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TitleWhat Can I Do With a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Degree?
Urlhttps://www.besthealthdegrees.com/careers/nuclear-medical-technology-degrees
Description
Date
Organic Position1
H1What Can I Do With a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Degree?
H2The Best Health Degrees
H3How do I Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist?
Can I Study to Become a Nuclear Medical Technician Online?
Do I need to be Certified to Work as a Nuclear Medicine Technician?
What jobs can you get with a nuclear medicine technology degree?
What Jobs are Related to the Nuclear Care Technologist?
How many years does it take to become a nuclear medicine technologist?
What are the Salary Expectations of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
H2WithAnchorsThe Best Health Degrees
BodyWhat Can I Do With a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Degree? A nuclear medicine technologist (NMT) is an imaging specialist who uses radionuclides prepared in a solution to create radiopharmaceuticals (under the supervision of a doctor). These radiopharmaceuticals are then administered to generate imagery that detects radioactivity in the body. This type of imagery differs from something like an X-ray as the imagery records the radiation from the inside out. Whereas an X-ray utilizes radiation from an external source. The NMT operates the equipment that generates these images and is responsible for clear communication to patients who are undergoing tests. They provide technical support to physicians and help to diagnose and treat patients. Nuclear medicine techs are employed in hospitals, clinics, diagnostic laboratories, offices and other facilities that use nuclear medical imagery. Common nuclear medicine scans include a positron emission tomography (PET) scan and a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. The nuclear medicine tech will be in charge of operating equipment like these. Required Science Quick Glance. As a nuclear medicine technologist you will want to have a background in: chemistryphysicsmathematicsmedicinecomputer technology Most nuclear medicine technologists will take these courses during their associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Skills of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Quick Glance. Clearly communicate medical procedures and tests to patientsAnswer any questions patients may have about proceduresPut patients at easeAdhere to safty protocol ensuring patients are safe from excessive radiation exposure.Prepare radioactive drugsAdminister radioactive drugsWatch over patients and look for out-of-the-ordinary reactions to drugsOperate a variety of imaging equipmentTake Data and maintain records during testingEvaluate ImageryDispose of radioactive materials safelyAssist during a nuclear crisisMaintains Patient ConfidentialityWhen Necessary Transfer Patients to and from machines A Day in the Life of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. A nuclear medicine technologist is more likely to work in a hospital setting but may work in a lab or other similar setting. Many NMTs work on weekends or in the evenings though schedules will vary depending on setting and length of time working in a facility. Like with most medical professions, shift work is likely part of the job. Each day an NMT will perform all diagnostic and nuclear medicine procedures. It is essential than an NMT have an excellent rapport with patients as the NMT is responsible for explaining the process to the patient. An NMT must conform to the ALARA precautions to ensure that each patient receives only the necessary dose of radioactive medicine. The NMT must then make up the nuclear pharmaceuticals under the supervision of a doctor. An NMT may be required to float from one facility to the next and may even be on call for some positions. NMT Soft Skills Good communicatorFriendlyCompassionateDetail OrientedFollow InstructionsWork as a TeamGood ListenerCan Take Constructive Feedback NMT Hard Skills Explain Medical ProceduresAnswer medically-related questionsFollow ALARAKeep Patients SafePrepare Radioactive drugsAdminister MedicineMonitor PatientsKeep Detailed Records during entire procedureOperate What Do I Study in a Nuclear Medical Technician Degree Program?Imagery EquipmentKeep Detailed RecordsRadiation Disposal How do I Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist? Most individuals who pursue a career as a nuclear medicine technologist will get either an associate’s or a bachelor’s degree. Let’s take a look at an example curriculum from both. Sample Curriculum for an Associate’s in Nuclear Medicine Technology (A.A.S). General Education Requirements CommunicationSocial Behavioral SciencesLife and Physcial Sciences/ MathematicsLiberal Arts/Language/CreativityInstitution-Specific Requirement Major Course Requirements Physics for Allied HealthNuclear Medicine Patient CareNuclear Medicine InstrumentationRadiochemistry and RadiopharmacyNuclear Medicine Methodology I,IIAdvanced Positron Emission TomographySeminarPracticum, I,II,III,IV,V Related Courses to this Major Total Credit Hours: 60 Anatomy and Physiology IAnatomy and Physiology IIIntroduction to ChemistryChemistry Lab Sample Curriculum for a Bachelor’s in Nuclear Medicine Technology (BHS). General Education Requirements English Comp I,IICollege Algebra/CalculusPsychologyLiteraturePhilosophySpeech Major Course Requirements Medical TerminologyMedical WritingCross Sectional AnatomyResearchMedical SociologyPathophysiologyIntroduction to Clinical PracticeIntroduction to Radiation PhysicsClinical ProceduresNuclear Physics and InstrumentationNuclear CardiologyCT Instrumentation and PhysicsPET InstrumentationClinical ProceduresAdvanced CardiologyClinical PracticumCT Procedures and Protocols Related Courses to this Major Anatomy and Physiology IAnatomy and Physiology IIIntroduction to ChemistryChemistry LabPhysicsNatural Science with a LabRadiation Physics Can I Study to Become a Nuclear Medical Technician Online? Today it is very possible to study to become a nuclear medical technician online. An online associate’s degree in nuclear medicine prepares students for an entry-level job as a nuclear medicine technologist. You can find the majority of programming through this online format though most of these type of programs do require a practicum experience which can be arranged at a location in your area. The other component of the course that may not be supported through an online format is the anatomy and physiology course and other related courses. Check with your institution in advance to determine which courses you may need to complete elsewhere. That being said, many programs offer all of or the majority of the curriculum online. When it comes to pursuing an online bachelor’s degree in nuclear medicine technology you may have a much more difficult time finding a good fit for an entry-level position. In many cases, students will pursue an online associate’s degree in nuclear medicine technology and then return after becoming certified to complete a bachelor’s of science. The majority of programs require an in-person component where you will gain hands-on experience with the technology. The bachelor’s degrees are generally much more thorough than the associate’s degrees and are starting to become the standard for job entry in the field. If you are looking to complete an online bachelor’s in medical imaging technology a good path would be to complete your A.A.S in nuclear medicine technology and then return once you have received either the ARRT certification or the NMTCB certification. There are a few schools that offer a Bachelor in Radiation Science Technology. Be sure to check that these schools are accredited according to the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Do I need to be Certified to Work as a Nuclear Medicine Technician? To become a nuclear medicine technician you will need to obtain either an associate’s or a bachelor’s degree in the field. These programs included clinical experience where the individual is required to fulfill this during their course work. From there, the majority of nuclear medicine technologists do become certified though this is not a requirement for the initial licensure it does, however, fulfill the requirements for most of the states. In some instances, your employer will require a certification regardless of the state requirements. For this reason, it is probably wise to pursue a certification. There are two main places where you can obtain certification the American Registry of Radiologic Technicians (ARRT) and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). ARRT Certification Requirements. To become certified through ARRT you must complete an A.A.S. or higher in an ARRT-approved program. Be sure to check our the ARRT-Recognized Accreditation Agencies. Most accredited institutions will apply. Additionally, you will be required to complete an ARRT-approved educational program. These programs may be completed at the community college level, state school level or university medical center. Finallly you will need to pass an exam with the ARRT. The exam is 4 hours long and contains 220 scored items. The majority of the questions are multiple-choice and are presented on a computer. ARRT Content Specifications. The following are the four main categories for the ARRT exam: Patient CareSafetyImage ProductionProcedures Here are a few examples of the types of questions you’ll be asked by category: Patient Care Ethical ConsiderationsPatients RightsExtent of CareInterpersonal CommunicationPatient EducationPhysical AssistanceInfection ControlEquipment DisinfectionDisposal of Contaminated Materials Safety Physical Properties of Radioactive MaterialsBiological Effects of RadiationBasic Concepts of Radiation ProtectionNCR regulations for exposureMedical EventsArea Facilities MonitoringRadioactive MaterialsDisposal of Pharmaceuticals Image Production Survey MeterDose CalibratorScintillation Detector SystemGas and Aerosol Delivery SystemsGamma CameraSPECT AcquisitionPET/CT ScannerData Processing Procedures Producing RadionuclidesRadiopharmaceutical CharacteristicsPreparation and AdministrationCalculating DoseCardiac ProceduresEndocrine and Oncology ProceduresGastrointestinal and Genitourinary ProceduresRadiopharmaceuticalsTherapeutic PharmaceuticalsInterventional Pharmaceuticals NMTCB Certification Requirements. The NMTCB certification is considered to be a high-quality certification for any individual pursuing a career as a nuclear medicine tech. When you complete this certification you are then allowed to use the CNMT designation. Am I Eligible to Take the NMTCB Exam? In order to take the exam you will need to complete a NMTCB recognized NMT program. This program must be accredited and culminate with a certificate meaning that an associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s degree will work for this. These programs must include a clinical training component. Once you have fulfilled these two areas you will be ready to prepare for your exam. The exam committee focuses on practical experiences that commonly occur in the first year of your NMT career. The following areas are covered on the test: Radiation Physics and DetectionRadiation Safety and RegulationsPharmaceutical and Radiopharmaceutical AgentsInstrumentation Operation and Quality ControlClinical Procedures The exam is formatted as a multiple choice test and is offered at IQT Testing Centers across the nation. The questions are centered around the practical application of materials learned during your course not on rote memorization of facts. Additionally, the NMTCB offers certifications for continuing education including their CT Exam, Radiation Safety Exam, PET Specialty Exam, NCT Specialty Exam, and NMAA Exam. Continuing education allows you to remain certified, relevant and generally opens more doors in your career. These types of What jobs can you get with a nuclear medicine technology degree? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) NMT employment is projected to grow at a pace of 7% between 2018 and 2028. This is faster than the average for all occupations. This position primarily looks at the organ systems of the body and the aging population will have an effect on the demand of this particular job. For example, an NMT may need to sue a NCT (nuclear cardiology) to examine a patient’s heat. An NMT is also trained to respond in times of emergency. The future landscape may have an impact on the demand of this job. A degree in nuclear medicine technology often leads to a career as a nuclear medicine technician. The NMT may find a position in a hospital, physicians office, outpatient care center, and medical and diagnostic laboratories. These positions are typically full-time and may include time spent on the evenings and weekends. This job focuses on radioactive chemical compounds that have been prepared to make radiopharmaceuticals What Jobs are Related to the Nuclear Care Technologist? Radiologic Technologist A Radiologic Technologist analyzes patients from the outside in. This person uses diagnostic imagery such as an MRI, X-Ray or CT to take images of patients. This individual typically works in a hospital or clinical setting. Biological Technician A Biological technician has a background in biology and assists biologists and medical scientists conduct their laboratory tests. The job is research-heavy and takes place inside of a laboratory. Radiation Therapist A radiation therapist helps to treat patients by administering radiation therapy and will treat diseases such as cancer as well as other diseases that require radiation treatment. This is a high-paying job that is typically a full-time position. Medical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians Medical Laboratory Technologists (AKA Medical Laboratory Scientists) analyze samples in a lab. How many years does it take to become a nuclear medicine technologist? Generally speaking it will take 2-4 years of education to become an NMT. An A.A.S. is a 2 year degree and a Bachelor’s degree generally takes 4 years to complete. Should I Pursue an Associate’s in Nuclear Medicine Technology or a Bachelor’s in Nuclear Medicine Technology? Associate’s Degrees Pros Affordable TuitionOnly 2 Years LongGood for Entry Level Jobs Associate’s Degrees Cons Not As ThoroughMany Jobs Require A Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Degrees Pros Thorough ProgrammingMany Jobs Seeking Candidates With a Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Degrees Cons Takes Longer to CompleteMore ExpensiveStill Only Entry Level Jobs What are the Salary Expectations of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. According to the BLS the median wage for NMTs is $76,820. The highest paid NMTs get up to $104,730 and the lowest paid get $55,330. A nuclear medicine technician is an excellent job that is on the rise. This position requires an individual who is sensitive and sharp as well as hard working. It is possible to land a job after just 2 years of schooling and certification is still at this stage optional. Most jobs require at least one certification. There is a faster than average rise in job expectations for NMTs. If you have an interest in physics and helping people to find solutions to their health concerns, this is a fantastic option. The Best Health Degrees. Take your healthcare career anywhere with the right degree from accredited universities.
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Result 2
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TitleNuclear Medicine Technologist - Explore Health Care Careers - Mayo Clinic College of Medicine & Science
Urlhttps://college.mayo.edu/academics/explore-health-care-careers/careers-a-z/nuclear-medicine-technologist/
DescriptionLearn about a health care career as a nuclear medicine technologist, including what they do, where they work, and training programs at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science
Date
Organic Position3
H1
H2What does a nuclear medicine technologist do?
Becoming a nuclear medicine technologist
Nuclear medicine technologist program at Mayo Clinic
H3Scope of practice
Work environment
Higher education requirements
Certification process
Career opportunities and outlook
By the numbers
Browse similar careers
Diagnostic medical sonographer
Neurodiagnostic technologist
Radiologic technologist
H2WithAnchorsWhat does a nuclear medicine technologist do?
Becoming a nuclear medicine technologist
Nuclear medicine technologist program at Mayo Clinic
BodyCollege of Medicine and Science Skip to main content Patient Care College Research Contact Visit Search Log In Student/Faculty PortalMedHubBlackboardContinuous Professional Development Page Content What does a nuclear medicine technologist do? Nuclear medicine technologists perform tests for diagnosis and medical research. They prepare and give small doses of radioactive drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) to patients, then use high-level imaging equipment to record images of the radioactive material in the body. Physicians interpret the images to study and diagnose an infection or disorder. Nuclear medicine technologists also give doses of radiation to patients internally to treat medical conditions. Scope of practice. Nuclear medicine technologists work with doctors, medical physicists, nuclear pharmacists, computer specialists, nurses, and administrative staff. Common tasks and duties of the role include: Preparing and administering radioactive drugs Capturing images that a physician will use to diagnose an infection or disorder Limiting radiation exposure to the patient and staff members administering the tests Analyzing specimens in the lab Setting up appointments Explaining procedures to patients Work environment. Nuclear medicine technologists are typically employed by hospitals, universities, medical clinics, imaging clinics, diagnostic labs, and research centers. They typically work a 40-hour week, which may include evening or weekend hours. They may also be required to have some on-call responsibilities. Becoming a nuclear medicine technologist. Individuals interested in becoming a nuclear medicine technologist, should prepare for their future career by taking high school courses heavy in math and science like algebra, biology, chemistry, geometry, statistics, and physics.  Higher education requirements. While the pathway to becoming a nuclear medicine technologist may look different for each individual, most employers require the following: Completion of an associate degree or bachelor's degree Completion of a certificate program that specializes in nuclear medicine technology In most circumstances, the difference between having an associate degree or a bachelor's degree will determine which professional certifications for which you can apply and there may be some difference in on-the-job responsibilities.  Certification process. Many employers require certification or licensure to work as a nuclear medicine technologist. Certification is available for individuals who have completed a nuclear medicine program and passed the certifying exam from a certification board like the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Career opportunities and outlook. Nuclear medicine technologists can expect a median annual salary of $79,500. Nuclear medicine technologists are in demand throughout the U.S. and career opportunities are good. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects employment of nuclear medicine technologists to grow faster than average. With the growth of the middle-aged and older adult populations, demand will increase for diagnostic procedures, including nuclear medicine testing. In addition, technological advancements will likely increase the diagnostic use of nuclear medicine. With additional training and experience, a nuclear medicine technologist could become a lead technologist or a research technologist. They could also move into a management or education role. Technologists can also earn specialty certificates to increase opportunities for advancement such as in positron emission tomography. By the numbers. $80kmedian annual salary2-4years of higher education5%job growth projected from 2019-2029 Nuclear medicine technologist program at Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic offers a one-year Nuclear Medicine Technology Program in Rochester, Minnesota, to prepare students for a career as a nuclear medicine technologist. Browse similar careers. Diagnostic medical sonographer. Neurodiagnostic technologist. Radiologic technologist. Back to top Academics ▸ Explore Health Care Careers ▸ Careers A-Z ▸ Nuclear Medicine Technologist Careers in health care: Let us help you find your fit Contact us Close
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TitleTechnologist - Careers in Nuclear Medicine - SNMMI
Urlhttps://www.snmmi.org/AboutSNMMI/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=4139
Description
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Organic Position4
H1Technologist - Careers in Nuclear Medicine
H2
H3In This Section
The Technologist's Role
An Exciting Future!
