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Copywriteroffice - a guide to building a home computer serp result detail
Keyword a guide to building a home computer
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=a+guide+to+building+a+home+computer&oq=a+guide+to+building+a+home+computer&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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how to build a pc for beginnershttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+build+a+PC+for+beginners&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgdEAE
how to build a pc step-by-step with pictureshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=how+to+build+a+pc+step-by-step+with+pictures&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgrEAE
what do you need to build a pchttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=What+do+you+need+to+build+a+PC&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAghEAE
build your own pc ukhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Build+your+own+PC+UK&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgkEAE
desktop computerhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Desktop+computer&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgjEAE
how to build a pc for gaminghttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=How+to+build+a+PC+for+gaming&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgiEAE
build your own pc kithttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Build+your+own+PC+kit&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgmEAE
build a pc onlinehttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Build+a+PC+online&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjng4qzxaL1AhWYq3IEHRBbAkAQ1QJ6BAgeEAE
Result 1
TitleHow To Build A PC - Step by Step (Full Build Guide) - YouTube
Urlhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXaLc9AYIcg
DescriptionA fully in-depth step by step PC build guide. Includes everything from installation of parts, installing Windows OS, installing drivers, XMP Profile setup, W..
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TitleHow to Build a PC: Hardware Suggestions, Instructions, and More | WIRED
Urlhttps://www.wired.com/story/how-to-build-a-pc/
DescriptionBuilding your own computer is a lost art—one due for a revival. We go over the process, from instructions to hardware recommendations
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H1Want a Better PC? Try Building Your Own
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BodyWant a Better PC? Try Building Your OwnAssembling a computer yourself is a good way to learn about how it works.FacebookTwitterEmailSave StoryTo revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.Photograph: Olly Curtis/Getty ImagesIf you've been beating yourself up about doing nothing productive during our never-ending pandemic, stop. Sometimes nothing is exactly what you need. Other times, it’s nice to make something with your own hands. That’s what this guide is about: how to build a PC from scratch.It can be daunting for a lot of reasons—it’s expensive, it’s complex, it can get messy. But I want to be clear: If you can build an Ikea table, bookshelf, bed, or anything that comes in more than one of those deceivingly heavy flat packs, you can build a PC. The tricky part? I can't tell you how to build your PC. Not really. Not unless I know exactly which hardware you're using. I can, however, explain what each component does and what my recommendations are for each category. Once you’ve built your shiny new PC, it might be time to check out some other stuff to further accessorize your new partner in crime. Be sure to have a look at our guides for the best gaming keyboards, best gaming mice, best gaming headsets, and best gaming controllers. Updated October 2021: We've added new hardware in the motherboard, storage, case, and cooler categories, and updated buying advice. Special offer for Gear readers: Get a 1-year subscription to WIRED for $5 ($25 off). This includes unlimited access to WIRED.com and our print magazine (if you'd like). Subscriptions help fund the work we do every day.If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission. Learn more. What Do You Need?No matter what your experience level is, you should use PCPartPicker. It not only has everything you need to buy, it also lets you build your PC piece by piece right on the website, making sure all your hardware will play nicely together. It even has a few example builds you can tweak to your liking.Regardless of what kind of PC you’re building (home office or gaming), the components you need are going to be the same. You’ll need a motherboard, a  central processing unit (CPU), storage, memory, a power supply, a case, and a monitor. The only thing you might not need if you're mostly using this PC for home-office tasks is a GPU (graphics processing unit), but it's necessary for photo or video editing and gaming. That’s a lot of stuff, so what follows is a little breakdown of what each component does, along with some hardware recommendations. Before diving in, you should know that there’s a worldwide shortage of PC components right now, particularly with graphics cards, and prices overall keep rising. If parts aren’t available, the best advice we can give is to wait. Things will eventually get back to normal. MotherboardEvery other component plugs into this circuit board. It’s the highway they use to communicate and collaborate. They come in different sizes and configurations, and each one looks a little different, but they all fill the same function. One thing to look out for: Make sure you know which processor you want to go with before you buy a motherboard. Motherboards come in a couple of flavors, but the most important thing to know is what kind of socket it has. There are basically two: LGA and AM. You'll always see them listed with a number after them, like “LGA1150” or “AM3.” The exact numbers after the LGA and AM portions of these socket names will change over time, to indicate which generation of Intel or AMD chips they support, but the current standards as of 2021 (which will work with the latest chips from either maker) are LGA1200 for Intel and AM4 for AMD. Motherboards also come in a couple of sizes, the most common being ATX (or “full size”). That’s what I generally recommend, especially if this is your first build. Your PC case will list which size motherboard it supports, so make sure they match up.Suggested HardwareASUS ROG Strix B450-F (AM4 Socket): For a rig designed for 1080p gaming, start here.MSI MPG Z490 (LGA 1200 Socket): This one is great for Intel processors and mid-tier machines.MSI Prestige X570 Creation (AM4 Socket): If you're building a high-end machine, go for the X570 Creation edition.ASUS ROG Maximus Hero (LGA 1200 Socket): As its name suggests, this is a high-performance motherboard for gaming machines. If you're picking up an Intel i9 processor, this is our recommendation.MSI MPG Z590 GAMING CARBON WIFI ATX (LGA 1200 Socket): This motherboard is intuitive to use and lends a badass carbon-fiber feel to your overall build. There are plenty of dedicated RGB options for fans and other lighting, and the metal heat sinks tie your whole aesthetic together.Processor (CPU)This is the brain of your computer. It sockets directly into the motherboard, and it’s the single most important component of your PC. That doesn’t mean it has to be the most expensive (we’ll get to that later). If the CPU doesn't mention including thermal paste, make sure to get some. Don't eat your CPU. I know it looks tasty, but it's not actually food. Suggested HardwareAMD Ryzen 3 3200G 4-Core 3.6 GHz: Since 1080p gaming isn't particularly CPU-intensive, this is a good all-around choice. It pairs well with the included Wraith cooler, but the CoolerMaster Hyper 212 is also a good choice.Intel Core i5-11400 6-Core 2.6 GHz: Intel's latest i5 offerings are a great choice for everyday workloads and won't get bogged down by your games, as long as you have the GPU horsepower to pull most of that weight. It's also available at Amazon.Intel Core i7-10700K 8-Core 3.8 GHz: An Intel i7 will see you through most heavy workday tasks and 4K gaming. It works well with an NZXT Kraken M22 Liquid Cooler.Intel Core i9-11900K 8-Core 3.5 GHz: Intel's high-end gaming option, the 11th-gen Core i9, is an incredibly versatile performer. This thing pushes games to their absolute limit and shreds content creation workloads.Ryzen 9 5950X 16-core 3.4 GHz: AMD's 16-core behemoth is a killer CPU for high-end 4K or 144-Hz gaming, but it can be hard to find right now. Use it with NZXT's Kraken X72 Liquid Cooler.Graphics Card (GPU)If you’ll be playing games on this PC, you’ll need a graphics processing unit (also called a graphics card). This is a specialized processor that’s designed and optimized for handling visual data like the graphics in games. It's also used in video and photo editing and other graphics-intensive tasks. These cards are tough to find in stock (or at a reasonable price) at the moment, so you may have to wait a while.Suggested HardwareMSI GeForce RTX 2060: If you're looking to get into medium- to high-end gaming, this card strikes a good balance between power and price.Asus ROG Strix RTX 3060: Nvidia’s 30-series graphics cards are often out of stock due to the global chip shortage, but if you can find one for a reasonable price, the RTX 3060 is a killer 1080p and 1440p gaming graphics card.Radeon RX 6600: The RX 6600 is a really solid pick for 1080p gaming on an AMD chip.Radeon RX 6800 XT: If you're going all-out, the RX 6800 XT is my top choice right now. It's a beast of a GPU that can handle anything you throw at it. Even Cyberpunk 2077 at full 4K resolution.StorageThis is your PC’s walk-in closet. This is where you store all your files, your games, your movies, your documents, your photos, your everything. You can always add more storage later.Suggested HardwareWestern Digital Black 1TB PCIe Internal SSD: This lightning-fast NVMe drive is a good option for nearly any gaming system. It has incredible read and write speeds of up to 7,000 and 5,300 megabytes per second respectively, making it fast enough to not only store all of your games, but possibly your operating system as well. It's also available in M.2 varieties.Samsung 980 Pro M.2 SSD: Samsung's M.2 drives are always a good choice. They're quick, durable, and itty-bitty (about the size of a stick of gum), so they can pair with just about any other internal SSD you'd like. Most motherboards have an M.2 slot either on the front of the board or around back, and you don't even have to mess with any cables. This one clocks in at around 6,980 MB/s read speed, and 4,876 MB/s write speed.Samsung 970 Evo M.2 SSD: The Evo line is cheaper though a bit slower, but it's still an excellent buy for any build. This M.2 drive tops out at around 3,500 MB/s read speed and 3,300 MB/s write speed. Slower than others on this list but still pretty quick—quick enough for gaming for sure. If you're on a budget, go with the Evo.Corsair MP600 M.2 SSD: Corsair's MP600 drive comes with a built-in heat sink to keep temperatures down while it transfers your data at blazing speeds. It features a 4,950 MB/s read speed and 4,250 MB/s write speed.WD Blue 1-TB Internal SSD: It's reasonably quick, with plenty of storage space but with max read speeds of 560 MB/S and write speeds of 530 MB/s, this Wester Digital model is better for a secondary storage drive—not the one you run games or your operating system off of.Memory (RAM)You’ll see a lot of the same terms when you’re looking at memory and storage, but they’re very different. Memory is more like that one table you toss things on to deal with later. It’s scratch paper; it’s short-term. It’s very important, though, because software uses memory to cache (temporarily store) data in a place it can be retrieved very quickly.Suggested HardwareCorsair Vengeance LPX 16-GB 288-Pin RAM: High-end gaming rigs always go for 32 or 64 gigabytes of RAM, but a good old pair of 8-GB sticks will see you through most 1080p games and everyday tasks.G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32-GB 288-Pin RAM: With this much RAM, you should be pretty well set for everyday tasks and gaming.Corsair Dominator Platinum 64-GB 288-Pin RAM: If you need extra heft for content creation or high-end gaming, consider stepping up to 64 GB of RAM.Power Supply (PSU)Your power supply unit is a little box that keeps the electricity running to every component. It determines how quick and powerful your PC can be. The faster it is, the more power it needs, and you always want to have a little more than you need, just in case. Just like GPUs, PSUs are also in and out of stock right now.Suggested HardwareEVGA SuperNOVA 750 GA Power Supply: You should always err on the side of having more power than you need, and this unit will provide exactly that.NZXT E850 850-Watt Power Supply: This 850-watt power supply should provide enough horsepower to run even the most high-end and demanding builds.EVGA SuperNOVA 1,000-Watt Power Supply: For PCs with multiple graphics cards or a whole lot of storage, EVGA's 1,000-watt PSU is a good pick.Case & CoolerYour case is just what it sounds like. It’s a metal box. It might be covered in glass panels and etched aluminum, but inside it’s just a big metal box that holds everything together. Make sure you match it up with your motherboard size. For example, if you have an ATX motherboard, you need an ATX (or “full-size”) case. Suggested HardwareCorsair Obsidian Series ATX Full Tower: There are lots of kinds of cases: Some are super small, others are enormous. And your decision will ultimately come down to the design you like as much as anything else. If you're unsure what to get, this one is great for your first build. Other case manufacturers we like are NZXT, Fractal, Phanteks, Cooler Master, and Lian Li.NZXT H710i ATX Mid-Tower: This is one of my faves. It has a slick aesthetic and slightly compact silhouette without compromising cooling capability or accessibility.MSI Gungnir 100 ATX Mid-Tower Case: This budget-friendly case is a solid option for most people. Be aware that it'll be a tight fit—there's almost no wiggle room for bulky cables or hyperspecific configurations. It looks nicer than you'd think for the money, and the RGB button syncs up your lights with very little effort. The smokey tempered glass allows them to shine through without turning your office into an EDM show.MSI MAG CoreLiquid 360R 78.73 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler: This beast of a liquid cooler can be tricky to fit in, so figure out where you want to place it before you start your build. The RGB fans are bright and gorgeous, and the heat sink has a rotating dragon emblem that can be customized using a 3D printer. More important, the cooler is nearly silent, and it kept temps in their ideal range (or lower) even when pushing my rig to the limit.Operating SystemWhen you build a PC, you don't automatically have Windows included. You'll have to buy a license from Microsoft or another vendor and make a USB key to install it. Or you can check out the newly released Windows 11: here’s a little more information about what all you get out of the newest version of Windows.Putting It All Together. We’re not going too far into the weeds here, because the internals of every PC are a little different, but in general, here’s how you should go about putting all these components together.First, prep yourself a clean workspace. This can be a dining room table, a cleared-off desk—just any surface big enough for your case to lay flat on its side, with ample room around it for the rest of your components. You’ll also need a Phillips-head screwdriver that will fit the screws on your case. When you put these parts together, be sure to discharge any static buildup and work on a nonmetallic surface like a wood table. Or you could just assemble the motherboard on top of the cardboard box it comes in.Most of the components you bought are going to come with instruction manuals; keep them handy. We’re going to start with the motherboard, so open up the instruction manual to the installation page. It can be pretty intimidating—there’s a lot to look at—but think of all this as a big Lego set. Each piece fits into each other piece. For the motherboard, your first job is going to be seating your CPU.Installing Your CPUDepending on what kind of CPU you purchased (Intel or AMD), the chip will have either little prongs on one side (don’t touch them) or little golden contacts on one side (don’t touch them). Seriously, don’t touch that side of your chip. Oils from your fingertips can damage the contacts, or you might bend a pin. Do either one and your processor becomes nothing more than an expensive hunk of silicon.Seating your processor is pretty easy. First, double-check your motherboard’s instructions and make sure you’ve unlocked the processor socket. It’ll be a big square with a bunch of little holes (or contacts), with a lever or button beside it. Your motherboard’s instructions will say explicitly how to unlock the socket so you can put your processor in without any issues.Once you’ve confirmed that it’s unlocked and ready, just find which corner of your processor has a little golden triangle and line it up with the same symbol on your motherboard’s processor socket. Gently lower the processor into the socket, then gently flip the latch or locking mechanism. You shouldn’t have to fight it. If you have to press really hard, double-check that the processor is socketed correctly.Next, you’re going to need your thermal paste. That little tiny plastic syringe of silvery goo is very important for this next step. Now that your processor is seated, take a look at the shiny square of silicon in the center of it. That’s where your heat sink is going to sit. Your processor came with a heat sink, and on one side of it, you’ll see a copper circle. You’re going to be putting the heat sink directly on top of the processor after we apply the thermal paste, with the silicone square and the copper circle lining up perfectly.Go ahead and carefully squeeze a tiny ball (no bigger than a pea) of thermal paste onto the silicon square on your processor. You’ll want it as close to the center as you can get.Now line up your heat sink with the screws surrounding your processor, and gently lower it into place. You’re gonna squish the thermal paste, and the goal here is to create a thin layer covering the back of your processor. It’s OK if it oozes a little bit, but if it oozes out and over the edge of the processor, you used too much. Get some isopropyl alcohol, dab it on a lint-free wipe, and wipe the processor and heat sink. Wait till they’re thoroughly dry and try again.If it looks all right, screw your heat sink into place. Flip back to your motherboard instruction book and find the right place near the processor socket to plug in your heat sink’s cooling fan. It should be very close to your processor socket. Once you’ve found it, plug it in—congratulations, you just installed a CPU. This was the hardest part, and it’s over, good job.Installing Your Storage and MemoryMemory is maybe the easiest thing to install. See those vertical little sockets beside the CPU? Line up your sticks of RAM and slot them in, starting from the left-hand slot. They’ll lock into place once you’ve seated them properly. If you have two sticks of RAM, make sure to skip a slot between them. Your motherboard manual should say which slots to use.For your hard drive or solid-state drive (SSD), find an empty bay in the front-facing part of your case. Slide your drive in and screw it into place. If you have an M.2 drive (a tiny SSD about the size of a stick of gum), there should be a place on the motherboard where you slot it in directly. Check out your motherboard’s manual to see where the M.2 slot is if you can't find it.Installing Your Motherboard and Power SupplyThe rest of this is formulaic. Start by putting your motherboard into your case. Consult your motherboard’s instructions, line up the screw holes in the case with the ones on your motherboard, and get to work.Next, you’ll want to install your power supply. There should be a spot for it near the top or bottom of the case, a big square spot that will fit your supply perfectly. If you’re having trouble finding it, look at the back of your case: There’ll be a big empty square. That’s where the power supply goes (and where you’ll plug in your PC when you’re all done). Once you've found its home, slot it in and screw it into place.Make sure all the snaky cables coming out of the power supply will reach your motherboard with room to spare. Don’t plug in anything yet; we’re going to come back to the power supply in a bit.Installing Your Graphics CardYour GPU is going to be pretty big. Even a modestly powerful GPU like the GTX 1060 is large compared to your other components. That means how it fits into your case is important. Once you put your GPU in there, space is going to start getting tight.Flip open your motherboard’s instruction book again and look for a PCIe slot. It’s going to be a horizontal slot with a little plastic latch beside it, near the middle or bottom of your motherboard. That’s where the GPU plugs in. All you need to do is identify the back of your GPU (the side with the HDMI and DisplayPorts), line that up with the back of your case, and push the GPU into the horizontal slot. It should lock into place easily enough, and if it doesn’t, make sure you’re inserting it correctly.Find another one of those tiny little screws and fasten your GPU to the case. There’s a little spot for that on the same piece of metal with the HDMI ports. It should be easy to find.Now, take a look at the cables coming out of your power supply. There should be a few that look like they could fit into the square (or rectangular) socket on the side of your GPU. It should look like six or eight little holes in a rectangle shape. If you’re having trouble, take a look at this video from hardware manufacturer Asus. Some of the specifics will be different, but it’s a great look at how to install a GPU.Ribbon CablesThe motherboard needs to be hooked into all your devices. The power supply unit I used in this build is what's called fully modular, which means that you can select the cables you need and leave the rest off to eliminate clutter. Otherwise, power supplies have a ton of cables, and you'll have to deal with the unused power connections dangling inside your case. You'll need to connect the PSU to the SSD and the motherboard.You also need to plug the motherboard into your case—the power buttons, audio plugs, and USB ports on the front of your case. There are special headers for each kind of plug scattered around the board, so you'll want to check your manual for the location and function of each grouping of pins. These tiny pins need to be plugged in a certain way, and they're unbelievably minuscule. There's also a hookup for the case's fan—in the case I used there was one header on the motherboard but three fans installed. Then there's the SATA cable for your SSD, which plugs into the motherboard.This part of your build really depends on the hardware you purchased, so consult the manuals for each component to ensure you've correctly plugged it into your motherboard and the power supply.Boot It Up and Install WindowsThe final stage of your build is a simple one: Hit your power button. If the PC whirs to life, you probably put it together perfectly! If it doesn't, don't despair. There are a lot of potential problems that could cause a PC to fail to boot up for the first time. This video from Kingston goes over some pitfalls that might cause you some headaches, so if you're not able to boot your PC, give it a watch and retrace your steps. There's also a chance you could have received faulty components. This video goes over some tips on how to check your parts. In general, if you’re having trouble with a specific component, YouTube is your friend. There are tons of helpful PC-building tutorials.If it started up just fine, the next step is super easy: Turn it off. Remember that Windows flash drive you made earlier? Plug it into the PC and boot it up again. If you set it up right, your computer should just do its thing and get started installing Windows. If not, you might need to open your BIOS (check your motherboard's manual for how to do that) and set the USB drive to be a "boot device" first. Here's a brief rundown of that process (start at step 3).You Did It!Congratulations on building your first PC. It's a bit of a pain, but it's a great way to spend an afternoon. Or a couple of days, depending on how many unforeseen headaches you run into. Seeing as the pandemic hasn’t totally gone away, you can use your new PC to help you spend all those extra indoor hours productively (or just grinding out loot in Warframe).More Great WIRED Stories📩 The latest on tech, science, and more: Get our newsletters!Weighing Big Tech's promise to Black AmericaAlcohol is the breast cancer risk no on wants to talk aboutHow to get your family to use a password managerA true story about bogus photos of fake newsThe best iPhone 13 cases and accessories👁️ Explore AI like never before with our new database🎮 WIRED Games: Get the latest tips, reviews, and more🏃🏽‍♀️ Want the best tools to get healthy? Check out our Gear team’s picks for the best fitness trackers, running gear (including shoes and socks), and best headphonesJess Grey is a product reviewer at WIRED, covering all those devices that make your life easier—and sometimes much more difficult. Since her first byline in Dragon Magazine to her more recent work at Digital Trends, she’s covered a little bit of everything from crime, courts, and patent filings to... Read moreWriter and ReviewerTwitterLouryn Strampe is a product writer and reviewer at WIRED covering a little bit of everything. She especially loves discounts, video games … and discounted video games. She previously wrote for Future PLC and Rakuten. She currently resides in northern Illinois with two fluffy cats.Writer and ReviewerTwitterTopicshow-toComputersShoppingHardwarevideo gamesPCsWIRED COUPONS. Finish Line$10 off $100 Student Finish Line promo codeHotwireSign for newsletter to get a $10 off Hotwire promo codeKohl'sExtra 30% off - Kohl's coupon codeJCPenneyJCPenney coupon: Up to 60% off + extra 20% offNordVPNNordVPN coupon: 72% off 2-year planAT&T InternetAT&T Internet promo code - $50 reward with AT&T Fiber
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TitleHow to build a PC: a step-by-step guide to building the best PC | TechRadar
Urlhttps://www.techradar.com/uk/how-to/how-to-build-a-pc
DescriptionLet us show you how to build a PC the right way, before you the plunge into the world’s most adult form of expensive lego
Date22 Oct 2021
Organic Position4
H1How to build a PC: a step-by-step guide to building the best PC
H2It's easier than you might think
What kind of PC do you need?
Tools of the trade
It’s time, to build. Finally
Step by step
H3
H2WithAnchorsIt's easier than you might think
What kind of PC do you need?
Tools of the trade
It’s time, to build. Finally
Step by step
BodyHow to build a PC: a step-by-step guide to building the best PC By Jackie Thomas published 22 October 21 It's easier than you might think. It might be hard sourcing PC components right now, but learning how to build a PC is still a fulfilling task, regardless of what the best graphics cards are going for right now. The process actually remains the same - you need to research and choose the components that will make up the best PC you’re trying to put together. After all, you want a PC that you can show off with pride.If you’ve never built a PC before, it can be a scary undertaking, especially considering that it is a good amount of work. Though a lot of people act like it’s an easy task building a gaming PC, you might find it a discouraging process your first time around. And, that’s okay. And, before you get too down about any issues you’re facing, we’re here to help. We’ve built quite a few PCs and have used our expertise to put together this step-by-step guide so you can build your PC in no time. We’ll make it as painless as possible and take you from beginning to end. Where to buy an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080What is RAM?These are the best CPUs for your PC from Intel and AMD(Image credit: DisobeyArt / Shutterstock)What kind of PC do you need?These days, basically everyone needs a decent PC to get through life, but they come in so many shapes and sizes that it's important to know what you're trying to build before you even get started. For instance, if you're just going to be using your PC to do daily office work – like web browsing or writing up documents – you don't need to drop thousands of dollars on a fancy gaming rig. Building a PC with something like the AMD Ryzen 5 5600G will get you a quick and responsive PC that will last you years, with enough graphics horsepower to get you through all tasks that most people experience on a day-to-day basis. However, there are plenty of people that need something with a bit more oomph. Computers are legitimately more powerful now than they've ever been, and there's never been more options to build something that will tear through the best PC games like they were so much paper. But, powerful hardware like the Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 and the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X come at a high price. Luckily, if you're on more of a budget, you can get something like an Intel Core i5-11600K and an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060 (if you can find one in stock at a decent price, that is), and have an incredible 1080p gaming machine. And, that will be able to get some video editing done on the side too. Tools of the trade. Although a single phillips screwdriver is all you need to construct a PC, you may want a few more things on hand just in case. For example, needle nose pliers or a simple pair of tweezers may come in handy to place screws into tight places or retrieve them. Zip ties are useful for tidying up all your PC cables and luckily, you most likely won’t have to buy them as they often come included with several different types of computer parts. You’ll also need a pair of side cutters (or just scissors) to cut those said zip ties.You can’t go wrong with an anti-static wrist strap, either – though you can get away with not having one. Unless you’ve been running around on carpet all day, or have cats, you likely aren’t holding enough static charge to damage the electronics. Just do yourself a favor and discharge any latent electricity by placing your hand on metal, like your PC case or power supply.As for your workspace, you’re going to want to clear off a good bit of table space, as you'll likely be flipping your PC on its side, feet, back and any which way to install everything. And, before we forget, it’s a good idea to get a monitor, keyboard and mouse set up before you start building, so you have something to plug it into when the building is done. You should also have a power socket and internet connection available.It’s hard to find a modern build with an optical drive these days, so put the Windows 10 installer onto a USB stick (we’ll show you how). If you can’t find a handy thumb drive and a laptop, we would cannibalize an older rig for a CD drive, or even just buy one – you can find them online for less than 10 bucks these days.  It’s time, to build. Finally.After spending weeks coming up with a list of PC components, waiting anxiously for them to go on sale, and getting them delivered to your door, it’s time. You’ve got a phillips head screwdriver in hand, and you’re ready to go.Now for the purposes of our PC building guide, we’ve used these following parts as an example of how to build a complete computer. These components are also exactly what you need to construct an modest – if a little last generation – gaming PC. Step by step. 1. Strip down First thing you’ll want to do is strip the case down as far as you can go. Remove every panel that you can, and store them in a safe place (inside the case box is the best bet). We recommend using a bowl (or a magnetic parts tray if you want to be fancy) to hold your screws throughout your PC building process.2. Fan-tasticIf you’ve purchased some replacement or extra cooling fans, now is the time to install them where you need them. Try to keep your cooling setup balanced, so there’s as much air being drawn in, as is being blown out. In case you’re not sure which way the wind will go, the plastic fan guards usually denotes where the air will come through.Typically you want two fans in the front drawing air in and at least one in the rear blowing air out. You could also screw one or two more optional fans into the roof of the PC case for additional exhaust, if your PC case has mounting points for them.3. Mobo InstallationBefore we get to install the motherboard, you’ll want to check on a few things about your PC case. Check for pre-installed motherboard standoffs, ensure the number and arrangement of them conforms to the holes found on your motherboard. Secondly, see if your PC case has a  large CPU cutout or window cut into the back of the motherboard frame. If it doesn’t you may want to install any CPU cooler backplates and M.2 solid-state drives at this juncture.Now that’s done, first find your motherboard’s rear I/O shield, and push it into the rectangular slot in the back of your PC case. Make sure it’s right side up by matching the pattern of cutouts to the arrangement of ports on the back of your motherboard. Next, lay your motherboard down inside the chassis – carefully lining up its rear ports with the corresponding holes in the I/O shield you just installed – on top of the standoffs installed in your chassis.Then it’s a simply case of securing the motherboard down with the screws that came with your chassis. Make sure you use the right ones here, as you don’t want to thread the standoffs, in case you need to remove it at a later date.4. CPU InstallationNext up, socket your CPU into the motherboard. Here’s where things are a little different depending on which processor family and/or brand you decided to go with.For Intel mainstream CPUs, slide the spring loaded retention arm out and up, then lift the bracket up leaving the plastic cover in place. Then, gently place your CPU inside the socket, matching the golden triangle located on the bottom left corner of the processor, with the triangle on the socket bracket. For the next step, you should slide the securing bracket back into its original position so it locks in place underneath the screw, and secure the retention arm back down. During this process the protective plastic cover should pop off, so don't freak out if it comes flying at you. Be sure to stow the cover away in a safe place as it'll protect the motherboard's sensitive pins if you decide to remove the processor from the motherboard. If you’re installing an AMD CPU, fortunately installation is much less daunting. There’s no bracket here, simply lift the retention arm in its raised position.You should then take your processor and match the golden triangle on the corner of the Ryzen processor with the triangle on the socket. Once the pins on the bottom of the processor lineup with the holes on the socket, drop it into place. Give it a little nudge to make sure it’s secure, then lower the retention arm back down and lock it into place.Processor installation done, whew.5. Memory MattersNext on the agenda is installing computer memory. Push down the latches at either ends of the DDR4 slots on your motherboard. Then line up the notch on the bottom of the memory with the notch in the slot. After that, you can install the memory by carefully pushing down both sides of the memory into the slot. You should hear a clicking sound as the memory secures into place and the latches click back up. Make sure you use the farthest and second closest slot from the CPU if you’re only using two memory sticks. Complete that and you’ll be good to go.6. Cooler mountingHere's the last complicate piece in the PC building process, CPU coolers.Most third-party coolers require installing a backplate, which you may or may not have already done from step three of our PC building guide. Each individual cooler will have its own set of instructions your should follow, but the gist of most installations requires affixing a backplate and threading four pins though back of your motherboard. From there you’ll want to thermal paste if your CPU cooler didn’t come with any pre-applied already. Users will want to squeeze out a small blob, around the size of half a pea, onto the middle of the CPU. This will spread out once your cooler is mounted, and provide a sufficient amount of thermal interface material to successfully transfer heat from the processor die to the cooler of your choosing.For air coolers, you’ll want to install most models with the fans unattached. Carefully orient the heatsink onto the pins or threads of the mounting plate and secure in place with any provided thumb screws or regular screws. After that it’s simply a case of reattaching the fan to the tower, and plugging the 4-pin PWM fan header into the CPU Fan slot on the motherboard. Liquid-coolers follow basically the same process, but require more upfront work. You'll probably have to attach fans onto the radiator and installing it into your PC case in advance. Depending on which liquid-cooler you’re using, you may also need to plug in a second four-pin cable into a dedicated AIO cooler or optional cooler header on your motherboard.This is also a good opportunity to plug in the rest of your system fans into any available slots on the board. Or alternatively, if your PC case has an integrated fan controller at the back of the chassis to route all your fans into, then directly onto the motherboard. It’ll also need to connect to the motherboard via USB header.7. Storage installationOnce memory is in, it’s time to focus on some non-volatile memory storage, hard drives and solid-state drives. Our NZXT H400i happens to have a small SSD bracket on the front. Installing 2.5-inch drives into these caddies is a cinch, as you can simply slide it into place with the option of fully securing it with four screws. Most modern PC cases comes with SSD bays of some sort. But if you’re case doesn’t, the 3.5-inch drive caddies typically reserved for hard drives should have compatible mounting points. No matter what type of storage drive you’re installing, ensure the connection ports are facing towards a cable cut-out inside your chassis as it will make routing cables easier.8. PSU positioningNow you’ve got your motherboard, CPU and memory installed you’re going to want to install your power supply next. If you’ve got a modular PSU, figure out what cables you need ahead of time, and plug them into your power supply first. If your PC case comes with a PSU bracket, remove it ahead of time and attach it to the back of the unit. Next up thread the cables through the PSU slot in the back of the case first, and then slide the PSU into place, securing the bracket back onto the chassis. Otherwise, on older cases you’ll have to slip in the power supply in through the inside of the chassis and push it firmly against the inside wall as you attach it with four screws. Depending on the design of your case, you’ll want to orient the fan towards ventilation areas built into it. For most cases we suggest facing the fan downwards or to the side away from the interior of your PC. This way, your PSU can draw in fresh air and exhaust heat through the back.9. All the buttonsTo get your front I/O power buttons working properly, you need to plug in the correct cables. Fortunately, on our NZXT H400i, this is a single block that plugs directly onto the front I/O headers on the motherboard, make sure you orient it the correct way, then push it into place on the pins.For everyone else, take the individual pins, and, using the motherboard installation handbook, identify which pins and cables need connecting. Try to do this part gently do, so as to not to bend the pins. It’s important to note that any LED lights (HDD and Power), need to be oriented correctly, with the + and - cables installed into the + and - pins on the board.It’s also a good time to plug in your USB 3.0 header, USB 2.0 header, and audio passthrough. Audio is located on the bottom left of most motherboards. It will be labelled, and the pin outs will be different to the USB 2.0 headers. Install your USB 3.0 cables (denoted with a blue-colored end) into any available slots on the board, making sure to lineup the pins with the holes in the USB 3.0 cables.10. Cable conundruming Now you can plug in the rest of your power cables. Identify your 8-pin EPS cable, and slide it up the back of the chassis, through the cable grommet and plug it into the 8 pin power slot at the top of the motherboard. Then, find the bulkier 24-pin cable, slide that through any cable routing recesses on the chassis and plug it into the corresponding 24-pin ATX power port on the motherboard. Next up, take your SATA power and connect it to any storage drives. If you happen to have a something mounted onto the front of the case, run this SATA power cable through the PSU shroud, appropriate grommets or holes, and into your front mounted 2.5-inch drive. This is a good opportunity to plug in the SATA Data cables between any storage drives and the motherboard as well. Lastly, you’ll want to thread your PCIe power cable through the cutout in the PSU cover or any side grommets/holes, so that it’s ready for when you install your GPU.11. Graphically soundFinally we have the last piece of the puzzle to slot into place. First take a look at your motherboard and locate the PCIe slot closest to your processor. From there locate the two PCIe slots next to where you’ll want to install your GPU and remove them. In most PC cases, that’ll involve undoing two screws on the PCIe slot covers and removing them.Take your graphics card out of the anti-static bag and line it up with the slots we just opened up. The rear I/O on the GPU should be facing out the back of the chassis. Once the gold contacts on your GPU make are touching the PCIe slot, gently push it into place until you hear a click. Then use the same screws we removed from the PCIe slot cover to secure the GPU into place.Then it’s simply a case of plugging your PCIe power that you routed in with our last step – and we have a fully built PC (mostly).12. Into BIOSNow the system’s built, don’t reattach all your panels just yet. First you’ll want to make sure it actually turns on and runs properly.Take your temporarily built tower over to your pre-setup computer space and plug it into power, a screen, keyboard and mouse too. Power it on, and mash the delete key to get into the BIOS screen. Check your CPU temp, make sure that’s operating somewhere around 30-40 degrees C, and ensure that your boot drive is registering correctly.If everything is showing up, now is also a good time to enable the XMP for Intel or DOCP for AMD to make sure your memory is operating at the correct frequency. Then hit F10, save and exit. Then power off.13. Tidying upNow that we’re sure the machine is working, disconnect it again and bring it back to your workspace. It’s worth doing this because you’ll want to reattach all those PC case panels and tidy up any loose cables. That means using cable ties to bunch together cables as much as you can. Most PC cases come to cable cut-outs to use as tie down points. Where they’re aren’t any, we usually use thicker cables to help push smaller ones flush against the inside of our computer chassis.14. Installing WindowsBring the system back to your computer space, where it’ll sit forever – or at least until your next upgrade – as we’ll want to install the operating system next.Most modern rigs lack an optical drive to install your OS, so you’ll need to create a USB install on another PC. To do this, download the Windows 10 Media Creation Kit and then install Windows 10 onto an USB stick with at least 8GB of space. Then, once it’s finished, simply plug it into your new system. Go back into your BIOS to tell your system to boot from the USB stick first. From there you can go through the prompts to install the operating system onto your new rig. Don’t worry about not having a software key during installation, you can activate Windows 10 once you reach desktop.15. Desktop maintenanceOnce you’re finally logged on, head on over to the manufacturer’s website, find your motherboard, head to service, and download the correct chipset drivers for your system. Ninite is a nifty tool to get all the programs you want fast without having to worry about installing each one individually is. On the Ninite site, you can select which programs you want, download the installer and let it run its magic. After that, go download and install the correct graphics driver for your card and you’ll be all set to sit back and enjoy. Jackie Thomas Jackie Thomas (Twitter) is TechRadar's US computing editor. She is fat, queer and extremely online. Computers are the devil, but she just happens to be a satanist. If you need to know anything about computing components, PC gaming or the best laptop on the market, don't be afraid to drop her a line on Twitter or through email. See more how-to articles
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TitleHow to Build a PC From Scratch: A Beginners' Guide | Digital Trends
Urlhttps://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/how-to-build-a-pc/
DescriptionYou don't need a degree to learn how to build a PC. Our guide walks you through the process step by step, with plenty of helpful tips along the way
Date
Organic Position5
H1How to build a PC
H2Getting Started
Safety First
Opening the case
How to install the power supply
How to install the processor
How to install RAM
How to install the motherboard
How to install the CPU cooler
How to install the graphics card
How to install expansion cards
How to install hard drives and SSDs
Double-check everything
Turn the PC on
H3Difficulty
Duration
What You Need
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H2WithAnchorsGetting Started
Safety First
Opening the case
How to install the power supply
How to install the processor
How to install RAM
How to install the motherboard
How to install the CPU cooler
How to install the graphics card
How to install expansion cards
How to install hard drives and SSDs
Double-check everything
Turn the PC on
BodyHow to build a PC By Jon Martindale December 15, 2021 Share Learning how to build a PC is easier than you might think. The process mostly involves screwing in the right screws and connecting the right cables, so as long as you're careful with your components and take the proper safety precautions, you can build your own PC. We've broken down the process into a series of easy-to-follow steps. From gathering your components to putting on the finishing touches, our guide will walk you through how to easily build a PC. ContentsGetting StartedSafety FirstOpening the caseHow to install the power supplyHow to install the processorHow to install RAMHow to install the motherboardHow to install the CPU coolerHow to install the graphics cardHow to install expansion cardsHow to install hard drives and SSDsDouble-check everythingTurn the PC on Difficulty . Moderate Duration . 2 hours What You Need . Compatible PC components, screwdriver, clear surface ContentsGetting StartedSafety FirstOpening the caseHow to install the power supplyHow to install the processorHow to install RAMHow to install the motherboardHow to install the CPU coolerHow to install the graphics cardHow to install expansion cardsHow to install hard drives and SSDsDouble-check everythingTurn the PC on Getting Started. This guide is all about piecing components together to create a functional machine. If you haven’t selected and purchased all the required hardware, make sure you do that first. Also make sure that it's all compatible, and that it will fit inside whatever case you want to build it in. Before you dig in, ensure there’s a clean workspace with plenty of room to open boxes and put parts together, preferably a desk at a comfortable height for working on. Safety First. There’s an invisible risk when building a computer that threatens even the most powerful system: Static electricity. The same force that lets you shock your friends when you wear wool socks can also fry components in a heartbeat. Fortunately, static is easy to all but eliminate with a few simple steps. One simple solution is to purchase an antistatic wristband. One end wraps around your wrist, and the other clips somewhere on the computer case, keeping the wearer constantly grounded. Touching the case frequently with the PSU plugged in and powered off achieves the same effect. Make sure you're building your PC in a room with a bare floor if you can — carpets generate a lot of static — and wear rubber-soled shoes rather than socks. Many components ship in antistatic bags, so leave them bagged until just before installation. Opening the case. Preparing the case is the easy part. Instructions for the specific case you purchased should introduce you to its basic layout, as well as list special instructions regarding component installation. Lay down the case in your work area and remove the side panel. For most PC cases, this means the left-side panel when viewed from the front. This panel provides access to the case interior. Also, remove anything that’s dangling inside the case. If it’s attached, push it aside. Many cases have permanent internal wiring that becomes problematic later on. Before we start putting everything together, we’ll first install the power supply and then set the case aside for a few minutes. How to install the power supply. The first component to make its way into the case should be the power supply (PSU). It is typically located at the rear of the case, usually in the bottom or top corner. Consult your case’s manual if you have trouble finding the proper location. Step 1: Place your power supply in the mounting position. Most cases are designed for the PSU to be installed with the fan facing down, letting it pull cool air from outside the case, but check your manual if you're unsure. Step 2: Attach it to your case using appropriate screws, or thumb screws. Step 3: If your power supply is a modular PSU, plug in the power cables that you need for your various components. If you're not sure, though, don't worry, you can plug them in later as and when needed. If your PSU is not modular, you'll have all the cables already installed. How to install the processor. Although you don't have to, it's a good idea to install the processor before you put the motherboard in the case, as access is far easier. Step 1: Carefully remove the motherboard from its antistatic bag and set it on a hard, flat, nonmetal surface such as a wooden desk, or the top of the motherboard box itself. Also, make sure there are no sources of dust or liquid nearby. Even though installing a CPU is an easier task now than it was in previous years, it’s still precarious. There are numerous pins on the CPU and/or motherboard, and bending any one of them could render that component kaput. The process isn’t designed to be difficult, and as long as you follow the instructions clearly and keep an eye out to ensure the chip is fully seated before you clamp it in place, you’ll be fine. However, there are some subtle differences in the process depending on who made your CPU. Step 2: Although the design of Intel and AMD CPUs are a little different, the process for installing them is much the same, no matter which kind of processor and motherboard you have. Intel CPUs have flat metal contacts on the underside, and the pins reside inside the socket, whereas AMD CPUs have pins on the underside of the processor, and contacts in the socket. In either case, do not bend or touch the pins. The square metal bracket holding the CPU in place is the load plate, and it’s raised and lowered using the load lever. When clamped down, the end of the load lever tucks under a hook to keep everything in place. When you unbox your motherboard, the contact array will be covered with a piece of plastic. This plastic will pop out once you open the bracket, so wait to open it until you’re ready to install your processor. First, open the load plate. Do this by gently pushing down on the load arm and moving it out sideways from under the hook, and then raising it up all the way. The hook’s lever action opens the plate, which you can easily flip up. At this point, the plastic piece will come loose. If it doesn’t pop out, gently remove it. Step 3: To install the CPU, you need to line it up correctly. On most Intel CPUs, you'll have notches on the side that allow you to only place the CPU in one orientation. On the latest 12th-generation Intel CPUs, you get a little golden triangle in one corner to help you align it properly. The same is true of all modern AMD processors. Pick the processor up by its sides and align it correctly using whatever aids you're given, and gently place it into the CPU socket. Double-check alignment, and give the processor a little nudge to make sure that it has slotted in correctly. If in doubt, remove it and try again just to be sure. Step 4: Once you're happy that the CPU is correctly installed, press the retaining arm down firmly, but gently, until the CPU is locked in place. This can take quite a bit of pressure, but it shouldn't be hard. If in doubt, check again that the CPU was seated correctly before locking it down. How to install RAM. System memory, or RAM, doesn’t require any careful goo placement or wires. There are just two important factors, assuming you’ve chosen compatible RAM: Direction and slot choice. The direction is easy enough. Each memory stick has a notch in the contacts lining the bottom edge that lines up with a block in the motherboard’s memory slots. If you hold it just above the slot and the two line up, it’s facing the right direction. If it doesn’t line up, spin it 180 degrees. Slot choice depends on a few factors, one of which is how you purchased RAM. If you have just a single stick of RAM, you want to install it in the first slot, often called A1. If you have two sticks, you'll often want to install them in the A2 and B2 slots, but check your motherboard's manual for confirmation of where they should go. Step 1: When you know which slot to install your RAM in, push the plastic wings at either end of the slot down and outward (some motherboards only have one), then place the stick in the slot sticking straight up. Push down firmly until the RAM clicks into the slot, and the plastic wings click back in and clamp the ends of the sticks. Be sure that your motherboard is well supported across its entire surface, as it is possible to put too much pressure on the motherboard when installing RAM if you push too hard. This is unlikely, but as with any steps in this guide, take care, and if in doubt, double-check everything before proceeding. Step 2: Repeat the same process for each stick you have until all of your RAM is installed. We put together a more detailed guide for how to install RAM if you need additional information. How to install the motherboard. The motherboard is the most unweildy component in your system, but since it acts as the foundation for everything else in your case, installing it correctly is of paramount importance. Step 1: Take your motherboard's rear I/O panel from the box — it looks like a small cutout of all the different motherboard ports — and install it in the back of your case by orientating it properly, and pushing it in. Double-check that it aligns with your motherboard's outputs before plugging it in if you're not sure which way it goes. Step 2: To install the motherboard, you have to screw it into the insulating standoffs that prevent your components from shorting. Some cases come with these preinstalled, while others need you to install them yourself. They’re easy to identify because they look unusual — essentially screws that have another screw hole on top instead of the typical screwdriver notch. They’re usually gold or black. If necessary, screw in your motherboard's standoffs into the correct holes depending on the size and layout of your motherboard. You can look at your motherboard to figure it out, or install them where your manual suggests. Step 3: Place your motherboard into your case, and push and wiggle it into place so that it slots into your I/O panel and has all of its screw holes lined up with the motherboard standoffs underneath. To attach your motherboard to the case, screw it in. First, seat the screws and give them a couple of precursory turns. Then, proceed in a star pattern, tightening each screw a little at a time. Don’t go wild while tightening as you might damage the board. You only need enough torque to hold the board in place without it wiggling. Step 4: Once the motherboard is seated comfortably in the case, there are a few necessary connections. The motherboard’s main power connection is a wide, two-row cable that fits snugly into a similar-looking spot on the board itself. This 20-28 pin connector powers both the motherboard and the CPU. However, some boards have a second 4-pin or 8-pin connector for the processor, which resides near your CPU, typically in the top corner. If you have it, you’ll need to plug that in, too. Connect the case plugs and buttons to the motherboard. A double-wide row of pins — the location of which will be noted in your manual — runs the USB ports, buttons for reset and power, and activity LEDs for power and storage. These small cables run in a bundle from wherever the ports reside in the case. Proper installation can be difficult, however, due to their size. If you have a magnifying glass or a set of tweezers, now is a great time to use them. Some motherboards include an adapter that bridges these jumpers to the right connections on your motherboard. Otherwise, installing them is as simple as matching the labels on the pins with the labels on the connections. The USB header connecting to your front-facing motherboard ports will be on its own. This connection is around eight by two pins, and they’re enclosed in a larger plastic housing. This header has a notch on one side that should clearly indicate which direction it plugs in. How to install the CPU cooler. Installing a CPU cooler differs depending on the cooler you're using, so for specific instructions, please refer to the manufacturer's manual or support site. Here are some simple instructions that apply to almost every cooler. Note: In the below images, we're installing an all-in-one (AIO) watercooler, but the tips apply to most air coolers as well. Step 1: Every cooler needs thermal paste. You don't have to use the best thermal paste, but make sure you use some. It typically looks like a silver paste and comes either preapplied to the cooler, or in a short syringe tube. If you're reapplying heat paste, be sure to remove the original heat paste with a lint-free cloth and a little isopropyl alcohol. When your CPU is ready, Apply a pea-sized amount to your CPU in the center. Step 2: If your CPU cooler requires it, remove your case's other side panel and attach the custom backplate design. You may need to remove the stock backplate from the motherboard first. Step 3: Place the CPU cooler on top of the processor, and press down gently. Line up any retaining brackets or bolts with the CPU cooler mounting holes on the motherboard. Install the retaining screws/brackets to secure the cooler in place. If you have to tighten several screws, be sure to do them a couple of turns at a time in a cross pattern, so that you don't put too much pressure on one portion of the CPU. Make sure that they are tight enough that the CPU cannot wiggle around, but don't overtighten. Step 4: If your cooler has a separate fan, attach it now, and plug its 3pin or 4pin connector into the CPU cooler port on the motherboard. It should be located near the CPU cooler. If you're installing an AIO watercooler, mount the radiator at an appropriate point in the case (at the front or rear air intakes/exhaust are common) and attach the fan's header to the correct port. How to install the graphics card. Not every system needs a dedicated graphics card (discrete GPU), but for most gaming PCs, it's a necessity. Still shopping for a GPU? Check out our GPU reviews like this latest one about the AMD Radeon RX 6600. But keep in mind that buying the one you want has become a bit more difficult lately because of a major and ongoing GPU shortage. Snagging a deal on them is harder but not impossible, especially when you’ve got our tips on how to buy graphics cards to guide you. Step 1: Modern graphics cards use a PCI-Express (PCIe) x16 slot. It’s a long, thin connector located on the rear of the motherboard, below the processor. For the vast majority of motherboards, you’ll want to use the top PCIe x16 slot. To seat the card in that slot, you’ll need to remove one, two, or, in some cases, three rectangular backplates from your case. It’s one of many thin metal brackets lined down the back of the case to keep it sealed up. Do this by removing the screw(s) that secures the backplate(s) to the chassis. Once removed, the plate should slide (or fall) out freely. Keep the screw, as you’ll need it in a moment. Step 2: Grab your graphics card and, making sure the ports are aligned to the rear of the case and the PCIExpress connector is facing down, carefully slot it into the motherboard. You should hear a click when the motherboard locks it into place, but that's not always the case on every motherboard. You don’t need excessive force, so if you encounter a great deal of resistance, take another look at the backplate and PCIe slot to make sure both are clear and the motherboard is properly aligned. Also take note if there is a pushpin that locks the card in like your memory slots, as some motherboards use it as a safety measure. Step 3: Use the screws pulled from the metal brackets to fasten the back of the card into the same spot in the case. Again, they don’t need to be extremely tight — just enough to hold the card firmly in place. Step 4: Most graphics cards need more power than the PCIe slot provides. If your card needs extra juice, you’ll see one or two PCIe power connectors on the card’s side facing away from the motherboard or, in some cases, on the top of the card. This can be a traditional six- or eight-pin PCIe power connector, or a new mini-12pin. Find the appropriate connector on your power supply, sometimes labeled VGA, and slot it in. The connector’s design prevents improper installation, so if the connection isn’t easy, double-check your alignment to make sure it’s correct. If you need additional help, we have a detailed guide on how to install a graphics card that provides additional information. How to install expansion cards. Graphics cards aren’t the only components that use PCIe slots. Other add-in cards include wireless networking, sound, video capture, and even storage. Their installation is no different than adding a discrete GPU. There are a few different types of PCIe slots. Many expansion cards use the “PCIe 4x” slot, which is much shorter than the full PCIe slot used by video cards. A quick check of your motherboard’s connectivity, and the size of the connector on your card, will make it obvious which slot is appropriate. If in doubt, refer to the expansion card’s manual. Step 1: Remove the metal bracket at the back of the case that corresponds with the PCIe or other expansion slot playing host to your add-in card. Keep the bracket screw handy so you can use it to secure your new card. Step 2: Line up the row of contacts on the card with the slot and firmly push down. If the card requires any additional power from SATA or 4pin molex connectors, find the right cables and plug them into the card. Step 3: Secure the card in place by screwing it into the back of the case. How to install hard drives and SSDs. There are three different storage drive sizes you’re likely to encounter, and they all mount and connect differently. Generally, hard disk drives (HDD) are the larger 3.5-inch size, while newer solid-state drives (SSD) adopt the smaller 2.5-inch size. There’s also the even smaller M.2 format and PCI-Express drive format, which tend to be thin sticks with bare chips measuring around a few inches long. Step 1: To install a hard drive, find the 3.5-inch drive mounting point(s) in your case. These can be full hard drive cages with multiple mounting points, or it might be just space for a single drive with screw holes right in the case. If in doubt, refer to your manual. Slot your drive into the appropriate place and screw, or lock it into place using your case's mounting system. When in place, attach the SATA data cable to the drive and the motherboard, and attach the SATA power connector to the drive. Step 2: To install a SATA SSD, repeat the same steps as the larger hard drive, only change the mounting point to an appropriate 2.5-inch cage or slot. Make sure that it is secured in place, and attach both the SATA power and data cable. Step 3: To install an M.2 NVMe SSD, locate the appropriate slot on your motherboard. It will be labeled, but it is pretty small, so check your manual if you're unsure. Remove the retaining screw and slot the drive in at a 45-degree angle. Gently, but firmly push down on the drive until it clicks into place, then replace the retaining screw. Step 4: To install a PCIe SSD, choose an appropriate PCIe slot on your motherboard. The 16x slots will offer the most bandwidth, but that may not be necessary for your particular drive's bandwidth. Consult the drive's manual for confirmation on which is best for your particular motherboard. Angle the drive with the gold contacts down, then gently push it into the PCIe slot. It should click into place when it is locked in. It shouldn't take much force, so if it gets stuck, check the alignment. Attach any necessary additional power cables. Double-check everything. With everything installed, it's worth checking everything once more before you hit that power button. It can prevent any heart-stopping moments where you get warning beeps because you forgot a power cable. Step 1: The motherboard should be seated correctly and doesn't move if you jostle it a little. It should also have the 20+4 pin power connector plugged into the relevant slot and be firmly seated. There may be an additional 4pin or 8pin connector at the top of the board that also needs to be plugged in. Step 2: The CPU cooler needs to be fitted securely to the processor, and the fan needs power. Make sure the fan's 3pin or 4pin connector is plugged into the appropriate slot on the motherboard. Step 3: If you have a graphics card, make sure it's plugged into the board correctly and has any appropriate power cables attached. Some cards, like the RTX 3080, even require two eight-pin connections, or their own special mini-12pin. These plugs are brightly colored and easy to spot and only fit in the interior end of the card in one orientation. If they aren’t plugged in, the fans on the card won’t spin, and it won’t produce any video output. Step 4: Make sure any expansion cards are also mounted into their PCIe slot comfortably, and have any relevant power cables plugged in. Step 5: Make sure each hard drive and SSD is installed correctly and won't come loose when you pick the case up or move it. Ensure they each have the relevant power and data cables plugged in, too. Turn the PC on. Step 1: Switch on the power supply and press the power button on the front. If all is well, it should display the post screen or manufacturer logo on the monitor, and then move on to Windows installation, or the login screen. If it doesn't, however, don't fret. It's not uncommon for PCs to need to reboot a couple of times on their first startup. If you encounter any error messages or beeps, refer to your motherboard's manual to decode the message and figure out what you need to fix. If you don't get any power at all, turn the power supply off and double-check all of your connections. Make sure the wall socket is turned on, too. Step 2: Once the system does boot up, you'll need to install Windows. If you're not sure how, here's a quick guide on how to download Windows 10 and install it. Step 3: Once you reach Windows, you'll need to install drivers. Windows 10 already supports modern chipsets and automatically downloads and installs the remaining drivers in most cases. Check the Update & Security menu in the Settings pane for more information regarding this process. If that doesn’t work, the chipset driver for your motherboard will handle most connectivity and onboard features, though this varies greatly based on motherboard and component manufacturers. You can download the latest version(s) from your motherboard manufacturer's website. If you have a discrete graphics card, you’ll periodically have to check for updates and install them when they come available. Check out the AMD page for Radeon drivers or the Nvidia page for GeForce drivers. With some luck and a lot of attention to detail, you should have a fully operational system. Keep an eye on your system temperatures for a few days to make sure all the coolers are working correctly, and if an error message pops up, take care of it accordingly. After a few weeks, you’ll get the hang of your machine and be more confident in what you can push it to do. If something breaks or needs an upgrade, you’re fully equipped to deal with it. Editors' Recommendations . This Lenovo Chromebook is only $119 at Best Buy for a limited time The 5 biggest computing announcements from CES 2022 How to set up multiple monitors for PC gaming How to uninstall Windows 10 and downgrade to Windows 8.1 Folding laptops at CES 2022 should have learned from mobile’s mistakes Checking in with Bluetti at CES 2022: Announcements you don’t want to miss . Pixar’s Turning Red will skip theaters and head directly to Disney+ . What is QD-OLED? The newest (and best) TV tech fully explained . Satechi just launched a crazy 165-watt, 4-port USB-C charger . This 55-inch TV is ON SALE for only $319 at Walmart right now . We can’t believe how cheap this LG OLED TV is at Walmart today . This Lenovo Chromebook is only $119 at Best Buy for a limited time . This massive air fryer oven is $70 off at Best Buy today . The 5 biggest computing announcements from CES 2022 . The top 15 best RPGs on PC . The best fantasy movies on Hulu . Don’t be a Wordle Scrooge: Learn to love Twitter’s new favorite game . How to set up multiple monitors for PC gaming .
