 1130, 1170 Literature electives: ENG 1600, 2300, 2510, 2520, 2610, 2620 Natural Sciences electives: BIO 1410, 1420, 1510, 1520, 2121, 2122, CHM 1150, 1160, 1210,1220, GLG 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, PHY 1100, 1501, 1502, 2501, 2502 History or Philosophy electives: HST 1110, 1120, 1210, 1220, PHL 2000, 2100, 2300, 2400 Advanced electives include any 2000 level course Literature, arts and humanities electives include any college level course from subjects ASL, ENG, HST, PHL, SPN or THE Concentration electives include most college level courses in the academic catalog.  Consult an advisor for course selection. Transfer Information. Clark State has detailed transfer agreements with many local colleges and universities. The greatest number of these are with Wright State University and are in areas such as Business, English, Math, Pre-Teacher Education, Psychology, etc.  Check the transfer guide section of the Clark State website for more information about these transfer agreements.Transfer institutions make the determination in acceptance of credit. The student should consult with an academic advisor and the intended transfer institution when planning a schedule of classes. With careful scheduling and advising, a student should be able to transfer with junior standing, especially within the state of Ohio.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • elective
  • 25
  • 19
  • concentrationelective
  • 24
  • 19
  • science
  • 16
  • 19
  • transfer
  • 10
  • 19
  • electif
  • 10
  • 19
  • science elective
  • 9
  • 19
  • social science
  • 8
  • 19
  • social
  • 8
  • 19
  • degree
  • 8
  • 19
  • associate science
  • 7
  • 19
  • literature
  • 7
  • 19
  • associate
  • 7
  • 19
  • area
  • 6
  • 19
  • cours
  • 6
  • 19
  • student
  • 6
  • 19
  • english
  • 5
  • 19
  • eng
  • 5
  • 19
  • level
  • 5
  • 19
  • program
  • 5
  • 19
  • state
  • 5
  • 19
  • college
  • 5
  • 19
  • 1100
  • 5
  • 19
  • elective concentrationelective
  • 4
  • 19
  • literature art
  • 4
  • 19
  • natural science
  • 4
  • 19
  • math
  • 4
  • 19
  • natural
  • 4
  • 19
  • requirement
  • 4
  • 19
  • institution
  • 4
  • 19
  • credit
  • 4
  • 19
  • 2000
  • 4
  • 19
  • literature art humanity
  • 3
  • 19
  • associate science degree
  • 3
  • 19
  • elective social
  • 3
  • 19
  • social science elective
  • 3
  • 19
  • art humanity
  • 3
  • 19
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 19
  • electif include
  • 3
  • 19
  • information
  • 3
  • 19
  • 2220
  • 3
  • 19
  • 2300
  • 3
  • 19
  • 1110
  • 3
  • 19
  • include
  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
TitleAssociate of Science | MATC
Urlhttps://www.matc.edu/course-catalog/general-education/associate-in-science.html
DescriptionIf you plan to earn a bachelor's degree from a four-year college or university, you can take your first two years of courses at MATC and transfer your credits
DateAug 30, 2021
Organic Position19
H1Associate of Science
H2Program Information
About the Associate of Science Degree
Related Programs
Detailed Program Information
READY TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP?
H3DESCRIPTION
Associate of Science – Economics: Pre-Major
Associate of Science - Chemical Technology: Pre-Major
2021-22 Curriculum
Important Dates
Program Outcomes
Scholarships
QUESTIONS?
H2WithAnchorsProgram Information
About the Associate of Science Degree
Related Programs
Detailed Program Information
READY TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP?
BodyAssociate of Science Program Information. Location: Downtown Milwaukee Campus, Mequon Campus, Oak Creek Campus, West Allis Campus Pathway: General Education Program Code: 20-800-2 Offering: In-class Degree Type: 2-Year Degree (Associate) Start Dates: August/January About the Associate of Science Degree. DESCRIPTION. Liberal Arts and Sciences Four-Year College Transfer Program The Associate of Science degree provides you with the first two years of bachelor’s degree credit courses that will transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The courses in this degree emphasize the sciences and allow students many options to analyze information, think critically and creatively, respect diversity and collaborate with others. Courses may be taken online or face to face. Students who plan to transfer should consult with the four-year college/university regarding specific requirements for a major and the credit transfer details. Contact an MATC advisor for information. See the Four-Year College/University Transfer Agreements section on matc.edu for detailed information. Related Programs. Associate of Science – Economics: Pre-Major. Economic issues affect you as a consumer, worker and investor. Gain knowledge of economics and develop analytical and communication skills through your coursework. This program provides the first two years of bachelor's degree credit courses that can transfer to four-year colleges and universities. Students who plan to transfer should consult with the four-year college/university regarding specific requirements for a major. Associate of Science - Chemical Technology: Pre-Major. The Associate of Science – Chemical Technology: Pre-Major provides the first two years of bachelor’s degree credit courses that will transfer to four-year colleges and universities. MATC’s state-of-the-art labs give students an advantage as they prepare for bachelor’s degree studies and the workforce. Students who plan to transfer should consult with the four-year college/university regarding specific requirements for a major and the credit transfer details Detailed Program Information. 2021-22 Curriculum. Course Course Name Credits English – 6 credits required 6 ENG-201 English 1 ‡ ENG-202 English 2 ‡ Speech – 3 credits required 3 SPEECH-201 Elements of Speech(or) SPEECH-203 Interpersonal Communication(or) SPEECH-206 Intercultural Communication Humanities – 6 credits required 6 Three credits must be in 200-level diversity/ethnic studies courses - see list in Program Plan.Three credits must be in 200-level fine arts courses - see list of courses in Program Plan.Discuss your course selections with Pathway Advisor. Social Sciences – 6 credits required 6 Select 200-level courses in the Social Sciences - see list of courses in Program Plan; discuss your selections with Pathway Advisor. World/Foreign Language – 4 credits required 4 This requirement may be waived if student has completed fourhigh school semesters of the same foreign language with agrade of C or higher; the four waived credits must be made up byanother 200-level course. Students may earn retroactive creditand credit by exam. Strongly recommended: Take two semestersof the same language if not already taken in high school. Mathematics – 5 credits required 5 MATH-231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 ‡ Natural Sciences – 15 credits required 15 (8 credits must be lab) See list of courses in Program Plan; discuss your course selections with Pathway Advisor. Physical Education – 3 credits required 3 Select any 200-level PHYED course(s). Additional Electives – 12 credits required 12 TOTAL CREDITS 60 ‡ Prerequisite required. Current MATC students should consult their Academic Program Plan for specific curriculum requirements. Note: It is important to consult the four-year institution regarding transferability of your selected courses. Successful completion of this degree requires a grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or higher, with 25% of the credits taken at MATC. Search for available classes now (link) to see course descriptions, class times and locations. Already a student? You can visit Self-Service (link) and choose Student Planning to register for classes. 2021-2022 Program Card. View/print the program card: front (png) | back (png) Important Dates. Deadlines and important dates can be found on: Cost & Aid Deadlines Also, you can find dates and deadlines on the MATC Calendar Program Outcomes. The Associate of Science degree (AS) prepares students with the necessary academic and practical skills to complete a program of general education study and successfully transfer to a four-year college/university or to the workforce. The Associate of Science requires coursework to prepare students to enter into many different areas of study, emphasizing the Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields. Specifically, program learning outcomes for graduates of the AS degree include the following: Effective Communication - In writing, speaking and listening. This outcome is aligned with MATC’s Effective Communication Career Essential. Information Literacy - Students will possess basic skills to access, evaluate, and use information technology to support academic, community, and career-related interests. This outcome is aligned with MATC’s Technological Competency Career Essential. Global Awareness - Students will be able to explain cultural difference and its importance, identify global interdependencies, and work productively with cultural differences. This outcome is aligned with MATC’s Global Awareness Career Essential. Analytical/Critical Thinking - Students will be able to perform analyses of messages, problems, or issues using a logically structured approach such as qualitative, quantitative, scientific, logical, critical or other human reasoning systems. This outcome is aligned with MATC’s Effective Problem Solving Career Essential. Professionalism - Students will display the behaviors of successful students and pre-professionals, identify the individual behaviors conducive to learning and succeeding in college, and display the abilities to interact successfully in classes, with instructors, other students, and student life personnel. This outcome is aligned with MATC’s Professionalism Career Essential. Scientific Method - Students will be able to conduct research by planning and implementing an appropriate investigative strategy and synthesize results in an academic document. This outcome is aligned with MATC’s Professionalism Career Essential. With additional education and work experience, graduates may find employment in a variety of fields and occupations. Scholarships. Learn about scholarship opportunities here. Learn about Scholarships available for this program here: https://matc.academicworks.comUse Search function to search for your program(s) READY TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP? . Use the buttons below to get more information, visit the college or apply now.  Request Info    Visit Us    Apply Now   QUESTIONS? General Education Academic & Career [email protected]   Last updated: 08/30/2021