A Variety of Opportunities
Career Alternatives
Educational Programs
Certification
RELATED CONTENT
H2WithAnchors
BodyTechnologist - Careers in Nuclear Medicine If you have a keen interest in the health sciences and computer technology and are looking for a people-oriented career, consider Nuclear Medicine Technology! Nuclear medicine combines chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer technology, and medicine in using radioactivity to diagnose and treat disease. Though there are many diagnostic techniques currently available, nuclear medicine uniquely provides information about both the structure and function of virtually every major organ system within the body. It is this ability to characterize and quantify physiologic function which separates nuclear medicine from other imaging modalities, such as x-ray. Nuclear medicine procedures are safe, they involve little or no patient discomfort and do not require the use of anesthesia. The Technologist's Role. The Nuclear Medicine Technologist is a highly specialized healthcare professional who works closely with the nuclear medicine physician. Some of the technologist's primary responsibilities are to: Prepare and administer radioactive chemical compounds, known as radiopharmaceuticals Perform patient imaging procedures using sophisticated radiation-detecting instrumentation Accomplish computer processing and image enhancement Analyze biologic specimens in the laboratory Provide images, data analysis, and patient information to the physician for diagnostic interpretation. During an imaging procedure, the technologist works directly with the patient. The technologist: Gains the patient's confidence by obtaining pertinent history, describing the procedure and answering any questions Monitors the patient's physical condition during the course of the procedure Notes any specific patient comments which might indicate the need for additional images or might be useful to the physician in interpreting the results of the procedure. An Exciting Future! Nuclear medicine will continue to be a field at the forefront of modern clinical medicine and technological development. The future has never been brighter thanks to: The development of new radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes Promising research and development of cancer-detecting and cancer-killing agents, such as genetically engineered antibodies The expanding clinical use of exciting new technology know as Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which provides new and unique means of studying biochemistry and metabolism within living tissues. A Variety of Opportunities. Nuclear Medicine Technologists work in a wide variety of clinical settings, such as Community hospitals University-affiliated teaching hospitals and medical centers Outpatient imaging facilities Public health institutions Government and private research institutes. Salaries in nuclear medicine are very good. Salaries tend to vary with geographic regions and cost of living. For entry-level salary information for your region, contact a Nuclear Medicine Technology training program in your area. Career Alternatives. Technologists have a wide variety of alternative career paths available, including: Senior staff technologist Research technologist Technology program educator Chief technologist Team leader, lead or supervisor Hospital administrator Industry sales representative, technical specialist, or research-and-development specialist. Educational Programs. More than 100 accredited Nuclear Medicine Technology programs currently offer instruction and clinical internship. General prerequisites depend on the type of program offered, but typically include a background in science and mathematics and an interest in working with patients. Programs available include: Post-bachalaureate one-year certificate programs Two-year associate degree Four-year bachelor's degree For information about or a complete list of Nuclear Medicine Technology programs, contact: Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology 2000 W. Danforth Road Suite 130, #203 Edmond, OK 73003 Tel 405.285.0546 Fax 405.285.0579 Website: www.jrcnmt.org Email: j[email protected] Or contact your guidance counselor or local library for The Allied Health Education Directory (ISBN 0-88970-186-8) Certification. Upon successful completion of a nuclear medicine program, qualified technologists can be certified through examination by one of the national certifying agencies. Many employers and an increasing number of states now require certification or licensure. Want More Information? Call your local hospital and ask for the Nuclear Medicine Department. Speak directly with a Nuclear Medicine Technologist and arrange for a visit. For additional information about the profession, write or call The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technologist Section1850 Samuel Morse DriveReston, Va 20190-5316Tel 703-708-9000Email: [email protected]   2/17/2011 Technologist Career Brochure RELATED CONTENT. Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology 2/17/2011 Technologist Career Brochure - PDF document, 736 KB Fact Sheet: Molecular Imaging and Head and Neck Cancers Fact Sheet: Molecular Imaging and Parkinson’s Disease Fact Sheet: Molecular Imaging and Melanoma Centers of Excellence Gastrointestinal (GI) Cancer ADVERTISING • LIST SALES • MEDIA • CONTACT • SITE MAP • PRIVACY NOTICE/LEGAL/DISCLAIMER COI • REPORT A PROBLEM 1850 Samuel Morse Drive  Reston, Virginia 20190  P: 703.708.9000  F: 703.708.9015 Download Acrobat Reader STAY IN TOUCH:
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TitleNuclear Medicine Technologists : Occupational Outlook Handbook: : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Urlhttps://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nuclear-medicine-technologists.htm
DescriptionNuclear medicine technologists prepare and administer radioactive drugs for imaging or treatment
DateSep 8, 2021
Organic Position5
H1Nuclear Medicine Technologists
H2Summary
What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do About this section
Work Environment About this section
How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist About this section
Pay About this section
Job Outlook About this section
State & Area Data About this section
Similar Occupations About this section
Contacts for More Information About this section
What They Do
Work Environment
How to Become One
Pay
State & Area Data
Job Outlook
Similar Occupations
Contacts for More Information
2020 Median Pay
On-the-job Training
Entry-level Education
Work experience in a related occupation
Number of Jobs, 2020
Job Outlook, 2020-30
Employment Change, 2020-30
Entry-level Education
On-the-job Training
Employment Change, projected 2020-30
Growth Rate (Projected)
Projected Number of New Jobs
Projected Growth Rate
2020 Median Pay
H3What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do
Work Environment
How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Pay
Job Outlook
State & Area Data
Similar Occupations
More Information, Including Links to O*NET
Duties
Injuries and Illnesses
Work Schedules
Education
Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations
Important Qualities
Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Employment
Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)
Projections Central
CareerOneStop
CareerOneStop
O*NET
H2WithAnchorsSummary
What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do About this section
Work Environment About this section
How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist About this section
Pay About this section
Job Outlook About this section
State & Area Data About this section
Similar Occupations About this section
Contacts for More Information About this section
What They Do
Work Environment
How to Become One
Pay
State & Area Data
Job Outlook
Similar Occupations
Contacts for More Information
2020 Median Pay
On-the-job Training
Entry-level Education
Work experience in a related occupation
Number of Jobs, 2020
Job Outlook, 2020-30
Employment Change, 2020-30
Entry-level Education
On-the-job Training
Employment Change, projected 2020-30
Growth Rate (Projected)
Projected Number of New Jobs
Projected Growth Rate
2020 Median Pay
BodyNuclear Medicine Technologists PRINTER-FRIENDLY Summary What They Do Work Environment How to Become One Pay Job Outlook State & Area Data Similar Occupations More Info Summary. Please enable javascript to play this video. Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dI4kdhlAlKU. Quick Facts: Nuclear Medicine Technologists 2020 Median Pay $79,590 per year $38.27 per hour Typical Entry-Level Education Associate's degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation None On-the-job Training None Number of Jobs, 2020 18,300 Job Outlook, 2020-30 8% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2020-30 1,400 What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do . Nuclear medicine technologists prepare and administer radioactive drugs for imaging or treatment. Work Environment. Most nuclear medicine technologists work in hospitals. Some work in physicians’ offices, diagnostic laboratories, or imaging clinics. Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate’s degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Formal education programs in nuclear medicine technology or a related healthcare field lead to a certificate, an associate’s degree, or a bachelor’s degree. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified, and some must be licensed. Pay. The median annual wage for nuclear medicine technologists was $79,590 in May 2020. Job Outlook . Employment of nuclear medicine technologists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 1,500 openings for nuclear medicine technologists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. State & Area Data . Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for nuclear medicine technologists. Similar Occupations. Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of nuclear medicine technologists with similar occupations. More Information, Including Links to O*NET. Learn more about nuclear medicine technologists by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations. What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do About this section. Most nuclear medicine technologists work in hospitals. Nuclear medicine technologists prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to patients for imaging or treatment. They provide technical support to physicians or others who diagnose, care for, and treat patients and to researchers who investigate uses of radioactive drugs. They also may act as emergency responders in the event of a nuclear disaster. Duties. Nuclear medicine technologists typically do the following: Explain medical procedures to the patient and answer questions Follow safety procedures to protect themselves and the patient from unnecessary radiation exposure Prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to the patient Maintain and operate imaging equipment Keep detailed records of procedures Follow procedures for radiation disposal Nuclear medicine technologists work with radioactive drugs, known as radiopharmaceuticals, to help physicians and surgeons diagnose a patient’s condition. For example, they may inject radiopharmaceuticals into the bloodstream of a patient with foot pain and then use special scanning equipment that captures images of the bones; a radiologist interprets the scan results, based on the concentration of radioactivity appearing in the image, to identify the source of the patient’s pain. Nuclear medicine technologists also deliver radiopharmaceuticals in prescribed doses to specific areas, such as tumors, to treat medical conditions. Internal radiation treatment may be used in conjunction with, or as an alternative to, surgery. In the event of a radioactive incident or nuclear disaster, some nuclear medicine technologists may be involved in emergency response efforts. These workers’ experience with radiation detection and monitoring equipment may be useful during a response to events that involve radiological materials. The following are types of nuclear medicine technologists: Nuclear cardiology technologists use radioactive drugs to obtain images of the heart. Patients may exercise during the imaging process while the technologist creates images of the heart and blood flow. Nuclear medicine computed tomography (CT) technologists use radioactive isotopes in combination with x-ray imaging to create two-dimensional or three-dimensional pictures of the inside of the body. Positron emission tomography (PET) technologists use a machine that creates a three-dimensional image of a part of the body, such as the brain. They also use radiopharmaceuticals to measure body functions, such as metabolism. Some nuclear medicine technologists support researchers in developing nuclear medicine applications for imagery or treatment. Work Environment About this section. Some radiopharmaceuticals are given intravenously to treat cancers, blood diseases, or other illnesses. Nuclear medicine technologists held about 18,300 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of nuclear medicine technologists were as follows: Hospitals; state, local, and private 70% Offices of physicians 14 Medical and diagnostic laboratories 7 Outpatient care centers 3 Technologists are on their feet for long periods and may need to lift or turn patients who are ill or injured. Injuries and Illnesses. Although radiation hazards exist in this occupation, they are minimized by the use of gloves and other shielding devices. Nuclear medicine technologists wear badges that measure radiation levels in the radiation area. Instruments monitor their radiation exposure and detailed records are kept on how much radiation they get over their lifetime. When preparing radioactive drugs, technologists use safety procedures to minimize radiation exposure to patients, other healthcare workers, and themselves. Like other healthcare workers, nuclear medicine technologists may be exposed to infectious diseases. Work Schedules. Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. Some nuclear medicine technologists work irregular hours, such as evenings or weekends. They also may be on call, especially if they work in hospitals. How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist About this section. Nuclear medicine technologists can earn specialty certifications that show their proficiency in specific procedures or equipment. Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate’s degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Formal education programs in nuclear medicine technology or a related healthcare field lead to a certificate, an associate’s degree, or a bachelor’s degree. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified, and some must be licensed. Education. High school students interested in nuclear medicine technology should take courses in math and sciences, including biology, chemistry, anatomy, and physics. Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate’s degree in nuclear medicine technology to enter the occupation. Bachelor’s degrees also are common. Some technologists complete an associate’s or a bachelor’s degree program in a related health field, such as radiologic technology or nursing, followed by a 12-month certificate program in nuclear medicine technology. Nuclear medicine technology programs often include courses in human anatomy and physiology, physics, chemistry, radioactive drugs, and computer science. In addition, these programs include clinical experience—practice under the supervision of a certified nuclear medicine technologist and a physician or surgeon who specializes in nuclear medicine. Graduating from a nuclear medicine program accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology may be required for licensure or by an employer. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified. Although certification is not required for a license, it fulfills most of the requirements for state licensure. Licensing requirements vary by state. For specific requirements, contact the state’s health board. Some employers require certification, regardless of state regulations. Certification usually involves graduating from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Certification is available from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). In addition to receiving general certification, technologists may earn specialty certifications that show their proficiency in procedures or equipment. A technologist must pass an exam offered by the NMTCB to earn certification in positron emission tomography (PET), nuclear cardiology (NCT), or computed tomography (CT). Technologists also may be required to have one or more other certifications, such as in basic life support (BLS), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS), or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Important Qualities. Ability to use technology. Nuclear medicine technologists work with computers and large pieces of electronic equipment and must be comfortable operating them. Analytical skills. Nuclear medicine technologists must understand anatomy, physiology, and other sciences to assess whether dosage is accurate. Compassion. Nuclear medicine technologists must be able to reassure patients who are stressed or upset. Detail oriented. Nuclear medicine technologists must follow instructions precisely to ensure correct dosage and prevent overexposure to radiation. Interpersonal skills. Nuclear medicine technologists interact with patients and often work as part of a team. They must be able to communicate effectively with their supervising physician. Physical stamina. Nuclear medicine technologists must stand for long periods and be able to lift and move patients who need help. Pay About this section. Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Median annual wages, May 2020 Nuclear medicine technologists $79,590 Health technologists and technicians $45,620 Total, all occupations $41,950   Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics The median annual wage for nuclear medicine technologists was $79,590 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $57,830, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $109,070. In May 2020, the median annual wages for nuclear medicine technologists in the top industries in which they worked were as follows: Outpatient care centers $116,800 Hospitals; state, local, and private 79,750 Offices of physicians 79,210 Medical and diagnostic laboratories 75,790 Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. Some nuclear medicine technologists work irregular hours, such as evenings or weekends. They also may be on call, especially if they work in hospitals. Job Outlook About this section. Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30 Health technologists and technicians 9% Nuclear medicine technologists 8% Total, all occupations 8%   Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Employment of nuclear medicine technologists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 1,500 openings for nuclear medicine technologists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Employment. An aging population may lead to the need for nuclear medicine technologists who can provide imaging to patients with certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, or treatments for cancers and other diseases. In addition, technological advancements may increase the types of imaging and treatments that nuclear medicine technologists provide, leading to increased demand for their services. Employment projections data for nuclear medicine technologists, 2020-30 Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Nuclear medicine technologists 29-2033 18,300 19,700 8 1,400 Get data State & Area Data About this section. Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS). The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area. Nuclear medicine technologists Projections Central. Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved. CareerOneStop. CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code. Similar Occupations About this section. This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of nuclear medicine technologists. Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY Biological Technicians Biological technicians help biological and medical scientists conduct laboratory tests and experiments. Bachelor's degree $46,340 Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Diagnostic medical sonographers and cardiovascular technologists and technicians, including vascular technologists operate special imaging equipment to create images or to conduct tests. Associate's degree $70,380 Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians collect samples and perform tests to analyze body fluids, tissue, and other substances. Bachelor's degree $54,180 Nuclear Technicians Nuclear technicians assist physicists, engineers, and other professionals in nuclear research and nuclear energy production. Associate's degree $84,190 Radiation Therapists Radiation therapists treat cancer and other diseases in patients by administering radiation treatments. Associate's degree $86,850 Radiologic and MRI Technologists Radiologic technologists perform diagnostic imaging examinations on patients. MRI technologists operate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to create diagnostic images. Associate's degree $63,710 Contacts for More Information About this section. For more information about nuclear and radiologic medicine, visit American Board of Nuclear Medicine American Board of Radiology American College of Nuclear Medicine Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging For a list of accredited programs in nuclear medicine technology, visit Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology For more information about certification for nuclear medicine technologists, visit Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board American Registry of Radiologic Technologists CareerOneStop. For a career video on nuclear medicine technologists, visit Nuclear Medicine Technologists O*NET. Nuclear Medicine Technologists Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nuclear-medicine-technologists.htm (visited December 22, 2021). Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 8, 2021 What They Do. The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties. Work Environment. The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face. How to Become One. The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation. Pay. The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH. State & Area Data. The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop. Job Outlook. The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings. Similar Occupations. The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile. Contacts for More Information. The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). 2020 Median Pay. The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950. On-the-job Training. Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Entry-level Education. Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. Work experience in a related occupation. Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education. Number of Jobs, 2020. The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2020, which is the base year of the 2020-30 employment projections. Job Outlook, 2020-30. The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent. Employment Change, 2020-30. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Entry-level Education. Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. On-the-job Training. Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Employment Change, projected 2020-30. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Growth Rate (Projected). The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030. Projected Number of New Jobs. The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030. Projected Growth Rate. The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. 2020 Median Pay. The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn PublicationsOccupational Outlook Handbook Healthcare
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TitleNuclear Medicine Technologists: Salary, career path, job outlook, education and more - RaiseMe
Urlhttps://www.raise.me/careers/healthcare/nuclear-medicine-technologists/
DescriptionWhat do Nuclear Medicine Technologists do? Find out how much Nuclear Medicine Technologists make, what to study, and whether it's the right job for you
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BodyNuclear Medicine Technologists: Salary, career path, job outlook, education and more Education Required Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associates degree in nuclear medicine technology. Bachelors degrees are also common. Some technologists become qualified by completing an associates or a bachelors degree program in a related health field, such as radiologic technology or nursing, and then completing a 12-month certificate program in nuclear medicine technology. Job Outlook The projected percent change in employment from 2016 to 2026: 10% (Faster than average) (The average growth rate for all occupations is 7 percent.) Licenses/Certifications Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified. Although certification is not required for a license, it fulfills most of the requirements for state licensure. Licensing requirements vary by state. For specific requirements, contact the states health board. Median pay: How much do Nuclear Medicine Technologists make? $74,350 Annual Salary $35.75 per hour Nuclear medicine technologists prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to patients for imaging or therapeutic purposes. They provide technical support to physicians or other professional nuclear medicine personnel in the diagnosis, care, and treatment of patients and for research and investigation into the uses of radioactive drugs. They also may act as emergency responders in the event of a nuclear disaster.What do Nuclear Medicine Technologists do?Nuclear medicine technologists typically do the following: Explain medical procedures to the patient and answer questions Follow safety procedures to protect themselves and the patient from unnecessary radiation exposure Prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to the patient Monitor the patient to check for unusual reactions to the drugs Operate imaging equipment Keep detailed records of procedures Follow radiation disposal and safety procedures Radioactive drugs, known as radiopharmaceuticals, give off radiation, allowing special scanners to monitor tissue and organ functions. Abnormal areas show higher-than-expected or lower-than-expected concentrations of radioactivity. Physicians and surgeons then interpret the images to help diagnose the patients condition. For example, tumors can be seen in organs during a scan because of their concentration of the radioactive drugs.Radiopharmaceuticals can also be used to deliver concentrated doses of radiation to specific areas, such as tumors, for treatment of conditions that may not allow other forms of treatment. Various forms of internal radiation treatments also may be good alternatives to invasive surgical procedures.In the event of a radioactive incident or nuclear disaster, some nuclear medicine technologists may be involved in emergency response efforts. These workers experience with radiation detection and monitoring equipment could be useful during the response to events that involve radiological materials.After graduation from an accredited program, a technologist can choose to earn a certification in positron emission tomography (PET) or nuclear cardiology. PET uses a machine that creates a three-dimensional image of a part of the body, such as the brain. Nuclear cardiology uses radioactive drugs to obtain images of the heart. Patients may exercise during the imaging process while the technologist creates images of the heart and blood flow.Some nuclear medicine technologists work in support of researchers in the development of new nuclear medicine applications in imagery or therapy. Careers for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Certified nuclear medicine technologists Isotope technologists Nuclear cardiology technologists Nuclear medical technologists PET technologists Positron emission tomography technologists Radioisotope technologists Registered nuclear medicine technologists Similar Careers. Higher Paid. Nuclear Technicians Radiation Therapists Less Education. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians More Education. Biological Technicians Exercise Physiologists Sign up to start earning scholarships at 200+ universities! Earn money for college while you're still in high school for your academic achievements, sports, and activities. Sign Up
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TitleNuclear Medicine Technologists: Jobs, Career, Salary and Education Information
Urlhttps://collegegrad.com/careers/nuclear-medicine-technologists
Description
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Organic Position7
H1Nuclear Medicine Technologists
H2What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do[About this section] [To Top]
Work Environment for Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]
How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist[About this section] [To Top]
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]
Job Outlook for Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]
Careers Related to Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]
More Nuclear Medicine Technologist Information[About this section] [To Top]
H3Career, Salary and Education Information
Top 3 Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs
Duties of Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Injuries and Illnesses for Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Work Schedules
Education for Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Important Qualities for Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Employment of Nuclear Medicine Technologists
H2WithAnchorsWhat Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do[About this section] [To Top]
Work Environment for Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]
How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist[About this section] [To Top]
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]
Job Outlook for Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]
Careers Related to Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]
More Nuclear Medicine Technologist Information[About this section] [To Top]
BodyNuclear Medicine Technologists Career, Salary and Education Information. What They Do: Nuclear medicine technologists prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to patients for imaging or therapeutic purposes. Work Environment: Most nuclear medicine technologists work in hospitals. Some work in physicians' offices, diagnostic laboratories, or imaging clinics. Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. How to Become One: Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate's degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Formal education programs in nuclear medicine technology or a related healthcare field lead to a certificate, an associate's degree, or a bachelor's degree. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified. Salary: The median annual wage for nuclear medicine technologists is $79,590. Job Outlook: Employment of nuclear medicine technologists is projected to grow 8 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Related Careers: Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of nuclear medicine technologists with similar occupations. Following is everything you need to know about a career as a nuclear medicine technologist with lots of details. As a first step, take a look at some of the following jobs, which are real jobs with real employers. You will be able to see the very real job career requirements for employers who are actively hiring. The link will open in a new tab so that you can come back to this page to continue reading about the career: Top 3 Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs. Travel Nuclear Medicine Technologist - $3,334 per week - Vivian Health - San Francisco, CA Nuclear Medicine Technologist * Discipline: Allied Health Professional * Start Date: 02/07/2022 * Duration: 14 weeks * 40 hours per week * Shift: 8 hours, days * Employment Type: Travel TotalMed Job ... Nuclear Medicine Technologist - Radiology (RAD) - Travel Contract - Accountable Healthcare Staffing - Ukiah, CA Nuclear Medicine Technologist - Immediate and Future Travel / Local Contracts : Start Date: ASAP Nuclear Medicine Technologist - Radiology (RAD) - Travel Contract / Travel Contract Adventure Awaits Nuclear Medicine Technologist - Positron Emission Tomography - (Nuclear Med Tech) - Club Staffing - Kingman, AZ This and other nuclear medicine technologist jobs brought to you by AlliedHealthJobCafe.com Job Description & Requirements Nuclear Medicine Technologist - Positron Emission Tomography - ( Nuclear Med ... See all Nuclear Medicine Technologist jobs What Nuclear Medicine Technologists Do[About this section] [To Top]. Nuclear medicine technologists prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to patients for imaging or therapeutic purposes. They provide technical support to physicians or other professional nuclear medicine personnel in the diagnosis, care, and treatment of patients and for research and investigation into the uses of radioactive drugs. They also may act as emergency responders in the event of a nuclear disaster. Duties of Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Nuclear medicine technologists typically do the following: Explain medical procedures to the patient and answer questions Follow safety procedures to protect themselves and the patient from unnecessary radiation exposure Prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to the patient Monitor the patient to check for unusual reactions to the drugs Operate imaging equipment Keep detailed records of procedures Follow radiation disposal and safety procedures Radioactive drugs, known as radiopharmaceuticals, give off radiation, allowing special scanners to monitor tissue and organ functions. Abnormal areas show higher-than-expected or lower-than-expected concentrations of radioactivity. Physicians and surgeons then interpret the images to help diagnose the patient's condition. For example, tumors can be seen in organs during a scan because of their concentration of the radioactive drugs. Radiopharmaceuticals can also be used to deliver concentrated doses of radiation to specific areas, such as tumors, for treatment of conditions that may not allow other forms of treatment. Various forms of internal radiation treatments also may be good alternatives to invasive surgical procedures. In the event of a radioactive incident or nuclear disaster, some nuclear medicine technologists may be involved in emergency response efforts. These workers' experience with radiation detection and monitoring equipment could be useful during the response to events that involve radiological materials. After graduation from an accredited program, a technologist can choose to earn a certification in positron emission tomography (PET) or nuclear cardiology. PET uses a machine that creates a three-dimensional image of a part of the body, such as the brain. Nuclear cardiology uses radioactive drugs to obtain images of the heart. Patients may exercise during the imaging process while the technologist creates images of the heart and blood flow. Some nuclear medicine technologists work in support of researchers in the development of new nuclear medicine applications in imagery or therapy. Work Environment for Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]. Nuclear medicine technologists hold about 18,300 jobs. The largest employers of nuclear medicine technologists are as follows: Hospitals; state, local, and private 70% Offices of physicians 14% Medical and diagnostic laboratories 7% Outpatient care centers 3% Technologists are on their feet for long periods and may need to lift or turn patients who are disabled. Injuries and Illnesses for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Although radiation hazards exist in this occupation, they are minimized by the use of gloves and other shielding devices. Nuclear medicine technologists wear badges that measure radiation levels in the radiation area. Instruments monitor their radiation exposure and detailed records are kept on how much radiation they get over their lifetime. When preparing radioactive drugs, technologists use safety procedures to minimize radiation exposure to patients, other healthcare workers, and themselves. Like other healthcare workers, nuclear medicine technologists may be exposed to infectious diseases. Nuclear Medicine Technologist Work Schedules. Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. Some nuclear medicine technologists work evenings, weekends, or nights. How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist[About this section] [To Top]. Get the education you need: Find schools for Nuclear Medicine Technologists near you! Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate's degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Formal education programs in nuclear medicine technology or a related healthcare field lead to a certificate, an associate's degree, or a bachelor's degree. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified. This form requires javascript. Education for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate's degree in nuclear medicine technology. Bachelor's degrees are also common. Some technologists become qualified by completing an associate's or a bachelor's degree program in a related health field, such as radiologic technology or nursing, and then completing a 12-month certificate program in nuclear medicine technology. Nuclear medicine technology programs often include courses in human anatomy and physiology, physics, chemistry, radioactive drugs, and computer science. In addition, these programs include clinical experience—practice under the supervision of a certified nuclear medicine technologist and a physician or surgeon who specializes in nuclear medicine. The Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology accredits nuclear medicine programs. Graduating from an accredited program may be required for licensure or by an employer. High school students who are interested in nuclear medicine technology should take courses in math and science, such as biology, chemistry, anatomy, and physics. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified. Although certification is not required for a license, it fulfills most of the requirements for state licensure. Licensing requirements vary by state. For specific requirements, contact the state's health board. Some employers require certification, regardless of state regulations. Certification usually involves graduating from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Certification is available from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). In addition to receiving general certification, technologists can earn specialty certifications that show their proficiency in specific procedures or on certain equipment. A technologist can earn certification in positron emission tomography (PET), nuclear cardiology (NCT), or computed tomography (CT). The NMTCB offers NCT, PET, and CT certification exams. Important Qualities for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Ability to use technology. Nuclear medicine technologists work with computers and large pieces of technological equipment and must be comfortable operating them. Analytical skills. Nuclear medicine technologists must understand anatomy, physiology, and other sciences and be able to calculate accurate dosages. Compassion. Nuclear medicine technologists must be able to reassure and calm patients who are under physical and emotional stress. Detail oriented. Nuclear medicine technologists must follow exact instructions to make sure that the correct dosage is given and that the patient is not overexposed to radiation. Interpersonal skills. Nuclear medicine technologists interact with patients and often work as part of a team. They must be able to follow instructions from a supervising physician. Physical stamina. Nuclear medicine technologists must stand for long periods and be able to lift and move patients who need help. Nuclear Medicine Technologist Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]. The median annual wage for nuclear medicine technologists is $79,590. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $57,830, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $109,070. The median annual wages for nuclear medicine technologists in the top industries in which they work are as follows: Outpatient care centers $116,800 Hospitals; state, local, and private $79,750 Offices of physicians $79,210 Medical and diagnostic laboratories $75,790 Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. Some nuclear medicine technologists work irregular hours, such as evenings or weekends. They also may be on call, especially if they work in hospitals. Job Outlook for Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]. Employment of nuclear medicine technologists is projected to grow 8 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 1,500 openings for nuclear medicine technologists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. See all medical jobs. Employment of Nuclear Medicine Technologists. An aging population may lead to the need for nuclear medicine technologists who can provide imaging to patients with certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, or treatments for cancers and other diseases. In addition, technological advancements may increase the types of imaging and treatments that nuclear medicine technologists provide, leading to increased demand for their services. Employment projections data for Nuclear Medicine Technologists, 2020-30 Occupational Title Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Percent Numeric Nuclear medicine technologists 18,300 19,700 8 1,400 Careers Related to Nuclear Medicine Technologists[About this section] [To Top]. Biological Technicians. Biological technicians help biological and medical scientists conduct laboratory tests and experiments. Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians, Including Vascular Technologists. Diagnostic medical sonographers and cardiovascular technologists and technicians, including vascular technologists, also called diagnostic imaging workers, operate special imaging equipment to create images or to conduct tests. The images and test results help physicians assess and diagnose medical conditions. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians. Medical laboratory technologists (commonly known as medical laboratory scientists) and medical laboratory technicians collect samples and perform tests to analyze body fluids, tissue, and other substances. Nuclear Technicians. Nuclear technicians assist physicists, engineers, and other professionals in nuclear research and nuclear energy production. They operate special equipment and monitor the levels of radiation that are produced. Radiation Therapists. Radiation therapists treat cancer and other diseases in patients by administering radiation treatments. Radiologic and MRI Technologists. Radiologic technologists, also known as radiographers, perform diagnostic imaging examinations, such as x rays, on patients. MRI technologists operate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to create diagnostic images. More Nuclear Medicine Technologist Information[About this section] [To Top]. For more information about nuclear and radiologic medicine, visit American Board of Nuclear Medicine American Board of Radiology American College of Nuclear Medicine Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging For a list of accredited programs in nuclear medicine technology, visit Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology For more information about certification for nuclear medicine technologists, visit Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board American Registry of Radiologic Technologists A portion of the information on this page is used by permission of the U.S. Department of Labor. Explore more careers: View all Careers or the Top 30 Career Profiles.