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TitleHow to build your own PC in 2021 — the right way | Windows Central
Urlhttps://www.windowscentral.com/how-build-pc-ultimate-step-step-guide
DescriptionOur comprehensive PC build guide will walk you through how to put together your own computer, to save some money
Date23 Dec 2021
Organic Position6
H1How to build your own PC in 2021 — the right way
H2Building your own PC:
Picking the right parts
How to build a PC
Power up
H3Products used in this guide
Compatibility
Trusted tools
Best case
Installing the CPU
Best CPU
Installing the RAM
Best DDR4 RAM
Check everything works
Installing the PSU
Best PSU
Installing the motherboard
Best motherboard
Installing storage drives
Best SSD
Plugging everything in
Adding case fans
Installing a GPU
Best GPU
Rich Edmonds
H2WithAnchorsBuilding your own PC:
Picking the right parts
How to build a PC
Power up
BodyHow to build your own PC in 2021 — the right way Building your own dream rig has never been easier. Rich Edmonds 23 Dec 2021 Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Building a PC remains a daunting endeavor for many, but it doesn't have to be. Even if you've yet to pick up a screwdriver and toss together a few components, this comprehensive guide will make you a PC building master in no time at all. We'll also save you money in the process. Building your own PC:. Picking the right parts Installing the CPU Installing the RAM Check the system boots Installing the PSU Installing a motherboard Installing storage drives Plugging everything in Adding case fans Installing a GPU Power on and diagnostics Picking the right parts. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central The most crucial part to get right is picking parts that do what you want and working with each other. Choosing wrong or incompatible PC parts may cause issues, damage to other components, or require time for returning said products to retailers. In short, we'll need a case, processor (CPU), graphics card (GPU), RAM, power supply (PSU), motherboard, cabling, and some storage to complete the barebones checklist. Looking inside a PC case can reveal a mess of electronics to someone who doesn't know what does what. We can lend a helping hand when it comes to picking the right parts, even if you don't know the difference between a CPU and a GPU. Check out our best guides for each component and then check for incompatibilities using our brief checklist below. Products used in this guide. Best cases Best CPU (best CPU coolers) Best PSU Best motherboards Best RAM Best graphics card Best SSD Compatibility. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Here's what you'll need to build a PC: Case: Cases come in different form factors, depending on the size of the PC you wish to build. Less important overall. PSU: This is what converts AC to DC power from your home socket to components. Needs to supply enough stable power (500W is usually a good place to start). CPU: You have the choice of AMD and Intel for desktop processors. Take a look at our best guide and note the sockets they use as you'll need to match the socket for the motherboard. Motherboard: A motherboard simply needs to match the same socket type of the CPU. Chipset and other features are all down to pricing and preference. RAM: Faster frequencies and lower latencies generally mean better the RAM, though you'll need to make sure your motherboard can support the same clock speed, or it'll be limited. Most new boards support DDR4 or DDR5. DDR4-3200 or DDR5-4800 is a safe bet for most CPUs. Storage: Entirely down to personal requirements, though we always recommend an SSD for installing the OS. GPU: This is optional and is only really needed if you plan to do some gaming or intensive workloads. In that case, spend as much as you can. But wait! Even after double and triple-checking that everything will place nicely together, it's recommended you use an automated tool that checks entered components against a database to confirm that there are no conflicts. It's worth visiting PC Part Picker, entering in all your components, and then checking everything over. Not only does the website allow for comparison between other options available — potentially allowing for even more savings to be made — it will also provide warnings for any issues detected. After a few PC builds, you'll be able to tell components apart by just looking at the specs and streamlining this process without using such websites. All the products in this guide are compatible with one another so if you fancy building yourself a capable gaming PC, take up our recommendations as you move through the guide. Trusted tools. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Some tools you'll need to build a PC include the following: Toolkit. LED light source. Flat workspace (no carpet). Anti-static mat. Anti-static wristband. Magnetic parts tray. Free workspace (never use carpet to prevent frying your components). Did I mention you shouldn't use carpet to build a PC? How to build a PC. We've arranged this guide in an order that makes sense for most builds, though it may not be optimal for every PC. You'll need to check the layout and see which components will need to be installed first, but usually, starting with the power supply is the best way to go. You'll first want to put aside the box/bag of screws that come with the case as we'll need these for the steps ahead. Just be sure to check our helpful guide on how to avoid these rookie PC building mistakes so you can get up and running in no time at all. Best case. Lian Li PC-O11 Dynamic Gaming Computer Case. Do you want a compact chassis that's easy to build a PC inside and looks amazing? That's what Lian Li offers with the PC-O11 Dynamic, designed in partnership with DER8AUER. $180 at Amazon $180 at Newegg When putting together a new PC, you'll need a case that looks good, is sturdy enough to hold everything inside, has ample features like dust filtering, smart RGB lighting, and doesn't break your budget. This sums up the Lian Li PC-O11 Dynamic perfectly. Installing the CPU. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central You'd have noticed I said we'll be installing the PSU first, but that's only when we're sure everything works. Before we fit everything inside the PC case, we'll need to check all our components actually work out the box. Instead of throwing everything inside the case and discovering there's an issue, unpacking everything on your chosen flat surface and installing a few components to test is the best way to go. Unpack your PSU, CPU, RAM, and motherboard for this. The first step here is to install the CPU, which requires you to remove the motherboard from its packaging too. This is a super-easy process, regardless of whether you're rocking an AMD or Intel chip. Unpack the motherboard from its packaging. Place the motherboard atop its cardboard box. (It's safe here. Never place on carpet.) Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Open the CPU latch. The plastic cap will pop off once we install the CPU. Keep this safe! Just in case you need to return the motherboard to the manufacturer. Insert the CPU, matching notches and indicators to the socket. (Do not apply pressure, it should lie flush without force.) Close the latch to secure the CPU. (This step will require some amount of pressure, popping off the plastic cap.) Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Now, we'll need to install the CPU cooler. Depending on the cooler you've purchased, you may have a layer of thermal paste already applied. If not, we'll need to do this before installing the cooler. (Tip: less is more.) The manual will run you through the process of installation, which can vary between coolers and manufacturers. Especially with aftermarket coolers — both water and air — you'll need to pay close attention to the manual that comes with the product. This is why it's better to do all these steps with the motherboard outside the PC case for easier handling. How to install an Intel CPU Best CPU air coolers Best CPU water coolers Best CPU. AMD Ryzen 7 5800X. The Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 9 CPUs are attractive options, but for a middle-ground the Ryzen 7 5800X excels. $360 at Amazon $370 at Best Buy $360 at Newegg After many years of falling behind Intel, AMD has come leaps and bounds with Ryzen, and this latest generation is even better. There has never been a better time to hop over to team red, and the Ryzen 5 5600X is the perfect entry point for most PCs. There's even an included cooler to get you up and running. Installing the RAM. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central RAM is a sensitive component and, as such, should be handled with care. It's recommended that contact be avoided with the pins on the underside of each module. The RAM slots on a motherboard are located to the right of the CPU. Do check the motherboard manual as to which RAM slots are to be used, depending on how many sticks you have. Unclip the RAM locks on the motherboard module slots. Match the RAM module notches to those found in the slots on the motherboard. Insert the module carefully, using light even force across the stick. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central After it inserts into the slot, push down on either side of the RAM module until it securely clicks into place. How to install RAM Best DDR4 RAM. G.SKILL TridentZ RGB Series 16GB. G.SKILL TridentZ RAM modules not only perform well with satisfactory latency, frequency, and capacity; they also look pretty awesome with built-in RGB lighting. Yes, you can now have your RAM modules glow in the dark. $87 at Newegg $85 at Amazon $100 at Walmart It's vital to choose RAM that will be best matched with the motherboard and CPU, and this 3200MHz kit is excellent for the Ryzen 5 5600X and accompanying motherboard. There's also room for some tuning at a later date when you need a little more from your system memory. Check everything works. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central With the CPU and RAM installed, the motherboard is now ready to boot. If you're using a Ryzen or Intel CPU without integrated graphics processing (our 5600X is one such CPU), we'll also need to install our GPU here to get an output from the motherboard. Unpack the GPU from its box and carefully seat it into the top-most PCIe slot. Press down until you hear it click. The GPU should be fine sat atop of the motherboard, but you may need to allow the backplate to hang over the edge of the motherboard box so it can lie flush with the board itself. All we require now is power. Reference your motherboard and PSU manuals to sort through the right cables and connectors. Hook up the main 24-pin ATX cable to the PSU and motherboard (it's the largest one in the bundle). Connect the CPU ATX power cable (usually a 4+4 pin connector, some motherboards take two or three) to the PSU and motherboard. Install any PCIe power cabling for the GPU if it requires it. Connect an HDMI or DisplayPort cable to an available port on your GPU (or motherboard if your CPU has an integrated GPU). Plug in a keyboard to a free USB port on the motherboard. Usually, to turn on a PC, you'll want to hit the power button, but since our PC is not technically inside a case yet, we have no power button. Luckily, we don't require the power button to turn everything on. We can emulate a physical button by simply using a screwdriver to create a bridge between the to POWER_SW pins on the motherboard. Source: Daniel Rubino / Windows Central Again, consult your motherboard manual to locate these pins. By simply making contact with the + and - pins for POWER_SW we're telling the motherboard to turn the system on. It's precisely what happens when you hit the power button on your PC case. Give it a few attempts if you can't quite make the connection between the two pins. If everything boots through the BIOS and you see the splash screen, go into the setup by hitting the DEL key as the system cycles. Check that all your RAM is registered here. All good? Shut everything down and disconnect all the cables, removing the GPU and placing it back into its protective wrapping. It's now time to install the PC inside the case. Installing the PSU. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central The PSU is the most critical component of any PC. It provides the juice required for all the computing magic to take place. Depending on the case you've purchased, we'll need to install the unit with the fan facing up or down. To determine which is most optimal, check if you have a vent at the bottom of the case. If so, face the PSU fan downwards. You'll want to have all your cables connected to the PSU prior to installing it to make your job easier. Depending on the PSU you've purchased, it may be one of the following: Fully modular: No cables are permanently connected to the PSU. Semi-modular: Some cables are permanently fixed, usually ATX and CPU power. Non-modular: Every cable is connected and cannot be removed from the PSU. Fully and semi-modular PSUs are the easiest to work with as you'll have an easier time making sure all cables look neat and tidy. Slide the PSU into the mounting area with the fan facing up or down. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Screw in the bundled screws (should come with the case) in the four holes at the rear of the case. Ensure the unit is switched off using the rear switch. Plug the PSU into a power socket to ground the PC. Bind all the power cables coming out of the PSU together and put them to one side. Best PSU. EVGA SuperNOVA P2 650W. The best power plant for your PC You'll find it difficult to find a better value PSU than this EVGA example. It's rated for 80 Plus Platinum and has enough power for gaming PCs. $90 at Amazon $90 at Newegg The PSU is the most critical component inside your PC case. It's what provides power to all other components and, as such, should be able to supply a reliable current. You can trust this PSU to provide clean, stable power. Installing the motherboard. With the CPU, the cooler, and RAM modules installed, the motherboard is ready to be screwed to the backplate inside the case. First, we need to install the I/O shield, a long piece of metal that has cutouts for all the rear ports and connections. This is optional, but recommended accessory helps provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) protection. Place the I/O shield to the rear cutout in the PC case and click into place. (Skip this step if it's attached to your motherboard.) Hover the motherboard atop the backplate to see where standoffs need to be screwed in. Different sizes need different holes. Standoffs are the screws that are installed on the motherboard backplate, which then allows the motherboard to rest atop them and for screws to secure the board. Some cases have them pre-installed. Install the standoffs for the motherboard, if not already pre-installed. (Some backplates may feature ATX labels next to holes to guide you.) Lower the motherboard onto the standoffs. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Tighten the screws, but do not overtighten them — just enough to secure the board in place. Check the sides of the motherboard by lightly pulling to make sure every inch has been secured. Best motherboard. ASUS ROG Strix X570-E motherboard. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X motherboards may be mid-tier, but they can stretch their legs with an X570 chipset-touting motherboard like the ASUS ROG Strix X570-E. Not only would you be able to overlock the CPU without issue, but you also enjoy PCIe 4.0 support, high-quality components, Wi-Fi 6, and Gen 4 M.2 slots capable of unidirectional transfer speeds up to 64GB/s, rapid LAN ports, and plenty of RGB options to light up your office. $350 at Amazon $318 at Newegg Motherboards allow for the CPU, memory, storage, GPU, and all other components to communicate with one another, and the ASUS X570-E Gaming is a great solution. It's reliable, houses premium parts, has a ton of features, and has a solid UEFI setup that allows you to overclock your system easily. Installing storage drives. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Storage drives are essential devices that hold not only the operating system but also all programs, personal media, and all other data. It's recommended to use an SSD (be it M.2 or 2.5-inch) drive for the primary OS partition, which enables quick booting and reliable performance. Data can be stored on traditional (3.5-inch) mechanical drives. M.2 PCIe NVMe drives are the fastest with SATA M.2 and 2.5-inch drives coming in second. 3.5-inch drives come in last for speed but are the most affordable, especially at higher capacities. Depending on the case and how drive bays are configured, M.2, 2.5- and 3.5-inch drives may be able to be installed at the same points or using dedicated brackets. Be sure to double-check the PC case manual. We'll go over how your PC case may have both configured below. M.2 SSD. Unscrew and remove the M.2 SSD plate, if your motherboard has one. Install a standoff for the M.2 module, if not already installed. Place the M.2 drive atop of the slot and secure it with a screw. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Re-install the M.2 plate (if applicable). 2.5-inch SSD. Some cases will simply allow you to screw in a 2.5-inch drive to a bay that also supports larger 3.5-inch drives, though more modern PC cases allow you to use brackets to the rear of the motherboard tray. For the latter: Take the SSD bracket and attach the drive to it, lining up the screw holes. Screw in the drive using appropriate screws. Attach the bracket and secure it to the case. 3.5-inch HDD. Extract the HDD bracket from one of the bays. Slide the mechanical drive into the bracket. Secure the drive to said bracket using screws or screwless mechanism. Slide the bracket and drive back into the bay. Best SSD. Samsung 970 EVO Plus. Insane performance at an affordable price Samsung has long been at the forefront of the SSD market, and its latest is undoubtedly the greatest with incredible performance. From $55 at Amazon $55 at Walmart Since the ASUS motherboard we selected has M.2 support, we can opt for a super-fast SSD. Samsung's latest 970 EVO Plus is incredibly fast, perfect for both Windows 10 and games. With 500GB, you'll be able to install the OS and then a few programs and games too, though if your budget can stretch it, we'd always recommend installing games on a different drive to the OS. Plugging everything in. With all significant components now installed, it's time to hook everything up to the power supply and motherboard. Generally speaking, it's best to start with the power to the motherboard itself. Motherboard: The PSU has multiple cables for the board: 24-pin ATX and 8-pin CPU — the same cables we used earlier to test the motherboard, CPU, and RAM. Route these behind the backplate, using available grommets and cutouts. Storage drives: Most SSDs and HDDs today use SATA connectors. These are 15-pin flat connectors with a dip on one side to prevent plugging them in the wrong way. Route these from the PSU to the drive bays and mounts, using more than one lead from the PSU if required. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Next, we need to connect the storage drives to the motherboard, using SATA data cables. These are mostly smaller versions of their power siblings that carry data instead. The motherboard usually has SATA ports located to the lower-right hand-side. It doesn't matter which ports are used. Much like the power cables, route these through cut-outs and grommets to the drive bays and mounts. We now have power to our storage drives and the motherboard, as well as data channels between drives and the mainboard. All that's left is to connect front panel I/O and other optional connectors (front panel USB, HD audio, etc.). Connecting the front panel I/O, which includes the power switch, reset switch, HDD activity LED, and power LED can be a tricky step. These pins stand up from the motherboard, which requires a careful approach when plugging in the small connectors. The motherboard manual should provide information as to the layout of these pins and what they correspond to — though usually the below layout is used: Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central The front USB 3.0 and HD audio pins can be located on the motherboard. Again, refer to the manual for exact placement as not all motherboards are created equal. Adding case fans. For added cooling capacity (and room for overclocking or more stable operation), throwing in an extra fan or two is worthwhile. PC cases may come with fans pre-installed, but if not, it's simple to screw them into fan mounts. Just be sure to align them correctly and have the blades pointing the correct way. Fans can have small arrows on the side that show which way the blades spin and where airflow will be directed. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central Note: some cases may require you to install fans before inserting the motherboard, especially for the top exhaust. Fans can either be plugged into a motherboard or into the PSU directly using an adapter. We'd always recommend the motherboard due to the ability to control the fans intelligently depending on system temperatures. Fan headers can be located on the motherboard itself, where the 3 (or 4) pin connectors can be inserted. Installing a GPU. Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Windows Central Need some extra power for gaming and intense workloads? The best graphics card is a must-have. As a bonus, it's straightforward to install a graphics card. We usually leave the GPU until last because of how much space they typically take within the chassis. Unscrew the rear PCI case brackets that align with the PCI slot you will use. Check that the motherboard GPU card latch is open. Line up the GPU to the PCIe slot on the motherboard. Carefully insert the card and push down once it has made contact with the slot, listening out for a click of the latch securing. Use the rear bracket screws to secure the GPU to the PC case for added stability. Source: Windows Central If the GPU requires additional PSU power, connect the necessary cables. Upgrading a GPU Installing a GPU Best GPU. NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080. Glorious graphics Our PC build so far is best suited for 1440p and 4K gaming, and so we need a GPU that can match this level of performance. The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 is an amazing GPU that uses NVIDIA's latest graphics technology. See at Amazon See at Best Buy See at Newegg It has 10GB of GDDR6X memory, can boost to 1710MHz or so, and can even do some 4K gaming if you don't mind seeing sub-three-digit frame rates. This is one of the best GPUs you can buy today. Power up. Source: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central All that hard work will now pay off. It's time to boot up the PC and make sure everything is working fine now that all components are inside the case. Switch on the PSU and hit the power switch. You should now be greeted by the BIOS POST screen, asking for an OS to be installed if one is not detected. You'll now need to follow OS installation instructions. If you run into problems, it's time to do a little troubleshooting. Diagnose common PC problems We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more. Rich Edmonds. Rich Edmonds is a word conjurer at Windows Central, covering everything related to Windows, gaming, and hardware. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a device chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.
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Result 8
TitleBuild Your Own PC: The Basic Components | Crucial.com
Urlhttps://uk.crucial.com/articles/pc-builders/how-to-build-a-computer
DescriptionWant to build your own PC but don’t know where to start? Discover all the basic components you need to get started
Date
Organic Position7
H1How to build a computer
H2Find a product
What do you want to build?
The key components you’ll need
Storage
Case, fans, and power supply
PC building on your budget
How to build your PC
Adding the hardware
Time to boot up your new computer!
H3Motherboard
Processor/Central Processing Unit (CPU)
Memory (RAM)
Installing the memory
Installing the HDD or SSD
H2WithAnchorsFind a product
What do you want to build?
The key components you’ll need
Storage
Case, fans, and power supply
PC building on your budget
How to build your PC
Adding the hardware
Time to boot up your new computer!
BodyHow to build a computer How to find the best storage, memory, and processor to build the best computer possible. There has never been a better time to build your own PC, but where’s the best place to start? Determining what you want to get out of your new computer is the first step and it guides the rest of the process. When you know what you want from your computer, you’ll know what you need from your hardware, which is the source of your computer’s performance. Get the most performance for less by investing in the right components from the start. That’s when you can begin to build. What do you want to build? . It’s easy to get overwhelmed with all the possible variables in a PC build. Do you want to build a PC to save money? Or do you want to reach the highest levels of performance? The common thread with each of these scenarios is the hardware – the motherboard, processor (CPU), storage (hard drive or SSD), and memory (RAM). The “guts” of the computer have the most impact on your system’s performance, while the other components like the case, operating system (OS), monitor, mouse, power supply, and keyboard have a much smaller impact on how the computer runs, though they’re still important. The key components you’ll need . Once you’ve decided what kind of PC you want to build, you can begin to research and purchase the hardware you need to fulfil your plan. Here are the essential parts:  Motherboard . A motherboard is the first component you’ll want to choose. The motherboard dictates the physical form factor and size of your PC build, but it also determines what other pieces of hardware the computer can use. For example, the motherboard establishes the power of the processor it can handle, the memory technology (DDR4, DDR3, DDR2, etc.) and number of modules that can be installed, and the storage form factor (2.5-inch, mSATA, or m.2) and storage interface (SATA or PCIe). While you will want to choose your motherboard based on other compatible components, the motherboard should be your starting point. Find out more about RAM and motherboard compatibility. Processor/Central Processing Unit (CPU) . The CPU is the engine of your computer and sets the performance expectations for the entire build. Memory and storage fuel the processor, which controls every data transaction within the PC. When you’re determining which CPU to install, pay attention to the gigahertz (GHz) – the higher the GHz, the faster the processor. However, more GHz also means the CPU consumes more energy, which could lead to higher system temperatures that require better airflow or heat dissipation within the computer. Memory (RAM) . Adding memory (RAM) is one of the fastest, easiest, and most affordable ways to amplify the performance of the computer you’re building because it gives your system more available space to temporarily store data that’s being used. Nearly every computer operation relies on memory – that includes having several tabs open while surfing the Web, typing and composing an email, multitasking between applications, and even moving your mouse cursor. Even background services and processes, like system updates, can draw from your RAM and that’s why it’s important to have as much memory as possible. The more things you’re doing, the more memory you need.   Choosing the best RAM for your system involves two things: compatibility and how much RAM your system can support. First, for compatibility, identify the kind of module your system uses by identifying the form factor (the physical form of the module – generally, desktops use UDIMMs, laptops use SODIMMs), then figure out the memory technology (DDR4, DDR3, DDR2, etc.) your system supports. Second, your system can only handle so many GB of memory, and that depends on your system. If you buy 64GB of RAM and your computer can only handle 16GB, that’s 48GB of wasted memory you can’t take advantage of. There’s an easy way to find compatible upgrades: Download the Crucial® System Scanner and let it do the work for you. It displays how much memory you currently have, the maximum memory capacity of your computer, and available upgrades for your specific system. Using the System Scanner doesn’t cost a thing and guarantees compatibility of your components when you order on Crucial.com. Storage . Your files and data are saved long-term on your storage drive. This data is held on either a hard disk drive (HDD) or solid state drive (SSD). Although hard drives generally give you more storage space (in GB), SSDs have essentially made them outdated – SSDs are on average 6x faster1 and 90x more energy-efficient2 than hard drives. The speed discrepancy comes from how the two storage devices read and write data – read and write speeds measure how fast data loads (reads) and saves/transfers (writes). Hard drives use small mechanical moving parts and spinning platters to do this, and SSDs use NAND flash technology. The difference results in better speed, efficiency, and durability because small mechanical parts and spinning platters are much more susceptible to physical damage than NAND. Your data is accessed faster and preserved longer on SSDs because of this difference. Case, fans, and power supply . Depending on the kind of PC you’re building, you’ll also need to adjust what you’re looking for with a case and power supply. If you’re creating a high-powered performance workhorse, you’ll need a robust power supply to make it all run, and a case with optimal internal airflow and fans to expel hot air that could potentially damage the system. Zip ties are a massive help with managing all the cables inside your rig, and consolidating the cables helps improves airflow.  PC building on your budget . The amount of money you spend on the parts of a computer will vary. If you’re building a PC to save money, you’ll probably want to at least match the performance of a store-bought desktop or laptop while spending less. If you’re going for the best possible performance in all of your PC components, expect to pay more. Faster processors cost more than slower ones, and memory and SSDs with more GB cost more than those with fewer GB. Since memory and storage are a large part of the cost within a new computer, building your own PC gives you a chance to save on these components by adding your own. While RAM and SSD costs rise with the amount of GB they offer, they are less expensive than buying pre-installed (and often inadequate) components that you’ll likely need to upgrade quickly. How to build your PC . When you put all the parts together, make sure you have plenty of room to keep your build organized. Be aware of static electricity as you build – it’s one of the few ways the hardware can be damaged but it’s easy to avoid. Frequently ground yourself by touching an unpainted metal surface or wear an electrostatic discharge (ESD) wrist strap to protect your system’s components from the static electricity that’s naturally present in your body. It’s also helpful to keep a can of compressed air to remove any dust or fine debris from the interface as you’re installing the processor, memory, and SSD.  Adding the hardware . For instructions on installing the processor, power supply, and putting the motherboard in the case, consult each component’s owner’s manual. The act of installation or assembling parts isn’t complicated, but there is the potential for errors to occur. That’s why it’s best to follow the more detailed step-by-step instructions for each specific part. Installing the memory . RAM is the easiest hardware to install when you’re building a PC. Locate the memory slots on the motherboard. Hold your memory modules on the side to avoid touching the chips and gold pins. Align the notches on the module with the ridge in the slot then firmly press the module in until it clicks. As you’re pressing, note that it takes about 30 pounds of pressure to fully install a module. Find out how to install memory in a laptop or a desktop. Installing the HDD or SSD . Depending on the form factor of the SSD you’ve purchased (2.5-inch, mSATA, or M.2), installation requires attaching the drive to the storage interface, then fitting it into the drive bay (if it’s a 2.5-inch SSD). If you’re looking for the largest capacity possible and have an extremely tight budget, a hard drive may be an attractive option. For instructions on installing your hard drive, consult its owner’s manual. Find out more about SSD installation with our guides and videos. Time to boot up your new computer! . Once your system is assembled, it’s time for the big moment – hit the power button! Make sure your monitor and keyboard are connected to the PC, and if everything worked correctly, a screen will appear where you can enter the system BIOS. If you have a disc or flash drive with an OS, put it into the appropriate drive, boot up, and you can install the OS. At this point, the assembly is over – congratulations, you’ve now built your own PC! Way to go! 1. Performance times based on internal lab testing conducted in August 2015. Each task was executed and timed after the system had undergone a fresh boot so that other factors and applications didn’t affect the reported load and boot times. Actual performance may vary based on individual system configuration. Test setup: 1TB Crucial MX200 SSD and 1TB HGST Travelstar® Z5K1000 internal hard drive, both tested on an HP® Elitebook 8760W laptop, Intel® Core™ i7-2620M 2.70GHz processor, 4GB Crucial DDR3 1333 MT/s memory, BIOS Rev. F50 (5 August 2014), and Microsoft® Windows® 8.1 Pro 64-bit operating system. 2. Active average power use comparison based on published specs of the 1TB Crucial MX300 SSD and the 1TB Western Digital® Caviar Blue™ WD10EZEX internal hard drive, which, as of January 2016, is one of the industry’s top-selling internal hard drives. All other capacities of the Crucial MX300 SSD have comparable active average power consumption specs, with the exception of the 2050GB version of the drive, which consumes 0.15W. ©2017 Micron Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Information, products, and/or specifications are subject to change without notice. Neither Crucial nor Micron Technology, Inc. is responsible for omissions or errors in typography or photography. Micron, the Micron logo, Crucial, and the Crucial logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Micron Technology, Inc. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners. ×
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Result 9
TitleA beginner's guide to building your own PC
Urlhttps://www.popsci.com/beginners-guide-build-pc/
DescriptionPutting together your own computer sounds like a monumental task. But anyone can do it—especially if you have this handy beginner's guide to help
Date18 Oct 2018
Organic Position8
H1A beginner’s guide to building your own PC
H2The building blocks of a computer
Shopping for components
Put together the build
Install the operating system
H3Android’s Recorder app makes it easy to post audio to social media
Get your scratched wooden cutting board looking bright and new
Do everything in your browser faster
H2WithAnchorsThe building blocks of a computer
Shopping for components
Put together the build
Install the operating system
BodyA beginner’s guide to building your own PC Create a custom computer. By David Nield | Published Oct 18, 2018 5:33 PM DIY With a little help, you can build your own computer. Fancycrave via Unsplash SHARE Building your own PC from scratch gives you the freedom to choose the exact specifications you want, and it often saves money as well. However, the idea can be daunting. You have to source the components, stick them all together, troubleshoot problems, ensure everything works, and install an operating system—all of which requires a lot more work than just buying a computer. Still, once you get started, the process isn’t all that difficult. With the right guidance, anyone can build a custom PC. So we collected everything you’ll need to know. Go ahead, put together your own computer piece by piece. The building blocks of a computer. Before you start buying components, you need to decide which ones will work best for your needs. Any PC requires a case to hold everything, a motherboard to act as the nervous system of the new machine, a processor and RAM to slot into the motherboard, a power supply unit (PSU) to regulate electricity, a hard drive to store files, and a monitor to interact with your machine. Choosing a case is as simple as deciding what you want your new PC to look like and how much stuff you want to cram in it. The latter feature will affect the potential size of your other components. For example, more powerful graphics cards need more room, and robust processors require more cooling space, so if you want a seriously fast machine for gaming or video editing, then go big. On the other hand, if you plan to just stream Netflix, you can get away with a smaller case (without a separate graphics card). On to the motherboard. This part attaches to one of the case’s interior sides, and other pieces (such as the processor) slot into it. Because of that, you’ll need to pick this component’s size based on the case—most cases will list the types of motherboards they can accommodate. You’ll find that the configuration specification called Advanced Technology EXtended (ATX) is the most common choice, while Micro ATX acts as a popular smaller option. The other consideration: What do you want to slot into the motherboard? Specific models will house specific central processing units (also called CPUs or processors). Because this is a key spec, every motherboard prominently displays the types of CPU it can accommodate. You do have some leeway—a motherboard will support a particular line or family, rather than just a single one. Once you plug your chosen CPU into the large square slot near the center of the motherboard, you’ll need to dissipate heat by slapping a heatsink or sometimes a cooling fan on top of that (the faster the processor, the bigger the cooling setup). Luckily, most CPUs come with standard heatsinks, so you should find everything you need in the box. In addition to the CPU, you’ll have to plug in some random access memory (RAM), which gives the computer room to think and handles open applications. Plug in more RAM, and you can work on more files simultaneously, access applications more quickly, run games at higher resolutions, and keep more browser tabs open at once—all without slowing your computer to a crawl. Again, you’ll need to buy the right RAM for your chosen motherboard, but you don’t need to be as particular about this component as you were about the CPU. Just make sure your motherboard has enough RAM slots for your needs. Look for two or four long slots in the motherboard—the manual will tell you the precise location. You can also give the motherboard a graphics card. As we’ve explained in our separate guide, this component is optional. Today’s CPUs come with what’s known as integrated graphics, enough to power your PC’s display. A separate card only proves its worth when you’re trying to put a lot of fast-moving pixels on your computer’s screen for top-end gaming or you have your machine make graphics-related calculations for video editing. It slots into one of the PCI Express slots on your motherboard, which are usually on the other side of the CPU socket. A graphics card can improve your gaming, as well as image and video editing. Gigabyte The most powerful graphics cards need an extra power connection to the power supply unit, which brings us back to the PSU. The key spec you should pay attention to here is the wattage, how much power it can provide to the system. Most PSUs on the market will cover a basic setup of CPU, RAM, and hard drive—but if you’re installing a separate graphics card or an extra hard drive, then you might need more. Cooler Master has a very useful PSU calculator you should use to work out the wattage you’ll need. Speaking of the hard drive, you’ll need this long-term digital storage to hold your files and applications. The physical component sits in a separate cage inside the case. Then you connect it via cables to the motherboard (for data) and the PSU (for power). When you’re shopping, you can opt for an older hard disk drive (HDD), which gives you more capacity for a cheaper price, or a newer Solid State Drive (SSD), which is much faster but more expensive. You can also choose a hard drive with a greater or lesser storage capacity. Your new PC will also need a monitor, so pick one based on the amount of screen space you want. Just be aware that the larger the monitor’s size, the more you’ll have to pay. Almost all of the products you’ll find on the market will use HDMI as the connection standard. This lets you plug the video output from your motherboard or graphics card into the monitor’s input. One component we haven’t mentioned is a DVD or Blu-ray drive. By all means buy one if you think you’re going to use it. But if you do, make sure to purchase a case that has an optical disc drive bay. Once you do, the internal connections are the same as for the hard drive: one to the PSU for power, and one to the motherboard for transmitting data. Shopping for components. Now you know all the components you need to buy: a case, motherboard, CPU, RAM, potentially a graphics card, PSU, a hard drive of some kind, monitor, and optionally an optical drive. Before you sit down to do some comparison shopping for these items, consider how you plan to use your new computer. For example, a PC’s most demanding uses include gaming, running a VR headset, and video editing, so if you don’t plan to do these things, you can save some money on your final setup and skip that separate graphics card. There’s no exact formula for working out the components you’ll need, and there are almost an infinite number of combinations to choose, but don’t panic. As you start to browse around, you’ll soon get comfortable using the common terms and brand names. The Oculus Rift VR headset requires a fairly hefty PC setup. Oculus You should start with your processor. In this case, you’ve got a choice between two brands: Intel (usually best for performance) and AMD (usually best for value-for-money). Intel offers several generations of i3, i5, and i7 processors, rising in power and price as you go up that list. The newest versions of these processors are the 8th-generation chips, but if you want to go for more affordable option and don’t mind a slight performance trade-off, look for older-generation CPUs still on sale. As for AMD, the second-generation Ryzen processors are the newest on the market, and like Intel, it has a rising scale of performance and price: Ryzen 3, 5, and 7. We don’t have room to give you a complete buying guide here, but benchmarking and comparison tools like CPU Benchmarks can help. Broadly speaking, an Intel Core i5 processor (or the AMD equivalent, Ryzen 5) and 8GB of RAM will give you a decent mid-range machine. If you want to save money and don’t mind budget-level performance, then downgrade an Intel Core i3 chip and 4GB of RAM. For the fastest, most powerful machine, you’ll want to bump up to an Intel Core i7 chip and 16GB (or more) of RAM. If you plan to check emails, write essays, edit photos, and play simple games, then the integrated graphics built into Intel’s chips should serve you just fine. For serious gaming, video editing and more advanced photo editing (with larger files and more complex edits), consider investing in a separate graphics card. However, first make sure you have enough RAM and a fast enough CPU to cope—otherwise you run the risk of causing a bottleneck where the graphics card isn’t being used to its full potential because the other components can’t keep up. This isn’t usually a problem unless you have a top-end graphics card with a distinctly mid-range processor. To make sure, do some online research. Picking hard drive storage is a little easier than sifting through the dozens of graphics cards on the market: 1TB is a good size for a capable PC. Get more if you’ll be installing a lot of games or working with a lot of 4K videos; get less if you’ll be mostly working on the web and storing a lot of your data in the cloud. Once you’ve decided on CPU and RAM, these will guide your choice of motherboard and case. The PSU and hard drive are more independent because most models of these components will fit most motherboards. Still, you should double-check the specs sheet to make sure that they’ll function well together. If you can’t immediately figure out the compatibility, a quick web search or a chat with a customer service representative should help you. NewEgg is one of the best-known PC component retailers. David Nield When you’ve chosen your components, get some help from forums like those at Overclockers and Tom’s Hardware. List the components you plan to use, and members will point out potential compatibility or performance issues. You can also learn useful information by reading threads on these sites. After you double-check your choices, you’re ready to buy. Dedicated electronics retailers such as NewEgg, OutletPC, and Micro Center are good places to start your search. These sites are easy to navigate—computer parts are clearly categorized, so you can jump straight to the type of motherboard or RAM that you require. You’ll also find plenty of PC components on Amazon, but the retail giant doesn’t have the same variety that the dedicated retailers do. At these sites, you often find bonus guides, compatibility advice, and forums. For example, NewEgg has a compatibility checker that can tell you what types of memory work with which motherboards, while Micro Center offers a guide to installing a graphics card. In addition to those lists of products and prices, look out for helpful resources like these. Put together the build. You’ve picked your components, checked their compatibility, and ordered them. Now you’re ready to actually build your computer. You can easily do this within a couple hours—though you should avoid rushing the process if you’ve never put together your own PC before. And if you can enlist the help of a reasonably tech-savvy friend, all the better. First, set up in a good environment. A hard, flat table is the perfect place for assembly. Avoid carpets, which are uneven and tend to generate static electricity that can damage the components. Speaking of static electricity, before you touch any components, ground yourself by touching a metal part of the computer case, or by wearing an anti-static wrist strap. As for other tools, a lot of modern cases let you slot in components without them. Still, we’d recommend keeping a Phillips screwdriver on hand, just in case. That’s just about the only equipment you’ll need. The PC parts you buy should ship with just about everything you need—for example, the PSU will come with its own power cable. Handle all of these components carefully by the edges. When you’re not using them, place them on top of the anti-static bags they came in. Now you’re ready for assembly. First, fit the PSU into the case, then screw in the motherboard. Next, add the CPU, RAM, hard drive, and graphics card (if you’ve bought one). Unsure about where to put everything? The instructions supplied with the motherboard and other components should tell you. If they’re confusing or incomplete, an online search should help—make sure your search terms include the exact model names and numbers of your components, or you won’t get the right results. An Intel CPU inside a motherboard socket. Alexandru-Bogdan Ghita via Unsplash The processor has perhaps the most involved installation process, but it should also come with step-by-step instructions to help. When you drop it into the motherboard slot, you should see some form of clip or bracket you can use to fix it in place. Apply a thin layer of thermal paste, if it doesn’t come pre-applied on the cooler, then fix the heatsink and cooling fan on top. These typically screw straight into the motherboard. Once you’ve installed all these pieces, the last hardware requirement is to connect the power cable and actually switch on the machine. You do this via a button on the PSU or the case. When you hit it, you should hear the reassuring sounds of the motherboard and storage drive starting up…that is, if you’ve connected everything successfully. If not, don’t panic. Switch the power back off, double-check all the connections and slots, and then try again. Troubleshooting problems is a whole new article in itself, but one way to work out what’s going on is if the motherboard emits a beep or two. To translate those noises, Computer Hope offers a comprehensive beep code list. In fact, your motherboard’s manual might include its own decoder. For example, on a Dell machine, two beeps indicates that the motherboard can’t detect any installed RAM. If the motherboard doesn’t offer any tell-tale noises, you’ll have to go methodically through each component, one by one, making sure they’re all correctly seated and connected. Are data and power cables hooked up to the hard drive? Is the CPU heatsink firmly attached on top of the processor? The connections must be solid for the system to work. Install the operating system. When the hardware warms up, your computer will need an operating system, either Windows or Linux. The best option is to use a different computer to set up a USB drive that holds the necessary installation files. Microsoft has instructions for doing this with Windows, and you can follow these instructions to do the same thing for Ubuntu Linux. Although Linux is free, Windows 10 isn’t: You’ll need to pay $139 for the direct download, and then you can transfer it to your new PC via USB. To get your new machine to recognize the USB stick and the software on it, you may need to adjust the way the hardware boots up. Watch the screen for a message about entering the BIOS, which stands for Basic Input/Output System. This is the software on the motherboard, which handles communications between all the different parts of the computer. The motherboard user manual should come with a shortcut key to help you get into the BIOS. You should see a boot order option somewhere, where you can tell the BIOS to load from the USB drive rather than the hard drive or the optical drive. While you’re here, you can check that the motherboard is correctly recognizing the drives, RAM, processor, and all the other components. After you install your operating system, you should be ready to go! The whole process may take some time, but it’s also a lot of fun. And in the end, you’ll have a PC tailored to your exact specifications. David Nield David Nield is a tech journalist from the UK who has been writing about gadgets and apps since way before the iPhone and Twitter were invented. When he's not busy doing that, he usually takes breaks from all things tech with long walks in the countryside. build it yourself COMPUTING DIY tech hacks MORE TO READ. RELATED Android’s Recorder app makes it easy to post audio to social media. Promote your podcast like a pro. READ NOW RELATED Get your scratched wooden cutting board looking bright and new. It’s quick and easy with minimal tools required. RELATED Do everything in your browser faster. Because time is money, money is power, power is pizza, and pizza is knowledge. Like science, tech, and DIY projects? Sign up to receive Popular Science's emails and get the highlights. LET'S GO
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TitleHow to Build a Computer (with Pictures) - wikiHow
Urlhttps://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-Computer
DescriptionThis wikiHow teaches you how to build a desktop computer using custom parts. Successfully building a computer is largely contingent on defining your computer goals and budget, buying the right parts, and putting everything together in the..
