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Keyword how to upgrade my laptop
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Result 2
TitleHow to upgrade a laptop | CHOICE
Urlhttps://www.choice.com.au/electronics-and-technology/computers/desktop-and-laptop-computers/articles/how-to-upgrade-an-old-notebook
DescriptionUpgrading your laptop hardware can be an affordable way to give it a power boost. We show you how to upgrade your RAM, storage and battery, as well as how to check whether those parts are accessible and replaceable on your laptop
Date
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H2Upgrading your laptop's hardware can be an affordable way to give your laptop a power boost.
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H3Can I upgrade my laptop?
What laptop parts can you upgrade?
Before you start: back up your storage drives
Upgrading your laptop's RAM
Upgrading your laptop's storage drive
Upgrading your laptop's battery
Why upgrade?
H2WithAnchorsUpgrading your laptop's hardware can be an affordable way to give your laptop a power boost.
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BodyDonate Log in Join CHOICE Toggle main navigation Top of the content JavaScript is disabledIf possible, please enable JavaScript for an enhanced experience on the CHOICE website. How to upgrade a laptop Upgrading your laptop's hardware can be an affordable way to give your laptop a power boost. . Alex Angove-Plumb Last updated: 15 April 2021 Upgrading a laptop is a simple way to improve its performance without breaking the bank. A few hundred dollars in hardware will be enough to give your Mac or PC a boost in power, buying you enough time until you can afford a brand new model – or it can eliminate the need for a new one altogether. On this page: Can I upgrade my laptop? What laptop parts can you upgrade? Upgrading your laptop's RAM Upgrading your laptop's storage drive Upgrading your laptop's battery Can I upgrade my laptop? The older your laptop, the more likely it is to have user-replaceable parts. Newer laptops tend to have parts that are glued or soldered in place and require special tools and professional expertise to repair or upgrade – in the long run it might be better value, effort and cost to buy something new. Increasingly often, a laptop's casing is one piece of metal or the parts are unreachable without damaging them, so upgrading is impossible.  Can I upgrade it myself? . A quick look at the underside will usually show if you can upgrade your laptop at home. Check for removable panels that could give you access to battery, RAM or storage. Next, search the internet for information on your specific laptop brand and model to find out what parts can be easily changed.  Often you can find a user manual online (if you've lost your original) and comments or even repair/upgrade videos by people like you who have already done something similar. These will help you find out if you need any special screwdrivers or tools (Philips, Torx or Pentalobe screwdrivers may be required). What laptop parts can you upgrade? The three areas that you can generally upgrade are: RAM Storage Battery Other laptop hardware such as the CPU (central processing unit) or GPU (graphics processing unit) – or integration of the two – generally can't be upgraded.  The same goes for data ports, such as upgrading a USB 3.0 port to a faster technology like Thunderbolt 3. Before you start: back up your storage drives. Of course, before pulling anything apart, make sure you have a full backup of the computer. A "clone" of your old hard drive will give you a quicker recovery of your operating system and programs if anything goes wrong. But there are other options. If you're replacing your laptop's internal hard drive with a smaller SSD (solid-state drive), you may need to archive some stuff first (such as music, movies and photos) to a different drive. Once you've cloned your operating system and programs to the new drive and it's working in the laptop, you can choose what data files and folders to restore. If you're new to backing up, check out our article on how to choose the best backup software. Upgrading your laptop's RAM. Usually, a laptop will only have one or two RAM slots available. Sometimes it has a spare RAM slot that isn't already occupied by anything. If this is the case, you can probably just buy new RAM and not remove the old. Make sure you check online and buy exactly the right RAM for your model. You may be limited in the capacity of the RAM module you can install. How much RAM do I need? If your laptop has 4GB or less RAM, upgrading to 8GB is a good idea. If you only have 2GB or less, you might get by with an upgrade to 4GB if your laptop is just for light use such as emails and word processing. You probably won't need beyond 8GB, as any programs which require that much RAM may also need a faster CPU (central processing unit) and GPU (graphics processing unit) than your old laptop has, and you can't upgrade these parts. What is RAM? Random access memory (RAM) is fast