Copywriteroffice

Serp data

Request Result Detail

The request result help you to show your API requests results.

Copywriteroffice - Office Management Professional Licensure and Certification serp result detail
Keyword Office Management Professional Licensure and Certification
Search Urlhttps://www.google.com/search?q=Office+Management+Professional+Licensure+and+Certification&oq=Office+Management+Professional+Licensure+and+Certification&hl=en&gl=US&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Devicedesktop
Languageen
LocationUS
Search Enginegoogle.com
No. Of Results566000000
RelatedSearch
office management certificationhttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Office+Management+certification&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAgyEAE
office management certificate onlinehttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Office+management+certificate+online&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAguEAE
office management certification requirementshttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Office+Management+certification+requirements&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAgqEAE
office management certificate salaryhttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Office+Management+Certificate+salary&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAgnEAE
best certifications for office managershttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Best+certifications+for+office+managers&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAgmEAE
office management courses online freehttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Office+management+courses+online+free&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAglEAE
business office manager certificationhttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Business+Office+Manager+certification&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAgkEAE
medical office manager certification onlinehttps://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&q=Medical+office+Manager+certification+online&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiv-uKqw7H1AhUBD0QIHU_YCawQ1QJ6BAgjEAE
Result 1
TitleCertified Business Office Manager
Urlhttps://www.msicertified.com/business-office-manager-certification.html
DescriptionCertified Business Office Manager through the Management and Strategy Institute. This program is completed 100% online. Learn more by visiting MSIcertified.com
Date
Organic Position1
H1
H2Certified Business Office Manager (CBOM)™
Services
Company
Support
H3
H2WithAnchorsCertified Business Office Manager (CBOM)™
Services
Company
Support
BodyHome About Us Contact Contact FAQ Six Sigma Certifications MSI Fellowship Why Choose Us Blog Log In Certified Business Office Manager (CBOM)™. As an office manager, it’s critical that you have the skills and knowledge to optimally manage an office for efficiency, productivity, and with the necessary level of professionalism. Managing an office varies with the complexity of the operations or the industry your business supports. The daily operations can be managed using a solid framework with established processes. Why choose the Management and Strategy Institute? - FREE training material included with all certifications - Affordable and Respected - Flexible: Training and exam done 100% online - Competency based: Take the exam as soon as you're ready - Members nationwide working for top companies - Professional certificate mailed to you after you pass exam [example]Frequently asked questions:Are There Prerequisites?No, the Office Manager certification includes all of the course work required to study for and pass the final exam.Is the Office Manager Certification Test Difficult?This test is open book, however it is also timed, so you will not have much time to look up answers to questions.  It is very important that you study and understand the material prior to taking the test or you will not pass.How in-depth is the training?It is designed to give you a solid understanding of Office Manager roles and responsibilities. This professional development course was designed to teach someone with little knowledge of running an office the basic skills needed to function as a front-office manager. Office Manager is a very popular company position. For an example, click on this [Job Search] link to see how many positions mention the words "Office Manager".Is the test proctored?No, the test for the Office Manager certification is not proctored.  It is timed, with a limit of 60 minutes.  You may take the test online, from home or work whenever you are ready.What will I receive after I pass my test?You will be mailed a Certificate Of Completion, as well as a letter of congratulations and two copies of our training verification letters which you can give to employers who request it. The certificate is heavy-stock, cream paper suitable for framing. [View Example]How would I list this certification on my resume?Certifications are generally the last item listed under the education section of your resume.  List them directly beneath your college information in this format:        Certifications:        Management and Strategy Institute        - Certified Business Office Manager (CBOM)™ Business Office Manager CertificationTraining Material & Certification Test$99.95 Additional Information:Course of Study [.pdf]   |   Sales Brochure [.pdf] Office Management RolesCore Competencies and SkillsetsCustomer Service Business OperationsLegal RequirementsFinancial ManagementInformation Technology Management / Human ResourcesOffice Equipment Supervising EmployeesEnsuring Work FlowPhysical Office ManagementProductivity and EfficiencyMeasure ProductivityBest PracticesFinal Exam:Timed examPCUs earned: 10 Services. All CertificationsFellowshipSix Sigma CertificationHealthcare CertificationHuman Resources CertificationQuality Management CertificationIT CertificationLeadership & BusinessContinuous Improvement Awards Company. About UsAccreditationReviewsBlogCharityNewsletterSix Sigma ResourcesDisplaced Worker Training Support. ContactFAQPoliciesSearch / SitemapAccessibilityJob Search © COPYRIGHT MSIALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • office
  • 16
  • 1
  • office manager
  • 10
  • 1
  • manager
  • 10
  • 1
  • certification
  • 8
  • 1
  • test
  • 6
  • 1
  • business
  • 5
  • 1
  • management
  • 5
  • 1
  • training
  • 4
  • 1
  • business office manager
  • 3
  • 1
  • office manager certification
  • 3
  • 1
  • business office
  • 3
  • 1
  • manager certification
  • 3
  • 1
  • sigma
  • 3
  • 1
  • material
  • 3
  • 1
  • exam
  • 3
  • 1
  • company
  • 3
  • 1
  • certificate
  • 3
  • 1
  • pass
  • 3
  • 1
  • work
  • 3
  • 1
  • study
  • 3
  • 1
Result 2
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position2
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 3
TitleProfessional Licensure - Wilson Community College - Wilson, NC
Urlhttps://www.wilsoncc.edu/academics/distance-learning/professional-licensure/
Description
Date
Organic Position3
H1Professional Licensure
H2Professional Licensure Disclosure
Professional Licensure Contacts
Additional Resources
Find us online:
H3
H2WithAnchorsProfessional Licensure Disclosure
Professional Licensure Contacts
Additional Resources
Find us online:
BodyProfessional Licensure Professional Licensure Disclosure. Some programs at Wilson Community College lead to a license and/or certification in North Carolina. Beginning July 1, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education regulations require disclosures for all programs leading to a license or certification. Disclosures will be provided for all states and will indicate whether the program meets state educational licensure requirements, does not meet state educational licensure requirements, or has not yet been determined for each state. Professional Licensure Contacts. If you are considering a taking a course, or enrolling in a program at Wilson Community College that leads to licensure or certification and you do not live in North Carolina, please contact the state contact or WCC individual that corresponds to your program of interest to discuss licensure options prior to beginning your course of study. Program DisclosureCertification Information/Licensure ContactsWCC Program Contact Associate Degree Nursing DisclosureNursing Licensure by State Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing NC Board of Nursing Nursing State Contacts Becky Strickland Interim Dean of Allied Health/Instructor Phone: (252) 246-1333 Email: [email protected] Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration DisclosureHVAC Licensure Contact Information by State HVAC State Contacts Travis Flewelling Instructor - Mathematics Phone: (252) 246-1316 Email: [email protected] Automotive Systems Technology Disclosure Travis Flewelling Instructor - Mathematics Phone: (252) 246-1316 Email: [email protected] Applied Engineering Technology Disclosure Travis Flewelling Instructor - Mathematics Phone: (252) 246-1316 Email: [email protected] Basic Law Enforcement Training DisclosureNC Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission BLET State Contacts Darlene Hall Director of Law Enforcement Training Phone: (252) 246-1365 Email: [email protected] Biotechnology Disclosure Travis Flewelling Instructor - Mathematics Phone: (252) 246-1316 Email: [email protected] BioWorks Process Technician Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Building Construction Technology DisclosureNC Licensing Board for General Contractors Contractor Licensing Requirements by State Travis Flewelling Instructor - Mathematics Phone: (252) 246-1316 Email: [email protected] Cosmetology DisclosureNorth Carolina Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners Cosmetology Licensure Requirements by State Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Culinary Arts A.A.S. Disclosure Wes Hill Dean of Business and Applied Technologies Phone: (252) 246-1339 Email: [email protected] Dialysis Technician Disclosure Mary Killette Health Programs Coordinator Phone: (252) 246-1325 Email: [email protected] DMV Car Dealer Pre-license Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Early Childhood Education DisclosureEarly Childhood Education State Contacts Sheril Roberts Dean of College Transfer and Public Services Phone: (252) 246-1309 Email: [email protected] Electrical Contractor License Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Emergency Medical Services Disclosure North Carolina Office EMS EMS State Agencies EMT State Contacts Advanced EMT State Contacts Kyle Willis EMS Coordinator Phone: (252) 246-1296 Email: [email protected] Fire Service Training and Rescue DisclosureFirefighter State Contacts Ben Smith Director of Health and Emergency Services Phone: (252) 246-1372 Email: [email protected] Industrial Welding License Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Interpreter Education Disclosure Sheril Roberts Dean of College Transfer and Public Services Phone: (252) 246-1309 Email: [email protected] IT Support A.A.S. DisclosureCompTIA A+ Certification The IT Support program prepares students to sit for the CompTia A+ certification exam. This certification is not regulated by individual states. It is recommended that you contact CompTia for specific information related to your state. Wes Hill Dean of Business and Applied Technologies Phone: (252) 246-1339 Email: [email protected] Medical Office Administration Disclosure Wes Hill Dean of Business and Applied Technologies Phone: (252) 246-1339 Email: [email protected] NC Safety Inspection Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Networking and CyberSecurity A.A.S. DisclosureCISCO Courses in the Networking and Cybersecurity program prepares students to sit for the CCNA certification exam. This certification is not regulated by individual states. It is recommended that you contact CISCO for specific information related to your state. Wes Hill Dean of Business and Applied Technologies Phone: (252) 246-1339 Email: [email protected] Notary Public Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Nurse Aide I DisclosureState Nurse Aide Registry Contact Information href="https://www.wilsoncc.edu/wp-content/uploads/Nurse-Aide-I-State-Contacts.docx" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Nurse Aide I State Contacts Mary Killette Health Programs Coordinator Phone: (252) 246-1325 Email: [email protected] Nurse Aide II DisclosureState Nurse Aide Registry Contact Information Nurse Aide II State Contacts Mary Killette Health Programs Coordinator Phone: (252) 246-1325 Email: [email protected] OBD Emission Inspection Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Office Administration Disclosure Wes Hill Dean of Business and Applied Technologies Phone: (252) 246-1339 Email: [email protected] Paralegal Technology DisclosureAmerican Bar Association North Carolina State Bar Paralegal Certification Wes Hill Dean of Business and Applied Technologies Phone: (252) 246-1339 Email: [email protected] Pharmacy Technician DisclosurePharmacy Technician State Contacts Mary Killette Health Programs Coordinator Phone: (252) 246-1325 Email: [email protected] Phlebotomy DisclosurePhlebotomy Licensure Requirements by State Phlebotomy State Contacts Mary Killette Health Programs Coordinator Phone: (252) 246-1325 Email: [email protected] Practical Nursing Diploma DisclosureAccreditation Commission for Education in Nursing NC Board of Nursing Becky Strickland Interim Dean of Allied Health/Instructor Phone: (252) 246-1333 Email: [email protected] School Age Education Disclosure Sheril Roberts Dean of College Transfer and Public Services Phone: (252) 246-1309 Email: [email protected] ServSafe DisclosureServSafe The ServSafe certification is recognized in most jurisdictions where a Food Protection Manager Certification is required. However, some states have additional requirements and contact with ServSafe is recommended. Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Surgical Technology DisclosureAssociation of Surgical Technologists - State Assembly Contacts Association of Surgical Technologists - Legislative Overview Surgical Technology State Contacts Becky Strickland Interim Dean of Allied Health/Instructor Phone: (252) 246-1333 Email: [email protected] WasteWater Treatment Plant Operator Grade I, II, III, and IV Disclosure Robert Taylor Director of Workforce Development Phone: (252) 246-1421 Email: [email protected] Welding Technology DisclosureAmerican Welding Society The Welding program prepares students to sit for the AWS Exam. This certification is not regulated by individual states. It is recommended that you contact the American Welding Society (AWS) for specific information related to your state. Travis Flewelling Instructor - Mathematics Phone: (252) 246-1316 Email: [email protected] Additional Resources. NC-SARA Professional Licensure Directory U.S. Department of Education Professional Licensure by State Although we strive to connect you with the best information possible, Wilson Community College cannot confirm whether a particular program meets requirements for professional licensure and/or certification outside of the State of North Carolina. Academics. Academic Calendars Academic Programs Allied Health Associate Degree Nursing Nursing Frequently Asked Questions Practical Nursing Surgical Technology Business/Applied Technologies Accounting & Finance Business Administration Criminal Justice Technology Culinary Arts Information Technology Medical Office Administration Office Administration Paralegal Technology CCP – Career and College Promise Career Exploration and Assessments CCP – Orientation Video Series CCP FAQ Transfer Guides How to Study Effectively College Transfer Associate in Arts (A.A.) Associate in Arts in Teacher Preparation (A.A.T.P) Associate in Fine Arts in Music (A.F.A.) Associate in Science (A.S.) Associate in Science in Teacher Preparation (A.S.T.P) A.A. and A.S. Fast Track Options College Transfer Advising Center College Transfer FAQ Current Student Resources Transfer Informational Videos To What Four-Year Schools Can I Transfer? Future Student Resources College & University Guaranteed Admission Programs Honor Graduates Distance Learning Distance Learning FAQ Instructional Technologies Online Programs Online Self-Assessment State Authorization Professional Licensure Industrial Technologies Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Technology Applied Engineering Technology Automotive Systems Technologies Biotechnology Building Construction Technology Electrical Systems Technology Welding Technology Public Services Community Spanish Interpreter Early Childhood Education Interpreter Education School-Age Education Wilson Academy of Applied Technology Wilson Early College Academy Work-Based Learning Online Programs Earn an associate degree or certificate online Find us online:. Instagram Facebook Twitter YouTube Main Campus. 902 Herring Avenue Wilson, NC 27893 Phone: 252-291-1195 Get DirectionsLee Technology Center. 4815 Ward Blvd Wilson, NC 27893 Get DirectionsCoastal Plains Law Enforcement Training Center. 3997 Ward Blvd Wilson, NC 27893 Get Directions
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • phone 252
  • 37
  • 3
  • state
  • 37
  • 3
  • phone
  • 37
  • 3
  • 252
  • 37
  • 3
  • phone 252 246
  • 36
  • 3
  • 252 246
  • 36
  • 3
  • 246
  • 36
  • 3
  • email
  • 36
  • 3
  • wilsonccedu
  • 36
  • 3
  • technology
  • 28
  • 3
  • contact
  • 24
  • 3
  • disclosure
  • 21
  • 3
  • program
  • 20
  • 3
  • licensure
  • 15
  • 3
  • state contact
  • 13
  • 3
  • certification
  • 13
  • 3
  • robert
  • 13
  • 3
  • college
  • 12
  • 3
  • education
  • 12
  • 3
  • dean
  • 12
  • 3
  • director
  • 12
  • 3
  • robert taylor director
  • 10
  • 3
  • taylor director workforce
  • 10
  • 3
  • director workforce development
  • 10
  • 3
  • workforce development phone
  • 10
  • 3
  • development phone 252
  • 10
  • 3
  • 252 246 1421
  • 10
  • 3
  • 246 1421 email
  • 10
  • 3
  • 1421 email rtaylor
  • 10
  • 3
  • email rtaylor wilsonccedu
  • 10
  • 3
  • robert taylor
  • 10
  • 3
  • taylor director
  • 10
  • 3
  • director workforce
  • 10
  • 3
  • workforce development
  • 10
  • 3
  • development phone
  • 10
  • 3
  • 246 1421
  • 10
  • 3
  • 1421 email
  • 10
  • 3
  • email rtaylor
  • 10
  • 3
  • rtaylor wilsonccedu
  • 10
  • 3
  • nursing
  • 10
  • 3
  • taylor
  • 10
  • 3
  • workforce
  • 10
  • 3
  • development
  • 10
  • 3
  • 1421
  • 10
  • 3
  • rtaylor
  • 10
  • 3
  • applied
  • 9
  • 3
  • transfer
  • 9
  • 3
  • disclosure robert taylor
  • 8
  • 3
  • disclosure robert
  • 8
  • 3
  • aide
  • 8
  • 3
  • wilson
  • 8
  • 3
  • associate
  • 8
  • 3
  • information
  • 8
  • 3
  • professional licensure
  • 7
  • 3
  • applied technology
  • 7
  • 3
  • service
  • 7
  • 3
  • travi flewelling instructor
  • 6
  • 3
  • flewelling instructor mathematic
  • 6
  • 3
  • instructor mathematic phone
  • 6
  • 3
  • mathematic phone 252
  • 6
  • 3
  • 252 246 1316
  • 6
  • 3
  • 246 1316 email
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1316 email rf2412
  • 6
  • 3
  • email rf2412 wilsonccedu
  • 6
  • 3
  • we hill dean
  • 6
  • 3
  • hill dean business
  • 6
  • 3
  • dean business applied
  • 6
  • 3
  • business applied technology
  • 6
  • 3
  • applied technology phone
  • 6
  • 3
  • technology phone 252
  • 6
  • 3
  • 252 246 1339
  • 6
  • 3
  • 246 1339 email
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1339 email kh2901
  • 6
  • 3
  • email kh2901 wilsonccedu
  • 6
  • 3
  • coordinator phone 252
  • 6
  • 3
  • travi flewelling
  • 6
  • 3
  • flewelling instructor
  • 6
  • 3
  • instructor mathematic
  • 6
  • 3
  • mathematic phone
  • 6
  • 3
  • 246 1316
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1316 email
  • 6
  • 3
  • email rf2412
  • 6
  • 3
  • rf2412 wilsonccedu
  • 6
  • 3
  • we hill
  • 6
  • 3
  • hill dean
  • 6
  • 3
  • dean business
  • 6
  • 3
  • business applied
  • 6
  • 3
  • technology phone
  • 6
  • 3
  • 246 1339
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1339 email
  • 6
  • 3
  • email kh2901
  • 6
  • 3
  • kh2901 wilsonccedu
  • 6
  • 3
  • coordinator phone
  • 6
  • 3
  • college transfer
  • 6
  • 3
  • mary killette health
  • 5
  • 3
  • killette health program
  • 5
  • 3
  • health program coordinator
  • 5
  • 3
  • program coordinator phone
  • 5
  • 3
  • 252 246 1325
  • 5
  • 3
  • 246 1325 email
  • 5
  • 3
  • 1325 email mk5335
  • 5
  • 3
  • email mk5335 wilsonccedu
  • 5
  • 3
  • north carolina
  • 5
  • 3
  • mary killette
  • 5
  • 3
  • killette health
  • 5
  • 3
  • health program
  • 5
  • 3
  • program coordinator
  • 5
  • 3
  • 246 1325
  • 5
  • 3
  • 1325 email
  • 5
  • 3
  • email mk5335
  • 5
  • 3
  • mk5335 wilsonccedu
  • 5
  • 3
  • nurse aide
  • 5
  • 3
  • service phone 252
  • 4
  • 3
  • state contact mary
  • 4
  • 3
  • contact mary killette
  • 4
  • 3
  • licensure requirement
  • 4
  • 3
  • public service
  • 4
  • 3
  • service phone
  • 4
  • 3
  • office administration
  • 4
  • 3
  • contact mary
  • 4
  • 3
  • wilson community college
  • 3
  • 3
  • becky strickland interim
  • 3
  • 3
  • strickland interim dean
  • 3
  • 3
  • interim dean allied
  • 3
  • 3
  • dean allied healthinstructor
  • 3
  • 3
  • allied healthinstructor phone
  • 3
  • 3
  • healthinstructor phone 252
  • 3
  • 3
  • 252 246 1333
  • 3
  • 3
  • 246 1333 email
  • 3
  • 3
  • 1333 email bs8558
  • 3
  • 3
  • email bs8558 wilsonccedu
  • 3
  • 3
  • disclosure travi flewelling
  • 3
  • 3
  • law enforcement training
  • 3
  • 3
  • disclosure we hill
  • 3
  • 3
  • license disclosure robert
  • 3
  • 3
  • sheril robert dean
  • 3
  • 3
  • robert dean college
  • 3
  • 3
  • dean college transfer
  • 3
  • 3
  • college transfer public
  • 3
  • 3
  • transfer public service
  • 3
  • 3
  • public service phone
  • 3
  • 3
  • 252 246 1309
  • 3
  • 3
  • 246 1309 email
  • 3
  • 3
  • 1309 email srobert
  • 3
  • 3
  • email srobert wilsonccedu
  • 3
  • 3
  • program prepare student
  • 3
  • 3
  • prepare student sit
  • 3
  • 3
  • exam certification regulated
  • 3
  • 3
  • certification regulated individual
  • 3
  • 3
  • regulated individual state
  • 3
  • 3
  • individual state recommended
  • 3
  • 3
  • state recommended contact
  • 3
  • 3
  • specific information related
  • 3
  • 3
  • information related state
  • 3
  • 3
  • wilson nc 27893
  • 3
  • 3
  • wilson community
  • 3
  • 3
  • community college
  • 3
  • 3
  • associate degree
  • 3
  • 3
  • becky strickland
  • 3
  • 3
  • strickland interim
  • 3
  • 3
  • interim dean
  • 3
  • 3
  • dean allied
  • 3
  • 3
  • allied healthinstructor
  • 3
  • 3
  • healthinstructor phone
  • 3
  • 3
  • 246 1333
  • 3
  • 3
  • 1333 email
  • 3
  • 3
  • email bs8558
  • 3
  • 3
  • bs8558 wilsonccedu
  • 3
  • 3
  • contact information
  • 3
  • 3
  • system technology
  • 3
  • 3
  • disclosure travi
  • 3
  • 3
  • law enforcement
  • 3
  • 3
  • enforcement training
  • 3
  • 3
  • requirement state
  • 3
  • 3
  • disclosure we
  • 3
  • 3
  • license disclosure
  • 3
  • 3
  • childhood education
  • 3
  • 3
  • sheril robert
  • 3
  • 3
  • robert dean
  • 3
  • 3
  • dean college
  • 3
  • 3
  • transfer public
  • 3
  • 3
  • 246 1309
  • 3
  • 3
  • 1309 email
  • 3
  • 3
  • email srobert
  • 3
  • 3
  • srobert wilsonccedu
  • 3
  • 3
  • program prepare
  • 3
  • 3
  • prepare student
  • 3
  • 3
  • student sit
  • 3
  • 3
  • exam certification
  • 3
  • 3
  • certification regulated
  • 3
  • 3
  • regulated individual
  • 3
  • 3
  • individual state
  • 3
  • 3
  • state recommended
  • 3
  • 3
  • recommended contact
  • 3
  • 3
  • specific information
  • 3
  • 3
  • information related
  • 3
  • 3
  • related state
  • 3
  • 3
  • surgical technology
  • 3
  • 3
  • wilson nc
  • 3
  • 3
  • nc 27893
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
TitleNYS Office of the Professions - State Education Department