Date3 Dec 2021
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Part 1 Part 1 of 4:Planning Your Computer
Part 2 Part 2 of 4:Purchasing Components
Part 3 Part 3 of 4:Assembling Your Computer
Part 4 Part 4 of 4:Running Your Computer
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BodyHow to Build a Computer Download Article Explore this Article parts 1 Planning Your Computer 2 Purchasing Components 3 Assembling Your Computer 4 Running Your Computer + Show 1 more... - Show less... Other Sections Questions & Answers Video Tips and Warnings Related Articles References Article Summary Written by Jack Lloyd Last Updated: December 3, 2021 References Approved Download Article X This article was written by Jack Lloyd. Jack Lloyd is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. He has over two years of experience writing and editing technology-related articles. He is technology enthusiast and an English teacher. There are 15 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. This article received 23 testimonials and 80% of readers who voted found it helpful, earning it our reader-approved status. This article has been viewed 2,215,622 times. This wikiHow teaches you how to build a desktop computer using custom parts. Successfully building a computer is largely contingent on defining your computer goals and budget, buying the right parts, and putting everything together in the correct order. Steps . Part 1 Part 1 of 4:Planning Your Computer . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f0\/Build-a-Computer-Step-1-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-1-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f0\/Build-a-Computer-Step-1-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-1-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Determine your computer's use. Before you buy any components or establish a budget, you'll need to know what you plan on using the computer for. Standard desktop PCs which are used for things like browsing and minor programs (e.g., Microsoft Word and Excel) can use older, less expensive parts, while gaming- or editing-focused computers will need more powerful, up-to-date parts.[1] X Research source Note: You can expect to spend under $500 for most basic desktops. Gaming and editing computers may run you anywhere from $500 to several thousand dollars. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/4d\/Build-a-Computer-Step-2-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-2-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/4d\/Build-a-Computer-Step-2-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-2-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Establish a budget. It's too easy to start buying attractive parts without sticking to a budget, only to realize that you're out of money and don't have all of the necessary equipment to build your PC. Figure out a soft limit (e.g., $300) and a hard limit (e.g., $400) and try to stay within that range. Common sense should guide your purchasing as well. For example, if the processor for which you budget is $100 but a nicer, newer model is discounted from $200 to $120 at your local tech store, spending the extra $20 is probably a better long-term investment. Advertisement {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f8\/Build-a-Computer-Step-3-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-3-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f8\/Build-a-Computer-Step-3-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-3-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Know which components you need to buy. No matter how expensive your computer, you will need the following components for your project:[2] X Research source Processor — Acts as the "brain" of your computer. Motherboard — Serves as an interface between all of your computer's components and the processor. RAM — Random Access Memory. More RAM will provide more "workspace" to increase your computer's performance. Think about the RAM as a table: more RAM gives you more room for doing things on that table. Less RAM is like having a smaller table! Hard drive — Stores data. You can buy a traditional hard drive, or you can opt for a more expensive solid state drive (SSD) if you want an exceptionally fast drive. Power supply — Powers all of your computer's individual components. The power supply is also the interface between your computer and the wall socket into which you plug your computer. Case — Necessary for storing and cooling your components. Graphics card — Used to render images on your computer. While most processors have a built-in graphics processing unit (GPU), you can buy a dedicated graphics card if you plan on gaming or using your computer for intensive editing. Cooling system — Keeps the inside of your case at a safe temperature. Only necessary for gaming and editing PCs—regular PCs should be fine with a stock cooler. Advertisement Part 2 Part 2 of 4:Purchasing Components . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/d6\/Build-a-Computer-Step-4-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-4-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/d\/d6\/Build-a-Computer-Step-4-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-4-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Know where to buy components. In-store locations such as Best Buy will stock computer components, but you can usually find comparable parts for cheaper if you shop online. Common online locations include Amazon, eBay, and NewEgg. Don't write off used parts, especially if the parts are listed as "Like New" or are in new condition. You can often buy such parts at a heavily discounted price for little to no change in function. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/7d\/Build-a-Computer-Step-5-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-5-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/7d\/Build-a-Computer-Step-5-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-5-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Research every component you intend to purchase. Read magazines and online consumer review sites for more information. Remember, this is one of the most important steps, because everything will depend on your hardware working correctly. A few relevant articles on wikiHow include How to Build a Cheap Gaming Computer, How to Choose Components for Building a Computer, and How to Build a Powerful Quiet Computer. Look for good reviews for your preferred product, both on the site from which you're considering purchasing it and elsewhere. Stay away from marketing graphs or numbers - there is always some trickery to make the numbers seem better than they are. Some reputable hardware reviewers are Linus Tech Tips, Tom's Hardware or Gamers Nexus. Once you've found a decently reviewed component, look for negative reviews of the component. You may find that the component is great for certain uses, but inappropriate for your own preferences. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f4\/Build-a-Computer-Step-6-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-6-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f4\/Build-a-Computer-Step-6-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-6-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Find a processor. The processor (or CPU) is the core of your computer's performance. The higher the processor's speed in gigahertz (GHz), the faster it can process data. Many applications use multiple threads at the same time, so more cores can improve performance. The processor will usually entail a large part of your budget. Processors typically come in quad-core, hexa-core or higher. Unless you're building an ultra-high-performance gaming PC, you should stick to <6 cores. Intel and AMD are two of the main processor manufacturers. Typically, AMD offers better value. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/ba\/Build-a-Computer-Step-7-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-7-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/ba\/Build-a-Computer-Step-7-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-7-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 Get a motherboard which fits your processor. You'll want to select a motherboard which is compatible with your processor, which can be accomplished by checking the socket of the CPU and motherboard. Other aspects to look for in a motherboard include the following:[3] X Research source "Onboard Wi-Fi" (ensures that your computer will have wireless capabilities) Bluetooth Multiple RAM slots Support for graphics cards if necessary (PCIe x16 slot) {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/02\/Build-a-Computer-Step-8-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-8-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/02\/Build-a-Computer-Step-8-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-8-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 Purchase RAM. RAM is responsible for storing data from running programs, so having enough of it is important. Before buying RAM, be sure to check both your processor and your motherboard for the type of RAM which is supported.[4] X Research source There is a limit to how much RAM your computer can use, and that limit is dictated by your processor's capabilities (typically 64GB) and your applications. If a program stores only 1GB data in the RAM, more RAM won't accelerate the task. Typically 8 GB is encouraged, with higher-end gaming machines benefiting from 16GB. Depending on your motherboard, you'll usually buy either DDR3 RAM or DDR4 RAM. The type of RAM that is supported by your motherboard will be noted in the motherboard's documentation. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f0\/Build-a-Computer-Step-9-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-9-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f0\/Build-a-Computer-Step-9-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-9-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 6 Buy a hard drive. Comparatively speaking, purchasing a hard drive is easy—most hard drives are compatible with virtually all motherboards and processors, though you may need to make sure the hard drive you find will fit in your case. You'll want to buy a SATA hard drive which stores at least 500 gigabytes, and be sure to buy from a reputable manufacturer such as Western Digital, Seagate, or Toshiba. Your average hard drive has a speed of 7200 RPM. Hard drives can also use IDE instead of SATA as their connections, but SATA is newer and thus supported on all modern motherboards. If you want a smaller hard drive with faster data retrieval, you can instead purchase a solid state drive (SSD). These drives are significantly more expensive than most standard computer hard drives. Often they are used as a complementary drive with a larger hard drive. SSDs usually come with a SATA connector, with newer models using NVMe M.2 or SATA M.2. Some motherboards might not support the NVMe or M.2 standard. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/02\/Build-a-Computer-Step-10-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-10-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/02\/Build-a-Computer-Step-10-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-10-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 7 Purchase a graphics card if necessary. A dedicated graphics card is essential for playing the latest games, but not a major issue for a computer you plan on using for daily tasks. If you watch or edit a lot of HD video or play a lot of games, you'll want a dedicated graphics card.[5] X Research source As with any other component, make sure that your graphics card is compatible with your motherboard. However, you are unlikely to get issues. The graphics card should take up 1/3 of a gaming computer budget. Nearly all Intel CPUs have integrated graphics, so you don’t need a dedicated card if you’re planning to use the computer for office work, web browsing email, and a little bit of online gaming. AMD also manufactures the 2200G and 2400G processors with powerful integrated graphics, capable of some games at lower settings. Graphics cards are also referred to as "video cards" or "GPU". {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f2\/Build-a-Computer-Step-11-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-11-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f2\/Build-a-Computer-Step-11-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-11-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 8 Make sure your power supply can handle the load. The power supply powers all of your components in your computer. Some cases come with a power supply already installed, but others require you to provide your own. The power supply should be powerful enough to charge all of your components; don't worry about it being so powerful that you waste electricity by powering more than you need, as it will only output as many watts as you use and the number on its wattage is only its max capacity. Tip: Choose a power supply from a reputable manufacturer like Seasonic, beQuiet, EVGA or Corsair. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/15\/Build-a-Computer-Step-12-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-12-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/15\/Build-a-Computer-Step-12-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-12-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 9 Pick up a case that is both functional and easy on the eyes. The case is what holds your computer components. A few cases come with a power supply included, but if you are making a gaming build then getting a separate power supply is recommended, as the power supplies that come with cases are usually not very high quality.[6] X Research source The size of the case will be based on how many drives bays and card slots it has, as well as the size and type of your motherboard. Be sure to select a case which can fit all of your components, including your hard drive. Cases might obstruct air flow causing some higher-end components with larger power draw to overheat. Advertisement Part 3 Part 3 of 4:Assembling Your Computer . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/0b\/Build-a-Computer-Step-13-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-13-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/0b\/Build-a-Computer-Step-13-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-13-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Ground yourself. Use an antistatic wrist-strap cable to prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD) which can be deadly to computer electronics. Alternatively, touch a large metal body like a radiator to discharge yourself. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/b9\/Build-a-Computer-Step-14-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-14-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/b9\/Build-a-Computer-Step-14-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-14-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Open the case. Unscrew the side panel (or slide it toward the back of the case) to do so. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/20\/Build-a-Computer-Step-15-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-15-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/20\/Build-a-Computer-Step-15-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-15-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Install the power supply. Some cases come with the power supply already installed, while others will require you to purchase the power supply separately and install it yourself. Make sure that the power supply is installed in the correct orientation, and that nothing is blocking the power supply's fan.[7] X Research source The power supply will usually go near the top or the bottom rear of the case. You can determine where the power supply is supposed to sit by looking for a missing section on the back of the case. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/70\/Build-a-Computer-Step-16-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-16-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/70\/Build-a-Computer-Step-16-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-16-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 Add components to the motherboard. This is usually easiest to do before you install the motherboard, as the case can limit your ability to wire components:[8] X Research source Attach the processor to the motherboard by finding the processor port on the motherboard's surface. An indicator on CPU and motherboard will show you the correct orientation. Attach your RAM to the motherboard by finding the RAM slots and inserting the RAM appropriately (they should only fit one way). Attach your power supply to the motherboard's power connectors. Locate (but do not attach) the motherboard's hard drive SATA port. You'll use this to connect the hard drive to the motherboard later. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/7f\/Build-a-Computer-Step-17-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-17-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/7f\/Build-a-Computer-Step-17-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-17-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 Apply thermal paste to the processor if necessary. Put a small dot (around the size of a grain of rice or a pea) of thermal paste on the CPU. Adding too much thermal paste will create a mess, such as getting paste into the motherboard socket, which may short circuit components and decrease the motherboard's value if you plan to sell it later.[9] X Research source Tip: Some processors that come with heat sinks do not need thermal paste because the heat sink already has thermal paste applied by the factory. Check the bottom of the heat sink unit before applying paste to the processor.[10] X Research source {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/93\/Build-a-Computer-Step-18-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-18-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/93\/Build-a-Computer-Step-18-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-18-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 6 Attach the heat sink. This varies from heat sink to heat sink, so read the instructions for your processor.[11] X Research source Most stock coolers attach directly over the processor and clip into the motherboard. Aftermarket heat sinks may have brackets that need to be attached underneath the motherboard. Skip this step if your processor has an installed heat sink. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/e0\/Build-a-Computer-Step-19-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-19-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/e\/e0\/Build-a-Computer-Step-19-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-19-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 7 Prepare your case. You may need to knock the plates out of the back of the case in order to fit your components into the correct positions. If your case has separate shelving units to hold your hard drive, install the units using the included screws. You may need to install and wire your case's fans before you can install any components. If so, follow your case's fan installation instructions. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/03\/Build-a-Computer-Step-20-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-20-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/03\/Build-a-Computer-Step-20-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-20-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 8 Secure the motherboard. Once the standoffs are installed, place the motherboard in the case and push it up against the backplate. All of the back ports should fit into the holes in the I/O backplate. Use the screws provided to secure the motherboard to the standoffs through the shielded screw holes on the motherboard. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/38\/Build-a-Computer-Step-21-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-21-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/38\/Build-a-Computer-Step-21-Version-3.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-21-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 9 Plug in the case connectors. These tend to be located together on the motherboard near the front of the case. The order in which these are connected will depend on which is easiest. Make sure that you connect the USB ports, the Power and Reset switches, the LED power and hard drive lights, and the audio cable. Your motherboard’s documentation will show you where on your motherboard these connectors attach.[12] X Research source There is typically only one way that these connectors can attach to the motherboard. Don’t try to force anything to fit. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/88\/Build-a-Computer-Step-22-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-22-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/88\/Build-a-Computer-Step-22-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-22-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 10 Install your hard drive. This process will vary slightly depending on your case, but should typically go as follows:[13] X Research source Remove any front panels on the case (if you're installing an optical drive, you will usually install it near the top of the case). Insert the hard drive into its slot (again, usually near the top of the case). Tighten any screws needed to hold the drive in place. Plug the hard drive's SATA cable into the SATA slot on the motherboard. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/9b\/Build-a-Computer-Step-23-Version-5.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-23-Version-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/9b\/Build-a-Computer-Step-23-Version-5.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-23-Version-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 11 Connect the power supply to any necessary components. If you haven't already connected the power supply to components which need power, make sure that it is connected to the following locations: Motherboard Graphics card(s) Hard drive(s) {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/36\/Build-a-Computer-Step-24-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-24-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/36\/Build-a-Computer-Step-24-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-24-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 12 Finish your computer assembly. Once you've placed and connected the various internal components for your computer, all that's left to do is ensure that none of the wires interfere with circulation and close up the case. If you bought a cooling system, you'll want to install it before you proceed. Refer to the cooling system's installation instructions in order to do so. Many cases will have a panel which either slides back into place or screws onto the side of the case. Advertisement Part 4 Part 4 of 4:Running Your Computer . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/d6\/Build-a-Computer-Step-25-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-25-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/d\/d6\/Build-a-Computer-Step-25-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-25-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Attach your computer to an outlet. Using your power source's power cable, plug your computer into a wall outlet or power strip. You may first have to attach the electrical cable to the power source input on the back of your computer's case. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/a\/a2\/Build-a-Computer-Step-26-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-26-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/a\/a2\/Build-a-Computer-Step-26-Version-3.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-26-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Plug a monitor into your computer. You'll typically use the graphics card output that's near the bottom of the case, though some motherboards may have this port on the right or left side of the case.[14] X Research source The output here is usually a DisplayPort or HDMI port. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/53\/Build-a-Computer-Step-27-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-27-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/53\/Build-a-Computer-Step-27-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-27-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Turn on your computer. Press the computer's Power {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/5\/5d\/Windowspower.png","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/5d\/Windowspower.png\/30px-Windowspower.png","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":460,"bigWidth":30,"bigHeight":30,"licensing":"I edited this screenshot of a Windows icon.\n<\/p>License: Public Domain<\/a>\n<\/p><\/div>"} button on the front or back of the case. If everything's properly connected, your computer should start up. Tip: If you encounter issues during the startup process—or if your computer fails to start—disconnect it from the power source, re-open the case, and check the connections again. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/96\/Build-a-Computer-Step-28-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-28-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/96\/Build-a-Computer-Step-28-Version-3.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-28-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 Install Windows or Linux. Windows is compatible with all PCs and will make full use of their various features (e.g., Bluetooth), but you will have to purchase a copy of Windows if you don't have a product key. Linux is free, but may not be able to use all of your computer's hardware. If you don't have an installation USB drive, you'll need to create one on another computer before you can install your operating system. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/67\/Build-a-Computer-Step-29-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Computer-Step-29-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/67\/Build-a-Computer-Step-29-Version-4.jpg\/aid323368-v4-728px-Build-a-Computer-Step-29-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"\u00a9 2022 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.\n<\/p>\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 Install your drivers. Once your operating system is installed, you will need to install your drivers. Almost all of the hardware that you purchased should come with discs that contain the driver software needed for the hardware to work. Modern versions of Windows and Linux will install most drivers automatically when connected to the Internet. Advertisement Community Q&A . Search Add New Question Question Where can I get price comparisons for computer parts? Community Answer Use a website called PCpartpicker.com It will help you choose compatible parts and also determine the cheapest website to buy from. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 48 Helpful 374 Question How do I install an OS? Community Answer Because most OSs nowadays are booted from USBs, you will need to change the start-up order (in BIOS) to start from the USB. There will usually be on-screen instructions aiding you with installing your OS. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 4 Helpful 32 Question Is it possible to get Windows without having to insert a disc into your optical drive? If yes, how? Community Answer Windows 10 purchased from a store or online comes on flash drive now, all you have to do is plug in the flash drive and boot from that. You can also download the ISO and, using Microsoft USB Download Tool software, create your own bootable installation flash drive if you have a spare. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 33 Helpful 140 Question After building my PC with all new parts, I plugged it in but only got power for a second then nothing, what went wrong? Community Answer It's possible that there is a grounding issue with the motherboard. If the motherboard is contacting the case, it creates a path to ground, which kills the electric charge in the circuits. Check to make sure there are spacers separating the motherboard from the metal of the case. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 48 Helpful 180 Question What is thermal paste for? Community Answer Thermal paste is a very good conductor so it transfers heat from the CPU to the heatsink more effectively than without it. Even though metal is a good conductor, there can be imperfections on the metal which will reduce conductivity leading to heat being built up in the CPU. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 8 Helpful 40 Question Can I put two separate CPUs in a motherboard non-dual/quad core or is there not enough space? Community Answer It is impossible for you to do that unless your motherboard already accepts two CPUs. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 10 Helpful 22 Question What if the CPU doesn't go in? Community Answer Check the arrow on the bottom left part of your CPU, and line it up to the little arrow on your motherboard. It should just drop in. If not, you might have bought the wrong motherboard for your CPU. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 18 Helpful 48 Question Do I need a heat sink too? Community Answer Yes. You need a heat sink to prevent the computer from overheating and shutting down automatically. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 46 Helpful 115 Question Is a heat sink the same as a CPU cooling fan, or does it come with it, or do I need to purchase it separately? Community Answer Most of the time, a CPU comes with a heatsink, but if it is Intel and has a K on it (ex. Core i7 6700k, Core i5 6600k), you will most likely need to buy a separate fan. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 41 Helpful 102 Question Can I install a hard drive that already has an OS on it? Community Answer Yes, when you want to run that OS you will have to go into the BIOS or boot option menu to tell the computer to boot from a specific hard drive. If you are keeping a hard drive from an old computer, make sure it is compatible with the new parts and try to do a fresh install of the OS to wipe out any bloatware. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 9 Helpful 19 Show more answers Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement Video .By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. . Tips . Some components will come with protective plastic on them so they aren’t scratched up. Make sure you remove this or you computer will start to smell like burning plastic. Thanks! Helpful 11 Not Helpful 0 Each power supply cable will only fit in the correct orientation, but pressure will still be needed to push the cables in. If using a newer power supply with an 8-pin EPS 12V connector and a PCI Express 8-pin connector, don't attempt to force the cables into place. Thanks! Helpful 10 Not Helpful 0 If you install a water cooling system instead of a typical fan, you should run a 24-hour test to check for leaks before actually installing it in your computer. Thanks! Helpful 8 Not Helpful 0 You can use zip ties to carefully bundle all of the cables and then route them to prevent them from blocking the airflow. Thanks! Helpful 7 Not Helpful 1 If you bought an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) edition of Microsoft Windows and you have a license sticker, you may want to attach the sticker on the side of the PC for future reference when Windows Setup asks for it. Thanks! Helpful 5 Not Helpful 1 Some power supplies have a built in 115/230V converter. If you are in the U.S., use the 115V setting.[15] X Research source Thanks! Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0 Advertisement Warnings . Avoid electrostatic discharge when installing components. Wear a static wristband or regularly ground yourself by touching a metal part of the case before handling components. Thanks! Helpful 15 Not Helpful 2 Make sure all parts are compatible with your motherboard! Thanks! Helpful 13 Not Helpful 2 Do not buy any computer parts from any untrusted retailer online; you might get scammed, or the computer part may be defective. Thanks! Helpful 13 Not Helpful 2 Use care when working around the sharp, sheet metal edges of a computer case. It is easy to cut yourself, especially with very small cases. Thanks! Helpful 12 Not Helpful 2 Don't touch the resistors and the pins on the CPU or the socket. Thanks! Helpful 15 Not Helpful 4 Be sure to buy a power supply with the specific needs for your system and from a reputable company, as cheaper ones can be faulty and completely damage your system. Thanks! Helpful 11 Not Helpful 3 Wash your hands before building a computer. Thanks! Helpful 3 Not Helpful 1 Advertisement You Might Also Like. How toAttach a USB Drive to Your Computer How toGround Yourself to Avoid Destroying a Computer with Electrostatic Discharge How toSafely Get Rid of an Old Computer How toBuild a Supercomputer How toAvoid (Static) Electric Shock How toApply Thermal Paste How toBuild a Laptop Computer How toInstall a New Processor How toRemember Electrical Resistor Color Codes How toExecute a Script at Startup on the Raspberry Pi How toBuild a Personal Desktop Computer How toCreate a Gaming Computer How toAdd LED Lights to a PC How toBuild a Liquid Cooling System for Your Computer Advertisement References . ↑ https://www.techradar.com/news/computing/best-computer-how-to-choose-the-right-one-935053 ↑ http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=29470&seqNum=3 ↑ https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/motherboard-buying-guide,5682.html ↑ https://techguided.com/how-to-choose-ram/ ↑ https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/21/17761644/graphics-card-how-to-choose ↑ https://techguided.com/how-to-choose-a-pc-case/ ↑ https://www.pcworld.com/article/2924378/replace-your-pcs-heart-how-to-install-a-power-supply-in-your-computer.html ↑ https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/13/17828092/gaming-pc-build-custom-how-to-asus-intel-geforce-cost ↑ https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-comparison,5108-3.html More References (6) ↑ http://techreport.com/review/23624/how-to-build-a-pc-the-tech-report-guide/3 ↑ https://www.maketecheasier.com/what-is-heatsink/ ↑ https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2018/06/27/how-to-build-a-pc-2018-how-to-connect-case-cables-system-panel-connector/ ↑ https://www.pcworld.com/article/131231/how-to-install-a-new-hard-drive-in-your-desktop-pc.html ↑ https://www.dell.com/support/kbdoc/pl-pl/000132424/how-to-connect-a-monitor-to-a-pc?lang=en ↑ https://us.answers.acer.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1323/~/what-should-the-voltage-setting-be-on-the-power-supply-for-my-desktop-computer%3F About This Article. JL Written by: Jack Lloyd Tech Specialist This article was written by Jack Lloyd. Jack Lloyd is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. He has over two years of experience writing and editing technology-related articles. He is technology enthusiast and an English teacher. This article has been viewed 2,215,622 times. How helpful is this? Co-authors: 236 Updated: December 3, 2021 Views: 2,215,622 Categories: Featured Articles | Building Your Own Computer Article SummaryXTo build a computer, start by grounding yourself with an antistatic wrist-strap cable to prevent electrostatic discharge. Next, open the case and install the power supply near the top of the case. Then, attach the processor and RAM to the motherboard, hook it up to the power supply, and attach the heat sink. Once the standoffs are installed, place the motherboard in the case, push it up against the backplate, and secure it with screws. Finally, install the hard drive and make sure the power supply is connected to all of the necessary components before connecting the monitor. To learn more about which components to buy and where to buy them, read on! Did this summary help you?YesNo In other languages Español:construir una computadora Русский:собрать компьютер Italiano:Assemblare un PC Français:assembler un ordinateur Nederlands:Zelf een computer bouwen Bahasa Indonesia:Merakit Komputer 中文:组装计算机 العربية:تجميع جهاز كمبيوتر Čeština:Jak postavit počítač Tiếng Việt:Lắp ráp một Máy tính हिन्दी:एक कंप्यूटर बनायें ไทย:ประกอบคอมพิวเตอร์เอง Türkçe:Bir Bilgisayar Nasıl Toplanır 日本語:パソコンを組み立てる Print Send fan mail to authors Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 2,215,622 times. Reader Success Stories. Matthew Lennartz Apr 1, 2017 "While majoring in Computer Engineering, the majority of my IT career was, unfortunately, spent in the auspices of management. A product of such circumstances was building one pc over thirty years ago (AMD KD-400?). Needless to say, I need to shake loose the rusts of time. This article provided the level of insight for me to build the performance/cosmetic jet of my dreams. Thanks to the team for taking the time to remember that memories of building sometimes just are not enough!"..." more Rated this article: More reader stories Hide reader stories Share your story Is this article up to date? Yes No Advertisement Cookies make wikiHow better. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. JL Written by: Jack Lloyd Tech Specialist Click a star to vote % of people told us that this article helped them. Co-authors: 236 Updated: December 3, 2021 Views: 2,215,622 Matthew Lennartz Apr 1, 2017 "While majoring in Computer Engineering, the majority of my IT career was, unfortunately, spent in the auspices of management. A product of such circumstances was building one pc over thirty years ago (AMD KD-400?). Needless to say, I need to shake loose the rusts of time. This article provided the level of insight for me to build the performance/cosmetic jet of my dreams. Thanks to the team for taking the time to remember that memories of building sometimes just are not enough!"..." more Rated this article: Malaika Awan Feb 8, 2017 "This article helped me so much. I had to do my ICT homework which was about building a computer, so I really needed an article like this. Thank you so much. :)"..." more Seamus McFinnigan May 13, 2017 "It was easy to understand. Most articles like this are written like the readers already know all the terminology and steps."..." more Chris Smith Jun 6, 2017 "A general guide that provided enough information to know where to start and avoid most potential problems." Jake Lizarraga Sep 10, 2016 "A guide that talks about everything from budget to assembly, with countless useful tips & warnings." Share yours! More success stories Hide success stories You Might Also Like. How toAttach a USB Drive to Your ComputerHow toGround Yourself to Avoid Destroying a Computer with Electrostatic DischargeHow toSafely Get Rid of an Old ComputerHow toBuild a Supercomputer Featured Articles. How toDeal With Password Reset HarassmentHow toInstall Microsoft Teams on a Mobile DeviceHow toInstall Microsoft Teams on WindowsHow toMake a Play TelephoneHow toMake Tomato SoupHow toUnclog a Bathtub DrainTrending Articles. How toFind a Hobby You'll Stick WithHow toMake a Travel Itinerary with Google MapsHow toGet More Effects on Tik TokHow toOrganize Your LifeHow toKeep a Tent Warm in WinterHow toMake PotteryFeatured Articles. How toFix a Bicycle WheelHow toButterfly ShrimpHow toMake a Paper Origami FoxHow toKnit a ScarfHow toDownload Windows 11How toMake Lip BalmNew Pages. How toGet Unbanned from GrindrHow toRespond to "¿Cómo estás?"How toDownload Tiktok for PC on Windows 10How toWhat Does the Moon Symbolize in AstrologyHow toDescribe a Good MarriageHow toAdd a PDF Printer to MacFeatured Articles. How toLove ReadingHow toGrow Lemon Trees IndoorsHow toKeep Track of Your KeysHow toDelete a Post on InstagramHow toInk WashHow toProtect Hair from HeatWatch Articles. How toCreate Airflow in a RoomHow toWrite a Journal EntryHow toMake Homemade ScrapbooksHow toMake Mini Cinnamon Roll Baked DoughnutsHow toWrap a PresentHow toMake Peppermint TeaTrending Articles. How toSigns She Is Infatuated with YouHow toKeep Poinsettias Growing To Next ChristmasHow toCancel a Date over TextHow toImprove Your Health by GardeningHow toCover Brick FloorsHow toDate Your Ex Again CategoriesComputers and ElectronicsComputersBuilding Your Own Computer wikiHow Newsletter You're all set! Helpful how-tos delivered toyour inbox every week! Sign me up! By signing up you are agreeing to receive emails according to our privacy policy. Home About wikiHow Experts Blog Jobs Contact Us Site Map Terms of Use Privacy Policy Do Not Sell My Info Not Selling Info Contribute Follow Us × wikiHow Tech Help Pro: Level up your tech skills and stay ahead of the curve Let's go! X 1029
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TitleHow To Build a Computer: A Step By Step PC-Building Infographic - PC Build Advisor
Urlhttps://www.pcbuildadvisor.com/how-to-build-a-computer-step-by-step-infographic/
DescriptionWe've been working on something for all our readers who want to know what exactly is involved in building your own computer from scratch. We wanted to create something a bit more user-friendly than an in-depth video or text-heavy instruction list, so we've created a step-by-step computer assembly infographic to show you how to assemble [...]
Date
Organic Position10
H1How To Build a Computer: A Step By Step PC-Building Infographic
H2Planning Your Build (Safety First!)
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) and Your Computer Parts
About Our Step-by-step Guide to Building Your Own Computer
Computer Assembly Steps
Connecting Peripherals
Build Complete!
H3Tools
1. Building Outside of the Case:
2. Changing Up the Order of Mounting Components
Step 1: Open Case
Step 2: Mount Motherboard
Step 3: Mount Processor (CPU)
Step 4: Install CPU Cooler
Step 5: Install Power Supply (PSU)
Step 6: Mount Memory (RAM)
Step 7: Install Graphics Card
Step 8: Mount Storage Drives
Step 9: Mount Optical Drive
Step 10: Connect case fans and front panel connectors
Step 11: Close Case and Connect Peripherals
Leave a Reply Cancel reply
H2WithAnchorsPlanning Your Build (Safety First!)
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) and Your Computer Parts
About Our Step-by-step Guide to Building Your Own Computer
Computer Assembly Steps
Connecting Peripherals
Build Complete!
BodyHow To Build a Computer: A Step By Step PC-Building Infographic We’ve been working on something for all our readers who want to know what exactly is involved in building your own computer from scratch. We wanted to create something a bit more user-friendly than an in-depth video or text-heavy instruction list, so we’ve created a step-by-step computer assembly infographic to show you how to assemble your own PC, complete with pictures for each step along the way. Perhaps you have never built a PC before in your life…. or maybe you are just looking to brush up on what’s involved in assembling a computer from parts.. Either way, we are sure that our DIY computer assembly infographic will have you covered. It’s perfect for those who want to get an idea of what they might be getting themselves into if they decided to attempt a PC build, or even for those after a quick refresher! Feel free to skip ahead to your area of interest if you need to, and at the bottom of the infographic you’ll find some more in-depth text explaining each step and key things to look out for.       We get questions all the time from people who have never built a computer before, but it’s really not that difficult as long as you know how. So if you’ve ever found yourself asking questions like any of the following… What do I need to know to build my own computer? What’s involved in assembling a computer from scratch? Am I going to be getting in over my head? How do I build a fully customized computer from parts? … then we think our step-by-step illustrated infographic may help you get a quick overview of the entire PC build process! So if you are new to PC assembly and are interested in getting involved, please check out out our infographic below for a step-by-step guide in pictures of how to build your own computer. We’ve also gone into slightly more detail in the written text which you’ll find below the image. Be sure to let us know what you think by leaving us a comment below!     DIY Computer Assembly: An Infographic Planning Your Build (Safety First!). If this is the first computer you’ve built, it can pay to make sure you do a bit of forward planning. Have a suitable work area, with good lighting and plenty of space. Ensure you have all required tools on hand for easy access. Consider keeping a container nearby to hold loose parts like screws. Have a guide/reference material nearby (this guide, or an instructional video). You may also want to quickly skim over the relevant sections of the manuals for the individual parts you’re about to assemble. These are typically included as a paper insert in the product packaging. Ensure your area is not at risk of static electricity, which has the potential to damage your parts. Be aware of safety precautions. Tools. Surprisingly, you don’t need many tools to put a PC together. Screwdriver (Philips head) –  Used for nearly all screws including case and various component mounting screws Screwdriver (Flat head) – You may need this for installing your CPU cooler, so it’s best to have one on hand just in case Optional extras include: Anti-Static Wrist strap – If you are worried about static damaging your parts, you can opt to use an anti-static wrist strap Cable ties – A must for cable management (unless your case has some included with it). These will keep all cabling in your case nice and neat Scissors – For cutting excess length off cable ties and making short work of any pesky plastic packaging on your computer parts Flashlight – In case you need a little extra light to see what you’re doing Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) and Your Computer Parts. You may have heard about electrostatic discharge (ESD), or simply ‘static’ being harmful to computer parts. If you’ve ever shocked yourself from static when touching a metal object, that’s what this is referring to. ESD can occasionally be thousands of Volts which has the potential to cause damage to computer parts. Generally though, it’s pretty rare. By following good practice (I.e. Grounding yourself to remove any static build-up), it’s very unlikely that you’ll have any issues with ESD. To ground yourself, simply touch the metal casing of your computer case to bring yourself to the same electrical potential as it. You can do this often throughout the assembly process to discharge any electrical potential you may have built up. Avoid building up any charge on your body by limiting how much you move around or what you touch (e.g. you don’t want to be shuffling your feet on a carpeted surface on a dry day while you are building your new PC). If you get worried, simply discharge yourself to the computer case by touching it with your bare hands again. If you’re still concerned about static, you can get yourself an anti-static wrist strap, which simply keeps your body in contact with the case of the computer at all times while you are building your PC. About Our Step-by-step Guide to Building Your Own Computer. There are a few different ways you can tackle building a computer, and when it comes down to it, take the one you feel most comfortable with. The process we’ve outlined in our computer build infographic is just one of the ways we prefer to build PCs, but there is some flexibility around it. For instance, you could easily switch around steps (and in fact, we did when we went through our detailed build guide), or even do what’s called an ‘out of the case’ build. Over the internet you’ll find opinions everywhere, and the truth is, nearly all of the different methods are justifiable with their own pros and cons. Examples of other build orders that can work and some popular ‘build methods’ are: 1. Building Outside of the Case:. This method involves partially assembling the motherboard and associated units (CPU, CPU cooler, and RAM) outside of the case, then transplanting this whole unit to within the case before continuing with the build assembly. Pros:. When outside of the case, you’ve plenty of ‘working space’ to mount the CPU, cooler and RAM You have better visibility to ensure components are mounted correctly Cons:. Mounting the components on the motherboard without it suitably supported has the potential to cause damage Trying to install the motherboard into the case with components like the CPU cooler already mounted to it may be difficult depending on where the motherboard mounts are located. Sometimes you may not be able to fit your screwdriver where it needs to be if other  parts like the CPU cooler or RAM get in the way. If you have an aftermarket CPU cooler it may have a back bracket that needs to be fixed to the read of the motherboard. In this case, install hardware on the motherboard before mounting the motherboard into the case (though some cases may have a cutout in the motherboard mounting plate that allows you to access this section of the motherboard – depending on your case). 2. Changing Up the Order of Mounting Components. Whether you choose to build ‘inside the case’ or ‘outside the case’, you can still assemble individual parts in nearly any order you choose. Examples:. Power supply -> Motherboard -> CPU -> RAM -> Graphics card -> Storage and optical drives Motherboard -> Power supply -> Storage and optical drives -> CPU -> RAM -> Graphics card It’s up to you! However, if you’re new we suggest following a build guide until you get an idea of your personal preferences when it comes to build order. Pros/Cons:. Depending on the order of assembly, some parts can get in the way of other parts when trying to mount them, or result in less working space/room inside the case for installing other parts. Be careful as there are some items which must be installed in a certain order (for instance, you cannot install the CPU cooler without first installing the CPU). If you are deviating from the suggested order, be sure to think ahead, as sometimes you may not be able to access fastening points (for example, some graphics card/motherboard combinations can result in not being able to release the RAM fastening clips once the graphics card is installed; in which case you would need to install your RAM before your graphics card). Computer Assembly Steps. Step 1: Open Case. Remove the back screws Take side cover off Its easiest to work on your PC with it laying sideways on a flat surface, so the open side is facing up. Don’t forget to ground yourself (by touching the case) before working on assembling parts. Keep any screws which were supplied with the case separate and take note of the different types. Most cases will come with a few different packets of screws and they may have different sizes or threads, so make sure to match them up with the correct mounting locations as best as possible. If in doubt, refer to the documentation which came with your computer case. Step 2: Mount Motherboard. Screw motherboard standoffs into the case Punch out rear I/O plate from the case (if existing) and replace it with the motherboard I/O plate Fasten the motherboard in place on top of the mounting standoffs There a few different sizes (also known as ‘form factors’) of motherboard commonly available, so most cases have screw positions that will accommodate the various sizes of motherboard.  You don’t need to install mounting standoffs in all of them; just the ones that match your motherboard will be fine. The I/O plate is an input-output plate which is simply a metal cover that is customized to your particular motherboard. You’ll need to remove the default I/O plate that may have been supplied with your case and swap it out for the one that came with your motherboard. Screws and standoffs are often supplied with your computer case, however sometimes screws may be supplied with a motherboard. Step 3: Mount Processor (CPU). Locate the CPU socket holder on the motherboard Lift up the latch lever to release and hinge open the CPU socket cover. Holding the CPU by its sides, line up any alignment notches or the triangle marked on the corner of the CPU to the triangle marked on the motherboard. Gently place it straight down into the motherboard socket to seat the CPU Lower the CPU socket cover over the CPU and lower the latch lever closed again to secure the CPU socket holder closed Don’t apply force to seat the CPU. Avoid touching of pressing down on the back of the CPU with your fingers, as any residue from your hands can destroy the heat transfer surface for the cooler which will be mounted next. Another important thing to note is to remove any plastic packaging around the CPU socket cover before installing your CPU and cooler. Usually there is a piece of removable hard plastic somewhere around the CPU socket cover which serves to protect the CPU terminal pins on the motherboard. Be sure to remove and discard this as you install your CPU. Step 4: Install CPU Cooler. Make sure the CPU cooler is installed directly to the back of the CPU metal housing. We’ve heard stories of installations where the plastic packaging on the CPU socket cover (which is meant to be discarded after CPU installation) was not removed, and the CPU cooler was mistakenly mounted to the plastic. Don’t make this expensive mistake, as this will cause overheating and damage to your CPU. If required, apply thermal paste to the back of the CPU Seat CPU heatsink/cooler and fix in position. Plug the power cable attached to the cooler fan into the motherboard connector. Some CPU coolers do come with a thermal pad already applied, in which case you can skip step 1. If yours doesn’t, you will need to  apply thermal paste to the CPU surface before seating the CPU cooler in position. Cable headers on motherboards vary in their location depending on what motherboard you have. To identify the correct header, look for the labeling on the motherboard; they are always labeled next to the header with the intended connection, for example: CPUFAN = CPU fan SYS_FAN1 = System fan (any general fan can be plugged in here) SYS_FAN2 = System fan (any general fan can be plugged in here) Step 5: Install Power Supply (PSU). Mount the power supply and fasten with screws to the case mounting points Plug the largest cabling connector from the power supply cabling into the motherboard power connector. Plug the 8-pin cabling connector from the power supply cabling into the CPU power connector Most power supplies will have a whole bunch of cabling and connectors coming out of the rear. Others may have sockets for cables to be plugged in. We find it easiest to connect the power cabling for each hardware component to the power supply as you assemble the PC (rather than waiting until the all parts are assembled and plugging in all power cables at once); we do it this way so that you won’t accidentally forget to connect power to any device. Step 6: Mount Memory (RAM). Press to open the clips at both ends of the RAM mounting slots Line up the notch on the RAM stick with the mounting slot Seat the RAM and press it firmly down into the slot. The tabs should automatically latch closed as you press the RAM down, securing the RAM in place Install any other RAM sticks using the same process Most motherboards will have multiple RAM mounting slots. If you are installing pairs of RAM sticks, mount them in the same color slots on the motherboard. When pressing the RAM into the motherboard mounting slots, you’ll often have to use a fair amount of force to ensure it is seated properly. Be careful not to flex the motherboard too much when doing this – it can help to support the edge of the board if necessary with your spare hand to avoid bending the motherboard too much as you press down on the back of the RAM stick. Step 7: Install Graphics Card. Not all computers have a dedicated graphics card. If you have decided to use the on-board graphics of your motherboar instead of installing a dedicated graphics card, you can skip this section. Remove the expansion slot covers from the rear of your case where the graphics card will sit The graphics card slots into a PCI expansion slot on the lower half of the motherboard. Line it up and press down firmly to seat the card. Put in the screws to hold the graphics card in place Plug in the power connector cables from your power supply into the graphics card power connector (if existing – not all graphics cards required external power) When you plug in your display monitor, always use the output ports of the graphics card frist (if you have one installed) and not the output ports of the motherboard itself. This ensures you are actually using your graphics card! Step 8: Mount Storage Drives. Storage drives come in two main sizes: a 3.5″ form factor or 2.5″ form factor. Due to their smaller size, 2.5″ drives may need an adapter plate to mount them within your PC case. The exact mounting strategy for storage drives will vary from computer case to computer case. Sometimes, you may need to refer to the manual for your case in order to fit drives into the drive bays. Update: A smaller form-factor storage drive has also become more popular and available recently – the M.2 storage drive. If you have one of these drives, you won’t need to use the drive bays on your case, and you’ll simply plug the connector tab of the M.2 storage drive (which looks like a card) directly into the appropriate M.2 port on your motherboard, no cables needed. Mount storage drives in the case drive bays. Fix the drive in place with screws through the case frame into the case mounting holes located on the storage drive Connect the drive to the motherboard using a SATA cable Plug in power cabling to the storage drive Mount any other storage drives in the same way External storage drives will typically come with two connections that you need to make: power and data; which is why we plug in two separate cables to each drive. The data connection cable is a SATA cable which connects between the motherboard and the storage drive. The power connection cable supplies power to the drive, and plugs into the drive from the power supply. Step 9: Mount Optical Drive. Optical drives are optional and only required if you wish to read or write CDs, DVDs, or Bluray discs. Some people choose not to include an optical drive in their PC build if they don’t plan on using optical discs. Remove any front panels from the computer case where the optical drive will sit. Mount optical drive in the case by fixing with screws through the case frame into the case mounting holes located on the optical drive Connect the optical drive to the motherboard using a SATA cable Plug in power cabling from your power supply to the optical drive Just like external storage drives that we connected in Step 8, optical drives also require two connections: power and data. Again, the data connection cable is a SATA cable which connects the optical drive to the motherboard. The power connection cable supplies power to the drive, and plugs into the drive from the power supply Step 10: Connect case fans and front panel connectors. Some computer cases come with case fans already installed/mounted within the case. However, you will still need to plug the power cables of these fans into a header port located on your motherboard. This supplies the fan with power which is required for it to operate. In other cases you might need to mount your own case fans, or you may even choose to run your computer without any case fans at all. Front panel connections may vary according to your case, but typically comprise of the same components: audio, USB, and power/reset/lights etc. These will be present in the form of cables that come from the front panel; the ends of which will be hanging loose in your case. You’ll need to hook these up to the appropriate locations on your motherboard. Mount any case fans within your case as required using the supplied screws or clips Connect any case fan power connectors to the multiple fan headers located at various places on the motherboard. Identify the cabling from the front panel ports of your PC. These front panel connectors will need to be plugged into the motherboard so that buttons and inputs/outputs (I/O) on your case front panel will work Connect any front panel audio connectors to the the motherboard front audio header Connect any front panel USB connectors to the motherboard USB headers Connect the front panel case connectors to the motherboard front panel I/O headers Different computer cases may have slightly different I/O connections, but generally both the connectors and motherboard headers are labelled, so use these to your advantage when working out where to plug each cabling connector! If in doubt, refer to the documentation which came with your motherboard, which should tell you exactly where to connect these items. Step 11: Close Case and Connect Peripherals. Before closing up your case completely, you may wish to do some ‘cable management’, which means tucking away, rerouting, or removing and securing any loose slack from cables which would otherwise be hanging around loose in your case. We recommend using cable ties to neatly secure cables in bundles and away from any moving parts (such as fans). Place the side cover back on Secure the side panel with case screws Connect peripheral devices including mouse, monitor, keyboard, speakers etc. Connecting Peripherals. Connecting peripherals to your computer once it is all assembled is a matter of simply making sure everything you want to use with your computer (like keyboard, mouse, speakers etc) is plugged in to the right spot. Use the following list as a guide for what goes where: Plug into USB ports: Keyboard Mouse Wireless network dongle Printers Webcams Plug into 2.5mm sockets: Speakers Microphone Line-in/line-out devices Plug into ethernet ports: Internet connection Local area network (LAN) cables Plug into display ports: Monitor / screens Be sure to plug into the correct display ports: always plug into the graphics card display output (if you have one installed) instead of the motherboard display ports. If you don’t have a dedicated graphics card, then plug into the motherboard’s display output ports. Build Complete! Congratulations, if you’ve made it this far you should have a fully assembled computer! After a final check to ensure there are no loose screws floating around in your case, and that all cables are clear of any moving parts, it’s time to power on your new computer.   If you’re new to building computers, it can also help to have a video to follow along to, so you can actually see what parts go where. Need more help or want to see more in-depth instructions for each step? The below video from Newegg TV is an excellent guide to building a PC and indexed into easy-to-follow sections. 23 Comments . I also found a relevant article on https://www.techshok.com/ Reply This is completely wrong. First take your motherboard and items out of the motherboards box and then place the motherboard that box. Now install all your ram (while it’s out of the case), next install all your m.2 drives , while it’s outside of the case , now place the Cpu correctly into the socket (still outside of the case) From here everyone has their own way. I personally hook up the psu to the board and (if it’s a new board ,plug in your usb drive with updated bios you downloaded prior to all of this ) and I flash the bios. All of this can be done before windows or anything is installed. Now you install the motherboard raisers , and make sure your Cpu cooler doesn’t have a bracket that needs to connect to the back of the motherboard. If you did it the way they suggested, you would know have to uninstall everything , just to take out the motherboard so you can install the coolers rear mounting bracket. This is why you try and do as much as possible outside of the case. Installing the motherboard should never be the first step. Usually installing the ram is the first step , and then m.2 drives. From there it’s up to you. Reply Hi John, thanks for your comment here and for the tip that some CPU coolers require a bracket connection to the rear of the motherboard. We’ll look into this and update the article to include this. Reply For ever greatfull for sharing your knowledge, easy to understand for us common person…. God bless… Looking forward for other future knowledge sharing. Reply Thanks for the feedback Harry! Reply THANK YOU SO MUCH! MY STUDENTS WILL LEARN A LOT FROM THIS. GOD BLESS AND MORE POWER! Reply Awesome! Thanks Venz! Reply just passed my comptia a plus and can honestly say ,i found this very useful and will use this for any assignments. Reply I appreciate all of your tips and steps for how to put together a computer. My brother is wanting to get some new computer parts and this article will be super useful to him. I will make sure to pass along this information about hot to assemble a computer to help him put his new parts together when he gets them. Reply Thanks for the feedback Charlotte! Reply am so great full on this information given. Reply You’re very welcome Janie! Thanks for the feedback! Reply Hey, this helped a lot but i have a question, do I need the Optical Drive? Thx. Reply Hi Sebastian, You don’t need an optical drive – it’s becoming more and more common for PCs not to have one these days, as a lot of software is now available on USB stick or by download over the internet. I’d suggest taking a look at what you might use the optical drive for (whatever programs you might need to install or run) and if they are available through other means, then you probably can save some cash by leaving out the optical drive. Good luck! Reply I appreciate the step by step written out instead of watching a video, but this is the wrong way to build a PC fast and easy, if you want the stress of trying to assemble all of this inside the case then enjoy, but if not install everything you can on the Motherboard before putting the motherboard into the case, also do not, and I repeat do not install the PSU to the motherboard before getting everything connected and put together first. Reply Hi Tyler, thanks for the feedback! There are pros and cons to each build strategy and the ‘out of the box’ build that you described is another popular method. People should definitely go with a build strategy that they feel most comfortable with. We personally prefer the ‘in the box’ build described in this guide because it means the motherboard is well supported by the case while connecting all the other parts, and it’s easier to get to the motherboard mounting screws (which can be a problem if you’ve got larger CPU coolers etc. that might block screw access when you drop the whole assembly in as one piece). Regarding the PSU connection, why do you recommend not connecting the PSU to the motherboard before all other parts? Reply Great information. keep it up Reply this GUIDE was really helpfull for me THANKS A LOT Reply Thanks sks! Glad to hear you found it useful! Reply awesome guide !! Reply Thanks Vanitha, glad you liked it! Reply What a guide and very informative. Reply Thanks Shakeel! Hope you found it useful. 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TitleHow To Plan a Custom PC Build – The Ultimate Guide for Dummies
Urlhttps://helpdeskgeek.com/how-to/how-to-plan-a-custom-pc-build-the-ultimate-guide-for-dummies/
DescriptionSo you’ve heard that you can build a PC, but you have no idea how to do it, if you should do it and what (literally) goes into creating your own computer. The good news is that building your own computer is both very easy and quite rewarding, but it isn’t for everyone
Date5 Mar 2020
Organic Position11
H1How To Plan a Custom PC Build – The Ultimate Guide for Dummies
H2Desktop Or Laptop?