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Result 8
TitleNuclear Medicine Technologist Overview - US News Money
Urlhttps://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/nuclear-medicine-technologist
DescriptionTo become a nuclear medicine technologist, you must complete an associate degree or a bachelor's degree in nuclear medicine technology.
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TitleNuclear Medicine Technologist | explorehealthcareers.org
Urlhttps://explorehealthcareers.org/career/allied-health-professions/nuclear-medicine-technologist/
DescriptionThe nuclear medicine technologist is a highly specialized health care professional who prepares and administers radiopharmaceuticals to patients
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H2Working Conditions
Academic Requirements
Resources
H3Learn More About a Career as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
H2WithAnchorsWorking Conditions
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BodyMake Caring Your Career Sign Up Homepage Careers Allied Health Professions Nuclear Medicine Technologist Nuclear Medicine Technologist Average Salary $65,000 Years Higher Education 2 - 4 Job Outlook Excellent The nuclear medicine technologist is a highly specialized health care professional who looks at how the body functions in order to help in diagnosis and treatment of a range of conditions and diseases. Nuclear medicine combines imaging, patient care, chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer technology, and medicine. Nuclear medicine technologists prepare and administer small amounts of radioactive substances called radiopharmaceuticals, as well as other medications, to patients for diagnosis and treatments. Radiopharmaceuticals are made up of radionuclides—unstable atoms that emit radiation spontaneously. Nuclear medicine technologists use specialized camera systems to detect the radiopharmaceuticals, which then creates a precise picture of the part of the body being imaged. The nuclear medicine technologist monitors the characteristics and functions of tissues or organs in which the radiopharmaceuticals localize. Abnormal areas show higher or lower concentrations of radioactivity than normal. Physicians use these images to diagnose molecular, metabolic, physiologic, anatomic and pathologic conditions. Nuclear medicine technologists may also operate computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners that are used in conjunction with nuclear medicine procedures. The technologist’s responsibilities include: Putting the patient at ease, obtaining pertinent history, describing the procedure and answering the patient’s questions Administering radiopharmaceuticals and medications for patient imaging and therapeutic procedures Monitoring the patient’s physical condition during the course of the procedure Processing data and enhancing digital images using advanced computer technology Providing images, data analysis and patient information for diagnostic interpretation or therapeutic procedures Evaluating images to determine the technical quality and calibration of instrumentation Evaluating new protocols Working Conditions | Academic Requirements | ResourcesWorking Conditions. Nuclear medicine technologists generally work a 40-hour week. This may include evening or weekend hours in departments that operate on an extended schedule. Technologists who work in hospitals may need to be on call. Opportunities for part-time and shift work are also available. Academic Requirements. If you are interested in a career as a nuclear medicine technologist, you can begin preparing in high school by taking as many science and mathematics classes as you can. Nuclear medicine technology programs include: Post-baccalaureate one-year certificate programs Two-year associate degree Four-year bachelor’s degree As of 2015, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists only recognizes programs at an associate level or higher. After successfully completing a nuclear medicine program, graduates need to pass a certification exam to be recognized as nuclear medicine technologists. As of 2017, the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board will require graduation from regionally accredited college and university programs that have structured clinical training sufficient to provide clinical competency in radiation safety, instrumentation, clinical procedures and radiopharmacy. Learn More About a Career as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Watch a video about a day in the life of a nuclear medicine technologist Read the “Technologist – Careers in Nuclear Medicine” section of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Technology website. Resources. American Registry of Radiologic TechnologistsNuclear Medicine Technology Certification BoardAmerican Society of Radiologic TechnologistsAmerican Registry of Radiologic TechnologistsSociety of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular ImagingThe Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging reviewed this career profile. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. OkLearn More
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Result 10
TitleHow to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT)
Urlhttps://www.medicaltechnologyschools.com/nuclear-medicine-technologist/how-to-become-an-nmt
DescriptionLearn more about steps and requirements to become a nuclear medicine technologist, a potentially lucrative career in medical technology
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H1How To Become A Nuclear Medicine Technologist
H2Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT) Salary
Steps To Become A Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT)
H3Patient-Facing Technology Programs
Laboratory Technology programs
Natural & Clinical Lab Science
Medical IT & Administrative
Medical Technology Programs
Patient-Facing Technology Programs
Laboratory Technology programs
Natural & Clinical Lab Science
Medical IT & Administrative
Certification Guides
Career Guides
Interviews & Features
Search For Schools
Step 1: Graduate from High School (Four Years)
Step 2: Complete an Accredited College Program in Nuclear Medicine Technology (Two to Four Years)
Step 3: Get Professional Certification (Timeline Varies)
Step 4: Earn State Licensure (Timeline Varies)
Related Articles
Related Programs
H2WithAnchorsNuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT) Salary
Steps To Become A Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT)
BodyHow To Become A Nuclear Medicine Technologist Search For Schools. *sponsored Nuclear medicine technology—the process of elucidating various bodily processes using small amounts of radioactive drugs traced via diagnostic scans—is a relatively new (and lucrative) medical field, requiring at least a two-year postsecondary degree. In fact, O*NET (2021)—a data organization sponsored by the US Department of Labor—reports that 63 percent of these professionals have associate degrees and 22 percent have a bachelor’s. For a career that pays an average annual salary of $82,080 (Bureau of Labor Statistics May 2020)—nearly double the average pay for all occupations at $56,310 (BLS 2020)—this can be an enticing return on investment in a skill-based education. So what do nuclear medicine technologists (NMTs) do? O*NET (2021) details some of the typical job responsibilities in this field which include educating patients and families on medical procedures; administering radioactive drugs (i.e., radiopharmaceuticals) to be traced through diagnostic imaging machinery under the supervision of a physician; working with various medical equipment (e.g., SPECT, PET, ECG, gamma camera, intravenous infusion pump, sphygmomanometer, etc.); applying expertise in radiation safety to limit exposure; monitoring patients’ health status for any adverse reactions; verifying the proper functioning of imaging equipment; keeping confidential patient records and digital images of scans; keeping abreast of changes in technology and processes through continued education; disposing properly of hazardous materials; and ensuring compliance with governmental regulations. They may also choose to specialize in positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), or nuclear cardiology. Due to the nature of the medical profession, NMTs may work evenings, weekends, and holidays. Seventy-three percent of NMTs work in hospitals (BLS 2021). Finally, the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) reports that at least 30 US states require licensure for NMTs and offers a table of regional requirements, including exams, continuing education, and local certifying board contact information. As well, most states accept NMTCB certification in place of state licensure examination. Read on to discover how much money NMTs generally make and the steps to joining this high-paying profession, including the educational, experiential, and certification requirements. Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT) Salary. As mentioned above, nuclear medicine technology can be a lucrative career. By illustration, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS May 2020) reports the following salary ranges for NMTs: 10th percentile: $57,830 25th percentile: $68,370 50th percentile (median): $79,590 75th percentile: $95,230 90th percentile: $109,070 For comparison, alary.com (2021)—an aggregator of HR-reported salaries—found slightly different salary ranges among its reporting organizations: 10th percentile: $68,851 25th percentile: $76,721 50th percentile (median): $85,365 75th percentile: $93,394 90th percentile: $100,704 The BLS (May 2020) adds that the top-paying states for this occupation are the following: California: $121,070 annual average salary Rhode Island: $103,170 Washington: $101,450 Hawaii: $100,980 District of Columbia: $96,960 The above states were not necessarily the top-employing states for this profession, a factor that correlated more with state population size (BLS 2020): Florida: 1,510 NMTs employed Texas: 1,320 California: 1,270 Ohio: 910 New York: 870 It’s important to note that although some regions pay NMTs higher average salaries, the cost of living is generally higher in those regions. In fact, the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center (MERIC) found that in 2021, the five most expensive states were Hawaii, the District of Columbia, New York, California, and Massachusetts. Conversely, the most affordable states were Mississippi, Kansas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Arkansas. Although it’s one of the most expensive states, there’s great news for Californians: eight of the 10 top-paying metropolitan areas for NMTs were located in the Golden State, mainly concentrated in the Bay Area (BLS 2020): San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA: $139,410 average annual salary San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA: $136,650 Sacramento-Roseville/Arden-Arcade, CA: $135,660 San Diego-Carlsbad, CA: $124,330 Fresno, CA: $121,070 Finally, demand for NMT positions is likely to be strong in the coming years. As proof of point, the BLS (2021) estimates that job openings in this field will grow 8 percent between 2020 and 2030, which is as fast as the average growth projected for all occupations during that time. Steps To Become A Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT). There are varied paths to becoming a nuclear medicine technologist (NMT). Some choose to attend an accredited associate degree program, while others may seek a more advanced four-year bachelor’s program before becoming professionally certified. Here is one possible path to joining this career. Step 1: Graduate from High School (Four Years). In anticipation of the college admissions process, aspiring NMTs are encouraged to excel in the prerequisite secondary school courses. These courses generally include precalculus, English composition, physics, chemistry, biology, and anatomy if available). Also, since NMTs typically require immunizations to work in a medical setting, people interested in the career should ensure their tetanus-diphtheria, MMR, hepatitis B, and varicella (i.e., chickenpox), and COVID-19 vaccinations are up-to-date. Furthermore, students at this stage may choose to garner experience in a hospital setting as a volunteer or paid intern and are urged to check with local organizations for opportunities. Step 2: Complete an Accredited College Program in Nuclear Medicine Technology (Two to Four Years) . As stated above, most NMTs have an associate degree or higher (O*NET 2020). In addition to the prerequisite coursework listed above, admissions committees to NMT programs typically call for a competitive GPA; a personal statement; proof of immunizations; letter(s) of recommendation; relevant volunteer or work experience; an interview (web-based or in-person); a background check; and an application fee. Please note that there may also be physical requirements to join this profession. For example, California’s Kaiser Permanente School of Allied Health Sciences (KPSAHS) requires program applicants to be able to stand (or walk) at least eight hours daily; lift and move a 290-pound person with the assistance of 1-2 colleagues; reach above shoulders for up to six hours; reach forward 18 inches holding an object up to 15 lbs.; “bend, crouch, or stoop” up to 20 times hourly; push a wheelchair or gurney at least 300 feet; and move up to 45-pound loads 25 times hourly. Prospective NMTs with other allied health fields certifications may also have an advantage in the application process. Students are urged to seek out NMT programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT), the primary accrediting agency for NMT programs which weighs factors such as school administration, resources, curricula, and operational policies to gauge program quality. For more information on the accreditation process, please visit JRCNMT’s Accreditation Standards Manual. One exemplary JRCNMT-accredited program is Bellevue College (BC) in Washington state, which provides an NMT associate degree program. This associate of arts (AA) program typically takes 18 months to complete and combines general education requirements with specialized coursework in basic nuclear medicine science, radiopharmacy, positron emission tomography (PET), and instrumentation. In addition to didactic instruction, Bellevue has partnered with several hospitals to give students the hands-on, supervised instruction they need to join this highly skilled field. Upon completing the program, students are eligible to take both the national and Washington state NMT certification exams. There are also distance learning options available to aspiring NMTs in more rural regions of the state. Accredited bachelor’s programs are also available for those interested in potentially enhancing their employment and salary prospects. For example, the State University in New York (SUNY) at Buffalo provides a four-year NMT bachelor’s degree program through its Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences Department. Boasting “a very high first-time pass rate on the certification exams,” SUNY at Buffalo offers training in immunology for NMT, radiation safety, patient care and management, X-ray and computed tomography (CT) physics, and in-vivo studies. Additionally, students spend four days weekly during their senior year in clinical rotations and gain empirical exposure to the tasks and challenges of a clinical setting. Finally, the California-based Kaiser Permanente School of Allied Health Sciences (KPSAHS) provides bachelor’s and certificate NMT programs for applicants who have already received their associate’s degrees. In its competitive 18-month bachelor of science (BS) program, students are prepared to take state and national certification exams with comprehensive training in the classroom, laboratory, and hospital environments. With an incredible 100 percent of its graduates passing the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) or the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) exams, KPSAHS focuses on clinical competence, professionalism, and critical thinking. Please visit the JRCNMT website or the nuclear medicine technology programs page for more information on accredited education in this field. Step 3: Get Professional Certification (Timeline Varies). As of 2020, 30 states require NMTs to be licensed before employment. Requirements for licensure, certification, and registration vary by state. The Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board provides a convenient table of exams, continuing education requirements, and agency contact information by region. Although the state may not require certification, employers generally prefer it. There are two leading certification organizations for NMTs: the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). The NMTCB offers its certification exam to applicants who have completed a regionally accredited NMT program. However, beginning January 1, 2017, the qualifying program standards will become more stringent. NMTCB will only accept applicants who have completed a program accredited by the JRCNMT or a qualified international accrediting body. The NMTCB exam covers four areas: radiation safety (15 percent), instrumentation (20 percent), clinical procedures (45 percent), radiopharmacy (20 percent). Certified individuals must register annually following the completion of at least one hour of qualifying continued education (CE) per month. Finally, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) offers an NMT certification exam to candidates who meet standards of education and ethics. For education, candidates must have a degree from a program accredited by an agency recognized by the US Department of Education (e.g., JRCNMT). They also must have documented all skills in ARRT’s competency area checklist, a form completed by a program director. For ethics, aspiring NMTs must report any felonies, misdemeanors, or other criminal convictions and disclose whether they’d ever been subjected to discipline by a medical regulatory authority. ARRT’s exam covers five areas: radiation protection (10 percent), radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals (11 percent), instrumentation and quality control (20 percent), diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (50 percent), and patient care and education (9 percent). Candidates have three chances to pass the exam. To maintain this credential, certified NMTs must formally comply with ARRT’s rules, regulations, and ethics annually; submit continuing education (CE) documentation biannually; and fulfill the continuing qualifications requirements (CQR) every ten years. Step 4: Earn State Licensure (Timeline Varies). As previously mentioned, 30 states require NMTs to be licensed to practice nuclear medicine technology. Most of those states consider current NMTCB certification as a valid qualification for the state licensure requirement. To be prepared for job searches, all aspiring NMTs are encouraged to research the state licensure requirements for where they plan to work. The Society of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) lists nuclear medicine technologist requirements by state. For example, California requires NMTs to be licensed while Alaska does not. Keep in mind that even if a state does not require NMT licensure, having the certification is still recommended as it can lead to increased job opportunities and serve as proof of commitment to the profession. Jocelyn Blore Managing Editor After graduating from UC Berkeley, Jocelyn traveled the world for five years as freelance writer and English teacher. After stints in Japan, Brazil, Nepal, and Argentina, she took an 11-month road trip across the US, finally settling into lovely Eugene, OR. When Jocelyn isn’t writing about college programs or interviewing professors, she satirizes global politics and other absurdities at Blore’s Razor (Instagram: @bloresrazor). Thank you for being interested. Related Articles. MARCA: Interview with a Certified Nuclear Medicine Technologist On Medicare Disbursements Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification - NMTCB, AART Related Programs. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer MRI Technologist Neurodiagnostic Technologist Nuclear Medicine Technologist Radiation Therapist
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Result 11
TitleNuclear Medicine Professions
Urlhttps://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info/professions-nuclear-medicine
DescriptionInformation about professions in nuclear medicine
Date
Organic Position11
H1Professions in Nuclear Medicine
H2Nuclear Medicine Radiologist
Nuclear Pharmacist
Nuclear Medicine Physicist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist
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H3Images
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H2WithAnchorsNuclear Medicine Radiologist
Nuclear Pharmacist
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BodyProfessions in Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine Radiologist Nuclear Pharmacist Nuclear Medicine Physicist Nuclear Medicine Technologist Nuclear Medicine Radiologist. Nuclear medicine radiologists, also called nuclear radiologists, are physicians who use radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat disease. They employ such techniques as scintigraphy, which uses radiopharmaceuticals to produce images of the body's organs or to visualize certain diseases. These radioactive materials are typically injected into a patient's vein, but may also be inhaled or swallowed by the patient. Nuclear medicine radiologists also utilize radiopharmaceuticals to treat hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, solid tumors, hematologic malignancies, or painful bone metastases. After graduating from medical school, nuclear medicine radiologists must complete a four-year residency in diagnostic radiology and be trained in a wide variety of imaging techniques, including the diagnostic and therapeutic use of radioactive pharmaceuticals. Nuclear radiologists may also undergo one or more years of additional nuclear medicine training. All educational programs must be certified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). top of page Nuclear Pharmacist. Nuclear pharmacists, once known as radiopharmacists, specialize in preparing, dispensing and distributing radiopharmaceuticals or radioactive drugs. They are part of the nuclear medicine team and provide consultation regarding health and safety issues. Nuclear pharmacists may work in a number of settings: Hospitals Nuclear pharmacies Industry Academia Government and private research institutes Nuclear pharmacists: control the inventory of radioactive drugs and other supplies. prepare radiopharmaceuticals. fill prescription orders. check instruments and equipment for quality assurance purposes. properly handle dangerous substances and biological specimens. ensure that patients receive proper preparation before administering radiopharmaceutical materials. A nuclear pharmacist may also take an active role in educating nuclear medicine technologists and/or nuclear medicine residents. In order to become a nuclear pharmacist one must receive the following training: 200 hours of classroom instruction in basic radioisotope handling techniques specifically applicable to the use of unsealed sources. Part of the training should include lectures and laboratory sessions on radiopharmaceutical chemistry, radiation physics and instrumentation, mathematics of radioactivity, radiation biology, and radiation protection. 500 hours in handling unsealed radioactive material under a qualified instructor. All nuclear pharmacists must attend an institution with a nuclear pharmacy program and obtain certification through the Board of Pharmaceutical Specialties (BPS). Nuclear pharmacists are then considered Board Certified Nuclear Pharmacists (BCNP). top of page Nuclear Medicine Physicist. Nuclear medicine physicists work with nuclear imaging instrumentation and radiation dosimetry. They are considered experts in dealing with the interactions between ionizing radiation and matter. Many of them also have expertise in computer science and image processing. As an integral part of the nuclear medicine team, the physicist provides assistance with the physical aspects of new applications for nuclear medicine and can perform tests on new equipment, develop and maintain a quality control program for equipment, make dosimetric calculations or create computer programs for clinical use. A nuclear medicine physicist with expertise in image reconstruction and data analysis is able to assist in determining the best possible approaches for processing various kinds of nuclear medicine studies. Nuclear medicine physicists traditionally work in research labs where they develop new instrumentation and data analysis approaches for future generations of nuclear and molecular imaging. To guarantee proper safety of patients, co-workers, staff and the public, many nuclear medicine physicists are involved with radiation protection work. The role of a nuclear medicine physicist requires a solid scientific background, a capacity for innovation, attention to detail and most of all, the capability to work within a multidisciplinary team of technologists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses. Prior to becoming a nuclear medicine physicist, one usually undergoes general training as a medical physicist. Nuclear medicine physicists have a master's or doctorate degree in one of the following fields: Physics Medical Physics Radiologic Physics Engineering Applied Mathematics Other physical sciences To become certified, nuclear medicine physicists must complete two to three years of clinical experience and training. They can obtain certification in Nuclear Medicine Physics or Radiation Protection through the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine or in Medical Nuclear Physics through the American Board of Radiology (ABR). top of page Nuclear Medicine Technologist. A nuclear medicine technologist works closely with the nuclear medicine radiologist. The technologist may prepare and administer radiopharmaceuticals, perform imaging procedures, enhance images utilizing a computer and analyze biologic specimens. During an imaging procedure, the nuclear medicine technologist works with the patient. The technologist obtains important patient history, describes imaging procedures and answers questions, monitors the physical condition of the patient during procedures and takes note of patient comments that may be useful to the physician in interpreting procedure results. A nuclear medicine technologist is able to work in any of the following clinical settings: Community hospitals Outpatient imaging centers Public health facilities University-affiliated teaching hospitals and medical institutions Government and private research institutes There are also several areas of concentration on which they may focus: Research technologist Senior staff technologist Technologist program educator Hospital administrator Chief technologist Team leader, lead or supervisor Industry sales representatives, technical specialist or research-and-development specialist Typically, one who is interested in becoming a nuclear medicine technologist has a background in science and math, as well as an interest in working with patients. Three programs in particular are offered: Post-baccalaureate one-year certificate programs Two-year associate degree Four-year bachelor's degree With additional training, a technologist can specialize and work almost exclusively with specialized radiographic equipment, such as PET/CT. Nuclear medicine technologists are certified by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). top of page This page was reviewed on July, 20, 2021 Images. × Image Gallery. Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media. What does a radiologist do? Professions in Diagnostic Radiology Professions in Interventional Radiology Professions in Radiation Therapy Sponsored By. Please note. RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for a referral to a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database. This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with expertise in the medical area presented and is further reviewed by committees from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo.org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org, RSNA and ACR are not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links.
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Result 12
TitleHow to Become A Nuclear Medicine Technologist: Step by Step Guide And Career Paths
Urlhttps://www.zippia.com/nuclear-medicine-technologist-jobs/
DescriptionA complete guide that will help you start your career as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Follow these essential steps to becoming a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Learn about career path, skills, education, certifications and salary
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Organic Position12
H1How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
H2What is a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Career Paths
Average Salary for a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Resumes
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Demographics
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Education
Check Jobs That Match To Your Education
Top Colleges for Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Online Courses For Nuclear Medicine Technologist That You May Like
Top Skills For a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
12 Nuclear Medicine Technologist RESUME EXAMPLES
Best States For a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
How Do Nuclear Medicine Technologist Rate Their Jobs?
Top Nuclear Medicine Technologist Employers
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Videos
H3What Does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Do
How To Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
What is the right job for my career path?
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs You Might Like
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Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs You Might Like
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H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Career Paths
Average Salary for a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Resumes
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Demographics
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Education
Check Jobs That Match To Your Education
Top Colleges for Nuclear Medicine Technologists
Online Courses For Nuclear Medicine Technologist That You May Like
Top Skills For a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
12 Nuclear Medicine Technologist RESUME EXAMPLES
Best States For a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
How Do Nuclear Medicine Technologist Rate Their Jobs?