Urlhttp://www.op.nysed.gov/
Description
Date
Organic Position4
H1Office of the Professions
H2Headlines
H3University of the State of New York - New York State Education Department
H2WithAnchorsHeadlines
BodyOffice of the Professions Google Translate Disclaimer COVID-19 Online Services Registration Professions NYS Boards Enforcement Corporate Entities Verification Career Path How Do I NYSED / OP / The Licensed Professions in New York State In 1891, medicine became the first profession licensed by the New York State Board of Regents. New York's unique system of professional regulation, recognized as a model for public protection, has grown to encompass nearly 1,000,000 practitioners and over 30,000 professional practice business entities in more than 50 professions. Guided by the Regents, a citizen body, the professions are within New York State's unified system of education - The University of the State of New York. This recognizes the key role education plays in both preparing licensed professionals and in ensuring their continuous development. The State Education Department, under Regents' direction, administers professional regulation through its Office of the Professions, assisted by the State Boards for the Professions. Notification: Potential Access to Personally Identifiable Information The New York State Education Department (NYSED or the Department) discovered a recent data security incident that may have involved the personally identifiable information of certain professional licensure candidates and those who were eligible for certain professional permits. Please note that no unauthorized access has been confirmed, nor has any unauthorized use of this data been reported to NYSED. The Department is providing this notification out of an abundance of caution. NYSED took immediate action to remove all access to the information and has since instituted appropriate corrective action to ensure all data NYSED possesses is secure. Additional information is available on our dedicated web page.   Advisory Notice: Governor Kathy Hochul has issued Executive Order 4 Declaring a Statewide Disaster Emergency Due to Healthcare Staffing Shortages in the State of New York. In addition, please be advised that The Declarations of the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services issued pursuant to the federal Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act remain in effect and continue to provide certain authorizations and exemptions for many professions and activities related to the ongoing COVID-19 emergency response. These provisions include permitting an expanded list of professionals to administer vaccine or to administer COVD-19 testing. Specifically, the United States CDC has recently provided clarification that the federal preemption provisions of the PREP Act authorize "qualified persons" (licensed professionals and others authorized under the Act) to continue to order and administer covered COVID countermeasures (testing, vaccination, treatment, issuance of non-patient specific standing orders, and other response measures) under the Act, despite the ending of state-level emergency authorizations. This means that the federal Act will authorize individuals to continue these actions in New York, notwithstanding state laws that may conflict. Individuals should refer to the Declaration, Amendments, and Guidance documents issued by US HHS for specific information. For more information on those categories of qualified persons covered to administer COVID-19 vaccines under the PREP Act Declaration and its amendments: PREP Act Fact Sheet: Expanding the COVID-19 Vaccination Workforce. Additional information about the PREP Act can be found on our website.   Please be advised that the COVID-19 Disaster Emergency declared by former Governor Andrew Cuomo, pursuant to Executive Order 202 issued on March 7, 2020, and each successor Executive Order to Executive Order 202 have expired as of June 25, 2021. While the several exceptions and authorizations relevant to the Title VIII statutes and regulations contained within Executive Order 202 and each successor Executive Order to Executive Order 202 have now expired, Title VIII professionals should return to compliance with all Title VIII statutory and regulatory requirements without delay unless specifically suspended or waived pursuant to Executive Order 4. The Department is working closely with other New York State agencies and the Governor’s Office relative to issues related to COVID 19. Please continue to monitor the Department’s website for updated guidance. Additional Information: Important Information for Applicants and Licensees Impacted by COVID-19   Beware of Voice Phishing—or “Vishing”—Calls, Emails or Faxes The New York State Education Department (“SED”) Office of the Professions (“OP”) is alerting everyone to a vishing scam that has been brought to our attention. Phishing—or “vishing”—scams impersonate SED employees attempting to collect licensure and personal information from the licensee. If you receive an inquiry which you believe to be suspicious do not provide any information. To verify if the inquiry was from OP contact OP directly using the contact information on the OP webpage at www.op.nysed.gov. You may report suspicious calls to the Federal Trade Commission at https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds#item-37207. Headlines. Important Information Related to COVID-19 Amendment of Sections 68.4 and 68.6 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education Relating to the Licensure Requirements for Land Surveyors Registered Pharmacy Technicians IMS Vacancy Pharmacists Administering COVID-19 Vaccine Mandatory Continuing Education Requirements for Licensed Psychologists Renewal of Limited and Provisional Permits Regents Physician Loan Forgiveness Award Program 2019 Clinical Laboratory Technologists/Certified Histological Technicians Provisional Permit Guidelines to Implement Part Y of Chapter 57 of the Laws of 2018 Launch of Paths to the Professions Website Opportunity for Stakeholder Input Proposed Amendment to Section 63.9 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education Relating to Administration of Immunizations by Pharmacists Extension of Exemptions from Licensure for Social Workers, Mental Health Practitioners, and Psychologists Enactment of a Baccalaureate Degree in 10 years Requirement for Registered Professional Nurses ("RN") Online Registration PIN Retrieval Limited License in Speech-language NYSDOH Mandatory Prescriber Education Expedited Licensing Services for Military Spouses Relocated to New York State Amendment to Section 61.10 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education Relating to the Dental Anesthesia Certification Requirements for Licensed Dentists. First Online Professional Licensing Applications Available Licensed professionals and parents/caregivers of school-age students should be aware of changes in the immunization requirements for school attendance Mandatory Continuing Education Requirements for Mental Health Practitioners Connecticut Law Regarding Social Work Licensure Without Examination Does Not Impact New York Social Work Licensure requirements Physical Therapy Practice Alerts Now Available Report to the Legislature and Executive Regarding the Exemption from Licensure for Social Workers, Psychologists and Mental Health Practitioners Nominations to Regent’s Advisory Committee on Long-Term Clinical Clerkships Sought Licensure of Professional Geologist Information Relating to Ebola Online Survey of Programs and Agencies Exempt from Licensure Laws Licensure of Behavior Analysts and Certification of Behavior Analyst Assistants - UPDATED Report to the Legislature Regarding Collaborative Drug Therapy Management Pilot Project pursuant to Chapter 21 of the laws of 2011 now available Podiatric Ankle Surgery Privileges and Wound Care Support for Professionals with Substance Use Disorders More News Last Updated: November 4, 2021 Laws & Regulations | About OP | Contact | Forms | Q&A | IFB & RFP | Site Feedback University of the State of New York - New York State Education Department. Contact NYSED | Index A - Z | Terms of Use | Accessibility   
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • state
  • 17
  • 4
  • york
  • 14
  • 4
  • professional
  • 14
  • 4
  • information
  • 14
  • 4
  • order
  • 12
  • 4
  • education
  • 12
  • 4
  • department
  • 11
  • 4
  • profession
  • 11
  • 4
  • executive order
  • 10
  • 4
  • covid
  • 10
  • 4
  • 19
  • 10
  • 4
  • licensure
  • 10
  • 4
  • covid 19
  • 9
  • 4
  • act
  • 9
  • 4
  • executive
  • 9
  • 4
  • york state
  • 8
  • 4
  • requirement
  • 8
  • 4
  • licensed
  • 7
  • 4
  • regulation
  • 7
  • 4
  • regent
  • 6
  • 4
  • amendment
  • 6
  • 4
  • nysed
  • 6
  • 4
  • op
  • 6
  • 4
  • law
  • 6
  • 4
  • prep act
  • 5
  • 4
  • federal
  • 5
  • 4
  • administer
  • 5
  • 4
  • emergency
  • 5
  • 4
  • prep
  • 5
  • 4
  • state education department
  • 4
  • 4
  • executive order 202
  • 4
  • 4
  • state education
  • 4
  • 4
  • education department
  • 4
  • 4
  • order 202
  • 4
  • 4
  • continue
  • 4
  • 4
  • 202
  • 4
  • 4
  • contact
  • 4
  • 4
  • relating
  • 4
  • 4
  • social
  • 4
  • 4
  • york state education
  • 3
  • 4
  • regulation commissioner education
  • 3
  • 4
  • commissioner education relating
  • 3
  • 4
  • mental health practitioner
  • 3
  • 4
  • office profession
  • 3
  • 4
  • state york
  • 3
  • 4
  • licensed professional
  • 3
  • 4
  • additional information
  • 3
  • 4
  • title viii
  • 3
  • 4
  • amendment section
  • 3
  • 4
  • regulation commissioner
  • 3
  • 4
  • commissioner education
  • 3
  • 4
  • education relating
  • 3
  • 4
  • mental health
  • 3
  • 4
  • health practitioner
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
TitleProfessional certifications and occupational licenses: evidence from the Current Population Survey : Monthly Labor Review: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Urlhttps://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2019/article/professional-certifications-and-occupational-licenses.htm
DescriptionThis article uses data from the Current Population Survey to analyze the role of professional certifications and occupational licenses in the U.S. labor market. It discusses the prevalence of these credentials among the employed by age, sex, race, ethnicity, educational attainment, and occupation
Date
Organic Position5
H1Professional certifications and occupational licenses: evidence from the Current Population Survey
H2
H3Professional certifications and licenses: what they are
How certifications and licenses are measured in the Current Population Survey
Certifications, licenses, and employment status
Prevalence of certifications and licenses among the employed
Educational attainment
Occupation
Educational attainment within occupations
Requirement for job
Earnings
Conclusion
Notes
H2WithAnchors
BodyProfessional certifications and occupational licenses: evidence from the Current Population Survey This article uses data from the Current Population Survey to analyze the role of professional certifications and occupational licenses in the U.S. labor market. It discusses the prevalence of these credentials among the employed by age, gender, race, ethnicity, educational attainment, and occupation. This analysis also explores the relationships between certifications, licenses, and earnings. Finally, the article presents new data on certification and licensing by detailed occupation and whether the credential is required for one’s job. In 2018, more than 43 million people in the United States held a professional certification or license. The prevalence of occupational licenses, common in fields such as healthcare, law, and education, has risen substantially over the past 50 years.1 Professional certifications, while less common than licenses, can signal proficiency in fast-changing fields like project management, software development, and financial analysis. Both of these time-limited credentials can serve as alternative forms of educational attainment, demonstrating a level of skill or knowledge needed to perform a specific type of job. As a result, researchers and others have developed an interest in using government surveys to measure the prevalence of certifications and licenses and tying these credentials to labor market outcomes and earnings. To meet this need, in January 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), working with the federal Interagency Working Group on Expanded Measures of Enrollment and Attainment (GEMEnA), added questions on certifications and licenses to the Current Population Survey (CPS). This article provides an in-depth analysis of CPS data on professional certifications and licenses for 2018.Professional certifications and licenses: what they are. As mentioned previously, in the CPS, certifications and licenses are credentials that demonstrate a level of skill or knowledge needed to perform a specific type of job. Both terms refer to time-limited credentials that need to be renewed periodically. The fundamental difference between the two is the issuer of the credential: certifications are issued by nongovernmental certification bodies, whereas licenses are awarded by a federal, state, or local government agency. Thus, licenses convey a legal authority to work in an occupation, while a certification on its own does not.2How certifications and licenses are measured in the Current Population Survey. In January 2015, the following three questions on certifications and licenses were added to the CPS, based on the work of GEMEnA:31. Do you have a currently active professional certification or a state or industry license? Do not include business licenses, such as a liquor license or a vending license.This question is used to identify people with a certification or license. People may have more than one of these credentials.2. Were any of your certifications or licenses issued by the federal, state, or local government?This second question is asked of people who answered “yes” to the first question. People who answer “yes” are classified as having a license. People with a license may also have a certification.43. Earlier you told me you had a currently active professional certification or license. Was your certification or license required for your job?This third question is asked later in the interview of employed people who answered “yes” to the first question. In this question, “required” can mean either legally required (a license to be a practicing doctor, for example) or required by an employer (such as a computer maintenance certification).5In 2018, 43.7 million people in the United States held a currently active certification or license—16.9 percent of the civilian noninstitutional population. Among the employed, 24.1 percent held one of these credentials, compared with 12.1 percent of the unemployed and 5.6 percent of those not in the labor force. Licenses were the more common credential—21.8 percent of employed people held a license, while only 2.3 percent held a certification but no license.6 Of the 37.6 million employed people with a certification or license, 32.5 million—or 87 percent—usually worked full time (35 or more hours per week). (See table 1.) Finally, 84.4 percent of employed people with a certification or license responded that their credential was required for their job. Among those with a license, 87.0 percent said their credential was required, compared with 60.0 percent for those with a certification, but no license.7Table 1. Certification and licensing status of the civilian noninstitutional population 16 years and over by employment status, 2018 annual averagesEmployment statusNumber of people (thousands)Percent distributionTotalWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseTotalWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseTotalWith a certification, but no licenseWith a license(2)TotalWith a certification, but no licenseWith a license(2)Civilian noninstitutional population257,79143,6914,19739,495214,099100.0%16.9%1.6%15.3%83.1%Civilian labor force162,07538,3213,65834,664123,753100.023.62.321.476.4Employed155,76137,5563,54634,010118,205100.024.12.321.875.9Usually work full time128,57232,5333,15229,38196,040100.025.32.522.974.7Usually work part time27,1895,0243944,63022,165100.018.51.417.081.5Unemployed6,3147651126545,549100.012.11.810.487.9Not in the labor force95,7165,3705394,83190,346100.05.60.65.094.4Notes:(1) A person may have more than one certification or license.(2) People with a license may also have a certification.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Certifications, licenses, and employment status. In 2018, people with a currently active certification or license participated in the labor force at a higher rate and had a lower unemployment rate than people without one of these credentials. The labor force participation rate—the proportion of the civilian noninstitutional population working or looking for work—for those with a certification or license was 87.7 percent in 2018, compared with 57.8 percent for those with no certification or license. The unemployment rate—the number of people actively looking and available for work as a percentage of the labor force—for people with one of these credentials, at 2.0 percent, was less than half the rate for people with no certification or license (4.5 percent). These results generally held for people in all age, sex, race, ethnicity, and educational attainment groups. (See table 2.)Table 2. Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population by certification and licensing status and selected characteristics, 2018 annual averagesCharacteristicLabor force participation rateEmployment–population ratioUnemployment rateWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseTotal, 16 years and over87.7%57.8%86.0%55.2%2.0%4.5%16 to 24 years86.153.382.348.54.49.025 to 54 years94.078.692.375.71.83.855 years and over74.634.373.133.22.03.3Men90.165.088.362.12.04.5Women85.750.984.048.62.04.5White87.657.686.055.31.84.0Black or African American87.457.984.553.63.37.3Asian89.559.188.257.01.53.4Hispanic or Latino ethnicity(2)89.063.586.860.32.55.0Total, 25 years and over87.858.786.256.61.93.7Less than a high school diploma84.844.481.941.93.45.8High school graduates, no college(3)88.454.385.951.92.84.3Some college or associate degree87.560.285.657.92.23.7Some college, no degree86.758.784.556.32.54.0Associate degree88.362.886.560.82.03.2Bachelor's degree or higher87.967.786.766.01.42.5Bachelor's degree only88.568.887.267.01.52.5Advanced degree(4)87.365.386.163.61.32.6Notes:(1) A person may have more than one certification or license.(2) People of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity can be of any race.(3) Includes people with a high school diploma or equivalent.(4) Includes people with a master's, professional, or doctoral degree.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Labor force participation rates typically vary by demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, ethnicity, and educational attainment. However, the size of these participation rate gaps depends on certification and licensing status. Among those with a certification or license, differences in labor force participation between demographic groups tended to be smaller compared with those without one of these credentials. For example, among those with a certification or license in 2018, the participation rate for people ages 25 to 54 (often referred to as the prime working age), at 94.0 percent, was about 19 percentage points higher than the rate for people age 55 and over (74.6 percent). Among those without a certification or license, the prime-working-age participation rate, at 78.6 percent, was about 44 percentage points higher than the participation rate for those 55 and over (34.3 percent). The labor force participation rate gap between men and women was also smaller among those with one of these credentials. Among those with a certification or license, the participation rate for men (90.1 percent) was only about 4 percentage points higher than the rate for women (85.7 percent), compared with a difference of about 14 percentage points among those with no certification or license (65.0 percent for men and 50.9 percent for women).This pattern was perhaps most striking for educational attainment. For those with no certification or license, labor force participation increased steadily with educational attainment, ranging from 44.4 percent among people age 25 and over with less than a high school diploma, to 68.8 percent for people in the same age group with a bachelor’s degree. For those with a credential, however, labor force participation was above 80 percent for every education level. In fact, the participation rate for people with a certification or license and at least a high school diploma, regardless of how much additional education they attained, was 87.9 percent. The participation rate for those with a certification or license but less than a high school diploma was only slightly lower, at 84.8 percent. An important caveat, however, is that people with less than a high school diploma represent a very small share of those with a professional certification or license. Higher levels of educational attainment are often required for obtaining a license, so people with a certification or license tend to have higher levels of educational attainment than those without such credentials. (See figure 1.) ⁠ View Chart Data Prevalence of certifications and licenses among the employed. Since labor force participation rates are generally higher and unemployment rates lower for people with a professional certification or license, the remainder of this article focuses on the employed. This section discusses trends in the prevalence of certifications and licenses by demographic factors including age, sex, race, and ethnicity.Employed people with a certification or license were disproportionately of prime working age (25 to 54) or older (55 and over). In 2018, 26.0 percent of workers ages 25 to 54 and 26.6 percent of workers age 55 and over held a certification or license. Younger workers (ages 16 to 24) were considerably less likely to hold one of these credentials, with just 9.7 percent doing so in 2018. Among employed people in their prime working age, those ages 25 to 34 were somewhat less likely to hold one of these credentials (23.2 percent) than those ages 35 to 44 (27.7 percent) or ages 45 to 54 (27.3 percent). The prevalence of certification and licensing did not vary substantially for workers age 35 and over. These patterns held for those with a certification but no license, as well as for those with a license. (See table 3.) Table 3. Certification and licensing status of employed people 16 years and over by age and sex, percent distribution, 2018 annual averagesCharacteristicTotal employedWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseTotalWith a certification, but no licenseWith a license(2)Total, 16 years and over100.0%24.1%2.3%21.8%75.9%16 to 24 years100.09.71.08.790.325 to 54 years100.026.02.523.574.025 to 34 years100.023.22.320.976.835 to 44 years100.027.72.824.972.345 to 54 years100.027.32.524.872.755 years and over100.026.62.324.373.455 to 64 years100.026.32.423.873.765 years and over100.027.52.025.572.5Men, 16 years and over100.021.42.518.978.616 to 24 years100.07.71.06.792.325 to 54 years100.022.42.919.577.625 to 34 years100.018.72.716.081.335 to 44 years100.023.93.120.876.145 to 54 years100.025.02.822.275.055 years and over100.025.72.423.374.355 to 64 years100.025.02.622.475.065 years and over100.027.72.025.772.3Women, 16 years and over100.027.12.025.272.916 to 24 years100.011.70.910.888.325 to 54 years100.030.12.128.069.925 to 34 years100.028.51.926.671.535 to 44 years100.032.02.329.768.045 to 54 years100.030.02.227.870.055 years and over100.027.62.125.472.455 to 64 years100.027.72.225.572.365 years and over100.027.22.025.272.8Notes:(1) A person may have more than one certification or license.