In the Beginning: Deciding on Your Vision
Setting Your Budget
Using a PC Build Planning Tool
The Shopping List: Every Component Edition
The Build: I Love it When a Plan Comes Together
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H3
H2WithAnchorsDesktop Or Laptop?
In the Beginning: Deciding on Your Vision
Setting Your Budget
Using a PC Build Planning Tool
The Shopping List: Every Component Edition
The Build: I Love it When a Plan Comes Together
Want to impress your friends and family with awesome tech geekery?
Thanks for subscribing!
BodyHow To Plan a Custom PC Build – The Ultimate Guide for Dummies We walk you through the entire process Written by: Sydney Butler Posted on: March 5th, 2020 in: How-To So you’ve heard that you can build a PC, but you have no idea how to do it, if you should do it and what (literally) goes into creating your own computer. The good news is that building your own computer is both very easy and quite rewarding, but it isn’t for everyone. Under the assumption that you have never built a computer before, we’re going to approach this rather weighty topic in as logical a way as possible. Table of Contents Desktop Or Laptop? If you didn’t know, the world of computers is being taken over by laptops. The appeal is completely understandable. We live a more mobile life now and simply buying a complete, portable computer in a single package is the easiest way to simply get on with your life and get some work done. Should you opt to buy a laptop instead of building a desktop computer? To be honest, if you buy a decent mid-range laptop, most users are going to be perfectly happy with a modern laptop. Even more budget-oriented laptops have more than enough performance in reserve for office work, browsing the web and playing casual video game titles. It’s one of the reasons some people are even dumping laptops for tablets. General purpose computing just doesn’t take any sort of special computer anymore.  High-performance computers are still the domain of desktop machines, especially since high-performance laptops are super expensive and come with plenty of compromises. For most people then, a laptop is going to be perfectly fine.  That being said, there are some good, compelling reasons to build a PC. Here are some of the most important ones: It’s generally less expensive than a laptop of similar specifications.Some computers, such as home media servers or shared computers don’t need portability.You can build a basic computer now and expand it later.You can swap out and upgrade single components over time, to extend the life of the computer or repair it.You can customize the computer exactly to your needs. If that’s a list of reasons that sound appealing to you, then prepare yourself for a journey of discovery as we get down to the business of building a computer. In the Beginning: Deciding on Your Vision. Computers come in all shapes and sizes, and that should be determined by the purpose you envision for your computer.  Do you want an office machine that will run applications like Word and do some web browsing? Are you going to use your PC for some sort of media work, such as video or audio editing? Maybe you want to build a media PC connected to your TV, nestled next to your console and AV receiver? Whatever you want to do with your future computer will have an influence on which parts you choose and how your budget is allocated. So before you make any decisions that require a financial commitment, take the time to think about what job this computer is meant to do.  Bear in mind that this guide is aimed at users who want to build general-purpose computers, but you can tweak the baseline advice to fit your needs. If you’re specifically looking for a guide to build a butt-kicking gaming PC, do yourself a favor and have a look at our specialized guide for gamers. Setting Your Budget. This is quite possibly the most important part of the PC building process. The total amount of money you have to spend on your PC build is everything. It determines what overall level of performance you can afford, how many sacrifices you need to make and whether you’ll have to rely on used parts in some cases.  Decide on your budget first and then allocate it to various components according to your priorities. We’ll talk about sensible budget decisions with each component individually. Using a PC Build Planning Tool. Thankfully, there are now quite a few very intuitive online tools where you can “build” your computer on paper and make sure all the parts will work together.  For our money, PC Part Picker is the premiere choice. Using this tool you can play around with your build, make sure your components will actually work together and get the best prices for each component.  It’s also a great way to show your prospective build to a friend who can help you make good decisions. In fact, for the example system in this guide, we’re going to use their budget home office build. The Shopping List: Every Component Edition. Now you’re armed with a good idea of what sort of system you want to build, and have a tool to help you organize the parts before you buy them and start assembly. Now we have to actually choose the parts that will make up the computer.  We’ll go through them in a logical order and discuss key considerations for the various needs you may have. The suggested part in each section is taken from the PC Part Picker build mentioned above. The Case. The case (sometimes referred to as the chassis) is the physical framework of your computer. All the parts of the device are mounted within this item. Why are we starting with the case? We think there are a few good reasons to choose a case before you pick anything else. First of all, you need to pick a case that’s the right size and shape for your needs. You don’t want a hulking full tower case just to act as a media server or office machine. You also don’t want a case that can’t handle future expansions you’re likely to need. Cases come in different standards, which dictate what type of motherboards they are compatible with. We’ll explain what you need to know about motherboards next, but a given PC chassis will support specific motherboard sizes. The three you’ll most likely encounter (from largest to smallest) are ATX, Micro ATX and Mini ITX. There are other variations on these size standards, but they aren’t relevant to typical home users. Cases designed to house ATX motherboards are generally larger than those designed to house the smaller standards. This doesn’t have to be true, but it’s a good rule of thumb. Sometimes ATX cases will also have mounting points for smaller board standards, although there’s not much reason to put a tiny motherboard in a giant case. In terms of the actual case size classes, the most popular style to build a PC is the mid-tower case, such as this one. Mini ITX systems are also becoming popular, especially since you can buy one that takes full-sized expansion cards and has great cooling. There are lots of considerations when choosing a case, but we’ve boiled it down to the following: Shortlist cases that will fit in the space you have and look good in that specific environment.Make sure the case has enough drive bays and expansion slots to accommodate your immediate and future needs.Features such as tool-less design and modular drive bays are a nice feature, but not essential. The final piece of advice we have for you when it comes to PC cases, is to avoid cases that come with a power supply. We’re going to deal with power supplies in their own right a little later in the article, but it’s worth mentioning this here. It’s better to buy the power supply separately so that it fits your needs exactly and the ones included with cases are more often than not a poor investment. The suggested case here is the Thermaltake Versa H15. The Motherboard. The motherboard is the component that connects all of your other computer components together. Since you’ve already chosen a case above, the first major filter when narrowing down your motherboard selection is which motherboard types your chosen case can accommodate. Next we want to look at which brand of CPU your motherboard will support.These days the choice is between motherboards that accept AMD CPUs and ones that work with Intel. At the time of writing, AMD offers the best performance-per-dollar value and is challenging Intel to the outright performance crown. Most of the important performance components that used to be on the motherboard is now on the CPU itself, so the most important decisions you need to make have more to do with how much expansion the board allows. In other words, how many USB ports does it have? What types are they? How many PCI Express expansion slots are there? Choose a motherboard that: Fits the case you’ve chosenSupports CPUs as recent as you can affordHas enough expandability to leave you with an upgrade path For general purpose computing (and even high-end tasks, such as gaming) there’s not an important difference in performance between cheaper and more expensive motherboards. You don’t have to spend money on features that relate to overclocking, fancy light or any of those decorative features. You may want to spend a little more to have a motherboard with a thicker PCB (printed circuit board), solid capacitors and more power phases. On balance however, any motherboard from a good brand will do. The suggested motherboard here is the ASRock B450M-HDV R4.0. The CPU. The CPU is the main brain of your computer and the key performance component. Modern CPUs are multi-core, which means they actually consist of multiple CPUs in one. Quad-core CPUs are now considered the mainstream standard for general computing. Your budget may even allow for a six- or eight-core CPU. Especially if you’ve chosen to go with AMD’s latest Ryzen CPUs. The clock speed (measured in Ghz) isn’t all that important these days, as even entry-level quad-core CPUs can dynamically ramp up their speed to match the task at hand. Just make sure you pick a CPU that’s on your chosen motherboard’s supported list. Your CPU should also come with a stock cooler, which will be perfectly fine for most people. The suggested CPU here is the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G Quad Core. Memory. RAM – Random Access Memory, is the high-speed storage space that your CPU accesses directly. Having lots of RAM means the CPU doesn’t have to wait for slower storage to catch up. But how much should you have?  These days the absolute minimum is 8GB of RAM. regardless of what you use your computer for. That’s going to be as low as you’ll want to cut it. 16GB is however the mainstream amount to aim for. Modern operating systems are very good at using idle memory to speed up the system, so you won’t be wasting any of it. What memory should you get when you build a PC? If the price differences aren’t large, it’s worth buying the fastest memory that your chosen motherboard supports. Your motherboard will support a specific range of memory modules and also have a fixed number of slots within which to put them. Most motherboards use a “dual channel” memory configuration, which means modules work in pairs to improve performance.  Triple- and quad- channel setups also exist, where you need to install memory modules in sets of three and four respectively. It’s preferable that all your memory modules be the same brand, capacity and model to make sure it all works smoothly. At the very least each matched set of modules should be the same. You can run a single module in your computer to save money at the cost of some performance. This makes the most sense when you only have two slots on your motherboard, because you can then later double your memory capacity by adding another module to the open slot.  The suggested memory here is this 8GB Patriot Viper dual-channel kit. Internal Storage. Internal storage describes the drives that hold your operating system, applications and frequent data. The norm these days is to use an SSD or solid state drive. They are much faster and robust than mechanical drives and give even modest computers a massive performance boost.  They are also pretty affordable now, so get an SSD as your main drive and, if you need mass storage, add a cheap mechanical drive as your secondary. For example, you could get a 500GB main drive and then add a 4TB mechanical drive for the best of both worlds. The suggested internal storage for this particular build is the TEAMGROUP GX2 512GB 2.5 Inch SATA III Internal Solid State Drive SSD. The GPU. A GPU is a dedicated processor that handles the pretty pictures you see on screen. You can buy a CPU that has an integrated GPU, and also shares the same pool of RAM. If you don’t need to use applications that use detailed 3D graphics and just want to do general work and maybe watch some Netflix, the integrated GPUs you get these days are quite good. Especially on AMD CPUs. If you do need the power of a dedicated GPU card, then have a look at our detailed guide on the subject. Since the build we pulled from PC Part Picker uses the built-in GPU on the CPU, there’s no separate part here. The Power Supply. The last component you should decide on is the power supply. Why? Because this part needs to have enough juice to power everything safely, with enough overhead.  The easiest way to do this is by using a power supply calculator and then buying a good-quality power supply that matches or exceeds the recommended amount of power. Especially if you want to add components in future without having to replace the power supply. The Build: I Love it When a Plan Comes Together. Now that we have all our parts, here’s how to put them together. First, install the CPU and CPU cooler as per the manufacturer’s instructions, into the motherboard. You should also install the RAM modules at this point. If your motherboard supports M.2 SSDs, which also slot directly into the motherboard, you should also attach them now, before the motherboard goes in the case. Install the power supply into the case, it should only take a few screws to secure it. This is where the power supply goes. Now you should have a case and power supply on one hand and a motherboard with its main components on the other. Now that all these components are on the motherboard, we can put it into the case. First, screw in the included motherboard standoffs, in line with the corresponding holes on your motherboard. Then all you have to do is install the IO shield that came with your motherboard into the case. Then line up the IO ports with it. Now line up the screw holes on the motherboards with your standoffs and secure the board. Next, you need to hook up the motherboard headers to the case. This is where they should be: Check your motherboard manual and case manual for the locations of these. Then plug in the case USB, power switch, reset switch, LED indicator lights and additional audio connectors. Now, hook up the power connectors from the power supply to the motherboard. This should consist of the main power connector which usually consists of 24-pins. It will also usually include a 12-pin power connector for the CPU. Here’s an example: Finally, we need to install any storage drives, connect them to the motherboard and also connect their power connectors. If you also need to install a GPU card, head over to our detailed guide here. That should be it! After connecting a screen, mouse, keyboard and power cable, the computer should boot up and be ready for its operating system to be installed. If it doesn’t start up, open it up again and make sure everything is plugged in where it’s meant to be. When you build a PC, it can be easy to miss one small cable that’s crucial to everything. Sydney Butler is a social scientist and technology fanatic who tries to understand how people and technology coexist. He has two decades of experience as a freelance computer technician and more than a decade as a technologies researcher and instructor. Sydney has been a professional technology writer for more than five years and covers topics such as VR, Gaming, Cyber security and Transhumanism. Read Sydney's Full Bio Subscribe on YouTube! Did you enjoy this tip? If so, check out our YouTube channel from our sister site Online Tech Tips. We cover Windows, Mac, software and apps, and have a bunch of troubleshooting tips and how-to videos. Click the button below to subscribe! Subscribe Read More Posts:. How to Point Your Domain to Google Sites How to Migrate Windows 10 to a New Hard Drive What is Gamebar.exe and Is It Safe? What Is the Shell Infrastructure Host Process and Is It Safe? Want to impress your friends and family with awesome tech geekery?Subscribe to Help Desk Geek and get great guides, tips and tricks on a daily basis! We only send useful stuff!  Thanks for subscribing! We hate spam too, unsubscribe at any time. Do not share my Personal Information.
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Result 13
TitleHow to Build a PC | Tom's Hardware
Urlhttps://www.tomshardware.com/uk/reviews/how-to-build-a-pc,5867.html
DescriptionAre you looking to build a PC but intimidated about how to put the parts together? Learn how to turn your components into a desktop with our step-by-step guide
Date
Organic Position12
H1How to Build a PC
H2Be Prepared
Connect Components to the Motherboard
The CPU
The Cooler
Memory
M.2 SSD
Putting the Motherboard in the Case
Standoffs
I/O Shield
The Motherboard
Adding the Power Supply and Traditional/SATA Storage
Power Supply
SATA Storage
Inserting the Graphics Card
Add a Wi-Fi Card (if necessary)
The Last of the Cable Connections
Turn the Computer On
Cable Management
Install an Operating System, Drivers and Updates
H3
H2WithAnchorsBe Prepared
Connect Components to the Motherboard
The CPU
The Cooler
Memory
M.2 SSD
Putting the Motherboard in the Case
Standoffs
I/O Shield
The Motherboard
Adding the Power Supply and Traditional/SATA Storage
Power Supply
SATA Storage
Inserting the Graphics Card
Add a Wi-Fi Card (if necessary)
The Last of the Cable Connections
Turn the Computer On
Cable Management
Install an Operating System, Drivers and Updates
BodyHow to Build a PC By Andrew E. Freedman published 26 August 20 Turn your components into a rig. There are plenty of great pre-built gaming PCs on the market, but there’s nothing quite like the satisfaction of using one that you create yourself. While the process of assembling a computer isn’t difficult, it’s daunting the first time you do it. For those embarking on their first build, we’ve put together a step-by-step guide to building a PC.Before we start, know that this is a guide exclusively dedicated to assembly. That means you’ll need to pick out your parts first. Our list of recommended cases, CPUs,GPUs, motherboards, SSDs, power supplies and RAM, along with our buying guides can help you choose key components.The other thing to know is that no two builds are identical. The order we’re going in here is based partly on preference and also based on the needs of the build. For instance, if you have a large aftermarket cooler that blocks the DIMM slots, you may have to go in a different order than we did, or backtrack and pull out a part here or there to to make room for a particularly bulky part or cramped case. More advanced options like liquid cooling and RGB lighting, as well as high-end CPU platforms like Intel's Core X and AMD's Threadripper also aren’t covered in this guide.Be Prepared. Before you start building a PC, you need to get your workspace ready. Make sure that you have all of your parts and tools at the ready. At the very least, you’ll want:Phillips-head screwdrivers (#1 and #2 should do the trick)Zip ties and/or twist ties for cable managementFlashlight (it can get dark in the corners of a PC case)Thermal paste (although stock coolers usually have this pre-applied)Something to hold your screwsBand-aids (just in case)Some builders swear by anti-static equipment, including mats or wrist straps. But as long as you don’t live in a particularly dry environment, you’re not building on a metal surface (opt for wood or plastic) and you aren't rubbing your socks on a carpet while building, you should be able to avoid shorting out your PC or parts. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with playing things safe. So if you’re worried about static, take the appropriate precautions.Connect Components to the Motherboard . While some prefer to mount the motherboard in the case before they do anything else, it’s easier with many builds to connect key components like the CPU and the RAM, without leaning over inside the chassis.The CPU. Whether you’re going with an Intel or and AMD build, the first step is to release the tension lever on the CPU so that you can drop the processor into the CPU socket. (The big difference here is that on Intel builds the pins are on the socket while in AMD’s case, the pins are on the CPU.)The arrow/triangle on the top of the CPU needs to line up with one on the socket or the socket cover. Don’t attempt to install a CPU with the arrow facing the wrong direction, or you could damage your chip, your board, or both! Once your CPU and socket are properly aligned, you can drop the chip in place, and it  will settle into the socket under its own weight. If it doesn't, pick up the CPU and re-seat it. Don't force the processor into the socket or you'll almost certainly damage something. Once you've got the CPU settled correctly in the socket, press the tension lever back down (on Intel motherboards like the one in the image above, this will also include a metal plate that holds the CPU in).Note that the above instructions pertain to the mainstream platforms for AMD (the AM4 socket) and Intel (socket LGA 1200). Enthusiast platforms like Intel’s Core X (LGA 2066) and AMD’s Threadripper (sTRX4) have different/more complex CPU installations, with the Intel chips involving two levers and Threadripper requiring Torx screws and a slide-in plastic bracket. The Threadripper CPU install process in particular is tricky and, given the price of chips and TRX40 motherboards, we would not recommend Threadripper as your first PC build platform.Once the cooler is installed, plug the fan connector into its header on the motherboard. This is usually somewhere close to the CPU socket and labeled something like "CPU_FAN." The Cooler. Many processors come with coolers in the box. If you’re not doing any heavy overclocking, those may be good enough, though lots of builders also like to buy more powerful (and often quieter) aftermarket coolers, which may also just be more attractive.If you decide to use the stock cooler, you'll find that it already has thermal paste applied. With aftermarket coolers, you’ll generally need to apply your own thermal paste. You don’t need much--just a pea-sized amount applied to the center of the CPU will spread when you put the cooler on. Again, serious overclockers and PC build veterans will have techniques for evenly spreading thermal compound. But for novice builders and those not looking to achieve the maximum possible overclock speeds, dropping a small amount in the center and letting the CPU cooler spread the thermal paste works just fine. Just make sure you don't add too much paste; you definitely don't want it squirting out the sides onto the socket and surrounding PCB.Stock coolers for Intel processors use push pins that go through holes in the motherboard. We recommend pushing opposite corners in to evenly spread the thermal paste, and to keep from putting uneven pressure on one side of the CPU. AMD stock coolers have metal arms that snap into notches on a plastic bracket on either side of the socket. Aftermarket coolers mount in various ways, so be sure to consult the instruction manual, as mounting aftermarket coolers can be surprisingly complicated, often involving a large backplate that has to be mounted behind the motherboard.Memory. Installing RAM is a snap--literally. First, make sure that the latches for each memory slot are open. Some boards have latches on both sides of a RAM slot, while others--often budget boards--have a latch on one side, with the other end fixed in place. Once your latches are opened, look at each DIMM and position it over the slot such that the small divot on the bottom of the RAM stick is aligned with the matching bump on the board. Finally, push down on the DIMM on each edge until it snaps into place, causing the latches to close on their own. The process requires a bit of force, but if you’re having trouble, make sure that you’re not putting the module in backwards.If you’re installing two RAM sticks in a board that has four slots, check the motherboard manual to make sure you’re installing your DIMMs in the right slots. If you put them in the wrong slots you may not get the best performance possible, or one of the sticks may not be recognized by the motherboard/operating system.M.2 SSD. If you’re using an M.2 SSD, now is as good a time as any to install it, because later on other parts may get in the way.If it’s already installed, remove the screw located across from the M.2 slot and slide the SSD in at an angle. Make sure the notch lines up with the slot, similar to RAM installation. If the notch doesn’t line up, your drive may not be compatible with that slot. Slowly lay the SSD flat and secure the mounting screw. This tiny screw is easy to drop, which is another reason to install M.2 drives before putting your motherboard into the case.Putting the Motherboard in the Case. Now that we’ve built the core platform (minus the graphics card, which we’ll do later), we’re going to install the CPU and RAM-equipped motherboard in the case. If you haven’t yet, remove the side panels on your chassis. Most cases have thumb screws holding their panels in place, which makes it easy to remove them.Standoffs. First, gather the standoffs that came with your case and find the proper place to install them. They’re likely marked on the case based on the size of the motherboard you chose. Many cases have standoffs preinstalled, so you may be able to skip this step. If standoffs are preinstalled in the wrong spot for your motherboard, you can use needle nose pliers to get  them out.I/O Shield. The I/O shield, which covers the area around your rear ports, comes with your motherboard. You’ll need to fit the shield into the chassis before you install the motherboard itself, making sure it's the right-side up so that your motherboard ports will fit through the holes once both are installed. You’ll have to use some force to snap all four corners into place. Be careful of sharp edges (that’s why you have the band-aids) as well as metal bits that can block the ports--especially if you have a budget motherboard. The exception are some premium boards, which ship with this shield pre-attached, but you won't find that on most boards.The Motherboard. Now, it’s time to put the motherboard in. Make sure the holes on the motherboard line up with the standoffs you installed and that the ports line up with the cutouts on the I/O shield. Once the board is in, put the screws into the standoffs to anchor the motherboard in place.Adding the Power Supply and Traditional/SATA Storage. Now for a few parts that aren’t attached directly to the motherboard.Power Supply. The PSU is usually mounted to the back at the case. Sometimes you’ll find it at the top, but it’s usually mounted at the bottom, where it can pull in cool air from under the chassis. Once you put it in place, it’s generally as simple as screwing it into place with four screws at the back of the case. Then, plug in the 24-pin power connector and supplemental/CPU power connector into the motherboard.SATA Storage. We added M.2 storage earlier, so now it’s time for SATA drives, which could be a 2.5-inch SSD or hard drive, or a traditional 3.5-inch hard drive. Connect the SATA data cable to the motherboard and your drive or drives, then connect the SATA power connector from the PSU to your drive(s). Mount the hard drive or SSD in the appropriate bracket and screw or snap it into place. Note that bracket/drive mounting methods and placement vary by chassis model.Inserting the Graphics Card. This is an optional step. If you’re using an Intel or AMD CPU with integrated graphics and don’t plan on serious gaming, you may not need or want a discrete graphics card. Many AMD CPUs, as well as high-end Intel models, don’t have on-board graphics, though, and will require a graphics card in order to connect and output to your monitor.To install the GPU, you'll likely have to remove some slot covers on the back of the case, so that the HDMI, DVI and other ports show through, letting you can connect your monitor(s) later.Connect the GPU into the PCIe X16 slot on the motherboard (it’s the long one, and you’ll want to use the topmost one if there’s more than one on your motherboard). If necessary, plug the PCIe power connectors from the power supply into the card. (You may not need to do this on lower-end cards).Add a Wi-Fi Card (if necessary). Most motherboards come with an Ethernet port on them and many also have Wi-Fi built-in. However, if you need wireless access and your computer doesn’t come with a Wi-Fi card, you’ll need to install one in one of the PCIe slots, a short M.2 slot, or attach a USB Wi-Fi dongle. If you’re gaming, an Ethernet connection is probably your best bet for reliable connectivity.The Last of the Cable Connections. OK, just a few more cables to go until we try turning the PC on. Make sure the connectors for any fans are plugged into the motherboard fan headers. Then, attach the front-panel audio cable, USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 case connectors to those headers. You’ll want to consult your motherboard manual for this, because their location varies by motherboard model.Lastly, there are the tiny front-panel connectors, including power, reset, HDD activity light, etc. Those need to go to the appropriate pins on the motherboard (usually in the bottom-right corner if your motherboard is mounted in the traditional orientation. You’ll need to consult your motherboard manual to see where each should go, as this also can differ based on board make and model.Double check that you’re using the right headers. These things are small (and so are their labels), so it’s easy to mess them up if you’re not paying close attention.Turn the Computer On. Once all that's done, it's a good idea to double check to make sure there are no extra fan headers or power cables still waiting to be routed to the right connector. Then plug the PC in, plug in and connect your monitor (to one of the ports on the graphics card, if you've installed on) and your keyboard and mouse.Hit the power button on your monitor, then turn the power supply switch on (on the back of the power supply) and then press your PC's power button. If everything is working, the PC should turn on and run its POST (power-on self test). Since your operating system isn’t installed yet, you may get an error message about a missing boot drive, or you may get sent straight to the UEFI/BIOS.Cable Management. This is where you make your case pretty and ensure better air flow. We’re doing this after we know that the system boots properly, because we’d hate to tear apart all of the careful wiring and cut a bunch of zip ties just to have to re-seat a component or reroute a cable. You could of course install your operating system before this step. And clean cable routing is of course less important if you don’t have a case with a window. But we like things neat and pretty, so it’s time to shut the system down, unplug the power cable and clean things up.Routing some cables through the back of the case during the build process is a good first step toward a clean build. But this is where we’ll shove any extra cable slack through the back panel, break out the zip ties to neaten things up and then, put the side panels back on. You could spend hours making your cable routing as perfect as possible. But just spending 15 minutes making an effort to clean up your cables can make a huge visual difference in what your final build looks like.Install an Operating System, Drivers and Updates. Preferably before the build process, you'll want to make a USB install drive for either Windows 10 or the Linux build of your choice. For Windows 10, simply navigate to Microsoft’s Download page and click the “Download Tool Now” button. You’ll download and run the Media Creation tool which will turn any 8GB or larger USB drive into a Windows install disk. If you don’t already have a Windows 10 key, you can get one cheap or for free. If you have a problem with the OS, you can try to reset Windows 10 to factory settings.Plug the USB drive into your new computer, power on and you should boot into your operating system installer, which will step you through the process. If the system doesn’t access your drive, you may need to navigate to the BIOS and make sure your USB key is available as a boot device and that it's placed in the boot order before your internal drive or drives.Once you've installed your operating system, when you first connect to the internet, Windows 10 is pretty good these days at getting device drivers. However, you should still go to the manufacturers’ product pages for your parts to make sure you have or get the latest updates.Finally, when your OS and drivers are all updated, it’s time to start using your PC! The one that you built. Install some games, stream some movies, edit some photo or video, chat on Discord--whatever it is you like to do with your PC. And remember: Whenever you’re ready to add more features or performance, you can always upgrade. Andrew E. Freedman Andrew E. Freedman is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware focusing on laptops, desktops and gaming. He also keeps up with the latest news. A lover of all things gaming and tech, his previous work has shown up in Tom's Guide, Laptop Mag, Kotaku, PCMag and Complex. among others. Follow him on Twitter: @FreedmanAE Topics PC Builds See all comments (31) 31 Comments Comment from the forums jimmysmitty While I don't always use one I think you should add an anti-static strap to the list of pre-requirements. Its never a bad idea to have one and I do have a couple at home in case I have to work on carpet. Also is that standard bubble wrap or anti-static bubble wrap? Reply islandwalker @jimmysmitty: From the paragraph right below the "Be Prepared" section: "Some builders swear by anti-static equipment, including mats or wrist straps. But as long as you don’t live in a particularly dry environment, you’re not building on a metal surface (opt for wood or plastic) and you aren't rubbing your socks on a carpet while building, you should be able to avoid shorting out your PC or parts. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with playing things safe. So if you’re worried about static, take the appropriate precautions." Reply TechyInAZ Solid tutorial Andrew! The only criticism I have to add is the lack of recommending the user to update the BIOS ASAP (especially for AMD users). It's super easy now that all modern motherboards can update their bios within the bios/UEFI itself (all you need is your Ethernet cable plugged in)). Reply Barty1884 Solid tutorial, goes into enough detail to guide even the most novice builder through. A couple of thoughts/comments though, would be on the order of a couple of things. 1. Installing SATA power/data before mounting the drive could work in some cases, but I'd suspect most people would be better off mounting the drive and then connecting cables. 2. Personally, I wouldn't moved the FPanel, USB, Fans etc to pre-GPU. I can't think of many cases/boards where it's particularly easy to access all necessary headers after the GPU is installed. Small nitpicks though, good tutorial overall! Reply islandwalker @techyinaz Andrew actually had a mention of that in there and I took it out because I was on the fence about it, particularly for first-time builders. While I would personally always update the BIOS, it's also pretty easy to brick a motherboard in the BIOS update process, particularly if it's a budget board with no built-in BIOS recovery, and you aren't careful about what you're doing. So my general thought, particularly if you're a new builder, is "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." So if there's an issue you're having that's expressly addressed by an update, go for it. But I worry that if we told everyone to update their BIOS by default, it might do more harm than good. Reply MagicWok You need WAY more thermal paste. Becareful of the PSU shocking the system. And you really should use a swiss army knife that might have a screwdriver. vulgarity removed Reply Math Geek i do like that RTFM is a big part of the instructions. for new builders i always suggest going page by page through the mobo manual and hooking up/plugging in whatever is on that page if you have it. makes it a lot harder to miss anything that way. especially for the front panel headers and power switches and so on. they are in so many different places and the writing is so small at times the manual is the only way many can figure it out. but overall a great tutorial for a new builder that gives the basics without being too specific to certain brands/set-ups. Reply pincher.lala.2014 ty, very nice aproach.. its very similar the way i usually do, only changing that in most of cases i install "tiny front-panel connectors" bedore i lay down the board at cabinet ... very cool.. Reply ingtar33 I like to do the cable management (as much as possible) before installing anything in the case. It's usually easier that way, however it requires some knowledge of what cables go where and why, as well as a little planning. Still I think overall that's a fine instructional. Better than the monstrosity that "The Verge" did. Reply KidHorn Cable management for my builds is basically making sure none of the fans are hitting the cables. Too many cables barely reach so I don't have any leeway in where they go. Oh and those last few pins for the power button etc... are always a major PITA. If I were a skinny asian woman, it might not be that bad, but my fingers are way too fat. I wish the MoBo makers and case makers would agree on a single ribbon connection with everything in the right spot. Reply View All 31 Comments Show more comments
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Result 14
TitleHow to build a desktop PC: A reference guide
Urlhttps://thenextweb.com/news/build-desktop-pc-reference-guide
DescriptionIf you’ve ever spent any time looking for recommendations on a new computer, chances are someone has told you to “just build a desktop.” There’s a reason: building your own desktop is almost always cheaper than buying one from a manufacture
Date30 Jul 2017
Organic Position13
H1How to build a desktop PC: A reference guide
H2Before you start
What you’ll need
Putting it together
H3Motherboard
CPU
RAM
Graphics Card
Hard Drive
Power Supply
Cooling
Case
Peripherals and Accessories
Oh, and you’ll need a screwdriver. Duh
H2WithAnchorsBefore you start
What you’ll need
Putting it together
BodyHow to build a desktop PC: A reference guide Story byNapier Lopez. Story by Napier Lopez . Reporter Napier Lopez is a writer based in New York City. He's interested in all things tech, science, and photography related, and likes to yo-yo in (show all) Napier Lopez is a writer based in New York City. He's interested in all things tech, science, and photography related, and likes to yo-yo in his free time. Follow him on Twitter. If you’ve ever spent any time looking for recommendations on a new computer, chances are someone has told you to “just build a desktop.” There’s a reason: building your own desktop is almost always cheaper than buying one from a manufacturer.The problem, of course, is it that you need to get your hands dirty. But building a PC in 2017 is probably not as difficult as you imagine; it’s kind of like putting together a lego set. And we’re here to help.One disclaimer: this is not meant to be an exhaustive guide for absolute beginners. There are plenty of those on the interwebs; I like this one by Lifehacker and this one by Tom’s Hardware. Instead, this is for the tech-saavy user that already has a solid understanding of PC hardware (do you know what a PCI-E Slot is? Does DDR4 mean anything to you?), but has never taken it upon themselves to build a PC – or hasn’t done so in a while.Before you start. This will be the future of fintech. 6 trends that will dominate fintech in 2022READ ARTICLEOne of the more daunting aspects is making sure all the components you buy actually, you know, work with eachother. So before you get started, you should head on over to PC Part Picker. It’s an excellent resource that allows you to collect your parts, view recommended builds, and see pricing from various sellers. PC Hound is another popular one.More importantly, these sites will warn you if the components you are putting together are not compatible with one another. They are not foolproof though, so if this is your first time building a PC, I suggest you begin with one of the recommended builds, and tweak from there.Lastly, don’t worry too much about getting the latest and greatest. Trying to extremely future-proofing your PC isn’t a very good idea; the most expensive components provide diminishing returns. You’re better off getting mid-to-high end components that offer more bang for your buck.What you’ll need. Motherboard. Your computer’s circulatory system, this is probably the component you should spend the most time researching. For one, it’s the most annoying component to replace, since everything connects to it, and you’ll probably have to reinstall your OS if you do.For another, because it connects to everything, your motherboard also dictates what types of components you can use. Make sure your motherboard has all the features you want, else you might have to buy additional accessories, or miss out on some features altogether. For example, many motherboards don’t include Wi-Fi or Bluetooth on board – yes, even in 2017. Companies expect you to use Ethernet or buy your own wireless card.USB-C is another one to look out for. The new port has only recently started to be picked up by new motherboards, and many are only the slower USB 3.1 variety, not Thunderbolt 3. You also currently can’t get Thunderbolt 3 on an AMD motherboard.Lastly, motherboards come in three general sizes: ATX, micro-ATX, and ITX. You’ll probably want an ATX case for your first build. It’s the largest – which means a larger case – but gives you the most flexibility for expansion.CPU. You have two choices in the CPU world, Intel or AMD. Detailing the differences is beyond the scope of this piece; I recommend you check out sites like Anandtech for more.A quick, very generalized summary: Intel still makes the fastest chips at top level configurations, but AMD’s Ryzen processors offer better bang for your buck.Intel will provide generally provide better gaming performance, but AMD will better handling multiple threads – like simultaneous gaming and streaming – thanks to the extra cores. AMD’s Ryzen 5 will probably offer the best value and performance for the vast majority of people, while Intel’s Core i7 7700K is the your best bet for maximal gaming performance.RAM. RAM may be one of the most important parts of your computer, but it’s one of the easiest components to pick. 16GB will handle most tasks for the vast majority of people for quite some time, and is a bit of overkill for gaming. If you want to go crazy, get 32 GB.If you need more than that, you probably don’t need to be reading this guide anyway.Don’t fret over RAM speed. Anything 2400 Mhz and over is unlikely to bottleneck your performance. Just get whatever seems like the best dealOne point of advice: Buy RAM in pairs. Odd numbers of RAM sticks are often inefficient.Graphics Card. Chances are you’re planning on doing some gaming. If you’re playing at 1080p, an Nvidia 1060 or AMD RX 580 will generally let you max settings out and hit a smooth 60fps.That said, the Nvidia 1070 is a significant upgrade and I think is the sweet spot for most gamers.For 4K gaming at max settings, you’ll pretty much need an Nvidia 1080 or higher.Hard Drive. If you want your PC to be as snappy as possible, install your OS on an SSD. Make sure its of the NVMe variety, and that it’s using a fast connector like an m.2 or u.2 slot. Asus has a good guide on different kinds of storage here.If you need a lot of storage storage for movies and games, a traditional mechanical hard drive gets you the most gigs per dollar.  It’s slower, but that doesn’t matter much for some workloads like watching videos.Power Supply. The most boring part of your build, the power supply handles all your electricity needs. The main thing to consider is whether it can draw enough energy for running your configuration. Assembling your computer on PC Part picker should tell you your system’s wattage and whether your power supply is powerful enough.Keep in mind power supplies come in a ATX and SFX sizes. unless you’re going for a tiny build, you’ll need an ATX unit.Cooling. As nice as liquid cooling looks, it’s absolute overkill for any first-time builder. Just get a decent cooling fan from a trusted brand like Thermaltake or Coolermaster. Get one with LED lights if you really need something pretty.Note: Your cooler will generally come with thermal paste to transfer heat from the CPU, but double check to make sure.Case. This is the a fun bit. There are a myriad of cases to choose from at a myriad of price ranges, fitting all sorts of aesthetics. Corsair, Thermaltake, NZXT, Cooler Master, etc make some good affordable ones.Corsair’s Spec Alpha strikes a nice balance between sleek and ‘gamery’Make sure the case is compatible with your motherboard size and power supply, and you should be good to go. Each case has its own idiosyncrasies regarding cable management and spacing, so I’d recommend looking for YouTube reviews before ponying up the cash. Also keep in mind many modern cases don’t accommodate disk drives, so be on the lookout if you intend to install one.Peripherals and Accessories. You’ll need a monitor, keyboard, mouse and speakers or headphones. Keep in mind many motherboards and cases don’t come with some of the features we take for granted on laptops, like Wi-Fi and an SD Card Slot, so you might have to pony up some extra cash there too.Your OS: Unless you’re planning on running a Linux distro, you’ll need to pony up for a Windows License. An official Windows 10 Home copy from Microsoft is $120; you can get it on a USB stick or download and set up the install media yourself.You can also find cheaper copies of Windows 10 licenses on various online marketplaces, but you do so at your own risk.Oh, and you’ll need a screwdriver. Duh.Putting it together. Now comes the fun part. Once you know all the components you need to buy, the rest of the process is basically just putting together the puzzle pieces.First things first: watch a video guide on how to assemble a PC, preferably before you get the components. It will help you be a bit less overwhelmed when get all  the pieces arrive and you don’t know where to start. You can watch it again as you’re building your PC.Here’s a concise one by Austin Evans that goes through all the basics using modern components:There are plenty more strewn around YouTube at varying levels of detail. Also be sure to consult with the manuals for each of your components (the motherboard, in particular) for any particular quirks these videos might not cover.If you just want to read, the basic steps are as follows:Install the power supply and plug it into the outlet. Triple check it is on the OFF position, or connect it to a surge protector (also turned off).Ground yourself to prevent frying any components. Here’s a guide, but it basically involves touching an unpainted metal surface on the case or power supply NOT other components). Many power supplies comes with unpainted metal screws; I like using those once installed.Screw in your motherboard. Cases usually come with standoffs to lift your motherboard a bit from the case. Make sure you use them.Install the CPU. Make sure it’s in the right orientation, and pull the lever down all the way.Install the cooler. Follow the guide for your particular unit, and make sure to apply thermal paste if it doesn’t already have it, or else you’ll fry your CPU.Insert your RAM into the slots. Make sure it’s inserted properly, such that the little clips at the sides snap all the way in.Mount your storage onto your PC. This varies depending your case and storage type. An M.2 SSD plugs directly into your motherboard, while most others can attached to your case via screws or special slots. You’ll attach them to your motherboard via a cable later.Install your graphics card into the PCI-E slot. Make sure it’s all the way in; it uses a clip similar to the RAM.You’ll then have to wire everything. Again, your motherboard’s manual is the most useful resource, as it should precisely label which cable goes where. Most cables can only fit in one slot, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to figure out.Once you’ve dubbed checked all the connections, you can close up your case and plug in your accessories. Then insert your install media and follow the usual steps for installing Windows/Linux, and you should be good to go!Building a PC is a right of passage for any tech geek. It takes a little patience the first time around, but you’ll be rewarded with valuable experience and endless upgradeability. You should be proud of yourself.
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Result 15
TitleAre you a human?
Urlhttps://www.neweggbusiness.com/smartbuyer/buying-guides/building-pc-ultimate-beginners-guide-part-1/
Description
Date9 May 2019
Organic Position14
H1Human?
H2Are you a human?
H3
H2WithAnchorsAre you a human?
BodyHuman? Are you a human? We apologize for the confusion, but we can't quite tell if you're a person or a script. Please don't take this personally. Bots and scripts can be very much lifelike these days! To help us better protect your account security, please check the CAPTCHA box below. detecting... If you're interested in accessing Newegg API service, please submit a request. We would love to hear your opinion. Let us know your feedback.
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TitleThe Beginner's Guide to Building a Mini ITX Computer for ...
Urlhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Build-PC-Beginners-Building-ebook/dp/B00I9PM7SQ
DescriptionHow to Build a PC: The Beginner's Guide to Building a Mini ITX Computer for your Home or Office eBook : Dogwood Apps: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store.