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BodyHow to Become a Nuclear Medicine TechnologistOverviewJobsSalaryResumeSkillsWhat They DoEducationCertificationsDemographicsBest StatesGet Alerts For Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsOn This PageSkip to sectionOverviewOpen JobsCareer PathsAverage SalaryResume Examples & TemplatesMore DemographicsEducational RequirementsTop SkillsBest StatesEmployersVideosDemographicsEducational RequirementsTop SkillsBest StatesEmployersVideosWhat is a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Nuclear medicine technologists are healthcare professionals specialized in the use of radiopharmaceuticals to diagnose and heal diseases. This complex branch of medicine is centered around the use of small amounts of radioactive substances for medical practices. With specialized camera systems that detect radiopharmaceuticals in the body, technologists create precise pictures of areas and organs supposedly affected by disease. This way they can monitor tissues and identify an array of different conditions. As a nuclear medicine technologist, you will work with patients, analyzing their medical histories and administering radiopharmaceuticals to create images of their relevant body parts and carry out treatment. You will process and evaluate data from the images to arrive to a correct diagnosis and plan adequate therapeutic processes. An education in medicine will be necessary to take on this role, a bachelor's degree being the minimum requirement. What Does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Do. Nuclear medicine technologists operate equipment that creates images of areas of a patient’s body. They prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to patients. The radioactive drugs cause abnormal areas of the body to appear different from normal areas in the images. Learn more about what a Nuclear Medicine Technologist doesHow To Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate’s degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Technologists must be licensed in about one half of the states; requirements vary by state. Education Nuclear medicine technologists typically need an associate’s degree in nuclear medicine technology. Bachelor’s degrees are also common. Some technologists become qualified by completing an associate’s or a bachelor's degree program in a related health field, such as radiologic technology or nursing, and then completing a 12-month certificate program in nuclear medicine technology. Nuclear medicine technology programs often include courses in human anatomy and physiology, physics, chemistry, radioactive drugs, and computer science. In addition, these programs include clinical experience—practice under the supervision of a certified nuclear medicine technologist and a physician or surgeon who specializes in nuclear medicine. The Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology accredits nuclear medicine programs. Graduating from an accredited program may be required for licensure or by an employer. High school students who are interested in nuclear medicine technology should take courses in math and science, such as biology, chemistry, anatomy, and physics. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations As of 2015, about half of all states required nuclear medicine technologists to be licensed. Requirements vary by state. For specific requirements, contact the state’s health board. Most nuclear medicine technologists become certified. Although certification is not required for a license, it fulfills most of the requirements for state licensure. Some employers require certification, regardless of state regulations. Certification usually involves graduating from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. Certification is available from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). In addition to receiving general certification, technologists can earn specialty certifications that show their proficiency in specific procedures or on certain equipment. A technologist can earn certification in positron emission tomography (PET), nuclear cardiology (NCT), or computed tomography (CT). The NMTCB offers NCT, PET, and CT certification exams. Important Qualities Ability to use technology. Nuclear medicine technologists work with computers and large pieces of technological equipment and must be comfortable operating them. Analytical skills. Nuclear medicine technologists must understand anatomy, physiology, and other sciences and be able to calculate accurate dosages. Compassion. Nuclear medicine technologists must be able to reassure and calm patients who are under physical and emotional stress. Detail oriented. Nuclear medicine technologists must follow exact instructions to make sure that the correct dosage is given and that the patient is not overexposed to radiation. Interpersonal skills. Nuclear medicine technologists interact with patients and often work as part of a team. They must be able to follow instructions from a supervising physician. Physical stamina. Nuclear medicine technologists must stand for long periods and be able to lift and move patients who need help. Show moreWhat is the right job for my career path?Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the right jobs to get there.See My JobsAverage Salary$72,703Job Growth Rate7%Job Openings57,350Don't Have A Professional Resume?Create My ResumeNuclear Medicine Technologist Career Paths. In addition to switching up your job search, it might prove helpful to look at a career path for your specific job. Now, what's a career path you ask? Well, it's practically a map that shows how you might advance from one job title to another. Our career paths are especially detailed with salary changes. So, for example, if you started out with the role of CT Technologist you might progress to a role such as Staff Technologist eventually. Later on in your career, you could end up with the title Senior Radiologic Technologist. Nuclear Medicine TechnologistCT TechnologistStaff TechnologistRadiologic TechnicianSenior Radiologic Technologist5 YearsCT TechnologistStaff TechnologistX-Ray TechnicianLead CT Technologist7 YearsCT TechnologistLead TechnicianDirectorMedical Director9 YearsStaff TechnologistRadiologic TechnicianRegistered NurseSenior Registered Nurse7 YearsSenior Nuclear Medicine Technologist6 YearsLead TechnicianTechnical ManagerChief Technologist7 YearsShow MoreShareEmbed On Your WebsiteTop Careers Before Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Radiologic Technician18.9 %Nuclear Medicine Internship15.0 %Certified Nursing Assistant7.7 %Show MoreSearch for these jobsTop Careers After Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Pet/Ct Technologist21.9 %Supervisor Nuclear Medicine7.6 %Nuclear Cardiology Technologist7.3 %Show MoreSearch for these jobsNuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs You Might Like. What is the right job for my career path?Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the rights job to get there.See my jobsCreate The Perfect ResumeOur resume builder tool will walk you through the process of creating a stand-out Nuclear Medicine Technologist resume.Create My Resume NowAverage Salary for a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Nuclear Medicine Technologists in America make an average salary of $72,703 per year or $35 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $106,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $49,000 per year.Average Salary$72,703Find Your Salary EstimateHow much should you be earning as an Nuclear Medicine Technologist? Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to get an estimation of how much you should be earning.View Your SalarySee More Salary InformationCalculate your salary. Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to see how your pay matches up.CalculateNuclear Medicine Technologist Resumes. Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job. Dorothy WrightNuclear Medicine TechnologistContact InformationWashington, DC(700) [email protected] CarePacsCardiologyHplcCbrnDiagnostic ProceduresNuclear Power  Employment HistoryNuclear Medicine Technologist2020 - PresentKaiser PermanenteWashington, DCWorked as a traveler and provided patient care services within the imaging center.Demonstrated basic principles of hybrid imaging and fusion processing learned from my 7 years of SPECT/CT and PET/CT imaging and processing.Assisted radiology analysts with a 15 month clean-up of historical exceptions after implementation of a new PACS.Perform all daily, weekly and monthly QC on all of the nuclear equipment and the Discovery NM 360 gamma camera.Nuclear Medicine Specialist2015 - 2020Virginia Hospital Center - ArlingtonWashington, DCAdminister radiopharmaceuticals to detect and treat disease.Provided exceptional patient care, including conducting patient history and explanation of the procedure in a professional, empathetic manner.Maintain all hot lab records and diligently follow state regulations.Train new staff on the use of PACS application, and train existing staff based on system upgrades.Nuclear Medicine Specialist2008 - 2015Virginia Hospital Center - ArlingtonWashington, DCProvided exceptional patient care while remaining aware of patient needs and test requirements.Perform diagnostic procedure and computer-process acquired data in preparation for interpretation by a radiologist.Planned, organized, and oversaw staff to ensure quality patient care.EducationAssociate's Degree Medicine2006 - 2008Howard UniversityWashington, DC  Carolyn HayesNuclear Medicine TechnologistContact InfoTinley Park, IL(640) [email protected] CareOSQCJavascriptInformation TechnologyVoipFDGComputer LabEmergencyEmployment HistoryNuclear Medicine Technologist2020 - PresentGood SamaritanTinley Park, ILAchieved professional certification from the ARRT in the modality of computed tomography.Work variable shifts as a CT Technologist.Direct and administer the nuclear cardiology studies for the Olney Office of Cardiology Associates, P.C.Interact with all levels of staff to ensure patient care and safety is primary.Nuclear Medicine Technologist2017 - 2020DigiradTinley Park, ILEstablish IV access and application of ACLS measures to patients when needed.Perform daily and monthy QC on camera's and equipmentMaintain and calibrate radioisotope and Hot lab equipment including QC/QA.Perform QC on Gamma Camera, Well/Probe.Computer Technician Student2016 - 2017Insight GlobalChicago, ILfull time, Point of Sale hardware deployment, refresh, software installation.Experience in Active Directory and Microsoft operating systems.Advanced Knowledge of COTS ticketing system.Performed coordinated and monitored troubleshooting to isolate and diagnose common personal computer (PC) problems.Educated clients and upgraded hardware and cooling components, assembled systems.Performed on-site support for a Nortel CS1K-M switch Monitored a Remedy ticketing system and dispatched Technicians accordingly.EducationBachelor's Degree Medicine2013 - 2016Harvard UniversityCambridge, MA  Jeffrey MasonNuclear Medicine TechnologistAltamonte Springs, FL(430) [email protected] Medicine Technologist2017 - PresentFlorida Hospital Ctr•Altamonte Springs, FLAcquire studies on GE Dual Head MG, GE VG/Hawkeye, and GE Infinia dual head Gamma Camera.Study data processing, PACS, Xeleris.Perform diagnostic scans on inpatients, outpatients, and emergency room patients, including starting IV lines.Documented quantity of dose and site of administration Performed imaging procedures when applicable and transferred results through PACS or DICOMDeveloped patient care plans, including assessments, evaluations, and nursing diagnoses.Nuclear Medicine Technologist2013 - 2017Cedars-Sinai Medical Center•Los Angeles, CAExperienced with several PACs systems.Helped other teams start IV's and transfer patients.Research in Parathyroid SPECT vs. Planar Imaging Proficient in Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT Imaging Complete radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality controlPerform diagnostic procedures using radiation detection instrumentation.Coordinated operational patient flow of procedures in CT department.Nuclear Medicine Specialist (Part-Time)2012 - 2013Cedars-Sinai Medical Center•Los Angeles, CAExperienced with several PACs systems.Experienced operating various gamma cameras, processing and analysis programs: Siemens e-cam, SPECT/CT, and Toshiba gamma camera.Performed general nuclear medicine, PET/CT, SPECT/CT, therapeutic, and DEXA studies.SkillsHot LabJcahoCardiologyPatient CareRadiologyAlaraStress TestsEmergencyINDIVEducationBachelor's Degree Medicine2010 - 2013University of Southern California•Los Angeles, CA  Mary GrantNuclear Medicine TechnologistEmployment HistoryNuclear Medicine Technologist2019 - PresentScripps HealthSan Diego, CAWork with PACS for transferring images to radiologist.Entered patient results in PACs and RIS systems.Nuclear Medicine Internship2018 - 2019DigiradSan Diego, CAPerformed daily SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Processing Assisted with preparation of marketing materialsPerform stress tests and image with Cardius-3 portable gamma camera.Set up, calibrate, and perform SPECT cardiac stress testing.Experienced in Cardiac Imaging, Radionuclide Therapy, Monoclonal Antibodies, and Sestamibi for oncology studies to include Nuclear Breasting Imaging.Performed QC on cameras and uptake probe and dose calibrator.Gained proficiency in IV catheter insertion and straight stick injections.Pet/Ct Technologist2013 - 2014Scottsdale Medical ImagingPhoenix, AZInterfaced and cooperated with facility healthcare personnel to ensure quality patient care and maintained patient confidentiality.Obtained medical history on patients as part of screening for MRI exams.Perform QC on lab equipment and cameras, maintain hot lab and proper state regulations for licensing.Acquired SPECT study with circular orbit when automatic contouring failed.Experienced in Centricity PACS, Cerner, Firstnet, and Beacon.EducationDoctoral Degree Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic Technologies2015 - 2018Pima Medical InstituteAlbuquerque, NMMaster's Degree Biology2014 - 2015Arizona State UniversityPhoenix, AZBachelor's Degree Biology2010 - 2013Arizona State UniversityPhoenix, AZ  Contact InformationSan Diego, CA(240) [email protected] ResonanceRadiologyPatient CareData AnalysisTomographyAlaraAdminister RadiopharmaceuticalsRISDiagnostic Images  Margaret HarperNuclear Medicine TechnologistEvansville, IN(730) [email protected] MembersCliaDigital ImagesRadiologyTomographyCombatMedical TrainingData AnalysisPacsSailors  Employment HistoryNuclear Medicine Technologist2018 - PresentGood Samaritan•Evansville, INAchieved professional certification from the ARRT in the modality of computed tomography.Start IV's, inject radioactive isotopes, and draw blood for in-vitro blood cell labeling.Offer exceptional patient care, while focusing on easing fears and providing comfort in a highly emotional and fearful environment.Establish IV access and application of ACLS measures to patients when needed.Perform daily, weekly, monthly, and quarterly QC on Siemens E-cam and GE Infinia scanners.Nuclear Medical Technologist2008 - 2018Palmetto General Hospital•Fort Lauderdale, FLCreate and maintain POCT Patient Care and QM policies.Performed and analyzed tests in areas including chemistry and immunology.Solve problems that may arise to continue work flow and good patient care.Received acclaim from CEO for patient care.Corpsman2005 - 2007Fort Belvoir Community Hospital•College Park, MDFiled medical records in the clinic.Perform an EKG on patients before seeing the doctor and also on request both within and outside the department.EducationMaster's Degree Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic Technologies2007 - 2008Broward College•Fort Lauderdale, FLBachelor's Degree Physics2002 - 2005University of Maryland - College Park•College Park, MD Frances PriceNuclear Medicine TechnologistLeonardtown, MD  |  (630) 555-0743  |  [email protected]:Nuclear Medicine Technologist | St. Mary's Hospital for Children | Leonardtown, MD | 2020 - PresentAcquired SPECT study with circular orbit when automatic contouring failed.Acquired SPECT study with one detector when circuit board on second detector failed.Worked in the Backus Health Care Center in Colchester, Connecticut performing X-rays and CT as the sole technologist.Recruited by Regional Director and VP of Business Development to direct turnaround of Fairmont Regional Medical Center.Performed daily/monthly requirements: QC, receiving/shipping nuclear isotopes etc.Nuclear Medicine Specialist | St. Mary's Hospital for Children | Leonardtown, MD | 2018 - 2020Experience with SPECT/CT, PET/CT.Received first-hand experience with patient care.Provided quality patient care through gathering relevant past medical history, explaining/clarification of proceduresPerformed diagnostic X-ray, CT and Nuclear medicine procedures, assisted in scrubing with IR procedures.Staff Technologist | Parallon Business Solutions | Richmond, VA | 2017 - 2018Work alone at busy trauma centers on a temporary basis.Performed a variety of imaging, inpatient, outpatient and trauma patients Venipuncture, quality assurance.Verified that images are correct and legible, ensured that each scanned document is associated to the appropriate patient account.Trained in UNIX, Shell scripting, Perl scripting in IBM.SkillsRadiologicalSpecial ProceduresQARadiologyCbrnINDPatient CareCTClinical ProceduresStaff MembersEducation:Associate's Degree | Weber State University | Ogden, UT | 2015 - 2017Major: Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic TechnologiesDavid WillisNuclear Medicine TechnologistOrlando, FL(970) [email protected]:2013 - PresentNuclear Medicine Technologist / Orlando Health / Orlando, FLProvided quality innovative patient care utilizing Siemens Sensation 16 slice MDCT and also using G.E.Perform full spectrum of diagnostic planar and SPECT Nuclear Medicine procedures, including cardiac.Full Time 3-11 staff CT / Nuc- Med technologist.Gather information on patients' illnesses and medical history to guide the choice of diagnostic procedures for therapy.2009 - 2013Nuclear Cardiology Technologist / Florida Hospital Ctr / Orlando, FLStudy data processing, PACS, Xeleris.Developed patient care plans, including assessments, evaluations, and nursing diagnoses.Documented quantity of dose and site of administration Performed imaging procedures when applicable and transferred results through PACS or DICOM2006 - 2009Computed Tomography Technologist / St. Mary's Hospital for Children / Richmond, VADirect and indirect communication with radiologists regarding patient care; communication with various disciplines and departments.Experienced with McKesson PACS, RIS, Cerner, advanced Radiology as well as traditional archival systems.Conducted training for Radiology students, providing coaching and mentoring.Executed various Magnetic Resonance examinations as directed by physicians.SkillsArrt, High Quality, CT, Patient Care, Test Results, Radiology, Patient Preparation, Cardiology, QA, SpectEducation:2004 - 2006Associate's Degree In Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic Technologies/ Ferris State University / Big Rapids, MIEthan RileyNuclear Medicine TechnologistDublin, OH(800) [email protected] Medicine Technologist, Cardinal Health - Dublin, OH2018 - PresentManufactured FDG and Sodium Fluoride for pharmaceutical applications.Operated ADAC Genesys and performed Cardiolites, MUGA s and occasional Thallium Viability Scans.Obtained ICANL accreditation by enforcing policies and procedures.Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Doctors Medical Ctr - South Bend, IN2017 - 2018Set up IV lines and injected patients.Provided excellent patient care in a Jewish Hospital network.Attend to patients comfort and physical safety in accordance with prescribed safety standards.Entered patient results in PACs and RIS systems.Performed all Nuclear Medicine procedures in a hospital setting Became proficient with GE PACS and ADAC camera systemsRadiologic Technologist Assistant, Doctors Medical Ctr - South Bend, IN2012 - 2017Trained in x-ray Portable setting, trauma setting, burn unit, fluoroscopy all to include pediatric patient care as well.Practiced and help implement processes to provide a great patient care experience.Provided administrative services in the Emergency Room that entailed patient registration, admissions and general Emergency Room policy and procedures.Staff and train for after hours clinic and run all QC.Worked as a lead technologist and ran shifts.Registered Technologist, ARRT (R) (MR).SkillsTreatment PlansPatient CareGreeting PatientsRadiologyStress TestsClinical ProceduresTroubleshootSuture RemovalRoutine DiagnosticSafety PrecautionsEducationAssociate's Degree Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic Technologies2010 - 2012Indiana University South Bend - South Bend, INJuan OwensNuclear Medicine TechnologistPompano Beach, FL(870) [email protected] Medicine Technologist, Boca Raton Community Hospital, Pompano Beach, FL2020 - PresentLearned how to setup IV's, perform QC, and maintain proper paperwork.Experience on Siemens S and Ecam dual/single head cameras, PACS ( Picture Archive System) and pharmacy N.M.I.S.Perform multiple diagnostic procedures, research, therapies, QA/QC.Operate diagnostic/portable X-ray equipment, GE CT scanner, GE LOGIC 7 and 9 ultrasound machine and PACS system.Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Holy Cross Hospital, Pompano Beach, FL2018 - 2020Work with PACS for transferring images to radiologist.Achieved professional certification from the ARRT in the modality of computed tomography.Obtained four weeks of CT experienceNuclear Medicine Specialist, Holy Cross Hospital, Pompano Beach, FL2014 - 2018Process images on ESOFT program as well as transferred images to PACS systems.Performed CT procedures during days and on call for 1.5 years.SkillsRadiologicalPatient CareIVTomographyBlood PressureHospital SettingClinical ProceduresCTHazardous MaterialsCardiologyEducation2011 - 2014Bachelor's Degree Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic Technologies, Keiser UniversityFort Lauderdale, FLEvelyn FranklinNuclear Medicine TechnologistRochester, MN  |  (270) 555-4863  |  [email protected] History:Mayo Clinic - Rochester, MN2020 - PresentNuclear Medicine TechnologistEnsured the quality management of 12 different gamma camera systems.Utilized three different software programs as part of computer processing.General Nuclear Medicine Performed Sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging.General nuclear medicine exams, perform routine QC on equipment, iv certified.Unisys - North Torrey Pines Road, LA Jolla, CA2017 - 2020Nuclear Medicine TechnologistPrepared radiopharmaceuticals and adhered to safety standards that kept the radiation doses to co-workers and patients as low as possible.LICENSE: Florida Department of Health, Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine, CT License # CRT 32948Unisys - North Torrey Pines Road, LA Jolla, CA2016 - 2017Computer Technician StudentTrouble shooting in XP and windows 8.Train how to use Microsoft Office, Internet Explorer, how to use Windows.Replace all defective hardware components.Mapped Network Drives Supported Windows XP and 7 Supported Network Folders and permissions.Provided server hardware support and Windows administration support including granting administrative rights/Pulled Remedy tickets from the PC Technicians Que.Education:National University - North Torrey Pines Road, LA Jolla, CA2013 - 2016Bachelor's Degree MedicineRoger ReynoldsNuclear Medicine TechnologistPhone (510) 555-3710Address Fort Lauderdale, FLE-mail [email protected] - PresentNuclear Medicine TechnologistHoly Cross Hospital · Fort Lauderdale, FLPerformed technical aspect of CT guided aspirations, drainages, and biopsies Took call for emergencies Gave excellent patient carePerformed imaging procedures using Picker cameras and acquisition software and daily hot lab and camera QC testing.Perform diagnostic procedures using radiation detection instrumentation.Sustained a high level of patient care, quality exams, and efficient work ethic.Established IV access for injection of radioistopes as prescribed.Planned, organized, and oversaw staff to ensure quality patient care.2015 - 2019Nuclear Medicine TechnologistFlorida Medical Center · Fort Lauderdale, FLHelped implement new radiation therapy protocols * Helped lead the radiology department transition from film to PACSComplete a number of 3D rendering to provide diagnostic images to improve patient care.Carried out QC in hot lab and on cameras Used ADAC gamma camerasPerformed nuclear medicine procedures with ADAC cameras on inpatient and outpatients.Developed new safety procedures for radiology departments and research laboratory.2008 - 2015Cardiac TechnicianTeleperformance · Fort Lauderdale, FLBid information is gathered from plans, specs, geotech s, bid docs, plus communication with the owner/developer.Monitor, record, and report cardiac rhythms Perform general patient care and patient exam schedulingAssist the cardiologist with coronary and peripheral catheterization procedures Monitor patient vitals and hemodynamics Maintain sterile field Data entry Patient careMonitor vital signs, and cardiac waveforms updated RN of any rhythm or vital sign changes in a timely manner.SkillsRSOCardiac RhythmsClinical TrialsMedical RecordsSpecimen CollectionDaily OperationsPatient CarePhysician OrdersRadiologicalSpectEducation2006 - 2008Associate's Degree Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic TechnologiesKeiser University · Fort Lauderdale, FLCarolyn HillNuclear Medicine TechnologistPhone: (530) 555-7929Email: [email protected]: San Francisco, CAEmployment HistoryNuclear Medicine Technologist2017 - PresentSt. Francis Hospital · San Francisco, CALead CT technologist at a level one trauma hospital working on 64 slice GE CT scanners.Preformed high quality CT scans, utilizing a vast array of protocols with proper technical parameters.Start IV's, informed and instruct patient of post exam instructions.Delivered effective patient care working concurrently with other medical professionals to accomplish desired tasks.Have a working knowledge of McKessan and PACs.Computed Tomography Technologist2010 - 2017Kaiser Permanente · Pasadena, CAWorked as a traveler and provided patient care services within the imaging center.Comply with established protocols in performing MRI procedures while processing and maintaining accurate current records.Direct patient care aimed at increasing comfort and support by providing assistance with personal hygiene, elimination and transport.Maintained QC for radiology department.Cardiac Technician2009 - 2010AT&T · Los Angeles, CAInstalled att services and provided excellent customer service.Install U-Verse TV, Install internet and phone services.Use of company vehicle Follow company guidelines and safety procedures in regards to driving, job location and property.Work with a variety of hand tools and equipment.Read, interpret, log, fax EKG's to the referring doctor or healthcare provider.SkillsHolterRSOCPRCTPatient CarePatient RoomsPhysician OrdersMRSafety StandardsAdminister RadiopharmaceuticalsEducationAssociate's Degree Medical Technician2007 - 2009West Coast Ultrasound Institute · Los Angeles, CACreate My Free ResumeBuild a professional resume in minutes using this template.Create My Resume NowLearn How To Write a Nuclear Medicine Technologist ResumeAt Zippia, we went through countless Nuclear Medicine Technologist resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.View Nuclear Medicine Technologist Resume Examples And TemplatesNuclear Medicine Technologist Demographics. Compare JobsCompare JobsNuclear Medicine Technologist Gender Statistics. female51.6 %male44.7 %unknown3.7 %Nuclear Medicine Technologist Ethnicity Statistics. White70.5 %Asian12.7 %Hispanic or Latino10.2 %Show MoreNuclear Medicine Technologist Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics. Spanish59.9 %French7.2 %Russian3.6 %Show MoreFind the best Nuclear Medicine Technologist job for youSearchNuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs You Might Like. High Paying Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs - $106K and UpSearch jobs near Ashburn, VAEntry Level Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsLittle to no experience requiredPart Time Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsPart Time Jobs Hiring NowActively HiringNuclear Medicine Technologist jobs added within last 7 daysNo Degree Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsSearch jobs with no degree requiredShow More Nuclear Medicine Technologist DemographicsCreate The Perfect ResumeOur resume builder tool will walk you through the process of creating a stand-out Nuclear Medicine Technologist resume.Create My Resume NowNuclear Medicine Technologist Education. Compare JobsCompare JobsNuclear Medicine Technologist Majors. Nuclear And Industrial Radiologic Technologies35.3 %Medicine19.1 %Medical Technician13.3 %Show MoreNuclear Medicine Technologist Degrees. Bachelors45.2 %Associate38.8 %Certificate8.8 %Show MoreCheck Jobs That Match To Your Education. NoneHigh School / GEDAssociateBachelor'sMaster'sDoctorateTop Colleges for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. 1. Texas A&M University. College Station, TX • PrivateIn-State Tuition$11,870Enrollment53,194details2. Duke University. Durham, NC • PrivateIn-State Tuition$55,695Enrollment6,596details3. University of Michigan - Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor, MI • PrivateIn-State Tuition$15,262Enrollment30,079details4. Yale University. New Haven, CT • PrivateIn-State Tuition$53,430Enrollment5,963details5. Cornell University. Ithaca, NY • PrivateIn-State Tuition$55,188Enrollment15,105details6. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Chapel Hill, NC • PrivateIn-State Tuition$8,987Enrollment18,946details7. Northwestern University. Evanston, IL • PrivateIn-State Tuition$54,568Enrollment8,451details8. Georgetown University. Washington, DC • PrivateIn-State Tuition$54,104Enrollment7,089details9. Vanderbilt University. Nashville, TN • PrivateIn-State Tuition$49,816Enrollment6,840details10. Tufts University. Medford, MA • PrivateIn-State Tuition$56,382Enrollment5,597detailsShow More Nuclear Medicine Technologist Education RequirementsFind the best Nuclear Medicine Technologist job for youSearchNuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs You Might Like. High Paying Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs - $106K and UpSearch jobs near Ashburn, VAEntry Level Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsLittle to no experience requiredPart Time Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsPart Time Jobs Hiring NowActively HiringNuclear Medicine Technologist jobs added within last 7 daysNo Degree Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsSearch jobs with no degree requiredOnline Courses For Nuclear Medicine Technologist That You May Like. Basic Concepts of International Nuclear LawNuclear power gives us hope and potential for significant benefits, in a variety of fields, from medicine and agriculture to electricity production and industry. At the same time, we all know that nuclear energy poses serious risks. This course observes concepts of nuclear safety to the health, humans and to the environment. The specifics of the legal framework, of the management of risks and nuclear liability are represented to students. It is important to recognize that international legal...View Details on edXNuclear Facilities: Regulations and LicensingThe first part of the course concentrates on the requirements of operating a nuclear facility – initial licensing process and subsequent continuous regulatory control. Next, we will take a look at the international system of radiological protection and legal framework on nuclear safety, transport and transboundary movement of nuclear material. Finally, we will discuss the issues of illicit nuclear trafficking and nuclear terrorism...View Details on edXNuclear Energy: Science, Systems and SocietyNuclear Energy: Science, Systems and Society offers an introduction to the basic physics of nuclear energy and radiation, with an emphasis on the unique attributes and challenges of nuclear energy as a low-carbon solution. Peaceful applications of radiation to help humankind, such as reactors for materials science research, nuclear medicine, security initiatives and quantum technology, will be introduced. The course will explore fission energy, establishing the scientific, engineering, and...View Details on edXShow More Nuclear Medicine Technologist CoursesJob type you wantFull TimePart TimeInternshipTemporaryTop Skills For a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 13.4% of Nuclear Medicine Technologists listed Nuclear Medicine on their resume, but soft skills such as Ability to use technology and Analytical skills are important as well. Nuclear Medicine, 13.4%Patient Care, 13.3%Radiology, 10.7%Pacs, 5.5%Radioactive Materials, 5.3%Other Skills, 51.8%See All Nuclear Medicine Technologist Skills12 Nuclear Medicine Technologist RESUME EXAMPLES. Build a professional nuclear medicine technologist resume in minutes. Browse through our resume examples to identify the best way to word your resume. Then choose from 12+ resume templates to create your nuclear medicine technologist resume.Build My Resume NowBest States For a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. The best states for people in this position are California, New Jersey, New York, and Mississippi. Nuclear Medicine Technologists make the most in California with an average salary of $98,008. Whereas in New Jersey and New York, they would average $94,930 and $81,655, respectively. While Nuclear Medicine Technologists would only make an average of $81,001 in Mississippi, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four. 1. New JerseyTotal Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs:1,161Highest 10% Earn:$151,000Location Quotient:1.28 Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here$94,930Avg. SalaryView 1,161 Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs2. MaineTotal Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs:248Highest 10% Earn:$132,000Location Quotient:1.63 Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here$80,722Avg. SalaryView 248 Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs3. ArizonaTotal Nuclear Medicine Technologist Jobs:793Highest 10% Earn:$132,000Location Quotient:1.18 Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here$75,941Avg. SalaryView 793 Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsFull List Of Best States For Nuclear Medicine TechnologistsHow Do Nuclear Medicine Technologist Rate Their Jobs?Top Nuclear Medicine Technologist Employers. RankCompanyZippia ScoreAverage Nuclear Medicine Technologist SalaryAverage Salary11.Digirad4.3$81,39322.University Hospitals4.3$80,22033.Cardinal Health4.7$79,47444.PeaceHealth4.5$76,92755.Cardiovascular Associates PC4.3$76,58066.HCA Healthcare4.7$75,202Show MoreNuclear Medicine Technologist Videos. Nuclear Medicine Technologist Salary | Nuke Med Tech Job Duties & Education RequirementsCareer Profile - Nuclear MedicineMedical Careers : How to Become a Nuclear Medicine TechnicianNuclear Medicine Technologist Related Careers. Become a CT TechnologistBecome a Cardiovascular TechnicianBecome a Director Of Nuclear MedicineBecome an Exercise SpecialistBecome a Nuclear Cardiology TechnologistBecome a Nuclear Medical TechnologistBecome a Nuclear Medicine InternshipBecome a Nuclear Medicine SpecialistBecome a Senior Nuclear Medicine TechnologistBecome a Supervisor Nuclear MedicineNuclear Medicine Technologist Related Jobs. CT Technologist JobsCardiovascular Technician JobsDirector Of Nuclear Medicine JobsExercise Specialist JobsNuclear Cardiology Technologist JobsNuclear Medical Technologist JobsNuclear Medicine Internship JobsNuclear Medicine Specialist JobsSenior Nuclear Medicine Technologist JobsSupervisor Nuclear Medicine JobsWhat Similar Roles Do. What a CT Technologist DoesWhat a Cardiovascular Technician DoesWhat an Exercise Specialist DoesWhat a Nuclear Medical Technologist DoesResume For Related Jobs. CT Technologist ResumeCardiovascular Technician ResumeExercise Specialist ResumeNuclear Medicine Internship ResumePrevious:Nuclear Medicine Technologist OverviewNext: Nuclear Medicine Technologist OverviewZippia CareersHealthcare Practitioner and Technical IndustryNuclear Medicine TechnologistUpdated August 18, 2021
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  • examplecomexperiencenuclear medicine technologist
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  • morenuclear medicine technologist
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  • 3
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  • calculate location quotient
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  • radioactive drug
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  • 3
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  • radiologic technology
  • 3
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  • radiologic technologist
  • 3
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  • medicine technologist2017
  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • imaging procedure
  • 3
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  • medical center
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  • siemen
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  • pac ri
  • 3
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  • spect study
  • 3
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  • college park
  • 3
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  • st mary
  • 3
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  • mary hospital
  • 3
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  • hospital child
  • 3
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  • presentnuclear medicine
  • 3
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  • hospital pompano
  • 3
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  • pompano beach
  • 3
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  • cross hospital
  • 3
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  • north torrey
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  • torrey pine
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  • pine road
  • 3
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  • road la
  • 3
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  • la jolla
  • 3
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  • resume example
  • 3
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  • morenuclear medicine
  • 3
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  • time nuclear
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  • nuclear energy
  • 3
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  • quotient measure
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  • 3
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  • bl determine
  • 3
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  • determine concentrated
  • 3
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  • concentrated industry
  • 3
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  • industry single
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  • single state
  • 3
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  • state compared
  • 3
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  • 3
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  • read bl
  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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Result 13
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology Associate of Science – Gateway Community College
Urlhttps://gatewayct.edu/Allied-Health/Nuclear-Medicine
DescriptionAllied Health, Divisions and Departments at Gateway Community College, New Haven, CT
Date
Organic Position13
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Result 14
TitleSchool of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Urlhttps://clinicalschools.nm.org/school-of-nuclear-medicine-technology.html
DescriptionThe Northwestern Medicine School of Nuclear Medicine Technology provides students with a comprehensive body of knowledge and skills and the opportunity for some of the finest clinical experiences. Each year approximately 20,000 imaging procedures and over
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Organic Position14
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Bodysrc="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-P8MRZZ" height="0" utm_source="weebly-non-nmg" width="0" style="display: none; visibility: hidden" > Home School of Diagnostic Medical Sonography About Diagnostic Medical Sonography Diagnostic Medical Sonography Curriculum and Rotation Diagnostic Medical Sonography Faculty Members Diagnostic Medical Sonography Eligibility and Prerequisites For Prospective Diagnostic Medical Sonography Students School of Nuclear Medicine Technology About Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Technology Faculty Members Nuclear Medicine Technology Curriculum and Rotation Nuclear Medicine Technology Eligibility and Prerequisites For Prospective Nuclear Medicine Technology Students School of Radiation Therapy About Radiation Therapy Radiation Therapy Curriculum and Academic Calendar Radiation Therapy Faculty Members Radiation Therapy Eligibility and Prerequisites For Prospective Radiation Therapy Students School of Radiography About Radiography Academic Calendar Radiography Faculty Members Radiography Curriculum and Rotation Radiography Eligibility and Prerequisites For Prospective Radiography Students CT Post-Primary Program CT Faculty Members CT Curriculum and Rotation CT Prospective Students > CT Post-Primary Program Application and Instructions MRI Post-Primary Program MRI Faculty Members MRI Curriculum and Rotation MRI Prospective Students > MRI Application and Instructions MA Program MA Faculty Members MA Curriculum and Rotation MA General Requirements and Program Policies MA for Prospective Students > Medical Assistant (MA) Program Application and Instructions Related Web Sites Student Services MyNM Patient Portal Careers Pay a Bill Financial Assistance For Physicians Northwestern Medicine Newsroom Review the latest information on visitor policies, safety procedures, vaccines and more in the COVID-19 Resource Center. MyNM Patient Portal    I    Careers    I    Pay a Bill    I    Financial Assistance    I    For Physicians    I    Northwestern Medicine Newsroom Menu Accredited Clinical Schools Review the latest information on visitor policies, safety procedures, vaccines and more in the COVID-19 Resource Center. School of Nuclear Medicine Technology The NM School of Nuclear Medicine Technology prepares students for a career in Nuclear Medicine.  The 13-month program begins in August and is limited to ten students per year.  Upon successful completion of the program, students are awarded a certificate of program completion in Nuclear Medicine Technology and will be eligible to be certified through examination by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).  Students will be eligible to take the following examinations for certification:Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB)Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB, CT)American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT)Each year approximately 16,000 imaging procedures and over 2,000 cardiac stress imaging procedures are performed by the sections of nuclear medicine and nuclear cardiology.  With Northwestern Medicine's state-of-the-art facility, students are taught with the most advanced technological and diagnostic equipment available, including:1 Siemens Biograph PET/MRI2 Siemens Biograph Vision PET/CT2 Siemens Symbia Intevo SPECT/CT1 Siemens Symbia TruePoint SPECT/CT2 Siemens Symbia EVO SPECT Cameras4 Siemens Dual-Head E.cam Cameras2 Hologic DensitometersOur experienced instructional staff includes:5 board-certified physicians24 technologistsNuclear pharmacistRadiation safety officer2 physicists3 nursesAdministrative and support staff Hospital Mission StatementNorthwestern Memorial Hospital, our sponsor institution, is part of a premier integrated academic health system where the patient comes first. The core values of Northwestern Memorial Hospital are: Patients first: Putting our patients first in all that we do Integrity: Adhering to an uncompromising code of ethics that emphasizes complete honesty and sincerity Teamwork: Team success over personal success Excellence: Continuously striving to be betterProgram Mission Statement and GoalsThe mission of the School of Nuclear Medicine Technology, sponsored by Northwestern Memorial Hospital, is to provide high-quality academic instruction, with Patients First clinical experiences, and ongoing professional development for the next generation of nuclear medicine technologists. In order to fulfill our mission, we have adopted the following goals:Students/graduates will demonstrate clinical competence.Students/Graduates will possess necessary technical skills required for clinical practice.Graduates will be well-prepared to enter the fieldStudents will demonstrate communication skills that will result in an effective exchange of information and collaboration.Students will demonstrate effective oral communication skills.Students will demonstrate effective written communication skills. Students/graduates will apply critical thinking skills during clinical practice.Students will be able to evaluate image quality.Students will compare and contrast normal and abnormal nuclear medicine case studies.Graduates will demonstrate effective critical thinking and problem-solving skills in clinical practice.Students/graduates will demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct and professionalism.Students will demonstrate knowledge of the Code of Ethics.Students/Graduates will display professionalism in the clinical environment.  The program will:  Prepare students for excellence in a nuclear medicine careers.Students will be satisfied with their training and education.Employers will be satisfied with the performance of newly hired graduates.   The Nuclear Medicine Technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology. They can be reached at 405.285.0546. Quicklinks About Nuclear Medicine TechnologyFaculty MembersCurriculum and RotationEligibility and PrerequisitesFor Prospective Students Application & Instructions ContactSchool of Nuclear MedicineNorthwestern Memorial HealthCare541 N. Fairbanks CourtSuite 950Chicago, Illinois 60611312.926.6609 Graduate Outcomes Graduate achievement data is an indicator of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals.  The current report on graduate achievement data, identified by program, is available on the JRCNMT website by clicking on the following link:  Graduate Achievement Report Outcome Data - Student Graduation RateYear of Graduation                # Enrolled              # Graduated            Graduation Rate           2017                                            5                                  4                                   80%           2018                                            8                                  8                                 100%           2019                                            8                                  8                                 100%           2020                                            7                                  7                                 100%            2021                                            8                                  7                                   88% Outcome Data - Certification Exam Pass RatesYear of Graduation     # of Examinees ARRT/NMTCB            Overall Board Exam Pass Rate           2017                                                         0           4                                     100%             2018                                                         2           8                                     100%           2019                                                         1           8                                     100%           2020                                                         0           7                                     100%           2021                                                         0           7                                     100%   Northwestern Memorial HealthCare is authorized by the Illinois Board of Higher Education to operate as a post-secondary educational institution in the state of Illinois.  Northwestern Memorial 312.926.2000 Central DuPage 630.933.1600 Lake Forest 847.234.5600 Delnor 630.208.3000 Kishwaukee 815.756.1521 Valley West 815.786.8484 Marianjoy 630.909.8000 Patient Rights and Website Policies        Accessibility       © 2022 by Northwestern Medicine® and Northwestern Memorial HealthCare. Northwestern Medicine® is a trademark of Northwestern Memorial HealthCare, used by Northwestern University Northwestern Memorial 312.926.2000 Central DuPage 630.933.1600 Lake Forest 847.234.5600 Delnor 630.208.3000 Kishwaukee 815.756.1521 Valley West 815.786.8484 Marianjoy 630.909.8000 Patient Rights and Website Policies       Accessibility © 2022 by Northwestern Medicine® and Northwestern Memorial HealthCare. Northwestern Medicine® is a trademark of Northwestern Memorial HealthCare, used by Northwestern University. Accredited Clinical Schools I Northwestern Medicine
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  • medicine
  • 29
  • 14
  • 100
  • 24
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  • nuclear
  • 22
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  • nuclear medicine
  • 20
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  • northwestern
  • 20
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  • student
  • 18
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  • program
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  • medicine technology
  • 15
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  • technology
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  • nuclear medicine technology
  • 13
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  • memorial
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  • northwestern medicine
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  • 3
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Result 15
TitlePurdue University: College of Science: Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Urlhttps://www.purdue.edu/science/careers/what_can_i_do_with_a_major/Career%20Pages/nuclear_medicine_technologist.html
Description
Date
Organic Position15
H1Nuclear Medicine Technologist
H2Summary
H3Educational Requirements
Median Salary 2018
H2WithAnchorsSummary
BodyNuclear Medicine Technologist Nuclear medicine technologists operate equipment that detects and maps a radioactive drug within a patient’s body to create diagnostic images. The images are then produced on a computer screen or on film for diagnosis by the health care team.   Sample of Reported Job Titles Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Staff Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Certified Nuclear Medicine Technologist (CNMT), Supervisor Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety Officer, Registered Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Nuclear Cardiology Technologist   Summary. Nuclear medicine differs from other diagnostic imaging technologies because it determines the presence of disease on the basis of metabolic changes rather than changes in organ structure. These professionals handle radionuclides — unstable atoms that emit radiation — which are purified and compounded to form the radiopharmaceuticals detected by highly specialized equipment. By administering these radiopharmaceuticals to patients they can monitor the characteristics and functions of tissues or organs in which the drugs localize.   Educational Requirements. To become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist, students can complete a bachelor’s degree in a health science field (biology or chemistry) and continue education through a 12 month certification program in Nuclear Medicine Technology. Some enter the profession through obtaining an associate’s degree in medical imaging.   Median Salary 2018. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist in 2018 was $76,820.   Want to know more? Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Career Information Bureau of Labor Statistics NMT highlight   Get Connected. Belonging to professional organizations & LinkedIn groups can provide you with networking, informational interviewing, & job shadowing opportunities, as well as assist you with finding internships and jobs. Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging List of Professional Organizations   Get Experience. Research & Internship Listings   NMT Certification Programs. Listing of accredited programs in NMT KU Medical Center   Information retrieved from O*NET Online and U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Career Development What Can I do with a Major In... Major Mapping Tool Career Mapping System Personalize Your Career Plan Build a Professional Profile Internships and Research Job Search Resources Programs & Events Additional Career Resources Archived Newsletters Applying to Graduate School Report Your Post Grad Plans Post-Graduation Data Alumni Profiles Purdue University College of Science, 150 N. University St, West Lafayette, IN 47907 • Phone: (765) 494-1729, Fax: (765) 494-1736 Student Advising Office: (765) 494-1771, Fax: (765) 496-3015 • Science IT, (765) 494-4488 © 2021 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints Trouble with this page? Disability-related accessibility issue? Please contact the College of Science Webmaster.
Topics
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  • nuclear
  • 14
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  • nuclear medicine
  • 13
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  • medicine
  • 13
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  • 9
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  • nuclear medicine technologist
  • 8
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  • 8
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  • 5
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  • 5
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  • 3
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Result 16
TitleNuclear Medical Technology College Degree Programs | The College Board
Urlhttps://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/majors/health-professions-related-clinical-sciences-allied-health-diagnosis-intervention-treatment-nuclear-medical-technology
DescriptionExplore nuclear medical technology studies and whether it's the right major for you. Learn how to find schools and universities with strong programs for this major
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Organic Position16
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BodyYour web browser must have JavaScript enabled in order for this application to display correctly.
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Result 17
TitleNuclear Medicine Program | College of DuPage
Urlhttps://www.cod.edu/academics/programs/nuclear_med/
Description
Date
Organic Position17
H1Nuclear Medicine
H2Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT)
Graduate Outcomes Report
Gainful Employment Information
Program Contact Information
H3
H2WithAnchorsJoint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT)
Graduate Outcomes Report
Gainful Employment Information
Program Contact Information
BodyNuclear Medicine Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine (DMIN) is the scientific and clinical discipline involving the diagnostic and therapeutic use of radionuclides. Simply put, nuclear medicine specialists help treat disease and image the body. In the Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine (DMIN) program, students learn the skills necessary to produce high-quality diagnostic images of patients. Nuclear medicine students are instructed to deliver compassionate patient care; abstract data from patient records; prepare, calculate and administer radiopharmaceuticals; operate scanning equipment; perform computer acquisitions; analyze patient studies; and assist the physician when necessary. The curriculum for this 15-month program includes clinical nuclear medicine, nuclear medicine procedures, nuclear physics, radiation detection with imaging and non-imaging instrumentation, radiation safety, radiation biology, radioactive material regulations, radiopharmacy, positron emission tomography, computer applications and patient care. The student also spends three days a week at the clinical affiliate and two days a week at the college.  Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate is eligible to sit for the certification exams administered by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (ARRT). Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT) . The Nuclear Medicine program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Nuclear Medicine Technology. In 2005, there were 100 accredited programs in the continental United States and Puerto Rico. In addition, the following organizations recognize the COD Nuclear Medicine program accreditation: American College of Radiology American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science American Society of Clinical Pathologists American Society of Radiologic Technologists Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society of Nuclear Medicine - Technologist Section American Medical Association Graduate Outcomes Report. Graduate achievement data is an indicator of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals. The current report on graduate achievement data, identified by program, is available on the JRCNMT website by clicking on the following link: Graduate Achievement Report. Gainful Employment Information. View information about this program, including estimated cost and employment opportunities. Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine   Program Contact Information. Please visit the Program Contacts page for detailed information. ©
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  • nuclear
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  • 7
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Result 18
TitleWhat does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Do and How to Become a One
Urlhttps://www.yourfreecareertest.com/nuclear-medicine-technologist/
DescriptionWhat does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist do? How to become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Job Description, Educational Requirements, and Career Outlook
Date
Organic Position18
H1What does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist do?
H2How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Job Description of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Career Video Transcript
H3Article Citations
Access Your Prior Test Results
Check out all the free career tests
Get Your Degree!