solid-state memory used for running programs. RAM only stores information temporarily, while the computer is powered on. It's one of the main reasons older computers struggle with new programs due to ever-increasing RAM demand. If your computer struggles when running several programs or multiple tabs in a web browser at once, you can probably do with more RAM. Upgrading your laptop's storage drive. Usually, the easiest way to improve a laptop's overall performance is to replace a hard drive with an SSD (solid-state drive), which is much faster. If you already have an SSD, you can still potentially get benefits from upgrading. Newer or more premium SSD options for your laptop might exist. If your SSD is small and regularly fills up, this will slow down performance. Storage drives work faster the more free space they have, so a bigger SSD might come with the benefit of faster speeds. What's the difference between a hard drive and an SSD? Hard drives are an older technology. They provide long-term high-capacity data storage, usually ranging from around 1TB to 2TB (terabytes) in laptops, and hold everything from the computer's operating system to music, photos and video files. They use a magnetic rotating disc mechanism and offer relatively cheap high-capacity storage. SSDs are many times faster than hard drives, but they cost quite a bit more per MB (megabyte). Usually, an SSD will have less capacity than the hard drive it replaces, but it's often worth downsizing your storage to boost your performance.  As well as being much faster, SSDs are lighter, use less power (giving longer battery life) and usually stay cooler than hard drives. In laptops, they're physically around the same size, so they can slot in as a direct replacement. They're also a little more durable, so any jolts or bumps to your laptop are less likely to damage them than a hard drive. What size SSD do I need? Just go for the largest SSD you can afford. A 256GB SSD sits in the sweet spot for a price-capacity trade-off if you stick mostly to productivity software and don't need media storage, though SSDs of up to 512GB could be affordable, depending on your needs. SSDs of up to 2TB or more are available, but the rapidly escalating cost of the higher capacity drives tends to be prohibitive for general use. Unless you save everything to the cloud, avoid 128GB drives. After accounting for your laptop's operating system, default programs, drivers and other background software, you'll have very little free space for personal use. Upgrading your laptop's battery. Batteries wear out. Replacing yours with a fresh one can give you much longer between charges, even though it will probably be the same model battery as your old one. But it won't boost performance, unless you regularly find your laptop in power-saving mode. Is your battery removable? With older laptops that have a removable battery, changing it is usually as easy as undoing the battery lock button/clip, removing the old one and slotting in a replacement. Unfortunately, many modern laptops aren't designed for this; you need to force or cut open the casing and some batteries are not user-replaceable at all. They may be hidden behind other parts or even glued in place. In that case it's time for a professional or a whole new laptop. Before you buy a new battery. Make sure the battery you're thinking of buying matches your computer product model exactly. Batteries are often designed to fit into a specific laptop – avoid getting one that doesn't fit. Check whether your laptop's RAM and storage can be upgraded (and if it's worthwhile) before forking out for a new battery. If they can't, consider how long you think you can keep using your laptop before it needs replacing. Why upgrade? Extra-long boot-ups, endless timeouts, slow saves and lengthy program launches mean your laptop has lost its vim and vigour. And the older it is, the slower it gets.  But just because your faithful old computer is constantly driving in the slow lane doesn't necessarily mean it's time for the off ramp to the e-waste bin. You could revitalise it with a few easy upgrades without breaking the bank. With the right information, tools and a little preparation, you could have your old laptop performing even better than new. We care about accuracy. See something that's not quite right in this article? Let us know or read more about fact-checking at CHOICE Join the conversation. To share your thoughts or ask a question, visit the CHOICE Community forum. Visit CHOICE Community
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TitleHow to Upgrade Your Laptop: A Part-by-Part Guide | PCMag
Urlhttps://www.pcmag.com/how-to/how-to-upgrade-your-laptop-a-part-by-part-guide
DescriptionAdding more memory or storage, or swapping in a new battery or wireless card, can help squeeze a few more years out of that aging laptop. Here's how to figure out what you can upgrade, and how to do it the right way
Date22 Sept 2021
Organic Position2
H1How to Upgrade Your Laptop: A Part-by-Part Guide
H2Can Upgrades Void Your Laptop Warranty?