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • credit
  • 31
  • 20
  • credit required
  • 23
  • 20
  • year
  • 23
  • 20
  • student
  • 20
  • 20
  • program
  • 19
  • 20
  • matc
  • 18
  • 20
  • required
  • 17
  • 20
  • transfer
  • 15
  • 20
  • degree
  • 15
  • 20
  • science
  • 15
  • 20
  • cours
  • 13
  • 20
  • aligned matc
  • 12
  • 20
  • year collegeuniversity
  • 9
  • 20
  • consult
  • 9
  • 20
  • associate
  • 9
  • 20
  • associate science
  • 8
  • 20
  • speech
  • 8
  • 20
  • information
  • 8
  • 20
  • outcome
  • 8
  • 20
  • career
  • 8
  • 20
  • year college
  • 7
  • 20
  • outcome aligned matc
  • 6
  • 20
  • cours transfer
  • 6
  • 20
  • transfer consult
  • 6
  • 20
  • outcome aligned
  • 6
  • 20
  • career essential
  • 6
  • 20
  • education
  • 6
  • 20
  • requirement
  • 6
  • 20
  • college
  • 6
  • 20
  • plan
  • 6
  • 20
  • major
  • 6
  • 20
  • aligned
  • 6
  • 20
  • essential
  • 6
  • 20
  • year bachelor
  • 5
  • 20
  • degree credit
  • 5
  • 20
  • 200 level
  • 5
  • 20
  • class
  • 5
  • 20
  • collegeuniversity
  • 5
  • 20
  • 200
  • 5
  • 20
  • level
  • 5
  • 20
  • academic
  • 5
  • 20
  • transfer year
  • 4
  • 20
  • consult year
  • 4
  • 20
  • study
  • 4
  • 20
  • list
  • 4
  • 20
  • associate science degree
  • 3
  • 20
  • bachelor degree
  • 3
  • 20
  • degree credit cours
  • 3
  • 20
  • credit cours transfer
  • 3
  • 20
  • year college university
  • 3
  • 20
  • student plan transfer
  • 3
  • 20
  • plan transfer consult
  • 3
  • 20
  • year collegeuniversity specific
  • 3
  • 20
  • collegeuniversity specific requirement
  • 3
  • 20
  • specific requirement major
  • 3
  • 20
  • list cours program
  • 3
  • 20
  • selection pathway advisor
  • 3
  • 20
  • general education
  • 3
  • 20
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 20
  • bachelor
  • 3
  • 20
  • credit cours
  • 3
  • 20
  • college university
  • 3
  • 20
  • student plan
  • 3
  • 20
  • plan transfer
  • 3
  • 20
  • collegeuniversity specific
  • 3
  • 20
  • specific requirement
  • 3
  • 20
  • requirement major
  • 3
  • 20
  • pre major
  • 3
  • 20
  • english
  • 3
  • 20
  • list cours
  • 3
  • 20
  • cours program
  • 3
  • 20
  • selection pathway
  • 3
  • 20
  • pathway advisor
  • 3
  • 20
  • program plan
  • 3
  • 20
Result 21
TitleDegree Program Overview - Associate Degree Programs - Georgia Military College
Urlhttps://www.gmc.edu/academic-programs/overview.cms
Description
Date
Organic Position20
H1Degree Program Overview
H2Associate of Arts (AA)
Associate of Science (AS)
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
Associate of Arts (AA) versus Associate of Science (AS)
Top 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Provided by Front Range Community College
Academic Affairs Directory
Division Chair and Degree Program Coordinator Directory
Department Chair Directory
H3
H2WithAnchorsAssociate of Arts (AA)
Associate of Science (AS)
Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
Associate of Arts (AA) versus Associate of Science (AS)
Top 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Provided by Front Range Community College
Academic Affairs Directory
Division Chair and Degree Program Coordinator Directory
Department Chair Directory
BodyDegree Program Overview At Georgia Military College we offer three types of associate degrees: an Associate of Arts (AA), an Associate of Science (AS), and an Associate of Applied Science (AAS).    Associate of Arts (AA). The core curriculum of the AA degree at GMC includes those courses that the faculty members of the college have identified as central to the development of the proficiencies of a Georgia Military College student. The core courses are also those in common with the core requirements of most four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. This curriculum facilitates transfer, after graduation from GMC, to a four-year degree program. Associate of Science (AS). The core curriculum of the AS degree at GMC includes those courses which the faculty of the college have identified as central to the development of the proficiencies of a Georgia Military College student. The core courses are also those in common with the core requirements of most four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. This curriculum facilitates transfer, after graduation from GMC, to a four-year degree program. Associate of Applied Science (AAS). The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree provides the educational background necessary for a chosen career field or profession and for transfer into career- oriented bachelor degree programs. While some four-year colleges offer the bachelor of applied science degree, many do not. Therefore, students completing the AAS degree who have decided to pursue a higher degree, need to ensure their selected four-year college offers the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) or similar degree in their concentration area prior to enrolling. Please note that many colleges who do not offer the BAS degree may accept core curriculum coursework based on a course-by-course evaluation for transfer. Associate of Arts (AA) versus Associate of Science (AS). The Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) degrees provide the foundation, after graduation, for transfer to a four-year college or university. An Associate of Arts (AA) is most suitable for those continuing an education in Liberal Arts, whereas an Associate of Science (AS) is geared towards studying the sciences and behavioral sciences.  Each degree includes the core curriculum that mirrors the core requirements of most four-year colleges as well as elective courses in selected areas of study (the concentration) that are foundation courses in the specific fields of study. An Associate of Arts (AA) does require completion of a foreign language for the degree.  Completion of an AA or AS degree provides the most effective method for transfer of college coursework to a four-year college or university. Top 5 Reasons to Earn an Associate Degree Provided by Front Range Community College. Take Advantage of Transfer Agreements GMC offers 52 transfer agreements to better prepare you to jump start into your major courses at a four-year college or university. Forty-five (45) of these agreements are guaranteed admission agreements upon completion of an AA or AS degree at GMC. Save Your Money Typically, tuition rates at a community college are significantly less than at a four-year college or university. Increase your Earning Potential Completing an associate degree significantly increases your lifetime earnings compared to just a high school diploma or GED. Solidify Your Credits If a life situation occurs while continuing your education, you at least still have a degree. Finish What You Start It is rewarding to show your friends and family what you have accomplished by finishing what you have started. Academic Affairs Directory. Division Chair and Degree Program Coordinator Directory. Department Chair Directory. ALLIED HEALTH BIOLOGY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COMMUNICATION COMPUTER SCIENCE CRIMINAL JUSTICE CYBER SECURITY  ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION ENGLISH GENERAL STUDIES HISTORY HOMELAND SECURITY & EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND ANALYTICS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY KINESIOLOGY LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MATHEMATICS OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT PARALEGAL STUDIES POLITICAL SCIENCE PRE-NURSING PSYCHOLOGY SOCIAL WORK SOCIOLOGY STUDIO ART TECHNICAL STUDIES  
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • year
  • 22
  • 21
  • degree
  • 22
  • 21
  • year college
  • 18
  • 21
  • college
  • 18
  • 21
  • associate
  • 17
  • 21
  • science
  • 14
  • 21
  • aa
  • 13
  • 21
  • transfer
  • 9
  • 21
  • core
  • 9
  • 21
  • gmc
  • 8
  • 21
  • cours
  • 8
  • 21
  • art
  • 8
  • 21
  • associate art aa
  • 6
  • 21
  • year college university
  • 6
  • 21
  • core requirement
  • 6
  • 21
  • degree program
  • 6
  • 21
  • associate art
  • 6
  • 21
  • art aa
  • 6
  • 21
  • college university
  • 6
  • 21
  • requirement
  • 6
  • 21
  • program
  • 6
  • 21
  • curriculum
  • 6
  • 21
  • university
  • 6
  • 21
  • associate science
  • 5
  • 21
  • applied science
  • 5
  • 21
  • aa degree
  • 5
  • 21
  • offer
  • 5
  • 21
  • applied
  • 5
  • 21
  • study
  • 5
  • 21
  • college offer
  • 4
  • 21
  • aa associate
  • 4
  • 21
  • core curriculum
  • 4
  • 21
  • education
  • 4
  • 21
  • agreement
  • 4
  • 21
  • management
  • 4
  • 21
  • georgia military college
  • 3
  • 21
  • associate applied science
  • 3
  • 21
  • applied science aa
  • 3
  • 21
  • requirement year
  • 3
  • 21
  • georgia military
  • 3
  • 21
  • military college
  • 3
  • 21
  • associate degree
  • 3
  • 21
  • associate applied
  • 3
  • 21
  • science aa
  • 3
  • 21
  • degree gmc
  • 3
  • 21
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 21
  • georgia
  • 3
  • 21
  • military
  • 3
  • 21
  • include
  • 3
  • 21
  • student
  • 3
  • 21
  • graduation
  • 3
  • 21
  • bachelor
  • 3
  • 21
  • completion
  • 3
  • 21
  • directory
  • 3
  • 21
  • information
  • 3
  • 21
Result 22
TitleWhat is an Associate Degree in Science?
Urlhttps://learn.org/articles/What_is_an_Associate_Degree_in_Science.html
DescriptionIf you'd like to pursue education in a medical or science-related field, but are unsure how to begin, you might consider earning an associate..
Date
Organic Position21
H1What Is an Associate Degree in Science?