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TitleHow to Build Your Own PC | PCMag
Urlhttps://www.pcmag.com/news/how-to-build-your-own-pc
DescriptionIf you want the strongest, most adaptable, and most upgradeable PC, you should build it yourself
Date3 Jun 2015
Organic Position16
H1How to Build Your Own PC
H2Memory, Video Card, and Storage
Power Supplies and Case
Putting It All Together
Finishing Touches
H3Dig Deeper With Related Stories
PCMag Stories You’ll Like
About Matthew Murray
H2WithAnchorsMemory, Video Card, and Storage
Power Supplies and Case
Putting It All Together
Finishing Touches
BodyHow to Build Your Own PC If you want the strongest, most adaptable, and most upgradeable PC, you should build it yourself. By Matthew Murray June 3, 2015 facebook twitter flipboard social share Flipboard Pinterest Reddit LinkedIn Email Copied Error! Copy Link https://www.pcmag.com/news/how-to-build-your-own-pc Comments Computing has changed a lot in the last decade. For many, smartphones have become the go-to method of playing games, staying in touch with friends, and browsing the Web for answers to spur-of-the-moment trivia questions and viewing cat pictures. When you need something more powerful, or with a bigger screen, you might reach for a tablet. And if actual, real work calls, the laptop you'd use is probably svelte, light, and stylish. Traditional bulky desktops are increasingly rare, and when you see them, they're usually all-in-ones, or decked out with designs that are meant to be noticed. Let's face it, no one really builds their own desktop PC anymore, right? Wrong, actually. DIY may not be all it used to be, but it's still a thriving sector of the PC industry, and one that any serious computer user—we mean the type of person who cares more about what a computer can do than how small an envelope it can slide into—should be aware of. Because, if you want the strongest, most adaptable, most upgradeable, and most personal computer you can possibly get, there's no way around it: You need to build it yourself. By researching each individual component's capabilities and limitations, you can tailor your purchases to your exact needs now and in the future. And if your requirements or your mood change tomorrow, next week, next month, or next year, you can easily pull out and replace as few as one of the pieces, and your computer is perfect for you yet again. Nothing else gives you this much control or satisfaction. Yes, you'll have to sacrifice some—maybe a lot—of portability, but the result will be something you can totally and deeply call your own as you never will be able to with an unchangeable system designed and manufactured entirely by someone else. Building your own PC is not necessarily an inexpensive or quick proposition. But if you're willing to devote the time and resources to the project, you will end up with the best possible computer on Earth for you—and that will make everything else worthwhile. Shopping for Parts The most difficult and time-consuming part of the PC-building process happens long before you start looking for the screwdriver. You can't even start thinking about assembling the individual components until you buy them—and that means doing a lot of investigating into the options (of which there are thousands) and, believe it or not, some serious soul-searching. The first, and most important, thing to consider is: What do you want your PC to do? Are you looking for a really inexpensive system to put in the kids' room? Do you want a squat, console-like desktop that will fit right next to the TV that you can use for streaming media, or maybe as a Steam Machine? Is a dedicated work PC for your home office the goal? Or do you want the biggest, baddest build that can play the hottest new games without breaking a sweat? We can't answer this question for you.  But once you've reached a decision, you'll have a better idea of what you need to buy and how much money you'll have to spend. And then you can get on to the actual shopping. For research and shopping, we highly recommend using Newegg.com. It has a dizzyingly wide selection of components in every conceivable category and one of the Internet's most powerful search engines for narrowing down your precise needs. But feel free to use your favorite tool (or brick-and-mortar store). The nuances of what components do, and how to best get them to serve your needs, is beyond the scope of this story. But the descriptions below of their functions and what you need to look for when shopping should give you a solid of idea of where to start in collecting all the parts you'll need for your PC. Processor If you're building a gaming PC on a budget, you'll probably want to start off by choosing a video card (see below). But everyone else can start with the central processing unit (CPU), or processor, the "brain" of the computer that, well, processes all the instructions it receives from the software you run and the other components you have installed. Because of the considerable difference it will make in how well you run every program on your PC, paying particular attention to its capabilities is crucial. Here's what to look for: Number of cores. Back when every CPU only contained one processing unit, or core, clock speed was the easiest way to measure performance. But practically every processor today is a multicore CPU, and the more cores a chip has, the more it can accomplish at once (if it's supported by the software). Most common are two- (dual-) and four- (quad-)core CPUs, though six- and eight-core CPUs are becoming more visible on the market. Number of threads. Most processors today, particularly from Intel, can simultaneously operate two processing threads per core (Intel calls this technology hyperthreading), effectively doubling your core count. Because not every processor supports this, check that yours does if you expect to be running a lot of multithreaded applications. Clock speed (operating frequency). This is the frequency at which each core in a CPU runs, or the number of cycles it is able to execute per second. The higher the number, the faster CPU will generally be per core. These days, clock speed is measured in gigahertz (GHz), or billions of cycles per second. Cache (L2 or L3). A processor uses memory installed in the chip itself to store and speed up operations before utilizing external system RAM. This on-board memory is stored in one or more caches, which are identified L2 or L3. More powerful processors will be equipped with larger caches. Socket type. CPUs come in different sizes, are identified by the kind of socket they plug into. (For example, Intel's most powerful current chips use the third revision of the LGA 2011 socket.) You'll need this information to determine what motherboard to buy (see the next section). Manufacturing technology. Every year or two, processors get thinner and more power-efficient. Knowing a chip's manufacturing technology (measured in nanometers, or nm) will give you some insight into its capabilities, but is not strictly necessary. Cooler. Most processors come with a fan rated for their specific speed and estimated heat output; unless you're planning to overclock your computer or otherwise put it through particularly traumatic paces, you probably don't need to buy another fan or liquid cooling system. (And for that reason, we're not going to dwell on the question here.) But if you do decide to buy a separate one, or if you choose a high-end CPU that doesn't come with its own fan, make sure that the cooler you get is designed for the family of processor you have or are planning to buy. Motherboard If the CPU is a computer's brain, the motherboard is its nervous system. Most of your other components will plug into the motherboard, so the one that you use for your build needs to be exactly what you need now, and what you expect to need from it in the future. Here's what to look for: Socket type. A motherboard's socket type must, must, must match that of the CPU you plan to use in it. Form factor. Motherboards come in a range of sizes, or form factors, from the tiny Mini ITX to the enormous Extended ATX. For most full-size desktop builds you'll probably want either regular ATX or the somewhat smaller Micro ATX. The form factor you get will dramatically affect both the number of other components you're able to install and what kind of case you're able to install them in (see that section below for more details). Memory. Be on the lookout for several different attributes of how your motherboard deals with memory. You need to know the memory type and standard, which are usually listed together. For example, if your motherboard supports DDR4 2133 memory, buy that. (Many motherboard manufacturers certify certain brands of memory for use with their boards; look up the motherboard on the Web to find out what's officially supported.) The number of memory slots tells you how many individual modules, or DIMMs, you can buy; you'll also be informed of the maximum memory supported, or the total amount of all the individual DIMMs taken together (such as 32 or 64GB). You may also see motherboards labeled as tri- or quad-channel, which signifies that you can expect a noticeable performance benefit if you fill the correct number of RAM slots. Note: Many times a motherboard will be listed as supporting a number of memory types with the designation "O.C." after them—this refers to memory that is overclocked. If you don't plan on overclocking your memory (which we don't recommend, unless you're an expert or fearless tweaker), you may safely ignore these numbers. Expansion slots. The most common motherboard form factors, ATX and Micro ATX, will have between four and seven PCI Express (PCIe) slots, for adding expansion cards. These may use either the current top-end standard, PCIe 3.0, or the older (and slower) 2.0, with designations based on the size of the slots and the number of PCIe lanes they use. The longest slots are x16, though some that look identical may run at x8 or x4; in addition, there are visibly smaller x1 slots. On a Mini ITX motherboard, however, you should only expect one x16 slot. Storage. SATA remains the most common interface for connecting internal storage devices to your motherboard. The newest version of the standard, SATA 3, supports data transfer rates of up to 6Gbps. You may also find some other interfaces; M.2, in which a flash-based storage module plugs directly into a thin slot on your motherboard, is becoming increasingly popular, for example. Regardless, you'll want to have enough of the right kind of ports for whatever storage you want to buy. (Learn more about that in the Storage section, below.) Onboard technologies. Just about every motherboard will feature onboard stereo sound and Ethernet, most will include integrated Wi-Fi and/or Bluetooth, and many will also include ports for taking advantage of processors' integrated video capabilities. (You won't find the last on motherboards for higher-end processors, which are designed for use with discrete video cards, and you may ignore these ports on lower-end or midrange motherboards if you plan on installing a standalone video card.) It's worth checking the specs so that you don't forego something you really want. Video card support. Think you may want to concoct an ultra-powerful gaming machine with more than one graphics card? Even if you have enough slots to hold multiple cards, you're out of luck if your motherboard isn't designed for use with either Nvidia's SLI technology or AMD's CrossFireX, so verify that first. Memory, Video Card, and Storage. Memory Your computer's random-access memory, or RAM, is where data is stored while the processor is waiting to crunch the numbers. More is pretty much always better, within the boundaries of your budget and your system (if yours is 32-bit, it's limited to about 4GB; 64-bit PCs can handle up to 192GB, which is much more than any consumer desktop motherboard can currently hold), though if you use simple applications and aren't an avid multitasker, you can get away with less. The nice thing about building your own PC: If it turns out you need more, memory is one of the easiest things to add. Here's what to look for: Type. Memory will only be useful to you if the motherboard supports it; read that section for more information. Each new standard offers some additional speed and features, but not in all situations, so don't feel as if DDR4 RAM, rather than DDR3, is an automatic must for you if you're building from scratch.  Just remember that RAM is not backward-compatible, so DDR4 will not work in a DDR3 slot. The higher the number in a memory's standard, such as DDR4 2666, the faster it generally is. Faster memory designed for the same slot type will work in a slower slot, but save yourself some money and don't leave any performance on the table you don't have to. Capacity. DIMMs for each memory type come in a variety of capacities, so you can buy what you need and can afford. It's best to buy at least one chip for each memory channel (three for triple-channel, four for quad-channel), and memory often comes in "kits" to make that easier; and we don't recommend mixing and matching capacities within any one build. If you see a capacity listed as something like "8GB (2 x 4GB)," this means the total amount of RAM is divided up between a number of chips (in this case, two DIMMs of 4GB each, for a total of 8GB). Memory timings. Most memory specs include a series of four numbers, separated by hyphens, that provide an at-a-glance way to tell how speedy the memory is. The first number, CAS latency (the amount of time between when the memory controller requests data and when it's available) is the most significant, and may be listed by itself. The lower the numbers, the faster you can expect the memory to be. Other specs. Error Checking and Correction (ECC) memory is intended for high-performance systems such as workstations and servers; you will need a motherboard that specifically supports this type of memory if you want to use it (and most ordinary users won't need to). Voltage numbers give you specific information about how the memory uses power, with higher voltages typically meaning speedier RAM—but this is something only overclockers will really need to know. Video Card Though integrated graphics systems are more commonplace today than ever, even the best versions in the latest processors can't deliver what you can get from even a lower-end discrete video card. If you're into gaming of any sort, a video card is a must, but any programs that are designed to take advantage of graphics hardware acceleration, from Windows to Photoshop and beyond, can benefit from offloading video processing to a dedicated subsystem. Unless you're blasting out a tight-budget build, there's no good reason to forego a video card. Here's what to look for: Processing cores. Like your CPU, your graphics processing unit (or GPU) has contains multiple processing cores exclusively for churning out graphics. The more of them your video card has, the better a performer it's likely to be (and the more it's likely to cost). AMD calls its versions "stream processors" and Nvidia has named its own "CUDA cores"—note that although you can't directly compare the two types, the numbers of cores are good indicators of relative power within each company's chipset families. Clock rates. As with your CPU, this is the speed at which the graphics processing unit, or GPU, runs. It's not unusual to see cards with fewer processing cores and faster clock speeds, or vice versa, so try to find the best blend for the amount of money you have to spend. Memory. Video memory (VRAM) serves a function for video cards that's similar to what ordinary RAM does for the rest of your computer: It stores the data until it's needed for processing. This matters less if you're playing at lower resolutions, where there aren't as many pixels and other visual effects to be wrangled, but, as a rule of thumb—as with RAM—more tends to be better. (You'll see 4GB or more on the highest-end video cards.) Also pay attention to the memory clock speed, which can also function into performance. Ports. A video card isn't worth much if it's not hooked up to at least one monitor. Look at the list of its ports to determine whether your card outputs to DVI, HDMI, and DisplayPort; if you'll be using your computer with a monitor you already own, you'll want to know ahead of time whether you'll need to buy an adapter. Another good idea is verifying how many monitors the card can drive at once: It may not be the same as the card's number of output ports. Power requirements. Video cards are among the most power-hungry PC components you can buy, so know what you need to get from your power supply. Usually there will be a minimum value you should respect, and you'll also be told the specific number of PCIe power connectors (six- or eight-pin) you'll need in order to get the card to work, as well as the number of amps needed from the power supply (see that section below for more information about this). Storage Even if you love smartphones and tablets, you have to admit that storage is one of their biggest weaknesses: You seldom get that much, and you're pretty much stuck with whatever you buy. When you're building your own PC, that's not a problem—it's easy to add or change more pretty much anytime you want. But even if you don't have to worry too much about capacity, you need to make a few other crucial decisions. Here's what to look for: Hard drive or SSD? The average price of solid-state drives (SSDs), which store data on flash memory, has dropped a lot in recent years, making them a better choice than ever to add to your computer if speed in booting up and accessing files is what you crave. But by and large, they're still punishingly expensive on a cost-per-gigabyte basis compared with traditional, slower mechanical hard drives: It's not hard to track down a 3TB hard drive that costs $100 or less, whereas consumer-oriented SSDs top out at about 1TB—and those will run you $350 at an absolute minimum. Because of this, the classic advice is still the best: Pair a lower-capacity solid-state drive (256GB or so is a good compromise), for installing Windows and your most important programs, with one or more spinning hard drives for housing all your data. Another option may be a hybrid drive, which stores most of your data on an inexpensive hard drive but uses a tiny amount of flash memory for things you use most frequently; this can save you a lot of money, but because of how the underlying technology functions, the performance will not always match what you get from a true hard drive–SSD pairing. Interface. Serial ATA (SATA) connections are still common, especially for hard drives, and your motherboard will undoubtedly have plenty. But for major speed advantages, you can also buy newer SSDs on PCIe cards that install directly into your motherboard's expansion slots and use that much faster bus. Other interfaces, such as mSATA and M.2 are less common, but you may want to take a page from space-saving smaller systems and consider M.2 (which plugs directly into a motherboard port) for use as a boot drive. Just be certain your motherboard supports whatever standard you intended to use. Form factor. This refers to the size of the drive, with hard drives coming in 3.5- or 2.5-inch varieties, and SSDs coming in 2.5- or 1.8-inch models. For desktop computers, form factor doesn't always matter much, though you'll need to have the right kind of space in your case for whatever drive you choose. Hard drive specs. A couple of extra details may appear on hard drive listings that you won't see when researching SSDs. Most consumer hard drives spin at either 7,200 or 10,000rpm, with the speedier drives costing more and using more energy. You can also select the amount of cache memory your hard drive uses (up to 128MB) to boost performance. This information is useful for detail-oriented purists, but is of limited use if you don't plan to use your hard drive as your boot drive (which, as mentioned above, we don't recommend). Is optical optional? Now that most software is purchased and delivered digitally, an optical drive may not be a necessity for you, particularly if you don't plan to install a lot of older programs. If you don't want an optical drive, you'll need another strategy for installing the operating system; use another computer to create an installation USB key, for example. If you do want a drive, it may be worth it to splurge a bit on a Blu-ray burner (they cost around $100, or about five times what you'd pay for a DVD burner), so you can watch high-definition movies you may have hanging around. Power Supplies and Case. Power Supplies You can buy the best components to be found on the Web, and they'll be useless if you can't actually turn your computer on once you've finished building it. A power supply unit (or PSU) may be the most unappreciated of components, but without it, nothing else will work, so don't forget to give it the thought it deserves. Here's what to look for: Maximum power. This is the highest amount of power the PSU is capable of directing to your components. The less complicated or intense the build, the lower a number you can get away with—for most people, 500 to 750 watts will be fine. But if you're using high-end parts, particularly energy-sucking video cards (or more than one), your power needs could raise to 1,000 watts or even more. Checking your components' power usage or thermal design power (TDP) is vital—get a power supply that's too weak, and your computer may not even turn on. Voltage rails. Simply put, voltage rails are like individual power circuits within your PSU, with each of the major varieties (+3.3V, +5V, and +12V) powering different kinds of components. In most cases, the most important one to pay attention to is the +12V rail, as that's what will be driving your video cards; one of these capable of supplying 34 to 40 amps should be enough for the most powerful cards you can currently buy, and is likely to be more reliable than using multiple +12V rails for the same job. Form factor. Like other components we've covered here, power supplies come in a variety of form factors that determine the kinds of hardware you can use with them, and under what circumstances. The most common for mainstream motherboards right now is the ATX12V, but you may also see others (such as EPS12V), and you may need to buy a smaller power supply if you're building a system too miniature to fit a full-size ATX power supply, say. Connectors. Power supplies come in two varieties: one in which all the cables are preattached, and another (called modular) that lets you connect only the cables you need. In either case, your PSU still has to have the right connectors, whether six- and eight-pin for video cards, SATA for newer hard drives and SSDs, or Molex for older drives and other devices. The good news is that if you don't have all the connectors you need, adapters aren't too tough to find. Still, it's easiest to verify that you have what you need ahead of time; the PCIe connectors for the video card are most likely to trip you up, so find out what your card needs so your PSU can supply power in the proper way. Case Yes, you'll need a case to house all the other components you buy, and that's what we'll focus on here. But remember that it's also the outward expression of your computer's personality—and your own. How big should it be? What shape? What color? Do you want a window? Make these decisions, too, so your final computer will look every bit as good as it runs. But as far as the necessary specs, here's what to look for: Form factor. Though a case can basically be as big or as small as you want it to be, what matters more is which form factor of motherboard it's designed for. One intended for ATX motherboards will have room for the board and the proper number of expansion slots; a Micro ATX motherboard is smaller and will have fewer slots, though the case itself may not necessarily be smaller; and smaller form factors still, such as Mini ITX, may require other adjustments to your component choices (less storage, for example, or maybe a smaller power supply). Many larger ATX cases can also be used with motherboards of other form factors; as long as yours is supported, you should be fine. Front-panel ports and controls. You'll definitely want to access all of your computer's features, and its front-panel ports are the way to do that. Every case will have Power and Reset buttons and an activity light, and most will also have headphone and microphone jacks and USB ports; some may even have fan or lighting controls. Just remember that you'll need to connect any front-panel ports to the motherboard, so cross-comparing those specs ahead of time is a good idea. Drive bays. You'll need someplace to store your hard drives and SSDs, and any other devices you may be using. Generally speaking, cases may have one or more 5.25-inch external bays for optical drives other enthusiast gadgets, and multiple bays for 3.5- or 2.5-inch hard drives and SSDs. (Some cases also have externally accessible 3.5-inch bays for easily swapping hard drives in and out.) The smallest cases, though, can have very few of these, so pay attention, or risk not being able to perform necessary upgrades later. Fans and filters. Cooling is one of a case's most important functions. Your case will probably come with one or more intake or exhaust fans, and have room for adding more (in several sizes, from 80mm on up) if you want them. Removable filters, which capture dust to keep your PC's interior tidy and are easy to clean, are also common on higher-end cases. Putting It All Together. Putting It All Together Once you've decided on and purchased your parts, it's time to do the really exciting/fun/scary thing: assembling them all. Believe it or not, this is less difficult than it may sound, especially now that tool-free cases are de rigueur and you won't need your Phillips screwdriver for installing much more than the power supply and the motherboard. But doing things in the proper order will help out a lot. What follows is the basic procedure we used while building a higher-end system for testing hardware here in PC Labs. It illustrates most of the points you'll encounter in your building, though the details will differ a bit depending on the components you buy. The basic techniques, however, seldom vary much from build to build. 1. Get Prepared Just as a chef wouldn't fire up the stove without the mise en place ready to go, neither should you. Unpack all your components, remove the packing material from them, and arrange them cleanly on a large, flat surface. The floor will absolutely work if that's all you have, but try to avoid doing it on a carpet—static electricity remains a major danger for electronics, and frying your system before you even get to use it is one shock you don't want. (If you're concerned, you can use an antistatic wrist strap or ground yourself by touching some bare metal, such as the frame of your empty computer case, before you start working with anything else.) Also, open up the main side panel of your case, because that's where your build will begin. 2. Install the Power Supply You won't need the power supply until much later in the build process, but you're better off installing it first because once the other components are in place, it becomes a lot more difficult to put the supply where it needs to go. Position the PSU in the bay with the fan pointing downward (many cases will have a vent there) and the screw holes lining up with the holes on the back of the case. Secure the power supply with the provided screws, then drape the cables over the side of the case to keep them out of the way while you work on everything else. 3. Install the Processor Most of the time, it's going to be easiest to install some components on the motherboard before you put the motherboard in the case—you'll have a lot more room to work that way. The processor definitely qualifies for this treatment. Begin by opening the socket. If you're using an AMD CPU, just lift the lever to release the locking mechanism; you'll also need to do this for Intel chips, but notice that a metal cover will also secure the chip in place, and that needs to be lifted as well. (On higher-end Intel chips using the LGA 2011 socket, two levers hold down the socket cover, and you'll need to lift those one at a time.) Once the socket is opened, use the arrows printed on the socket and chip to align the CPU correctly, then lower it gently into the socket. (With AMD processors, the pins are on the CPU, so they'll need to all go down into the proper holes and the chip sits flat before proceeding.) Once the chip is in place, secure the socket again by reversing the procedure you used to open it. 4. Install the CPU Cooler Some fans and coolers may come with the necessary thermal compound already applied.  If yours doesn't, squeeze a small dab onto the center of the top of the processor; you can spread it around evenly with something like a business card if you want, but this isn't strictly necessary. With most stock coolers, you just align the support posts for the cooler around the socket and secure them in place; each cooler is slightly different in this regard, so refer to its instructions for exact directions on doing this with the model you have. If you're using a liquid cooler (such as the one shown in this paragraph) or another aftermarket cooler, you may need to install mounting hardware on the underside of the motherboard or configure a universal support mechanism for use with your specific motherboard and processor—either is another good reason to install the cooler while the motherboard is still outside the case. 5. Install the RAM The RAM bays are opened with the little clips at either end (some motherboards use only one set of clips, but most have two)—just push them down. Align the notch in the memory connector to the raised "key" in the RAM bay (you could do damage to the DIMM if it's not oriented correctly), then push the DIMM firmly into place. When it's correct, the clips should rotate back up and lock the memory in. Repeat with your other chips. Note: If you're using multiple-channel memory, the DIMMs should be installed in the proper channels if you want the according speed boost. It's pretty easy if, say, you have a quad-channel board and only four memory bays, but it might be more confusing in other situations, though the bays are often color-coded to clear things up. Consult your motherboard's manual if you're not sure. 6. Place the I/O Plate Each motherboard comes with a specially designed I/O plate that labels each of its ports and helps close off the back of the computer from dust and other intrusions; you don't absolutely need it, but it's a really good thing to have. Align the plate right-side up (you may want to compare it to the back of the motherboard, just to be safe), place it inside the wide space at the rear of the case, and push on it—hard—until it locks into place on all four edges. Finishing Touches. 7. Mount the Motherboard Although some cases come with preinstalled motherboard risers, which prevent the board from directly touching the metal of the case, most don't.  To find out where the risers should go if you're not sure, place the motherboard in the case and see which holes in it correspond with which holes in the case, then screw the risers that came with your case into those holes.  (Some cases have the holes needed for the various form factors marked so you won't have to either do this or guess.)  Once the risers are in, tighten each of them as much as you can. Guide the motherboard gently into the case, pushing its rear-panel ports through the correct openings in the I/O plate, and then laying the motherboard on top of the risers so you can see them through the screw holes. Insert and screw in half way all the screws; once they're in, and you've verified that the motherboard's position is correct, go back and screw them all in the rest of the way. Be careful not to overtighten the screws. 8. Install the Video Card The video card plugs into the longest (x16) PCIe slot on the motherboard, the first in the series of slots. Open that slot on the case, either by unscrewing the cover blocking it or utilizing your case's tool-free mechanism. Line up the card's backplate with the slot and the gold connectors (avoid touching them) with the slot itself. Then push the card down until it clicks. Secure the card in its position using whatever method your case employs. Note: If you're using an extra-wide video card or multiple video cards, you'll need to open more than one slot. 9. Install Your Drives Because every case is different, it's tough to provide a single blanket explanation for how to install the specific drives for your build. Most 5.25-inch drives, if you're using them, will either screw in place or use a simple tool-free system on one or both sides of the drive cage. It's not uncommon for 3.5-inch drives to install using caddies or trays, though they may also screw into a smaller cage below the 5.25-inch one (almost always at the top of the drive well). And many of those same trays will also have space for 2.5-inch drives, though some of these drives come with adapters that let them work easily in 3.5-inch bays, or other slots (such as on the floor of the case or beneath the motherboard tray) may be provided for installing them. Other drive form factors, such as mSATA or M.2, install into special slots on the motherboard itself; and still other drives can be placed in PCIe slots. The manuals for your motherboard and any unusual drives will have the information you need about this. 10. Connect Your Cables With all your hardware installed, it's time to start linking everything together. Run data cables from your drives that need them to the appropriate ports on the motherboard. (SATA ports are often located along the edge of the motherboard.) Ensure that everything that needs power gets it: Connect the appropriate cables from the power supply to the motherboard (you'll probably need two for this: one terminating in a 24-pin plug, another in a four- or eight-pin plug), to your video card (one or more of the six- or eight-pin cables, probably labeled PCIe), and to your drives (the connectors are thin and black). For bonus points, route your interior cables through the holes in the inside of the case and around the back of the motherboard if you can; most non-budget cases today are designed to facilitate this. Yes, the inside of your computer will look better (nice if you have a window), but you'll also be improving airflow, and thus the way your computer deals with heat. 11. Connect Your Wires The final step in making it possible to interact with all the various parts of your computer—and seeing that they operate correctly—is connecting all the wires.  Connect the power wires from your CPU cooler and any case fans to the proper pins on the motherboard; sets are clearly marked for "CPU Fan," "Chassis Fan," or "Aux Fan."  Then connect the wires from the front panel to the appropriate headers: USB will be common here (note that the 2.0 and 3.0 standards' headers look different), as will the headphone and microphone jacks (which will connect via the same audio header), but you may have other esoteric ones to deal with as well. Last, but not least, link the bevy of tiny front-panel wires linked to your activity lights and Power and Reset buttons to the pins on the motherboard. These are almost always labeled on the board itself, but they can be hard to see, and it can be difficult to know which of the two-pin connectors goes where. Again, consult your motherboard manual if you have any questions as to what goes where—you won't do any permanent damage if you screw this up, but your buttons might not work and your lights might not flash correctly, and that can sometimes be even more annoying. 12. Start Using Your PC That's it. You'll still need to install Windows and software, and tweak the BIOS or UEFI settings to your liking, so there's a fair amount of work yet to be performed. But remember that this doesn't have to be the end of the process. Want more speed? Swap out the processor for a faster one. Tackle more demanding projects by upping the RAM. Make your games more exciting by replacing your video card with the latest and greatest model. Add another hard drive or two or three. The choice is yours, and you can change your mind at any time—and upgrading individual parts (aside from the motherboard) is invariably easier than starting from scratch. In any event, rest easy knowing that you're doing it all on a PC you built especially for you, and that will always reflect your needs and desires in a way no tablet or laptop easily can. Sure, maybe a desktop is limited in some ways in 2015, but you'll have more freedom than with any other setup. And don't be surprised if you find that the satisfaction you derive from putting it all together yourself, is well worth the loss in mobility. Get Our Best Stories! Sign up for What's New Now to get our top stories delivered to your inbox every morning. This newsletter may contain advertising, deals, or affiliate links. Subscribing to a newsletter indicates your consent to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe from the newsletters at any time. Thanks for signing up! Your subscription has been confirmed. Keep an eye on your inbox! Sign up for other newsletters Dig Deeper With Related Stories. 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Currently the managing editor of Hardware for PCMag, Matthew has fulfilled a number of other positions at Ziff Davis, including lead analyst of components and DIY on the Hardware team, senior editor on both the Consumer Electronics and Software teams, the managing editor of ExtremeTech.com, and, most recently the managing editor of Digital Editions and the monthly PC Magazine Digital Edition publication. Before joining Ziff Davis, Matthew served as senior editor at Computer Shopper, where he covered desktops, software, components, and system building; as senior editor at Stage Directions, a monthly technical theater trade publication; and as associate editor at TheaterMania.com, where he contributed to and helped edit The TheaterMania Guide to Musical Theater Cast Recordings. Other books he has edited include Jill Duffy's Get Organized: How to Clean Up Your Messy Digital Life for Ziff Davis and Kevin T. Rush's novel The Lance and the Veil. In his copious free time, Matthew is also the chief New York theater critic for TalkinBroadway.com, one of the best-known and most popular websites covering the New York theater scene, and is a member of the Theatre World Awards board for honoring outstanding stage debuts. Read the latest from Matthew Murray. Lenovo Ideapad 110S Review Havit HV-MS735 MMO Gaming Mouse Review CyberPower Gamer Master Ultra Review Lenovo Showcases New Windows 2-in-1s at MWC Das Keyboard X40 Pro Gaming Mechanical Keyboard Review More from Matthew Murray
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Result 18
TitleParent's Guide To Building A PC For Your Kid This Christmas | WePC
Urlhttps://www.wepc.com/how-to/parents-guide-to-building-a-pc-for-your-kid/
DescriptionThis parent's guide to building a PC is the perfect place to start if you're looking to purchase your kid a computer these holidays
Date
Organic Position17
H1Parent’s Guide To Building A PC For Your Kid This Christmas
H2Parent’s Guide To PC Building
Things To Consider
What Hardware You Need To Build A PC
Peripherals And OS
The Difference Between Custom Build And Prebuilt Computers
How To Build A PC
Final Thoughts
H3Your Budget
Your Requirements
Processor (CPU)
Motherboard (MOBO)
Graphics Card (GPU)
Memory (RAM)
Storage (SSD/ HDD)
Power Supply (PSU)
Case
Hardware Roundup
Operating System
Peripherals
Monitor
H2WithAnchorsParent’s Guide To PC Building
Things To Consider
What Hardware You Need To Build A PC
Peripherals And OS
The Difference Between Custom Build And Prebuilt Computers
How To Build A PC
Final Thoughts
BodyParent’s Guide To Building A PC For Your Kid This Christmas Charlie Noon PC Building Tips 2 Comments Last Updated: November 23, 2021 Parent’s Guide To PC Building. With Christmas fast approaching, kids across the globe are starting to write their lists for Santa. Thanks to modern technology and the recent rise of gaming popularity, many of today’s lists will see action man and barbie replaced with PC components and gaming peripherals. For some technophobe parents, that can be a fairly daunting request, especially when you consider how technical and costly a PC can be if done incorrectly. However, here at WePC, we understand the stress that might come with such a request and have decided to create this comprehensive article – a parent’s guide to building a PC for kids this Christmas. We’ll be looking at the things you should consider before buying any components, some of the intricacies that come with PC building, a simple step by step PC building guide, and some of the more frequently asked questions we get in our comments section and Community posts. So, without further ado, let’s dive into it. Things To Consider. OK, you’ve decided to do it, you’re going to buy your kid a new PC. They say it’s for schoolwork or some hokum, but we all know deep down they just want to play games like Fortnite on it. Which you’re OK with, and so are we! Anyway. You’ve probably found your way to this article because you’re a first-time builder or haven’t built a PC in a couple of years and wanted to get a refresher. You’re looking for a bit of guidance on PC building and need to know what your money can buy, how much power you need to play games, and a whole host of other questions as well. We’ll be answering all those questions in the following article, but before you get to that bit, before you even start looking at components, you need to explore the following aspects of a PC build. Consider these areas before making your purchases and you’ll save yourself a lot of time, money, and stress. Your Budget. One of the first questions you need to be asking yourself as a PC builder – is budget, or better still, how much of it you have at your disposal. It’s an extremely important aspect of PC building because the difference between a low-performance PC and a top-tier build can be thousands. Setting a clear budget at the start of your PC build project will set the stage for what performance you can extract from your PC. It will also determine whether you’re performance requirements are reachable or not. The following are general guidelines to what we believe are reasonable budgets for relevant performance outputs.   – Budget Build –  Budget – $300-$600 – At this price point, your performance power is fairly limited. If you’re looking to play new AAA game titles such as Call of Duty or Farcry 5, you’re going to want to consider looking at some of the other price points. Having said that, at $500, you can still build a PC that can play some lower-intensive games at 60FPS+. If you’re looking to play games like CS: GO, Fortnite, and Minecraft, then a PC within this price range should be able to provide you with an enjoyable experience. – Mid-range build –  Mid-range – $700-$1,000 – If you’re looking to play more demanding AAA game titles in mid to high settings, you’re going to want to consider a budget within this range. At this price, you start to choose components with the highest available performance output, instead of making compromises. With a powerful standalone GPU, you should be able to play a large variety of games in high-settings, and most in 1080p. – High-end Build – High-end – $1,000+ – Any budget above $1,000 is considered high-end. At this price point, you enter into the premium-tier hardware components that can drive huge FPS figures and can perform demanding multitasking scenarios. This is where compromises are no longer an issue. You buy the best-of-the-best and start to prioritize aesthetics and speed over budget. Your Requirements. Once you’ve established what budget you have to play with, the next most important thing to consider is your kid’s requirements. As mentioned above, the difference between a workstation PC and a gaming PC can differ in price massively. That makes understanding your needs all the more important and will save you time and money. Let’s discuss some of the main differences between the two types; a workstation computer, and a gaming PC. A workstation computer has the sole purpose of providing the user with a PC that can perform both light and heavy workload tasks. Whether it be spreadsheet work or demanding video editing, a workstation should be able to accomplish these tasks with the minimum of fuss. If you plan on building a workstation PC, you might find that the component list is quite different from that of a gaming PC. Many modern-day workstation PCs will come equipped with an APU instead of the more commonly used CPU and GPU. Thanks to AMD’s latest line of Ryzen APU’s, consumers can now buy processors with powerful integrated graphics in-built. A gaming PC is a different beast altogether. Whereas a workstation PC can be built from as little as $300, a gaming PC demands a much higher budget. To be able to play any form of demanding AAA game title, you will require some form of entry-level GPU and a reasonably competent CPU with good single-core performance. I know by now you’re probably a little flustered at some of the technical terms being thrown around, but don’t worry, we’re going to make everything clear as we go along! What Hardware You Need To Build A PC. So, you’ve stuck with us this far, and you have a pretty good understanding of what PC will best suit your kid’s needs. But we still know absolutely nothing about PC building or the components that go into a PC. Well, we do, but you don’t. Don’t worry, that’s exactly what we’ll focus on in this section. Every build is comprised of several PC components. However, not all builds use the same number of components. Let me explain. The main list of components for any build is as follows: Processor (CPU/APU) Motherboard (Mobo) Memory (RAM) Hard Drive (SSD or HDD) Power Supply (PSU) Case These are the base components that make up every PC. If you’re more familiar with PC building, then you might notice certain hardware missing from this list, and that’s because they aren’t essential in getting a PC up and running. If you’re into gaming you might want to consider a parts list more like this: Processor (CPU/APU) Graphics Card (GPU) AIO Cooler Motherboard (Mobo) Memory (RAM) Hard Drive (SSD or HDD) Power Supply (PSU) Case Fans Case With the introduction of a GPU and AIO cooler, this PC will be able to handle more demanding games and provide a truly immersive experience. You’re going to need an AIO cooler to ensure system temps are always running low and a GPU for providing a high FPS output. Let’s take a look at what each part does so you gain a greater understanding of each component. Processor (CPU). Each processor can vary in price, clock speed, cores, and thread count. They are measured by their clock speed, and core/thread counts, with high speeds naturally being more powerful and desirable by gamers. Individual CPUs have specific chipset and socket compatibility, so it’s always essential to make sure your motherboard is right for your CPU. CPU stands for central processing unit and is the brain of the computer. It is the second most impactful component in a gaming rig and the most important in a workstation PC. A CPU is made up of Cores and Threads and is measured in several different ways, with clock speed being one of the most important. The clock speed is measured in gigahertz (GHz) and is based upon each core across the chip. When your PC is in full operation, the CPU will dedicate cores to individual tasks. Having more cores means your PC can perform highly demanding tasks more efficiently. If you’re looking for a gaming PC, then I would recommend a CPU with a minimum of 4 cores/ 8 threads. A workstation can get by with a 2 core/ 2 thread CPU, but let’s be honest, you’ll do well to find one of those these days. Entry-level CPUs in today’s market come to shelves with 4 cores/4 threads and are optimized for work tasks and some light gaming. Motherboard (MOBO). A motherboard is the main foundation of your technological new-build. It’s the component that allows all the other parts to work together in perfect harmony. *Be aware though* not every motherboard works with every processor, you need to make sure your components are compatible. Each motherboard comes designed with a specific chipset and socket in mind. This will tell you, as a consumer, which motherboard is compatible with your specific CPU. Take the following as a rough guide to chipset and socket selection: Intel CPU’s will work with LGA 1151 socket type and a number of different chipsets ranging from B360 to Z390. AMD CPU’s work with AM4 socket type boards and a number of different chipsets ranging from B450 to X570. As you can see from the table above, sockets lend themselves to many chipsets but are NOT compatible with the opposing brand. Another important area to consider when purchasing a motherboard is the form factor. The form factor is the physical size of your motherboard. It determines the general shape and size of your motherboard and it also specifies what type of case and power supply you’ll need. The three most commonly used form factors at ATX, M-ATX, and Mini-ITX, with the latter being the smallest. Below, is a diagram that outlines the size of each motherboard form factor and some of the pros each come with. Graphics Card (GPU). Your GPU, or graphics processing unit, is the most impactful component when it comes to your gaming requirements. It will determine what games you can play and at what graphical settings. If your kid is looking to play highly demanding AAA game titles, then you WILL need to invest in a powerful graphics card. Be aware, though; they can be quite expensive. We recommend spending a minimum of 50% of your PC budget on the GPU. A GPU is measured by its clock speed and VRAM, but can also be separated from other GPU’s in a number of different ways which range from aftermarket cooling to CUDA cores. Clock speed is fairly unsubstantial when referencing in-game performance, but can be the difference between two aftermarket graphics cards. For example, an ASUS ROG STRIX 2080TI comes with a clock speed of 1665 MHz, whereas a Zotac Gaming RTX  2080TI (essentially the same GPU but with a different aftermarket manufacturing process) has a clock speed of 1545 MHz.  VRAM, on the other hand, is much more important. VRAM is your graphics card’s video RAM and works in the same way as system memory. They come in a variety of capacities and types. Today’s standard VRAM is GDDR5, and you should not accept anything less. However, VRAM does come in improved types such as GDDR5X, GDDR6, and HBM (High Bandwidth Memory). Capacities can range as follows: 2GB – At 2GB, you have a very limited amount of VRAM to play with, and you will struggle to play anything over 720p. 4GB – This gives you a little more room to play with and should be able to power 1080p and maybe 1440p. 6GB – At 6GB, you are entering into the realms of the mid-range GPU, and you should be able to push good FPS in both 1080p and 1440p. 8GB – This is the start of the premium GPU’s, and you should be looking to achieve 100FPS in 1440p and some 4k gaming. 11GB – Only a few GPUs come with 11GB’s of VRAM, and these are your top of the range cards, which can push in advance of 200FPs in most titles. They can max out 4k resolution gaming and should still provide a smooth, immersive experience. Memory (RAM). Memory, or random access memory, is one of the most important aspects of any build. Luckily, it’s also one of the most affordable additions thanks to a decrease in market price over the last couple of years. RAM comes in several different forms and capacities and helps drive the speed of your system when under heavy load. If your kid is looking to build a gaming PC, then we would highly recommend 8GB of RAM as a minimum. Pushing to 16GB would definitely be advisable if they plan on doing heavy workload multitasking or streaming. 4GB – This is the absolute bare minimum we would recommend. If you’re looking to build a PC for schoolwork, emails, general browsing, and multimedia, then 4GB will be suitable for your needs. 8GB – This is the minimum we would recommend for a gaming PC. You’ll be able to play most games and should be able to do some light multitasking. From a workstation point of view, 8GB should be good for most tasks and editing purposes. 16GB – At 16GB, you pretty much have the freedom to do whatever you like in terms of gaming. No game really needs more than 12GB as they rely heavily on your graphics card. Establish what your kid is looking to do with this new computer, and you’ll be able to tailor the RAM for their specific needs. Storage (SSD/ HDD). Storage is one of the simplest components to understand, mainly because everyone has some sort of storage facility in their techno-lives. Your phone has storage, your TV has storage, even your watch now comes with a little storage drive. It’s everywhere, and it basically allows you to save and access files that you don’t wish to delete. Simple, right? Storage comes in a number of different formats, some of which are on their way out of consumer-grade builds. The hard drive is something everyone has probably heard of. It’s storage made of a 2.5 – 3.5-inch disk that rotates at high RPM to find and access the files. These have been around for an eternity and still play a major role in today’s PCs. How much longer they will is up for debate, but right now, they offer a cheaper alternative to the more expensive, much faster SSD. SSD, which stands for solid-state drive, is a new way of accessing memory, which rapidly improves how fast you can access the data. They use non-volatile memory where the data files can be accessed at any time and in any order. Thanks to the hugely increased read/write times, and their general increase in speed, SSD’s are much more expensive than your generic hard drives. Whichever you choose, just know, if you plan on building a gaming PC, you are going to need a fairly large storage drive. We recommend 500GB as an absolute minimum. For a workstation computer, we recommend 500GB – 1TB unless you are editing large video/image files. In this case, you might want to splash out on a 4TB drive and above. 250GB – 500GB – Light gaming and general desktop PC storage requirements. 500GB – 1TB – For users with a medium-sized games library and does light work on the side. 1TB – 4TB – Extensive gaming library and does quite a bit of video editing on the side. 4TB+ – For those looking to own an extensive games library and do a lot of media editing as well. Power Supply (PSU). Your power supply pretty much does what it says on the tin; it supplies your PC with power. PSU’s come with varying levels of power output and efficiency and should be taken extremely seriously when purchasing a build. A poorly made, un-certified PSU could be the difference between an enjoyable gaming session and sleepless nights dreaming of fires. Each PSU has a wattage output that it can provide your computer with. Your hardware will determine what PSU wattage you will need, with more parts requiring more power. PSU’s start from as little as 400W and go up to and beyond 1000W. Wattage’s aside; a PSU also comes with a rating for efficiency. The 80+ certification, as we’ll call it, ranges from un-certified to Titanium and specifically references how efficient your PSU is. We would recommend not to go under 80+ bronze for a gaming PC as they require good power efficiency, especially when you’ll be using it for long periods of time. Below is a rough guide to the PSU ratings. Case. Lastly, we have your case – and you’ll be happy to know this is one of the simplest components to understand. Its main job is to house your components. Having said that, there is one aspect you need to be concerned with, and that’s form factor. Certain cases are compatible with certain motherboard sizes. As we mentioned above, a motherboard can be one of several form factors that range from Mini-ITX to E-ATX. You need to make sure before purchasing a case, it can accommodate your motherboard form factor. You also need to be aware of the size of your GPU (if you plan to get one) as they can be extremely large. A smaller ITX case will almost certainly struggle to accommodate a large GPU, so be aware when you’re looking at case purchases. Hardware Roundup. So, those are the parts you’ll need if you plan on building your own PC for your kid this Christmas. It might seem a little daunting at this stage, but I can assure you, once you start to understand the parts and know where to put them, it really is a piece of cake. We build PC’s in the office on a weekly basis, and they can go from a pile of parts to a full-blown gaming rig in about 30 mins. Having said that, building the PC is just the start of the process. The following is everything else you will need to get this thing up and running! Peripherals And OS. Every PC, whether it’s for gaming, schoolwork, or movies, needs the following add-ons to make it a full functioning computer. These will add a little to the cost of your build, but in the grand scheme of things, they roughly add around 20% to your total bill. Operating System. Without an operating system, your build is simply a very expensive, very large paperweight. Your operating system, or Windows, in this case, is what makes all your parts work together. Your operating system is a series of operating systems that include a graphical interface and desktop, which allows the users to access and view files and folders. There are a number of different operating systems out there, but for general usage and gaming, we can only recommend Windows. The latest version is 10, and you can pick it up on both DVD and USB flash drive. Peripherals. Your peripherals can be as simple as a keyboard and mouse, having said that, they can also stretch to mousepads, mouse bungees, headphones, microphones, and a whole host of other addons. For the purposes of this article, we recommend a mouse, keyboard, and speakers to get your kid up and running. There are a number of bundles out there, or you can buy individual parts, it’s completely up to you. There is a large difference between peripherals, so please don’t think a $5 mouse is the same as a $100 one, because they aren’t. We have a ton of pages on peripherals, and if you would like to go into more detail on those, I’ve left a list of suitable pages below. Monitor. Let’s not forget about the monitor. We all know what a monitor is, right? For those that don’t, it’s the seeing box that sits on top of your desk and shows pretty pictures. No, but seriously, monitors are a key piece of hardware, especially when gaming and video editing. If your kid is into gaming, then you might want to think about purchasing a monitor with a good refresh rate and response time. For kids looking to do a bit of video editing and image manipulation, I’d recommend an HDR monitor with an IPS panel. We have some great pages on monitors, and I’ve listed the most relevant below. The Difference Between Custom Build And Prebuilt Computers. At this stage in the article, you might be scratching your head in complete confusion, wondering how you’re ever going to figure this thing out. You might be thinking about throwing the towel in and just getting your kid a console. Well, before you do that, you always have the option to go prebuilt. A prebuilt PC is precisely that. It’s a PC that is prebuilt. That means you don’t have to worry about buying all the parts and going through the seemingly impossible task of putting them all together perfectly. Be aware though, buying a prebuilt will cost you a premium and you will lose a lot of the value by doing so. Having said that, there are some decent prebuilt options; you just need to find them in the sea of overpriced options that are available. Below are some general guidelines for the difference in price between building your own PC and buying a prebuilt one: How To Build A PC. So, you’ve got this far, you’ve decided you’re going to buy your kid a PC for Christmas and you now need to figure out how to put this PC together. Even though this might be the most foreign part of the entire process, don’t worry. We have you covered and we’ve already made a video showing exactly how a PC is put together. Before you start though, you might want to consider purchasing the following items: PC Toolkit Anti-static equipment As a first-time builder, these items are going to ensure a much easier, less stressful overall build process. Below is an easy-to-follow guide to how to build a PC. There are several more, in-depth videos coming soon, so stay tuned! Final Thoughts. So, there you have it, our comprehensive guide for parents looking to build a PC for their kid this Christmas. Many parents out there are probably terrified of the concept of buying and building a PC from scratch. But, hopefully, we took a lot of the stigma away from something that sounds much more technical than it actually is. Let us know whether or not this guide helped you by leaving us a comment in the section below. Or, better yet, jump on over to our Community page where you can start a thread and ask any questions that haven’t been answered already.
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Result 19
TitleBuilding vs Buying a PC - Which Is Right For You? | CDW
Urlhttps://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/articles/hardware/building-vs-buying-pc.html
DescriptionShould you build or buy a new computer? Here’s everything you need to know about building vs buying a PC so you can make the right decision for you
Date
Organic Position18
H1Building vs. Buying a PC: Which Is Right For You?
H2In this Article:
Building vs. Buying a PC: A Top-Level Comparison
Key Factors to Consider
Should You Build a PC?
Should You Buy a Prefab PC?
The Bottom Line
H3Browse CDW
Storage Size
CPU Power
GPU Power
RAM/Memory
Advantages of Building a PC
Disadvantages of Building a PC
Advantages of Buying a PC
Disadvantages of Buying a PC
H2WithAnchorsIn this Article:
Building vs. Buying a PC: A Top-Level Comparison
Key Factors to Consider
Should You Build a PC?
Should You Buy a Prefab PC?