(2) People with a license may also have a certification.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.The low prevalence of certifications and licenses among younger workers is most likely related to the nature of these credentials. Many licenses require certain levels of educational attainment or supervised work experience that are difficult to attain before reaching the age of 25. For example, all states require physicians and surgeons to be licensed, which involves graduating from an accredited medical school and completing residency training in an area of specialty, which typically takes from 7 to 11 years.8 In addition, obtaining a license often involves high upfront financial costs, which can be more difficult for younger workers to afford.9Employed women were more likely to hold a certification or license than employed men. In 2018, 27.1 percent of employed women held a certification or license, compared with 21.4 percent of employed men. Nearly all of the difference was due to the gender gap in the prevalence of licenses, rather than certifications. Employed women (25.2 percent) were 6 percentage points more likely to hold a license than employed men (18.9 percent). This may reflect, in part, differences in the occupational distribution of employment between women and men. For example, women are more likely to be employed as teachers or nurses, occupations that generally require a license. In 2018, employed men were slightly more likely to hold a certification, at 2.5 percent, than employed women (2.0 percent). Not including those ages 16 to 24, the gap between women and men in the prevalence of these credentials declined with age. Women ages 25 to 34 were about 10 percentage points more likely to hold a certification or license than men ages 25 to 34, while women age 55 and over were only about 2 percentage points more likely to hold one of these credentials.A look at the major race and ethnicity groups reveals that employed Whites had the highest prevalence of certification and licensing, at 24.9 percent in 2018, followed by employed Blacks or African Americans (21.8 percent) and Asians (20.9 percent). Employed people of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, at 14.9 percent, were the least likely to hold one of these credentials. These patterns generally held for both those with a certification but no license and those with a license. As with age, employed women were more likely than their male counterparts to hold a certification or license within each major race and ethnicity group. Of all these groups, White women, at 27.9 percent, were the most likely to hold one of these credentials in 2018, while Hispanic men were the least likely (13.2 percent). This may also reflect differences in age, educational attainment, and occupation among employed people in the major race and ethnicity groups. (See table 4.) Table 4. Certification and licensing status of employed people 16 years and over, by sex, race and ethnicity, percent distribution, 2018 annual averagesCharacteristicTotal employedWith a certification or license(1)Without a certification or licenseTotalWith a certification, but no licenseWith a license(2)White100.0%24.9%2.3%22.6%75.1%Men100.022.42.619.877.6Women100.027.92.026.072.1Black or African American100.021.82.119.678.2Men100.018.12.415.881.9Women100.025.01.923.175.0Asian100.020.92.418.579.1Men100.017.62.814.882.4Women100.024.72.022.775.3Hispanic or Latino ethnicity(3)100.014.91.613.385.1Men100.013.21.711.586.8Women100.017.11.415.782.9Notes:(1) People may have more than one certification or license.(2) People with a license may also have a certification.(3) People of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity may be of any race.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Educational attainment. Reaching a specified level of educational attainment is often a requirement for obtaining a professional certification or license. CPS data show that, in 2018, employed people age 25 and over with higher levels of educational attainment were more likely to hold a certification or license. Just under half (48.9 percent) of workers with an advanced degree held a certification or license, compared with only 8.1 percent of those with less than a high school diploma. Workers with an associate’s degree (33.4 percent) or a bachelor’s degree only (28.5 percent) were more likely to hold one of these credentials than those with some college but no degree (21.1 percent) or those with only a high school diploma (14.9 percent). This pattern was mostly driven by differences in the prevalence of licenses, rather than certifications, between education levels. However, workers with at least some college experience were more likely to have a certification but no license than those with only a high school diploma or less education. (See figure 2.) ⁠ View Chart Data The prevalence of certification and licensing varied among the three advanced degree categories. Workers with a professional degree (78.6 percent) were much more likely to hold a certification or license than those with a master’s (42.9 percent) or doctoral (54.6 percent) degree, probably because many workers with a professional degree are employed in legal occupations or in healthcare occupations, where obtaining a license is common.10 Workers with a master’s degree were the most likely (3.7 percent) to hold a professional certification but no license.Occupation. Among the employed, the prevalence of certifications and licenses varied widely by occupation. In 2018, the share of workers with a currently active certification or license was highest among healthcare practitioners and technical occupations (75.7 percent) and legal occupations (65.9 percent). In addition, about half of workers in education, training, and library occupations (52.7 percent) and in healthcare support occupations (49.0 percent) held one of these credentials. By contrast, there were four occupational groups in which less than 1 in 10 workers held a certification or license: food preparation and serving related occupations (7.4 percent); building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (7.9 percent); office and administrative support occupations (9.1 percent); and farming, fishing, and forestry occupations (8.6 percent). (See figure 3.) ⁠ View Chart Data In nearly all occupational groups, licenses appear to be the dominant credential. In the groups in which these credentials were most prevalent, more than 90 percent of credentialed workers held a license. In every occupational group, more workers held a license than a certification. The only exception was computer and mathematical occupations, in which 6.6 percent of workers held a certification but no license, and 6.9 percent held a license. The share of workers with a certification but no license reached 4 percent in only two other occupational groups—installation, maintenance, and repair occupations (4.1 percent) and community and social service occupations (4.6 percent). However, it is important to note that the occupational groups displayed in figure 3 are broad. Some jobs within an occupational group may have a high prevalence of certification and licensing, while others in the same group may not.In 2018, a large majority of jobs with the highest share of licensed workers were in healthcare. However, when occupations were ranked according to the number of licensed workers, a wide variety of sectors were represented. In 2018, there were 2.6 million registered nurses with a license (81 percent of all employed registered nurses), 2.5 million licensed elementary and middle school teachers (72 percent) and 1.0 million licensed lawyers (84 percent). The level of licensed physicians and surgeons (926,000) did not quite reach one million, but the share with a license was about 85 percent. Although licenses were less prevalent among nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides (48 percent) and driver/sales workers and truck drivers (26.7 percent), these occupations accounted for just under 1 million licensed workers. Other detailed occupations with a high number of licensed workers include secondary school teachers (811,000; 76 percent); real estate brokers and sales agents (738,000; 69 percent); and hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists (566,000, 68 percent). These results show that occupational licenses are prevalent in a diverse range of detailed occupations that are spread across different industry sectors. (See table 5; also, data for all detailed occupations is available in an unpublished table upon request. Please email [email protected])Table 5. Employment in selected detailed occupations, by licensing status, 2018 annual averagesEmploymentTotal employment (thousands)With a license (thousands)Percent with a licenseRegistered nurses3,2132,61081.2%Elementary and middle school teachers3,4212,45471.7Lawyers1,1991,00383.7Nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides2,03597547.9Drivers/sales workers and truck drivers3,54994726.7Physicians and surgeons1,09492684.6Managers, all other4,82784517.5Secondary school teachers1,06281176.4Real estate brokers and sales agents1,07273868.8Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists83456667.9Accountants and auditors1,92951326.6Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses65841763.4Counselors89538442.9Education administrators95538440.2Insurance sales agents61937861.1Postsecondary teachers1,41737826.7Electricians88736441.0Police and sheriff’s patrol officers72833345.8Health practitioner support technologists and technicians69432847.2Chief executives1,57332720.8Note: People with a license may also have a certification. Not all detailed occupations are shown.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.In 2018, professional certifications were less prevalent than occupational licenses, and they were most common among workers in computer and mathematical occupations. Examples of occupations with a high prevalence of certifications include computer network architects (24 percent), information security analysts (18 percent), and network and computer systems administrators (15 percent). In 2018, the share of workers with a certification but no license did not exceed 25 percent in any detailed occupation with employment of more than 50,000. Among workers in management occupations, 580,000 held a professional certification in 2018. Other occupations with the largest number of certified workers include software developers, members of the clergy, registered nurses, automotive service technicians and mechanics, and financial managers.As mentioned previously, there is often substantial variation in the prevalence of these credentials within occupational groups. Consider legal occupations, for example, which include lawyers, judicial law clerks; judges, magistrates and other judicial workers; paralegals and legal assistants;11 and miscellaneous legal support workers. In 2018, 84 percent of lawyers held a license, compared with only 21 percent of paralegals and legal assistants. This difference underscores the limitations of using intermediate occupation groups, which include many different kinds of specific occupations, to analyze the role of certifications and licenses in the labor market.After seeing these data, readers may be curious as to why detailed occupations that are “universally licensed” in theory do not have licensing rates of 100 percent. Beyond the caveat that measures of the prevalence of certification and licensing from the CPS are self- or proxy-reported (See endnote 2.), the exact reasons often depend on the job in question and the relevant state and local licensing laws. (See “Occupational licensing regulation in the United States.”)Occupational licensing regulation in the United StatesIn the United States, occupational licensing laws are generally enacted by state governments and executed by licensing boards, often composed of professionals from within the occupation. These laws can be quite complex. The two main forms of licensing are “title” and “practice” acts.A “title” act (also called “right to title”) is when a government requires that prospective workers meet certain criteria in order to advertise themselves as a member of an occupation. Interior designers in Georgia are regulated this way. To be called a “registered interior designer,” one must meet education and work experience requirements and pass an examination. Those who are not officially registered may still provide many of the same services, but using the title of “interior designer” is a misdemeanor.* It is important to note that although the Georgia law provides for the granting of interior designer “certificates,” this credential would be considered a license in the Current Population Survey since it is awarded by a governmental licensing agency.A “practice” act, or “right to practice” regulation, is a stricter form of licensing. Such laws make it illegal for anyone to perform the services associated with an occupation without a license. Many of the most well-known examples are among healthcare practitioners, such as physicians and surgeons, nurses and nurse practitioners, and physical and occupational therapists. Lawyers also typically cannot provide legal services or represent clients in a court of law without being licensed, which involves obtaining a law degree (Juris Doctor or J.D.), passing the bar examination, and having their “character and fitness” confirmed by their state’s board of examiners.† However, over the past several decades, some states have expanded “right to practice” licensing laws to cover a wide variety of occupations, including cosmetologists, barbers, funeral directors, florists, tour guides, locksmiths, and professional wrestlers.‡States may also enact legislation that requires workers to be licensed in order to legally perform specific tasks, while allowing unlicensed workers to perform the remaining work. For example, in different states, there are different limits on the scope of tasks that nurse practitioners are allowed to perform. In Illinois, nurse practitioners are allowed to prescribe medication, while in Missouri, only physicians can do so.§ Anyone can call themselves an accountant, but only a licensed certified public accountant (CPA) can perform a mandatory audit for a publically traded company.** Another variation is when laws require unlicensed workers to be supervised by a licensed worker when performing specific tasks. For example, in most states, licensed dental hygienists are required to perform their work, which could include teeth cleaning, fluoride treatment, or initial screenings, under the supervision of a licensed dentist. However, in some states, licensed dental hygienists are permitted to perform some of these tasks without a dentist present, and in a few states, they are allowed to own their own dental hygiene practices.††_______________________________* See Morris M. Kleiner, Guild-ridden labor markets: the curious case of occupational licensing (Kalamazoo: Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 2015), pp. 20–22, http://www.upjohn.org/publications/upjohn-institute-press/guild-ridden-labor-markets-curious-case-occupational-licensing, and Georgia Law Title 43, Ch. 4, Article 2, http://sos.ga.gov/plb/acrobat/Laws/23_Architects_And_Interior_Designers_43-4.pdf.† See “Bar admissions basic overview,” American Bar Association, https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/bar_admissions/basic_overview.html.‡ See Kleiner, Guild-ridden labor markets, pp. 1–3.§ Ibid., pp. 47–50.** See “Become a CPA—FAQs,” Association of International Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), http://www.aicpa.org/becomeacpa/faqs.html. Also see “All about auditors: what investors need to know, https://www.sec.gov/reportspubs/investor-publications/investorpubsaboutauditorshtm.html.†† See Morris M. Kleiner and Kyoung Won Park, “Battles among licensed occupations: analyzing government regulations on labor market outcomes for dentists and hygienists,” NBER Working Paper No. 16560 (Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, November 2010), http://www.nber.org/papers/w16560.pdf.As an example, consider the case of physicians and surgeons. After 4 years of medical school, (unlicensed) medical school graduates typically begin their residencies. Medical residents work for pay under the supervision of a licensed physician or surgeon in their chosen specialty for at least 3 years. After the completion of their residency, these physicians and surgeons can then apply for a license, which gives them legal permission to practice medicine independently in their jurisdiction.12 Although the CPS questionnaire does not address this issue specifically, the vast majority of the 146,000 unlicensed physicians and surgeons in 2018 were almost certainly medical residents.Educational attainment within occupations. Within occupational groups, the prevalence of professional certifications and licenses varies substantially by educational attainment. Overall, these results are analogous to those discussed previously in the “Education” and “Occupation” sections of this article. The prevalence of certification and licensing increased with educational attainment and varied widely between the intermediate occupation groups. Workers with a professional degree and those employed in legal occupations; healthcare practitioner and technical occupations; or education, training, and library occupations held certifications and licenses at the highest rate. This is to be expected, because lawyers, physicians, surgeons, nurses, and teachers fall into these groups. Workers with the lowest rates had a high school diploma or less or were employed in sales and office occupations; natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations; production occupations; and many service occupations. (See table 6.)Table 6. Percentage of employed people 25 years and over with a certification or license by occupation and educational attainment, 2018 annual averagesIntermediate occupationTotalLess than a high school diplomaHigh school graduates, no college(1)Some college, no degreeAssociate's degreeBachelor's degreeMaster's degreeProfessional degreeDoctoral degreeTotal, 25 years and over26.1%8.1%14.9%21.1%33.4%28.5%42.9%78.6%54.6%Management, professional, and related occupations36.912.917.623.740.732.745.981.755.8Management, business, and financial operations occupations22.910.715.819.923.921.530.355.242.5Management occupations22.310.816.419.625.519.730.657.442.0Business and financial operations occupations24.3—13.120.919.724.829.651.043.8Professional and related occupations47.118.720.628.250.841.854.485.658.0Computer and mathematical occupations14.1—11.414.019.313.014.5—13.3Architecture and engineering occupations25.1—14.418.918.926.630.8—18.0Life, physical and social science occupations29.4——18.626.923.334.545.132.4Community and social services occupations38.8—20.420.426.827.855.3—56.2Legal occupations67.2—20.025.230.032.264.289.283.5Education, training, and library occupations55.5—20.326.630.260.670.462.932.8Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations11.1—8.38.414.310.213.9——Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations77.2—38.757.078.477.981.093.288.5Service occupations24.68.618.729.144.331.033.048.436.4Healthcare support occupations51.335.044.051.664.454.156.4——Protective service occupations39.019.730.038.950.541.538.7——Food preparation and serving related occupations9.34.57.610.319.211.814.9——Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations8.33.26.913.318.418.013.3——Personal care and service occupations33.322.230.034.051.729.033.7——Sales and office occupations13.64.58.213.016.816.825.449.443.8Sales and related occupations18.14.911.817.621.321.829.753.846.0Office and administrative support occupations9.84.15.59.813.911.320.4——Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations19.96.417.925.337.423.929.3——Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations10.22.911.617.819.321.4———Construction and extraction occupations19.26.017.826.440.125.832.9——Installation, maintenance and repair occupations22.911.519.224.736.222.224.6——Production, transportation, and material moving occupations15.89.714.118.721.419.624.9——Production occupations10.43.98.313.818.913.716.8——Transportation and material moving occupations20.515.719.222.824.324.230.6——Notes:(1) Includes people with a high school diploma or equivalent.Note: Dashes indicate no data available or data do not meet publication standards. Percentages are not presented when base is less than 50,000. People may have more than one certification or license.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.While the prevalence of certifications and licenses in service occupations, at 24.6 percent in 2018, was about in line with the share of all workers who held one of these credentials, there was much variation within this occupational group. Certifications and licenses were most prevalent in healthcare support occupations, in protective service occupations, and in personal care and service occupations. Within these occupations, workers with an associate’s degree were most likely to hold one of these credentials. In healthcare support occupations, these workers were mostly nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides and medical assistants. Within protective service occupations, they tended to be employed as police officers, security guards, or firefighters. Personal care and service occupations include hairdressers, hairstylists and cosmetologists, as well as barbers. Professional certifications and licenses were relatively uncommon in food preparation and serving related occupations and in building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations.Finally, within professional and related occupations, those employed in computer and mathematical occupations and in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations held certifications and licenses at a lower rate, regardless of their level of educational attainment. In 2018, only 13.9 percent of those with a master’s degree who were employed in arts occupations held a certification or license; among those with a bachelor’s degree, 10.2 percent held one of these credentials. Among all workers in professional and related occupations, 54.4 percent of those with a master’s degree and 41.8 percent of those with bachelor’s degree held a certification or license in 2018. Despite being relatively more likely to hold a certification than college graduates in other professional and related occupations, less than 15 percent of workers in computer and mathematical occupations with a bachelor’s degree or higher held a certification or license.Requirement for job. In 2018, 84.4 percent of employed people with a certification or license said the credential was required for their job. 13 (See table 7.) Among those with a credential, the percentages of workers with a required certification or license were at least 50 percent for all intermediate occupation groups. However, there was substantial variation across the groups. Generally, credentialed workers in occupational groups with the highest prevalence of certification and licensing were more likely to say their credential was required. For example, among workers with a certification or license, 98.1 percent of those employed in healthcare practitioners and technical occupations, 94.8 percent in legal occupations, and 94.8 percent in education, training, and library occupations said their credential was required. However, among credentialed workers in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations, as well as in office and administrative support occupations, less than 60 percent said their certification or license was required for their job.14 These results show that for workers in highly credentialed occupations, a certification or license tended to be a necessary qualification for employment.Table 7. Employed people with a certification or license, by occupation and requirement for job, 2018 annual averagesOccupationNumber of people (thousands)Percent distributionTotal, with a certification or licenseRequired for jobNot required for jobTotal, with a certification or licenseRequired for jobNot required for jobTotal, 16 years and over37,55631,7095,847100.0%84.4%15.6%Management, professional, and related occupations22,29019,5582,732100.087.712.3Management, business, and financial operations occupations5,7674,2731,494100.074.125.9Management occupations3,9912,9211,070100.073.226.8Business and financial operations occupations1,7761,352424100.076.123.9Professional and related occupations16,52215,2841,238100.092.57.5Computer and mathematical occupations690413277100.059.940.1Architecture and engineering occupations780615165100.078.821.2Life, physical, and social science occupations41535065100.084.415.6Community and social services occupations995872123100.087.612.4Legal occupations1,2471,18265100.094.85.2Education, training, and library occupations4,9104,656254100.094.85.2Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations351199152100.056.743.3Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations7,1356,998137100.098.11.9Service occupations5,7915,001790100.086.413.6Healthcare support occupations1,7801,671109100.093.96.1Protective service occupations1,1701,08189100.092.47.6Food preparation and serving related occupations607376231100.062.038.0Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations462288175100.062.237.8Personal care and service occupations1,7721,585187100.089.510.5Sales and office occupations4,0352,6771,358100.066.333.7Sales and related occupations2,4301,866564100.076.823.2Office and administrative support occupations1,605810795100.050.549.5Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations2,7232,276447100.083.616.4Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations977324100.075.424.6Construction and extraction occupations1,5101,285224100.085.114.9Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations1,117918199100.082.217.8Production, transportation, and material moving occupations2,7172,198519100.080.919.1Production occupations859587272100.068.331.7Transportation and material moving occupations1,8571,610247100.086.713.3Note: People may have more than one certification or license.