H2Popular Schools
H3Associate Degree in Science Overview
Important Facts About These Programs
Typical Courses
Concentrations
Associate Degree vs. Bachelor's Degree
H2WithAnchorsPopular Schools
BodyWhat Is an Associate Degree in Science? If you'd like to pursue education in a medical or science-related field, but are unsure how to begin, you might consider earning an associate degree in science. This degree is designed to provide you with foundational knowledge and prepare you to transfer to a 4-year institution. View Schools Associate Degree in Science Overview. An Associate of Science (AS) is a 2-year degree offered by most community colleges and some 4-year colleges. As opposed to the Associate of Applied Science degree, which prepares you to enter a career immediately after graduation, most AS degrees are transfer degrees and provide an academic foundation, but not specific career training. To make the transfer process easier, many community colleges have transfer agreements with 4-year institutions in their states. These agreements often ensure that the credits you earn while completing your AS degree meet the general education requirements of the school to which you intend to transfer. Important Facts About These Programs. Online Availability Fully Possible Careers Systems administrator, network engineer, operations manager, IT manager Prerequisites Minimum GPA, college placement test, possible background check and drug screening Degree Levels Master of Science and Doctor of Science programs are also available Median Salary (2020) $84,810 (for systems administrators) $103,650 (for operations managers) $151,150 (for computer and information systems managers) Job Outlook (2019-2029) 4% growth (for systems administrators) 6% growth (for operations managers) 10% growth (for computer and information systems managers) Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Typical Courses. You'll have to complete around 60 credit hours, or 20 courses, to earn an associate degree. Much of your coursework will fulfill general education requirements, which will probably include math, English composition, social science and humanities courses. After completing general education courses, you'll fulfill your concentration or take electives in your preferred area of study. The number of required courses and course distribution will vary between schools, so check with an adviser at your school to determine the exact requirements. Concentrations. When you enter a general associate degree in science program, you may want to select a concentration. Depending on your interests and goals, you could choose between computer science, physics, biology, engineering, chemistry, health sciences and more. Some programs are specialized, such as dental hygiene, emergency medical services and nursing, although in many cases these are offered as Associate of Applied Science degrees. These specialized programs often take longer to complete and allow you to transfer to a bachelor's degree program or find jobs upon graduation. Associate Degree vs. Bachelor's Degree. Although you could enter a science program at a 4-year school without first earning an AS degree, attending a community college offers several advantages. You could cut down on your educational costs, receive personal attention in smaller classes and build your academic success to better your chances of acceptance to a 4-year school. Even if you decide not to pursue a bachelor's degree after completing an AS degree, you'll still meet with an improved career outlook. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that earning an associate degree can lead to a higher-paying job that doesn't require additional training (www.bls.gov). © Copyright 2003-2022 Learn.org. All rights reserved.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 20
  • 22
  • science
  • 15
  • 22
  • year
  • 12
  • 22
  • associate
  • 10
  • 22
  • program
  • 8
  • 22
  • associate degree
  • 7
  • 22
  • transfer
  • 7
  • 22
  • college
  • 6
  • 22
  • school
  • 6
  • 22
  • manager
  • 6
  • 22
  • science program
  • 5
  • 22
  • growth
  • 5
  • 22
  • system
  • 5
  • 22
  • cours
  • 5
  • 22
  • associate degree science
  • 4
  • 22
  • community college
  • 4
  • 22
  • system administrator
  • 4
  • 22
  • degree science
  • 4
  • 22
  • administrator
  • 4
  • 22
  • education
  • 4
  • 22
  • career
  • 4
  • 22
  • general
  • 4
  • 22
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 22
  • general education
  • 3
  • 22
  • operation manager
  • 3
  • 22
  • bachelor degree
  • 3
  • 22
  • earning
  • 3
  • 22
  • community
  • 3
  • 22
  • enter
  • 3
  • 22
  • completing
  • 3
  • 22
  • requirement
  • 3
  • 22
  • operation
  • 3
  • 22
  • computer
  • 3
  • 22
  • job
  • 3
  • 22
  • youll
  • 3
  • 22
  • concentration
  • 3
  • 22
  • bachelor
  • 3
  • 22
Result 23
TitleAssociate in Science | HCC
Urlhttps://henderson.kctcs.edu/education-training/program-finder/associate-in-science.aspx
Description
Date
Organic Position22
H1Associate in Science
H2What are my degree options?
Length of Program
For more information
H3What is an Associate in Science?
Why should I start at HCC before transferring?
Academic Plans
Eligible Programs
Custom Viewbook
Program Contact
H2WithAnchorsWhat are my degree options?
Length of Program
For more information
BodyAssociate in Science What is an Associate in Science? Henderson Community College offers Associate in Science degrees equivalent to the sequences of courses taken in the first two years at four-year colleges and universities. These college transfer programs allow students to spend their first two years of study for a baccalaureate degree in an academic institution that is close to home and reasonable in cost. HCC graduates who go on to complete a four-year degree do as well academically as native students at four-year institutions. The general education core curriculum ensures that HCC graduates are well-educated men and women who are intellectually flexible, articulate, creative, and prepared for continuous growth. For all students, this implies some understanding of their own abilities, interests, and needs. The general education core curriculum will also help students develop their own values, pursue goals, and contribute to the political, moral, social, and cultural enrichment of society. Why should I start at HCC before transferring? An added benefit for transfer students is that they receive a separate degree--either an Associate in Science or Associate in Science depending on the type of program--at the end of two years. Under the General Education Block Transfer Policy, students completing the Associate in Science or the Associate in Science degree requirements will be "fully certified" and be able to transfer a block of general education credits to all Kentucky public colleges and universities. Students will be admitted to these institutions with junior level standing and their general education course work will be accepted as meeting up to 48 hours of the receiving institution's lower division general education requirements. What are my degree options? Besides a general education Associates in Arts or Associates in Science degree, you may earn degrees in the following areas: Agricultural Technology Business Administration Accounting Business Administration Management Business Administration Office Systems Industrial Maintenance Technology Information Technology--Computer Programming Information Technology--Network Administration Information Technology--Electronic Commerce Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education Medical Assistant Medical Laboratory Technician Nursing Academic Plans. Application for Certificate, Diploma, or Degree (.doc) Associate in Science Degree 2021 (Current Curriculum) - (XLS) Length of Program. You can earn an Associate in Science degree in two years if you maintain full-time status. For more information. This information should not be considered a substitute for the KCTCS Catalog. You should always choose classes in cooperation with your faculty advisor to ensure that you meet all degree requirements. Eligible Programs. Find your future Custom Viewbook. Make One Program Contact. Lorie Maltby Transfer Coordinator (270) 831-9828
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 13
  • 23
  • associate
  • 12
  • 23
  • associate science
  • 11
  • 23
  • year
  • 11
  • 23
  • science
  • 10
  • 23
  • student
  • 8
  • 23
  • education
  • 8
  • 23
  • general education
  • 7
  • 23
  • general
  • 7
  • 23
  • program
  • 6
  • 23
  • associate science degree
  • 5
  • 23
  • science degree
  • 5
  • 23
  • transfer
  • 5
  • 23
  • technology
  • 5
  • 23
  • information
  • 5
  • 23
  • college
  • 4
  • 23
  • institution
  • 4
  • 23
  • administration
  • 4
  • 23
  • associate science associate
  • 3
  • 23
  • science associate science
  • 3
  • 23
  • science associate
  • 3
  • 23
  • business administration
  • 3
  • 23
  • information technology
  • 3
  • 23
  • hcc
  • 3
  • 23
  • curriculum
  • 3
  • 23
  • requirement
  • 3
  • 23
  • business
  • 3
  • 23
Result 24
TitleAssociate in Science Degrees - Bunker Hill Community College
Urlhttps://www.bhcc.edu/associate-in-science-degrees/index.php
Description
Date
Organic Position23
H1Bunker Hill Community College
H2Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree Programs
H3
H2WithAnchorsAssociate in Science (A.S.) Degree Programs
BodyBunker Hill Community College Bunker Hill Community College Open Menu Bunker Hill Community College BHCC Associates in Science Degrees Associate in Science (A.S.) degree programs prepare students with the knowledge and skills necessary to enter the workforce at the conclusion of the degree. In addition to preparing students for employment, many Associate in Science degree programs transfer to four-year colleges and universities. To assure smooth transfer to four-year programs, A.S. transfer students should follow the recommendations for the Associate in Arts (A.A.) degrees.  Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree Programs. Number of Programs : 48 Accounting OptionBaking and Pastry Arts OptionBiological Sciences: Biotechnology OptionBiological Sciences: Medical Professions OptionBiology Transfer OptionBiomedical Engineering OptionCardiac Sonography OptionComputer Science Transfer OptionComputer Support Specialist OptionCriminal Justice Career OptionCriminal Justice Transfer OptionCulinary Arts OptionCybersecurity OptionData Analytics OptionDatabase Programming and Administration OptionDigital and Computer Forensics and Investigations OptionEarly Childhood Development ProgramElectric Power Utility Technology ProgramElectrical Engineering Transfer OptionEngineering Transfer OptionEntrepreneurship OptionEnvironmental ScienceFinance OptionFire Protection and Safety ProgramGaming/Computer Artist Track Simulation OptionGaming/Computer Programming Track Simulation OptionGas Utility Technology Degree Option ProgramGeneral Sonography OptionHotel/Restaurant Management OptionHuman Services ProgramInformation Technology Transfer OptionIntegrated Media Design OptionManagement OptionManagement of Assisted Living and Institutional FacilitiesMedical Information Management OptionMedical Laboratory Technician ProgramMedical Radiography Full-time OptionMedical Radiography Part-time OptionMeeting and Event Planning OptionNetwork Technology and Administration OptionParalegal Studies ProgramParamedic Studies ProgramRegistered Nursing Program: Day/Alternative OptionsSport Management OptionStudio Arts OptionSurgical Technology OptionVisual Design OptionWeb Development Option
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • transfer
  • 11
  • 24
  • science
  • 7
  • 24
  • degree
  • 7
  • 24
  • program
  • 6
  • 24
  • associate
  • 5
  • 24
  • technology
  • 5
  • 24
  • associate science degree
  • 4
  • 24
  • associate science
  • 4
  • 24
  • science degree