The Bottom Line
BodyBuilding vs. Buying a PC: Which Is Right For You? Should you build or buy a new computer? Here’s everything you need to know about building vs buying a PC so you can make the right decision for you. In this Article: . Building vs. Buying a PC: A Top-Level Comparison This guide will tell you everything you need to know about building vs. buying a PC. Key Factors to Consider Whether you’re building or buying, knowing what you will use your new PC for can help you determine which specifications matter most to you as a user.  Should You Build a PC? There are luckily a ton of resources out there that make building a PC possible for anyone. Should You Buy a Prefab PC? The quickest way to get a new computer and have it up and running is to buy a pre-built PC.  Buying a new computer is a serious task that requires both time and research. Whether you plan on purchasing a pre-built PC or buying components and building it yourself, the ultimate decision will be a serious investment. But which is the better option? Well, that depends on your specific needs. Here’s everything you need to know about building vs buying a PC so you can make the right decision for you. Buying a PC? Explore prefab options. Building a PC? Explore components. Building vs. Buying a PC: A Top-Level Comparison . Pre-built computers can get you up and running quickly but often have limited components or other drawbacks that can come back to bite you. Building a PC is the route to choose in terms of quality. However, components can get expensive, and user error can end up costing hundreds of dollars. Either way, there are several factors to consider that can make a significant difference no matter which option you end up choosing. Luckily, this guide will tell you everything you need to know about building vs buying a PC, so you can determine which is right for you. Key Factors to Consider . Whether you’re building or buying, knowing what you will use your new PC for can help you determine which specifications matter most to you as a user. To help you get started, check out this list of standard specifications and terms you may hear when purchasing a new computer: Storage Size . This refers to the number of programs, files, and other media you can have installed on your computer. Storage size is usually measured in GB (Gigabytes) or TB (Terabytes). The higher the number, the more storage on the PC. The component responsible for storage is the hard drive (HDD or SSD). This part is easily upgraded, so it is not the most important at the time of the initial purchase. Other solutions, such as cloud or external storage, can also help mitigate any storage size issues. Shop Hard Drives CPU Power . The power of your CPU or processor is directly related to the power of your PC. Processor power is measured in a few ways, but the most common is clock speed, represented in Gigahertz (GHz). To put it very plainly, the higher this number, the more powerful the processor. Most modern CPUs average speeds from 3-4GHz. Shop CPUs GPU Power . Like the CPU, the GPU or graphics card plays a critical part in determining how powerful your machine will be. You can use clock speed to measure GPU strength as well. However, there is another equally important specification to pay attention to. VRAM or video ram is the amount of memory the GPU has, and it directly relates to how powerful it is. Again, the higher the number, the more powerful the GPU. Shop GPUs RAM/Memory . Random Access Memory or RAM is the component that stores all of the data currently in use by your computer. You can easily upgrade the amount of RAM in your PC, with some limitations. How much you can upgrade your RAM is ultimately up to your motherboard. To put it plainly, the more RAM you have, the more things your computer can do at once. Modern PCs typically have 8-16Gb of RAM. Shop RAM Should You Build a PC? . Successfully completing a new PC build is one of the most rewarding feelings there is. After hours of research and work, you will have a powerful machine that will function for a long time to come. Unfortunately, putting that new PC together can get rather stressful. Everything from compatibility issues to user error can make the process exponentially more difficult and expensive. There are luckily a ton of resources out there that make building a PC possible for anyone. If you’re deciding on whether or not you should build a PC, take a look at these advantages and disadvantages first: Advantages of Building a PC . Here are some of the top benefits of building a PC: Cheaper Long-Term. Initially, building a PC is always more expensive than buying a pre-built machine. When purchasing components individually, however, they are often better in quality than the bulk-ordered components that go into pre-built computers. This leads to an overall better build quality that makes the computer have a longer lifespan. Building a PC will actually save you money in the long run, because you will likely not need to replace or repair components as often as with a pre-built. Easier to Fix. When a component fails inside a PC you built, it is easier to identify because you are more familiar with each part. When you buy individual computer components, they often come with extra spare parts that pre-built computers do not. These additional parts can sometimes save you from costly repair bills or unnecessary tech support visits. Better Overall Quality. If peak performance is your goal, build a PC. Building a PC allows you to handpick every component that goes into your machine. When you have total control over your computer's internal components, the final product can have a better overall build quality. Pre-built PCs often focus on just a CPU or GPU and fill the rest of the computer with cheaper, less desirable components. Disadvantages of Building a PC . Here are some of the most common disadvantages of building a PC: More Expensive Upfront. Buying individual parts adds expenses like shipping fees or limited quantities that drive up prices. When you buy a pre-built PC, none of that is a problem because all the components come in the PC included in its original price. User Error. While building a PC can be rewarding, it can also be challenging if you have not done it before. The smallest user error can result in a broken pin or snapped cable that can ruin costly components. Even the most experienced PC builders are susceptible to occasional user error. The good news is that there are plenty of helpful tutorials out there to walk you through the process step by step. Part Compatibility. When you build a PC, it is essential to make sure all of the parts you purchase are compatible with each other. Everything from the case down to the fans has specific needs that other components need to meet for the final product to work as intended. If you purchase parts without checking compatibility, you could end up with a GPU that does not fit in your case or, even worse, a motherboard that does not support your CPU or RAM. Just be sure to check components for compatibility before buying! Should You Buy a Prefab PC? . Getting a new PC is incredibly exciting, no matter how you plan on doing it. The quickest way to get a new computer and have it up and running is to buy a pre-built PC. You can avoid stress and know that you are getting a machine that requires no extra steps to get working. If it is from a store, you can take that PC home and have it working that day! If you order a pre-built computer online, you will still have to wait some time, but its only one package to wait for instead of multiple components — and there is very little setup time. Advantages of Buying a PC . Unsure if buying a prefab computer is right for you? Here are some of the top reasons to buy a PC: Plug & Play. Pre-built PCs are super easy and stress-free to set up. Most of the time, you only need to plug the computer in and turn it on. Sometimes, pre-built computers can even come with specific software or apps installed that can save you valuable time. Quick Delivery. When you buy parts individually for a PC build, there is the issue of numerous tracking numbers and delivery dates. On top of that, you have to wait for all of the components before using anything. With pre-built PCs, however, the entire machine is ready to go as soon as you purchase it. Cost-Effective. When manufacturers make pre-built computers, they often can reduce the final cost by buying parts in bulk. This allows companies to offer discounts on pre-built machines that are often unmatched when building your own computer. Disadvantages of Buying a PC . Don’t buy just yet. Consider these disadvantages to buying a PC: Repairs. When a pre-built PC needs repairs, it is harder to determine where the problem is. This is because you will be less familiar with the machine's individual components. Suppose you cannot determine where the issue is. In that case, the entire computer will need to be serviced, taking up valuable time. The other major problem with repairs and pre-built computers is that if the machine is under warranty, you will need to have the entire PC serviced, not just a single component. Build Quality. Part of the reason that pre-built computers are so cost-effective is that manufacturers save money by putting cheaper parts in "less important" areas of the PC. Pre-built computers focus on core components such as the CPU and GPU because of their direct relationship to PC power. Other components, however, such as the power supply or hard drive may be lower quality. Limited Configurations. Since manufacturers buy parts in bulk and build many of the same machines, that means that configurations of pre-built PCs are severely limited. When you buy a pre-built PC, you will have to settle on some components. The Bottom Line . After thinking about all the pros and cons, you hopefully have a better idea of whether building or buying a PC is right for you. Both methods achieve the same goal but take very different paths getting there. Building a new computer can be an exciting and rewarding experience if you have the time and resources. When time is an issue, pre-built PCs can get you up and running as quickly as possible. No matter which option you decide on, there is always room to customize or upgrade your PC later down the road. Hopefully, this guide will make deciding easier for you, and remember there is no "wrong" decision when it comes to buying a PC. Buying a PC? Explore prefab options. Building a PC? Explore components.
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TitleBuilding Computers Handbook Simplified: Detailed Guide on How to Build Your Computer from Scratch to Completion; a True Step by Step & DIY Guide for B (Paperback) | Golden Lab Bookshop
Urlhttps://www.goldenlabbookshop.com/book/9798594738171
Description
Date14 Jan 2021
Organic Position19
H1Building Computers Handbook Simplified: Detailed Guide on How to Build Your Computer from Scratch to Completion; a True Step by Step & DIY Guide for B (Paperback)
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BodyBuilding Computers Handbook Simplified: Detailed Guide on How to Build Your Computer from Scratch to Completion; a True Step by Step & DIY Guide for B (Paperback) By Uta S. Tipton $9.99 Usually Ships in 1-5 Days Description. Building Computers Handbook Simplified: Detailed Guide on How to Build Your Computer from Scratch to Completion; a True Step by Step & DIY Guide for Beginners & ProsDo you want to be a glad proprietor/maker of the best DIY PC or computer; one that you've worked with your own hands? In this guide, we're demonstrating how to fabricate a PC, bit by bit. Regardless of whether it's not your first time fabricating a PC, we'd suggest perusing on as we may very well show you some things you don't as of now have the foggiest idea. Interestingly, you will be shown how to build a computer/PC from scratch to completion in a short while Here and in this guide, the following will be discussed: *The first step by step guide to building your computer fast & effectively*The Various component parts that make up the computer.*The concluding step by step guide to building your computer fast & effectively*some vital things your need to know about your computer/PC plus a quick budgetary ideas for you*More recap/explanations on building your computer/PC fast & effectivelyThese and many other great things will be discussed in this wonderful and practical guide Simply Scroll up and click Buy Now Button to get your copy today You will be glad you did. Product Details ISBN: 9798594738171 Publisher: Independently Published Publication Date: January 14th, 2021 Pages: 76 Language: English Categories Computer Engineering Buyer's Guides Related Editions (all)   Paperback (January 14th, 2021): $9.99
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TitleHow to build a PC: A step-by-step guide
Urlhttps://www.pcworld.com/article/423753/how-to-build-a-pc-a-step-by-step-comprehensive-guide.html
DescriptionWondering how to build a PC? Our comprehensive guide can help you through the entire process, from installing the CPU and the Windows operating system, to proper cable management
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H1How to build a PC: A step-by-step guide
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H380 IN 1 Professional Computer Repair Tool Kit, Precision Laptop Screwdriver Set, with 56 Bit, Anti-Static Wrist and 24 Repair Tools, Suitable for Macbook, PC, Tablet, PS4, Xbox Controller Repair
Corsair Hydro Series H100i v2
Coupon Codes
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BodyHow to build a PC: A step-by-step guide We'll help you through the entire process, from installing the CPU and Windows to proper cable management. By Brad Chacos Executive editor, PCWorld Jul 24, 2020 11:12 am PDT Adam Patrick Murray / IDG AMD’s mighty Ryzen processors and Intel’s high-octane 10th-gen Core CPUs continue to spark interest in PC building, but some people still hesitate at the idea of crafting a custom PC. Don’t! Building your own PC isn’t some arcane art or esoteric skill that only the most hardcore of hardware geeks can pull off. In fact, assembling a DIY PC is pretty straightforward once you’ve settled on your parts list.  A tool kit isn’t necessary, but it’s handy . 80 IN 1 Professional Computer Repair Tool Kit, Precision Laptop Screwdriver Set, with 56 Bit, Anti-Static Wrist and 24 Repair Tools, Suitable for Macbook, PC, Tablet, PS4, Xbox Controller Repair. Best Prices Today: $26.99 at Amazon Rolling your own computer offers a number of advantages that boxed desktops just can’t match, even though high demand during the pandemic has made PC parts scarcer and more expensive. You still get granular control over every single aspect of the hardware. You still get to choose not only the nuts-and-bolts-level details like processing and graphical performance, but also deeply personal touches like the PC’s case design and cooling capabilities. There’s no need to settle for a boring black box, unless you want a boring black box. Looking to build a hulking PC brimming with top-of-the-line hardware and closed-loop water-cooling? Go for it! (If you can convince your significant other to OK the expense, that is.) Or maybe you prefer a more well-balanced rig, or a delightfully small system with big gaming chops. You can even go light on your wallet and still come away with a gaming PC. When you’re building your own computer, the choice is yours. [ Further reading: The best SSDs ] Brad Chacos We built this PC with a liquid-cooled 8-core AMD Ryzen chip and Nvidia’s powerful GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. Even better, when you’re building your own PC you can shop around for the best price for each of your chosen components, rather than paying a single marked-up cost for the whole-hog system. AMD’s Ryzen processors have sparked a brutal price war in CPUs. DIYers benefit from that! The superb PCPartPicker.com website makes comparison shopping dead simple. And when you’re done building your PC and successfully power it up, it feels glorious—like you’ve truly accomplished something, rather than simply yanking a prebuilt tower out of a box. Building a PC for the first time can be intimidating, though. Even though PC assembly’s fairly simple once you know what you’re doing, staring at a giant pile of disparate parts and knowing you not only need to piece them together correctly but also wire them correctly afterwards is enough to bring a lump to a newbie PC builder’s throat. We’re here to help. Brad Chacos Building a PC lets you opt for an SSD the size of a gum stick. The CPU cooler in PCWorld’s graphics test PC . Corsair Hydro Series H100i v2. MSRP: $129.99 Best Prices Today: $499.99 at Amazon PCWorld has detailed installation guides—often with supplementary buying advice—for every major PC component you need. This comprehensive superguide explains how to build your PC from top to bottom, from case fans to CPU to cable management. Need help installing a particular component? Here are links for each piece of hardware in your PC: How to avoid common PC building mistakes —a must-read before you even buy your first part. How to install a power supply in your computer How to install an Intel or AMD CPU in your PC How to install new memory in your PC How to replace your PC’s motherboard How to install a graphics card How to install a hard drive in your PC The ultimate guide to proper PC cable management—you want your PC looking nice and pretty, after all. Even veteran PC builders stumble into trouble every now and again (though our guide to avoiding common PC building mistakes should help you avoid most of it). If your system won’t start after it’s all together, check out PCWorld’s guide to troubleshooting your home-built PC. It’s several years old, but still very applicable today. And once everything’s up and running, consider checking out these free programs that your new PC needs first. They all rock! Then sit back, relax, and enjoy a cold beverage. You just built a PC with your own two hands. That wasn’t so hard, was it? Editor’s note: This article was most recently updated to mention component shortages and price increases for DIY hardware. Note: When you purchase something after clicking links in our articles, we may earn a small commission. Read our affiliate link policy for more details. Related: ComputersComputer ComponentsComputers and Peripherals Brad Chacos spends his days digging through desktop PCs and tweeting too much. Coupon Codes. Dell Coupon code35% off select Business PCs + free next day shipping Eastbay Promo CodeStudent discount: 20% off $99 with Eastbay promo codeAT&T Wireless Promo CodeLearn how new and existing customers get the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip3 5G for up to $800 off with eligible trade-in.Rosetta Stone Promo CodeRosetta Stone coupon - 50% off 1-year exclusiveSamsung Promo CodeSamsung promo code: Up to 40% off your orderMotley Fool Discount84% off 2-yr Rule Breakers membership with Motley Fool discount
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TitleLogical Increments
Urlhttps://www.logicalincrements.com/articles/build-pc-home-theater
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TitleHow to build your own PC in 8 steps (DETAILED GUIDE) | Alzashop.com
Urlhttps://www.alzashop.com/how-to-build-your-own-PC
DescriptionStavba PC není vždy jednoduchou záležitostí. Proto jsme pro vás připravili podrobný NÁVOD, jak sestavit PC ✔️ Stavba PC krok za krokem ✔️ vč. TIPŮ A TRIKŮ
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Organic Position22
H1How to build your own PC in 8 steps (DETAILED GUIDE)
H2Building a PC - Table of Contents
What do I need to build a PC?
How to select the components for your PC
PC assembly step by step
Getting started
Assembling the PC components. Step 1: Install the processor in the socket
Assembling the PC components. Step 2: Install the CPU heatsink
Assembling the PC components. Step 3: Install memory modules in the motherboard
Assembling the PC components. Step 4: Install the graphics card
Assembling the PC components. Step 5: Connect the SSD/HDD drive
Assembling the PC components. Step 6: Connect the PSU to the motherboard
Assembling the PC components. Step 7: Test the assembled PC components
Assembling the PC components. Step 8: Install the motherboard in the PC case with the components aleady mounted
The PC is complete. Installing the operating system and stability testing
A few words of advice
H3How to plug an Intel processor in the motherboard socket | How to build a PC - step 1
How to plug an AMD processor in the motherboard socket | How to build a PC - step 1
Start by installing the motherboard I/O panel | How to build a PC - step 8
How to install the motherboard in the PC case | How to build a PC - step 8
Cable management | How to build a PC - step 8
Plugging in the cables (connectors, switches, etc.) | How to build a PC - step 8
Connecting the peripherals (keyboard, mouse, monitor, etc.) | How to build a PC - step 8
Potential point of interest:
What about the drivers?
Stability testing
H2WithAnchorsBuilding a PC - Table of Contents
What do I need to build a PC?
How to select the components for your PC
PC assembly step by step
Getting started
Assembling the PC components. Step 1: Install the processor in the socket
Assembling the PC components. Step 2: Install the CPU heatsink
Assembling the PC components. Step 3: Install memory modules in the motherboard
Assembling the PC components. Step 4: Install the graphics card
Assembling the PC components. Step 5: Connect the SSD/HDD drive
Assembling the PC components. Step 6: Connect the PSU to the motherboard
Assembling the PC components. Step 7: Test the assembled PC components
Assembling the PC components. Step 8: Install the motherboard in the PC case with the components aleady mounted
The PC is complete. Installing the operating system and stability testing
A few words of advice
BodyHow to build your own PC in 8 steps (DETAILED GUIDE) Catalogue We have prepared a detailed tutorial that will teach you how to build your own PC. The whole process is surprisingly easy and there are step by step instructions for you to follow. The guide also contains useful tips and tricks that should make things even easier and will also tell you what to watch out for. If you still don’t feel confident enough to build a PC, don’t worry. With our Custom-built PC service, you can simply select the components and let us build the PC for you, all practically for free. Building a PC - Table of Contents. What do I need to build a PC? How to choose the right components PC assembly step by step Getting started Step 1: Install the processor in the socket Step 2: Install the CPU heatsink Step 3: Install memory modules in the motherboard Step 4: Install the graphics card Step 5: Connect the SSD/HDD drive Step 6: Connect the PSU to the motherboard Step 7: Test the assembled PC components Step 8: Install the motherboard in the PC case with the components aleady mounted Installing the operating system and stability testing A few words of advice What do I need to build a PC? Building a PC is like putting together a large puzzle. What tools do you absolutely need to have before you start? Aside from the regular tools (screwdriver, pliers, etc.), the key to success lies in selecting the right PC components and operating system. So what components do you need? Processor and potentially CPU heatsink Motherboard System memory Graphics card SSD or HDD drives Power supply Computer case and cooler How to select the components for your PC. Choosing the right components is crucial and we strongly recommend that you carefully consider various processor and graphics card setups. If you want to build a gaming PC for example, you can check our special Alza GameBox systems to see what gaming systems often look like. Once you receive your components, you can start building. If you are building your first PC, make sure to clear at least one afternoon for the task, so you don’t have to hurry. Just take your time and be careful. As the old saying goes, better safe than sorry. PC assembly step by step. Place the processor in the socket Insert the system memory Install the CPU heatsink Connect the dedicated graphics card Connect the SSD Plug the power cables from the PSU into the motherboard, graphics card, SSD and cooler Install the components in the PC case Getting started. There are many ways how to build a PC, but let’s make one thing clear: We do not recommend mounting the components straight into the case. If you don’t have much experience with this, it’s better to first put the key computer components together and check if everything works as it should. It’s more time-consuming and you're essentially building the computer twice, but in the end, it can make things easier for you—you won’t have to disassemble the whole PC system if anything goes wrong. Mounted components are easier to check and adjust if they are outside the case. Cardboard makes for a good work surface, so you can start by unfolding the box your motherboard came in and placing the motherboard on it. Before that, make sure unpack all the necessary accessories, including the manual. Assembling the PC components. Step 1: Install the processor in the socket. How to plug an Intel processor in the motherboard socket | How to build a PC - step 1. This is probably the hardest part of the whole assembly process. The socket pins are very sensitive and you have to make sure you don’t damage them in any way (don’t bend, pull or break them under any circumstances). A damaged socket is very difficult to repair and you will lose the warranty on the motherboard. First, open the socket using the locking mechanism (see the motherboard manual for details). If you look at the socket and processor more closely, you will find that both components have matching notches. These notches ensure that that there is only one possible way to install the processor correctly. Note that there is a small arrow on both the processor and the socket. The arrow tells you how you should orient the processor in the socket. The processor must be inserted gently, so that it snaps into the socket on your first attempt. Don’t even think about adjusting it inside the socket; if you feel it doesn’t fit, simply remove it and try again. Some motherboards have a CPU installation tool, most commonly found on Z170 and Z270 chipsets. Once the processor has been properly inserted, relatch the socket cover and you are done. Want to learn how to install an AMD processor? Read on. How to plug an AMD processor in the motherboard socket | How to build a PC - step 1. Unlike Intel processors, the AMD CPUs have pins directly on the processor itself, so you must be extra careful when handling them. On the upside, snapping them into the socket is easier and also less risky. Open the socket by sliding the lever into the vertical position, place the processor in the socket as indicated by the arrows (works the same as with Intel; see the included manual for details), and then lock the socket by sliding the lever back to the horizontal position. Make sure to insert the processor very gently and without applying any pressure. Assembling the PC components. Step 2: Install the CPU heatsink. The first part of the PC assembly process is done. Now you should install the CPU heatsink. Follow the instructions as specified in the manual. With Intel 6th and 7th gen processors, be extra careful to make sure all the bolts are tightened evenly. Take your time, pay close attention to what you are doing, and tighten the bolts in a crosswise pattern. These processors have very thin printed connections and tend to bend at the corners. Once you're done, it's time for the Step 3 - installing the RAM. Assembling the PC components. Step 3: Install memory modules in the motherboard. The installation process may vary depending on the motherboard type and model. Some motherboards have only two memory slots, others four. With dual-slot motherboards, you just fill them all; with four-slot motherboards, you have to mount at least two RAM sticks to ensure dual-channel operation. Check the manual for details. In the figure, you see the correct procedure for installing a RAM module in the DIMM slot. The module must fit into the slot securely; sometimes you may even need to apply a slight force to snap the toggle in place (see figure). In the next step, we'll show you how to install GPUs. Assembling the PC components. Step 4: Install the graphics card. The next step in building your PC is to install the graphics card. Most modern graphics cards are rather hefty, so you need to hold up the card during installation. In most cases, you use the first PCI-E 16x slot to mount the card—it’s the one closest to the CPU socket. If you have any questions or doubts, check the motherboard manual. Next, it's time to plug in an SSD or HDD. Assembling the PC components. Step 5: Connect the SSD/HDD drive. This figure shows the proper way to plug a HDD into the SATA connectors. The same procedure applies to optical drives as well. Assembling the PC components. Step 6: Connect the PSU to the motherboard. ? Control check - are you doing it right?To see if everything is working as it should, plug in the motherboard power supply (24-pin ATX) and the processor power supply (8-pin EPS). The corresponding LED on the bottom of the board should light up. Some boards require only 4-pin EPS, others 8 + 4 EPS or even 2X8 16-pin EPS. Assembling the PC components. Step 7: Test the assembled PC components. If your motherboard doesn’t have a dedicated "Power" or "Start" switch, you have to connect two PWRSW contacts to turn the board on. It’s not that hard, so just use a screwdriver. If you get a picture and can get into UEFI, then everything is probably fine. At this stage, you can either install the operating system or mount the components in the PC case and leave the OS installation for later. It’s up to you. Assembling the PC components. Step 8: Install the motherboard in the PC case with the components aleady mounted. Our "How to build a PC" guide is nearing the end and this step is the last time we have to work with the hardware. Now disconnect the power supply, SSD, and graphics card, and you can begin installing the motherboard in your PC case. Some coolers also allow you to install the motherboard with the cooler already mounted. Start by installing the motherboard I/O panel | How to build a PC - step 8. First, you have to install the so-called I/O shield, which is the back panel of the motherboard and comes included with other motherboard accessories. Assembling the PC components - installing the motherboard in the case. How to install the motherboard in the PC case | How to build a PC - step 8. Insert the motherboard into the case by snapping the rear part (the one with the connectors) into the I/O panel. Make sure you align it correctly and check if the holes on the motherboard fit with the standoff locations on the case. Carefully tighten all the screws to firmly attach the motherboard to the case. Cable management | How to build a PC - step 8. We recommend reading the manual that came with your PC case, as it will give you some idea how cable management is supposed to work in this particular case. Cable management and the way power supply cables are laid out has a significant impact on the overall design and airflow efficiency. The manual will also tell you where and how you should place the disks (SSD/HDD) or optical drives, which is important, because every PC case model is different. Plugging in the cables (connectors, switches, etc.) | How to build a PC - step 8. Once you have the motherboard installed, plug in the rest of the connectors, such as USB, AUDIO, FAN connectors, and PC case cabling. The figure shows how you should connect the USB connectors to the case. Keep in mind that every motherboard has a slightly different connector layout, so always follow the instructions as specified in the manual included in the packaging. Now your PC is pretty much complete; the only thing left are the peripherals such as a keyboard, mouse and monitor. Connecting the peripherals (keyboard, mouse, monitor, etc.) | How to build a PC - step 8. Once everything is plugged in, you can attach both side panels. Then connect the power cord to the power supply and connect the LAN cable to the rear I/O panel equipped with the keyboard, mouse, headphone, or audio connectors. If you don’t have a dedicated graphics card, connect the monitor to the appropriate connector (HDMI/DisplayPort) on the I/O panel; otherwise, connect it to the graphics card. ! How to build a PC - we're done!Now your PC is complete and ready for work. Turn it on and enjoy. The PC is complete. Installing the operating system and stability testing. The hardest part is done, so now it’s time to install the operating system. Namely Windows 10, because anything else would be a waste of time and money. Even the manufacturers of the latest Ryzen and Kaby Lake processors agree. The era of Windows 7 and 8.1 is simply over.Installing Windows 10 at home means you have two options to choose from. Either you have an installation DVD or you make a bootable USB flash drive. The second option is usually significantly faster, especially if you use USB 3.0. If everything goes well, you should be able to log-in into your Windows account in less than 15 minutes. Potential point of interest:. What about the drivers? In the past, finding the right drivers for individual components was often a monumental task, but today the situation is very different. Windows 10 comes preinstalled with the vast majority of necessary drivers, especially the key ones such as for network or WiFi cards. If your internet connection works, you are pretty much done. Just run Windows Update and the service will find and download the remaining drivers automatically. Manufacturers have realised that customers don’t appreciate being saddled with extra tinkering. Nevertheless, you will probably run into a component or two that will still refuse to work. Typically, these are TV tuner cards. In this case, we recommend that you use the supplied installation disk or find the required driver on the manufacturer’s website.That said, you should probably install the graphics card drivers manually, especially if you have a gaming PC. Both NVIDIA and AMD offer interesting and useful applications with such features as fan control, streaming apps, or game optimisation. AMD website NVIDIA website Stability testing. Even though your PC is made of brand new components, you may still encounter some issues such as crashing or freezing. For a beginner, determining the cause can be difficult. As a basic stability test, we recommend using the OCCT software, which runs a stress test to check all the key components. The minimum testing time should be one hour, but preferably more. The program is clear and user-friendly and you can even monitor the data from individual temperature sensors during the testing.If you want to check the performance of the whole system and especially the graphics card, use the popular 3DMark. This benchmarking program is essentially a batch of demanding graphical scenes and complex computational tasks. At the end you will receive a score that you can then compare to the worldwide results database. A few words of advice. Think hard before you choose the power supply. It’s the most important PC component and has a significant impact on the overall service life of your whole system. We recommend Seasonic PSUs, renowned for their quality, long service life, and very low failure rates. We recommend buying the so-called "modular" PSUs, which have fully detachable cabling. With this type, you only use the cables you actually need. Also pay attention when choosing the PC case. If want your PC components to last, it's worth investing in a case equipped with dust filters and well-designed and efficient airflow. Cheap cases tend to accumulate dust and aren’t very good at venting hot air. Both of these harm PC components and reduce the length of their service life. A well-designed case is also necessary if you want your PC to run as quietly as possible. Building a PC involves plenty of cables, so it’s good to have some cable management tools at hand. If nothing else, at least get some cable ties. Components 100-pack, Cable ties (4.6x200) Cable Organiser - tape, 100 piece(s) in package, made of plastic - from €0.06/pcs from €5.61 excl.VAT €4.64 Buy In stock > 10 pcs Order Code: MN395j AKASA Tidy Kit 2 Cable Bundling Kit - for order inside your computer case €5.84 excl.VAT €4.83 Buy In stock > 10 pcs Order Code: CT295g Zalman Z1 PC Case - ATX and mATX (Micro ATX), 2× 5,25" slot(s), 4× 3,5" slot(s), 1× 2,5" slot(s), USB 2.0, USB 3.2 Gen 1 (USB 3.0), Headphones and Microphone, 2x120mm, max. graphics card length: 360mm, without power supply, side panel made of steel €39.17 excl.VAT €32.37 Buy In stock > 5 pcs Order Code: CA069c1c WD Blue 1TB Hard Drive - 3,5", SATA III, 64MB cache, 7200RPM, For computers and Internal €39.17 excl.VAT €32.37 Buy In stock > 5 pcs Order Code: FW138l Intel Core i5-8400 Processor - 6-core, 6 threads, 2.8GHz (TDP 65W), Turboboost 4GHz, 9MB L3 cache, Intel UHD Graphics 630 1050MHz, socket Intel 1151, Coffee Lake, box cooler, intel 3xx series chipset only €197.20 excl.VAT €162.98 Buy Last piece in stock Order Code: BO431e6c Intel Core i5-9600K Processor - 6-core, 6 threads, 3.7GHz (TDP 95W), Turboboost 4.6GHz, 9MB L3 cache, Intel UHD Graphics 630 1150MHz, socket Intel 1151, Coffee Lake refresh, cooler not included, intel 3xx series chipset only €203.86 excl.VAT €168.48 Buy In stock > 5 pcs Order Code: BO431l6 WD Green SSD 240GB 2.5" SSD 2,5", SATA III, TLC (Triple-Level Cell), read speed 545MB/s €37.21 excl.VAT €30.75 Buy In stock > 5 pcs Order Code: FW137b3b Seagate BarraCuda 1TB Hard Drive - 3,5", SATA III, 64MB cache, 7200RPM, For computers and Internal €39.95 excl.VAT €33.02 Buy In stock > 5 pcs Order Code: FP957k1aa counselor computer 0 Print Was this information useful? 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TitleHow To Build A Gaming PC In 2021: Step-By-Step Guide - GameSpot
Urlhttps://www.gamespot.com/articles/how-to-build-a-gaming-pc-in-2021-step-by-step-guide/1100-6476963/
DescriptionPutting together a gaming PC build can be an intimidating process, but it doesn't have to be so hard if you know what you're doing
Date10 Feb 2021
Organic Position23
H1How To Build A Gaming PC In 2021: Step-By-Step Guide
H2Tools to use
Terms to know
A look at some gaming PC builds
How to build a gaming PC
H3Our gaming PC build
Under $1,000 gaming PC build
Step 1: Prepare your motherboard
Step 2: Install the CPU
Step 3: Install M.2 SSD(s)
Step 4: Install the RAM
Step 5: Get your case ready for your motherboard
Step 6: Install your motherboard into your case
Step 7: Install your power supply (PSU)
Step 8: Connect any SATA hard drives/SSDs
Step 9: Plug your case and power cables into the motherboard
Step 10: Install your CPU cooling system
Step 11: Start cable management
Step 12: Install your graphics card
Step 13: Install your OS
If your PC doesn't turn on
H2WithAnchorsTools to use
Terms to know
A look at some gaming PC builds
How to build a gaming PC
BodyHow To Build A Gaming PC In 2021: Step-By-Step GuidePutting together a gaming PC build can be an intimidating process, but it doesn't have to be so hard if you know what you're doing.By Mat Paget on February 10, 2021 at 1:04PM PST 28 Comments The PC is the most powerful gaming platform out there. A strong gaming computer has the potential for higher resolutions, faster frame rates, and better visuals than current consoles can even come close to achieving. It can be very tempting to build your own gaming PC, but if you don't know where to start, it can also be quite intimidating and turn you off entirely. Thankfully, it doesn't have to be that way. PCs are much easier to build than they were in the past, and while it's not as easy as putting together a Lego spaceship, you don't have to be scared of it.That's why we've put together this straightforward guide on how to build a gaming PC. It's intended for those who are a little wary of building their first PC or just need a little refresher of the steps to doing so. We’ll cover everything from the prep phase and picking parts to the actual parts like the CPU, GPU, motherboard, CPU cooler, hard drive (and yes, of course, which SSD you should throw in there) build and beyond. Of course, due to the current pandemic, many online stores are experiencing product shortages and shipping delays that could interfere with your PC build, so be sure to check the estimated delivery date when ordering from stores like Newegg or Amazon.Actually picking your parts can be daunting, especially when you factor in compatibility and power consumption. There are a lot of things to consider, partially because many of your components may rely on your CPU being either from Intel or AMD. Thankfully, PC Part Picker is an invaluable resource that you should absolutely refer to when building a PC. We used the website to build our rig and highly recommend using it for yours. It makes it easy to stay within your budget and lets you know if your components are compatible with each other--it'll even make suggestions if there are issues with your chosen parts. Thanks for signing upIf you're looking for some accessories to round out your new gaming rig, check out the best gaming mice, best gaming headset, best capture card for streaming, best gaming keyboard, and best budget gaming monitors.Table of Contents [hide]Tools to useTerms to knowA look at some gaming PC buildsOur gaming PC buildUnder $1,000 gaming PC buildHow to build a gaming PCStep 1: Prepare your motherboardStep 2: Install the CPUStep 3: Install M.2 SSD(s)Step 4: Install the RAMStep 5: Get your case ready for your motherboardStep 6: Install your motherboard into your caseStep 7: Install your power supply (PSU)Step 8: Connect any SATA hard drives/SSDsStep 9: Plug your case and power cables into the motherboardStep 10: Install your CPU cooling systemStep 11: Start cable managementStep 12: Install your graphics cardStep 13: Install your OSIf your PC doesn't turn on Tools to use. Fortunately, you don't need many tools or extra parts to build your PC--almost everything you need will be included in your components' boxes. However, there are a few items you'll need to have ready before you start building your PC.Screwdrivers:For the vast majority of your build, you'll be using a No. 2 Phillips screwdriver, but if you're installing M.2 SSDs into your motherboard, then you'll want to use a smaller No. 1 Phillips screwdriver for that.Flashlight:Thankfully, nearly every smartphone on the market can be used as a flashlight, and you’ll likely need it when installing certain cables and components into your case.Thermal paste:You'll want a tube of thermal paste to keep your CPU's temperature low during use. Most CPU coolers come with thermal paste already applied, which means you won't need any extra. However, if you do end up buying a tube of thermal paste, you can clean the cooler's paste off and use your own.Terms to know. We've attempted to simplify the process of building a gaming PC as much as possible here, but if you're not familiar with PC hardware, some of the terms in this guide may need some clarification. We've briefly explained some of the parts and terminology we'll be using below. Feel free to reference this section as you work on your build.GPU: GPU stands for graphics processing unit; another name for a graphics card. This will handle displaying images on your PC. The more elaborate and complex these images are, the more power you'll need from your graphics card. The two big names in the graphics card game are Nvidia and AMD.CPU: The CPU (central processing unit, also known as a processor) handles all of the processes and calculations on your PC. For your PC, you'll choose a CPU from either Intel or AMD.Motherboard: The motherboard is where all of the components are installed, allowing them to work together and perform their functions properly.SATA: SATA is a type of connection, like USB, that is used for hard drives and SSDs to transfer dataPCIe: PCIe is another type of connection, though it's most commonly used for graphics cards and M.2 SSDsNVMe: NVMe is a type of connection protocol that can be supported by M.2 SSDs. This provides much faster access to saving and accessing data.M.2 SSD: An M.2 SSD is a small stick that provides your PC with storage space. You can get a SATA-based M.2 SSD or a PCIe-based M.2 SSD, the latter of which can support NVMe.RAM: The RAM (or random access memory) is used to store data and information that is being processed by the CPU. The more RAM you have--paired with a good-quality processor--the faster your PC can perform its various functions.Cooling system: The cooling system is used to protect the CPU from overheating.PSU: The PSU (or power supply) supplies your PC and its various components with power.OS: OS stands for operating system. Most gaming PCs will utilize Windows 10--it's what we suggest--though some people may want to install Linux.A look at some gaming PC builds. We've included a breakdown of our recommended PC build alongside a much more affordable gaming PC build. This should give you an idea of the vast price range you can expect when starting to build your first PC. More expensive PC builds will absolutely rock your bank account, but they're more likely to be future-proofed--you won't need to upgrade the PC's components for quite some time, and when you do, you likely won't need to upgrade more than your graphics card. The cheaper PCs can still provide an excellent experience at a much more affordable price, but you may need to upgrade it more often if you want to keep up with new releases. Either way, you're sure to have a fantastic gaming experience, as long as you keep your expectations in check with your budget. Keep in mind that many a PC build these days lacks an optical drive (since actual disk usage is rare nowadays), but you always add one later if you need one.Our gaming PC build. Exact price: $2,835MSI RTX 2080 Ti Gaming X Ventus graphics card -- $1,180Intel i9-9900K processor -- $450Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Ultra gaming motherboard -- $3002x Crucial 1TB NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD -- $106 eachG.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32GB RAM -- $150Corsair Hydro H100i RGB CPU cooling system -- $170EVGA SuperNOVA 750 G3 power supply -- $140Fractal Design Meshify C case -- $90Windows 10 Home -- $139Under $1,000 gaming PC build. Exact price: $898Gigabyte GTX 1050 Ti graphics card -- $190AMD Ryzen 5 3600 processor -- $168MSI B450 Tomahawk Max motherboard -- $125Crucial P1 500GB NVMe M.2 SSD -- $63Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB RAM -- $73Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo CPU cooler -- $35EVGA 500-watt ATX power supply -- $50NZXT H510 ATX mid tower case -- $70Windows 10 Home -- $139How to build a gaming PC. Step 1: Prepare your motherboard. Parts used: MotherboardAssembling the motherboard outside of the case will make your whole experience much easier to deal with. Our general rule of thumb is to install as many parts as possible before screwing it into your case. An important thing to note before starting on your motherboard is that you should refer to its manual as often as possible, as your specific motherboard may suggest specific ways or places to install your components. Also, keep in mind that certain parts will require some force when plugging them in, while others simply just need to be placed into their respective spots. Please pay close attention to the following instructions before installing your components.The first thing you'll want to do is make sure you're assembling your PC on a flat surface. Don't build it on a carpet--the mixture of static electricity and your PC's parts is a dangerous combination and could cause damage to your components. It's unlikely to happen, but we still suggest touching your metal case from time to time to help ground yourself and avoid this from happening.Instead, build your rig in a room with hardwood or laminate floors like a dining room or kitchen--we even went the extra mile and took our socks off. Take your motherboard out of its packaging and then place it on a flat surface. You can lay it directly on your table, but we personally placed it on top of its box to avoid scratching our desk. At this point, you're ready to start.Step 2: Install the CPU. Parts used: CPU, motherboardThe easiest part of your entire build is also the first: installing our AMD Ryzen CPU. Your motherboard's CPU socket will be protected by a piece of plastic, which you'll be able to remove when you open the tray. All you need to do is gently push down on the tray's metal arm and pull it out. Once it's free of the tray, lift it up to open the socket and the protective plastic will fall out. Be sure to keep this plastic piece in case of any issues with your motherboard, as you'll need to reinsert it before sending it back to the manufacturer.At this point, your CPU socket tray should be open, allowing you to install your CPU on to your motherboard. Your CPU should have some small half-circle indents in its board. The CPU socket is designed to fill these indents, making it easy to line up your CPU and install it properly. Once you've figured out how to place your CPU into its socket, do so gently. Do not apply pressure directly on the CPU--simply close the tray and make sure the metal arm is locked into its original position, which may require a bit of force.Step 3: Install M.2 SSD(s). Parts used: M.2 SSD(s), motherboardM.2 SSDs are another easy step in the process, but don't forget to reference your manual to find out which M.2 slots you should use first. Your motherboard may have protective thermal guards on your M.2 slots, so remove those first. Once you've taken any guards off the motherboard, you can slot in your M.2 SSDs. These require a little bit of force to slot into their respective slots, but don't push too hard--they should slide in quite easily. Once the M.2 SSDs are in their slots, the opposite end should be pointing upward at a diagonal angle. At this point, you take the respective screw (that is often included with your motherboard), push each M.2 SSD down, and screw them into the appropriate spots. At this point, you can take the thermal guard and place it on top of each M.2 SSD, screwing it back into place.Step 4: Install the RAM. Parts used: RAM, motherboardThis is another step where you'll want to reference your motherboard's manual, which should be able to tell you which order to place the RAM in. If you have four slots and only two sticks of RAM, then you should make sure the two sticks are spaced apart in either the first and third slot or second and fourth--your motherboard manual can advise you here. Placing your RAM apart like this will help you get the most out of your CPU. First off, be sure to flip down the plastic clips on both sides of each slot you plan on using. Inserting the RAM requires more force, but make sure you start small and then ramp up your pressure gradually. When you hear a click, your RAM is in its slot. This should cause the plastic clips to flip up, gripping your RAM. If you notice your clips haven't flipped up, then your RAM may not be seated properly.Step 5: Get your case ready for your motherboard. Parts used: CaseIt's almost time to throw your motherboard into your case, but first you'll need to screw in some standoff screws that you'll place your motherboard onto before screwing it in. These standoffs will come with your motherboard, and once you've located them, you can start screwing them into your case. There should be about a dozen holes for the standoffs to fit into. Refer to your case's manual if you're having trouble finding them. Once the standoffs are screwed in, you're ready to insert your motherboard.Step 6: Install your motherboard into your case. Parts used: Motherboard, caseThe standoffs make it easy to place your motherboard into your case, but don't start screwing it in straight away. There should be a space on the back of your case for your motherboard's I/O ports to fit into. It'll be a rectangle, and you'll want your motherboard to be inserted comfortably into this space so that you can access all of the ports. Once everything fits, you can start screwing your motherboard onto the standoffs with the appropriate screws. Don't forget that you don't want to screw anything too tightly. Just turn your screwdriver until everything is securely tightened, and then you're ready to move on.Step 7: Install your power supply (PSU). Parts used: Power supply, case, motherboardInstalling the power supply into your case is often quite easy. You'll want to refer to your specific case's manual for this, but it's pretty straightforward. First, we took our case's mounting bracket and screwed it onto the back of our power supply. You'll notice your power supply also sports a fan, which is used to circulate air. If you're planning on placing your finished gaming PC on a hardwood floor or desk, then feel free to aim this fan downward; if you're placing your gaming PC on a carpeted floor, then you'll want to aim the fan upward.Once you've figured out which way your PSU needs to be oriented, and screwed on the mounting bracket, you can easily slide it into your case and tighten the bracket's screws. Depending on how much room you have for your PSU, you may want to hold off on screwing it in until you've plugged in all of its various power cables.Step 8: Connect any SATA hard drives/SSDs. Parts used: SATA drives, case, power supplyNow that the power supply is installed, you can start connecting any SATA hard drives or SSDs. Your case should have a specific bay area dedicated to holding these kinds of drives. Locate this area, then look for two metal clasps on the left and right side of each bay. Squeeze these clasps and then pull the bay out. Here is where you'll be able to screw in your SATA drive and keep it stable inside your case. Once this is done, you'll want to reinsert the bay into its place, and then plug a SATA and PSU cable into your hard drive. Find the SATA slot on your motherboard and plug the other side of the appropriate cable into it, then plug the other side of the PSU cable into your power supply. Your drive is now installed, though you will need to format it once your PC is up and running.Step 9: Plug your case and power cables into the motherboard. Parts used: Case, power supply, motherboardNow, you're ready to start plugging cables into your motherboard. This part requires some patience, as your case cables are extremely tiny and can be difficult to orient. You'll want to reference both your case and motherboard manuals during this step. Some motherboards, like our Aorus Ultra, come with a bus that you can plug the case cables into before inserting them into the motherboard. This makes this step much easier.Your case cables make it so you can use the various ports on the front of your PC in addition to the power button itself. Of course, nothing is going to happen when you press that button if you don't plug your PSU into your motherboard. You'll want to plug the 24-pin ATX and EPS12V cables into their respective spots on both the motherboard and PSU. You'll be plugging in all of your power cables into the PSU, including fans, SATA drives, and your cooling system.Step 10: Install your CPU cooling system. Parts used: Cooling system, CPU, motherboardInstalling your cooling system can be a somewhat nerve-wracking experience, particularly when applying the thermal paste, but it's a lot easier than it sounds. The first thing you need to do is mount the system's bracket to the motherboard. You'll need access to the back of the motherboard tray, as you'll be screwing part of it to the back of the tray. This'll give you the spots you need to set the cooler's pump onto your CPU and motherboard. Before you do this, however, there are a few other steps.Liquid-based CPU cooling systems come with a radiator equipped with fans, which you'll want to screw into your case. Of course, you'll need to figure out where you want to install it. We recommend screwing it into your case's top grill, as it'll allow for more airflow, but some cases may not have a top grill, and you'll need to install it on the back of the case. Once you figure out what position you're going to go with, you'll screw the radiator into the grill itself. Once you're done this, you're ready to attach the pump.First, you'll want to apply some thermal paste. Some coolers come with thermal paste already applied; if that’s the case, your cooler’s thermal paste is most likely capable of handling the job, and you may be able to skip this next step. You can also easily remove the cooler’s paste with a dry cloth if you bought thermal paste you’d rather go with. You'll want to apply a pea-sized glob of thermal paste into the center of your CPU. During this step, always go smaller than bigger. Once applied, you can press the cooler into its position on the CPU and thermal paste. If you feel like you've accidentally applied too much thermal paste, don't worry: It's as easy as wiping the CPU off with a dry cloth and rubbing alcohol and trying again.Once the pump is installed, you'll want to make sure all of your cooling system's wires are plugged into the right spots. Our particular cooler required us to plug a micro-USB cable into our pump and the other side into our motherboard.Step 11: Start cable management. Parts used: CaseBefore we move on to the last step of physically building your PC, you may want to do some cable management to clean up. This'll create some room for air circulation and accessing your components if you ever want to upgrade later. Most cases come with Velcro straps or zip ties, but I always keep a bag of Velcros on hand just in case. The case we went with, Fractal's Meshify C, includes an awesome area for cable management that's equipped with a series of Velcro straps. It's located on the back of the motherboard tray. We were able to slide all of our cables into this space and keep it all fastened up nicely.The only zip ties we used were for our CPU cooling system's wires, which were thin and plentiful. This made it easier for us to orient them through the holes in our case to reach our desired spot. Just make sure you don't over-tighten your zip ties as doing so could damage your cables.Step 12: Install your graphics card. Parts used: Graphics card, motherboardFinally, it’s time to discuss the component you're probably the most excited about. The graphics card is easy to install. First, you'll need to remove an appropriate number of expansion slot inserts from the back of your case to fit your graphics card. This will vary depending on which GPU you go with, but two is usually the safe number--our MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Ti takes up two. Once you unscrew and remove them, figure out which PCIe Express slot you'll need to insert your card into, then flip its plastic notch at the far end of the slot downward to prepare for installation. At this point, all you need to do is line up the graphics card with the PCIe Express slot and then push down until the plastic notch flips up and clicks. Again, you don't need a lot of force to push it in, but you will need to push the graphics card into its slot until you get that click. Once you hear that, you can screw your graphics card's mounting brackets into the case using the expansion slot's screws and holes.At this point, you need to plug your graphics card into your power supply to give it power. (Low-end graphics cards don’t typically require extra power, so if that’s what you’re working with, you’re good to skip this step.) Take the appropriate cables included with your power supply and plug one end into the graphics card; then, plug the other into the PSU. It's okay if there are parts of the cables that go unused--just make sure every port on the graphics card has part of the cable plugged in.Step 13: Install your OS. Parts used: USB thumb drive, caseOnce you've ensured a tidy PC with all of your cables managed, you should connect an HDMI cable to your PC and plug the other end into a monitor. Plug the power cable into your PSU and the other end into an outlet; then, flip the power switch on the back of your PC to its "On" position. Press the power button on your PC, and if it turns on, you're almost good to go.At this point, you'll need another PC and a fast USB drive of at least 8GB--we suggest the SanDisk Extreme Pro. You'll then want to head over to Microsoft and follow the steps provided there. This will help you create an installation device out of your USB drive, which you can plug into your PC before booting it up. Upon starting your PC, it should go straight into the Windows 10 installation process. Follow the steps here and wait for it to install. Once you're done, you should be good to go, though you will need to buy a proper license for Windows 10 from Microsoft. If you do this from your new PC, it'll activate automatically. On this is all setup, you're good to go, barring the installation of an optical drive, if you chose to get one.If your PC doesn't turn on. If your PC doesn't boot, don't worry: It's certainly not the end of the world. There are a number of things that can cause a PC to not boot up on your first try, and save for any product malfunctions, they're easily solvable. Here are a few things you can do to troubleshoot your powerless PC.Is the power supply plugged into an outlet?This is a simple fix. Just plug your PC into an outlet, and you should be good to go.Is the power supply's switch turned on?Make sure you've flipped your PSU's switch into the 'On' position before powering on. This is an easily overlooked issue with a solution that's just as easy.Are your power supply cables seated in the motherboard properly?This is the next thing you should double-check. Reconnecting the cables could be what you need to finally deliver power to your PC.Are your case's cables plugged into your motherboard properly?It's important to get this step right because if you push your case's power button and its specific cable isn't plugged in correctly, it won't be able to start your PC. Some motherboards come with a serial bus that you can plug your case's cables into before connecting to your motherboard.Are your parts installed correctly?This is the last thing to check as it can be the most time-consuming. Reconnecting your RAM and CPU or simply switching the RAM sticks into different slots could be the solution you're looking for.If all this fails, then your components may be defective.Unfortunately, this can happen. Sometimes when building a PC, you realize that one of your components isn't working correctly. At this point, you'll need to contact the manufacturer of your part and ask them about their return policy. The vast majority of big PC component manufacturers have return policies that will cover defective parts, so you don't have to worry. It just might take a little longer to enjoy your brand-new gaming computer. More Tech Picks From GameSpot Best 4K TVs For Gaming Best Monitor For PS5, Xbox Series X Best Gaming Chairs + Show More More Tech Picks From GameSpot Links (5) Best Cheap Gaming Monitors For 2021 The Best PC Gaming Headsets For 2021 The Best Nintendo Switch Controllers You Can Buy The Best VR Headsets In 2020 The Best Webcam For 2021: Top Picks For Streaming On Twitch And YouTube Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email [email protected] View Comments (28) PC Gaming Tech Join the conversation There are 28 comments about this story Load Comments (28) Use your keyboard!ESCLog in to comment Close
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TitleHow to build a gaming PC for beginners: All the parts you need | Tom's Guide
Urlhttps://www.tomsguide.com/uk/news/how-to-build-gaming-pc-parts
DescriptionTo build your perfect gaming PC, you must first decide what you want it to do, how much you want to spend, and what kind of parts will make it run
Date
Organic Position24
H1How to build a gaming PC for beginners: All the parts you need
H2The basic parts
Conceiving a machine
How to shop for parts
GPU: Nvidia GeForce 3070 - $500
CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 - $320
RAM: HyperX Predator DDR4 32 GB, 3200 MHz - $145
Storage: WD Blue NAND 2 TB SSD - $230
Motherboard: MSI MPG Z490M Gaming Edge - $180
Power Supply: Corsair TX-M Series TX650M - $110
Case: Corsair 4000D Tempered Glass - $80
Putting it all together
H3
H2WithAnchorsThe basic parts
Conceiving a machine
How to shop for parts
GPU: Nvidia GeForce 3070 - $500
CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 - $320
RAM: HyperX Predator DDR4 32 GB, 3200 MHz - $145
Storage: WD Blue NAND 2 TB SSD - $230
Motherboard: MSI MPG Z490M Gaming Edge - $180
Power Supply: Corsair TX-M Series TX650M - $110
Case: Corsair 4000D Tempered Glass - $80
Putting it all together