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.The share of workers who held a required credential also varied by detailed occupation. In general, virtually all workers in occupations with the highest prevalence of licensing said the credential was required for their job. For example, among lawyers; physicians and surgeons; and elementary, middle and secondary school teachers, at least 97 percent of credentialed workers said their license was required for their job in 2018. However, among credentialed workers in occupations in which certifications and licenses were less prevalent, a majority still needed the credential. For example, among paralegals and legal assistants (24 percent of whom held a certification or license in 2018), about 69 percent of those with a certification or license said the credential was required for their job. Of the 47 percent of police and sheriff’s patrol officers who held a certification or license, the credential was a requirement about 96 percent of the time. Thus, even in occupations in which certifications and licenses were not as prevalent, these credentials were often a necessary condition for employment. The results may have been driven, in part, by differences in occupational licensing regulation by state. Within detailed occupations in which the shares of people holding a certification (but no license) were the highest, the credential was less likely to be a requirement. Among computer network architects, information security analysts, computer and information systems managers, and software developers, the share of workers with a certification or license who said their credential was required for their job was closer to 50 percent than 100 percent. For workers in these occupations, the credential may have served primarily as a resume boost. However, among other occupations with a relatively high prevalence of certifications, this was not the case. In 2018, about 84 percent of the clergy and 86 percent of automotive service technicians and mechanics with a certification or license said the credential was required for their job.Earnings. In 2018, median weekly earnings for full-time wage and salary workers with a currently active professional certification or license were 35 percent higher than earnings for those without one of these credentials. However, the relationship between earnings and certification and licensing status was more complex than this 35-percent difference might suggest. As discussed in previous sections, older and more highly educated workers were more likely to hold a certification or license. In addition, the percent difference in earnings between those with and without a certification or license increased with age and decreased with educational attainment. Both the incidence of certification and licensing and the percent difference in earnings varied substantially across occupations. Finally, workers with a certification or license who said their credential was required for their job received higher earnings, on average, than those with a credential that was not required. The following sections discuss how earnings and certification and licensing status interact with age, sex, race, ethnicity, educational attainment, occupation, and requirement for job. It is important to note that these comparisons of earnings by certification and licensing status and demographic characteristics are on a broad level and do not control for these factors simultaneously.15Earnings by certification and licensing status and demographic characteristics. In 2018, weekly earnings for full-time wage and salary workers with a certification or license, at $1,106, were 35 percent higher than earnings for those without a certification or license ($818).16 (See table 8.) Earnings for workers with a certification but no license, at $1,196, were slightly higher than earnings for those with a license ($1,093). This difference was likely driven, in part, by the concentration of professional certifications in computer and mathematical occupations, in which workers tend to have relatively high earnings.17Table 8. Median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, by certification and licensing status, age, sex, race, and ethnicity, 2018 annual averagesCharacteristicFull-time wage and salary workers (thousands)Median weekly earningsPercent differenceWith a certification or license(1)With no certification or licenseTotal, 16 years and over115,567$1,106$81835.2%16 to 24 years10,42863453219.225 to 54 years80,8911,11085829.455 years and over24,2471,20591631.6Men, 16 years and over64,1421,23190735.716 to 24 years5,81868756022.725 to 54 years45,0611,23694331.155 years and over13,2631,3471,04828.5Women, 16 years and over51,42599072636.416 to 24 years4,61160751218.625 to 54 years35,83099675432.155 years and over10,9841,11877045.2White, 16 years and over88,9531,13384733.8Men50,5701,25293533.9Women38,3841,01774336.9Black or African American, 16 years and over15,04183865727.5Men7,28295069935.9Women7,76078061926.0Asian, 16 years and over7,6431,3421,02131.4Men4,1691,5451,16932.2Women3,4741,15287531.7Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, 16 years and over(2)20,29789964838.7Men12,22699069143.3Women8,07180859236.5Notes:(1) People may have more than one certification or license.(2) People of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity may be of any race.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.In 2018, weekly earnings for those with a certification or license were substantially higher than earnings for those without one of these credentials for all major age groups. However, the percent difference in earnings between those with and without a credential increased with age. Weekly earnings for credentialed full-time wage and salary workers age 55 years and over, at $1,205, were 32 percent higher than earnings for those without a credential ($916). Earnings for credentialed workers ages 25 to 54, at $1,110, were 29 percent higher than those of their noncredentialed counterparts ($858), while workers ages 16 to 24 with a certification or license, at $634, had 19 percent higher earnings than workers in the same age group with no certification or license ($532).In 2018, for every age group, earnings for men were higher than earnings for women, independent of certification or licensing status. Both male and female full-time wage and salary workers ages 16 to 24 with a certification or license had about 20 percent higher earnings than those without a credential. Among the employed ages 25 to 54, both men and women had about one-third higher earnings than their counterparts without a certification or license. However, earnings for women workers age 55 and over with a certification or license were 45 percent higher than earnings for those without one of these credentials. For men age 55 and over, earnings for credentialed workers were 29 percent higher than earnings for those without a certification or license.The difference in earnings between those with and without a certification or license also varied by race and ethnicity. The largest percent difference in earnings was among Hispanic full-time wage and salary workers. Earnings for Hispanic workers with a certification or license, at $899 in 2018, were 39 percent higher than the earnings for those without one of these credentials ($648). Among Whites (34 percent), Blacks (28 percent), and Asians (31 percent), the percent differences in earnings were similar.18Earnings by certification and licensing status and educational attainment. In 2018, percent differences in earnings between those 25 years and over with and without a certification or license generally declined with educational attainment. For all workers with less than a bachelor’s degree, the median earnings for those with a certification or license were considerably higher than the median earnings for those without one of these credentials. Workers with less than a high school diploma who had a certification or license, at $636, had 16 percent higher earnings than similarly educated workers without such credentials ($546). Those with a high school diploma but no college had 17 percent higher earnings when they had a certification or license ($837 compared with $715). Credentialed workers with some college or an associate’s degree ($902) had 12 percent higher earnings than their counterparts without a certification or license ($803). (See figure 4.) ⁠ View Chart Data For workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher, the percent difference in earnings between those with and without a certification or license varied substantially, especially between the three advanced-degree categories. The percent difference in earnings was highest among workers with a professional degree. In 2018, median weekly earnings for those with a professional degree and a certification or license, at $1,919, were 27 percent higher than for similarly educated workers without one of these credentials ($1,515). Earnings for workers with a master’s degree and a certification or license ($1,376) were 8 percent lower than for workers with a master’s degree but no additional credential ($1,492). In part, this was because credentialed workers with a master’s degree were concentrated in education, training, and library occupations (such as teachers), whereas similarly educated workers without a certification or license were more likely to work in higher paying management occupations. Among workers with a doctoral degree, those with a certification or license ($1,840) received 3-percent higher earnings than those without one of these credentials ($1,790). Finally, for workers with a bachelor’s degree, the difference in earnings was only 2 percent ($1,212 compared with $1,190).19However, these results are subject to at least two important caveats. First, while the percent difference in earnings between those with and without a certification or license was highest for lower levels of educational attainment, very few workers with less formal education actually held one of these credentials. In 2018, of the 35.7 million employed people age 25 and over who held a certification or license, only 790,000 (about 2 percent) had less than a high school diploma. (Workers with less than a high school diploma make up about 7 percent of total employment.) By comparison, 57 percent of employed people with a certification or license had a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared with 41 percent of all employed people.Second, because of the strong correlation between educational attainment and certification and licensing status, it is difficult to conclusively determine whether differences in earnings are driven by the traditional (education) or alternative (certification or license) form of credential. A further confounding factor, as mentioned previously, is that certain levels of educational attainment are often criteria for obtaining a certification or license. For example, in most states, an aspiring lawyer cannot become a licensed attorney without completing law school. As a result, it is difficult to determine how much of the difference in earnings between a licensed attorney and a paralegal or legal assistant can be attributed to the license.Earnings by certification and licensing status and occupation. Differences in earnings between those with and without a certification or license varied substantially by occupation in 2018. Table 9 presents median weekly earnings by certification and licensing status and occupational group, as well as the percent difference in earnings between credentialed and noncredentialed workers. Legal occupations were a clear outlier: those with a certification or license ($1,876) had 68-percent higher earnings than those without a credential ($1,115). On the other end of the distribution, for workers in computer and mathematical occupations and in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations, the differences in earnings were not statistically significant. Among other occupation groups with a high prevalence of certification and licensing, workers with a credential in healthcare practitioners and technical occupations ($1,218) had 39-percent higher earnings than those with no certification or license ($876). The percent difference in earnings between those with and without a credential was 17 percent in education, training, and library occupations ($1,054 compared with $902), and 5 percent for healthcare support occupations ($573 compared with $548).Table 9. Median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, by certification and licensing status, 2018 annual averagesOccupationFull-time wage and salary workers (thousands)Median weekly earningsPercent differenceIs the difference statistically significant?With a certification or licenseWithout a certification or licenseTotal, 16 years and over115,567$1,106$81835.2%YesManagement, professional, and related occupations48,8081,2681,2322.9YesManagement, business, and financial operations occupations19,8631,5411,30518.1YesManagement occupations13,4771,5761,38214.0YesBusiness and financial operations occupations6,3851,4451,15924.7YesProfessional and related occupations28,9451,2041,1584.0YesComputer and mathematical occupations4,7551,5921,5314.0NoArchitecture and engineering occupations2,9941,6481,44514.0YesLife, physical, and social science occupations1,3081,4431,19520.8YesCommunity and social services occupations2,2231,01584919.6YesLegal occupations1,4661,8761,11568.3YesEducation, training, and library occupations7,1661,05490216.9YesArts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations1,8801,1821,07310.2NoHealthcare practitioners and technical occupations7,1541,21887639.0YesService occupations16,28864554318.8YesHealthcare support occupations2,5955735484.6YesProtective service occupations2,83699777329.0YesFood preparation and serving related occupations4,39456149712.9YesBuilding and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations3,69570154029.8YesPersonal care and service occupations2,76858653010.6YesSales and office occupations23,71488972722.3YesSales and related occupations10,0771,02776534.2YesOffice and administrative support occupations13,63779871012.4YesNatural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations11,5461,03978831.9YesFarming, fishing, and forestry occupations85072657326.7YesConstruction and extraction occupations6,4141,08477240.4YesInstallation, maintenance, and repair occupations4,2821,02890214.0YesProduction, transportation, and material moving occupations15,21089868231.7YesProduction occupations7,66889870727.0YesTransportation and material moving occupations7,54289764938.2YesNote: A person may have more than one certification or license. Statistical significance is at the 90-percent confidence level.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.However, as mentioned previously in the “Occupation” section, each intermediate occupation group includes a variety of specific jobs, with varying responsibilities and requirements for certification and licensing. Differences in earnings between those with and without a certification or license at the intermediate occupational level may be the result of these differences in job roles and responsibilities, instead of the credential. Looking at differences in earnings at the detailed occupational level partially addresses this shortcoming.The difference in earnings for those with and without a certification or license varied substantially within occupational groups. Table 10 presents earnings data for those with and without one of these credentials for select detailed occupations. Not all occupations are presented, because many smaller occupations did not have a sufficient number of observations for reliable earnings estimates to be calculated. Table 10. Certification and licensing status of employed people, by selected detailed occupation, 2018 annual averagesOccupationFull-time wage and salary workers (thousands)Median weekly earningsPercent difference in earnings levelsIs difference statistically significant?With a certification or licenseWithout a certification or licenseWith a certification or licenseWithout a certification or licenseTotal, 16 years and over28,38487,183$1,106$81835.2%YesManagement, professional and related occupations17,40031,4081,2681,2322.9YesManagement, business, and financial operations occupations4,24215,6201,5411,30518.1YesManagement occupations2,84210,6351,5761,38214.0YesChief executives2378612,3162,2851.4NoGeneral and operations managers1407991,4741,32111.6NoMarketing and sales managers918731,5741,5650.6NoComputer and information systems managers1054971,9861,8557.1NoFinancial managers2598991,7201,38124.5YesHuman resources managers642301,4141,3742.9NoConstruction managers1364881,5431,39210.8YesEducation administrators3674901,5771,15636.4YesFood service managers11171688679411.6NoMedical and health services managers2912771,6311,22233.5YesProperty, real estate, and community association managers1042851,11598013.8YesSocial and community service managers842791,3351,08423.2YesManagers, all other6352,6501,6161,4779.4YesBusiness and financial operations occupations1,4004,9851,4451,15924.7YesClaims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators1152191,18794425.7YesCompliance officers921861,4021,25012.2NoHuman resources workers795411,3831,13921.4NoManagement analysts1095261,5531,5301.5NoAccountants and auditors4351,1801,5651,11440.5YesPersonal financial advisors1892261,7331,34029.3YesCredit counselors and loan officers1082251,4301,07832.7YesProfessional and related occupations13,15815,7881,2041,1584.0YesComputer and mathematical occupations6564,0991,5921,5314.0NoComputer systems analysts715091,8491,46826.0YesSoftware developers, applications and systems software1671,4441,8971,8532.4NoComputer support specialists684491,1581,0599.3NoComputer occupations, all other995791,2951,2097.1NoArchitecture and engineering occupations6842,3091,6481,44514.0YesArchitects, except naval81891,6731,28530.2NoCivil engineers1682421,7671,33232.7YesMechanical engineers522611,7621,51716.2YesEngineers, all other1174111,6231,5693.4NoEngineering technicians, except drafters703281,1751,1165.3NoLife, physical, and social science occupations3129961,4431,19520.8YesCommunity and social service occupations8031,4201,01584919.6YesCounselors3133921,09683131.9YesSocial workers2804731,01683521.7YesClergy1122251,0179665.3NoLegal occupations8965701,8761,11568.3YesLawyers7181352,0831,51037.9YesParalegals and legal assistants101311878965–9.0NoEducation, training, and library occupations4,2782,8881,05490216.9YesPostsecondary teachers3156791,4431,4380.3NoPreschool and kindergarten teachers27329678555641.2YesElementary and middle school teachers2,2897411,0319409.7YesSecondary school teachers7591891,1531,03511.4NoSpecial education teachers265581,05889418.3NoOther teachers and instructors1222651,06892016.1NoTeacher assistants1634525575550.4NoArts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations1961,6841,1821,07310.2NoDesigners746091,2711,04521.6YesHealthcare practitioners and technical occupations5,3321,8211,21887639.0YesPhysicians and surgeons7011262,2611,41959.3YesTherapists, all other102531,11493019.8YesRegistered nurses2,1474381,1861,04113.9YesClinical laboratory technologists and technicians1431471,04376037.2YesDiagnostic related technologists and technicians186831,18192427.8NoHealth practitioner support technologists and technicians26527773363715.1YesLicensed practical and licensed vocational nurses32216980463526.6YesMedical records and health information technicians509083272115.4NoMiscellaneous health technologists and technicians5563818910–10.1NoService occupations3,83312,45664554318.8YesHealthcare support occupations1,2641,3325735484.6YesNursing, psychiatric, and home health aides7286925195121.4NoDental assistants97996096021.2NoMedical assistants2372626405918.3YesProtective service occupations1,1021,73499777329.0YesFirefighters1921021,1451,02411.8NoBailiffs, correctional officers, and jailers96297738743–0.7NoDetectives and criminal investigators61961,2861,431–10.1NoPolice and sheriff's patrol officers3483801,1401,01212.6YesSecurity guards and gaming surveillance officers2375446345828.9NoFood preparation and serving related occupations3654,02956149712.9YesChefs and head cooks593076176140.5NoFirst-line supervisors of food preparation and serving workers5134668457618.8YesCooks891,2365114855.4NoWaiters and waitresses7286056149114.3YesBuilding and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations3333,36270154029.8YesJanitors and building cleaners1251,54767456419.5YesGrounds maintenance workers8275369155724.1YesPersonal care and service occupations7701,99858653010.6YesHairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists2021075495391.9NoMiscellaneous personal appearance workers124134518532–2.6NoChildcare workers6637258448819.7YesPersonal care aides1506365094972.4NoRecreation and fitness workers5115769958519.5YesSales and office occupations2,75020,96488972722.3YesSales and related occupations1,4618,6151,02776534.2YesFirst-line supervisors of retail sales workers1942,2261,00377928.8YesFirst-line supervisors of non-retail sales workers1437501,2441,1379.4NoCashiers621,328450465–3.2NoRetail salespersons1631,69788164636.4YesInsurance sales agents2901768698492.4NoSecurities, commodities, and financial services sales agents511461,8951,17062.0YesSales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing951,0171,3191,15214.5NoReal estate brokers and sales agents3481801,13783436.3YesOffice and administrative support occupations1,28812,34979871012.4YesFirst-line supervisors of office and administrative support workers1921,0871,03487418.3YesBilling and posting clerks5736077470210.3NoBookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks5862182073811.1NoCustomer service representatives1311,77385567626.5YesReceptionists and information clerks91844595606–1.8NoDispatchers5321785275912.3YesSecretaries and administrative assistants1701,8077647590.7NoOffice clerks, general778497156943.0NoOffice and administrative support workers, all other603961,02177132.4YesNatural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations2,1719,3751,03978831.9YesFarming, fishing, and forestry occupations7377772657326.7YesConstruction and extraction occupations1,1475,2671,08477240.4YesFirst-line supervisors of construction trades and extraction workers1064351,2891,01027.6YesCarpenters7989488774519.1YesConstruction laborers1201,35093270532.2YesOperating engineers and other construction equipment operators792481,10688624.8YesElectricians3304511,13684135.1YesPipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters1903411,18179149.3YesInstallation, maintenance, and repair occupations9513,3311,02890214.0YesFirst-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers522191,3801,04831.7YesAircraft mechanics and service technicians61941,2111,08211.9NoAutomotive service technicians and mechanics18352691277617.5YesBus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists902681,01290611.7YesHeating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers14623896484613.9YesIndustrial and refractory machinery mechanics693551,12794918.8NoMaintenance and repair workers, general7737993883911.8YesProduction, transportation, and material moving occupations2,23012,98089868231.7YesProduction occupations7646,90489870727.0YesFirst-line supervisors of production and operating workers827111,12396316.6NoWelding, soldering, and brazing workers1434198978239.0YesInspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, and weighers936631,00975234.2YesProduction workers, all other669267326768.3NoTransportation and material moving occupations1,4676,07689764938.2YesBus drivers114247619683–9.4NoDriver/sales workers and truck drivers8291,96395376923.9YesTaxi drivers and chauffeurs543466366074.8NoIndustrial truck and tractor operators7052773663316.3YesLaborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand901,50570659917.9YesNote: A person may have more than one certification or license. Estimates of full-time wage and salary workers for detailed occupations may not sum to totals because data are not presented for all occupations. Data are not presented for occupations for which the base is less than 50,000. Statistical significance is at the 90-percent confidence level.