So, What Exactly Can I Upgrade?
Getting Started (and the Tools You'll Need)
SO-DIMM, So Good: Upgrading Laptop Memory
Give Me Room: Upgrading Laptop Storage (SSDs and Hard Drives)
Can I Upgrade My Laptop's CPU or GPU? (Don't Get Your Hopes Up)
Back in Charge: Replacing the Battery Pack
Kick Up the Connectivity: Upgrading the Wi-Fi Card
Summing It Up: What Can I Upgrade?
H3PC Upgrade Tools to Consider..
Rosewill 32-Piece Precision Screwdriver with Bit Set RPCT-10001
Fellowes 55-piece Expanded Computer System Toolkit (49106)
Katzco Magnetic Mini Tray Holders - 4 Pack Multi Color - Use in Garage, Home, Construction - for Nuts, Bolts, Washers, Iron, Nails, Screws, Sockets, Bits, Etc. - 4 Inch Diameter x 1-1/4 Inch Depth
Top-Rated M.2 and 2.5-Inch SSDs We've Tested for Laptops..
Crucial P5 Review
Intel SSD 670p Review
Samsung SSD 980 Review
Samsung SSD 870 QVO Review
Recommended by Our Editors
Dig Deeper With Related Stories
PCMag Stories You’ll Like
About Charles Jefferies
H2WithAnchorsCan Upgrades Void Your Laptop Warranty?
So, What Exactly Can I Upgrade?
Getting Started (and the Tools You'll Need)
SO-DIMM, So Good: Upgrading Laptop Memory
Give Me Room: Upgrading Laptop Storage (SSDs and Hard Drives)
Can I Upgrade My Laptop's CPU or GPU? (Don't Get Your Hopes Up)
Back in Charge: Replacing the Battery Pack
Kick Up the Connectivity: Upgrading the Wi-Fi Card
Summing It Up: What Can I Upgrade?
BodyHow to Upgrade Your Laptop: A Part-by-Part Guide Adding more memory or storage, or swapping in a new battery or wireless card, can help squeeze a few more years out of that aging laptop. Here's how to figure out what you can upgrade, and how to do it the right way. By Charles Jefferies September 22, 2021 facebook twitter flipboard social share Flipboard Pinterest Reddit LinkedIn Email Copied Error! Copy Link https://www.pcmag.com/how-to/how-to-upgrade-your-laptop-a-part-by-part-guide Comments (Image: Shutterstock/Sensvector) Even if it's silver or blue on the outside, to most folks, a laptop PC looks like an impenetrable black box on the inside—you wouldn't dream of cracking it open. Some notebooks, indeed, do their best to keep you out. But if you can remove your laptop's bottom panel, chances are good that there's something inside—or maybe several somethings—that you can upgrade.Notebooks, of course, aren't nearly as flexible as your typical desktop PC when it comes to hardware swaps. But upgrading your laptop, within the confines of what it will allow, can be a great way to get more life out of it. Depending on the model, you might be able to add more system memory (RAM) to make it more responsive, upgrade the storage drive for a capacity and performance boost, or replace the battery to rejuvenate the charge-holding that the machine had when it was new. What you can actually do yourself varies from laptop model to laptop model, however. This guide helps you identify which laptop components you can (and can't) upgrade, and how to replace them. We'll even discuss items like the Wi-Fi radio and the graphics processor (GPU), and how to handle any warranty issues that might come up if you perform upgrades.Can Upgrades Void Your Laptop Warranty?First off: Let's discuss warranties before diving into upgrades. To cut to the chase, engaging in the process of upgrading or replacing parts in your laptop will not void its warranty in and of itself. The FTC has plainly stated that you can't void a warranty by breaking a seal, and more recently, the agency announced plans to crack down on companies that try to prevent their customers from repairing products.That's not a license, however, to dive in willy-nilly with screwdriver and pliers. The warranty won't cover damage that might occur from your upgrade efforts. If you don't feel confident you can do an upgrade on your own, seek a qualified repair shop or a computer-savvy friend or relative to do the job.So, What Exactly Can I Upgrade?This is a general guide for laptops produced from the early 2010s onward—that is, in the last decade. It won't cover every configuration, but it should get pretty close. You will definitely run across exceptions, though. Early Microsoft Surface Laptop models and their fabric-coated keyboard decks, for example, are largely glued together and near-impossible to open without damage. Or, a different limitation: Some Apple MacBooks use soldered-down instead of removable components. The bottom cover off, how it looks inside an older gaming laptop. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) That said, on average, the following components are usually upgradable in a typical business or consumer laptop:The main system memory (RAM).The primary storage, which may come in the form of an M.2 or mSATA solid-state drive or a 2.5-inch SSD or hard drive.The secondary storage, if present (typically a 2.5-inch hard drive, and only on larger models).The battery pack.The wireless/Bluetooth card.By contrast, the following parts are almost never upgradable:The processor (CPU)The graphics chip (GPU)Each component above has its own section in this guide, in which we'll explain how to identify whether it's upgradable in your laptop. This guide doesn't discuss laptop components that are often proprietary or too specific for us to offer general advice about, such as the display, the keyboard, and the touchpad. Replacing those is sometimes possible, depending on the model and availability of parts. But in almost all cases, they would fall under the category of a repair rather than an upgrade. (You'll typically be swapping a broken component for an identical working one.)Getting Started (and the Tools You'll Need). Ideally, you'll first want to find a service manual on your laptop manufacturer's support site that describes how to perform basic upgrades. If you can't, most notebooks are relatively simple to service. Popular models may have pro or amateur repair videos on YouTube, although you should consider the expertise of the video's poster before relying on one fully. (Also be sure your precise model is actually the one being upgraded!) As noted, any upgrade you perform is at your own risk, so we strongly suggest doing your research first and not skimping on your toolkit.Many laptops can be upgraded without tools other than a few Philips screwdrivers (having several on hand, with larger or smaller heads, is a good idea), or in some cases various sizes of star-head or Torx screwdriver. In the absence of a service manual to tell you the size(s) or types you need, flip your laptop over and see what fits. Most laptops will use same-size screws inside and out for simpler servicing, but not always. For laptop upgrades, a screwdriver kit like this Rosewill set (with a plethora of ordinary and Torx bits) will pay for itself many times over. Don't rush; never try to force a screw with a screwdriver that doesn't fit a screw head snugly. It's just too easy to strip or hollow out the head of a screw that way, which leaves you with a much bigger problem. This is the general process for getting to the guts of a laptop:Shut down, unplug the laptop, and close its lid. On a desk or other flat, sturdy surface, place the laptop upside-down on a towel or other soft cloth to avoid scratches (and catch stray screws).Undo the screws holding the laptop's bottom panel in place, and (gently!) remove the panel. A credit card or plastic trim tool can help separate the panel from the chassis if it's held in by clips or just being stubborn. Never force anything!Then set the bottom panel aside and segregate the screws you removed from the panel before proceeding. An HP laptop with its bottom panel removed: Easy access to the memory, SSD, battery, and wireless card. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) You might use small dishes or trays—one for exterior screws and one for interior screws—to hold screws after you take them out. (Note that some laptops use "captive" retainer screws, which will loosen but won't come out of the panel.) Screw lengths can vary, so pay close attention as you remove them; you don't want to return a screw that's too long into the wrong hole. (It either won't go all the way in or could even cause damage as it does.) We are partial to magnetic parts trays to keep screws separated yet secured. (You can find ones great for PC screws for just a few dollars from sellers as diverse as Micro Center and Harbor Freight.) Magnetic parts trays are invaluable for PC upgraders and builders. If you're dealing with a mix of screw lengths, though, a good alternative is taping them to a sheet of paper in the relative positions they came out of the laptop. (A rough sketch on the paper of the laptop's underside, and the position of the screw holes on it, will also help.) PC Upgrade Tools to Consider... Rosewill 32-Piece Precision Screwdriver with