  • 4
  • 24
  • college
  • 4
  • 24
  • art
  • 4
  • 24
  • bunker hill community
  • 3
  • 24
  • hill community college
  • 3
  • 24
  • science degree program
  • 3
  • 24
  • bunker hill
  • 3
  • 24
  • hill community
  • 3
  • 24
  • community college
  • 3
  • 24
  • degree program
  • 3
  • 24
  • bunker
  • 3
  • 24
  • hill
  • 3
  • 24
  • community
  • 3
  • 24
  • student
  • 3
  • 24
  • management
  • 3
  • 24
Result 25
TitleAssociate of Science - AS Degree
Urlhttps://coloradomtn.edu/programs/associate-of-science/
DescriptionStudy science at CMC — save tuition and avoid student debt while getting an excellent, hands-on education in the sciences
Date
Organic Position24
H1Associate of Science Degree at Colorado Mountain College
H2Start your hands-on science education in the heart of the Rocky Mountains
Ian Derrington
Dr. Crystal Walden Roney
Keegan Hammond
Dr. Chris Dionigi
H3Hands-On Associate of Science Degree at CMC
Save money for later
H2WithAnchorsStart your hands-on science education in the heart of the Rocky Mountains
Ian Derrington
Dr. Crystal Walden Roney
Keegan Hammond
Dr. Chris Dionigi
BodyAssociate of Science Degree at Colorado Mountain College Start your hands-on science education in the heart of the Rocky Mountains. An Associate of Science degree from Colorado Mountain College puts you in the one of the best labs around—the Rocky Mountains. With hands-on learning you will build a foundation to transfer smoothly to a four-year institution. And you’ll pay a fraction of the cost compared to the first two years at other colleges. Our 13:1 student to teacher ratio fuels success. Personal attention from faculty will guide you all along the way.. Make the Colorado Rockies your classroom! Study weather on a mountaintop or sample water from a snowmelt stream. Learn about the forces that shaped the earth as you walk through the river canyons and glacial valleys found across our 11 mountain campuses. Associate of Science degree concentrations: Biology Chemistry Engineering Environmental Science Mathematics Physics Psychology An Associate of Science degree from Colorado Mountain College is your ticket to a future in science. The hands-on experiential foundation you build here will transfer smoothly to a four-year institution. The world awaits your scientific discovery! Get a head start at a reputable, affordable institution. Hands-On Associate of Science Degree at CMC. Four CMC campuses focus on different science topics with hands-on experience. Each Colorado Mountain College campus focuses on special areas in science for our Associate of Science degree program: CMC Leadville emphasizes biology, chemistry and environmental concerns. CMC Spring Valley is equipped for chemistry and physics courses and also emphasizes biology and geology. CMC Steamboat Springs is strong for physics and biology, and is equipped with a science lab for both. CMC Rifle and Vail Valley campuses offer the Associate of Science degree with a range of science and math courses. Science teachers at Colorado Mountain College are passionate about showing students how science works in the world around them, not just on the chalkboard. Outside the classroom, the Rocky Mountain West is your science laboratory. You might study geology in the Colorado San Juan Mountains or the Grand Canyon, biology on a mountainside with a herd of bighorn sheep, or astronomy on a clear mountain night. Field experience is offered frequently, and a unique benefit of our Associate of Science degree program. Save money for later. With our low tuition, you'll avoid big student debt, and have more to spend when it's time to transfer. Colorado Mountain College is a member of the new Colorado State Guaranteed (GT) General Education Curriculum, which means you'll be guaranteed a full transfer of your Associate of Science degree to public colleges and universities in Colorado. Students also transfer from Colorado Mountain College to universities across the state and country.  Our long-standing reputation for quality academic preparation has allowed us to pioneer transfer agreements with many competitive four-year institutions. Here’s how our in-district and in-state tuition compares to other Colorado schools: wpDataChart with provided ID not found! *Includes fees charged to all students. Some programs have additional fees. See where our students have transferred. Yes, there are some Ivy League schools on the list. Ian Derrington. “I’m really glad I went to Colorado Mountain College before I went to CU. It helped me figure out the direction I wanted to go. College would have been a lot more difficult if I had not taken those courses.” Ian Derrington graduated as the salutatorian for Roaring Fork High School. While still attending high school, he took classes from Colorado Mountain College, transferring to the University of Colorado as a sophomore. He graduated from CU with honors and a double major in applied mathematics and engineering physics. He was awarded a teaching fellowship by the University of Washington, where he earned a Ph.D. in theoretical physics. Read more: Ian Derrington Dr. Crystal Walden Roney. “I was well prepared at Colorado Mountain College. The professors in academics were comparable to those at the private college to which I transferred. The low-stress environment also kept me from becoming burned out before med school. It gave me a good perspective on life.” Dr. Crystal Walden Roney transferred to Westmont College in California, then attended the University of Colorado Medical School. She is now a family physician. Keegan Hammond. “My chemistry professor at CMC took a real interest in us. He was able to explain very complex material in a way that made sense… Whatever we needed, he helped us. He equal to any chemistry professor I had at the School of Mines.” Keegan Hammond transferred to the Colorado School of Mines, where she graduated with the highest GPA in her specialty of Extractive Metallurgy and earned a prestigious scholarship to continue on at the School of Mines for her graduate degree. Read more: Keegan Hammond Dr. Chris Dionigi. “Colorado Mountain College was an excellent place to begin my career. Large universities are great places later… when research, laboratories and major libraries become critical. In my first two years, it was much more important for me to have excellent instructors and opportunities for personal attention.” Dr. Chris Dionigi is assistant director for Domestic Policy for the National Invasive Species Council in Washington, DC. The NISC, part of the department of the interior, was established by presidential order to coordinate the invasive species efforts of more than 30 federal agencies. Read more: Dr. Chris Dionigi NEXT: LOCATIONS FOR THIS PROGRAM REQUEST INFORMATION @Colorado Mountain College. Contact / Campus Locations / Maps CMC Board of Trustees CMC Foundation Community & Partnerships Departments / Contact Directory of Faculty & Staff Donate to CMC Employment Website. A-Z Index Site Feedback Site Login Legal. Student Consumer Information Report a Concern/Incident @ CMC Cares Notice of Nondiscrimination Privacy Policy
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • science
  • 20
  • 25
  • colorado
  • 20
  • 25
  • mountain
  • 18
  • 25
  • college
  • 17
  • 25
  • colorado mountain college
  • 12
  • 25
  • colorado mountain
  • 12
  • 25
  • mountain college
  • 12
  • 25
  • cmc
  • 11
  • 25
  • degree
  • 10
  • 25
  • associate science degree
  • 9
  • 25
  • associate science
  • 9
  • 25
  • science degree
  • 9
  • 25
  • hand
  • 9
  • 25
  • associate
  • 9
  • 25
  • school
  • 9
  • 25
  • year
  • 8
  • 25
  • year institution
  • 7
  • 25
  • student
  • 7
  • 25
  • rocky
  • 6
  • 25
  • transfer
  • 6
  • 25
  • university
  • 6
  • 25
  • derrington
  • 5
  • 25
  • institution
  • 5
  • 25
  • biology
  • 5
  • 25
  • chemistry
  • 5
  • 25
  • physic
  • 5
  • 25
  • dr
  • 5
  • 25
  • rocky mountain
  • 4
  • 25
  • ian derrington
  • 4
  • 25
  • program
  • 4
  • 25
  • transferred
  • 4
  • 25
  • science degree colorado
  • 3
  • 25
  • degree colorado mountain
  • 3
  • 25
  • dr chri dionigi
  • 3
  • 25
  • degree colorado
  • 3
  • 25
  • university colorado
  • 3
  • 25
  • keegan hammond
  • 3
  • 25
  • school mine
  • 3
  • 25
  • dr chri
  • 3
  • 25
  • chri dionigi
  • 3
  • 25
  • graduated
  • 3
  • 25
  • read
  • 3
  • 25
  • professor
  • 3
  • 25
  • keegan
  • 3
  • 25
  • hammond
  • 3
  • 25
  • mine
  • 3
  • 25
  • chri
  • 3
  • 25
  • dionigi
  • 3
  • 25
Result 26
Title3 Reasons to Get Your Associate's Degree | Military.com
Urlhttps://www.military.com/education/getting-your-degree/3-reasons-to-get-your-associate-degree.html
DescriptionNo matter your long-term goal, going for an associates now can be a great first step
Date
Organic Position25
H13 Reasons to Get Your Associate's Degree
H2Associate Degrees Explained
3 Reasons to Consider an Associate Degree
Keep Up With Your Education Benefits
You May Also Like
Education Topics
Select Service
Benefits Directory
Latest in Military Education
Latest Military News
H3
H2WithAnchorsAssociate Degrees Explained
3 Reasons to Consider an Associate Degree
Keep Up With Your Education Benefits
You May Also Like
Education Topics
Select Service
Benefits Directory
Latest in Military Education
Latest Military News
Body3 Reasons to Get Your Associate's Degree Military.com When starting out on your path to a college degree you'll need to choose whether to go for an associate degree or a bachelor's degree. Although there are good arguments for going either way, there are some excellent reasons to consider targeting your associates first. For instance, earning your associate degree first gives you a sense of accomplishment and a diploma to hang on your wall while you continue working toward your bachelor's degree, and no matter what your long-term goal may be, going for an associates now can give you a great jump start. Associate Degrees Explained. An associate degree is an academic degree normally awarded for completing two years of lower level studies. But, this doesn't mean you have to take two years to complete your degree. The three most common types of associate degrees are the Associate of Arts, Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science. Each of these degrees has unique characteristics, requirements and limitations, but all are a great way to get started toward your education and professional goals. Associate of Arts (AA) degrees, like other two-year degrees, normally require a minimum 60 semester hours in lower level studies, with a large percentage in traditional arts and sciences, such as math, english, social science, history, and often require a foreign language. The AA can be more time consuming for a servicemember due to the greater requirements for traditional academic courses. However the AA can be your best option if you are considering a career in education. Associate of Science (AS) degrees normally require less arts and sciences, have no foreign language requirement, and allow a greater number of credits from free electives. An AS is often the fastest and most flexible route to a degree for military servicemember due to the decreased number of elective credits. Associate of Applied Science (AAS)degrees are normally professional in nature, like electronics, avionics, mechanics, etc. AAS degrees are often the easiest for military students to earn. But, due to the professional specialty focus, the AAS can be limiting when it comes to pursuing higher levels of education later. 3 Reasons to Consider an Associate Degree. 1. Flexibility - AA and AS degrees do not require you to determine a major, and in fact a degree in liberal arts will give you the flexibility to postpone your decision until later when you have a better idea of what you want to focus on. 2. Saves Time and Money - An AS degree will allow you to apply a greater number of credits from your military experience. In fact if you have four or more years of service and have taken and passed the 5 General CLEP exams, you may find that you are just a few credits shy of earning your degree. 