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Within legal occupations in 2018, weekly earnings for lawyers with a certification or license, at $2,083, were 38 percent higher than earnings for lawyers without a credential ($1,510). On the other hand, paralegals with a credential had median weekly earnings of $878, which is not statistically different from the earnings of their counterparts without a certification or license ($965). These percent differences in earnings for individual jobs were much smaller than the percent difference in earnings for legal occupations in the aggregate. Thus, the overall difference in earnings for legal occupations was partially driven by occupational and educational differences. Within legal occupations, more than 8 in 10 workers with a certification or license were lawyers—who tend to be more highly paid—while about half of noncredentialed workers were paralegals and legal assistants. In addition, 87 percent of credentialed workers in legal occupations held an advanced degree, compared with 31 percent of noncredentialed workers.Within education, training, and library occupations, the percent difference in earnings between those with and without a certification or license was 41 percent for preschool and kindergarten teachers and 10 percent for elementary and middle school teachers. Earnings differences were modestly positive for secondary school teachers (11 percent), special education teachers (18 percent), and other teachers and instructors (16 percent), which includes substitutes. Among postsecondary teachers and teacher assistants, by contrast, differences in median earnings for those with and without one of these credentials were not statistically significant.However, it is important to note that among teachers, the difference in earnings may partly reflect whether the teacher is employed in a public or private school and whether the teacher is a member of a union or covered by a union contract. Research by Allegretto and Tojerow (2014) found that, when controlling for educational attainment and demographics, public school teachers were paid about 16 to 19 percent more, on average, than private school teachers during the period from 1996 to 2012.20 They also found that unionized teachers were paid about 5 to 8 percent more, on average, than nonunion teachers, regardless of whether they were employed in a public or private school. Because public school teachers are more likely to hold a certification or license than private school teachers, it is hard to determine to what degree each of these factors is influencing the difference in earnings between teachers with and without one of these credentials.21Among healthcare practitioners and technical occupations, some detailed occupations showed a substantial difference in earnings between full-time wage and salary workers with and without a credential. Physicians and surgeons with a certification or license had median weekly earnings of $2,261, which is 59 percent higher than the median for those without one of these credentials ($1,419).22 Pharmacists and nurse practitioners, virtually all of whom held a certification or license, had median earnings of $2,071 and $1,894, respectively. The median weekly earnings for licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses who held a currently active certification or license, at $804, were 27 percent higher than the median for those without one of these credentials, at $635. Registered nurses with a certification or license ($1,186) only received 14-percent higher earnings than their counterparts without a certification or license ($1,041).23 Nurses without a credential were likely younger and held interim or limited permits that allowed them to work under supervision while waiting for the results of their licensing test.24 Among diagnostic-related technologists and technicians, workers with a certification or license did not have statistically higher median earnings than those without a credential.Earnings by occupation and requirement for job. The difference in earnings between those with and without a certification or license also depended on whether a person’s credential was required for their job. In 2018, median weekly earnings for workers with a required credential, at $1,123, were 37 percent higher than they were for those without a certification or license ($818). However, median earnings for those who held a certification or license but said the credential was not required for their job, at $1,006, were only 23 percent higher. (See table 11.)Table 11. Median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, by occupation and requirement for job, 2018 annual averagesOccupationFull-time wage and salary workers (thousands)Median weekly earningsWith a certification or licenseWithout a certification or licenseTotalRequired for jobNot required for jobTotal, 16 years and over115,567$1,106$1,123$1,006$818Management, professional, and related occupations48,8081,2681,2571,3901,232Management, business, and financial operations occupations19,8631,5411,5501,5151,305Management occupations13,4771,5761,5951,5401,382Business and financial operations occupations6,3851,4451,4451,4451,159Professional and related occupations28,9451,2041,2031,2281,158Computer and mathematical occupations4,7551,5921,5241,6371,531Architecture and engineering occupations2,9941,6481,6661,5791,445Life, physical, and social science occupations1,3081,4431,4651,3441,195Community and social services occupations2,2231,0151,056883849Legal occupations1,4661,8761,8991,0631,115Education, training, and library occupations7,1661,0541,059963902Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations1,8801,1821,2021,1561,073Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations7,1541,2181,224929876Service occupations16,288645654600543Healthcare support occupations2,595573571601548Protective service occupations2,836997999863773Food preparation and serving related occupations4,394561580530497Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations3,695701794551540Personal care and service occupations2,768586586583530Sales and office occupations23,714889967784727Sales and related occupations10,0771,0271,070923765Office and administrative support occupations13,637798852728710Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations11,5461,0391,061955788Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations850726743—573Construction and extraction occupations6,4141,0841,114932772Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations4,2821,0281,0331,017902Production, transportation, and material moving occupations15,210898936705682Production occupations7,668898930794707Transportation and material moving occupations7,542897939617649Note: People may have more than one certification or license. Dash indicates data not available or data did not meet publication standards.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.In general, the gap in earnings between workers with a required credential and a nonrequired credential was largest in occupations with a high prevalence of certification and licensing. For example, in legal occupations, workers with a required certification or license—overwhelmingly lawyers—had median earnings of $1,899 in 2018. Workers in legal occupations with a credential that was not required, however, had median earnings of $1,063, little different from the median for those without any credential ($1,115). Workers without a required certification or license were disproportionately paralegals and legal assistants.A similar pattern was present among healthcare practitioners and technical occupations. Workers with a required certification or license had median earnings of $1,224 in 2018, significantly higher than the median for those who held a credential that was not required ($929). Earnings for the latter group were not statistically different from earnings for workers employed in healthcare practitioners and technical occupations without a certification or license ($876). Very few workers in this occupational group held a credential that was not required, but those who did were typically technicians or technologists. On the other hand, practitioners, such as physicians, surgeons, dentists, and nurses, held credentials that were required for their job. These occupations have very different roles and responsibilities, which may be a factor in the earnings differences.In many occupations, holding an optional certification or license was not associated with a boost in earnings. However, in computer and mathematical occupations—an occupational group with a lower prevalence of certification and licensing—median weekly earnings for workers with an optional credential ($1,637) were actually slightly higher than those for workers with a required one ($1,524).Conclusion. This analysis of CPS data provides insight into the effect that professional certifications and licenses have in the U.S. labor market. Over 43 million people, or 16.9 percent of the population, held one of these credentials in 2018. People with a certification or license had lower unemployment rates and higher labor force participation rates. Among the employed, the prevalence of these credentials increased with age and educational attainment. Employed women were more likely to hold a certification or license than employed men. Among the race and ethnicity groups, Whites held these credentials at the highest rate and Hispanics held them at the lowest rate.Licenses were the more common credential, held by 21.8 percent of the employed. Licensed workers were most frequently employed in legal occupations, or in jobs related to healthcare or education.  Professional certifications, by contrast, were held by only 2.3 percent of workers, most of whom were employed in computer and mathematical occupations and in management occupations. In addition, a large majority of workers with a certification or license said the credential was required for their job.Overall, earnings for workers with a credential were about one-third higher than earnings for those without one of these credentials. This percent difference in earnings increased with age, but decreased with educational attainment. In addition, workers who said their credential was required for their job had significantly higher earnings than those with an optional credential. These differences in earnings also varied widely by occupation, highlighting how the role of these credentials was often linked to a workers’ specific job, as one might expect.Although these new data from the CPS provide a useful snapshot of the prevalence of certification and licensing among U.S. workers, they are fundamentally limited in certain ways. Since the CPS is a household survey, it may not be able to accurately capture the nuances of occupational licensing regulation, such as whether a worker is covered by a “right to title” or “right to practice” law. Perhaps most importantly, because of the relatively small sample size in most states, the data are only available at the national level. Since many occupational licensing laws are passed at the state level, the applicability of CPS data to certain research questions about licensing may be limited. Still, as a tool to study changes in occupational licensing and professional certification over time and at various stages of the business cycle, these new data from the CPS should prove useful to researchers and other data users.  Suggested citation: Evan Cunningham, "Professional certifications and occupational licenses: evidence from the Current Population Survey," Monthly Labor Review, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, June 2019, https://doi.org/10.21916/mlr.2019.15. Notes. 1 See “Occupational licensing: a framework for policymakers,” U.S. Department of Treasury Office of Economic Policy, Council of Economic Advisors (CEA), and U.S. Department of Labor, July 2015, https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/docs/licensing_report_final_nonembargo.pdf.2 As defined by GEMEnA, a certification or license must be for engaging in professional, as opposed to personal, activities. For this reason, a commercial driver’s license (CDL) would count as a license, but a regular driver’s license would not. A license or certification must also be issued to a person—licenses issued to businesses, such as liquor or vending licenses, are excluded. Educational certificates awarded by an educational institution, such as a college or university, are also excluded. These credentials are not time limited, and while such training may help in the performance of a specific job, it is not necessarily required or considered proof of qualification. Finally, certificates of attendance at short-term training are not counted.3 For a detailed discussion of the development of CPS questions on certification and licensing, see Mary Dorinda Allard, “Adding questions on certification and licensing to the Current Population Survey,” Monthly Labor Review, November 2016, https://doi.org/10.21916/mlr.2016.52.4 BLS was unable to add questions to determine whether persons with a license also held a certification, or the number of credentials a person held. This was because adding questions to the monthly CPS is costly, and BLS did not have funding to increase the length of the survey permanently. For each question added about certifications and licenses, another question had to be removed. See Allard, “Adding questions on certification and licensing.”5 For multiple jobholders, the question refers to the respondent’s main job. This question is also asked of the unemployed and refers to the job at which they last worked. An important caveat to this third question is that it does not exhaustively measure the relevance of a credential to a particular job. While the question can provide information on whether a certification or license is required for a particular job, it cannot determine when a credential is not required but still helpful. Another important caveat is that the measure of the prevalence of certification and licensing is self- or proxy-reported in the CPS. People identified as holding a currently active certification or license and working in a specific occupation may not necessarily work in a state where a license is required to work in that occupation. Thus, certification and licensing data from the CPS should not be construed as complete measures of the extent of occupational licensing regulation in the United States. Even with the incorporation of results from the third question, readers should exercise caution when drawing conclusions. Respondents may not interpret “required for your job” as “legally required” or may not have sufficient knowledge of relevant licensing laws in their state.6 The CPS does not determine whether a person with a license has a certification, or the number of credentials of each type they hold. However, the Adult Training and Education Survey, conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics, found that a large majority of licensed workers—about 86 percent in 2016—did not hold a professional certification. See Stephanie Cronen, Megan McQuiggan, and Sarah Grady, “Adult training and education: results from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016: first look,” National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, February 2018, https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2017/2017103rev.pdf.7 While estimates from the CPS are not directly comparable to those from other sources for a variety of reasons, including the mode of survey collection, context, questions used, and the population of interest, the results were generally in line with previous studies. Conducting a national labor force survey in the summer of 2008, Morris Kleiner and Alan Krueger found that 28 percent of the labor force 18 years and over were licensed by the federal, state, or local government. In addition, data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) showed that in 2012, 28 percent of employed persons 18 years and over held a professional certification or license. Estimates of certification and licensing status by sex, age, race, ethnicity, educational attainment, and occupation, as well as earnings differences, were also generally consistent between the data sources. However, an important shortcoming to the new data is that because of sample size concerns, BLS does not have plans to publish CPS data on certifications and licenses at the state level. This may make analyzing the data more challenging, as many occupational licensing regulations are enacted at the state level. See Morris M. Kleiner and Alan B. Krueger, “Analyzing the extent and influence of occupational licensing on the labor market,” Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 31, No. 2, The Princeton Data Improvement Initiative (Part 2, April 2013), pp. S173–S202; and Stephanie Ewert and Robert Kominski, “Measuring alternative education credentials: 2012,” Household Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau, January 2014, https://www.census.gov/prod/2014pubs/p70-138.pdf. For an analysis of certification and licensing at the state level, see Morris M. Kleiner and Evgeny Vorotnikov, “Analyzing occupational licensing among the States,” Journal of Regulatory Economics, Vol. 52, 2017, pp. 132–158.   8 See BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook, “How to become a physician or surgeon,” 2015, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physicians-and-surgeons.htm. 9 See Ryan Nunn, “How occupational licensing matters for wages and careers,” The Hamilton Project, 2018, The Brookings Institution, https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/es_3152018_how_occupational_licensing_matters_for_wages_and_careers.pdf.10 Included in master’s degrees are M.A., M.S., M.Eng., M.Ed., M.S.W., and M.B.A. degrees. Included in professional school degrees are M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., L.L.B., and J.D. degrees. Included in doctoral degrees are Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees.11 The BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook (2015) describes paralegals and legal assistants as individuals who perform, “a variety of tasks to support lawyers, including maintaining and organizing files, conducting legal research, and drafting documents.” See https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/paralegals-and-legal-assistants.htm.12 While exact license requirements vary by state, some examples are New York (http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/med/medlic.htm) and California (http://www.mbc.ca.gov/Applicants/Physicians_and_Surgeons/).13 When analyzing the “requirement for job” data from the CPS, users should remember that it is the respondent who determines whether their credential is required. A “Yes” response could indicate that a certification or license is either required by law to work in specific occupations or that an employer requires it. In fact, a “Yes” response could reflect nothing more than a perception on the part of the respondent that a credential is required, even if it has no basis in reality. As a result, answers to the “requirement for job” question cannot distinguish whether a worker is covered under a “right to title” or “right to practice” regulation. (See box, “Occupational licensing regulation in the United States.”) Additionally, respondents may have incomplete knowledge of the relevant credentialing laws in their state. Thus, CPS data on certifications and licenses, including the “requirement for job” question, should not be used as a comprehensive measure of occupational licensing regulations in the United States.14 In 2018, 75 percent of credentialed workers in farming, fishing, and forestry occupations said their certification or license was required for their job. However, because the cell sizes were smaller for this occupation group, the difference between farming, fishing, and forestry occupations and the occupation groups listed above was not statistically significant.15 “Earnings” refers to median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers. The CPS data represent earnings before taxes and other deductions, and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips typically received. In the case of multiple jobholders, only earnings received at their main job are included. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term “usual” is defined by the respondent, but if asked, interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. Wage and salary workers are defined as those who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. This excludes all self-employed persons, regardless of whether their business is incorporated or unincorporated. Full-time workers are those who usually work 35 hours or more per week at their main job. BLS computes medians by ranking each reported or calculated weekly earnings value and placing them into a $50-wide interval or bin. Each of these bins is centered on a multiple of $50 ($25 or less, $25.01 to $75, $75.01 to $125, etc.). The procedure determines the bin in which the median falls and calculates the median through a linear interpolation. For more information, see the technical note in the news release, Usual Weekly Earnings of Wage and Salary Workers, at https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/wkyeng.pdf.16 While no formal regression analysis is presented in this article, Kleiner and Kruger and Gittleman, Klee, and Kleiner, using other data sources, find a licensing wage premium even when they control for age, sex, race and ethnicity, educational attainment, and occupation. See Kleiner and Kruger, “Analyzing the extent and influence of occupational licensing on the labor market”; and Maury Gittleman, Mark A. Klee, and Morris M. Kleiner, “Analyzing the labor market outcomes of occupational licensing,” Industrial Relations, Vol. 57, No. 1, 2018, pp. 57–100.   