BodyHow to build a gaming PC for beginners: All the parts you need By Marshall Honorof published 11 March 21 The first step to building a gaming PC is selecting the right components (Image credit: Tom's Guide) Building a gaming PC is arguably the best technological investment you can make. A quality gaming rig lasts longer than a smartphone, boasts more power than a gaming console, and is infinitely more versatile than even the most powerful streaming box. Whether you’re typing up documents, editing video or cranking up the settings on the latest and greatest games, a gaming PC is the best tool for the job. With regular maintenance, one of these systems could last five years — with regular upgrades, maybe ten.Still, building a PC can be a daunting process, particularly for newcomers. There are plenty of good guides out there, particularly from our sister sites like PC Gamer and Tom’s Hardware. However both of these stories focus a lot on mechanics: what components you need, and how to fit them all into a motherboard. Before I built my first PC, even these guides would have been a little daunting.Tom’s Guide has decided instead to split the process into two parts and take a more experiential tack. Before you build a PC, you need to decide why you want to build it. What do you want that you can’t get from a prebuilt machine? Which parts will facilitate that goal? And how can you make sense of the hundreds of different tech specs between the half-a-dozen different pieces you’ll need?With that in mind, the first part of our “How to build a PC” series focuses on picking parts. In a broad sense, we’ll cover the hardware that makes a PC tick. But I’ll also discuss my thought process behind each part, and what tradeoffs I was willing to make.The basic parts. Before I lay out my thought process behind each part, there are, at minimum, seven parts you’ll need to build a gaming PC:Graphics card, or GPU: Arguably the most important component in a gaming rig, the GPU (graphics processing unit) renders images from your PC and puts them on your monitor. More powerful GPUs facilitate better in-game graphics and settings.Max out your connection with a gaming VPN(Image credit: Tom's Guide)Processor, or CPU: More so than any other component, the CPU (central processing unit) is what makes your computer run. The CPU routes instructions from one system in your computer to another. The better the processor, the faster it can transmit information for both software and hardware functions.Motherboard: The motherboard is where all the hardware in your computer lives. The most important thing about a motherboard is its compatibility with the parts you choose, but motherboards can also have integrated graphics cards, Wi-Fi systems and more.Memory, or RAM: RAM (random access memory) determines how much data your computer can process at any given moment. To oversimplify things considerably, RAM is where your computer stores information it needs to access right away. The more RAM you have, the more efficiently your computer can process lots of information — helpful for productivity; essential for games.Storage, or SSD/HDD: PC storage essentially comes in two flavors: Solid state drives (SSDs) and hard disk drives (HDDs). Either way, it’s where your files live when they’re not in use. Bigger drives mean more storage space, which means more room for files, games, media and so forth.Power supply: Possibly the least interesting and most vital piece of the PC puzzle, the power supply is exactly what it sounds like: It gets electricity from an outlet to individual systems in your computer. Picking the right one can be tricky, but once you do, you’ll probably never need to think about it again.Case: Your computer case is, for the most part, an aesthetic choice, although some models include fans for additional cooling. While it’s possible to do an “open-air” build, a case is probably a better choice for keeping dust out and components sheltered.Anything else, such as additional cooling systems or secondary hard drives, are nice to have, but not strictly necessary. These are the parts you need to go from a pile of hardware to a functioning PC.Conceiving a machine. Like any creative project, the hardest part about building a PC is getting started. There are literally thousands of possible components; where do you even start? Do you pick a GPU and build around it? Find a case you like and see what will fit inside? Scour Newegg for whatever’s on sale and hope it all fits together?(Image credit: Tom's Guide)Believe it or not, those are all viable build strategies, but mine is a little simpler: Figure out the “why” first, and the “what” will follow. What kind of PC do you want to build? Do you want a productivity machine that can play some games on the side? A more versatile alternative to the next-gen consoles? A high-priced powerhouse to last the ages?Personally, I need to build a new machine because my current gaming rig is 10 years old. This wasn’t a big issue when I had a more powerful PC in the Tom’s Guide office for game and peripheral testing. But due to the pandemic, I’ve been working from home for the last few months, and the old workhorse isn’t cutting it anymore.As such: I need a computer that can run the latest games smoothly, but I don’t necessarily need to crank everything up to 8K resolution and 120 frames per second. I also need something that will be at least as powerful as the PS5 and Xbox Series X, in case I need to compare games across platforms.After doing some research, I found that $1,500 tends to be the sweet spot for a PC that’s powerful, but not quite top-of-the-line. I already have a mouse, keyboard, headset and monitor, so those didn’t factor into my budget. You’ll have to figure out what you’re comfortable spending and factor in your own peripherals, but knowing exactly what you want your PC to do will help a lot.How to shop for parts. From there, I went to Newegg (the best place to buy PC components online, in my experience) and started looking for components. Remember: You can’t just buy the first seven parts you see and expect them all to fit together. It’s best to start with the most important component (in my opinion, the GPU) and work your way down.(Image credit: Tom's Guide)Obviously, Newegg is just one place to shop. Once you find the gear you need, you can bargain hunt at Amazon, Best Buy and other big electronics retailers. My personal favorite is Micro Center, especially if you have one of these electronics meccas near you. You could very conceivably walk in with nothing and walk out with an unbuilt computer, at a very reasonable price.When possible, buy gear from established, known brands — Corsair, HyperX, Western Digital, and so forth. You could theoretically save a lot of money by going with no-name storage, RAM or power supplies. But device quality is a total crapshoot, and customer service in small brands tends to be either haphazard or nonexistent.My last piece of advice is to be somewhat flexible with your budget, if possible. Obviously, you don’t want to spend $1,500 on a $1,000 concept, but don’t throw the whole build out if it comes to $1,050. A good PC will last a long time, and a few dozen dollars make very little difference over the course of a few years.GPU: Nvidia GeForce 3070 - $500. As mentioned above, the GPU is the most important (or at least the most straightforward) place to start with a gaming PC build. The first big choice you’ll have to make is between Nvidia and AMD, each of which produces high-end graphics cards. The pros and cons of each is probably worth its own article, but in my own PC builds, I’ve had good luck with Nvidia and bad luck with AMD, and going with brands you trust is one of the best strategies in this process.From there, it was just a matter of selecting one of Nvidia’s three new cards: the GeForce RTX 3070, 3080 or 3090. Because I had a $1,500 budget in mind, the Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 was the natural choice. The other two cards would have eaten up too much of the cost. Buying older cards can save you some money, but makes your machine less future-proof.It's worth mentioning that at the time of writing, the RTX 3070 is still a few weeks away from release, and it's probably going to sell out quite fast. If you absolutely, positively have to build something now, you could go with the older Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 series, which is currently dropping in price, or the similarly powerful AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT. However, AMD will also release a new GPU (the Big Navi) shortly, so it's probably best to just be patient and catch a restock.CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 - $320. When I ran my proposed build by the Tom’s Guide crew, the CPU was easily the most controversial selection. The Intel Core i7-10700 is a powerful CPU, and while it’s not absolutely top-of-the-line, it’s a good match with the GeForce 3070 GPU. However, it was a tough call between the 10700 and the 10700K. The latter is only a little more expensive, but you can overclock it — a huge boon for a gaming PC.In the end, I settled on the 10700, because the 10700K would have caused sort of a pricing cascade. While the 10700 comes with its own cooling unit, the 10700K doesn’t, and a good cooling system would tack another $100 or so onto the price. Furthermore, overclocking draws more electricity, which might have required a bigger, more expensive power supply. Overclocking isn’t really necessary for testing games and peripherals, so the 10700K wouldn’t add much to this build.RAM: HyperX Predator DDR4 32 GB, 3200 MHz - $145. RAM is a tricky topic, since there are a lot of variables at play. You can get between 16 GB and 128 GB of memory, and between 3000 and 4800 MHz of speed. Naturally, higher memory levels and speed cost more money.Generally speaking, more memory is better than less, so I went with 32 GB — twice what the PS5 and Xbox Series X will offer. RAM speed is less important. Higher numbers are generally better, but not every system can leverage higher RAM speeds perfectly, so don’t sweat it too much.Storage: WD Blue NAND 2 TB SSD - $230. Another point of disagreement among the TG staff was whether to buy a large SSD, or a small SSD for Windows and a large HDD for game storage. Without going into too much detail about the relative pros and cons, I eventually decided that the PS5 and Xbox Series X will both use SSDs exclusively; why build a PC that’s less advanced out of the gate?There was also the question of whether to buy two SSDs: a small one just for system files, and a larger one for games. The benefits from this setup tend to be limited, however, and it increases the overall system complexity.Motherboard: MSI MPG Z490M Gaming Edge - $180. Depending on how you build your machine, the motherboard may be either the first or last component you choose. My strategy was to choose my GPU and CPU first, then find a motherboard that would support them both. I also knew I wanted a motherboard with Wi-Fi built in, since my computer desk is far from my router. I decided on a full-size ATX design, because it’s easier to fit components inside. (There are also mini- and microATX motherboards, and you can do some very cool things with them, but they can be expensive and difficult to put together.) The MSI MPG Z490M Gaming Edge was the cheapest motherboard I could find that met my specifications.(Image credit: Tom's Guide)To check compatibility with the parts you’ve selected, look at the “Specs” section on a given motherboard (every site should have something like this), and ensure that all the inputs match up. It’s harder than it sounds, but truthfully, this is a skill you’ll have to develop if you want to build a PC. If you have any concerns, try Newegg’s PC Builder tool, which helps ensure compatibility. Alternatively, consult Reddit or Tom’s Hardware, both of which have “critique my build” options in their forums.Power Supply: Corsair TX-M Series TX650M - $110. A common meme in PC-building communities is a power supply as a ticking time bomb. And they’re not wrong: If there is one component you really, really don’t want to mess up, it’s this one. The best-case scenario is overheating your components and burning them out well before their expected lifespan. The worst-case scenario involves a fire extinguisher.You’ll have to do a little legwork to determine how much power each component of your machine draws, add it all up, and choose a power supply that offers more than that by a comfortable margin. But if you get a truly enormous power supply, you’ll be spending a lot of money for power that you never use, so that’s not necessarily the best strategy, either. In any case, Nvidia recommends a 650W power supply for a 3070-equipped machine, and that’s with an i9 processor. Newegg’s Power Supply Calculator pegged my overall draw at a little less than 550W, so a 650W power supply should be more than I need.Case: Corsair 4000D Tempered Glass - $80. Selecting a case is mostly a matter of looks. I was actually hoping for something a little cheaper than the Corsair 4000D Tempered Glass case, but it was the least expensive case I could find that also had a USB-C input on the front. Remember: Your motherboard will have front-facing USB options, so make sure that your case has the proper connections for them.Putting it all together. In our next PC-building article, I’ll discuss how to put all these various components together, as well as common pitfalls you might encounter along the way. Don’t forget that you’ll also need a copy of Windows 10 — which can be very expensive or free, depending on what sort of software you already have on hand. (Building a Linux machine is a whole different can of worms; let’s just say that Windows 10 is the best gaming platform for most users.)In the interest of full disclosure, Tom’s Guide will request these parts directly from their manufacturers, since we’ll hopefully be using this PC to test gear for the next few years. As such, our final build may have slightly different components, depending on what they have available. If you’re building a machine at home, you can simply order what you want, when you want it.Finally, while I’m confident that these components will coalesce into a good gaming machine, I make no claims that this is an ideal build; an enterprising reader could probably do better, especially with a different budget. But that’s the beauty of building a PC: No two are alike, and every one has pros and cons. We’ll have a better idea of where this one excels and falls short in a few weeks.This article was originally published on October 11, 2020, and is Part 1 in a three-part series.Part 2: How to build a gaming PC for beginners: Putting it all togetherPart 3: How to build a gaming PC for beginners: What to do if it all goes wrong Marshall Honorof Marshall Honorof is a senior editor for Tom's Guide, overseeing the site's coverage of gaming hardware and software. He comes from a science writing background, having studied paleomammalogy, biological anthropology, and the history of science and technology. After hours, you can find him practicing taekwondo or doing deep dives on classic sci-fi.  Topics Gaming Gaming PCs See all comments (5) 5 Comments Comment from the forums Nightseer No offense, but are you pulling off one of those "just buy it" Tom's Hardware pulled off recently and went super well for them? Like RDNA2 is coming soon and Zen3 is coming soon. Unless this is to make Intel and nVidia happy, this guide should really be made after those come out to actually recommend parts based on reviews of everything. As is, if just feels like it got rushed out before arguments for Zen3 and RDNA2 can come out. Sorry, but it is paculiar timing. Reply rgd1101 So every time something new is coming out. we should do any article? stuff come out all the time. Reply Trunksies This is less of a guide as a shopping list of what you bought. You didn't mention AMD CPUs You didn't discuss the importance of latency when selecting RAM. You didn't talk about making sure your power supply has an efficiency rating so it doesn't blow up. You could have saved at least $100 if you went with a smaller SSD and larger HDD and didn't even mention NVMe as an option. I hope no one wastes $1500 trying to copy this build.This the Verge build in article form. Reply xmarine2847 This is fine but I don't know about this being a "guide" per se. Seems more like a blog with a few helpful tips. Seems to focus more on the "why" for a singular, personal scenario. To be a proper guide, IMO, should go into more detail regarding choice of hardware, what specs to look for, how to check for compatibility, and offer more information on procuring them. Having an article about picking parts and not mentioning certain specifics?: I/O Socket types and chipsets RAM frequency, latency, and channel configuration PSU efficiency ratings and TDP of components M.2 drives (NVMe or SATA interface) drives and and their significant performance differences Cooling methods and components... I could go on. I mean it's vaguely informative but again, more of a blog with tips and not really a guide. Reply blmopus67 I like you article. I first built a PC back in the 90s. It was a rewarding task that saved much money and churned out a superior PC. I've been thinking of going back into it and building another one which brought me to this article. I enjoyed reading it. I think it is a good "first part of a series" on how to build a PC - when will part II come out? Reply View All 5 Comments Show more comments
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TitleBuild Your Own Computer: 100 Tools, Tips & Resources
Urlhttps://html.com/blog/100-computer-building-tools-resources/
Description
Date
Organic Position25
H1Build Your Own Computer: 100 Tools, Tips & Resources
H2Tools & Components
Buying Guides
Guides
Media Center and Gaming Resources
Support
H3
H2WithAnchorsTools & Components
Buying Guides
Guides
Media Center and Gaming Resources
Support
BodyBuild Your Own Computer: 100 Tools, Tips & ResourcesIn Blog, HardwareDisclosure: Your support helps keep the site running! We earn a referral fee for some of the services we recommend on this page. Learn more These days, it’s easier than ever to build your computer. There are so many places to buy and comparison shop for individual computer parts that you almost have to try not to get a good deal on a homebuilt PC. Even better, there are a number of resources out there that offer step by step instructions, buying guides, and support, so you’ve got help every step of the way, even if you’re a beginner. We’ve compiled 100 of these resources, as well as some of the things you’ll need to get the job done.Tools & Components. These tools aren’t online resources. Rather, they’re the essential bits and pieces you’ll need both in your computer and the tools to put it all together.PC Case: This is the piece of hardware that everything will live in.Phillips head screwdriver: Most PCs use a Phillips head screwdriver.Hard drive: This one’s essential, as just about everything in your computer will live in the hard drive.Screw extractor: If you drop a screw into your PC’s body, this tool will make it easy to get it out.Wire stripper: This tool comes in handy if you need to do more advanced electrical or wiring modifications.Cable ties: Tidy up your cables with these ties to help increase airflow.Keyboard: You can’t get by without attaching this input device.Mouse: Another important input device, the mouse is just as essential as the keyboard, unless you want to learn a lot of keyboard shortcuts.Monitor: Although media PCs may not need it, most PCs can’t get by without a window into the way it’s working.Flashlight: Get a good look at what you’re working on by using a flashlight.Lint-free cloth: Get rid of accumulated dust with a lint-free cloth.Processor: A processor will interpret instructions in your computer.Processor cooling fan: Keep the processor cool and efficient with a built-in fan.CD/DVD Drive: If you need to install software from a disk, or play a DVD or CD on your computer.Tweezers: These are helpful for picking up and installing various bits and pieces. Needlenose pliers will work as well.Motherboard: The motherboard provides the connections other components will need to work together.Motherboard spacers: Although spacers generally come with the motherboard, you may need to buy some to space your motherboard off of your mounting plate.Memory: Without memory, your computer would only be able to perform a fixed operation and immediately output the result, like a calculator. With memory, your PC becomes a multifunctional device like the computers you’re likely used to.Power supply: Without juice, your computer won’t run.Video card: A video card will generate an output image on your display. This is especially important for gaming computers.Drive cables: Although they may be included with components, be sure you have the cables you need to hook everything up.LAN card: This card can be used to connect computers together and form a network. Your motherboard may already have a LAN port, so check before you buy this.Screws: PC cases generally provide all of the screws you need, but just in case, make sure you’re covered.Sound card: The sound card translates digital signals into analog audio. This is essential if you want to play games or run multimedia applications.Spare parts container: Store small parts while you’re working to keep everything handy and safe. This can be anything from an old coffee can to something you pick up at the hardware store.Anti-static wrist band: Computer components are sensitive to static electricity. Make sure you’re wearing an anti-static wrist band to protect them.Grounding strap: Just like an anti-static wrist band, a grounding strap with help mitigate static electricity.System disk: This disk should have all of your system and setup files on it.Device drivers: Although they usually come with hardware, you’ll need to ensure that you’ve got all of the right device drivers to do the job.Operating system: This software will manage your computer and give you a way to interact with it.Fdisk and Format: These utilities configure PC hard drives for use. You’ll also learn about hard drive partitioning and formatting from this resource.Buying Guides. Get help finding the best parts for the best price with these guides.How To Build A PC: From Component Selection To Installation: Read this article to get the lowdown on picking up a processor.How To Choose A Motherboard: A Guide For Beginners: Check out this guide for valuable information on choosing this all-important component.How to Build a “Cheap” Gaming Computer: This article lists the components for a budget gaming computer rig.Budget PC Guide: Check out the parts of a budget PC here.How to pick the right case for your build: This guide offers reputable brands and advice on buying this important component.5 Essential Things to Know About Buying a Computer Power Supply: Read this article before you buy a power supply device for your computer.Computer monitor buying guide: Learn about monitors from CRT to LCD and the factors to consider when choosing one.Choosing a Hard Disk Drive: If you’re building your computer from scratch, you’re probably going to buy one or all of these components. Find the right hardware for your needs using this guide.Five Best Places to Buy Computer Parts: Buy parts that meet your needs by using this guide.Audio Interface Buying Guide: Learn the ins and outs that come with buying a sound card here.Desktop Video Card Buyer’s Guide: Find the right video card for your PC using this guide.What’s The Best Place to Buy Computer Parts?: This article recommends good PC shopping sites and provides advice for making the shopping experience a little easier.Learn How to Choose Computer Parts That Suit Your Needs: Get the ultimate in customization using this guide.My Cheap Computer Tool Kits Suggestions: Read about one computer builder’s must-have tools.Guides. Learn how to build your PC through these tutorials that range from all-inclusive guides to specific task instructions.Anti-Static: Learn how static works against your PC components and what you can do about it.CPU Cooling: Read this resource to learn why CPUs get hot and what you can do about it.PC Building Precautions: Read this guide to stay safe and avoid damage when building your PC.Build Your Own Computer: PC Mechanic offers this 23-step tutorial that takes you from materials to tidying up.IDE Configuration: Use this resource to set up multiple IDE hard drives and CD/DVD drives in your PC.Installing an Operating System: Get installation guides for a number of operating systems here.How to Build a Computer: The Complete Guide: Check out Lifehacker’s complete tutorial.Build a Hackintosh Mac for Under $800: Check out Lifehacker’s tutorial for building a Mac from scratch.The Basics of Personal Computer Hardware: Learn about hardware essentials in this article.Installing a CPU Onto Your Computer’s Motherboard: Find out about the details behind installing a CPU.Building a Low Cost PC: This article offers a 6-part tutorial for building a highly customized PC on the cheap.How to Build Your Own PC: “If you want the strongest, most adaptable, and most upgradeable PC, you should build it yourself.”Installing a Motherboard is Easy: This guide breaks motherboard installation down into four easy steps.How to Format a Hard Drive: Once you’ve got your components in, format your hard drive to get started.My Super PC: Learn how to build an affordable, quality computer with this guide.Build a Cheaper, Customizable Alternative to Apple’s Mac Pro: Get your hands on a super cheap Mac using this tutorial.How to Install a Power Supply for Your Computer: Get the juice to your PC using this installation guide.How to Install a Primary Hard Drive: Install a hard drive with this four-step guide.Install RAM Memory in Your PC: Find out how to install this component and give your PC some speed.How to Open a Computer Case: Follow this guide to learn how to open a case properly.Build Your Own PC: This tutorial takes you through many steps of building your own computer from purchasing components to installing the OS and drivers.Hard Drive, Floppy & CD Drive Install: Read this guide to learn how to install a hard, floppy, or CD drive.Install PCI Cards on Your Desktop Computer: Get the details and troubleshooting information on this easy install.Learn to Build a Computer: This 13 step tutorial takes you through everything you’ll need to build a computer.Installing a Dual Boot Operating System: Learn how to put both Red Hat Linux 9 and Windows XP on your computer with this tutorial.Learn What Lies Inside a Computer: This article details the many parts of a computer.How to Disassemble a Computer: If you’re scrapping an old PC for parts, be sure to check out this guide.Learn How to Install a Motherboard: This article details the installation of a motherboard.Media Center and Gaming Resources. If you’re going to build your own PC, why not take it a step further and build a media or gaming machine while you’re at it? These guides and resources will help you get the job done.How to Convert Your Computer Into a DVR Using Windows Media Center: Check out this tutorial to learn how to build a DVR on your computer.PC build guide: the best budget gaming PC: Read this guide to learn how to build a cheap gaming computer that works great.The $1,000 Gaming / Productivity PC Build: Build a gaming PC on the cheap using this guide.Best Gaming PC Build For Under $1000, A Gaming Build for Gods: Get the details and price list for building a gaming PC here.Updated Home Theater PC Builds for 2016: Build a great home media PC with these components.How to turn your old PC into a modern media center with Kodibuntu: Check out this how-to to find out how to build a media center on Linux.Build Your Own Budget Gaming PC: Computer Shopper details the components, installation, and upgrades that go along with building a gaming PC on a budget.How to Set Up a Home Media Server You Can Access From Any Device: HowToGeek offers a guide for creating a home-brewed media center.Home Theater PC Build: This article discusses building a media center PC with home theater capabilities.Introduction to Building Custom Gaming Computers: Get introduced to the world of custom gaming computers and learn about their advantages.MythTV: MythTV offers all-in-one software to get TV on your computer.The pros and cons of building your own computer: Find out about the perks (and risks) that come with building a computer on your own.FreeCodecs.com: Load your PC up with all of the essential audio and video codecs with FreeCodecs.Building a Cheap Gaming Computer: Tips to Save Money: Build your computer on a tight budget with these tips.Support. You’re not alone in your homebrewed PC adventure. Get tips, support, and more from these communities and services.PC Mechanic Forums: These forums have advice and support for building your own PC as well as general computer questions.Hardware Zone: Check out Hardware Zone’s Hardware Clinic for help with technical issues.Taming The Beast Hardware Training: This training section has a plethora of information about specific pieces of PC hardware as well as troubleshooting.Hardware Central: Hardware Central’s forums offer peer support on everything from motherboards to overclocking.Glossary: If you’re confused about PC building terms, check out this growing glossary for some insight.CyberTechHelp: Get free help and support from this online community./r/buildapc: Find hardware discussions and help on these Reddit forums.My Super PC Forums: Get help from first boot problems to assembly on these forums.PC Troubleshooting Plus: This resource has loads of troubleshooting help for homebuilt PCs.10 Tips for Maintaining Your PC: Follow these tips to protect your hard work and investment on an ongoing basis.PCMech Forums: These forums offer support and discussion of the technology behind home PC building.alt.comp.hardware: This discussion forum on Google Groups offers lots of hardware help.alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt: Homebuilt PC users can share information and help each other using this group. Tags: Resources We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it.Ok
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Result 27
TitleAre you a human?
Urlhttps://www.newegg.com/insider/building-a-gaming-pc-for-the-first-time-dont-panic-this-guide-can-help-you-out/
Description
Date
Organic Position26
H1Human?
H2Are you a human?
H3
H2WithAnchorsAre you a human?
BodyHuman? Are you a human? We apologize for the confusion, but we can't quite tell if you're a person or a script. Please don't take this personally. Bots and scripts can be very much lifelike these days! To help us better protect your account security, please check the CAPTCHA box below. detecting... If you're interested in accessing Newegg API service, please submit a request. We would love to hear your opinion. Let us know your feedback.
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TitleHow To Build a Computer: A Beginner's Guide | Udemy
Urlhttps://www.udemy.com/course/how-to-build-a-computer-a-beginners-guide/
DescriptionBuild a computer from scratch, while learning about each component and how they work along the way
Date
Organic Position27
H1How To Build a Computer: A Beginner's Guide
H2What you'll learn
Requirements
Description
Who this course is for:
Featured review
Instructor
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat you'll learn
Requirements
Description
Who this course is for:
Featured review
Instructor
BodyHow To Build a Computer: A Beginner's Guide Build a computer from scratch, while learning about each component and how they work along the way. Bestseller Rating: 4.4 out of 54.4 (1,020 ratings) 7,299 students Created by Nathan Cope Last updated 3/2017 English English [Auto] What you'll learn. Build your first computer from scratch!Gain a basic knowledge of PC components and how they interact!Learn how to shop for components that have a high dollar-to-performance ratio! Requirements. Knowledge of basic computer usage is necessary for this course. Description. ** Note For New Students **The first section of my course is designed to be a classroom format, with pictures and documents for learning. If you're looking for a step by step video guide on handling physical hardware, what it is and how to put it together, please skip to the 2nd half of the course (the Lab section). Over 1000 students joined in the first week of release!Over 2700 students at the time of this writing!A big THANK YOU to my students for making this the HIGHEST RATED (5 STARS!), MOST POPULAR COURSE for building a computer on Udemy!Just added in 2017 - How to build a liquid cooled high-performance gaming PC! ________________________________________ Have you ever wanted to build your own computer? Would you like to know what each component does? Do you want to know how to get the best bang for your buck? This course will begin with some explanation of different terminology when it comes to PC components. You'll learn how each component connects to each other, their purposes, things to watch out for when purchasing components, and how to decide what parts need to perform better based on the tasks you want the computer will do. You'll go through the steps of building your first computer piece by piece, with great attention to detail along the way. Afterwhich, you'll learn the process of installing an operating system on the computer, to make the system fully functional and ready to use! This course will evolve over time.. Later installments may include things like: High-end Gaming PC Builds (Done and added to course!) Water Cooling (Done and added to course!) Home Theater PC Builds Raspberry PI BuildsHackintosh Builds In the first installment, you'll learn how to build a general usage PC that will perform well for daily use, using a classroom lecture format. ** First course expansion released! ** Showing how to build a computer hands-on was easily the most requested feature after the course's original release. So, we've put together a giant new section on building an extremely high performance liquid cooled overclocked gaming PC! You will find this section at the end of the course. Buy now to get the most value! Original Pricing - $25After 2017 Expansion - $50 As the course evolves and content is added, the pricing will go up with each installment. Get in now at the low cost of $50 and receive all of the new content for free! As a student, you will also receive special discounts unavailable elsewhere for Nathan's other courses that are currently in the works! And as always, 30-day refunds are 100% guaranteed if your satisfaction is not met! Thank you! Thank you for taking a look at this course on Udemy!Who this course is for:. This course is meant for hobbyists, students and technology enthusiasts that want to build a well performing computer for themselves or for a friend!Show moreShow less Featured review. Yemi A.2736 courses29 reviewsRating: 5.0 out of 5a year agoSo far the instructor has been very thorough with his lectures with several checkpoints to ensure assimilation by students. This is a thorough and timely course for one trying to build his first custom pc for penetration testing practice.Show moreShow less Instructor. Nathan CopeSoftware Engineer and IT Professional4.3 Instructor Rating1,092 Reviews15,851 Students3 Courses Nathan is an IT professional of over 20 years. In addition to IT work, he's also been a hobbyist developer using many different languages and platforms for many years. Currently, he's employed as a Software Engineer developing business-critical applications for iOS mobile devices and Windows. His goal is to bring his knowledge to Udemy's student base and hopefully help those that are interested in doing the things he does. Show moreShow less
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Result 29
TitleBuilding a Gaming PC From Start to Finish in 2020 (Full Guide)
Urlhttps://www.easypc.io/budget-pcs/
Description
Date
Organic Position28
H1Easy PC
H2Budget Gaming PCs
Choose Your Fighter
Budgeting
Parts Checklist
Buying Parts
Ordering Parts
Before You Build
Testing Your Parts
Secondary Testing
RMA (Return Merchandise Authorization)
Building Your PC
Connecting it All
Installations
Installing Windows
Installing Linux
Installing Utilities
H3Gaming Build
Workstation Build
Step 1: Find a Place to Build
Step 2: Sort Your Components
Step 3: Prep Your Parts
Step 4: Install The RAM
Step 5: Connect Your Power Supply
Step 6: Install Your CPU
Step 7: Attach The CPU Cooler
Step 8: Power Your PSU
Step 9: Power On Your Test Rig
Step 1
Step 2: Installing Your GPU
Step 3: Power Your Hard Drives
Step 4: Connect Everything Together
Step 6: Power On and Begin Your Test
Opening the Case
Case Fans
Storage
Power Supply
Motherboard
Graphics Card
Cable Management
Front Panel
USB Headers
HD Audio
Power Connectors
Step 1: Creating Boot Media for Your Operating System
No Computer
Computer
Step 1: Selecting the Boot Drive
Personalization
Ninite
Task Manager
Downloads Folder
Drivers
Conclusion
H2WithAnchorsBudget Gaming PCs
Choose Your Fighter
Budgeting
Parts Checklist
Buying Parts
Ordering Parts
Before You Build
Testing Your Parts
Secondary Testing
RMA (Return Merchandise Authorization)
Building Your PC
Connecting it All
Installations
Installing Windows
Installing Linux
Installing Utilities
BodyEasy PC How to Build a Gaming Computer from A to Z (Full Guide) Budget Gaming PCs. If you want some help picking out your components, we’ve got a bunch of build guides ranging from $400 to $1000. Check them out below: Budget Name Image Build Guide $400 Budget Gamer Build Guide $500 Perfect Balance Build Guide $600 Stealth Gamer Build Guide $700 Phoenix Build Guide $800 Monster Build Guide $900 Ripper Build Guide $1000 Beast Build Guide So you want to build your own personal computer system, huh? Well grab a cup of coolant, some silicon wafers, and strap yourself in because we’re about to cover everything you need to know to build your first gaming computer. From your type of workload to the money you’re willing to throw down, we’ll hit it all in this Ultimate PC Build Guide! We’re even going to walk you through a step-by-step installation guide. Choose Your Fighter. At the beginning of any project is an idea. What is your idea? Since you have decided to build your very own computer, you must have some motive. Do you want to play video games? Do you work with 3D modeling programs? Do you want to browse cat videos on the internet? There’s a budget and build for every occasion, but first, you have to decide what you want to do. It really depends on the purpose of your PC. Here’s what to focus on for each type of build: Gaming Build. The main things to focus on when building a gaming computer are any parts that may increase your frames per second or enrich your experience in general. That could include a lot of separate parts, which is why gaming builds are usually more expensive when compared to other types. That’s why it’s important to choose the proper CPU for your PC. Your graphics card will be the main factor involved in increasing your FPS in games but don’t forget that having a slow CPU can bring down the performance of your graphics card. You also may want solid-state storage to boost your load times. Workstation Build. Workstation builds are similar to gaming builds, but they include a greater focus on your computer’s processor speed and core count. Having more cores at higher speeds allows CPU focused programs like Blender. Do keep in mind that having a GPU is also very important to a workstation build though, as you still need to be able to efficiently complete GPU-based renders at times. An SSD isn’t required for a workstation but always recommended. Internet Browsing Now for the easy stuff. You just want a computer to go on youtube, maybe check your bank statements, or play some mild in-browser games, right? Luckily for you, that’s the cheapest option of the bunch. For an internet browsing build, you don’t even necessarily need a graphics card, you can get by sticking with a modest CPU that includes integrated graphics. As for storage anything really goes, so you might as well stick with that cheaper mechanical hard drive. Now, on to budgeting. Budgeting. Of course, you always have a budget going into an expensive project. Whether you’re at the low end of $300-500USD or upwards of $900-1100USD, there’s always a build to fit your needs within your own price range, though quality will vary. For a modest gaming build, we suggest a budget between $600-750USD. This will allow you to play games at high settings at a moderate FPS, or low to medium settings at high FPS. If you want a baseline 60FPS high settings build, we suggest a minimum of $1000USD. However, with sales and coupons, you could definitely lower that bar. When it comes to workstations, you’ll be pricing much higher in most cases if you plan to buy brand new parts. Buying used server hardware, though, can give you an amazing budget workstation. While we do suggest buying used parts if you want better performance in a budget, we don’t recommend it for lack of warranty. Browsing builds are easy and cheap, running you under $500 all the time for sure. For more on this topic, read our guide about how much you should spend on a gaming PC. *prices fluctuate daily. All budgets are within a $50 threshold. Some components may have been adjusted to fit the budget. Parts Checklist. When creating your checklist of parts to buy, we highly suggest using the website pcpartpicker.com to easily find and organize the components of your build. PCPartPicker’s System Builder utility includes each mandatory category for your computer to function, along with some extras you might want. It also includes the total price (including shipping but not tax) as you choose your parts. Clicking on a category will open a page like this that lists all the parts you can choose for said category. You can sort by price, socket, core count, speed, and much more with the filters on the left side. Clicking on any of the listed components takes you to a page listing basic specifications, as well as online retailers currently carrying the component in question (including promos and sales). Once you complete the process of choosing your parts, you can click the pcpartpicker affiliate links to purchase your chosen components at your chosen retailers. Buying Parts. When you have finally decided to go ahead and purchase all or your parts, you might want to check to make sure you’re within your budget since tax on something this expensive might be a bit high. So be sure to check the sales tax in your area and calculate shipping costs before purchasing. When it comes to buying an operating system, in the case of Windows, you can buy a consumer key for around $100USD or you can find an OEM key online for a tenth (or less) of that price. Though OEM keys do not include the same amount of support accessibility as a consumer key would. Ordering Parts. One thing you may run into when ordering your parts, if you are ordering from many different retailers, is that the parts may come in the mail at very different times. We suggest checking each package for contents on the date of delivery so that if any pieces may be missing you can make a speedy return. Before You Build. Once you have all of your parts delivered, you may think it’s time to get right into the nitty-gritty and build your computer. I think not. There are a couple of things you should consider before even starting your build. Making sure you have a proper space to build and making sure all of your parts function properly. IMPORTANT: If you are not using an antistatic wrist band when building your computer, touch a piece of metal every couple minutes to keep yourself grounded and avoid static shocks which can pose a fatal risk to your components. Testing Your Parts. It’s highly recommended that you go ahead and test your main components before deciding to go all-in and screw everything together. I’m sure you would want to know what’s working and what isn’t before it’s too late. Here is the best way to test your new parts. Step 1: Find a Place to Build. Find an area to build that is near a power outlet and does not have carpeted floors. A concrete floor is preferable, so maybe a garage? Step 2: Sort Your Components. Take your motherboard out of its box, sort all of the pieces, remove the motherboard from its antistatic bag, and place the motherboard on the motherboard box so you have a nonconductive platform. Step 3: Prep Your Parts. Take your power supply, memory modules (RAM), processor, and processor cooler out of their respective boxes. Step 4: Install The RAM. To install the RAM modules, locate the RAM slots neighboring the CPU socket. Unhinge the latches on either side of the socket, then match the notch on the RAM with the notch in the socket. Press down until both sides click to lock the memory in place. Step 5: Connect Your Power Supply. If you bought a fully modular power supply, connect the 24-pin motherboard power and the 8-pin CPU power to the power supply. Then for all power supplies, connect the opposite ends to the corresponding motherboard connectors and press down until the latch clicks. We have a full guide on the difference between modular and non-modular power supplies, and the pros/cons of each. You can find that guide here. But if you’re too lazy to read that article too, here’s the TLDR: Modular power supplies are a bit more expensive but are way easier to work with and help with cable management as well, so overall they’re worth the investment. In addition, if you want to learn more about power supply efficiency ratings, check out our full explanation here. Step 6: Install Your CPU. Image credit: Microcenter On the CPU socket, pull back the retention arm, then match the triangle on your CPU with the triangle on the socket, and carefully place your processor into the socket carefully without force. Once it’s in wiggle it gently to make sure it’s in properly, then pull the retention arm back down. Step 7: Attach The CPU Cooler. Before attaching the cooler, apply a pea-sized dribble of thermal compound to the top of your CPU. Remove the protective covering on your processor cooler and place the CPU Cooler on the CPU in the motherboard then screw the cooler to the mounting holes provided (refer to the user manual for your unit). In the case of the AM4 socket, you will use the retention brackets. Now you can plug the CPU fan power to the CPU fan header on the motherboard. Step 8: Power Your PSU. Plug one end of the power supply into the wall, then the other into the power supply itself and turn the power supply on. Step 9: Power On Your Test Rig. Find the front panel IO header (usually labeled JPF1). Take a screwdriver and bridge the positive and negative pins on the power switch connector to turn the computer on. You can turn the PC off by switching the power supply off. Now, if your CPU cooler’s fan turned on then your computer, at the very least, can receive power and turn on. If your PC does not power on, refer to the RMA section. Secondary Testing. For the secondary testing, you will need a keyboard, monitor, and display cable. In the second testing section, we will make sure your drives are being recognized by the system and that your graphics are outputting properly. Step 1. For integrated graphics: If your processor includes integrated graphics (refer to the specifications of your unit), you can test your output before installing a graphics card. If choosing this option, connect your display cable directly to the motherboard then skip step 2 for now. For fully/semi-modular power supplies: If you are using a fully modular or semi-modular power supply, connect your SATA power connectors to the power supply. For M.2 Drives: You may have chosen an M.2 drive for your storage, install it by carefully placing it into the M.2 keyed slot on your motherboard then pushing it down and screwing it in with the small screw included in the motherboard. Step 2: Installing Your GPU. Remove your graphics card from its box. To install just match the pins on the GPU with the PCIE x16 socket on the motherboard and the notch on the back of the GPU to the retention bracket on the PCIE slot, then press with slight force until it clicks. Then (if applicable) plug in the PCIE power to your graphics card. Step 3: Power Your Hard Drives. Take the SATA cables from your motherboard box and connect them to your SATA ports, then connect the other end to your hard drive or solid-state drive. Then connect SATA power to your drive(s). Step 4: Connect Everything Together. Hook up your monitor to power, then connect your display cable to both the monitor and graphics card. Connect your keyboard to any open USB port on the motherboard. Step 6: Power On and Begin Your Test. Turn on your computer via the screwdriver shorting method, wait for it to display, and repeatedly click the delete key on your keyboard until the computer enters the BIOS. If you don’t get a display, try turning it on and off again a couple of times. Navigate the BIOS to storage to check if your drives are being recognized. If all goes well, then awesome! You’re set to move directly on to the building stage, and now that most of your parts are connected, it’s a fairly straight shot to finishing your computer. However, if you found that certain parts were not functioning properly, move on to the next category to learn how to return for refund or replacement. RMA (Return Merchandise Authorization). Nobody ever wants to have to return a purchase because it isn’t working, but in the case of building a computer, everything needs to function for the computer as a whole to function. So, unfortunately, you just might have to return some of your components. Most retailers make the return process very easy for the buyer, so we will use Newegg.com as a baseline so you can apply this knowledge there and elsewhere. Scrolling to the bottom of the retailer website should always yield a section similar to this, which will include a customer service or support section. This area will include a means of which to contact customer support or directly initiate a return. The retailer will usually pay for return shipping and will email you a printable shipping label, or mail you a pre-printed label for return. Once returned, it will be checked for defects and the retailer will determine whether or not to send a replacement or refund based on your choice. After that, you’re basically home free. They’ll either give you a refund to buy a new component or send you a replacement part of the same model. Building Your PC. So, you’ve tested all of your components and the process went quite smoothly! Or, it didn’t and you’ve finished RMAing your broken parts. Either way, you’re finally ready to start the building process for your brand new PC! Considering you have most of your important components, your processor, memory, CPU cooler, and possibly an M.2 SSD installed, the rest of the build should be streamlined and easy for the most part. Opening the Case. Opening your case is the first step to the building since, of course, you need to access the interior where your components will reside. Building in an ATX case is going to be the easiest for beginners since it’s the largest, but you can build in a micro-ATX or mini-ITX case as well. Just know the smaller the case, the harder it’ll be. For more information on choosing the best case for your PC, check out our guide by clicking that link. If you have a tempered glass side panel, just unscrew the thumbscrews on the side, remove the glass, and place it someplace where it won’t be scratched or otherwise damaged. Next, remove the thumbscrews for the other side panel and slide the panel off. Case Fans. Some cases may not come with adequate cooling fans, or you may have bought some RGB or regular LED fans for your case. Case fans are relatively simple to install but they can become a hassle. Basically, case fans do not come pre-threaded so for when you screw them on you will have to put in that extra effort to thread them with the provided fan screws. Once you’ve got that in your head, all you gotta do is line up the fans with the case front and screw them in where you want. You can follow the same steps for the rear. Storage. Starting with your hard drive storage, we have quite an easy setup. Most modern PC cases, even some cheaper end ones, come with removable hard drive caddy that allows for screwless installation. Simply match the screw holes on the hard drive with the pegs on the caddy and snap the hard drive in. Once the hard drive is secured, you can slide the caddy right back into the slot in the case. If you purchased a 2.5-inch SSD, you will have to find the 2.5-inch bay somewhere in your case, then use the screws that came with the case to secure the SSD. Power Supply. The power supply is simultaneously the easiest and most difficult component to install in a PC. Let’s talk about that. The initial installation is as simple as 1-2-3. Just slide the power supply into the slot on the case it fits into, match up the screw holes, and secure with the included screws. Note that some older cases may have the power supply mounted on the top of the case as opposed to the bottom. The second part of the power supply installation is the cable management which we will cover in the cable management section below. Motherboard. Be careful with the motherboard, the heart of your computer. One small slip could end its miserable life. Lucky for you, motherboards are made very durable, but that doesn’t mean manhandle the damned thing. Before we can install the motherboard, we must install the rear IO shield. This will protect the rear of your motherboard from possible intrusions by unwanted visitors. To install the IO shield, match up the shield with the ports on your motherboard and match the orientation to the IO shield slot. Then place the shield in the slot and push until all edges have properly snapped in. The motherboard does not directly sit on the wall of the case, it uses small screws called “stand-offs” that keep it raised slightly to avoid the possibility of static electricity reaching your board. Some cases come with these pre-installed, some don’t, just always make sure they match up with the screw holes on your motherboard before attempting to install. To install your motherboard, hold it by the CPU cooler and slide the board in diagonally while matching your rear ports to those of the IO shield. Once they are matched up, place the rest of the motherboard down making sure to match up the motherboard holes with the stand-offs. Then use the provided screws to secure the motherboard to the stand-offs on all sides of the board. Ta-da, you’ve installed your motherboard! Remember that you don’t need a super fancy motherbaord for gaming (more on that here) so you don’t need to spend hundreds of dollars on a motherboard unless you want to flex your wallet. Check out our full guide about motherboards’ impact on gaming performance here. Graphics Card. Installing the graphics card while the motherboard is in the case is almost exactly the same as when in testing with just a couple extra steps. First, remove the tabs at the rear of the case that match up with the ports and exhaust on your graphics card. The case may also include a bracket on the rear to further secure these tabs, remove that as well. Follow the steps provided in the secondary testing section to install your graphics card. Once your graphics card is installed, screw the card down into the slot and re-secure the rear bracket if there was one. Cable Management. Cable management isn’t always as hard as everyone makes it out to be, but that really depends on how many cables you have and how prepared your case is to handle them. Cases and power supplies usually come included with zip-ties which are the standard means of which to secure cables. Though, your case may include velcro ties which are even better! Cases always have predetermined cable routing zones with slits to run your zip-ties through, but the placement with vary from case to case so either consult your manual or figure out your optimal routing by looking at the hole placement. We suggest reading the Cable Management section alongside the Connecting it All section for optimal cable management for all cables. Connecting it All. Now that all of your cables are properly routed, let’s connect all of the proper cables to the internal headers. Front Panel. Starting with the front IO cables, you can follow the above diagram and connect the corresponding cables based on their individual labels. USB Headers. Next, we will plug in the front IO USB headers. Depending on your case you may have both USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 headers or maybe just USB 2.0 or just USB 3.0, so we’ll just cover both. The USB 2.0 header will look like the picture above. Find the corresponding cable labeled USB and plug it right in. Boom, easy. The USB 3.0 header is a lot more delicate so we urge you to be careful and make sure you have it facing the proper direction before applying force because you will need to apply a little force. HD Audio. The HD audio connector is going to be our quickest install yet. Just find the HD Audio connector, and push it down to the corresponding header on your motherboard (usually near the bottom left). Easy. Power Connectors. Just a quick reminder since we’ve already covered it, remember to plug in the motherboard and CPU power connectors so your computer can, you know, receive power. If you need a full refresher, please refer to the Testing Your Parts section. Installations. The hardware side of your computer is finally finished and you can stand proud knowing that you built your own PC! Though, we aren’t quite done yet. In fact, we’re nowhere near done yet. In the following portion, we will show you how to install an operating system and completely load up your computer so you can get ready to do whatever you built it for. Step 1: Creating Boot Media for Your Operating System. Installing your new operating system may be the most time-consuming piece of this entire puzzle, but we’re sure you’ve still got some time to spare. Possibly. There are a couple of different options of operating system and installation method when you decide to finally install one, but the one aspect that is always universal is a USB flash drive (or SD card if you so desire). It’s always recommended that you use a minimum of an 8GB flash drive for any operating system installation. Most online guides for installing an operating system will tell you that you need another computer. I’m here to tell you that the future is now and that is no longer the case, but for those of you who do have another computer, we will cover both methods of bootable media creation. No Computer. Well, do you have a smartphone? If the answer is yes, you may be able to use your cellphone to create boot media. There are some separate requirements, though. You must have a flash drive that can connect to your phone, or an adapter to allow it to. Now that we have that cleared up, let’s get to creating your bootable drive. First, install an app that will allow you to etch an ISO file to your flash drive. We suggest ISO 2 USB as it is very straightforward, simple to use, and the interface won’t leave you asking questions. Second, you will need to find your chosen operating system’s ISO file. If you are going with a Linux distro the process will be a lot easier, just find your chosen distro’s website and navigate to the download link. As for Windows, you may have to do a little searching to find a proper ISO. We suggest downloading the Windows 10 Pro ISO from softlay.net for a (relatively) quick experience, just try not to click on all the ads. To install your ISO press ‘pick’ for the “Pick USB Pin Drive” option and select your drive, press ‘pick’ on the “Pick ISO File” option and select your ISO, then select “Format USB Pin Drive” and press start. During this time do not unplug or move your drive/phone, because it will stop the installation process and possibly corrupt your flash drive. Computer. When creating your bootable media on a computer you have two options depending on what operating system you choose and what operating system your current computer has. If on MacOS or choosing a Linux distro, download a program that will allow you to create your bootable media with an ISO file. We suggest Rufus. Rufus is very easy to use. Just leave all settings on default, select your ISO, select your drive, then click start and wait. To find your ISO file, download from the website of the chosen Linux distro, or from softlay.net for Windows. If you are using a Windows computer and you wish to install Windows on your new computer it’s a lot more simple. Find the Media Creation Tool on the Microsoft website (or just click here). Install, open, select “Create installation media for another PC” and from there just follow the onscreen directions. Installing Windows. Now that your boot media is in order, let’s get to the actual installation. Step 1: Selecting the Boot Drive. First and foremost you need to tell your computer which drive it needs to read off to install your operating system. When you turn on your computer you will eventually reach a screen similar to this but brandishing whatever motherboard brand you selected. Look at the lower half of the screen to find your designated BIOS and Boot Menu buttons, but typically they will be the same as the ones shown. Click your Boot Menu button (usually F11) once you reach this screen to enter the Boot Menu. Once in the Boot Menu, select the USB you used as a boot media device and hit Enter. When you load into the Windows installer, make sure the settings are correct and click next. Then click the “Install Now” button. If you have a product key ready, you may enter it now. If not, just select “I don’t have a product key.” Don’t worry, this won’t bar you from using Windows (just a few features) and you can always enter a product key later. Select the version you wish to install. There isn’t much difference between the Pro and Home versions so select either of the base versions of those two. Read the software license terms (or don’t) and select “I accept the license terms”, then click next. Select “Custom: Install Windows only (advanced)” to install a fresh copy of Windows. Select the drive you wish to use as your Windows boot drive and click next. The next part of the installation is simple and just asks for personal preference and experience questions so we will not be covering it. To activate Windows later navigate to Settings > Update & Security > Activation. Select the “Change product key” option and enter your new product key. Installing Linux. For our Linux installation example, we will be using Ubuntu, as most distros install the same or similar. The installation will first ask for a language and keyboard layout, choose what applies to you. Then select your internet connection if you are using Wi-Fi instead of ethernet. Select the normal installation if you will be using Linux as your main operating system and allow the installer to download updates while installing. Definitely opt to install third-party software as this will allow for proper up-to-date drivers for all of your hardware. You may choose whether or not to select secure boot, but we suggest it. Here you will select the disk you wish to install Linux on. Finally, select your location (or the nearest location to you) and create your username and password for the computer. Voila, your installation is almost done. Just let the computer do its magic and load in when it’s done. Installing Utilities. Once your operating system is installed, there are some housekeeping chores to get done and programs to get installed. We will not be covering the utility installation for Linux since it can vary distro to distro. Personalization. One of the first things you can check out once you’ve installed Windows is the personalized settings. Simply right-click your desktop and select Personalize. We should note, you will not have access to these settings if you have not activated Windows. Windows allows you to personalize everything from your desktop wallpaper to your lock screen wallpaper, to even your taskbar and button sizes. It really covers everything, so just choose whatever fits you! Ninite. The first site to always head to is Ninite. This site allows you to download bundles of programs all at once so that you don’t have to head to each individual site one by one. We suggest selecting the following programs: Chrome Firefox 7-Zip VLC Notepad++ Foxit Reader Otherwise, just choose whatever programs you see that you think you may need. Once you have chosen your programs, hit Get Your Ninite. Then click run and it will automatically install all of your programs. Task Manager. Open up your Task Manager by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Esc and click More details. Once in More details, head to Startup to see all the programs that will start with Windows. To disable or enable a program right-click and select the option, or click the option at the bottom right. We highly suggest keeping as many programs disabled as possible for a fast load and less clutter. Downloads Folder. Most people don’t want their boot drive to get all backed up with downloaded files, so it’s always good to remap your Downloads folder to a different drive. Select the drive that you want your downloads to go to and make a new Downloads folder. Right-click your original Downloads folder and select properties. Navigate to Location and hit Find Target. Find your new downloads folder and double-click it. Now you’ve got a new downloads folder. You can follow these same steps with any of the other baseline folders if you wish to move them to a drive other than the boot drive. Drivers. Oh boy, finally reaching the end here. Your drivers are very, very, very important to getting your computer up and running to the best of its abilities. Luckily, there’s only a couple we need to install. For AMD drivers it is a lot more simple to get all of the drivers you need. Simply go to their support page and select the product you need drivers for. For GPU drivers select Graphics, for CPU drivers select Processors, for motherboard chipset drivers select Chipsets, and for iGPU drivers select Processors with graphics. Once you’ve navigated to your product click Submit. From there just download the drivers for Windows 10. For Intel drivers, head to the Intel download center and select the type of product you need drivers for. Once you select a product type, select view by product and find the type you have. When you find it, click the link provided and it will send you to the download page for those drivers. Nvidia drivers are also fairly easy to install with the Nvidia GeForce Experience app. The GeForce Experience app will automatically detect your GPU and install the proper drivers, along with providing some pretty cool features for recording and streaming. Conclusion. I really considered giving you a “So you’ve made it this far” line because I thought it’d be hilarious, but honestly, after this journey you deserve a break. You’ve just built and configured your very own personal computer! Be proud of yourself, take a breather, and I don’t know go play some video games or something. Your brand new computer is right there, ready to delve into the ever-expanding depths of the internet. The world is now your oyster, just try not to go and ruin your machine with all those illegal downloads now.