3. Increase Your Income - Like any college degree, an associate degree will open doors to higher income and promotions. Many of the military services tie college credits to their advancement and promotion systems. And most of the services require the same to apply for enlisted to officer programs like OCS and OTS. If you are looking for a way to jump your start your education goals - that won't waste your time and money - then pursuing your associates degree first may be right for you. Keep Up With Your Education Benefits . Whether you need a guide on how to use your GI Bill, want to take advantage of tuition assistance and scholarships, or get the lowdown on education benefits available for your family, Military.com can help. Sign up for a free Military.com membership to have education tips and benefits updates delivered directly to your inbox Show Full Article Related Topics: College Degrees College © Copyright 2022 Military.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. You May Also Like. Top Military CLEP and DSST Pass Rates So you found out that taking CLEP and DSST exams are free while on active duty. Now what? Are Online and For-Profit the Same Thing? It's common for people to use the terms ‘for profit’, ‘distance learning’ and ‘online’ as synonyms. They aren't. Back to School - It's Not Just for Kids Anymore! Adult students are becoming a major force in higher education. Don't let the 20-something college kid image scare you off. Ask The Right Grad School Questions Deciding whether a particular graduate school or program is right for you requires asking smart questions. Education Topics . Education Overview Online Learning GI Bill Money For School Keys to Success Getting Your Degree Timesaving Programs Finding a School Select Service. Army Marines Navy Air Force National Guard Coast Guard Space Force Spouse Login Army My Profile Army Home Page Navy My Profile Navy Home Page Air Force My Profile Air Force Home Page Marines My Profile Marines Home Page Coast Guard My Profile Coast Guard Home Page Space Force My Profile Space Force Home Page National Guard My Profile National Guard Home Page Spouse My Profile Spouse Home Page   My Profile News Home Page Benefits Directory . Active Duty Benefits for Retirees Veteran Benefits Military Spouse & Family Reserve & Guard VA Loans Benefits Directory Latest in Military Education . Who Needs College? Vets Using New GI Bill Program to Get Good-Paying Jobs Five Reasons to Get Your College Degree Now What to Do About Your GI Bill or Veterans Education Benefits If Your School Closes Troubled Student Loan Forgiveness Program for Military, Public Servants Gets an Overhaul What Schools Teach About 9/11 and The War on Terror View more Latest Military News . Kazakhstan: Russia-Led Alliance's Troops Prepare to Pull Out Navy Helicopter Slams into Woods During Emergency Landing in Virginia House Votes to Expand GI Bill Eligibility for National Guard, Reserves Navy Blasted as Ineffective on Capitol Hill as Budget Crisis Looms Army Ups Bonuses for Recruits to $50K, as COVID Takes Toll View more
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 31
  • 26
  • associate
  • 17
  • 26
  • education
  • 13
  • 26
  • associate degree
  • 10
  • 26
  • home page
  • 9
  • 26
  • college
  • 9
  • 26
  • military
  • 9
  • 26
  • profile
  • 9
  • 26
  • home
  • 9
  • 26
  • page
  • 9
  • 26
  • benefit
  • 8
  • 26
  • guard
  • 8
  • 26
  • science
  • 7
  • 26
  • school
  • 7
  • 26
  • force
  • 7
  • 26
  • reason
  • 6
  • 26
  • aa
  • 6
  • 26
  • require
  • 6
  • 26
  • gi bill
  • 5
  • 26
  • year
  • 5
  • 26
  • art
  • 5
  • 26
  • credit
  • 5
  • 26
  • program
  • 5
  • 26
  • gi
  • 5
  • 26
  • bill
  • 5
  • 26
  • navy
  • 5
  • 26
  • aa degree
  • 4
  • 26
  • college degree
  • 4
  • 26
  • national guard
  • 4
  • 26
  • militarycom
  • 4
  • 26
  • service
  • 4
  • 26
  • army
  • 4
  • 26
  • national
  • 4
  • 26
  • spouse
  • 4
  • 26
  • degree require
  • 3
  • 26
  • education benefit
  • 3
  • 26
  • air force
  • 3
  • 26
  • coast guard
  • 3
  • 26
  • space force
  • 3
  • 26
  • coast
  • 3
  • 26
  • space
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
TitleWhat is an Associate Degree for Transfer?
Urlhttps://study.com/academy/popular/what-is-an-associate-degree-for-transfer.html
DescriptionAn Associate Degree for Transfer is a degree offered by two-year colleges in California which provides a specific pathway to earning a bachelor's degree. Read on for more information regarding the benefits to this degree
Date
Organic Position26
H1What is an Associate Degree for Transfer?
H2What is an Associate Degree for Transfer?
What are Common ADT Majors?
Must I Meet Any Requirements to Transfer?
What are the Benefits of an Associate Degree for Transfer?
Are There Any Drawbacks to the Associate Degree for Transfer?
Need help paying for college?
H3College Credit Transfer Information College Credit Transfer Information
H2WithAnchorsWhat is an Associate Degree for Transfer?
What are Common ADT Majors?
Must I Meet Any Requirements to Transfer?
What are the Benefits of an Associate Degree for Transfer?
Are There Any Drawbacks to the Associate Degree for Transfer?
Need help paying for college?
BodyWhat is an Associate Degree for Transfer? SHARE Written by: Kristin Fromal What is an Associate Degree for Transfer? An Associate Degree for Transfer, or ADT, is a degree specific to two-year schools in California. There are two types of ADT degrees: an Associate in Art for Transfer and an Associate in Science for Transfer. Within this program, students can earn a two-year degree at any of California's 115 community colleges. Upon earning the degree, students are guaranteed admission to participating Cal State universities, private universities around California or select out-of-state schools. Students can even start on the ADT path while in high school by taking dual enrollment courses. The ADT can also be used to transfer to universities that are not participating in the guaranteed admission system. In these cases, the courses will be evaluated similarly to other associate's degrees. What are Common ADT Majors? Students pursuing the ADT must declare a major as an associate's degree student and will transfer into a similar major at the university where they wish to earn their bachelor's degree. The chart below details some common ADT majors and some of the bachelor's degree majors into which students may transfer. ADT MajorBachelor's Degree Major Options Biology Biology, Pre-Health Sciences, Biology Teaching Business Administration Business Administration, Finance, Marketing Psychology Psychology, Early Childhood Development Kinesiology Exercise Science, Physical Education Teaching Computer Science Computer Information Systems, Software Engineering Studio Arts Art Administration, Graphic Design, Studio Art Must I Meet Any Requirements to Transfer? You must complete the ADT, usually earning 60 credits to qualify for the benefits of this plan. Eligibility requirements, such as a minimum GPA, may be a precondition of enrollment. Typically, all majors will require at least a 2.0 GPA in order to transfer. Some majors may have higher cut-offs in place. What are the Benefits of an Associate Degree for Transfer? Earning the ADT before beginning a bachelor's degree program can have many benefits. Students are guaranteed admission to some universities and have priority consideration for impacted majors. Once students are enrolled, the courses that were taken as part of the ADT program will all transfer into the four-year university and will fulfill all general education requirements. Students enter with junior standing, and only 60 more credits will usually be required to earn the bachelor's degree. This may save both time and money for students entering with an ADT. Are There Any Drawbacks to the Associate Degree for Transfer? In order to build an effective educational plan, students in the ADT program are required to declare their major by their second semester of study and enroll in a similar major at the university to which they transfer. That means that this may not be an effective route for students who are truly unsure as to their course of study. Also, it is typically recommended that students progress directly from the ADT program into their bachelor's degree program because if a significant break is taken, the number of credits required to complete the bachelor's degree could increase. Therefore, if a student was planning to travel or work after earning an associate's degree, the ADT may not be the best pathway. Continue reading: How To Take AP Courses Over the Summer What are Credit Hours in College? Students interested in learning about the concept of credit hours can read this article, which provides information about what college credit hours are, how they are earned, and a few different types of credit hours. Take the exam with confidence Try our test prep resources risk-free today and achieve the test score you want Start your prep College Credit Transfer Information College Credit Transfer Information . What are Credit Hours in College? How Do College Board AP Credits Work? How to Get College Loans with Bad Credit or No Credit Earning College Credit for Work and Life Experience How Do FEMA College Credits Work? How Do Internships for College Credit Work? Earning College Credit by Exam: Types & Process What is IB College Credit and How Does It Work? What is a Comprehensive Articulation Agreement? How to Transfer Out of Community College in One Year How to Be A Competitive Transfer Student How To Transfer AP Credit To College How To Transfer IB Credits From High School To College Reasons Why Students Transfer to Other Schools Do Technical College Credits Transfer? What is an Associate Degree for Transfer? How To Take AP Courses Over the Summer Transferring College Credits From Canada to the US College Credit Transfer Information Need help paying for college? . Become a Working Scholar®! Learn more
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • transfer
  • 25
  • 27
  • credit
  • 23
  • 27
  • degree
  • 20
  • 27
  • college
  • 20
  • 27
  • student
  • 17
  • 27
  • adt
  • 15
  • 27
  • college credit
  • 11
  • 27
  • associate
  • 11
  • 27
  • major
  • 11
  • 27
  • associate degree
  • 9
  • 27
  • year
  • 7
  • 27
  • university
  • 7
  • 27
  • associate degree transfer
  • 6
  • 27
  • degree transfer
  • 6
  • 27
  • bachelor degree
  • 6
  • 27
  • program
  • 6
  • 27
  • earning
  • 6
  • 27
  • bachelor
  • 6
  • 27
  • work
  • 6
  • 27
  • credit hour
  • 5
  • 27
  • credit work
  • 5
  • 27
  • school
  • 5
  • 27
  • cours
  • 5
  • 27
  • information
  • 5
  • 27
  • hour
  • 5
  • 27
  • college credit transfer
  • 4
  • 27
  • college credit work
  • 4
  • 27
  • student transfer
  • 4
  • 27
  • credit transfer
  • 4
  • 27
  • earn
  • 4
  • 27
  • art
  • 4
  • 27
  • science
  • 4
  • 27
  • ap
  • 4
  • 27
  • credit transfer information
  • 3
  • 27
  • transfer associate
  • 3
  • 27
  • guaranteed admission
  • 3
  • 27
  • major student
  • 3
  • 27
  • adt program
  • 3
  • 27
  • transfer information
  • 3
  • 27
  • type
  • 3
  • 27
  • guaranteed
  • 3
  • 27
  • admission
  • 3
  • 27
  • biology
  • 3
  • 27
  • administration
  • 3
  • 27
  • requirement
  • 3
  • 27
  • benefit
  • 3
  • 27
  • required
  • 3
  • 27
Result 28
TitleAlamo Colleges : NLC : Associate of Science
Urlhttps://www.alamo.edu/nlc/academics/program-index/science-and-technology/associate_of_science/
Descriptionassociate of science, liberal arts degree
Date
Organic Position27
H1Associate of Science
H2About NLC
Academics
Admissions & Aid
Experience NLC
News and Events
Northeast Lakeview College
H3What is Associate of Science?