17 In 2018, the median earnings for full-time wage and salary workers employed in computer and mathematical occupations was $1,539, compared with $886 for all full-time wage and salary workers.18 In a 2017 working paper, Peter Q. Blair and Bobby W. Chung, using data from the 2008 panel of the SIPP, found that occupational licensing reduces the racial wage gap between White and Black men and the gender wage gap between women and White men. Replicating their results using CPS data, however, is beyond the scope of this article. See Peter Q. Blair and Bobby W. Chung, “Occupational licensing reduces racial and gender wage gaps: evidence from the survey of income and program participation,” Human capital and economic opportunity global working group, working paper series, Working paper No. 2017-050 (University of Chicago, June 2017), http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Blair_Chung_2017_licensing_gender_racial_wage_gaps.pdf. Also see, Nunn, “How occupational licensing matters for wages and careers.”19 These patterns were also present in 2012 data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation. See, “The relationship between education and work credentials,” Data Point (Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics June 2015), https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2015/2015556.pdf.20 Sylia A. Allegretto and Ilan Tojerow, “Teacher staffing and pay differences: public and private schools,” Monthly Labor Review, September 2014, pp. 12 and 15, https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2014/article/teacher-staffing-and-pay-differences.htm. See table 2, “Regression-adjusted relative wages, public and private school teachers, 1996–2012.”21 In the United States, public preschools, elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools almost always require teachers to have a government-issued license in order to teach. While the exact licensing criteria and process are determined at the state level, common requirements include having at least a bachelor’s degree, completing a state-approved teacher preparation program (TPP), and passing a basic skills test. TPPs are typically either components of a bachelor’s or master’s degree in education or take the form of residency programs that combine professional development and supervised teaching experience in the classroom. Some states also issue preliminary credentials to entry-level teachers, who must then gain classroom experience and participate in formal mentorship programs in order to upgrade their license. After the upgrade, licenses are renewed automatically, as long as the teacher completes a required amount of professional development. Those who wish to teach in high school typically must pass a test in their desired subject (mathematics, science, history, etc.), and aspiring special education teachers must undergo additional training. Private school teachers and substitutes are generally not subject to these employment restrictions. For examples, see documentation on how to obtain a teaching license in California (https://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/teach) and New York (http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/certificate/certprocess.html#one).22 As discussed in the “Occupation” section, physicians and surgeons who did not have a certification or license were likely completing their residencies. These unlicensed physicians and surgeons would be younger, on average, than their licensed colleagues, which could partly explain the large difference in earnings.23 Registered nurses (R.N.s) and licensed practical nurses (L.P.N.s) and licensed vocational nurses L.V.N.s usually perform similar duties. However, entry-level R.N.s typically need an associate’s degree in nursing (A.D.N.) or a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (B.S.N.), while entry-level L.P.N.s and L.V.N.s only need to complete a 1-year state-approved educational program. R.N.s often supervise L.P.N.s and L.V.N.s, and receive higher pay on average. See BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook, “Registered nurses,” 2017, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm, and “Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses,” 2017, https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/licensed-practical-and-licensed-vocational-nurses.htm.24 In order to obtain a license, aspiring registered nurses (R.N.s) must complete and pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses (L.P.N.s and L.V.N.s) must complete and pass the NCLEX-RN or the NCLEX-PN, respectively. Testing is overseen by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. For examples of states that allow interim or limited nursing permits, see New York (http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/nursing.htm) and California (https://www.rn.ca.gov/careers/steps.shtml). About the Author Evan Cunningham [email protected] Evan Cunningham was formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Related Content Related Articles The effects of occupational licensing on labor market outcomes, Monthly Labor Review, February 2018. Adding questions on certifications and licenses to the Current Population Survey, Monthly Labor Review, November 2016. The de-licensing of occupations in the United States, Monthly Labor Review, May 2015. Related Subjects Labor force Earnings and wages Employment Article PDF Download article PDF version top Back to Top close or Esc Key Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn PublicationsMonthly Labor Review
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • certification
  • 260
  • 5
  • license
  • 217
  • 5
  • percent
  • 187
  • 5
  • certification license
  • 152
  • 5
  • occupation
  • 142
  • 5
  • worker
  • 132
  • 5
  • earning
  • 113
  • 5
  • credential
  • 109
  • 5
  • licensing
  • 78
  • 5
  • person
  • 74
  • 5
  • degree
  • 66
  • 5
  • 2018
  • 59
  • 5
  • employed
  • 58
  • 5
  • higher
  • 54
  • 5
  • occupational
  • 53
  • 5
  • required
  • 52
  • 5
  • difference
  • 52
  • 5
  • labor
  • 50
  • 5
  • age
  • 48
  • 5
  • held
  • 47
  • 5
  • school
  • 45
  • 5
  • certification licensing
  • 43
  • 5
  • professional
  • 43
  • 5
  • data
  • 41
  • 5
  • year
  • 41
  • 5
  • job
  • 41
  • 5
  • state
  • 40
  • 5
  • group
  • 40
  • 5
  • licensed
  • 36
  • 5
  • service
  • 34
  • 5
  • difference earning
  • 32
  • 5
  • related
  • 32
  • 5
  • teacher
  • 32
  • 5
  • educational attainment
  • 28
  • 5
  • higher earning
  • 25
  • 5
  • credential required
  • 25
  • 5
  • percent higher
  • 24
  • 5
  • occupational licensing
  • 24
  • 5
  • professional certification
  • 23
  • 5
  • prevalence certification
  • 21
  • 5
  • person certification
  • 21
  • 5
  • employed person
  • 20
  • 5
  • wage salary
  • 20
  • 5
  • salary worker
  • 19
  • 5
  • held certification
  • 19
  • 5
  • licensing statu
  • 19
  • 5
  • earning certification
  • 19
  • 5
  • certification licensing statu
  • 18
  • 5
  • wage salary worker
  • 18
  • 5
  • 16 year
  • 18
  • 5
  • high school
  • 18
  • 5
  • weekly earning
  • 18
  • 5
  • time wage salary
  • 17
  • 5
  • time wage
  • 17
  • 5
  • held certification license
  • 16
  • 5
  • percent higher earning
  • 16
  • 5
  • occupational group
  • 16
  • 5
  • percent difference
  • 16
  • 5
  • percent difference earning
  • 15
  • 5
  • school diploma
  • 15
  • 5
  • physician surgeon
  • 15
  • 5
  • legal occupation
  • 15
  • 5
  • full time
  • 15
  • 5
  • person certification license
  • 14
  • 5
  • high school diploma
  • 14
  • 5
  • earning certification license
  • 14
  • 5
  • table
  • 14
  • 5
  • labor force
  • 14
  • 5
  • earning credential
  • 14
  • 5
  • detailed occupation
  • 14
  • 5
  • bureau labor
  • 14
  • 5
  • required job
  • 14
  • 5
  • worker certification
  • 14
  • 5
  • full time wage
  • 13
  • 5
  • median weekly
  • 13
  • 5
  • participation rate
  • 13
  • 5
  • race ethnicity
  • 13
  • 5
  • percent employed
  • 13
  • 5
  • prevalence certification licensing
  • 12
  • 5
  • worker certification license
  • 12
  • 5
  • age 25
  • 12
  • 5
  • practitioner technical
  • 12
  • 5
  • school teacher
  • 12
  • 5
  • professional certification license
  • 11
  • 5
  • median weekly earning
  • 11
  • 5
  • master
  • 11
  • 5
  • median earning
  • 11
  • 5
  • labor market
  • 11
  • 5
  • 2018 annual
  • 11
  • 5
  • bachelor
  • 11
  • 5
  • training library
  • 11
  • 5
  • credentialed worker
  • 11
  • 5
  • credential required job
  • 10
  • 5
  • bachelor degree
  • 10
  • 5
  • percentage point
  • 10
  • 5
  • mathematical occupation
  • 10
  • 5
  • held credential
  • 10
  • 5
  • worker age
  • 10
  • 5
  • hold certification
  • 10
  • 5
  • financial operation
  • 10
  • 5
  • material moving
  • 10
  • 5
  • certification license credential
  • 9
  • 5
  • computer mathematical occupation
  • 9
  • 5
  • difference earning certification
  • 9
  • 5
  • earning worker
  • 9
  • 5
  • license credential
  • 9
  • 5
  • force participation
  • 9
  • 5
  • healthcare practitioner
  • 9
  • 5
  • administrative support
  • 9
  • 5
  • computer mathematical
  • 9
  • 5
  • current population survey
  • 8
  • 5
  • level educational attainment
  • 8
  • 5
  • hold certification license
  • 8
  • 5
  • master degree
  • 8
  • 5
  • healthcare practitioner technical
  • 8
  • 5
  • occupational licensing regulation
  • 8
  • 5
  • design entertainment sport
  • 8
  • 5
  • entertainment sport media
  • 8
  • 5
  • earning full time
  • 8
  • 5
  • higher earning credential
  • 8
  • 5
  • licensed worker
  • 8
  • 5
  • licensed vocational
  • 8
  • 5
  • line supervisor
  • 8
  • 5
  • current population
  • 8
  • 5
  • population survey
  • 8
  • 5
  • united state
  • 8
  • 5
  • cp data
  • 8
  • 5
  • person license
  • 8
  • 5
  • level educational
  • 8
  • 5
  • preparation serving
  • 8
  • 5
  • fishing forestry
  • 8
  • 5
  • service occupation
  • 8
  • 5
  • registered nurs
  • 8
  • 5
  • licensing regulation
  • 8
  • 5
  • professional related
  • 8
  • 5
  • design entertainment
  • 8
  • 5
  • entertainment sport
  • 8
  • 5
  • sport media
  • 8
  • 5
  • earning full
  • 8
  • 5
  • certification license1without certification
  • 7
  • 5
  • labor force participation
  • 7
  • 5
  • practitioner technical occupation
  • 7
  • 5
  • preparation serving related
  • 7
  • 5
  • ground cleaning maintenance
  • 7
  • 5
  • license credential required
  • 7
  • 5
  • license certification
  • 7
  • 5
  • license required
  • 7
  • 5
  • certification license1without
  • 7
  • 5
  • license1without certification
  • 7
  • 5
  • certification licensewith
  • 7
  • 5
  • person age
  • 7
  • 5
  • age sex
  • 7
  • 5
  • sex race
  • 7
  • 5
  • percent worker
  • 7
  • 5
  • technical occupation
  • 7
  • 5
  • serving related
  • 7
  • 5
  • ground cleaning
  • 7
  • 5
  • cleaning maintenance
  • 7
  • 5
  • paralegal legal
  • 7
  • 5
  • occupation group
  • 7
  • 5
  • care service
  • 7
  • 5
  • worker required
  • 7
  • 5
  • requirement job
  • 7
  • 5
  • private school
  • 7
  • 5
  • labor review
  • 7
  • 5
  • race ethnicity educational
  • 6
  • 5
  • ethnicity educational attainment
  • 6
  • 5
  • prevalence certification license
  • 6
  • 5
  • percent employed person
  • 6
  • 5
  • age sex race
  • 6
  • 5
  • sex race ethnicity
  • 6
  • 5
  • education training library
  • 6
  • 5
  • training library occupation
  • 6
  • 5
  • resource construction maintenance
  • 6
  • 5
  • transportation material moving
  • 6
  • 5
  • weekly earning full
  • 6
  • 5
  • monthly labor review
  • 6
  • 5
  • educational attainment occupation
  • 5
  • 5
  • certification license required
  • 5
  • 5
  • active certification license
  • 5
  • 5
  • employed person certification
  • 5
  • 5
  • person certification license2
  • 5
  • 5
  • certification license2 person
  • 5
  • 5
  • force participation rate
  • 5
  • 5
  • age 25 54
  • 5
  • 5
  • certification license varied
  • 5
  • 5
  • high prevalence certification
  • 5
  • 5
  • practical licensed vocational
  • 5
  • 5
  • paralegal legal assistant
  • 5
  • 5
  • licensing regulation united
  • 5
  • 5
  • morri kleiner
  • 5
  • 5
  • business financial operation
  • 5
  • 5
  • physical social science
  • 5
  • 5
  • occupation certification license
  • 5
  • 5
  • private school teacher
  • 5
  • 5
  • percent certification license
  • 4
  • 5
  • certification licensetotal 16
  • 4
  • 5
  • licensetotal 16 year
  • 4
  • 5
  • person hispanic latino
  • 4
  • 5
  • hispanic latino ethnicity
  • 4
  • 5
  • person age 25
  • 4
  • 5
  • prime working age
  • 4
  • 5
  • figure view
  • 4
  • 5
  • view chart
  • 4
  • 5
  • view chart data
  • 4
  • 5
  • age 16 24
  • 4
  • 5
  • race ethnicity group
  • 4
  • 5
  • associate degree
  • 4
  • 5
  • worker professional degree
  • 4
  • 5
  • worker master
  • 4
  • 5
  • certification license highest
  • 4
  • 5
  • healthcare support occupation
  • 4
  • 5
  • food preparation serving
  • 4
  • 5
  • farming fishing forestry
  • 4
  • 5
  • percent credentialed worker
  • 4
  • 5
  • psychiatric home health
  • 4
  • 5
  • intermediate occupation group
  • 4
  • 5
  • worker required certification
  • 4
  • 5
  • required certification license
  • 4
  • 5
  • occupation requirement job
  • 4
  • 5
  • earning certification licensing
  • 4
  • 5
  • higher earning certification
  • 4
  • 5
  • salary worker thousandsmedian
  • 4
  • 5
  • worker thousandsmedian weekly
  • 4
  • 5
  • earning counterpart certification
  • 4
  • 5
  • counterpart certification license
  • 4
  • 5
  • certification licensewithout certification
  • 4
  • 5
  • public private school
  • 4
  • 5
  • licensed vocational nurs
  • 4
  • 5
  • blair bobby
  • 4
  • 5
Result 6
TitleAbout Us | NH Office of Professional Licensure and Certification
Urlhttps://www.oplc.nh.gov/about-us
Description
Date
Organic Position6
H1About Us
H2Information about the State of New Hampshire Office of Professional Licensure and Certification
H3Get the latest Coronavirus COVID-19 update at https://www.covid19.nh.gov
Who we are
Our mission
How we are governed
H2WithAnchorsInformation about the State of New Hampshire Office of Professional Licensure and Certification
BodyAbout Us Information about the State of New Hampshire Office of Professional Licensure and Certification. Who we are. The purpose of the Office of Professional Licensure and Certification (OPLC) is to promote efficient professional healthcare licensing and professional technical licensing in the State of New Hampshire. The OPLC oversees the administration of forty-seven occupational licensing boards; these Boards, Councils, and Commissions directly regulate their professions pursuant to the powers, duties, functions, and responsibilities granted to them by individual practice acts. OPLC provides administrative, clerical, business processing and recordkeeping support to these Boards, Councils, and Commissions to assist in carrying out all statutory objectives in an efficient manner. In addition, OPLC directly regulates four professions, with the advice of advisory boards. OPLC has sole regulatory authority over one profession. To promote workforce opportunities in the State by increasing the interstate mobility of licensed professionals, OPLC is authorized to issue temporary and emergency licenses to individuals licensed in other jurisdictions.   Our mission. The principal mission of the New Hampshire Office of Professional Licensure and Certification is to safeguard the public health, safety, welfare, environment and the public trust of the citizens of the State of New Hampshire.   How we are governed. Pursuant to RSA 310-A
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • professional
  • 6
  • 6
  • oplc
  • 6
  • 6
  • state
  • 4
  • 6
  • hampshire
  • 4
  • 6
  • board
  • 4
  • 6
  • office professional licensure
  • 3
  • 6
  • professional licensure certification
  • 3
  • 6
  • state hampshire
  • 3
  • 6
  • office professional
  • 3
  • 6
  • professional licensure
  • 3
  • 6
  • licensure certification
  • 3
  • 6
  • office
  • 3
  • 6
  • licensure
  • 3
  • 6
  • certification
  • 3
  • 6
  • licensing
  • 3
  • 6
  • profession
  • 3
  • 6
Result 7
TitleAdministrator Licenses | Ohio Department of Education
Urlhttps://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Teaching/Licensure/Apply-for-Certificate-License/Administrator-Licenses
Description
DateJun 23, 2021
Organic Position7
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 8
TitleLearn.org -
Urlhttps://learn.org/articles/Administrative_Certificate_or_License_FAQs.html
Description
Date
Organic Position8
H1
H2
H3ABOUT LEARN.ORG
Subscribe to Student Saver
H2WithAnchors
BodyDegrees Associate Degrees Bachelor's Degrees Master's Degrees Doctorate Degrees Online Programs Online Associate Degrees Online Bachelor's Degrees Online Master's Degrees Online Doctorate Degrees Degrees by State Top Ranked Schools Subjects All Subjects and Degree Programs Agricultural Studies Architecture Design Biological Sciences Business Management Computer Science Culinary and Cosmetic Services Engineering Health Professions and Medical Services Humanities and Liberal Arts Legal Studies Mechanical and Electrical Repair Media Related Communications Physical Science Psychology School Administration Transportation and Distribution Services Visual and Performing Arts Careers Career Aptitude Tests Career Planning Career Profiles Career Roadmaps Career Training FAQs Education and Career FAQs Job Resume FAQs Salary FAQs Resources All Articles All Videos Scholarships In order to continue enjoying our site, we ask you enter in the text you see in the image below so we can confirm your identity as a human. Thank you very much for your cooperation. ABOUT LEARN.ORG . About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy © Copyright 2003- Fri Jan 14 07:10:52 PST 2022 Learn.org, all rights reserved. Subscribe to Student Saver. Free breaking news and coverage of savings in education
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • degree
  • 11
  • 8
  • career
  • 7
  • 8
  • online
  • 5
  • 8
  • degree online
  • 4
  • 8
  • faq
  • 4
  • 8
  • science
  • 3
  • 8
  • service
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleAdministrator License Types and General Requirements - Office of Educator Licensure
Urlhttps://www.doe.mass.edu/licensure/academic-prek12/admin/license-types.html
DescriptionThe goal of the Massachusetts public K-12 education system is to prepare all students for success after high school. Massachusetts public school students are leading the nation in reading and math and are at the top internationally in reading, science, and math according to the national NAEP and international PISA assessments
DateSep 30, 2018
Organic Position9
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 10
TitleOffice Management Certification
Urlhttps://www.car.org/en/education/designations/Office-Management-Certification
Description
Date
Organic Position10
H1
H2Transactions
Business Tools
Risk Management
Helplines
Education
Meetings & Events
Marketing Tools
Knowledge Center
Market Data
MLS / Professional Standards
Political Advocacy
Legal
Make a difference
Member Benefits
About Us
Contact Us
Office Management Certification
Featured Articles
H3
H2WithAnchorsTransactions
Business Tools
Risk Management
Helplines
Education
Meetings & Events
Marketing Tools
Knowledge Center
Market Data
MLS / Professional Standards
Political Advocacy
Legal
Make a difference
Member Benefits
About Us
Contact Us
Office Management Certification
Featured Articles
Bodyn & Thrive License Renewal Easily renew your real estate license with the FREE 45 hour online license renewal package from C.A.R. Pre-License Training Prepare to earn your real estate license with our online courses Designations / Certifications Distinguish yourself by learning how to build a business that specializes in niche markets to nearly double your earning potential in various real estate sectors Education Calendar Browse our class schedule to find when and where to take real estate courses. Course Catalog Browse through the many courses we offer - listed in alphabetical order.  Online Bundles TC Career Workout A special 1-day event pumped up with expert insight on Transaction Coordination (TC) practices throughout the industry. Risk and Education Management System The REMS system allows brokers to deliver quality education to their agents and track their progress. NMLS/MLO CE Courses Complete your eight-hour NMLS license renewal requirement through our NMLS-approved provider, OnlineEd C.A.R. Board of Directors and Committees The main Business Meetings page includes important links for Directors and Committee Members. NAR Meetings NAR meeting information and materials. REimagine! Real Estate Conference REimagine! Real Estate Conference & Expo is where learning takes center stage and where business solutions and connections are at the forefront of the real estate industry. Virtual Events View C.A.R's upcoming and past virtual events. Webinars Our comprehensive list of C.A.R. webinars you may attend free of charge. For Your Clients A one-stop shop for tools and and resources to educate consumers about the intricacies of buying and selling a home and how a REALTOR® can help. Infographics One Cool Thing Tax Reform One Sheets Fire Insurance One Sheets Charts & Graphs Explore and interact with the latest market statistics. County Housing Market Summaries County Market Updates Market @ A Glance Digital Tools Marketing tools from C.A.R.'s consumer advertising campaign For Brokers/Managers This information is designed for Real Estate Brokers and Office Managers to assist you in supporting your real estate business.  Center for California Real Estate CCRE's mission is to advance industry knowledge and innovation with an emphasis on convening key experts and influence-makers. Tax Reform FAQ Frequently Asked Questions about the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Multimedia Library From webinars to videos and podcasts to blogs, C.A.R. keeps you in the know. Videos Webinars Podcasts Publications C.A.R. publishes eight magazine issues and various newsletters throughout the year. Newsletters California Real Estate Magazine Education Meetings & Events Marketing Tools Knowledge Center Sign In Search Transactions Business Tools Risk Management Helplines Education Meetings & Events Marketing Tools Knowledge Center Market Data MLS / Professional Standards Political Advocacy Legal Make a difference Member Benefits About Us Contact Us CLOSE Transactions. Time to bring it home. Complete transactions and contracts electronically through zipForm®. VIEW MORE REALTOR® Secure Transaction. Realtor® Secure Transaction is your place to discover, access and master the essential tools for a modern, efficient and secure transaction. Transactions - zipForm Edition. Transaction management and forms software with all the must-have features, including current statewide contracts, local forms, and more. Transaction Products Service Providers Forms Libraries Support Forms Advisor™ & Forms Tutor®. Free advice to help you understand the form you're using with Forms Tutor® and identify which form you need for your transaction with Forms Advisor™ Standard Forms. C.A.R. Standard Forms are developed by the C.A.R. Legal Department which gathers input from real estate professionals and attorneys to create user-friendly, comprehensive, and dependable forms. Inspector Certification Program. C.A.R. now offers a list of Certified Home Inspectors for our REALTORS® members.  