Bit Set RPCT-10001. $15.43 at Amazon See It Fellowes 55-piece Expanded Computer System Toolkit (49106). $45.35 at Amazon See It Katzco Magnetic Mini Tray Holders - 4 Pack Multi Color - Use in Garage, Home, Construction - for Nuts, Bolts, Washers, Iron, Nails, Screws, Sockets, Bits, Etc. - 4 Inch Diameter x 1-1/4 Inch Depth. $18.99 at Amazon See It Pro tip: Keep any and all parts you replace! Should you need to send in the laptop for warranty service, you should reinstall the original parts before doing so. The reason for this is simple: If the service department decides to replace parts or your entire laptop, the parts you changed won't disappear in the process. (If you decide to discard the parts anyway, do so properly; many electronics stores will recycle them at no charge.)Okay, your laptop is now open for business! Let's go through the individual components.SO-DIMM, So Good: Upgrading Laptop Memory. Increasing a computer's random-access memory (RAM) is one of the most common upgrades. Adding RAM almost always yields superior multitasking and improved responsiveness. Laptop makers are increasingly turning to soldered memory, however, especially on premium thin and light models, which makes memory upgrades impossible. How do you know if your laptop has soldered memory? Read its specifications—if the memory type starts with "LP," as in LPDDR3 or LPDDR4X, it's soldered in place, and you're out of luck.On the other hand, if your laptop has SO-DIMM slots, your memory can be upgraded. (SO-DIMMs are laptop-specific RAM modules, shorter than the classic DIMMs that work in traditional full-size desktops.) Your PC's specifications or service manual should list the number of memory slots (one or two is common), the memory type and speed (DDR4-2666, DDR4-3200, and so on), pin count (DDR4 will be 260-pin), and the maximum supported amount in gigabytes (GB). An app like HWiNFO64 can tell you all that, along with how much memory is installed currently; Crucial's System Scanner website is even simpler. You'll need to buy memory modules that exactly match the correct specifications. If the laptop has DDR4, you'll need DDR4, for example. A Crucial DDR4 SO-DIMM. Matching the laptop's recommended peak memory speed and not exceeding the per-slot capacity limit are both—wait for it!—crucial. Use these guidelines to plan your memory upgrade:Your usage determines how much memory you need. The bare minimum for a reasonably responsive Windows or macOS laptop is 8GB, though you'll want 16GB for much-improved multitasking. Some laptops support up to 32GB or 64GB (and some workstations 128GB) for extreme computing needs.Each SO-DIMM slot has a maximum per-module capacity. Don't exceed it. If you do, the module won't work. (For example, if each slot takes up to a 16GB SO-DIMM, don't try and install two 32GB SO-DIMMs.) Also, for best results, match the recommended memory speed. Matched pairs of SO-DIMMs are best.If your laptop has two SO-DIMM slots but only one is occupied, you can simply install another module in the other slot. It doesn't have to be the same capacity—for instance, you can install an 8GB module alongside a 4GB module to get 12GB total—but it should be of the same rated peak speed (such as DDR4-2666). If both slots are occupied and you intend to replace both modules, buy a paired memory kit with same-capacity, same-speed modules (such as a 16GB kit containing two 8GB sticks) for maximum performance and compatibility. Again, obey the peak per-module capacity and memory-speed recommendations from the laptop's maker. Stick to major memory brands that offer a lifetime warranty, such as Corsair, Crucial, and Kingston, to name a few. It's also smart to buy from an outlet that offers free, easy returns in the event the memory proves incompatible (which is rare but does occur). The surest bet is to buy RAM from your laptop maker or the store that sold you the machine, though those are also likely to be the most expensive options.The memory upgrade procedure varies from laptop to laptop; follow your service manual if you have it. Otherwise, here's the general process.First, locate the SO-DIMM slots on the motherboard. The laptop in the photo below has two slots, each with a memory module installed. One module is already released and ready for removal. Two SO-DIMM slots in a laptop. Notice the silver retaining clips holding the modules down. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) To remove an existing module, simultaneously push the retainer clips to either side with your thumbs. The module will pop up at an angle. Grasp its sides with thumb and forefinger and gently pull it out in the direction it's angled. It should come free with minimal effort.The new modules will go in the same way, inserted at an angle. The notch along the gold pins lining the bottom of the module only permits insertion one way. (Don't touch the gold pins, lest you transfer oils from your fingertips and impede performance.) Push the module firmly but gently into the slot until it stops (the gold pins should be just visible), then press the top of the module downward until the retainer clips hold it in place. Never force anything! Stop if the module isn't going in easily; there's only one correct way to insert it.After you reassemble your laptop, it may take a few extra seconds to boot up (and may beep in the process) as it recognizes the new RAM. Running a pre-boot memory test like Memtest86+ from a flash drive for several hours or overnight is a wise precaution to ensure the new memory is error-free. Windows 10 also has a built-in Windows Memory Diagnostic tool; search for "memory test" from the Start menu to locate it.Give Me Room: Upgrading Laptop Storage (SSDs and Hard Drives). After adding memory, increasing storage is the next most common laptop upgrade. A new storage drive can give you more capacity and performance for a more responsive system, especially if you're replacing an old hard drive with a more modern solid-state drive (SSD). Indeed, going from a hard drive to an SSD is an almost sure turbo boost.Storage drives used in laptops commonly come in one of four types:An M.2 SSD that goes into an M.2 slot (working over the PCI Express or SATA bus).A 2.5-inch hard drive or SSD (working over the SATA bus).An mSATA SSD that goes into a now-obsolete mSATA slot (working, as you might guess, over the SATA bus).A soldered-down SSD or eMMC memory (the latter usually found in the cheapest laptops, and neither being upgradable).The stick-of-gum-shaped M.2 format has been common in laptops since the late 2010s; the photo below shows an example. An M.2 solid-state drive. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) M.2 SSDs used in laptops come in sizes or lengths ranging from 42mm (M.2 Type-2242) to 80mm (M.2 Type-2280), the latter being the most common. The other still-used format is the 2.5-inch slab, used first for spinning hard drives and later for SSDs. A 2.5-inch solid-state drive with SATA connector. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) The 2.5-inch drive is largely going away in laptops, since hard drives are being phased out as boot drives and M.2 drives have become cheap enough (while taking up much less space in today's slim laptops). The other form factor we've mentioned, mSATA, was a precursor to M.2 that has not been used in new laptops for some years now, but still shows up in older laptops. (Replacements are still available if your system requires such a drive.)So which drive format does your laptop use? The service manual will tell you, or you can simply remove the bottom panel and take a peek. Note that the drive may be covered with a heatsink. If you can't readily see it, there's a possibility the drive may just be soldered-down chips you can't upgrade, but it could also be layered under other components. In some models, the motherboard and M.2 slot might be accessible only from beneath the keyboard, not the bottom panel, which is why looking for a service manual or model-specific video can save you some trouble. Note: An eMMC memory boot drive will never itself be upgradable, so there's no point in investigating further if you know that is what your laptop has.If your laptop uses an M.2 drive, verify whether the drive employs the older SATA bus or newer PCI Express bus, and buy an SSD of the same type. The replacement drive you buy will also need to be of the same physical length. (When in doubt, search for the drive's model number, which should be printed on it.) One wrinkle with modern M.2 SSDs using the PCI Express interface is that you'll want to know whether your laptop supports PCI Express 3.0 drives (very likely) or PCI Express 4.0 ones (much less likely). A 4.0 drive will work in a 3.0 laptop, but at slower speeds, and it's best to match types. (See much more on the topic in our roundups of the best overall M.2 SSDs and best PCI Express M.2 SSDs.) Top-Rated M.2 and 2.5-Inch SSDs We've Tested for Laptops... Crucial P5 Review. 