Topics
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Result 30
TitleHow Long Does it Take to Build a PC? A Beginner's Guide
Urlhttps://www.cgdirector.com/how-long-build-a-pc/
DescriptionAre you thinking about building a PC but aren't sure how long it'll take you? As veteran-PC-Builders, we'll answer that question for you
Date9 Nov 2021
Organic Position29
H1How Long Does it Take to Build a PC? A Beginner’s Guide
H2What Influences the Build-Time of a PC
A Typical PC-Build Time-Line
How Long Does it Take to Build a PC?
Conclusion
Over to you
H3Research
Delivery Time
Experience
Issues
Customization
Cable Management
Water Cooling
RGB Lighting
Airflow
Unboxing and Gathering the Necessary Tools – Time: 5-20 Minutes
Setting-up the Motherboard – Time: 8 – 40 Minutes
Placing the Motherboard in the Case – Time: 12 – 60 Minutes
Installing the Power Supply – Time: 8 – 40 Minutes
Installing the GPU – Time: 4 – 15 Minutes
Preparing the Case and Testing – Time: 2 – 5 Minutes
Any Additional Troubleshooting – Time: 30 Minutes to Several Hours
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Custom PC-Builder
H2WithAnchorsWhat Influences the Build-Time of a PC
A Typical PC-Build Time-Line
How Long Does it Take to Build a PC?
Conclusion
Over to you
BodyHow Long Does it Take to Build a PC? A Beginner’s Guide. by Alex Glawion   /  Updated November 9, 2021 CGDirector is Reader-supported. When you buy through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission. TABLE OF CONTENTS If you’re building a PC for the first time, you may be wondering how long the process is really going to take.You may have seen people complete the procedure effortlessly in a matter of minutes, but also heard horror stories of how it may even take days when minor issues occur.So, how much time should you allot for the process? Also, what about picking the parts and planning out the components for the setup? How long will that take?In this article, we will cover all these questions and more; going through the chronology of planning, purchasing, and building a brand-new computer according to various different preferences.We will then come to a conclusion of how much time you should expect the entire building process to take.What Influences the Build-Time of a PC. Before we get into specific metrics in terms of how long it will take, let’s first take a look at the factors that will ultimately determine how time-consuming the project will be.Research. Perhaps the most important step of all: research is a key element for building the most optimal machine for your needs.It is also paramount to ensure the absence of compatibility issues between the components, the quality & longevity of the hardware, and, of course, the overall price.This is especially important when it comes to ensuring the availability of your desired parts, as you don’t want to sacrifice either cost or quality.Because this step is so important, it may also become the most onerous. How long it will take will mostly depend on the purpose of the PC, the budget, and the desired performance outcome.To help you complete this process in a swift manner, do make sure to check out our step-by-step guide, which will help you find the type of computer that will best suit your workload, as well as our PC-Builder; which will guide you toward choosing the best components for your needs and budget.Delivery Time. Depending on where you reside, as well as the availability of your components, delivery time may also be immensely time-consuming.Many countries have an Amazon shopping platform (which has next-day, and two-day delivery) so chances are you can cover this process in a timely manner; depending on your intended specifications.Experience. Another factor that can play a crucial role when it comes to building a desktop is your personal experience on the subject.When building a PC, minor issues can arise which can be identified and fixed in a matter of a few minutes by a veteran PC builder but may take hours for a novice.Additionally, knowing the proper series of steps to take in order to build a PC can save you a significant amount of time, as you won’t have to constantly refer back to the motherboard manual, or online videos, in order to proceed.To alleviate any inexperience on the matter, you can: Research the methods of PC-building while you wait for your components to arrive. You can refer to our own beginner’s guide on the subject – which will help you throughout the planning & assembling process – or several YouTube channels which go through the process step-by-step. Ask for a knowledgeable friend or colleague to be present during the assembly. Hire a professional PC-builder or IT-specialist to build your PC.Issues. When assembling components, there are a host of minor problems that may arise. These range from being totally unforeseeable (like a faulty component), to a simple oversight in cable management. Some of the most common issues include: Not properly connecting the PSU cables. Not enough RAM clearance from the CPU cooler. Power supply cables being too short to reach certain components. Components not being properly installed or secured into place. BIOS & CPU incompatibility. The PC not turning on due to a host of possible causes ranging from improper cable installation to bent CPU pins.Fixing the issues themselves can be a lengthy process if the errors are related to hardware incompatibility; which in turn may require a replacement to be made.Minor mistakes in the assembly can be resolved swiftly – that is if you are able to identify from where the error stems, which may require lengthy successions of trial and error.Customization. Some PC cases are more difficult to build than others; which is particularly the case when it comes to smaller setups.A Small Form Factor (SFF) build, for example, can be incredibly time-consuming to build, as the space within is limited, and everything must fit perfectly.Hence, if you have customizations in line for your PC, do make sure to allot some extra time to accommodate the changes that will make your setup unique.Cable Management. Many will agree that beauty lies in the simple things, and there are few things that are more satisfactory than having all your cables properly lined up and neatly packed together.This is almost an art form, and, like any art, it requires time to be done properly.Of course, others will argue that functional cable management will do just fine, which is far easier and will save you plenty of time when it comes to assembling your build.Indeed, proper cable management can be done in several ways and doesn’t necessarily need to take hours to be completed to perfection.Water Cooling. Cooling can come in two forms: airflow or liquid cooling. Liquid cooling requires creating a custom loop, which is a process that must be done scrupulously.This process will, on average, take a couple of days to properly plan out and complete; in order to avoid any leaks that can damage surrounding hardware.For those interested in adding custom water cooling for their system, check out JayTwoCents’s beginner’s guide for a more detailed breakdown of the process.RGB Lighting. Adding RGB lighting is usually a simple, straightforward process; depending on the level of customization you wish to achieve. RGB-illuminated fans or strips simply need to be plugged into the motherboard via an RGB header, and they are set to go.The only issue that can arise in this process is not having enough available RGB headers on your motherboard, in which case you’ll need an RGB splitter.To avoid having to wait for one after the fact, do make sure that your particular motherboard model can accommodate all your RGB-lit parts and, if it cannot, pre-purchase a splitter or RGB controller.Airflow. Achieving optimal airflow can be done quickly and easily, given that the positions of the fans are planned out properly.The fans, themselves, can be installed in a matter of minutes, and no additional maintenance is required – until they need to be cleaned.A Typical PC-Build Time-Line. So, now that we have an idea of which factors influence the assembly time of a PC, let’s move on to a timeline that you can expect for each individual step of the building process.Of course, the time each step will take depends on the experience of the builder.In the timelines below, the lower limit will be the time it takes an experienced builder to finish the task, while the upper limit will reflect the build-time of a novice.Unboxing and Gathering the Necessary Tools – Time: 5-20 Minutes. Before getting into the nitty-gritty of PC-building, take some time to gather any materials you need for the assembly itself.Ideally, you will have a clutter-free table with an anti-static mat, pliers, cable ties, a screwdriver, thermal paste, and an anti-static strap.Most of these tools are optional, of course, but can make the building process faster and safer. Next, you want to unbox the components so that you have them ready for installation.Setting-up the Motherboard – Time: 8 – 40 Minutes. The very first step in assembling a PC is installing the appropriate hardware components to the motherboard.These installations are quite straightforward, and easy to execute.They mostly consist of mechanical connections, so you don’t have to worry too much about the process.Setting up the motherboard includes: Installing the CPU Installing the RAM Installing the M.2 Storage Drive Installing the CPU CoolerPlacing the Motherboard in the Case – Time: 12 – 60 Minutes. Now that the motherboard has all the necessary components, it can be placed into the case itself. Prior to this installation, the case must be prepared, and its cables routed accordingly.This is where a great deal of the cable management will be dealt with, as the routing of the case cables will determine how the PSU cables will be dealt with.The particular steps are as follows: Preparing the Case Pre-Routing the Case-Cables Installing the I/O Shield Installing the Motherboard to the Case Plugging in the Case Cables to the Motherboard Installing any 2.5”/3.5” SSDs/HDDs (optional)Installing the Power Supply – Time: 8 – 40 Minutes. Depending on your PC’s case, a mounted PSU might or might not be easily accessible for plugging in cables. It’s usually best to plug in all necessary cables before mounting it in place.If proper cable management was applied, this step will already be planned out and easy to follow through with.That being said, this is not an operation you want to undertake in an impetuous manner, as improperly applied PSU cables are oftentimes the cause of immense frustration when a component (or the PC in its entirety) fails to power on. Installing the PSU to the Case Plugging the PSU Cables to the Motherboard and PeripheralsInstalling the GPU – Time: 4 – 15 Minutes. Another simple process that can be done in an effortless manner is installing the GPU. Now, you may be wondering, why wait so long to install the GPU? Why not do it sooner?Well, the answer is that the GPU is a cumbersome component and it can therefore become an obstacle when plugging in smaller cables (like front panel connectors f.e.). Unscrewing the PCIe Slot Covers Installing the GPU into the PCIe Slot Installing the GPU to the Case Plugging in the PCIe CablesPreparing the Case and Testing – Time: 2 – 5 Minutes. The fastest step – yet also the most nerve-racking – is closing up the case and turning on the PC for the first time. This will determine if the prior processes were a success, or if any troubleshooting must commence. Connecting the Monitor, Peripherals, and Power Cable Closing the Case Launching the BIOSAny Additional Troubleshooting – Time: 30 Minutes to Several Hours. If an issue has occurred (like the PC not turning on or the BIOS not showing a particular component), the best way to check for the root of the error is the motherboard’s EZ debug LEDs… That is if it has them.If it doesn’t, you will have to manually check the components to see what adjustments you can make to alleviate the issue.How Long Does it Take to Build a PC?To refer back to the original question of the article, and sum things up, let’s see how long it actually takes to build a PC.If we take research and delivery into account, it can take anywhere between a couple of days to a couple of weeks, depending on the availability of the desired components.When it comes to the actual assembly of the computer, it will take an experienced builder about 40 minutes to an hour for a simple build.For a novice, or inexperienced, PC builder, it will take anywhere between three to four hours; if all steps are followed carefully so that no issues arise.If mistakes have happened, then locating the origins of the problem and solving it may take hours; time that is compounded to the aforementioned 3-4 hour setup.Conclusion. All in all, if you are wondering how much time you should allocate for building a PC, it’s always best to give yourself some leeway so that you do not rush the process.Impatience may ultimately come back to haunt you in the form of undesired issues that require disassembly and reassembly of the components.This can happen immediately, or later down the line.Many find enjoyment in the process of assembling the PC parts, as it’s a process that is done once, and will last for years.Perhaps it is best to view it as a pleasurable experience, especially if you are a novice so that you can become accustomed to the process, and learn to do it swiftly, and accurately.Over to you. Are you looking to build a new PC? Wondering how long your specific build will take you? Let us know in the comments!Also, if you have any issues with planning or building a PC, make sure to check our expert forum, where you can find answers to a myriad of similar questions.The next post you should read. 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Result 31
TitleHow To Build A PC Guide For Beginners #YesWeBuild | MSI
Urlhttps://in.msi.com/Landing/how-to-build-a-pc
Description
Date
Organic Position30
H1A COMPLETE HOW-TO PC BUILDING GUIDE FOR BEGINNERS
H2#YesWeBuild
WHY ON EARTH DO WE BUILD OUR OWN PC?
INTRO TO PC COMPONENTS
FREE EBOOK!
HOW TO BUILD A PC
FAQ
H3Build-it-yourself is just simply cooler!
What do I need to build a pc?
Step-by-step build guide in 11 steps
Want to find quick answer?
Intel main CPU series are as follows:
AMD main CPU series are as follows:
When choosing a CPU cooler, take into account the following considerations:
Intel
AMD
At present, the two main graphics manufacturers are NVIDIA and AMD
Wattage
Energy Efficiency
Power Supply Design
Material
Dimensions
Air flow design, tool-free installation and expandability
What Type of Game Do You Play?
Choose the right graphics card
Increase loading speed of games with a SSD
Buy a proper headset or speaker, or use gaming-grade professional audio software
Improve game performance via overclocking
Choose the right motherboard
Start with the color scheme
Add RGB Lighting
How to install RGB device
Custom water cooling system
Gameplay and Streaming Quality
Is your Internet fast enough?
Graphics cards vs. capture cards
Choose a Quad-core or Higher CPU
Choose a 8GB or more memory
Choose your live streaming software
H2WithAnchors#YesWeBuild
WHY ON EARTH DO WE BUILD OUR OWN PC?
INTRO TO PC COMPONENTS
FREE EBOOK!
HOW TO BUILD A PC
FAQ
BodyA COMPLETE HOW-TO PC BUILDING GUIDE FOR BEGINNERS learn to build WHY ON EARTH DO WE BUILD OUR OWN PC? . We choose whichever component we want that perfectly fits our needs. We make the most use of our limited [or unlimited] budget We can upgrade and maintain our PCs with ease. In a nutshell… Build-it-yourself is just simply cooler! . INTRO TO PC COMPONENTS . What do I need to build a pc? . Building a PC is just so fun as building Lego.However, you should know the bricks before building a beast. While the builds can be in various styles and usages,there are indispensable computer parts that come togeher to make a PC work. Come learn the basics of each parts. CPU CPU Cooler Motherboard Memory Graphics Card Hard Drive Power Supply Case Peripherals FREE EBOOK! Ever wanted to build your own PC? Grab offline copy to make your PC building easier! DOWNLOAD NOW! HOW TO BUILD A PC . Step-by-step build guide in 11 steps . Time to get your hands dirty! With hands-on PC building instruciton, even first-time builder can build up a great custom PC. Grab the screwdriver, keep your passion, and you are good to go! Step 0: Preparation Before start, some simple things to be prepared: A magnetic screwdriver. Zip ties /velcro strips and a pair of scissors. A clean non conductive surface to build your PC onto Take a deep breath, read the manuals first and you are good to go! Caution: Pins on the back of the motherboard are very fragile. Do not place your directly onto the surface to avoid pins from bending. Unlatch the lid of the CPU socket Line up the notch printed on the CPU with the guiding notches marked on the socket; carefully insert it inside the socket. Make sure the CPU is placed properly then resecure the lid and lock it onto the processor. Caution: Be careful with the CPU socket pins (or CPU pins), as it is made of gold, which is soft material. They are exceedingly fragile, any slight collision can bend the pins, which might cause functional errors. Pressing down on the lock/ejector tabs that are located at the ends of the memory sockets. Check the memory module installation order outlined in the motherboard manual, and make sure which the suggested matching memory slots to insert first. Push the modules down until you hear a “click” as the retention clips are pushed upwards and lock the module. Tips: The suggested sequence of which memory slots to be installed first may differ due to different motherboards. Take MSI motherboards as example, you are suggested to insert the memory kit into Dimm1 slot first. Move and fasten riser screws on the M.2 standoffs. Take your drive and gently insert it into the connector at a 45 degree angle. Push it down towards the standoff and secure it with the little screw. Tips: Some high-end motherboards come with special cooling solution for M.2, such as M.2 shield and M.2 FORZR. You can refer to motherboard manual for additional installation steps. Mount the back- plate onto the back of the motherboard. (If you have one) Apply a drop of thermal paste onto the surface of the processor. Connect CPU Fan Cable to CPU Fan Header on the motherboard. Lower the cooler vertically and place it onto the CPU. Secure it evenly tightening opposite screws progressively. Caution: Make sure you apply thermal paste with the right amount. Too little or too much will cause bad contact or get paste into the socket relatively.Make sure the screws are tightened properly, and the pressure applied at the corners is even to avoid CPU damage and cooling performance degradation. Install I/O shield onto the back of the case. Take your motherboard and gently lower it at a 45 degree angle into the case. Match the mounting holes on the motherboard with the stand-offs in the case. Secure the board with each of the supplied screws. Tips: Don’t leave out screws - a solid mount will be very helpful to secure the motherboard in place to avoid unsteady movement. Remove rear PCI-e bracket from the case. Unlock the PCI-e slot by pushing back the small plastic lock located at the rear of the slot. Hold the card with two hands, lower the graphics card into the case and install into the PCI-e slot of the motherboard. Secure the graphics card with the required screws to the back of the chassis. Caution: Some high-end cards are longer or use up even more PCI space. Make sure to check that beforehand to choose the appropriate case that could fit the graphics card. Connect one end of the SATA cable to the SATA ports on the motherboard, and the other end to the storage devices (2.5’’ inches / 3.5’’ inches) itself. Caution: Make sure you mount the hard drive tight to avoid damage. Mount the Power Supply (PSU) into the chassis and secure it with all the screws. Connect 24-pin power connector into the socket on the motherboard Connect 8-pin CPU power connector to motherboard. Connect 6+2 Pin PCI-E Cable to graphics card (it may vary by graphics card products) Clip in your SATA power connecter to hard drive Connect other Molex connectors(with 4 horizontal pins) to extra devices (e.g. DVD/CD Optical Drives). Tips: Choosing the appropriate wattage for a Power Supply is essential. You can use online PC build simulators such as PC Part Picker or MSI Power Supply Calculator tool to get an estimation of the power required by your build. Make sure to purchase a Power Supply with a little headroom to account for future upgrades. Connect Power switch / Reset switch / Power LED/ HDD(Hard Drive) LED Cable to motherboard JFP1 Pin header. Connect front USB cables to USB pin headers on the motherboard USB 3.0 / USB 2.0 Cable to USB 3.0 / USB 2.0 Pin Header. Front USB Type-C Cable to Front USBType-C Pin Header Connect the Audio(Speaker) Cable to the motherboard JAUD1 Pin header. Tips: Check the maximum amount of USB ports on the motherboard before purchasing a PC case. Make sure the case you want to purchase also support enough USB ports as the motherboard does. Use zip ties or velcro strips to secure the cables in tight bundles to the back of the case. Insert the OS device (CD / USB) Follow the OS installation steps Download the latest device driver from the website and Install. Tips: Check the maximum amount of USB ports on the motherboard before purchasing a PC case. Make sure the case you want to purchase also support enough USB ports as the motherboard does. HOW TO BUILD A BEST PC FOR MY NEED? The best part of building your own pc is to customize your rig that suits your need. Do you build a PC for intense gaming or for heavy multimedia production? Here are some tips you need to take into consideration when choosing your components. Gaming PC Customized PC Streaming PC Useful Tools to Plan Your PC Parts Plan your Build ListPCPartPicker Choose the Right PSUMSI Power Supply Calculator Plan your Build List:PCPartPicker Plan your Build List: PCPartPicker The most important part of building a PC, is not “building” itself, but planning your component list by your specific preference.After all, what really matters to your PC’s performance is the hardware that comes together.To help you tailor-make your own build list, we recommend you one helpful resource: https://pcpartpicker.com/ Choose The Parts PCPartPicker offers stunningly detailed product information of all components you need, including users review and where-to-buy link. By switching the website to different countries, the where-to-buy links will correspondingly link to local e-tailer site. Not only does it provide a wide selection of available products, but also give you a reference of price and place to purchase, which helps you save up lots of time and money. All you need to do is to enter https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ and you can choose your parts. Ready and Go When you finish creating your ideal build list, there are a few functions you can leverage: Save. Simply save the planned build list first if you haven’t yet decided to purchase your rig at the moment. Take your time to compare and consider. Share. You can share the build list with your friends or to the forum for more opinion on you PC build. Buy. An easy button for you to buy the product on the e-tailer sites with ease. Choose the Right PSU:MSI Power Supply Calculator Choose the Right PSU for you: MSI Power Supply Calculator One big question many builders encounter when buying components is that “How much wattage do I need in my PSU to make my PC work?” Don’t underestimate this issue, for buying a PSU with an unfitted wattage can affect the upgradibiliy of your PC in the future. If you buy PSU with insufficient power supply, it might not have enough output cables for other component such as GPU. Also, your computer may encounter hiccups and system crashes from time to time. For some cases, it may cause . MSI Power Supply Calculator(https://www.msi.com/power-supply-calculator )can help you with this problem. Check out here : https://www.msi.com/power-supply-calculator Fill in your configuration By filling in your pc configuration, MSI Power Supply Calculator(https://www.msi.com/power-supply-calculator ) will automatically calculate the wattage your PC needs to run the system stably. User can just buy the PSU accordingly. FAQ . Want to find quick answer? . When you start to understand how PC building work, there must be bunches of questions. You are not alone, we’ve listed some commonly asked questions and organized into several categories. Computer Hardware What is CPU? CPUs are the brains of computers, mainly responsible for interpreting computer instructions and processing the data in computer software. What is CPU Cooler? A CPU cooler is compiled of fans and heatsinks to keep the CPU running cool and prevent CPU from overheating which may cause the system to shut down in order to protect important component. What is Motherboard? The motherboard is a platform that holds all the components in a computer. It links various components of a computer as well as handle communication and transmission between these components. What is RAM? RAM is used to store data temporarily, increasing the speed at which the CPU can access data from the hard drive. Both memory capacity and frequency affect computer performance. What is Graphics Card? The graphics card takes data from the computer and outputs it as text, images and colors on a display monitor. What is the difference between HDD and SSD? HDD and SSD are both storage devices in the computer. Hard disk drive (HDD): Inexpensive and offers higher storage capacity, but relatively slow and large in size Solid state drive (SSD): Lower capacity, medium size, higher price but faster speed. What do I need to build a gaming computer? Here are the parts you will need to build a gaming computer: CPU Motherboard Graphics Card CPU cooler Memory Storage Devices (HHD or SSD) Power Supply Case Peripherals (Keyboard, Mouse, Headset) Monitor What's The Difference Between USB 3.1 Gen 1 And USB 3.1 Gen 2? The USB-IF organization announced that USB 3.0 connectors capable of 5Gbps (SuperSpeed) would now be classified as USB 3.1 Gen 1. While the new USB 3.1 connectors, capable of 10Gbps (SuperSpeed+) would now be classified as USB 3.1 Gen 2. For details, you can visit: https://www.msi.com/blog/usb-3-1-gen1-gen2-explained How much wattage do I need in my PSU to make my PC work? The wattage you need depends on your PC configuration, you can check https://www.msi.com/power-supply-calculator to estimate the wattage your PC need to pick the right PSU. How to choose a CPU cooler? When choosing a CPU cooler, take into account the following considerations: choose a CPU cooler with corresponding brackets that supports the socket on the motherboard. Each CPU cooler supports a different thermal design power (TDP), indicating the upper range of heat output that it can handle. More powerful CPUs need better coolers to ensure stable operation. Choose a cooler that fits your case. Powerful coolers often have large heat sinks, so it is important to choose a cooler that can fit into your case without obstructing other components. How-to PC Building Tech Support How to build a PC step by step? Here are the steps to build a PC: Step 0: Prepare screwdriver and Step 1: Install a CPU Step 2: Install memory (DIMM) Step 3: Install M.2 drive Step 4: Install CPU cooler Step 5: Install motherboard Step 6: Install graphics card Step 7: Install storage device Step 8: Install power supply unit Step 9: Front panel connection Step 10: Cable management Step 11: Install operating system and drive For detailed demonstration, you can visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCPIEYfN_hc How to Install/Change RAM? To Install RAM, you can follow the below steps: Press down on the ejector tabs that are located at the ends of the memory sockets. Check the memory module installation order outlined in the motherboard manual, and make sure which the suggested matching memory slots to insert first. Push the modules down until you hear a “click” as the retention clips are pushed upwards and lock the module. How to install RGB device? Check the definition of pin headers on the purchased RGB accessory and the motherboard (for example, 12V/5V) Plug the 4-pin (3-pin) RGB connector to the RGB header on the motherboard Plug the power connectors additionally when connecting an RGB accessory if necessary For fans, connect to the fan connectors on the motherboard For non-fan products, connect to the 4-pin connectors of the power supply For details, you can visit: https://www.msi.com/Landing/mystic-light-motherboard CPU CPUs are the brains of computers, mainly responsible for interpreting computer instructions and processing the data in computer software. There are two major CPU product series available in the market: Intel and AMD. The two manufacturers have their own advantages, but the important thing to note is that different motherboards have different corresponding CPU sockets.For example, the Intel X299 platform works only with Intel processors that use the LGA 2066 socket. In general, high-end CPUs have higher model numbers. Aside from price, the difference in performance is reflected in the number of cores, clock frequency, overclocking ability and cache size. Here is a list of the mainstream sockets and processors currently available on the market: Intel Intel main CPU series are as follows:. Celeron series: One of Intel's cheaper models, providing entry-level performance, suitable for budget PCs mainly used for watching videos, word processing and surfing the web. Pentium series: Offers higher performance than the Celeron, but weaker integrated graphics performance and smaller cache than the Core i series Core i series: The current mainstream CPU series on the market. Core i3: Does not support Turbo Boost, suitable for light gamers. Core i5: Supports Turbo Boost, suitable for mid- to high-end gaming. Core i7: Support Turbo Boost, with pricing depending on the number of cores. Suitable for hardcore gamers who want high quality graphics, or users who frequently run image or video editing software Xeon series: Normally used on workstations and servers, does not typically include integrated graphics. Here is a list of the mainstream sockets and processors currently available on the market: Processor Socket Compatible Motherboard (chipset) Core i9-79XX Core i7-78XX/77XX/76XX LGA 2066 X299 Series Chipset Core i7/i5/i3/Pentium/Celeron LGA 1151 300 series /200 Series /100 Series /C236/C232 Chipset Core i7/i5/i3/Pentium/Celeron/XEON 1200 V3 LGA 1150 B85/H81 Chipset XEON E3-12XX V5/ LGA 1151 C236/C232 Chipset AMD AMD main CPU series are as follows:. Threadripper series:It has the highest core counts of AMD series. Supports SenseMI technology. Suitable for gaming enthusiasts and serious content creators, such as 3D modelling, huge data processing, audio/animation production, etc. Ryzen Series: the most common series amongst AMD processor products, with a wide selection from entry level to high-end performance. Ryzen 7 : octa-core processor. Suitable for hardcore gamers or advanced users who need heavy multitasking workloads. Ryzen 5 : quad- or hexa-core processor with less performance compared to Ryzen 7, yet capable of intense tasks such as streaming and intense gaming at the same time. Ryzen 3 : 4-core processor with modest performance, suitable for users who use for casual gaming, simple office work or entertainment purposes. AMD Athlon/A-series: 2-core with integrated graphics, suitable for entry-level users, who doesn’t want to buy a discrete graphics card for watching videos, word processing and surfing the web. Processor Socket Compatible Motherboard / Chipset Ryzen Threadripper TR4 X399 Series chipset Ryzen 3 / Ryzen 5/ Ryzen 7 AM4 X470/X370/B450/B350/A320 Series chipset AMD A10/ A8/ A6/ A4 ; AMD Athlon X2/X4 (Kaveri / Godavari) Processors FM2+ A55/A58/A68H/A78/A88X Series chipset AMD Athlon II AMD FX-Series AMD Sempron AM3+ 760/970/990 Series chipset CPU Cooler CPUs produce a lot of heat. High temperatures can cause the system to shut down in order to protect important components, and may even cause permanent damage. Fans and heatsinks are therefore necessary in order to keep the CPU running cool. Except for some high-end CPUs, most boxed CPUs are bundled with a corresponding CPU cooler which can meet basic demands for heat dissipation.For better system performance, it is suggested to buy a better CPU cooler. The cooler can be classified in terms of heat dissipation medium into two types: liquid cooling and air cooling. Air coolers can be further classified into tower-style, downdraft and updraft coolers, depending on their appearance and airflow direction. Users should choose a cooler that fits their product and circumstances. Intel Stock Cooler Air-cooling AIO Liquid-cooling When choosing a CPU cooler, take into account the following considerations:. Coolers need to provide corresponding brackets, as bracket positioning may vary slightly depending on the socket on the motherboard. Each CPU cooler supports a different thermal design power (TDP), indicating the upper range of heat output that it can handle. More powerful CPUs need better coolers to ensure stable operation. Choose a cooler that fits your case. Powerful coolers often have large heat sinks, so it is important to choose a cooler that can fit into your case without obstructing other components. Motherboard The motherboard is a platform that holds all the parts and components in a computer. It links the various components of a computer, including expansion cards, hard drives, memory and peripherals such as keyboard and mouse, as well as handling communication and transmission between these devices. The following considerations should be taken into account when choosing a motherboard: Motherboard Dimensions ust like clothes, motherboards come in different sizes. Common sizes include: ATX(30.5cm x 24.4cm)、Micro-ATX(24.4 cm x 24.4 cm) and Mini-ITX(17 cm x 17 cm),three types of motherboard Dimension. Mini-ITX(17 cm x 17 cm) Micro-ATX(24.4 cm x 24.4 cm) ATX(30.5cm x 24.4cm) Chipsets Chipsets affect the motherboard's price, as well as its functions and specifications. For easy identification by users, chipsets from the same maker generally have model numbers that correlate with functionality. Here we will introduce chipsets from the two main makers, Intel and AMD. Intel. Users who have a high budget and want the very best can choose the Intel X299, which supports both processor and memory overclocking. If you want an unlocked K-series processor, that is, a processor with the -K suffix (e.g. the Intel® Core™ i7-7700K), you should choose the Z370 chipset, which supports overclocking in conjunction with -K CPUs. Users who do not need overclocking can choose from the H370, B360 and H310 chipsets, with B360 considered the best in terms of price-performance. AMD. Overclockers will need the X370 or B350 chipsets. The biggest difference between the two is that the X370 supports NVIDIA's SLI multi-GPU technology. If you do not need overclocking, we recommend the A320 chipset, or the B350 chipsets which supports more storage devices. Memory In simple terms, memory is used to store data temporarily, increasing the speed at which the CPU can access data from the hard drive. Both memory capacity and frequency affect computer performance. The higher the memory frequency, the faster it is. Having more memory means more space for temporary storage, and better performance as a result. DDR4 is the current mainstream, starting at DDR4-2133 for entry-level computers. Higher frequencies such as DDR4-2400 and DDR-3000 are typically targeted at hardcore gamers and overclockers. Graphics Card The graphics card takes data from the computer and outputs it as text, images and colors on a display monitor. At present, the two main graphics manufacturers are NVIDIA and AMD. NVIDIA is the choice of many gamers because it has better compatibility on the current market. Here are the mainstream products currently on the market. The higher the model number, the better the performance. NVIDIA: GTX 1080/1070/1060/1050/1030 AMD: RX 580/570/560/550/480/470/460 In addition to the above, be sure to note the amount of VRAM available on the graphics card, as it is another factor that can affect performance. Nvidia AMD Hard Drive The hard drive is the computer's storage device. NGenerally, a traditional hard disk drive (HDD) is used in conjunction with a solid state drive (SSD) to get the best of both worlds in capacity and performance, with the latter serving as the operating system's boot drive. SATA interface Traditional hard disk drive (HDD): Inexpensive and offers higher storage capacity (typically 1TB or 2TB), but relatively slow and large in size ASolid state drive (SSD): Lower capacity (typically 256GB or 240GB), medium size, price and performance M.2 interface SATA-based SSD: Lower capacity (typically 256GB or 240GB), medium size, price and performance PCI-E SSD: Lower capacity (typically 256GB)、smaller size、expensive but fast U.2 Interface PCI-E SSD: Lower capacity (typically 400GB), smaller size, expensive but fast Power Supply The power supply converts AC power into DC power for computer components. The following considerations should be taken into account when choosing a power supply: Wattage. 550W or higher is recommended when using a discrete graphics card 750W or higher is recommended when running two graphics cards, such as in SL Energy Efficiency. The 80 Plus certification program for power supply units offers 80 Plus, 80 Plus Bronze, 80 Plus Silver, 80 Plus Gold, 80 Plus Platinum and 80 Plus Titanium certification levels. The most efficient (and most expensive) Titanium tier offers more than 90% energy efficiency. Titanium Platium Gold Sliver Bronze white Power Supply Design. General Design Modular Design. Modular cables are typically found in high-end PSUs and makes it easier to organize cables. Case In addition to performance, component layout is also an important consideration when building a computer. Be sure to take into account the following when buying a computer case: Material. Most computer cases use SECC or SGCC galvanized steel. Steel cases are cheap and sturdy, but heavy. Aluminum-magnesium alloy cases are more expensive. Another option is a combination of materials (SECC or SGCC for the main body, aluminum-magnesium alloy for side panels). In recent years, some makers have even turned to materials such as glass and wood. Dimensions. ATX motherboards will only fit in ATX cases. Micro-ATX or Mini-ITX motherboards can fit in ATX cases, but Micro-ATX or Mini-ITX cases are recommended, respectively. Air flow design, tool-free installation and expandability. The amount of expansion room available is an important consideration if you plan to upgrade your system in the future, such as adding more hard drives or graphics cards. Upgrading your computer also means higher cooling requirements, another factor to consider Peripherals Keyboard The keyboard is mainly used for text input. Keyboards use the USB or PS/2 interface. USB keyboards are the norm, with only a few high-end or low-end products employing PS/2. The mechanism and actuation method on a keyboard determines its tactile response when typing. The two main switch types are membrane and mechanical. Mechanical keyboards are actuated by an independent physical switch. Different mechanical switches have different tactile responses; the main types are brown, blue, black and white. Membrane keyboards are cheaper and make up a majority of the market. One problem that membrane keyboards may encounter is registering simultaneous key presses, so competitive gamers may want to choose keyboards that support N-Key Rollover (NKRO). Mouse Mice are typically classified according to their method of connection - wired or wireless. They can also be classified according to their sensor type, depending on whether they employ optical or laser sensors. Wired mice typically connect via a USB port, while Bluetooth and 2.4GHz WIFI are the norm for wireless mice.For gaming, we recommend using a wired mouse to avoid wireless signal and battery life issues. DPI (Dots Per Inch) is another criterion to consider when buying a mouse. DPI indicates the number of steps - "dots" - that the mouse registers for every inch of movement. The higher the DPI, the more sensitive the mouse is, and the quicker the cursor can move on screen. A high DPI mouse does not ensure precision on its own - you need a high resolution display to make full use of it. The most sensitive mice available on the market come in at 8200 DPI, while typical mice are around 1200 DPI. Monitors Monitors can be classified as flat or curved according to their shape . When buying a monitor, pay attention to the panel type, brightness, contrast and refresh rate. At present, IPS panels are the most popular type. In addition to your personal needs, you should also take into account your graphics card when choosing a display. High-end gaming monitors may support NVIDIA G-Sync or AMD Freesync, both of which help reduce screen tearing.Monitors typically receive display output through D-Sub/DVI/HDMI interfaces. D-SUB DVI HDMI Gaming PC The big advantage that a gaming PC offers is a sense of immersion during intense gaming. They typically have more powerful display output and CPU, as well as better audio. Gaming PCs come in different tiers too, with configuration and budget determined by the game and the desired graphics quality. Here, we will teach you how to build your own gaming computer, through some tips, methods and websites. What should I know to build a gaming PC? What Type of Game Do You Play? . Each game has its own requirements. For example, MMORPGs place great importance on graphics and sound quality, while FPS games may be less demanding on those, but emphasize good connection quality. Before building a computer, visit the right websites to learn about your game's system requirements, in order to avoid spending too little or too much. Reference Link: http://gamesystemrequirements.com/ Choose the right graphics card. Games are increasingly demanding on performance, and graphics cards are more powerful than ever. Finding the right graphics card is the key to building a good gaming PC. There are two graphics card brands, Nvidia and AMD. We recommend that you pick your graphics card based on your game's recommended hardware requirements. The high FPS that players look for is mainly determined by the specifications of the graphics card. Therefore, you should choose your graphics card based on your game and the level of graphics quality that you want to see. Graphics cards of come in reference (official) and custom versions by brands such as MSI. The latter is often equipped with better cooling systems. Increase loading speed of games with a SSD. Loading times are an issue for many players. It is affected by network speed, as well as the time it takes to read the game from the hard disk. Therefore, another way to improve gaming performance is to use an SSD (Solid State Drive) or an M.2 / U.2 SSD device which supports read speeds at up to 32Gb/s. Buy a proper headset or speaker, or use gaming-grade professional audio software . Almost all gaming motherboards are built with middle- or high-level onboard audio chip. A quality headset or speaker can work well with the motherboard to achieve the expected sound effect. Good sound effect software can also improve the gaming experience. For example, MSI motherboards come with Nahimic 2 software. With high-quality immersive sound, thiwhich helps you track the position of other players through sound, a very useful tool to have. Improve game performance via overclocking . Overclocking technology has become increasingly mature, and some motherboard manufacturers even provide one-click overclocking, turning what used to be a complicated process into the simple matter of a single mouse click. MSI's Game Boost allows you to quickly setup overclocking in your BIOS and increase CPU/graphics performance anywhere from 15%-25% depending on your CPU. Pro Tips Choose the right motherboard . A good gaming motherboard not only supports further upgrades, but also provides low-latency voice communication for an enhanced gaming experience. The MSI official Best Of The Best webiste can help you find the best motherboard for gaming that perfectly suits your gaming requirement Reference Link: https://www.msi.com/Landing/2017-best-motherboard-for-gaming-pc-build How to customize a Unique PC? In addition to high performance, lots of PC users are also paying more attention to customizing their own PCs, from its appearance to its accessories.Want your very own personalized rig? A few simple steps are all you need to make your gaming computer truly unique. Ways to customize a PC Start with the color scheme . In recent years, various manufacturers have begun releasing products with special color schemes, such as MSI's all-white Arctic motherboard series, the all-black SLI PLUS series, and the silver Titanium series. As a starting point, getting matching components from the same series helps maintain consistent color throughout your rig. Add RGB Lighting . Nowadays, many computers are equipped with RGB lighting devices. You can add RGB lighting by installing a LED strip, or choosing components that come equipped with lighting. Proper mixing and matching is the key to getting good lighting effects. MSI's Mystic Light Sync allows you to connect and control RGB devices inside and outside the case, delivering a brand new visual experience through a variety of color and mode settings. While RGB lights typically run on 12V power, digital LEDs that run on 5V power are also available. Digital LEDs offer greater potential for customization by allowing the user to adjust lighting color on an individual basis.The user is free to configure lighting effects according to their own taste. Reference Link: https://www.msi.com/Landing/mystic-light-motherboard How to install RGB device . Check the definition of pin headers on the purchased RGB accessory and the motherboard (for example, 12V/5V) Plug the 4-pin (3-pin) RGB connector to the RGB header on the motherboard Plug the power connectors additionally when connecting an RGB accessory if necessary ØFor fans, connect to the fan connectors on the motherboard Ø For non-fan products, connect to the 4-pin connectors of the power supply Custom water cooling system . A custom water cooling solutions places higher demands on skill, but is a good way to set your rig apart from others. Custom water cooling solutions that employ pipe bending can avoid the tangle of pipes often found in AIO systems. Streaming PC Live streaming has become an indispensable form of new media in the Internet Age, enabling you to share your gaming skills and experiences with friends remotely. Building a streaming PC may sounds professional, but don't let it intimidate you. Here are some useful advice you should know before you starts. What should I know to build a streaming PC? Gameplay and Streaming Quality . Every game has its minimum and recommended hardware requirements. Based on your budget and your desired stream quality, you can choose the display quality of 720P or 1080P, as well as 30 or 60 FPS. In most cases, this will be influenced by your CPU/Memory/GPU. This is the most effective way to recommend computer hardware. Is your Internet fast enough? . A 20Mb/s connection is more than enough for most streaming purposes. With a stable signal, you can even get a smooth streaming experience just by tethering a connection through your phone. In most cases, network instability and poor streaming quality is the result of improper hardware or software settings, resulting in excessive network usage by other programs. We suggest to install a network manager or restricting bandwidth used by other applications to give preference to the game and live stream, thus delivering better streaming quality. Graphics cards vs. capture cards. First, let us understand why we need a capture card. If you just want to share your gameplay footage, without looking for top streaming quality and stability, a mid- to high-end PC should work just fine. What a capture card does is that it can help reduce graphic glitches, as well as reduce CPU usage during recording and streaming. It also allows the user to embed webcam footage and voice commentary in the live stream, while maintaining 1080P resolution during gaming. Therefore, capture cards are suitable for those who want to be professional streamers. If you just share your gameplay occasionally, a mid- to high-end graphics card will suffice. Choose a Quad-core or Higher CPU. A dual-core CPU is enough to handle most games, since gaming doesn't require multi-threaded processing. But as we Some good choices are Intel's i5/i7 series or AMD's Ryzen 5 series/ Ryzen 7 series Pro Tips Choose a 8GB or more memory. Twitch recommends at least 8GB DDR3 for live streaming. Choose your live streaming software . The two most popular streaming software are the easy-to-use XSplit Gamecaster, and the free software OBS. XSplit Gamecaster is recommended for those just starting out, while OBS offers options for advanced users who want to customize their streams. THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO PC BUILDING Get hands-on knowledge of PC building and learn how to build. Get Ebook now
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