What will I learn?
What can I do with this course of study?
What's special about the Associate of Science?
H2WithAnchorsAbout NLC
Academics
Admissions & Aid
Experience NLC
News and Events
Northeast Lakeview College
BodyAssociate of Science Program Level: Degrees Department: Science and Technology Institute: Science & Technology College: NLC What is Associate of Science? The Associate of Science is designed to align closely with the first half of a BS degree.  Students should follow the pre-major AS to BS Transfer Advising Guide for the major and university selected.  The Transfer Advising Guides are developed in conjunction with the senior institution to which the student plans to transfer. What will I learn? Much of your coursework will fulfill general education requirements, including core requirements.  Students will also take courses that focus on the areas of science and math.  Upon completing the Associates of Science degree requirements at Northeast Lakeview College, students will demonstrate: creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, as well as analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of information. effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication. the ability to manipulate and analyze numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions. the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal. the ability to utilize current technology to collect and analyze empirical, quantitative, and qualitative data to promote understanding of scientific and mathematical concepts. the ability to apply and effectively communicate scientific knowledge and its relationship to real-world applications. What can I do with this course of study? Associate of Science programs provides the fundamentals for students wishing to pursue an education in a medical or science-related field. Coursework is designed to prepare to transfer to a university. What's special about the Associate of Science? Students are exposed to the fundamentals needed to excel in science-related career fields   The Associate of Science degree is designed to align closely with the first half of the Bachelors of Science Degree. Associate of Science
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • science
  • 14
  • 28
  • associate science
  • 8
  • 28
  • associate
  • 8
  • 28
  • student
  • 6
  • 28
  • degree
  • 5
  • 28
  • transfer
  • 4
  • 28
  • ability
  • 4
  • 28
  • science degree
  • 3
  • 28
  • technology
  • 3
  • 28
  • designed
  • 3
  • 28
  • requirement
  • 3
  • 28
Result 29
TitleShould You Get an Associate’s Degree or Bachelor’s Degree? - National University
Urlhttps://www.nu.edu/resources/should-you-get-an-associates-degree-or-bachelors-degree/
DescriptionIf you’re unsure about whether to pursue an associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree, we are here to help. Learn the pros and cons of both degree programs so you can make the best decision for your future
Date
Organic Position28
H1Should You Get an Associate’s Degree or Bachelor’s Degree?
H2Which is Better: Earning an Associates or Bachelor’s Degree?
Do I Need an Associate’s Degree to Get a Bachelor’s Degree?
Search the site
Terms & Conditions
H3Time Commitment
Financial Considerations
Your Career Goals
Earning Potential
Higher Education Plans
Applying Associate’s Degree Credits to a Bachelor’s Degree
Earn Your Associate’s or Bachelor’s at National University
Featured Programs
Helpful Links
H2WithAnchorsWhich is Better: Earning an Associates or Bachelor’s Degree?
Do I Need an Associate’s Degree to Get a Bachelor’s Degree?
Search the site
Terms & Conditions
BodyShould You Get an Associate’s Degree or Bachelor’s Degree? If you’re on the fence about getting a bachelor’s or associate’s degree, we’re here to help. There are various advantages associated with both degree programs, and the best degree depends heavily on the individual. Here, we’ll talk about the key differences between the two degree programs to help you decide the best course of action to pursue your academic goals. Which is Better: Earning an Associates or Bachelor’s Degree? One degree isn’t necessarily better than the other. The best degree for you will be the one that aligns with your personal and professional goals. The good news is, if you choose one route, you can always return to school later to get another degree or switch careers. Here are five things to consider to help you choose the right degree for you.  Time Commitment. If you’re not set on one degree over the other and the amount of time you spend in school is a concern, then you may want to pursue an associate’s degree. A full-time student can earn an associate’s degree in two years, whereas a bachelor’s program generally takes four years. Of course, these timelines will increase if you’re working and not attending school full time, so if you want to get in and out as quickly as possible, go for your associate’s degree. Another consideration is the amount of classes required to earn your degree. An associate’s degree consists of around 60 credits (or 90 quarter units), and these can be more specialized depending on the program you choose. There are even specialized associate’s degree programs that set you up for a specific job, such as a licensed practical nurse (LPN) or veterinary technician. To earn a bachelor’s degree, you’ll take at least 120 credits or 180 quarter units), which can consist of courses in your specific field of study (your major), plus general education requirements. Financial Considerations. While costs will vary based on the college or university, an associate’s degree is generally less expensive than a bachelor’s program. An associate’s degree typically costs between $20,000 – $25,000 vs. $40,000 for a bachelor’s degree.  Even if you commute, which allows you to omit the costs of room and board, you will still have tuition fees and have to pay per credit unit. Since the program takes longer and requires more courses, a bachelor’s degree naturally costs more.  Your Career Goals. Earning your degree can pave the way for more rewarding, lucrative career opportunities. Some specialized or trade-based industries require an associate’s degree, while others prefer prospective candidates have their bachelor’s degree. Jobs That Require an Associate’s Degree. Here are some examples of career opportunities for associate degree holders. Note: some of these require specialized training so you will need to find a specific program that caters to the field of your choosing. Occupational therapy assistant Respiratory therapist Ultrasound technician Dental hygienist Veterinary technician Paralegal Web developer Jobs That Require a Bachelor’s Degree. Some jobs in specific fields, such as accounting and finance, require a bachelor’s degree. Also, some management and leadership roles favor candidates with a bachelor’s degree. Computer and information systems manager Financial manager Aerospace engineer Marketing manager Human resources manager If you already know which type of job you want and it doesn’t require a bachelor’s degree, consider getting your associate’s degree. One of the benefits of an associate’s degree is that in some cases, you can bypass the general education courses that don’t align with your career goals. Earning Potential. If you’re going to invest time in your education you probably have the very valid question: which degree allows me to make more money? Based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, you can earn more with a bachelor’s degree, and you’re less likely to be unemployed.  This is not to say you can’t earn a decent living and support your family with an associate’s degree. With your associate’s and enough on-the-job experience, you can advance into a manager position in your career path and increase your initial earning potential.   Higher Education Plans. If you want to earn your degree and immediately start working in the industry of your choosing, we’ve given you some food for thought to help you choose one program vs. the other. However, if you have plans to continue your education to earn a master’s or graduate-level degree, a bachelor’s degree is a required prerequisite.  A graduate-level degree can help you gain specialized education in your field and increase your earning potential. If you’re considering any of the following career paths, you will need a master’s degree so you’re better off starting with a bachelor’s program. Psychologist School or career counselor Social worker Occupational therapist Physician assistant Do I Need an Associate’s Degree to Get a Bachelor’s Degree? . An associate’s degree is not a prerequisite to earn a bachelor’s degree, you can skip an associate’s degree and go straight to a bachelor’s degree. However, one option you may want to consider is earning your associate’s degree at a community college prior to transferring to a four-year university. This way, if you end up leaving school, you will still have an associate’s degree. The good news is, if you’ve dropped out, you can always go back to college to earn your bachelor’s at a later time.  Applying Associate’s Degree Credits to a Bachelor’s Degree. If you want to turn your associate’s into a bachelor’s degree, you will need to transfer to a four-year university. It may be helpful to contact an academic advisor at any school you are considering, as they can help you determine which of your previous credits you are able to transfer. If you were not in a trade-specific or specialized associate’s program, you likely have many of the general education courses required to earn your bachelor’s degree. This means you will only need to take upper-division courses and courses related to the major you want to pursue.   Earn Your Associate’s or Bachelor’s at National University. Now that you understand the benefits of each type of degree, we hope you can make a more informed decision about which program is right for you. Regardless of what you choose to study, National University offers flexible remote and in-person learning options and a diverse course catalog of undergraduate programs. Our four-week class schedules cater specifically to working professionals and/or students with families, to allow you to complete your coursework on your own time. Learn more about how to enroll in the undergraduate programs at National University or contact us to speak to an academic advisor. You’re one step closer to earning your degree and setting yourself up for career success.   × Search the site. Modal window with site-search and helpful links Featured Programs. Nursing Business and Management Computer Science Teaching and Credentials Helpful Links. Admissions & Application Information Login Scholarships Accredited Online Degrees & Programs Student Services Request Your Transcripts Tuition × Terms & Conditions. By checking this box as my electronic signature and submitting this form by clicking the Request Info button above, I provide my express written consent to representatives of National University and National University System affiliates (City University of Seattle, Northcentral University and National University Virtual High School) to contact me about educational opportunities, and to send phone calls, and/or SMS/Text Messages – using automated technology, including automatic dialing system and pre-recorded and artificial voice messages – to the phone numbers (including cellular) and e-mail address(es) I have provided. I confirm that the information provided on this form is accurate and complete. I also understand that certain degree programs may not be available in all states. Message and data rates may apply. I understand that consent is not a condition to purchase any goods, services or property, and that I may withdraw my consent at any time by sending an email to [email protected]. I understand that if I am submitting my personal data from outside of the United States, I am consenting to the transfer of my personal data to, and its storage in, the United States, and I understand that my personal data will be subject to processing in accordance with U.S. laws, unless stated otherwise in our privacy policy. Please review our privacy policy for more details or contact us at [email protected].