H2WithAnchorsHow to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Job Description of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nuclear Medicine Technologist Career Video Transcript
BodyWhat does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist do? A nuclear medicine technologist prepares radioactive drugs and administer them to patients in order to create images that cause abnormal areas of the body to appear different from normal images. They operate the equipment that creates these images in a patient’s body. Nuclear medicine techs are mainly employed in hospitals, while some can be found working in diagnostic laboratories, physicians’ offices, or imaging clinics on a full-time basis. Watch a Video: Find a College How to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Nuclear medicine technologists need an associate’s degree from an accredited medicine technology program. However, holding a bachelor’s degree is becoming more common. Some people become a nuclear medicine technologist by first attaining a degree in a related health field (such as nursing or radiologic technology) and then they complete a 12-month certification program. Nuclear medicine technology programs typically have courses in physics, radioactive drugs, human anatomy and physiology, chemistry, and computer science. Clinical experience is also included in these programs which are supervised under a surgeon or physician that specializes in nuclear medicine. Some states require certification or certification may be required by an employer. High school students interested in this occupation should take courses in science and math. Job Description of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. The duties of a nuclear medicine technologist is to answer questions and explain procedures to the patient. They must follow safety procedures to protect the patient and themselves from too much radiation and examine all equipment and machines to be sure they are safe and working properly. He or she would prepare and administer radioactive drugs to the patient and monitor the patient for any unusual reaction to the drugs. Nuclear medicine technologists must operate the equipment that creates the images of the targeted areas of the patient’s body. Their job would require them to follow radiation safety and disposal procedures. He or she would also be required to keep detailed records of the patient’s procedures. Nuclear Medicine Technologist Career Video Transcript. The work of nuclear medicine technologists revolves around tiny particles of matter called radionuclides. The particles are used in solutions that the technologist prepares and administers to patients, under the direction of a doctor. The technologist also operates equipment that tracks these particles as they move through organs or different parts of the body, and records images of how the particles appear. The resulting images can be used to diagnose a patient’s condition and to guide a course of treatment. Because they are working with radioactive materials, nuclear medicine technologists must follow strict safety procedures, including wearing a device to detect unintended exposure to radiation. They also explain test procedures to patients, so good communication skills are important. Nuclear medicine technologists most often work in hospitals; a few work in laboratories. Most work full-time, possibly on nights and weekends when needed. An associate’s or bachelor’s degree in nuclear medicine technology is usually required to enter this field. Some states require licensure, and some employers require certification. Often, these technologists seek additional training to handle other kinds of medical imaging procedures. In every case, they combine knowledge and precision with technology—to help the patient get the best possible outcome. Article Citations. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Nuclear Medicine Technologists. National Center for O*NET Development. 29-2033.00. O*NET OnLine. The career video is in the public domain from the U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. Access Your Prior Test Results. Check out all the free career tests. Free Career Tests Get Your Degree! Find schools and get information on the program that’s right for you. Powered by Campus Explorer Go to mobile version
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Result 19
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology | GateWay Community College
Urlhttps://www.gatewaycc.edu/degrees-certificates/nuclear-medicine-technology
DescriptionIf you want a challenging career in healthcare where you can combine imaging, diagnostics, patient care, chemistry, physics, and math, consider enrolling in the Nuclear Medicine Technology program. As a nuclear medicine technologist, you’ll play a critical role in preparing and administering radioactive drugs to patients in order to detect abnormalities and help
Date
Organic Position19
H1Nuclear Medicine Technology
H2
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Program Cost Estimate*
Certifications and Licensure
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BodyNuclear Medicine Technology Program Overview If you want a challenging career in healthcare where you can combine imaging, diagnostics, patient care, chemistry, physics, and math, consider enrolling in the Nuclear Medicine Technology program. As a nuclear medicine technologist, you’ll play a critical role in preparing and administering radioactive drugs to patients in order to detect abnormalities and help diagnose and treat a range of conditions and diseases. Our program combines academic, clinical, and laboratory training and experiences to train you to become a competent entry-level nuclear medicine technologist in the healthcare industry. Building on your anatomy, physiology, chemistry, and physics prerequisite training, our experienced instructors will teach you how to utilize your critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to make sound decisions and take corrective actions as needed. You’ll also learn how to use professional literature to enhance your clinical practice and personal and professional growth, collaborate with other medical professionals on interdisciplinary teams, and model the highest ethical standards and adherence to radiation protection standards and regulatory compliance. Upon successful completion, you will be eligible to sit for board certification and may pursue stackable post-primary certifications. If you want to start a bold new career helping others in healthcare, begin your journey in our Nuclear Medicine Technology program today. Students at any Maricopa Community College may need to complete courses at more than one of our colleges. Degrees Nuclear Medicine Technology Why GateWay Community College? GateWay Community College is the only college in Maricopa Community Colleges offering the Nuclear Medicine program.  Special Requirement. All students interested in any of our Healthcare programs will be required to attend an Information/Advising session, which will provide in-depth information and enrollment guidance. Virtual Information Sessions. Nuclear Medicine Technology Mondays at 5:00 p.m. Thursdays at 12:30 p.m. Click Here To Get Your Virtual Meeting Link Watch the video below to learn more about the Nuclear Medicine Technology program. Program Locations. Washington Campus  Program Cost Estimate*. Associate in Applied Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology:  $14,521 - $16,132 *Please note that these are only estimates and do not include books. These estimates may change based on increases to tuition, course fees and book costs. Estimates are based on tuition rates for in-county students. Additional fees may apply. Certifications and Licensure. Graduates of the Nuclear Medicine Technology program are eligible to apply to sit for the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board exam and/or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists exam in nuclear medicine technology. You will have the didactic requirements for the NMTCB computed tomography exam with an option to complete the clinical requirements. With NMTCB and/or ARRT credentials, graduates are eligible for licensure through Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency (ARRA) in Nuclear Medicine Technologist (CNMT) and the option for Computed Tomography licensure. Accreditation. Accreditation is a process used to measure and certify the credibility and quality of services offered by an organization. The Nuclear Medicine program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT), the nationally recognized accrediting agency for educational programs for nuclear medicine technologists. GateWay is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Learn More About Graduate Outcomes Here Why should you choose an accredited school? Although many schools offer seemingly similar degree and certification options, not all schools are accredited. In many instances, accreditation of the degree or program you complete may be required in order to become certified to work in the field.
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Result 20
TitleBachelor's in Nuclear Medicine Technology (BS) | Roosevelt University
Urlhttps://www.roosevelt.edu/academics/programs/bachelors-in-nuclear-medicine-technology-bs
DescriptionRoosevelt University is the only university that is affiliated with all four of the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Clinical School programs. This is a 3+1 program in which the first three years of course work are completed at Roosevelt University with the final year completed at the clinical affiliate site. Our downtown Chicago location allows students to continue to live on campus and have access to the RU support services and activities
Date
Organic Position20
H1Roosevelt University
H2Expectations & Requirements
Outcomes
Admission Info
Related Programs
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Sample Courses
H2WithAnchorsExpectations & Requirements
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BodyRoosevelt University Get Started Programs & Majors Request Info Visit Apply Give Future Students About History, Mission & Vision Why Roosevelt? Facts at a Glance Office of the President Virtual Tour University Podcast Stories Media Resources Academics Undergraduate Graduate & Professional College of Arts & Sciences College of Education College of Science, Health & Pharmacy Chicago College of Performing Arts Heller College of Business Student Experience Student Organizations Living on Campus Student Support Services Athletics Arts & Culture Tuition & Aid Tuition & Fees Financing your Education Freshman and Transfer Aid Graduate & Professional Student Aid PharmD Aid Applying for Financial Aid Financial Aid Forms Net Price Calculator Admission Admitted Students Freshman Transfer Graduate & Professional International Performing Arts Pharmacy Current Students Academics Registration & Classes Majors & Programs Summer Programs Grades & Transcripts Graduation Beyond the Classroom Student Research Undergraduate Honors Program McNair Scholars Course & Term Deadlines English Language Program Institutional Review Board Support Services Advising Career Closet Career Services Complaint or Concern Emergency Housing & Shower Services Food & Hygiene Pantry Grad Student Resources Health & Wellness International Students Learning Commons Loaner Laptop Program Mentoring Student Technology Guide Veteran Services SSS STEM Finances Pay My Bill Student Employment International Student Employment Tuition Refund Tax Info (1098-T) Financial Aid Forms Contact Financial Aid Services Campus Life Current Students Home Laker Connect #RULaker Life (Weekly Announcements) Important Dates Residence Life Engagement, Equity & Inclusion Health and Safety Athletics How to Get Around University Events Resources Blackboard Bookstore Building a Stronger University Catalog Course Finder Find Faculty/Staff Contacts Find My NetID Find Services/Departments Library Reset NETID Password RU Access Student Email Student Handbook Faculty & Staff Academics Blackboard Course Finder Library TK20 Institutional Review Board Get Info Inside Roosevelt Faculty/Staff Directory Dept/Office Directory Events Building a Stronger University ...And Justice for All Podcast Technology Zoom Help Desk Email RU Access Reset NetID Password Find My NetID WiFi on Campus Alumni & Giving Giving Why Give Giving Initiatives Give Now Ways to Give Get Connected Alumni Home Events Update My Info Women's Leadership Young Professionals Professional Mentoring Lifelong Lakers Volunteer Opportunities Benefits Request a transcript Get Career Assistance Library Privileges Insurance Plans Buy RU Gear Building a Stronger University Roosevelt Stories Alumni Profiles Roosevelt Review News ...And Justice for All Podcast Share a Story Bachelor's in Nuclear Medicine Technology (BS) College of Science, Health and Pharmacy Request More Info Nuclear medicine technologists are involved in direct patient care. Nuclear medicine provides unique information about the structure and function of virtually every major organ system within the body. It is the ability to characterize and quantify physiologic function at the molecular level that separates nuclear medicine from other imaging modalities. Nuclear medical technologists work with physicians to administer radioactive nuclides for the diagnosis of disease and to provide therapy. Most nuclear medicine technologists work in hospitals. This is a 3+1 program in which the first three years of course work are completed at Roosevelt University with the final year completed at the clinical affiliate site. Expectations Outcomes Admission Info Related Programs Location: Chicago Start Term: Fall, Spring, Summer Program Type: Major Roosevelt University is the only university that is affiliated with all four of the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Clinical School programs. This is a 3+1 program in which the first three years of course work are completed at Roosevelt University with the final year completed at the clinical affiliate site. Our downtown Chicago location allows students to continue to live on campus and have access to the RU support services and activities. Expectations & Requirements. Standards. Nuclear medicine technologists are involved in direct patient care. Nuclear medicine provides unique information about the structure and function of virtually every major organ system within the body. It is the ability to characterize and quantify physiologic function at the molecular level that separates nuclear medicine from other imaging modalities. Nuclear medical technologists work with physicians to administer radioactive nuclides for the diagnosis of disease and to provide therapy. Most nuclear medicine technologists work in hospitals. Sample Courses. Anatomy and Physiology I & II Ecology, Evolution and Genetics Cellular and Molecular Biology General Chemistry I & II Organic Chemistry I College Algebra Precalculus Elementary Statistics Physics I: Mechanics and Heat with lab Physics II: Electromagnetism with lab View Academic Catalog Outcomes. 100% Pass Rate For the last five years, our graduates have had 100% pass rate on the Board of Certification Exam and 100% job placement. Admission Info. Admission into Roosevelt University ALH nuclear medicine technology major follows the basic admission criteria of the University. Admission to clinical training is at the discretion of the clinical affiliate, Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Students are not guaranteed admission. The minimum GPA for clinical application for this program is a 2.5 GPA overall and a 2.5 GPA in the prerequisite courses. Related Programs. Bachelor's in Histotechnology (BS) Bachelor's in Medical Technology (BS) Bachelor's in Radiation Therapy Technology (BS) Bachelor's in Radiography (BS) ×
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Result 21
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology | Elmhurst University
Urlhttps://www.elmhurst.edu/academics/academic-centers/health-professions-advising/programs/nuclear-medicine-technology/
DescriptionPrepare for an exciting career in nuclear medicine technology at Elmhurst University in affiliation with Northwestern Memorial Hospital or College of DuPage
DateJan 4, 2022
Organic Position21
H1Nuclear Medicine Technology
H2Connect with #elmhurstu
H3Required Courses
H2WithAnchorsConnect with #elmhurstu
BodyNuclear Medicine TechnologyNuclear medicine is an exciting field that involves the diagnosis, treatment, and study of human disease through the use of radioactive pharmaceuticals.Elmhurst University has affiliations with Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the College of DuPage, where students can apply to spend three years completing coursework at Elmhurst University and their final phase of courses and clinical experience in a hospital setting. What does a nuclear medicine technologist do?Nuclear medicine technologists work with physicians and patients to create high-quality diagnostic images. Here are just some of the things you’ll do as an NMT:Prepare and administer radiopharmaceuticals (radioactive chemical compounds)Perform patient imaging procedures using sophisticated radiation-detecting instrumentationPerform computer processing and image enhancement functionsProvide image, data analysis and patient information to the physician for diagnostic interpretationPrepare patients for radioactive tracers and radioactive therapyApply knowledge of radiation physics and safety regulationsUse quality control techniques as part of the quality assurance program What should I major in?Students applying for the affiliations must major in health science technology. Students applying after graduation can major in anything they like as long as they complete the prerequisite courses for the program or track. What are the academic requirements?If accepted, students will complete three years of college courses on site at Elmhurst University, and then spend the final phase of clinical/academic education on-site at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (13 months) or through hospitals connected with the College of DuPage (15 months). Upon successful completion of the NMT courses and training, students will receive a certificate of program completion as a nuclear medical technologist and be eligible to take required national certifying examinations in addition to earning a bachelor’s degree from Elmhurst.Transfer students are eligible to apply for this affiliation. Their timeline may vary from the traditional one. Transfer students are required to attend Elmhurst full-time for 1.5 years (3 fall/spring semesters) prior to beginning at NMH or COD if accepted by them. Most transfer students will attend Elmhurst for 2 years full-time prior to beginning at NMH or COD if accepted.Students accepted to this track pay Elmhurst tuition and fees for courses at Elmhurst and Northwestern Memorial Hospital or College of DuPage. Additional fees may be required by the hospital as well. Northwestern Memorial Hospital is located at 541 N. Fairbanks Court, Suite 950 in Chicago, IL 60611. For the College of DuPage program, students may incur additional fees or costs by that school, including if they are out of district. The College of DuPage is located at 425 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn, IL 60137.Required Courses. BIO 200, 201, 207, 208, 315CHM 211, 212, 311, 312PHY 111, 112MTH 132, 345HST 400, 498CS 111 or CS 220 ENG 105, 106COM 213Elmhurst University Integrated CurriculumAdditional courses in the humanities, social sciences, and oral and written communication are required. The COD track specifically requires MTH 121 College Algebra; taking an advanced math course will not replace the MTH 121 requirement. The COD track also requires two years of direct patient contact or completion of a clinical health science course. Advisors can provide a list of possible course options and recommendations as well as additional information on GPA and prerequisite grade requirements for both tracks. What about advising?You will meet with the health professions advisor to discuss your specific academic and professional interests. Your advisor will work with you throughout your Elmhurst career, giving expert guidance. How do I get certified?When you successfully complete your academic and clinical courses, you’ll be eligible to take required national certifying examinations administered by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, and the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. Where can I find additional information?You can start by checking the website of Northwestern’s School of Nuclear Medicine Technology or the College of DuPage’s site. In addition to information about the Elmhurst University affiliations, you will find links to additional resources. For more help, contact Elmhurst’s health professions advising team.Any student interested in applying is responsible for learning about all the requirements for the program. Admission to Elmhurst University does not guarantee acceptance to any affiliation program or track.Connect with #elmhurstu. Instagram Facebook Twitter View All Close
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Result 22
TitleAssociate in Arts :: Nuclear Medicine Technology
Urlhttps://www.bellevuecollege.edu/nucmed/aa/
Description
Date
Organic Position22
H1Associate in Arts
H2Program Details
Prerequisites
Required Hospital Observations
Distance Education
Questions?
How to Apply
Academic Options
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H3Curriculum
Benefits of completing the nuclear medicine technology program include:
Who Should Apply?
Age Restriction
Credit for Previous Courses in Nuclear Medicine Technology?
H2WithAnchorsProgram Details
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Required Hospital Observations
Distance Education
Questions?
How to Apply
Academic Options
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Admissions
BodyAssociate in Arts Bellevue College’s Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT), Associate in Arts degree (AA), is an eighteen-month full-time program. It is offered through a cooperative effort between Bellevue College and a number of area hospitals and clinics. It is part of a larger career pathway in Nuclear Medicine and prepares you to work as a nuclear medicine technologist. The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). After completing the degree you’ll be eligible to apply to take the national certification exams required to work in this field. NMTs are certified by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (ARRT). Many states also require a state license to practice Nuclear Medicine Technology. Here is a link to our program outcomes and information about professional licensure.  Also, you may review the current JRCNMT report for Bellevue College. Program Details. Approximately 30 students apply each year. Eight to ten students are admitted each year to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program with the curriculum beginning in September (fall quarter) to this full-time (40 hours a week) program. The curriculum begins fall quarter each year and continues for 18 consecutive months. In this program, you’ll spend twelve months in clinical sites working alongside certified nuclear medicine technologists to learn all aspects of the field. Classes are held at Bellevue College (BC) and also at clinical sites located in the Puget Sound area and central Washington. Those attending classes in central Washington and south Puget Sound area participate in the classroom portion of the program via two-way videoconferencing from the Columbia Basin College (CBC) health sciences complex in Richland, WA and Tacoma Community College (TCC). Prerequisites. All prospective students are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with the program prerequisites prior to reaching out so that we may assist you in the most efficient way! Visit our course catalog to learn more about the nuclear medicine AA degree prerequisites.  If you would like our program chair to review your previous coursework to see if it might meet prerequisite requirements, please complete and submit the Nuclear Medicine Technology Prerequisite Review/Approval Form.  Please enter information on all prerequisites you would like reviewed by our program chair and submit your unofficial transcripts for those courses already completed along with your approval form. Required Hospital Observations. A minimum of two observations are required for the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and should be completed prior to the first interview. Learn more about observations…   Distance Education. The goals of the distance-education offering are to increase the supply of nuclear medicine technologists in Central Washington and the South Sound (Tacoma) area as well as allowing individuals from those regions to participate in the Bellevue College (BC) program without having to relocate. We expect to place two students into each distant cohort, each year. Learn More… Curriculum. The curriculum covers performance of a wide variety of imaging and therapeutic procedures, preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals, explanations of procedures and their risks, and analysis of the results of each study. Students work with a number of radiation detection systems, including gamma cameras and positron emission tomography systems. Students also work with computers that analyze data from imaging studies, in addition to those used for administrative tasks. Coursework will include principles and procedures in computed tomography, which is frequently done in conjunction with nuclear medicine procedures. Most important, students work directly with patients, helping to ease their anxiety as well as diagnose their ailments. Nuclear Medicine Degree Worksheet, course requirements and program requirements. Benefits of completing the nuclear medicine technology program include:. An interesting and rewarding career—nuclear medicine technologists do a wide variety of imaging, non-imaging, and therapy procedures and deal with about 5-10 patients each day. Good pay—current starting salaries for staff nuclear medicine technologists in the Seattle area are around $30/hour (Reference: Washington State Workforce Explorer). Possibilities for advancement—nuclear medicine technologists can move into management, research, or commercial positions Who Should Apply? This program is for students looking to enter the Nuclear Medicine profession. You are a great match for this program if you have good communication, analytical and critical thinking skills. A strong aptitude and academic background in science is very important, as is the ability to handle multiple tasks efficiently. Nuclear medicine is an ideal career for people who like working with others and enjoy the technical aspects of advanced medical technology. Age Restriction. State regulations prohibit Minors from getting occupational radiation exposure. For this reason, you must be 18 years old at the time that you begin the program. Credit for Previous Courses in Nuclear Medicine Technology? You are welcome to apply to the Bellevue program, but you will have to complete it in its entirety. Different programs are set up differently, so the only way we can ensure that you have all of the required knowledge and competencies is to have you do the program from beginning to end. Questions? Visit our Nuclear Medicine Technology page to request information.   How to Apply.   Bellevue College’s Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT), Associate in Arts degree (AA), is a selective admissions program. All students must apply to Bellevue College prior to completing the online Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) application. Specific instructions have been provided for this program. Please note, by completing the online Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) application, you are applying to the Associate in Arts degree (AA) program only. This program is for students looking to enter the Nuclear Medicine field. Last Updated January 4, 2022 Academic Options. Associate in Arts Advanced Certifications Bachelors of Applied Science Advising. Clinical Practicum Entry Codes Graduation Information Sessions Registration Tuition & Fees Admissions. AA Application Instructions BAS Application Instructions Advanced Certificates Application Instructions Accessibility Emergency alerts Privacy notice Public disclosure Website info We are an equal opportunity institution
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Result 23
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology | North Central College
Urlhttps://www.northcentralcollege.edu/program/nuclear-medicine-technology
DescriptionA Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in nuclear medicine technology trains you to administer radiopharmaceuticals and monitor treatment results
Date
Organic Position23
H1Nuclear Medicine Technology
H2Nuclear Medicine Technology, B.S
Major Requirements
Additional Requirements for the B.S. Degree
H3Coronavirus (COVID-19) Updates
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Why choose nuclear medicine technology at North Central College?