Participants of this program have completed certain background and education requirements.  Click Here to see the program details and a directory of Certified Home Inspectors.   Transaction Tips. Advice, Support and materials to improve your transactions. Transaction Tools Support Register for FREE Training Webinars Business Tools. We're here to help, people! Business products and tools to empower REALTORS®. VIEW MORE C.A.R. Business Products. Your one-stop-source for real estate products, forms, education, high-tech tools and more Leasing Resource Center. Everything you need for a successful property management & leasing business Mobile Apps. Download the latest C.A.R. mobile apps, including CARmojies & Stickers, C.A.R., Legal Hotline, CA REALTOR® EXPO, and zipForm Mobile. Down Payment Resource Directory. Help potential buyers open the door to home-ownership by searching from over 400 available down payment assistance programs throughout California. Risk Management. Q: Where do I go to get legal questions answered? A: Easy, look to the right! VIEW MORE California Residential Purchase Agreement (RPA). This is a resource page for all things RPA 2021. It includes links to the RPA and RPA-related forms, training, legal presentations, and publications. COVID Legal Docs. Forms, guides and other legal materials that may be used due to the spread of the Covid-19 strain of the coronavirus. Legal Q&As. Legal articles, many in question and answer format, are currently available on over 150 subjects in 50-plus categories. All Legal Q&As Disclosure Charts. 6 charts show REALTORS ® what needs to be disclosed and to whom in various sales and lease scenarios. Lease-Rental Disclosure Chart Sales Disclosure Checklist Sales Disclosure Chart Legal Material by Topic. Need help on a legal issue? First, pick one of the topics. Legal Tools. PowerPoint presentations, videos and flyers for Brokers, Agents, and Consumers. Quick Guides. Short, helpful, 1-page articles on key legal topics Legal Live Webinars. Wish you could catch up on California real estate law without having to read even more documents? Relax and watch a video as C.A.R.’s Legal Live Webinars bring you up-to-date on the hottest topics in real estate law. Legal Matters Podcast. The Legal Matters Podcast is the official podcast of the California Association of REALTORS® Member Legal Services Department. Helplines. Help, I need backup! Whether it's legal or financial help you need, C.A.R.'s got your back with these resources. VIEW MORE Ombudsman Hotline. If you're a member looking to resolve a minor dispute or communication issue with another REALTOR®, a C.A.R. ombudsman may be able to help! Peer-to-Peer Ethics. C.A.R. REALTOR® volunteers are specifically trained and are available to answer questions from other members about the Code of Ethics, and can provide information and limited counseling concerning its proper interpretation. Transaction Rescue™. Your lifeline to the lending community formerly known as the Finance Helpline and Mortgage Rescue™. Find contacts and answers to all mortgage related questions, and problems that arise in your real estate transaction. Get assistance today! Lending Resources Customer Service. Looking for additional assistance? The Customer Contact Center is looking forward to serving you Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. Consumer Mediation. The C.A.R. Real Estate Mediation Center for Consumers has mediators available to assist buyers and sellers (as well as other parties to real estate transactions) in resolving their disputes. Legal Hotline. Did you know that for zero dollars and zero cents, you can speak with an attorney about your transaction? If you don't believe us, check it out yourself. Education. We offer a wide array of real estate educational courses, certifications & designations in various formats. VIEW MORE License Renewal. Easily renew your real estate license with the FREE 45 hour online license renewal package from C.A.R. Pre-License Training. Prepare to earn your real estate license with our online courses Designations / Certifications. Distinguish yourself by learning how to build a business that specializes in niche markets to nearly double your earning potential in various real estate sectors Education Calendar. Browse our class schedule to find when and where to take real estate courses. Course Catalog. Browse through the many courses we offer - listed in alphabetical order.  Online Bundles TC Career Workout. A special 1-day event pumped up with expert insight on Transaction Coordination (TC) practices throughout the industry. Risk and Education Management System. The REMS system allows brokers to deliver quality education to their agents and track their progress. NMLS/MLO CE Courses. Complete your eight-hour NMLS license renewal requirement through our NMLS-approved provider, OnlineEd Meetings & Events. Mark your calendars for our yearly meetings and events! VIEW MORE C.A.R. Board of Directors and Committees. The main Business Meetings page includes important links for Directors and Committee Members. Current Business Meeting Materials Tentative Program Meeting Registration NAR Meetings. NAR meeting information and materials. REimagine. REimagine! Real Estate Conference & Expo is where learning takes center stage and where business solutions and connections are at the forefront of the real estate industry. REI 2020 Archive Virtual Events. View C.A.R's upcoming and past virtual events. Webinars. Our comprehensive list of C.A.R. webinars you may attend free of charge. Marketing Tools. You're the brand! Use our marketing tools to tell your story. VIEW MORE For Your Clients. A one-stop shop for tools and and resources to educate consumers about the intricacies of buying and selling a home and how a REALTOR® can help. Prop 19 Infographics One Cool Thing Tax Reform One Sheets Fire Insurance One Sheet Charts & Graphs. Explore and interact with the latest market statistics. Housing Market Summary County Market Updates Housing Perspective Market @ A Glance Digital Tools. Marketing tools from C.A.R.'s consumer advertising campaign Knowledge Center. Got knowledge? All the info you need on California’s housing market, economy, and issues impacting the industry. VIEW MORE For Brokers/Managers. This information is designed for Real Estate Brokers and Office Managers to assist you in supporting your real estate business.  Center of California Real Estate. CCRE's mission is to advance industry knowledge and innovation with an emphasis on convening key experts and influence-makers. Tax Reform FAQ. Frequently Asked Questions about the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Multimedia Library. From webinars to videos and podcasts to blogs, C.A.R. keeps you in the know. Videos Webinars Podcasts Publications. C.A.R. publishes eight magazine issues and various newsletters throughout the year. Newsletters California Real Estate Magazine Market Data. Be trendy -- stay current with our latest market forecasts and data analyses. VIEW MORE Housing Market Forecast. The latest housing market forecast and projection to what lays ahead. Data & Statistics. View the latest sales and price numbers. Find out where sales will be in upcoming months. Current Sales & Price Statistics HAI First-Time Buyer Housing Affordability Index - Traditional Historical Housing Data Annual Historical Data Summary Housing Matters Podcast. Your housing hub for market analysis, economic trends, and housing news. Market Minute. Get a roundup of weekly economic and market news that matters to real estate and your business. Interactive Market Stats. Gain insights through interactive dashboards and downloadable content.  Buyer's Guide Housing Market Overview Market Update Videos View All Shareable Reports View All Interactive Dashboards Speeches & Presentations. Catch up with the latest outreaches and webinars by the Research and Economics team. Surveys & Reports. C.A.R. conducts survey research with members and consumers on a regular basis to get a better understanding of the housing market and the real estate industry. Results and analyses from these studies are released in different formats – written report, power-point, infographic, webinar, and podcast - and can be found in this section. Stay Connected. Stay connected with the latest releases by subscribing to the products and services that interest you. MLS / Professional Standards. You’ve gone pro! So here are guidelines about MLS rules and professional standards. VIEW MORE Model MLS Rules/Materials. California Model MLS Rules, Issues Briefing Papers, and other articles and materials related to MLS policy. Statewide MLS Initiative C.A.R. Interboard Arbitration. Looking for information on how to file an interboard arbitration complaint?  You've come to the right place!  Find the rules, timeline and filing documents here. Code of Ethics Violators. Summaries and photos of California REALTORS® who violated the Code of Ethics and were disciplined with a fine, letter of reprimand, suspension, or expulsion. NAR Code of Ethics. The most recent edition of the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the National Association of REALTORS®. 2021 MEDIATOR TRAINING FOR REALTORS®. C.A.R. is presenting a 4-day Mediator Training for REALTORS® via Zoom webinar.  All REALTORS® are welcome to register. Professional Standards Materials. The California Professional Standards Reference Manual, Local Association Forms, NAR materials and other materials related to Code of Ethics enforcement and arbitration. Resources for Hearings via Zoom Online Training for Professional Standards Volunteers Professional Standards Webinars Professional Standards Administrator Certification Professional Standards Train the Trainer Political Advocacy. An industry that works together, thrives together. Participate in legislative advocacy as a C.A.R. member! VIEW MORE Legislation. C.A.R. advocates for REALTOR® issues in Washington D.C., Sacramento and in city and county governments throughout California. PACs and RAF. CREPAC, LCRC, IMPAC, ALF and the RAF comprise C.A.R.'s political fundraising arm. REALTOR® Action Fund Podcast. This week's topic:  Unlocking a Legacy, A Look Back & Ahead with CEO Joel Singer Politics and You. Learn how you can make a difference, by getting involved yourself or by passing along valuable information to your clients. Legal. It's the Law -- C.A.R.'s legal eagles tell you what you need to know to stay out of trouble. VIEW MORE Arbitration Rules. California Code of Ethics and Arbitration Rules and external link to JAMS Arbitration service. Risk Management. Recent Legal Developments. Summaries of legislation and regulation effecting REALTORS® and updates on news relevant to REALTORS®. 2022 New Laws 2021 New Laws 2020 New Laws 2019 Real Estate Clean Up Law Changes 2019 New Laws 2018 New Laws 2017 New Laws Legal News Real Estate Cases and Other Legal Resources. Important industry cases, resources and information Important Real Estate Cases (California and Federal) Small Claims Court Legal Matters Podcast. Learn on-the-go! The Legal Matters Podcast gives you bite-size nuggets of power-packed legal information that will help you protect yourself and your clients. Join our attorneys for a “Legal Bedtime Story” or for the scoop on vital issues like the “Top 5 RPA Mistakes”. Miscellaneous/Contacts. Current legal developments, C.A.R. legal products and services. Legal Foundation Realegal® SB 800 Member Legal Services Legal Action Fund Attorney Access Form Make a difference. Represent! Join C.A.R. in our community and foundation programs. VIEW MORE Californians for Homeownership. Californians for Homeownership was founded in response to the California Legislature’s call for public interest organizations to fight local anti-housing policies on behalf of the millions of California residents who need access to more affordable housing.  Housing Affordability Fund. Programs and grants to provide direct assistance to address the housing crisis in California. Make A Donation Rising Star. The Rising Star Award program is a C.A.R. initiative designed to work with the brokerage community to recognize their up-and-coming agents. C.A.R. Disaster Relief . C.A.R. stands ready to assist REALTORS® who have been impacted by wildfires through its Disaster Relief Fund and NAR's REALTORS® Relief Foundation. California Wildfire Resources Scholarship Foundation. Scholarships for California students planning to pursue a career in real estate. Education Foundation. Grants for California REALTORS® and residents pursuing real estate education. Diversity and Inclusion Programs. Find out more information on key diversity and inclusion programs and projects available. Fair Housing Latino Professionals Network C.A.R. Women's Initiative Young Professionals Network. New to the industry? YPN is a network to sharpen your skills, heighten your leadership, and connect with fellow REALTORS®. Member Benefits. Adding REALTOR® next to your name is cool. What comes with that title is even cooler. Check out your benefits. VIEW MORE Guide to Benefits. As a member of C.A.R., you receive more than 100 free and discounted benefits. Find out more about your member benefits here. C.A.R. Member Discounts NAR Member Discounts C.A.R. Insurance Products For New Members. As a new member of C.A.R. you have questions about your benefits and discounts. Find the answers here. Member FAQs Consumer Ad Campaign. C.A.R.'s annual consumer advertising campaign creates awareness of the REALTOR® brand and demonstrates the many benefits of the consumer-REALTOR® relationship. Online Campaign Paid Social Sponsorship and Branding Podcasts Search Sponsorship and Branding TV and Video About Us. This is so us...who we are and what we do. VIEW MORE C.A.R. Mission Statement . C.A.R. is a statewide trade association dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. Annual Report 2022 C.A.R. Officers. Meet the 2022 C.A.R. Leadership Team Media Center. C.A.R.'s Media Center houses the Association's news releases, media guidelines, and logos. News Releases Customer Service. Looking for additional assistance? The Customer Contact Center is looking forward to serving you Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. Careers. C.A.R. and its subsidiaries are currently recruiting for the following job opportunities. Partner With Us. Partner With Us Advertise With Us. Learn about advertising with C.A.R. Contact Us. Whichever department you are looking to speak with, don't hesitate to reach out! We'd love to hear from you. VIEW MORE C.A.R. Services. We are an email, a phone call or a click away. Don't hesitate and reach out to us! Rosters & Directories. Need help finding the right person? Try searching through our various rosters & directories. MAIN MENU Store Sign In Transaction Center Time to bring it home. Find zipForm®, transaction tools, and all the closing resources you'll need. Except for the champagne — that's on you. Learn & Thrive Take your professional development up a few notches. Here you'll find educational materials, marketing tools, training videos, and more to keep you on top of your game. Industry 360° We want you to feel like a champion every day. Find information on market data, government affairs, legislation, and trending industry issues. Your C.A.R. We're here to support you in every way possible. Learn more about your discounts, benefits and how your C.A.R. membership can help you succeed. Transactions Time to bring it home. Complete transactions and contracts electronically through zipForm®. Business Tools We're here to help, people! Business products and tools to empower REALTORS®. Risk Management Q: Where do I go to get legal questions answered? A: Easy, look to the right! Helplines Help, I need backup! Whether it's legal or financial help you need, C.A.R.'s got your back with these resources. Education We offer a wide array of real estate educational courses, certifications & designations in various formats. Meetings & Events Mark your calendars for our yearly meetings and events! Marketing Tools You're the brand! Use our marketing tools to tell your story. Knowledge Center Got knowledge? All the info you need on California’s housing market, economy, and issues impacting the industry. Market Data Be trendy -- stay current with our latest market forecasts and data analyses. MLS / Professional Standards You’ve gone pro! So here are guidelines about MLS rules and professional standards. Political Advocacy An industry that works together, thrives together. Participate in legislative advocacy as a C.A.R. member! Legal It's the Law -- C.A.R.'s legal eagles tell you what you need to know to stay out of trouble. Make a difference Represent! Join C.A.R. in our community and foundation programs. Member Benefits Adding REALTOR® next to your name is cool. What comes with that title is even cooler. Check out your benefits. About Us This is so us...who we are and what we do. Contact Us Whichever department you are looking to speak with, don't hesitate to reach out! We'd love to hear from you. REALTOR® Secure Transaction Realtor® Secure Transaction is your place to discover, access and master the essential tools for a modern, efficient and secure transaction. Transactions - zipForm® Edition Transaction management and forms software with all the must-have features, including current statewide contracts, local forms, and more. Transaction Products zipForm® Edition Service Providers Forms Libraries Transactions, zipForm® Edition Support Forms Advisor™ & Forms Tutor® Free advice to help you understand the form you're using with Forms Tutor® and identify which form you need for your transaction with Forms Advisor™ Standard Forms C.A.R. Standard Forms are developed by the C.A.R. Legal Department which gathers input from real estate professionals and attorneys to create user-friendly, comprehensive, and dependable forms. C.A.R. Home Inspector Certification Program C.A.R. now offers a list of Certified Home Inspectors for our REALTORS® members.  Participants of this program have completed certain background and education requirements.  Click Here to see the program details and a directory of Certified Home Inspectors.   Transaction Tips Advice, Support and materials to improve your transactions. Transaction Tools Support Register for FREE Training Webinars C.A.R. Business Products Your one-stop-source for real estate products, forms, education, high-tech tools and more Leasing & Property Management Resource Center Everything you need for a successful property management & leasing business Mobile Apps Download the latest C.A.R. mobile apps, including CARmojies & Stickers, C.A.R., Legal Hotline, CA REALTOR® EXPO, and zipForm Mobile. Down Payment Resource Directory Help potential buyers open the door to home-ownership by searching from over 400 available down payment assistance programs throughout California. California Residential Purchase Agreement (RPA) 2021 This is a resource page for all things RPA 2021. It includes links to the RPA and RPA-related forms, training, legal presentations, and publications. COVID Legal Documents Forms, guides and other legal materials that may be used due to the spread of the Covid-19 strain of the coronavirus. Legal Q&As Legal articles, many in question and answer format, are currently available on over 150 subjects in 50-plus categories. All Legal Q&As Disclosure Charts 6 charts show REALTORS ® what needs to be disclosed and to whom in various sales and lease scenarios. Lease/Rental Chart Sales Disclosure Checklist Sales Disclosure Chart Legal Launchpad Need help on a legal issue? First, pick one of the topics. Legal Tools PowerPoint presentations, videos and flyers for Brokers, Agents, and Consumers. Quick Guides Short, helpful, 1-page articles on key legal topics Legal Live Webinars Wish you could catch up on California real estate law without having to read even more documents? Relax and watch a video as C.A.R.’s Legal Live Webinars bring you up-to-date on the hottest topics in real estate law. Legal Matters Podcast The Legal Matters Podcast is the official podcast of the California Association of REALTORS® Member Legal Services Department. Ombudsman Hotline If you're a member looking to resolve a minor dispute or communication issue with another REALTOR®, a C.A.R. ombudsman may be able to help! Peer-to-Peer Ethics C.A.R. REALTOR® volunteers are specifically trained and are available to answer questions from other members about the Code of Ethics, and can provide information and limited counseling concerning its proper interpretation. Transaction Rescue™ Your lifeline to the lending community formerly known as the Finance Helpline and Mortgage Rescue™. Find contacts and answers to all mortgage related questions, and problems that arise in your real estate transaction. Get assistance today! Lending Resources Customer Service Looking for additional assistance? The Customer Contact Center is looking forward to serving you Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. Consumer Mediation The C.A.R. Real Estate Mediation Center for Consumers has mediators available to assist buyers and sellers (as well as other parties to real estate transactions) in resolving their disputes. C.A.R. Legal Hotline Did you know that for zero dollars and zero cents, you can speak with an attorney about your transaction? If you don't believe us, check it out yourself. License Renewal Easily renew your real estate license with the FREE 45 hour online license renewal package from C.A.R. Pre-License Training Prepare to earn your real estate license with our online courses Designations / Certifications Distinguish yourself by learning how to build a business that specializes in niche markets to nearly double your earning potential in various real estate sectors Education Calendar Browse our class schedule to find when and where to take real estate courses. Course Catalog Browse through the many courses we offer - listed in alphabetical order.  Online Bundles TC Career Workout A special 1-day event pumped up with expert insight on Transaction Coordination (TC) practices throughout the industry. Risk and Education Management System The REMS system allows brokers to deliver quality education to their agents and track their progress. NMLS/MLO CE Courses Complete your eight-hour NMLS license renewal requirement through our NMLS-approved provider, OnlineEd C.A.R. Board of Directors and Committees The main Business Meetings page includes important links for Directors and Committee Members. Current Business Meeting Materials Tentative Program Meeting Registration NAR Meetings NAR meeting information and materials. REimagine! Real Estate Conference REimagine! Real Estate Conference & Expo is where learning takes center stage and where business solutions and connections are at the forefront of the real estate industry. REimagine! 2020 Session Archive Virtual Events View C.A.R's upcoming and past virtual events. Webinars Our comprehensive list of C.A.R. webinars you may attend free of charge. For Your Clients A one-stop shop for tools and and resources to educate consumers about the intricacies of buying and selling a home and how a REALTOR® can help. Prop 19 Infographics One Cool Thing Tax Reform One Sheets Fire Insurance One Sheets Charts & Graphs Explore and interact with the latest market statistics. County Housing Market Summaries County Market Updates Housing Perspective Market @ A Glance Digital Tools Marketing tools from C.A.R.'s consumer advertising campaign For Brokers/Managers This information is designed for Real Estate Brokers and Office Managers to assist you in supporting your real estate business.  