4.5 Outstanding $57.99 at Amazon See It Intel SSD 670p Review. 4.5 Outstanding $243.62 at Amazon See It Samsung SSD 980 Review. 4.5 Outstanding $49.99 at Newegg See It Samsung SSD 870 QVO Review. 4.0 Excellent $199.99 at Amazon See It See all (4 items) Buyers of 2.5-inch and mSATA drives don't have to worry about interface or length, since those drives are one-size-and-one-interface (SATA) fits all. (For drive recommendations, see our guide to the best internal SSDs.) If you have a 2.5-inch hard drive in your laptop, you can replace it with a higher-capacity 2.5-inch hard drive or a 2.5-inch SSD. The latter should feel far snappier than a hard drive. The only fitment issue to check (generally a non-issue with newer laptops) is 2.5-inch drive thickness. Most recent laptops with a 2.5-inch bay should have a 7mm-high clearance inside the bay, and you should check that the 2.5-inch drive you are inserting is that height. Some older laptops may have a roomier 9.5mm-high bay, and you may want a 7mm-to-9.5mm plastic spacer to fill the extra room. This is a 7mm-thick 2.5-inch SATA SSD, with a plastic spacer attached for 9.5mm-high bays. Now, onto installation. Replacing your laptop's main storage drive means you'll need to back up its data and reinstall the operating system on the new drive, a job this guide won't cover. (Start here for some guidance if you want to copy the whole Windows installation to the new drive beforehand, not reinstall Windows; in addition, know that using a cloud storage service is often easiest for data backups before a reinstall.)We'll start with 2.5-inch drives (and get to M.2 and mSATA in a moment). These drives will sometimes be retained in a caddy, which connects at four corners of the drive. The caddy itself may be screwed into the laptop, in which case you'll need to undo those screws first. After you lift the caddy out, the old drive may still be tethered by its connector, so undo that next. Gently pulling while wiggling the connector from side to side should do the trick.The caddy itself may be attached to the drive via screws, as well, so undo those if present. Set the old drive aside. Then do everything in reverse to install the new drive. Start by attaching the caddy to the drive, then plugging in the connector and seating the caddy in the laptop chassis. If necessary, screw the caddy into the chassis.Installing an M.2 or mSATA drive is easier. After removing the retainer screw (potentially two for mSATA drives), lift the edge of the drive where the screw is located by a few millimeters—the official range is 5mm to 20mm—and gently pull the drive out in the direction it's angled. Removing an M.2 SSD: Pull it gently at an angle. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) When installing the new drive, insert it at the same angle (5mm to 20mm from horizontal) and gently push it in until the gold pins at the bottom disappear. (Avoid touching the pins.) Then press the tip of the drive downward until the retainer hole lines up with the screw hole, and replace the screw(s). That's it. Note: You'll need a fine-tipped Philips screwdriver for the M.2 screw. A magnetic-tipped one will help a lot with these notorious screws, which aren't much bigger than eyeglass screws and are super-easy to lose in a carpet or inside the guts of a laptop. Be warned, and be careful! Can I Upgrade My Laptop's CPU or GPU? (Don't Get Your Hopes Up). Unlike desktops, laptops since the early 2010s have mostly used soldered rather than socketed CPUs, making upgrades impossible. The only exceptions to this rule are the rare behemoth gaming rigs that use desktop processors, such as the Alienware Area-51m. Apart from them, laptop CPU upgrades are absolute non-starters.Don't believe us? Look up the CPU model and see what socket it uses. If it's a BGA socket, that means it's soldered and can't be upgraded. (See our guide to choosing a laptop processor.)As with CPUs, GPU upgrades are also a no-go in laptops, though not for entirely the same reasons. Most ordinary notebooks rely on graphics silicon that is integrated into the main processor, such as Intel's UHD Graphics or Iris Xe Graphics, or AMD's Radeon Graphics integrated solutions. Upgrading these chips is impossible since