Nuclear Medicine Technology Opportunities
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H2WithAnchorsNuclear Medicine Technology, B.S
Major Requirements
Additional Requirements for the B.S. Degree
BodyNuclear Medicine Technology Apply Visit Questions? Undergraduate Admission (630) 637-5800 [email protected] Why choose nuclear medicine technology at North Central College? Nuclear medicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, and computer technology to uniquely provide information about both the structure and function of virtually every major organ system within the body. It is this ability to characterize and quantify physiologic function which separates nuclear medicine from other imaging modalities.  With the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, treatments and the exciting technology of PET/MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT hybrid imaging, the nuclear medicine field has grown significantly over the past years and is expected to grow even more in the future. Daily tasks of a nuclear medicine technologist include: Prepare and administer radioactive chemical compounds known as radiopharmaceuticals; perform patient imaging procedures using sophisticated radiation-detecting instrumentation; perform computer processing and image enhancement functions; provide images, data analysis and patient information to the physician for diagnostic interpretation; prepare patients for imaging procedures and radioactive therapy; apply knowledge of radiation physics and safety regulations to radiation safety; and, utilize quality control techniques as part of the quality assurance program. North Central College's degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology prepares students for a career as a nuclear medicine technologist through a 3+1 program with NM School of Nuclear Medicine Technology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Students spend three years at North Central College, where they complete their liberal arts general education core along with prerequisite science and math courses. This is followed by a 13-month program of study (35 credits) at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. The student then graduates from North Central College with a degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology. Admission to the final year of the program is based upon successful application to the NM School of Nuclear Medicine Technology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in January of junior year. Student applicants are considered and evaluated solely by the faculty/staff at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Student admission to the program is not guaranteed. Students intending to major in Nuclear Medicine Technology must meet with the Pre-Professional Health Program Coordinator or the Chemistry Department Chair for the most recent information. Prerequisite courses and other requirements are subject to change. You can also: Pursue research and lab work under the individualized guidance of North Central’s full-time science faculty. Gain clinical experience at a leading nuclear medicine school with the most advanced technological and diagnostic equipment available.   Nuclear Medicine Technology, B.S. Nuclear medicine technologists help physicians diagnose and treat diseases by administering radiopharmaceuticals, then monitoring patients' responses. We can help you thrive in this fascinating field. First, you'll spend three years completing biology, chemistry, physics, math and liberal arts courses at North Central, mastering the scientific principles of the field while learning to communicate effectively with other health care professionals and patients. In your fourth year after acceptance into the program you'll complete a clinical internship at Northwestern Memorial School of Nuclear Medicine before graduating from North Central with a B.S. in nuclear medicine technology—and with a clear advantage over your peers in the field.For more programs and courses in this department, see Chemistry and Physics. Major Requirements. Required Courses. CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I. 4.00 credit hours A discussion of chemical principles through examples from the chemistry of carbon compounds and the molecules found in living systems. Major topics include atomic and electronic structure, ions, molecules, Lewis structures, VSEPR, hybridization, intermolecular forces, chromatography, equilibria, kinetics, stereochemistry and polymer chemistry. Laboratory required. Prerequisite(s) One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra. Cardinal Directions Designation(s) Sciences. Schedule Of Classes CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II. 4.00 credit hours An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required. Prerequisite(s) CHEM 121. Schedule Of Classes CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I. 4.00 credit hours Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, with emphasis upon molecular structure, stereochemistry and mechanisms of Organic reactions. Techniques for isolating, purifying and characterizing organic compounds are learned in the laboratory. Laboratory required. Prerequisite(s) Six hours in Chemistry including CHEM 121 or CHEM 122. Schedule Of Classes CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II. 4.00 credit hours Continuation of CHEM 251. This course builds on previously learned concepts to further explore the mechanisms of organic reactions. The emphasis shifts from physical organic to synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory required. Prerequisite(s) CHEM 251. Schedule Of Classes BIOL 195 - Investigating Biology BIOL 195 - Investigating Biology. 4.00 credit hours Students and faculty work as a team to conduct an authentic course-based undergraduate research project in an area of current importance. Course content is selected to support the research project and introduces students to concepts, techniques and skills of modern biology. Class activities move fluidly among lecture, laboratory, fieldwork, discussion and problem-solving modes. Gateway to the major. Cardinal Directions Designation(s) Sciences. Schedule Of Classes BIOL 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I. 4.00 credit hours Anatomy and Physiology is about how the body maintains life. Anatomy looks at the structure and organization of body parts; physiology explains their functions. Integration of structure and function allows understanding of what systems do and how. Beginning with cells and the grouping of cells into tissues and organs, groups of organs that function together form organ systems which maintain stable internal conditions. This course examines the integumentary, skeletal, muscle and digestive systems. Laboratory required; activities connect course concepts with experiential learning, using basic chemistry, tissue slides, human and cat skeletons, and cat dissection for muscle identification and function. Prerequisite(s) BIOL 104 or BIOL 108 recommended. Schedule Of Classes BIOL 202 - Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 202 - Anatomy and Physiology II. 4.00 credit hours Anatomy and Physiology is about how the body maintains life. Anatomy looks at the structure and organization of body parts; physiology explains their functions. Integration of structure and function allows understanding of what systems do and how. This course continues the study of organ systems with nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and reproductive systems. Laboratory required; activities connect anatomical and physiological concepts with experiential learning by continuing cat dissection for the nervous, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. All students will experience alteration of some physiological systems and homeostatic mechanisms designed to maintain a stable internal environment. Prerequisite(s) BIOL 201. Schedule Of Classes BIOL 210 - Cells and Systems BIOL 210 - Cells and Systems. 4.00 credit hours Structure and function of cells and applications to physiological systems of plants and animals. Topics include cell membranes, enzymes, energy metabolism, cell movement and cell communication and their roles in nerve and muscle function, photosynthesis, vascular transport, digestion, excretion and other systems. Laboratory required, includes investigative projects in protein and enzyme function, metabolism and signal transduction. Prerequisite(s) BIOL 195 or (NEUR 100 with instructor consent); CHEM 121 or concurrent enrollment. Schedule Of Classes BIOL 230 - Genes and Genomics BIOL 230 - Genes and Genomics. 4.00 credit hours Genetic analysis and applications of genetics to the understanding of cellular processes. Investigation of classical Mendelian genetics and modern molecular genetics, including mechanisms of inheritance, DNA structure and function, genotyping and genomic analysis, mutation, epigenetics and gene regulation. Laboratory required, includes investigative projects in Drosophila genetics, gene cloning and human genotyping. Prerequisite(s) BIOL 220. Cardinal Directions Designation(s) Writing Intensive. Schedule Of Classes PSYC 250 - Statistics PSYC 250 - Statistics. 4.00 credit hours The methods, concepts and logic underlying the statistical evaluation of research data with an emphasis on "why" as well as "when" to use various statistical methods. Content includes descriptive and inferential statistics, estimation and hypothesis testing. Analyses include z and t tests, one-way and factorial ANOVA, correlation, regression and Chi square. Assignments focus on problem solving, technical writing and use of computer statistical packages (SPSS). Only one of BUSN 265 or PSYC 250 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s) MATH 130 or higher. Cardinal Directions Designation(s) Quantitative Analysis. Schedule Of Classes Advanced Courses at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Upper-level coursework taken during the 12-month clinical internship at Northwestern Memorial Hospital includes 34 credit hours in courses such Management and Methods of Patient Care, Radiation Safety and Protection, Radiation Detection and Instrumentation, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation, Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging Clinical Practicum, Clinical Nuclear Medicine Procedures, Radionuclide Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Radiation Biology, Clinical Correlation—Pathology, and Computer Tomography & Cross Sectional Anatomy. Additional Requirements for the B.S. Degree. MATH 151 - Calculus I MATH 151 - Calculus I. 4.00 credit hours An exploration of the fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation and integration with applications. Prerequisite(s) Minimum grade of C- in MATH 140 or placement; Four years of math including algebra, geometry and trigonometry recommended. Cardinal Directions Designation(s) Quantitative Analysis. Schedule Of Classes Physics Sequence. One of the following sequences: Non-Calculus PHYS 131 - Physics I (Non-Calculus) PHYS 131 - Physics I (Non-Calculus). 4.00 credit hours Kinematics, Newton's Laws, conservation laws, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 131 and PHYS 161. Prerequisite(s) Precalculus (Algebra & Trigonometry) competence. Schedule Of Classes PHYS 132 - Physics II (Non-Calculus) PHYS 132 - Physics II (Non-Calculus). 4.00 credit hours Oscillations, waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 132 and PHYS 162. Prerequisite(s) PHYS 131 and Precalculus (Algebra & Trigonometry) competence. Schedule Of Classes Calculus-Based PHYS 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat PHYS 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat. 4.00 credit hours Newton's Laws of motion, energy conservation, rotational motion, thermodynamics. Laboratory required, includes experimental physics and an introduction to computational modeling. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 131 and PHYS 161. Prerequisite(s) CSCE 160; MATH 151 or concurrent enrollment. Cardinal Directions Designation(s) Sciences. Schedule Of Classes PHYS 162 - Physics II: Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics PHYS 162 - Physics II: Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics. 4.00 credit hours Oscillations, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics. Laboratory required, includes experimental physics and computational modeling. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 132 and PHYS 162. Prerequisite(s) CSCE 160, MATH 151 and PHYS 161. Schedule Of Classes Nuclear Medicine Technology Opportunities. A North Central education integrates career preparation with rich academic study. Our faculty encourages you to refine and apply your knowledge in an interconnected world. Here you'll learn to think independently and work globally to solve problems and lead. Careers. Recent graduates in nuclear medicine technology include: Nuclear medicine technologist, OSF St. Anthony Medical Center, Rockford, IL Lead nuclear medicine technologist, Advanced Breast Imaging, Arlington Heights, IL   Invest in your future. Choosing the right college is a big decision. Don’t make it alone. North Central’s admission and financial aid team is here to help you design a financial aid solution that works best for you and your family. Need-based loans, merit scholarships, grants, campus employment—these are just some of the resources available to you. Nearly 90 percent of first-year students and 100 percent of all students eligible for aid receive aid. Let our financial aid team assist you in finding the best value for you. Learn more about financial aid and costs for North Central College Apply to North Central College. The first step to becoming a North Central student is reading the application instructions specific to you. Find out everything you need to know about applying by selecting the group you belong to below. Freshman Transfer Homeschool International undergraduate Graduate and professional studies International graduate Former North Central student Veteran Related Programs Explore Similar Programs.
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Result 24
TitleB.S. Nuclear Medicine Technology | AdventHealth University | AHU
Urlhttps://www.ahu.edu/academics/bs-nuclear-medicine-technology
DescriptionAHU’s BS Nuclear Medicine Technology program teaches students to provide diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative applications in the health care field
Date
Organic Position24
H1Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology
H2Double your career potential
Loading..
Quick Facts
About the Program
H3
H2WithAnchorsDouble your career potential
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Quick Facts
About the Program
BodyBachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology Double your career potential. Now including Computed Tomography (CT) education in both the classroom and clinical rotations. Loading... Quick Facts. Degree Level Bachelor's Degree Average Admitted GPA 3.2 prerequisite; 3.25 cumulative (2020 Intake) Minimum 2.70 prerequisite and 2.70 cumulative required to apply Application Deadline May 15 Program Start Fall Trimester Admits per Intake 15 Accreditation View Accreditation Statement Average Annual Salary $81,254 *according Salary.com About the Program. The Profession. The nuclear medicine technologist is a trained professional in radioactive pharmaceuticals, providing diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative applications in the field of medicine. By employing small quantities of radioactive materials, these technologists help visualize and define tumors, malfunctioning organs and the physiology of cardiac, bone, liver, and other organic functions. Computed Tomography (CT) knowledge will be employed in the Nuclear Medicine Department with hybrid scanners or in the CT area for further analysis. The Program. Expand your career opportunities working as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist and/or a CT Technologist. The Nuclear Medicine Technology faculty members are certified by the NMTCB and AART as well as contribute to various professional organizations. With the faculty’s 50 years of combined experience in the field, students can expect a high quality education in the nuclear medicine technology program. Our program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT) and follows the Accreditation Standards for Nuclear Medicine Technologist Education. Students that study Nuclear Medicine Technology at AdventHealth University have the benefit of an accredited program with highly experienced faculty. The program has a fully equipped lab including a gamma camera, processing workstation, uptake probes, well counter, and survey meters. A variety of clinical rotations throughout hospitals and imaging centers allows students to interface with the latest technology preparing for their future careers. Program graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification examinations administered by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). The graduates can become both certified in Nuclear Medicine and/or Computed Tomography. Mission Statement: Consistent with the mission of the University, the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program at AdventHealth University provides an environment where students pursue technical expertise in the field of nuclear medicine while respecting their own spiritual, intellectual, social, and physical development. And the results are clear. Graduate Achievement Data Graduate achievement data is an indicator of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals. The current report on graduate achievement data, identified by program, is available on the JRCNMT website by clicking on the following link: View Graduate Achievement Data → 91% Graduation Rate 93% NMTCB Exam Pass Rate 98% ARRT Exam Pass Rate 79% Employment Rate (within 6 months of graduation) * Program averages since 2001 View All Program Outcomes 2001-Present (PDF) → To get a real sense of the Nuclear Medicine Program at AHU, you just have to see it. Here's where it all happens. .
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Result 25
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology Education Programs - Nuclear Medicine - Exams | NMTCB
Urlhttps://www.nmtcb.org/exams/nuclear-medicine/schools
Description
Date
Organic Position25
H1Nuclear Medicine Technology Education Programs
H2
H3Announcements
FAQs
Marketplace
H2WithAnchors
BodyNuclear Medicine Technology Education Programs The Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) has approved new eligibility requirements to take effect in 2017. Under these new requirements, the NMTCB will only accept applications for the entry level examination from graduates of programmatically accredited nuclear medicine technology educational programs beginning January 1, 2017. The NMTCB currently recognizes two programmatic accreditation agencies, the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT), and the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT). Click the links below to see a listing of nuclear medicine technology education programs currently accredited by these respective agencies: JRCNMT Accredited Programs CAMRT Accredited Programs This list of Nuclear Medicine Technology Training Programs Recognized by the NMTCB is sorted in alphabetical order by state. International Programs are listed at the bottom. School CODE 901100 University of Alabama at Birmingham Amy Brady , MAEd, CNMT, Interim Program Director Clinical & Diagnostic Sciences Department UAB School of Health Professions, Room 446, 1705 University Blvd., Birmingham, AL 35294-1212 205/934-3427 School CODE 904100 Baptist Health College Little Rock Daniel Guffey , MBA, CNMT, NMTCB(CT), R.T.(N)(CT), Program Director School of Nuclear Medicine Technology 11900 Colonel Glenn Road, Suite 1000, Little Rock, AR 72210-2820 501/202-7919 School CODE 904200 University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Arthur Maune , MEd, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Imaging Sciences College of Health Professions, 4301 West Markham, Slot 714, Little Rock, AR 72205 501/686-6848 School CODE 903110 GateWay Community College Julie Bolin , Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 108 North 40th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034 602/286-8574 School CODE 905860 Kaiser Permanente School of Allied Health Sciences Lori Blok , MBA, CNMT, NMTCB(CT), CRT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Program 938 Marina Way South, Richmond, CA 94804 510/231-5060 School CODE 905250 Loma Linda University Raynold Ho , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program School of Allied Health Professions, Nichol Hall, Room A-829, Loma Linda, CA 92350 909/558-4931 School CODE 905160 VA Palo Alto Health Care System Kent Hutchings , MS, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Service (115) 3801 Miranda Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304 650/493-5000 x 64135 School CODE 907150 Gateway Community College Ann Marie Jones , MBA, MSM, CNMT, R.T.(CT)(ARRT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 20 Church Street, New Haven, CT 6510 203/285-2381 School CODE 908100 Delaware Technical Community College Karen Griffith BS, CNMT, Interim Program Director School of Nuclear Medicine 700 W. Lea Blvd., Suite 101, Wilmington, DE 19802 302/320-4566 School CODE 909700 AdventHealth University Liz Duncan , MSHS, CNMT, RT(CT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 671 Winyah Drive, Orlando, FL 32803 407/303-8506 School CODE 909020 Broward College North Campus Mayra Limousin-Hernandez , BS, RT(R)(N)(CT), CNMT, Interim Program Director Bldg 41, Room 115 1000 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek, FL 33066 954/201-2974 School CODE 909100 Hillsborough Community College Ron Walker , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 4001 W. Tampa Bay Blvd. , DTEC 125, Tampa, FL 33613 813/253-7418 School CODE 909460 Keiser University Lakeland Campus Jasmin Miller , CNMT,BS, MBA,DBA Program Director, University Dpt. Chair Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 2400 Interstate Dr., Lakeland, FL 33805 863/682-6020 School CODE 909250 Miami Dade College Medical Campus Agdanamai Luis , MSEd, RT(N), CNMT, Program Director Initial Accreditation: 04/26/2019 950 NW 20th Street, Miami, FL 33127 305/237-4053 School CODE 909400 Santa Fe College Sharon Lafferty , MSA, RT(N), CNMT, Program Director Santa Fe College NMT Program 3000 NW 83rd Street, Heath Sciences Bldg. W. Room 22C, Gainesville, FL 32606-6200 352/395-5672 School CODE 910300 Augusta University Greg Passmore , PhD, CNMT, NMTCB(RS), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program - EC2422 Dept. of Undergraduate Health Professions, 987 St. Sebastian Way, EC2408, Augusta, GA 30912-0600 706/721-4181 School CODE 910600 Georgia Southern University Rochelle Lee , EdD., M.B.A., RT(N), Program Coordinator Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 11935 Abercorn St., Savannah, GA 31419-1997 912/344-2753 School CODE 915100 University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics Anthony W. Knight , CNMT, Program Director Department of Radiology, 3800 JPP Division of Nuclear Medicine, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242-1009 319/356-2954 School CODE 913150 College of DuPage Amy Yarshen , MBA, CNMT Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 425 N. Falwell Blvd., Glen Ellyn, IL 60137-6599 630/942-3065 School CODE 913750 Northwestern Memorial Hospital Michelle Coppens , MHA, CNMT, PET, RT(CT), Program Director School of Nuclear Medicine Technology 541 N. Fairbanks Court, Suite 950, Chicago, IL 60611 312/926-4461 School CODE 914300 Indiana University School of Medicine Deborah LeMay , MPH, RT(R)(N), Interim Program Director Dept of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences: NMT Program 1120 W. Michigan St. CL 120, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5111 317/274-7431 School CODE 916100 University of Kansas Medical Center Kellee George , MS, RT(R)(N), CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Mail Stop 1013, Kansas City, KS 66160-7234 913/588-7184 School CODE 918200 Delgado Community College Steve Trichell , M.Ed., ARRT(N), Program Director Allied Health Department 615 City Park Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70119-4399 504/671-6232 School CODE 921250 MCPHS University David Gilmore , EdD, CNMT, RT(R)(N), FSNMMI-TS, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 617/735-1051 School CODE 921300 Regis College Leo Nalivaika , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 235 Wellesley Street, Weston, MA 2493 781/768-7313 School CODE 921350 Salem State University Melinda Walker , BS, CNMT, Program Director SSC- Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 352 Lafayette Street, Salem, MA 01970 978/542-6236 School CODE 920400 Prince George's Community College Nicholas Robinson , MSRS, CNMT, PET, RT(N)(CT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program Division of Health, Wellness & Hospitality, 301 Largo Road, Room 2231-F, Largo, MD 20774-2199 301/546-3026 School CODE 920200 The Johns Hopkins Hospital David Kelkis , CNMT, NMTCB(CT), RT(N)(CT)(ARRT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 111 Market Place, Ste 830, Baltimore, MD 21202 410-223-1855 School CODE 922300 Ferris State University Timothy Vander Laan , MPA, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program College of Health Professions, 200 Ferris Drive, Big Rapids, MI 49307 616/643-5751 School CODE 923200 Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences Matthew Ugorowski Ugorowski, M.Ed., CNMT, R.T.(N), PET , Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 11-15 Siebens, 200 SW First St., Rochester, MN 55905 507/284-3245 School CODE 925400 Research Medical Center Jennifer Miles , MS, BS, CNMT, ARRT(N), NCT, Program Director School of Nuclear Medicine Technology 2316 E. Meyer Blvd., Kansas City, MO 64132 816/276-4068 School CODE 925900 Saint Louis University Crystal Botkin , PhD, MPH, PET, FSNNMI-TS, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program Doisy College of Health Sciences, 3437 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO 63104 314/977-8592 School CODE 925800 University of Missouri-Columbia Jeff Galen , M.Ed., CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program School of Health Related Professions, 605 Lewis Hall, Columbia, MO 65211-4230 573/884-7843 School CODE 924100 University of Mississippi Medical Center Chelsea Stephens , MHS, CNMT, RT(R)(N), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 2500 N. State Street, Jackson, MS 39216-4505 601/984-6355 School CODE 933100 Caldwell Community College & Technical Institute Leslie Deal , BS, RT(N), CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Program 2855 Hickory Blvd., Hudson, NC 28638 828/726-2330 School CODE 933200 Forsyth Technical Community College Jawahar Jesrani , Ed.D., MBA, CNMT, Program Coordinator, Associate Professor Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 2100 Silas Creek Parkway, Winston-Salem, NC 27103 336/734-7604 School CODE 933002 University of North Carolina Hospitals Brian McLamb , CNMT, RT(R),Interim Program Director School of Nuclear Medicine Technology Radiology Administration, CB #7600, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 984/974-8800 School CODE 930170 Rowan College South Jersey Main Campus Laura MacAulay , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 1400 Tanyard Road, Sewell, NJ 8080 856/415-2196 School CODE 931100 University of New Mexico Lynnette Trujillo , MS, CNMT, RT(N), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Imaging Program MSC 09 5260, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 505/272-5254 School CODE 932070 CUNY Bronx Community College Grace Wenzler , MA, RT(N) (CT), CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 2155 University Ave., CPH Building, Room 213, Bronx, NY 10453 718/289-5930 School CODE 932150 Manhattan College Christine Reina , R.T.(N), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 4513 Manhattan College Parkway, Miguel Hall Room 515, Riverdale, NY 10471 718/862-7807 School CODE 932200 Molloy College Marc B. Fischer , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 1000 Hempstead Avenue, P.O. Box 5002, Rockville Cntr., NY 11571-5002 516/323-3389 School CODE 932470 SUNY at Buffalo Egon W. Fast , M.Ed, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 105 Parker Hall, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214 716/838-5889 X135 School CODE 935650 Cuyahoga Community College Teresa Taggart , MS, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 11000 Pleasant Valley Rd, Western Campus, Parma, OH 44130-5199 216/987-5298 School CODE 935600 The University of Findlay Eric Hertenstein , MBA, CNMT, NMTCB (CT), PET, RT(CT)(ARRT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Institute 1000 North Main Street, Findlay, OH 45840-3695 419/434-4891 School CODE 935200 University of Cincinnati Alan W. Vespie , MEd, CNMT, Program Director College of Allied Health Sciences Advanced Medical Imaging Technology Program, 3202 Eden Ave- French East Building , Cincinnati, OH 45267-0394 513/558-7497 School CODE 936300 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Vesper Grantham , M.Ed., CNMT, RT(N) Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences College of Allied Health Bldg, AHB 3021, 1200 N. Stonewall, Oklahoma City, OK 73117-1215 405/271-6477 School CODE 938100 Community College of Allegheny County Lori Duke , MBA, RT(N), CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program Allegheny Campus, 808 Ridge Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412/237-2751 School CODE 938150 Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences Paula Mancini , Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 850 Greenfield Road, Lancaster, PA 17601 717/947-6058 School CODE 938200 Robert Morris University William Wentling II , MS, RT(R)(N), CNMT, Program Director Advanced Medical Imaging Technology Program Robert Morris University, 6001 University Boulevard, Scaife Hall 1, Moon Township, PA 15108-1189 412/397-5486 School CODE 952500 University of Puerto Rico-Medical Sciences Campus Miriam Espada , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program School of Health Professions, Medical Sciences Campus,POB 365067, San Juan, PR 00936-5067 787/758-2525 X4607 School CODE 939100 Rhode Island Hospital School of Medical Imaging Lauren Shanbrun , MS, CNMT, RT(N)(CT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 335R Prairie Avenue, Suite 2A, Providence, RI 02905 401-606-8531 School CODE 940400 Midlands Technical College S. Crystal Snow , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program PO Box 2408, Columbia, SC 29202 803/822-3483 School CODE 942200 Baptist Health Sciences University Donna Mars , MEd, CNMT, NCT, Program Director Division of Allied Health 1003 Monroe Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 901/572-2648 School CODE 942300 Chattanooga State Community College Leesa Ann Ross , CNMT, PET, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 4501 Amnicola Highway, Chattanooga, TN 37406 423/697-3331 School CODE 942400 South College Billy LaRoy , MHSc, CNMT, RT(R), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 3904 Lonas Dr., Knoxville, TN 37909 865/293-4598 School CODE 942900 Vanderbilt University Medical Center Jennifer Pafford , EdD, MS, CNMT, Program Director Department of Radiology CCC-1124 Medical Center North, 1161 21st. Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232-2675 615/875-6132 School CODE 943050 Amarillo College Tamra Rocsko , CNMT,ARRT (N), M.Ed., Program Director Nuclear Medicine Department P.O. Box 447, Amarillo, TX 79178 806/354-6071 School CODE 943200 Galveston College Courtney Cross , CNMT, RT (N) (CT), MBA, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, TX 77550 409/944-1491 School CODE 943300 Houston Community College Vikki Davis-Littleton , MBA, BAS, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 1900 Pressler Street, Houston, TX 77030 713/718-7398 School CODE 920300 Medical Education and Training Campus (METC) Amber Davis , MSgt, USAF, CNMT, Program Director METC Education & Training Campus J-7, 3068 William Hardee Road, Bldg. 899, JBSA Ft Sam Houston, TX 78234 School CODE 943700 Tarrant County College- Trinity River East Campus Tonya Pigulski , MS. CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 245 E Belknap, Fort Worth, TX 76102 817/515-2401 School CODE 943400 University of the Incarnate Word Norma Green Gutierrez , MBA, RT (N)(ARRT), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 4301 Broadway, CPO # 300, San Antonio, TX 78209 210/829-3991 School CODE 944300 University of Utah Health Otto Casal , BS, RT(CT), CNMT, Interim Program Director Department of Radiology and Imaging Services 30 North 1900 East #1A71, Salt Lake City, UT 84132-2140 801/585-6753 School CODE 946400 Old Dominion University Sara Maynard , CNMT, NMTCB(CT), MMHPE, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program College of Health Sciences, Health Science Bldg. Room 2128, Norfolk, VA 23529-0286 757/683-4702 School CODE 946300 Virginia Commonwealth University Mark H. Crosthwaite , M.Ed, CNMT, Program Director Department of Radiation Sciences 701 W. Grace St., PO BOX 843057, Richmond, VA 23284-3057 804/828-9104 School CODE 947210 Bellevue College Jennifer L. Prekeges , CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 3000 Landerholm Circle SE, Bellevue, WA 98007-6484 425/564-2475 School CODE 948300 Aurora St. Luke's Medical Center Kerry Michell , Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 2900 West Oklahoma Avenue, PO Box 2901, Milwaukee, WI 53201-2901 414/649-6418 School CODE 948200 Froedtert Hospital Ann Voslar , M.ED, CNMT, RT(N), Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 9200 W. Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53226 414/805-0057 School CODE 948250 Marshfield Medical Center (Formerly Ministry Saint Joseph's Hospital) Carlyn M. Johnson , MSEd, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 611 St. Joseph Avenue, Marshfield, WI 54449 715/389-3905 School CODE 958200 University of Wisconsin- La Crosse Aileen Staffaroni , MS, CNMT, Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 1725 State Street- HSC 4046, La Crosse, WI 54601 608/785-6625 School CODE 949100 West Virginia University Hospitals Tiffany Davis , MA, RT(R)(N),CNMT, Program Director Department of Radiology PO Box 8062, Morgantown, WV 26506-8062 304/598-4000 x 73179 School CODE 915300 Allen College Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective September 2018 School CODE 922900 Beaumont Health System Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective December 2017 School CODE 917100 Bluegrass Community & Technical College Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective June 30, 2017 School CODE 949200 BridgeValley Community & Technical College Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective August 2019 School CODE 943600 Del Mar College Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective August 16, 2017 School CODE 920600 Frederick Community College Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective December 2018 School CODE 919100 Maine College of Health Professions Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal December 2017 School CODE 930550 Rutgers School of Health Professions Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective August 2019 School CODE 923300 Saint Mary's University of Minnesota Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective December 2020 School CODE 941000 Southeast Technical Institute Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective August 30, 2019 School CODE 932500 SUNY- Stony Brook University and Health Sciences Center Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective May 2018 School CODE 938400 Thomas Jefferson University Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective September 14, 2020 School CODE 913800 Triton College Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective August 6, 2021 School CODE 921200 UMass Memorial Heathcare Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective June 2018 School CODE 927100 University of Nebraska Medical Center Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective February 9, 2017 School CODE 945100 University of Vermont Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective May 2019 School CODE 935700 Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University Programmatic Accreditation Withdrawal Effective June 2020 School CODE 958100 Ahuntsic College, Nuclear Medicine Department Chantal Asselin , RTNM, Program Director Ahuntsic College, Nuclear Medicine Department 9155 rue Saint Hubert, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H2M 1Y8 (514) 389-5921 x 2732 School CODE 960000 All Australian Programs Nuclear Medicine Technology Program School CODE 954100 British Columbia Institute of Technology Thomas Wong , Program Head Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, V5G 3H2 604/451-7030 School CODE 957100 Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences Susan Weltz , Chair, Imaging Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technology Program 222 St. Patrick Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5T 1V4 416/596-3101 X3191 School CODE 960100 School of Health Sciences Cristina Blefari , Program Director BJ1-29A Bonython Jubilee Building, City East Campus City East Campus, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001 +61 8 8302 2905 School CODE 953100 Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Polytechnic School of Health and Public Safety Jennifer Brown , Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 1301 16th Avenue, NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2M 0L4 403/284-7341 School CODE 960200 The University of Newcastle Daphne James , Program Convenor University Drive Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia, Announcements. The Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board Has Developed a Post-Primary Computed Tomography (CT) Credential. Read more FAQs. Can I change my NMTCB CE reporting cycle to match my continuing education cycle with another organization? Read more Marketplace. Order NMTCB replacement certificates, scrubs, polo shirts, patches, pins, mugs, and more. Read more
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Result 26
TitleHow To Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist | Indeed.com
Urlhttps://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/how-to-become-a-nuclear-medicine-technologist
DescriptionLearn what the role of a nuclear medicine technologist entails, this profession's requirements and the average salary and how to pursue a career in this profession
DateFeb 22, 2021
Organic Position26
H1How To Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist
H2What is a nuclear medicine technologist?