Center for California Real Estate CCRE's mission is to advance industry knowledge and innovation with an emphasis on convening key experts and influence-makers. Tax Reform FAQ Frequently Asked Questions about the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Multimedia Library From webinars to videos and podcasts to blogs, C.A.R. keeps you in the know. Videos Webinars Podcasts Publications C.A.R. publishes eight magazine issues and various newsletters throughout the year. Newsletters California Real Estate Magazine Housing Market Forecast The latest housing market forecast and projection to what lays ahead. Data & Statistics View the latest sales and price numbers. Find out where sales will be in upcoming months. Current Sales & Price Statistics Housing Affordability Index - First-Time Buyer Housing Affordability Index - Traditional Historical Housing Data Annual Historical Data Summary Housing Matters Podcast Your housing hub for market analysis, economic trends, and housing news. Market Minute Get a roundup of weekly economic and market news that matters to real estate and your business. Shareable and Interactive Reports Gain insights through interactive dashboards and downloadable content.  Buyer's Guide Housing Market Overview Market Update Videos All Shareable Reports All Interactive Dashboards Speeches & Presentations Catch up with the latest outreaches and webinars by the Research and Economics team. Surveys & Reports C.A.R. conducts survey research with members and consumers on a regular basis to get a better understanding of the housing market and the real estate industry. Results and analyses from these studies are released in different formats – written report, power-point, infographic, webinar, and podcast - and can be found in this section. Stay Connected Stay connected with the latest releases by subscribing to the products and services that interest you. Model MLS Rules/Materials California Model MLS Rules, Issues Briefing Papers, and other articles and materials related to MLS policy. Statewide MLS Initiative CAR Interboard Arbitration Looking for information on how to file an interboard arbitration complaint?  You've come to the right place!  Find the rules, timeline and filing documents here. Code of Ethics Violators Summaries and photos of California REALTORS® who violated the Code of Ethics and were disciplined with a fine, letter of reprimand, suspension, or expulsion. NAR Code of Ethics The most recent edition of the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the National Association of REALTORS®. 2021 Mediator Training for REALTORS® C.A.R. is presenting a 4-day Mediator Training for REALTORS® via Zoom webinar.  All REALTORS® are welcome to register. Professional Standards Materials The California Professional Standards Reference Manual, Local Association Forms, NAR materials and other materials related to Code of Ethics enforcement and arbitration. Resources for Hearings via Zoom Online Training for Professional Standards Volunteers Professional Standards Webinars Professional Standards Administrator Certification Professional Standards Train-the-Trainer Legislation C.A.R. advocates for REALTOR® issues in Washington D.C., Sacramento and in city and county governments throughout California. PACs and RAF CREPAC, LCRC, IMPAC, ALF and the RAF comprise C.A.R.'s political fundraising arm. REALTOR® Action Fund Podcast: Unlocking CA Politics This week's topic:  Unlocking a Legacy, A Look Back & Ahead with CEO Joel Singer Politics and You Learn how you can make a difference, by getting involved yourself or by passing along valuable information to your clients. Arbitration Rules California Code of Ethics and Arbitration Rules and external link to JAMS Arbitration service. Risk Management Recent Legal Developments Summaries of legislation and regulation effecting REALTORS® and updates on news relevant to REALTORS®. 2022 New Laws 2021 New Laws 2020 New Laws 2019 Real Estate Clean Up Law Changes 2019 New Laws 2018 New Laws 2017 New Laws Legal News Real Estate Cases and Other Legal Resources Important industry cases, resources and information Important California and Federal real estate related cases Small Claims Court Legal Matters Podcast Learn on-the-go! The Legal Matters Podcast gives you bite-size nuggets of power-packed legal information that will help you protect yourself and your clients. Join our attorneys for a “Legal Bedtime Story” or for the scoop on vital issues like the “Top 5 RPA Mistakes”. Miscellaneous/Contacts Current legal developments, C.A.R. legal products and services. Californians for Homeownership Realegal® SB 800 Member Legal Services Legal Action Fund Attorney Access Form Californians for Homeownership Californians for Homeownership was founded in response to the California Legislature’s call for public interest organizations to fight local anti-housing policies on behalf of the millions of California residents who need access to more affordable housing.  Housing Affordability Fund Programs and grants to provide direct assistance to address the housing crisis in California. Make A Donation to HAF Rising Star Award The Rising Star Award program is a C.A.R. initiative designed to work with the brokerage community to recognize their up-and-coming agents. C.A.R. Disaster Relief C.A.R. stands ready to assist REALTORS® who have been impacted by wildfires through its Disaster Relief Fund and NAR's REALTORS® Relief Foundation. California Disaster Resources Scholarship Foundation Scholarships for California students planning to pursue a career in real estate. Education Foundation Grants for California REALTORS® and residents pursuing real estate education. Diversity and Inclusion Programs Find out more information on key diversity and inclusion programs and projects available. Fair Housing Latino Professionals Network C.A.R. Women's Initiative Young Professionals Network New to the industry? YPN is a network to sharpen your skills, heighten your leadership, and connect with fellow REALTORS®. Guide to Benefits As a member of C.A.R., you receive more than 100 free and discounted benefits. Find out more about your member benefits here. C.A.R. Member Discounts NAR Member Discounts C.A.R. Insurance Products For New Members As a new member of C.A.R. you have questions about your benefits and discounts. Find the answers here. Member FAQs Consumer Ad Campaign C.A.R.'s annual consumer advertising campaign creates awareness of the REALTOR® brand and demonstrates the many benefits of the consumer-REALTOR® relationship. Online Campaign Paid Social Partnerships Podcasts Search Sponsorship and Branding TV and Video C.A.R. Mission Statement C.A.R. is a statewide trade association dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. Annual Report 2022 C.A.R. Officers Meet the 2022 C.A.R. Leadership Team Media Center C.A.R.'s Media Center houses the Association's news releases, media guidelines, and logos. News Releases Customer Service Looking for additional assistance? The Customer Contact Center is looking forward to serving you Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. Careers C.A.R. and its subsidiaries are currently recruiting for the following job opportunities. Partner With Us Partner With Us Advertise With Us Learn about advertising with C.A.R. C.A.R. Services We are an email, a phone call or a click away. Don't hesitate and reach out to us! Rosters & Directories Need help finding the right person? Try searching through our various rosters & directories. Office Management Certification. Explore Learn & Thrive Education Meetings & Events Marketing Tools Knowledge Center Home Education Designations / Certifications Office Management Certification Print Email Save Share Email Article Close What is This? Add a quick link to this page from the Homepage when you are signed in Add Now Share Article Twitter Facebook LinkedIn The Office Management Certification program helps prepare real estate professionals to organize and manage office staff, create an efficient working environment, and to follow current practice laws. These classes give brokers and agents the tools to organize office roles with employees, independent contractors, and helps them to understand legal requirements to reduce liability and manage risk. The OMC will help the ideal candidate provide oversight of licensed activities and create a context for recruitment and training goals. Generate an effective work environment to lead licensed and unlicensed employees, and REALTORS® alike toward maximum earning potential and growth. REQUIRED COURSES COURSE NAME HOURS CE PROVIDER Nuts & Bolts: The Broker’s Day-to-Day 3 N/A C.A.R./OnlineEd Who’s The Boss? Team Management For Brokers 3 N/A C.A.R./OnlineEd California Human Resource Law for Brokers   3 N/A   C.A.R./OnlineEd The New Broker's Benchmark: Prepare And Perform!   8 N/A  C.A.R./OnlineEd  Best Practices For ZipForm® Plus Broker Edition 1.5  N/A  C.A.R./OnlineEd     Earn Your Certification: Online Anytime Office Management Certification (OMC) Bundle     Live or LearnMyWay:®  To register for these courses in-person or in an upcoming webinar, visit the C.A.R. Education Calendar. Your Certificate: 24 hours after all requirements have been met (see below), participants will be automatically awarded a certificate for their records and a logo for marketing purposes. These will be sent to the email attached to the participant's www.OnlineEd.com profile. Once certified, students may add the certification logo to business cards, websites, email signatures, blogs, promotional materials, and more. Requirements: To earn your certificate you must complete the course(s) and exam(s) with a passing score. All C.A.R. Education certifications expire 2 years from the date they were awarded and anyone who wishes to renew must retake the course. The courses are updated regularly so that new information is available to new and returning agents and members.   Renewal Requirement: Unless earned in 2018 or prior, all C.A.R. Education certifications expire 2 years from the date they were awarded and anyone who wishes to renew must retake the course(s) or take a Renewal Course if available. The courses are updated regularly so that relevant information is available to new and returning agents and members. Who Should Attend: This certification is designed to train any professional about the current regulations and best practices in successful real estate transactions. Earn Your Certification: Online Anytime Office Management Certification (OMC) Bundle Live or LearnMyWay:®  To register for these courses in-person or in an upcoming webinar, visit the C.A.R. Education Calendar . Get more information on this and other online courses for sale at store.car.org. Related Articles C.A.R. Education AOR Resource Certified Forms Trainer - sortable Webinars Featured Articles . Transaction Center Ombudsman Hotline If you're a member looking to resolve a minor dispute or communication issue with another REALTOR®, a C.A.R. ombudsman may be able to help! Learn & Thrive Course Catalog Browse through the many courses we offer - listed in alphabetical order.  Learn & Thrive Education Calendar Browse our class schedule to find when and where to take real estate courses. « Need help? View our self-help resources or contact us. For website feedback, send us a message using this form. Thank you! SUPPORT Top Searches zipform purchase agreement lease agreement legal hotline one cool thing docusign rental agreement rpa residential lease legal Q&As license renewal health insurance ;
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • car
  • 111
  • 10
  • legal
  • 79
  • 10
  • real
  • 71
  • 10
  • real estate
  • 69
  • 10
  • estate
  • 67
  • 10
  • realtor
  • 57
  • 10
  • california
  • 47
  • 10
  • transaction
  • 41
  • 10
  • market
  • 40
  • 10
  • housing
  • 38
  • 10
  • member
  • 37
  • 10
  • form
  • 36
  • 10
  • tool
  • 35
  • 10
  • cours
  • 34
  • 10
  • education
  • 29
  • 10
  • webinar
  • 29
  • 10
  • resource
  • 27
  • 10
  • view
  • 26
  • 10
  • business
  • 26
  • 10
  • professional
  • 26
  • 10
  • center
  • 25
  • 10
  • podcast
  • 24
  • 10
  • standard
  • 23
  • 10
  • information
  • 22
  • 10
  • law
  • 22
  • 10
  • certification
  • 21
  • 10
  • industry
  • 21
  • 10
  • program
  • 21
  • 10
  • meeting
  • 20
  • 10
  • material
  • 20
  • 10
  • consumer
  • 20
  • 10
  • professional standard
  • 17
  • 10
  • housing market
  • 15
  • 10
  • code ethic
  • 14
  • 10
  • day
  • 11
  • 10
  • car legal
  • 11
  • 10
  • marketing tool
  • 11
  • 10
  • legal matter
  • 10
  • 10
  • license renewal
  • 10
  • 10
  • matter podcast
  • 10
  • 10
  • na caronlineed
  • 9
  • 10
  • california real estate
  • 8
  • 10
  • legal matter podcast
  • 8
  • 10
  • reach
  • 8
  • 10
  • california real
  • 8
  • 10
  • risk management
  • 7
  • 10
  • member benefit
  • 7
  • 10
  • disclosure chart
  • 7
  • 10
  • car education
  • 7
  • 10
  • view car
  • 7
  • 10
  • meeting event
  • 7
  • 10
  • real estate license
  • 6
  • 10
  • stop shop
  • 6
  • 10
  • interactive dashboard
  • 6
  • 10
  • california realtor
  • 6
  • 10
  • car member
  • 6
  • 10
  • network
  • 6
  • 10
  • dont hesitate
  • 6
  • 10
  • roster directory
  • 6
  • 10
  • estate license
  • 6
  • 10
  • education calendar
  • 6
  • 10
  • director committee
  • 6
  • 10
  • nar meeting
  • 6
  • 10
  • virtual event
  • 6
  • 10
  • tax reform
  • 6
  • 10
  • secure transaction
  • 6
  • 10
  • market forecast
  • 6
  • 10
  • reimagine real estate
  • 5
  • 10
  • real estate conference
  • 5
  • 10
  • real estate industry
  • 5
  • 10
  • consumer advertising campaign
  • 5
  • 10
  • real estate business
  • 5
  • 10
  • real estate transaction
  • 5
  • 10
  • office management certification
  • 5
  • 10
  • business meeting
  • 5
  • 10
  • reimagine real
  • 5
  • 10
  • estate conference
  • 5
  • 10
  • estate industry
  • 5
  • 10
  • stop
  • 5
  • 10
  • latest market
  • 5
  • 10
  • market update
  • 5
  • 10
  • consumer advertising
  • 5
  • 10
  • advertising campaign
  • 5
  • 10
  • estate business
  • 5
  • 10
  • webinar podcast
  • 5
  • 10
  • knowledge center
  • 5
  • 10
  • product service
  • 5
  • 10
  • home inspector
  • 5
  • 10
  • realtor member
  • 5
  • 10
  • legal hotline
  • 5
  • 10
  • legal qa
  • 5
  • 10
  • topic legal
  • 5
  • 10
  • member legal
  • 5
  • 10
  • realtor car
  • 5
  • 10
  • estate transaction
  • 5
  • 10
  • housing affordability
  • 5
  • 10
  • californian homeownership
  • 5
  • 10
  • office management
  • 5
  • 10
  • management certification
  • 5
  • 10
  • education calendar browse
  • 4
  • 10
  • calendar browse class
  • 4
  • 10
  • browse class schedule
  • 4
  • 10
  • class schedule find
  • 4
  • 10
  • schedule find real
  • 4
  • 10
  • find real estate
  • 4
  • 10
  • real estate cours
  • 4
  • 10
  • catalog browse
  • 4
  • 10
  • browse
  • 4
  • 10
  • cours offer
  • 4
  • 10
  • cours offer listed
  • 4
  • 10
  • offer listed alphabetical
  • 4
  • 10
  • listed alphabetical order
  • 4
  • 10
  • event view car
  • 4
  • 10
  • meeting event marketing
  • 4
  • 10
  • event marketing tool
  • 4
  • 10
  • realtor secure transaction
  • 4
  • 10
  • certified home inspector
  • 4
  • 10
  • legal live webinar
  • 4
  • 10
  • real estate law
  • 4
  • 10
  • member legal service
  • 4
  • 10
  • customer service additional
  • 4
  • 10
  • service additional assistance
  • 4
  • 10
  • additional assistance customer
  • 4
  • 10
  • assistance customer contact
  • 4
  • 10
  • customer contact center
  • 4
  • 10
  • contact center forward
  • 4
  • 10
  • center forward serving
  • 4
  • 10
  • forward serving monday
  • 4
  • 10
  • serving monday friday
  • 4
  • 10
  • monday friday hour
  • 4
  • 10
  • friday hour 830
  • 4
  • 10
  • hour 830 445
  • 4
  • 10
  • 830 445 pm
  • 4
  • 10
  • housing market forecast
  • 4
  • 10
  • mediator training realtor
  • 4
  • 10
  • real estate education
  • 4
  • 10
  • diversity inclusion program
  • 4
  • 10
  • association realtor
  • 4
  • 10
  • legal service
  • 4
  • 10
  • peer
  • 4
  • 10
  • customer service
  • 4
  • 10
  • service additional
  • 4
  • 10
  • additional assistance
  • 4
  • 10
  • assistance customer
  • 4
  • 10
  • customer contact
  • 4
  • 10
  • contact center
  • 4
  • 10
  • center forward
  • 4
  • 10
  • forward serving
  • 4
  • 10
  • serving monday
  • 4
  • 10
  • monday friday
  • 4
  • 10
  • friday hour
  • 4
  • 10
  • hour 830
  • 4
  • 10
  • 830 445
  • 4
  • 10
  • 445 pm
  • 4
  • 10
  • sale price
  • 4
  • 10
  • stay connected
  • 4
  • 10
  • ml rule
  • 4
  • 10
  • model ml
  • 4
  • 10
  • material related
  • 4
  • 10
  • interboard arbitration
  • 4
  • 10
  • mediator training
  • 4
  • 10
  • training realtor
  • 4
  • 10
  • action fund
  • 4
  • 10
  • arbitration rule
  • 4
  • 10
  • legal development
  • 4
  • 10
  • law 2019
  • 4
  • 10
  • rising star
  • 4
  • 10
  • disaster relief
  • 4
  • 10
  • estate education
  • 4
  • 10
  • diversity inclusion
  • 4
  • 10
  • inclusion program
  • 4
  • 10
  • professional network
  • 4
  • 10
  • member car
  • 4
  • 10
  • member discount
  • 4
  • 10
  • 2022 car
  • 4
  • 10
  • media center
  • 4
  • 10
  • news releas
  • 4
  • 10
  • learn thrive
  • 4
  • 10
  • na
  • 4
  • 10
  • maker tax reform
  • 3
  • 10
  • tax reform faq
  • 3
  • 10
  • reform faq frequently
  • 3
  • 10
  • faq frequently asked
  • 3
  • 10
  • frequently asked question
  • 3
  • 10
  • asked question tax
  • 3
  • 10
  • question tax cut
  • 3
  • 10
  • tax cut job
  • 3
  • 10
  • cut job act
  • 3
  • 10
  • job act multimedia
  • 3
  • 10
  • act multimedia library
  • 3
  • 10
  • multimedia library webinar
  • 3
  • 10
  • library webinar video
  • 3
  • 10
  • webinar video podcast
  • 3
  • 10
  • video podcast blog
  • 3
  • 10
  • podcast blog car
  • 3
  • 10
  • blog car video
  • 3
  • 10
  • car video webinar
  • 3
  • 10
  • video webinar podcast
  • 3
  • 10
  • webinar podcast publication
  • 3
  • 10
  • podcast publication car
  • 3
  • 10
  • publication car publish
  • 3
  • 10
  • car publish magazine
  • 3
  • 10
  • publish magazine issue
  • 3
  • 10
  • magazine issue newsletter
  • 3
  • 10
  • issue newsletter year
  • 3
  • 10
  • newsletter year newsletter
  • 3
  • 10
  • year newsletter california
  • 3
  • 10
  • newsletter california real
  • 3
  • 10
  • real estate magazine
  • 3
  • 10
  • education meeting event
  • 3
  • 10
  • marketing tool knowledge
  • 3
  • 10
  • tool knowledge center
  • 3
  • 10
  • ml professional standard
  • 3
  • 10
  • time bring home
  • 3
  • 10
  • transaction zipform edition
  • 3
  • 10
  • real estate professional
  • 3
  • 10
  • car legal hotline
  • 3
  • 10
  • ombudsman hotline youre
  • 3
  • 10
  • hotline youre member
  • 3
  • 10
  • youre member resolve
  • 3
  • 10
  • member resolve minor
  • 3
  • 10
  • resolve minor dispute
  • 3
  • 10
  • minor dispute communication
  • 3
  • 10
  • dispute communication issue
  • 3
  • 10
  • communication issue realtor
  • 3
  • 10
  • issue realtor car
  • 3
  • 10
  • realtor car ombudsman
  • 3
  • 10
  • housing affordability index
  • 3
  • 10
  • real estate cas
  • 3
  • 10
  • rising star award
  • 3
  • 10
Result 11
TitleProfessional Licensure Disclosures | Office of the Provost
Urlhttps://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/provost/resources/professional_licensure_disclosures
DescriptionProfessional Licensure Disclosures
Date
Organic Position11
H1
H2Professional Licensure Disclosures
H3
H2WithAnchorsProfessional Licensure Disclosures
Bodyame src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-P43R9T>m_auth=jCHsNovKQBjtTL9y_RXzMQ>m_preview=env-1>m_cookies_win=x" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> Skip Navigation Search Office of the Provost Home About Us About the Provost Staff and Administration Reporting Units Reporting Units Orgchart Provost's Reports Past Provosts Contact Faculty Faculty Pathways Faculty Affairs Awards Travel Grants Information for New Faculty COACHE Survey Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching Emeriti Faculty Budget Budget Overview Contact Budget Manual and Forms Interfolio Faculty Search Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure Faculty 180 Resources Provost's Forms and Policies Academic Program Proposals Nomination Forms Enrollment and Retention Management Academic Affairs Curriculum Review Committee Search/Hire Toolkit Initiatives Provost's Lecture Series Academic Success Diversity General Education Arts and Humanities Initiative Funding SBF Trustees Faculty Awards FAHSS Arts and Humanities Initiative Home Resources Professional Licensure Disclosures Professional Licensure Disclosures. New York State prides itself in the high quality of its licensed and certified professionals.  For the protection of its citizens, each license and certificate has requirements that individuals must meet in order to be licensed or certified in New York State. A number of programs at Stony Brook lead to a professional license or certification that is required for employment. Such programs are carefully designed to meet and exceed these State requirements. Professional licensure/certification requirements vary from state to state, which may affect a student’s ability to apply for a professional license/certification upon the completion of the program. Stony Brook University is a member of the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (NC-SARA), which allows us to provide distance learning programs and coursework to residents of states other than New York. NC-SARA membership, however, does not grant reciprocity or exempt us from state professional licensing requirements. As a result, licensing requirements in New York may not be recognized as sufficient to obtain a license in any other state. The U.S. Department of Education regulation, 34 CFR 668.43 (a) (5) (v), requires an institution to disclose whether the program will fulfill educational requirements for licensure or certification for each state. The administrative departments that offer the programs have made the following determination regarding their curriculum. These disclosures are strictly limited to the SUNY Stony Brook’s determination of whether its programs if successfully completed, would be sufficient to meet the licensure or certification requirements.  Stony Brook University cannot provide verification of an individual’s ability to meet licensure or certification requirements unrelated to its educational programming.  Such individual determinations are made by state licensing boards, and are fact-specific determinations.  Programs leading to certification and their disclosure statements . Educational Leadership Program, School of Professional Development (Advanced Graduate Certificate in Educational Administration or School District Business Leader) More programs will be added to the list shortly, as we work with them on creating professional disclosure statements.   Provost's Personnel Forms and Policies Nomination Forms Professional Licensure Disclosures Provost's Personnel Forms and Policies Nomination Forms Professional Licensure Disclosures Administration 407 Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11794-1401 Phone: (631) 632-7000 Fax: (631) 632-7112 Report an accessibility barrier © Admin Login 2021 Stony Brook University
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • program
  • 11
  • 11
  • professional
  • 11
  • 11
  • state
  • 11
  • 11
  • stony brook
  • 8
  • 11
  • brook
  • 8
  • 11
  • provost
  • 8
  • 11
  • faculty
  • 8
  • 11
  • requirement
  • 8
  • 11
  • form
  • 7
  • 11
  • licensure
  • 7
  • 11
  • disclosure
  • 7
  • 11
  • stony
  • 7
  • 11
  • determination
  • 5
  • 11
  • certification
  • 5
  • 11
  • professional licensure disclosure
  • 4
  • 11
  • stony brook university
  • 4
  • 11
  • professional licensure
  • 4
  • 11
  • licensure disclosure
  • 4
  • 11
  • brook university
  • 4
  • 11
  • individual
  • 4
  • 11
  • york
  • 4
  • 11
  • meet
  • 4
  • 11
  • university
  • 4
  • 11
  • educational
  • 4
  • 11
  • form policy
  • 3
  • 11
  • nomination form
  • 3
  • 11
  • licensure certification
  • 3
  • 11
  • administration
  • 3
  • 11
  • budget
  • 3
  • 11
  • policy
  • 3
  • 11
  • academic
  • 3
  • 11
  • nomination
  • 3
  • 11
  • license
  • 3
  • 11
  • licensing
  • 3
  • 11