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 98
  • 29
  • associate
  • 53
  • 29
  • bachelor
  • 52
  • 29
  • program
  • 22
  • 29
  • associate degree
  • 20
  • 29
  • bachelor degree
  • 18
  • 29
  • degree associate
  • 11
  • 29
  • earn
  • 11
  • 29
  • university
  • 11
  • 29
  • earn bachelor
  • 10
  • 29
  • time
  • 10
  • 29
  • career
  • 10
  • 29
  • degree bachelor
  • 8
  • 29
  • job
  • 8
  • 29
  • national university
  • 7
  • 29
  • national
  • 7
  • 29
  • earning
  • 7
  • 29
  • school
  • 7
  • 29
  • education
  • 7
  • 29
  • require
  • 7
  • 29
  • require bachelor
  • 6
  • 29
  • degree program
  • 6
  • 29
  • year
  • 6
  • 29
  • specialized
  • 6
  • 29
  • cours
  • 6
  • 29
  • cost
  • 5
  • 29
  • choose
  • 5
  • 29
  • credit
  • 5
  • 29
  • specific
  • 5
  • 29
  • manager
  • 5
  • 29
  • data
  • 5
  • 29
  • understand
  • 5
  • 29
  • goal
  • 4
  • 29
  • personal
  • 4
  • 29
  • field
  • 4
  • 29
  • contact
  • 4
  • 29
  • associate bachelor
  • 3
  • 29
  • bachelor program
  • 3
  • 29
  • goal earning
  • 3
  • 29
  • general education
  • 3
  • 29
  • job require
  • 3
  • 29
  • earning potential
  • 3
  • 29
  • personal data
  • 3
  • 29
  • state
  • 3
  • 29
  • email
  • 3
  • 29
Result 30
TitleAssociate Degree in Health Science | All Allied Health Schools
Urlhttps://www.allalliedhealthschools.com/health-science/associates-degree/
DescriptionAn associate degree in health science can prepare you for a broad range of careers, working directly with patients or behind the scenes
Date
Organic Position29
H1What You Can Do with an Associate Degree in Health Science
H2Overview
Associate Degree in Health Science
Online Degree Options
Worthwhile Concentrations to Pursue
Careers with an Associate Degree in Health Science
H3Prerequisites
Curriculum
Clinical and Training Requirements
Healthcare Administration
Pharmacy Technician
Associate Degree vs. Bachelor’s Degree
Healthcare Administration
Health Informatics
Medical Lab Technician
Medical Records Administrator
Health Science Writer
H2WithAnchorsOverview
Associate Degree in Health Science
Online Degree Options
Worthwhile Concentrations to Pursue
Careers with an Associate Degree in Health Science
BodyWhat You Can Do with an Associate Degree in Health Science With an associate degree, you can jump into an entry-level healthcare career. OverviewAssociateBachelor’sMaster’sSalary Home » Health Science » Associate Overview Associate Bachelor’s Master’s Salary An associate degree in health science provides the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-based knowledge and skills you need to succeed in a range of growing healthcare professions. This degree is a great starting point if you’re interested in qualifying for entry-level roles at the intersection of science and healthcare. With this education, you can enter the workforce prepared to contribute to many aspects of the healthcare system. In this Article OverviewAssociate Degree in Health ScienceOnline Degrees ConcentrationsHealth Science Careers Overview. An associate degree in health science can prepare you for roles that are behind the scenes or involve direct patient care. Your knowledge will be based on an interdisciplinary curriculum that includes STEM. “Associate-level careers in health sciences can be very rewarding,” says Anna Zendell, PhD, MSW, senior faculty program director at Excelsior College. “People seeking health sciences degrees want to make a difference.” Associate Degree in Health Science. An associate degree in health science typically includes a curriculum that provides a broad view of the healthcare industry through interdisciplinary coursework. Many programs offer the opportunity to focus on a range of clinical or nonclinical concentrations. “Many health sciences degrees are flexible,” Zendell says. “At many colleges, the degree is often open to electives and career exploration.” While some students use the degree as a foundation for earning a bachelor’s or master’s degree later, you can also use it to step into some clinical positions without further education. “(Associate) health science degree programs are great for those traditional college-age students who are not interested in attending school for four years and those nontraditional students seeking a career change,” says Marcy McCarty, MBA, RT (R) (N), director of the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences program and assistant professor of Healthcare Administration at Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences. While some students use the degree as a foundation for earning a bachelor’s or master’s degree later, you can also use it to step into some clinical positions without further education. Prerequisites. A high school diploma or equivalent is the minimum educational requirement to be admitted to a program in health science, and your transcript should reflect good grades in science and math-related subjects, McCarty says. Curriculum. A health science curriculum is designed to give you a strong foundation in basic STEM coursework, along with the professional skills to pursue a career in your area of specialization. Examples of the types of core courses you may find in a health science associate degree include: Anatomy and physiologyComputer and internet literacyEnglish compositionGeneral chemistry General psychologyHealthcare ethicsMedical terminologyStatistics Depending on the program you choose and your goals, you may also be able to take introductory courses in these specialties: Cardiovascular technologyHealth informationNutritionMedical administrative assisting Medical assistingNuclear medicine technologyPharmacy technicianRadiology technology Clinical and Training Requirements. Depending on your specialization, you may be required to complete a capstone project or get hands-on training in a healthcare setting. Working in a professional setting gives you the chance to apply what you’ve learned in the classroom. Your program may refer to this experience as internships, externships, practicums, or fieldwork. Most programs award course credit for this work, and some employers may also provide a stipend to students. Depending on your specialization, you may be required to complete a capstone project or get hands-on training in a healthcare setting. If your specialty involves direct patient care, your training should focus on meeting requirements for professional licensure and/or certifications that your state requires. Online Degree Options. An online degree can be a good choice for students who work, have family responsibilities to juggle, or don’t live near a college campus. Online and campus curriculums are virtually the same. But online programs typically allow you to attend classes at your convenience while meeting established deadlines for assignments and exams. You may also be able to finish your degree faster if your online program allows you to complete courses at your own pace, rather than following a quarter or semester schedule. It’s important to note that while you’ll be able to complete theory-based coursework online, you may have to attend onsite labs and do clinicals, fieldwork, or any other hands-on training in person. While an online degree can be convenient, it’s not for everyone. Online students must manage their work and have the motivation to succeed without the structure of a classroom program. Worthwhile Concentrations to Pursue. While the core of an associate degree in health science provides a broad-based education, some programs allow you to concentrate on a specific clinical or nonclinical area. Here are two concentrations to consider: Healthcare Administration. A healthcare administrator works in roles that involve managing healthcare facilities and ensuring the efficient allocation of resources. These roles are usually behind the scenes rather than at the bedside. At the associate degree level, roles typically involve assisting managers and administrators in their day-to-day duties, with varying degrees of independent responsibility. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects job growth of 32% from 2020 to 2030 for healthcare managers and administrators. This staggering demand is due largely to the increasing need for healthcare services as the number of older adults continues to grow. Pharmacy Technician. A pharmacy technician works under the supervision of a pharmacist, assisting in tasks related to dispensing prescription medication accurately and safely. They also perform administrative tasks such as inventory control and insurance billing. As pharmacists perform more clinical roles, like administering immunizations, and the demand for prescription medicine increases with the growing aging population, pharmacy technicians are performing more duties traditionally handled by pharmacists. The BLS projects 4% job growth for pharmacy technicians from 2020 to 2030. Associate Degree vs. Bachelor’s Degree. An advantage of pursuing an associate degree is that you can qualify for a range of entry-level positions without a four-year degree. This can save you time and money and let you decide whether a field is right for you before committing to a bachelor’s degree. “There is absolutely a benefit to starting with an associate degree for some students,” Zendell says. “Many students are working full time while earning their degrees, all while balancing work, family, and community roles. They will often take a break between degrees to test the waters and be sure this is what they really want to do before going further.” While an associate degree can qualify you for entry-level positions, you may need a bachelor’s when you’re ready to move up to