What are the requirements to become a nuclear medicine technologist?
How to become a nuclear medicine technologist
Average salary
Career outlook for nuclear medicine technologists
Where do nuclear medicine technologists work?
What is a shift like for a nuclear medicine technologist?
Related Articles
H3Education
Certifications and licensure
Skills
1. Graduate from high school
2. Complete an accredited college program
3. Get certified or licensed
How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps)
12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work
What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a nuclear medicine technologist?
What are the requirements to become a nuclear medicine technologist?
How to become a nuclear medicine technologist
Average salary
Career outlook for nuclear medicine technologists
Where do nuclear medicine technologists work?
What is a shift like for a nuclear medicine technologist?
Related Articles
BodyHow To Become a Nuclear Medicine TechnologistBy Indeed Editorial TeamFebruary 22, 2021TwitterLinkedInFacebookEmailCopy to ClipboardIf you're interested in working in healthcare, consider becoming a nuclear medicine technologist. Not only does this job get you into the medical field, but you also get to choose from many pathways to obtain employment in this profession. Knowing the role of a nuclear medicine technologist and its requirements can help you determine whether to pursue this career. In this article, we define the role of a nuclear medicine technologist, explain the requirements for this career, list the steps for pursuing this profession, outline the career outlook and the average salary for this profession and describe the work setting.What is a nuclear medicine technologist?A nuclear medicine technologist refers to a highly skilled professional who performs nuclear imaging tests under the supervision of a trained physician. Under the supervision of a trained physician, nuclear medicine technologists work with patients and use imaging equipment to determine how radioactive elements respond and interact with a patient's organs and tissues. Here are some of their common duties:Diagnosing medical conditions and diseases such as cancer using imaging testsExplaining test results and medical procedures to patients and answer related questionsWorking alongside doctors to analyze image testing results to come to an official diagnosisFollowing medical safety procedures to ensure the safety of themselves and their patients when it comes to radiation exposurePreparing radioactive drugs and administer these drugs to various patientsMonitoring patients for unusual reactions to radioactive drugsOperating imaging equipment and prepare it for imaging testsMaintaining detailed records of medical proceduresRelated: Learn About Being a Medical TechnologistWhat are the requirements to become a nuclear medicine technologist?Before you pursue a career as a nuclear medicine technologist, you need to know the requirements you need to meet. The better you meet these requirements, the greater chance you have of gaining employment as a nuclear medicine technologist. Here are the main requirements you need to become a nuclear medicine technologist:Education. Nuclear medicine technologists often need an Associate Degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology. While it's not always required, you can also opt for a bachelor's degree in this field. No matter the path you choose, you need to obtain the degree from an accredited program. Having a formal education in this field helps give you the knowledge to succeed in this field and can help increase your marketability.Certifications and licensure. Licensure and certification requirements vary by state and employer. Not only do states determine whether you need a certificate or license in this profession, but so do some employers.While nuclear medicine technologists don't necessarily need to get certified, most professionals in this field are. As with a formal degree, getting certified makes you more marketable in this field and essentially makes it easier for you to compete against other applicants. It's also worth noting that even though you don't need to get certified for your license, a certification fulfills most of the licensure requirements. Like certificate programs, licensure requirements vary by state.If you get certified, it's important to maintain your certification due to the continually changing technologies in this field. Maintaining your certification typically involves the completion of continuing education hours.Skills. Nuclear medicine technologists need a variety of hard and soft skills to help them perform their job duties successfully. Here are some common skills required for nuclear medicine technologists:Attention to detail. Nuclear medicine technologists use their attention to detail to analyze images to detect patient diseases and medical conditions. Also, you need a good attention to detail to follow exact instructions when it comes to dosages and to ensure you don't overexpose a patient to radiation.Technology skills. Nuclear medicine technologists use their technology skills to operate computers and a variety of technological equipment throughout their shift.Compassion. As a nuclear medicine technologist, you need to have empathy and compassion when working with patients. Not only do you need to reassure them, but you also need to help calm and relax them when they're under emotional and physical stress.Interpersonal skills. Nuclear medicine technologists need to have strong interpersonal skills to effectively communicate with patients, their team and a supervising physician. The better you interact and communicate, the better level of care you provide.Math and science skills. Nuclear medicine technologists need strong math and science skills that help them solve problems and come to the right conclusion.Physical stamina. Nuclear medicine technologists need to be physically fit to stand for long periods of time. Also, they need enough strength and stamina to lift and move patients as needed.How to become a nuclear medicine technologist. If you're interested in becoming a nuclear medicine technologist, you have many pathways to choose from. While some prospective nuclear medicine technologists opt for the minimum requirements in this field, others seek a more advanced education to help improve their chance of employment and to help them advance in their careers more easily. Here's one of the pathways you can use to become a nuclear medicine technologist:1. Graduate from high school. To become a nuclear medicine technologist, you need a high school diploma. While in high school, consider taking courses like pre-calculus, chemistry, biology, physics and anatomy as they're available. You can also spend your high school years getting experience in a hospital setting as a volunteer or intern.2. Complete an accredited college program. Enroll and complete an accredited nuclear medicine technology program, whether it's for an associate degree or bachelor's degree. Many nuclear medicine technologists have an associate degree or higher. Make sure you meet all requirements and that you have a competitive GPA that most nuclear medicine technology programs require. Coursework for these programs typically include subject areas such as nuclear physics, biochemistry, radiation biology, immunology, statistics and anatomy. These programs give you the knowledge you need to succeed in this field.Related: Applying To Medical School: Tips and Requirements3. Get certified or licensed. Check with your state's health board regarding certification and licensure requirements. Whether or not your state requires it, consider getting certified or licensed as it can improve your chances of employment. Not only does it show hiring managers you're skilled in this profession, but it also shows your dedication to your career.While you can receive a general certification, you can also opt for a specialty certification that shows your expertise with a specific procedure or equipment. For example, you can get certified in nuclear cardiology or positron emission tomography.Along with states, some employers also have their own requirements when it comes to nuclear medicine technology certification and licensure. Make sure to review the job postings you're interested in so you can determine whether you need a certification or license for the job you want to apply for.Related: How To Become a Medical TechnologistAverage salary. Nuclear medicine technologists make a national average salary of $81,827 per year. By comparison, senior nuclear medicine technologists make a national average salary of $88,593 per year. Keep in mind that your salary depends on your experience and expertise, your geographic location and your employer.Career outlook for nuclear medicine technologists. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports a projected employment growth of 5% for nuclear medicine technologists from 2019 to 2029. As the U.S. population ages, more patients depend on nuclear medicine technologists who can provide them with imaging for their various medical conditions.Where do nuclear medicine technologists work?The majority of nuclear medicine technologists work in hospitals. Other nuclear medicine technologists work in physicians' offices, diagnostic laboratories, outpatient care centers and clinics.What is a shift like for a nuclear medicine technologist?Nuclear medicine technologists often work a standard 40-hour workweek. In some cases, particularly if they work in a hospital, they may be on call when they're supposed to be off shift. Some nuclear medicine technologists work evening hours, over the weekend and during the night.Related Articles. How To Stop Procrastinating at Work (With 3 Steps). 12 Tips To Stop Procrastinating at Work. What Is a Unique Value Proposition? Plus Examples.
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  • employment
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  • career
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  • salary
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  • state
  • 5
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  • nuclear medicine technology
  • 4
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  • medicine technology
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  • high school
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  • determine
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  • requirement nuclear medicine
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  • 3
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Result 27
TitleNuclear Medicine Program at Tri-C: Cleveland
Urlhttps://www.tri-c.edu/programs/health-careers/nuclear-medicine/index.html
Description
Date
Organic Position27
H1Nuclear Medicine
H2Getting Started
Classes & Programs
Degree Programs & Certificates
Workforce Training & Professional Development
Community Programming for Adults & Youth
Request Info
Live Chat
Tri-C 24/7
Ask Tri-C
Additional Information
H3Program Status:
Learn more about the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program at Tri-C
Transfer Programs
Accreditations
Career & Job Outlook
H2WithAnchorsGetting Started
Classes & Programs
Degree Programs & Certificates
Workforce Training & Professional Development
Community Programming for Adults & Youth
Request Info
Live Chat
Tri-C 24/7
Ask Tri-C
Additional Information
BodyNuclear Medicine Area of Study: Nuclear Medicine Technology Degree/Certificate: Associate of Applied Science degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology Program Sequence Program Outcomes Course Description Apply to Tri-C Apply to Health Careers Graduation and Certification Rates Student Background Requirements If you are not already an active Tri-C student, you must first apply to the college. If you are interested in more than one health careers program, you must submit a separate health careers application for each program.  You may only apply to three programs at one time. MISSION: The Nuclear Medicine curriculum is to provide high quality learning opportunities to prepare students to be competent entry-level technologists. VISION: To incorporate the philosophy of the college which allows a balance between basic science, general education and technical courses so that the student will possess a solid background for future career development. What is Nuclear Medicine? A Nuclear Medicine Technologist (NMT) is the health care professional responsible for performing nuclear medicine examinations which assist the physician in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. The trained NMT prepares and administers radiopharmaceuticals and performs patient imaging and treatment procedures using a variety of radiation detection and imaging devices. Technologists perform data analysis on the computer and provide patient information and images to the physician. Day in the Life Nuclear Medicine Technologist Career Outlook: The nuclear medicine technologist may be employed in hospitals, clinics, imaging centers, physician's offices, manufacturing facilities and medical imaging equipment sales companies. Graduates of the Tri-C NMT program, meet the educational and clinical eligibility requirements to sit for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Nuclear Medicine Examination and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) examination. This program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). Graduate achievement data is an indicator of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals.  The current report on graduate achievement data, identified by program, is available on the JRCNMT website by clicking on the following link:  Graduate Achievement Report   Career Outlook See which states this program meets licensure/certification requirements. Nuclear Medicine Application Packet Nuclear Medicine FAQs Program Status:. Every fall semester the Nuclear Medicine Program admits up to 16 students, dependent upon clinical site availability.  We are currently accepting applications for fall enrollment.  Currently, there is a waitlist 2021. Proudly Accredited By: Learn more about the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program at Tri-C. Nuclear Medicine Additional Information. Transfer Programs. Does your academic plan include earning a Bachelor Degree? Tri-C is a great place to start. View the list of partnerships we have with four year institutions. You can search by school or Tri-C major. Accreditations. Investigate our accreditation and articulation agreements. Career & Job Outlook. Do you know what it's like to work in this field or what the salary range might be? Get more information.
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Result 28
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology
Urlhttps://www.ccac.edu/programs/health-sciences/nuclear-medicine.php
Descriptionccac
Date
Organic Position28
H1Nuclear Medicine Technology
H2Application Information
Nuclear Medicine Programs at CCAC
H3
H2WithAnchorsApplication Information
Nuclear Medicine Programs at CCAC
BodyNuclear Medicine Technology knowledge necessary for entry-level employment in the general practice of nuclear medicine technology. Nuclear medicine is an imaging health science used to diagnose and treat disease states through the administration of radioactive isotopes to patients. Technologists then image the characteristics and functions of tissues or organs in which the drugs localize.  Employment opportunities exist in hospitals, physicians’ offices and clinics.The 12-month certificate program is designed for students who may already have a college degree and who wish to expand their skills in the field of nuclear medicine technology. Both programs include an externship in a nuclear medicine facility. Graduates are eligible to take the national examination leading to certification as a nuclear medicine technologist.Graduates have the opportunity to enter careers with strong earning potential. Nuclear Medicine Programs at CCAC. If you would like to learn more about these programs click on the links below to go to the CCAC Online Catalog. Link Not Loaded Link Not Loaded ©
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  • 7
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  • 3
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Result 29
TitleNuclear Medicine Technology
Urlhttps://www.dcc.edu/academics/allied-health/programs/nuclear-medicine-technology/default.aspx
Description
Date
Organic Position29
H1Nuclear Medicine Technology
H2Header Two
Career Opportunities
NUMT Program Outcomes
NUMT Job Placement Within 6 Months of Graduation
NUMT Graduation Rate
H3
H2WithAnchorsHeader Two
Career Opportunities
NUMT Program Outcomes
NUMT Job Placement Within 6 Months of Graduation
NUMT Graduation Rate
BodyNuclear Medicine Technology The Nuclear Medicine Technologist administers radioactive materials to assist the physician in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the organs or the body. After the patient has inhaled, ingested, or been injected with a small quantity of radioactive material, the technologist performs the desired imaging procedures. Students may take the national board examinations required for state licensure. The Delgado Community College program in Nuclear Medicine is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). Upon successful completion, students will be eligible to take the American Registry of Radiologic Technology in Nuclear Medicine and/or the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board Exam. The Program begins each year in August and extends through the summer semester ending in July. The deadline for receipt of completed applications, transcripts, and letters of recommendation is May 15. All applications will be reviewed and evaluated by the Nuclear Medicine Faculty Admissions Committee. Those candidates who are not accepted will be advised accordingly by letter.  The duration of this program is 12 months. Official Program Description in the College Catalog Career Opportunities. The profession is expected to grow faster than average for all occupations. Most nuclear medicine technologists work in major medical centers or hospitals.For more information check out these web sites: Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board Society of Nuclear Medicine For more information please see the following: Graduate achievement data is an indicator of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals.  The current report on graduate achievement data, identified by program, is available on the JRCNMT website by clicking on the following link: Graduate Achievement Report Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT)820 W. Danforth Rd, #B1Edmond, OK 73003 NUMT Program Outcomes. Years ARRT # Examinees ARRT Pass Rate NMTCB # Examinees NMTCB Pass Rate 2011-2015 30 97% 31 100% NUMT Job Placement Within 6 Months of Graduation. Year Grad # Full Time % Part Time % 2011 7 3 57% 4 57% 2012 7 3 43% 3 43% 2013 6 4 67% 1 17% 2014 6 3 50% 2 33% 2015 6 4 67% 1 17% NUMT Graduation Rate. Year Grad # Full Time % 2011  7 7 100% 2012  7  6 86% 2013  7  6 86% 2014  6  6 100% 2015  6  6 100% Graduate outcomes are indicators of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals. Programmatic graduate outcomes data reported on the JRCNMT website include: 5-year time period of current report; graduation rate; ARRT credentialing success; NMTCB credentialing success and job placement rate.   Graduate Outcomes Report at the JRCNMT website. ©
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Result 30
TitleCCC&TI Nuclear Medicine Technology
Urlhttps://www.cccti.edu/NMT/Default.asp
DescriptionMuclear Medicine Technology
Date
Organic Position30
H1Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute
H2Nuclear Medicine Technology
H3Curriculum Description
Program Information
Accreditation
Program Contacts:
Program Spotlight
APPLY NOW
Admission Requirements
Interested?
Career Information
H2WithAnchorsNuclear Medicine Technology
BodyCaldwell Community College and Technical Institute Nuclear Medicine Technology Home Health Career Programs    Nuclear Medicine Technology CCC&TI offers educational opportunities in Nuclear Medicine Technology on the Caldwell Campus in Hudson, N.C. Nuclear Medicine Technology . Curriculum Description. The Nuclear Medicine Technology curriculum provides the clinical and didactic experience necessary to prepare students to qualify as entry-level Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to properly perform clinical procedures. These skills include patient care, use of radioactive materials, operation of imaging and counting instrumentation, and laboratory procedures. Graduates may be eligible to apply for certification/registration examinations given by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board and/or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists Program Information. CCC&TI offers the following educational programs in this area: Associate's Degree (A.A.S.) - Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Technology Diploma For more information about course descriptions or required courses, refer to the current CCC&TI Course Catalog and its corresponding Addendum. Accreditation. The Nuclear Medicine Technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs, 820 W. Danforth Rd, #B1 Edmond, OK 73003 Telephone: 405.285.0546 Email: [email protected] www.jrcnmt.org Graduate achievement data is an indicator of program effectiveness, demonstrating the extent to which a program achieves its goals. The current report on graduate achievement data, identified by program, is available on the JRCNMT website by clicking on the following link: Graduate Achievement Report Program Contacts:. Program Spotlight.   APPLY NOW   . Admission Requirements . Information Session. To schedule an Information Session, contact Leslie Deal at 828-726-2330 or [email protected] Admission Requirements for the Nuclear Medicine Technology DEGREE program: Degree Admission Requirements Admission Requirements for the Nuclear Medicine Technology DIPLOMA program: Diploma Admission Requirements Interested? If you are interested in the Nuclear Medicine Technology program, please let us know by clicking on the link below and completing the form: I am interested in the Nuclear Medicine Technology program. Career Information. An Exciting Future! Nuclear medicine will continue to be a field at the forefront of modern clinical medicine and technological development. The future has never been brighter thanks to: The development of new radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes Promising research and development of cancer-detecting and cancer-killing agents, such as genetically engineered antibodies The expanding clinical use of exciting new technology known as Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which provides new and unique means of studying biochemistry and metabolism within living tissue The advancement of fusion imaging to correlate physiological and anatomical patient information. (Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Technologist Career Brochure on the internet http://s3.amazonaws.com/rdcms-snmmi/files/production/public/docs/2061%5FEducationBrochr%5FFinal%2Epdf. (Visited December 2019.) To learn more about a career in the Nuclear Medicine field, visit CCC&TI's Career Coach site for the following programs: AAS: Nuclear Medicine Technology Diploma: Nuclear Medicine Technology There are no additional costs for this program outside of tuition, fees, books, and supplies. Working conditions. The DOL's Occupational Outlook Handbook states, "Technologists are on their feet for long periods and may need to lift or turn patients who are disabled… Most nuclear medicine technologists work full time. Because imaging is sometimes needed in emergencies, some nuclear medicine technologists work evenings, weekends, or on call. Although radiation hazards exist in this occupation, they are minimized by the use of gloves and other shielding devices. Nuclear medicine technologists wear badges that measure radiation levels in the radiation area. Instruments monitor their radiation exposure and detailed records are kept on how much radiation they get over their lifetime. When preparing radioactive drugs, technologists use safety procedures to minimize radiation exposure to patients, other healthcare workers, and themselves. Like other healthcare workers, nuclear medicine technologists may be exposed to infectious diseases." Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nuclear-medicine-technologists.htm (visited May 25, 2015).
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  • nuclear medicine
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  • admission requirement
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