positions with more responsibility. “The associate degree typically leads to entry-level careers, such as technical and assisting careers in radiology, dentistry, and in laboratories, or research and development,” Zendell says. “Career options in management and leadership begin to open up with a bachelor’s degree. Graduates enter healthcare delivery, advocacy, health education, health promotion, community health work, informatics, and more with their bachelor’s degrees.” Careers with an Associate Degree in Health Science. Whether you plan to use an associate degree in health science to begin a lifelong career or serve as a path to more advanced roles, the degree can qualify you for a range of entry-level positions, McCarty says. “Health science degree programs are unique because a student only needs the associate degree to practice in that specific discipline for many programs,” she says. “Many health science societies and accreditors only recommend/require an associate degree to meet the eligibility status for certification or licensure.” A certification is a professional credential that demonstrates knowledge and expertise in a profession or specialty. States and employers sometimes require professionals to earn certification for employment. But even if they don’t, a professional credential is worth considering. They may: Help you stand out in a field of job candidates Position you for career advancement Boost your salary Consider some of the potential careers you can pursue with a two-year degree: Healthcare Administration. Job Description: At the associate-degree level, positions in healthcare administration typically involve assisting more advanced managers who oversee the resources of departments, facilities, or entire systems. Working in these entry-level assistant roles can often be the first step in a lifelong career in this area of healthcare.Median Salary: $104,280 (at managerial levels; at the assistant level, the salary will be less)Job Outlook: 32% growth from 2020 to 2030Required Skills and Traits: Analytical skills, communication skills, detail-orientedAvailable Certifications: Certified Healthcare Access Manager (CHAM)Certified Medical Manager (CMM)Certified Professional in Healthcare Risk Management (CPHRM) Health Informatics. Job Description: A health informatics technician maintains and reviews patient records and the coding of health information data. Their duties include organizing and updating patient data in clinical databases or registries.Median Salary: $44,090Job Outlook: 9% growth from 2020 to 2030Required Skills and Traits: Analytical skills, detail-orientedAvailable Certifications: Certified Associate in Healthcare Information and Management Systems (CAHIMS)Certified Healthcare Technology Specialist (CHTS)Certified Health Informatics Systems Professional (CHISP) Medical Lab Technician. Job Description: A medical lab technician collects blood, urine, tissue, and other samples so they can be analyzed for disease and other conditions. Their duties can include working with patients to collect samples and using sophisticated equipment to provide accurate and useful data for patient care.Median Salary: $54,180Job Outlook: 11% growth from 2020 to 2030Required Skills and Traits: Ability to use technology, detail-oriented, dexterityAvailable Certifications: American Medical Technologists (AMT)Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT)Phlebotomy Technician (PBT) Medical Records Administrator. Job Description: A medical records administrator organizes, manages, and codes health information data. They use various classification systems to code and categorize patient information for databases and registries, process insurance reimbursements, and maintain patient histories. Median Salary: $44,090Job Outlook: 9% growth from 2020 to 2030Required Skills and Traits: Analytical skills, detail-orientedAvailable Certifications: Certified Professional Coder (CPC)Certified Coding Associate (CCA)Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT) Health Science Writer. Job Description: A health science writer creates documents, articles, and other media related to a wide range of medical, scientific, and health-related topics for the general public. They often consult with medical professionals or research medical content to report on news involving research and developments in healthcare.Median Salary: $74,650Job Outlook: 12% growth from 2020 to 2030Required Skills and Traits: Writing and research skills, critical thinkingAvailable Certifications: Certified Medical Writing Professional (CMWP)Medical Writer Certified (MWC) Salaries and projected job outlook are from the BLS. With professional insight from:Anna GiorgiContributing Writer With professional insight from:Anna Zendell, PhD, MSWSenior Faculty Program Director for Graduate Health Sciences Degrees, Excelsior College With professional insight from:Marcy McCarty, MBA, RT (R) (N)Program Director, Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences, and Assistant Professor, Bachelor of Science Healthcare Administration, Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 52
  • 30
  • health
  • 36
  • 30
  • science
  • 32
  • 30
  • associate
  • 26
  • 30
  • health science
  • 25
  • 30
  • healthcare
  • 21
  • 30
  • associate degree
  • 20
  • 30
  • bachelor
  • 19
  • 30
  • program
  • 15
  • 30
  • career
  • 14
  • 30
  • professional
  • 14
  • 30
  • level
  • 12
  • 30
  • skill
  • 12
  • 30
  • medical
  • 11
  • 30
  • salary
  • 10
  • 30
  • job
  • 10
  • 30
  • student
  • 10
  • 30
  • technician
  • 10
  • 30
  • master
  • 9
  • 30
  • degree health
  • 9
  • 30
  • growth
  • 9
  • 30
  • position
  • 9
  • 30
  • role
  • 9
  • 30
  • certification
  • 9
  • 30
  • associate degree health
  • 8
  • 30
  • degree health science
  • 8
  • 30
  • outlook
  • 8
  • 30
  • patient
  • 8
  • 30
  • clinical
  • 8
  • 30
  • online
  • 8
  • 30
  • growth 2020
  • 7
  • 30
  • entry level
  • 7
  • 30
  • entry
  • 7
  • 30
  • college
  • 7
  • 30
  • work
  • 7
  • 30
  • 2020
  • 7
  • 30
  • health science degree
  • 5
  • 30
  • growth 2020 2030required
  • 5
  • 30
  • 2020 2030required skill
  • 5
  • 30
  • 2030required skill trait
  • 5
  • 30
  • level position
  • 5
  • 30
  • science degree
  • 5
  • 30
  • healthcare administration
  • 5
  • 30
  • job description
  • 5
  • 30
  • 2020 2030required
  • 5
  • 30
  • 2030required skill
  • 5
  • 30
  • skill trait
  • 5
  • 30
  • certified
  • 5
  • 30
  • information
  • 5
  • 30
  • health science associate
  • 4
  • 30
  • bachelor degree
  • 4
  • 30
  • science associate
  • 4
  • 30
  • pharmacy technician
  • 4
  • 30
  • certification certified
  • 4
  • 30
  • science associate degree
  • 3
  • 30
  • bachelor master
  • 3
  • 30
  • hand training
  • 3
  • 30
  • entry level position
  • 3
  • 30
  • skill trait analytical
  • 3
  • 30
  • trait analytical skill
  • 3
  • 30
  • skill detail orientedavailable
  • 3
  • 30
  • detail orientedavailable certification
  • 3
  • 30
  • orientedavailable certification certified
  • 3
  • 30
  • bachelor science
  • 3
  • 30
  • hand
  • 3
  • 30
  • training
  • 3
  • 30
  • online degree
  • 3
  • 30
  • degree qualify
  • 3
  • 30
  • trait analytical
  • 3
  • 30
  • analytical skill
  • 3
  • 30
  • skill detail
  • 3
  • 30
  • detail orientedavailable
  • 3
  • 30
  • orientedavailable certification
  • 3
  • 30
  • health informatic
  • 3
  • 30
  • health information
  • 3
  • 30
  • professional insight
  • 3
  • 30
Result 31
TitleAssociate of Science Majors | Columbus State Community College
Urlhttps://www.cscc.edu/academics/transfer/as-majors.shtml
Description
Date
Organic Position30
H1Associate of Science Majors
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyAssociate of Science Majors Future Scientists of Ohio Scholarship If you are entering an Associate of Science major at Columbus State with plans to transfer on to earn a STEM-related bachelor's degree, you may be eligible for the Future Scientists of Ohio (FSO) scholarship. FSO pays full tuition for two years at Columbus State and provides additional benefits. FSO scholars also have scholarship opportunities after completing the Associate of Science and transferring to a four-year institution. Find out more here. Complete the Columbus State scholarship application before June 1, 2020 for priority FSO Scholarship consideration. Scholarships will be awarded after this date as funds remain available.   The following Associate of Science degrees are designed to transfer to a four-year college. They fulfill the first two years of a bachelor's degree. Anthropological Sciences Associate of Science Degree Biology Associate of Science Degree Chemistry Associate of Science Degree Computer and Information Science Associate of Science Degree Economics Associate of Science Degree Geography Associate of Science Degree Geology Associate of Science Degree Integrated Science Education Associate of Science Degree Mathematics Associate of Science Degree Middle Childhood Math & Science Education Associate of Science Degree Physics Associate of Science Degree Psychology Associate of Science Degree Systems Engineering Associate of Science Degree   Department Contact Academics Department (614) 287-0000 [email protected]
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • science
  • 21
  • 31
  • associate science
  • 17
  • 31
  • associate
  • 17
  • 31
  • degree
  • 16
  • 31
  • associate science degree
  • 14
  • 31
  • science degree
  • 14
  • 31
  • year
  • 6
  • 31
  • scholarship
  • 6
  • 31
  • columbu state
  • 4
  • 31
  • state
  • 4
  • 31
  • fso
  • 4
  • 31
  • columbu
  • 3
  • 31