they're a permanent part of the processor and thus, the mainboard.Gaming laptops and mobile workstations that include a dedicated AMD or Nvidia GPU are also generally impossible to upgrade, since the GPU is almost always soldered to the motherboard. For the rare laptop that does have a modular GPU, changing it out for anything that differs from the original is a questionable prospect because of the potentially different heatsinks, chassis configurations, and/or power demands of other solutions that may have been offered for purchase at configuration time. This is true even for laptops that use Nvidia's supposedly modular MXM standard, which has disappeared from laptop design. MXM cards came in many formats and board layouts, compatibility wasn't guaranteed across brands, and the cards were prohibitively expensive. They were intended for laptop makers to design around and integrate, allowing for some modicum of configurability at time of sale, not for consumer upgrades, though you could occasionally find them on the gray market. Recommended by Our Editors. How to Choose the Best Laptop Processor in 2021 Help, My Laptop Battery Is Swollen! Now What? How to Choose the Right RAM for Your Desktop or Laptop PC in 2021 That said, you may still be able to give your laptop a GPU boost if it has a Thunderbolt 3 or Thunderbolt 4 port. These allow you to connect an external GPU (eGPU) like the Razer Core X Chroma (hit the link to understand what those enclosures can and can't do), into which you install a compatible PCI Express desktop graphics card of your choice.Back in Charge: Replacing the Battery Pack. Once upon a time, more laptops than not had removable batteries that could be swapped without tools. Only a few rugged laptops still do, but battery replacement is nonetheless possible and can extend the usable life of your laptop. Notebook batteries typically last for only a few hundred charge cycles before wearing out. If yours doesn't hold a charge for as long as it once did after trying our tips for increasing battery life, it might be time for a battery replacement. Ditto if your laptop doesn't charge when plugged in, and definitely if the battery is starting to swell.You'll want to try your best to source a genuine, i.e., original battery from your laptop manufacturer. Third-party batteries may not be designed to the same standards and may not offer the same capacity or potency as factory power packs. Paying a little extra for a genuine battery is worth the money.As for the replacement process, the batteries in most of today's laptops are sealed inside the chassis, which means getting to them requires removing the bottom access panel as described earlier. The battery should be easy to locate; it spans most of the chassis in the HP notebook in this photo. A laptop battery pack should be easy to spot once the bottom panel is off. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) Carefully note how the battery connects to the motherboard, typically through a single connector as you can see in the photo here. (Note the handy illustration on how to remove the cable. This can vary from laptop to laptop, but should give you the general idea.) Here's a closer look at the battery connector. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) In addition to removing the connector, you'll need to undo any screws that secure the battery before you can remove it. (Remember to isolate these screws from any others you may have installed, and tape them down to a sketch of the laptop interior if they differ in length or girth.) Other wires may also be routed around the battery; take care not to pull or stress them. They'll need to go back the way they were. Taking a before-and-after photo of the interior with your smartphone is never a bad idea.Installing the replacement battery is a reversal of the removal process. Route any wires around the battery, then put the new battery in place, screw it in, and plug in the connector. Again, never force anything.After you replace the bottom panel and plug in the laptop, its charging indicator should illuminate. You can start using the laptop immediately. To test the battery, allow it to charge fully, then use the laptop on battery power until it gives you a low-battery warning. Charge it again and verify that it reaches full capacity.Kick Up the Connectivity: Upgrading the Wi-Fi Card. If you're looking for a new wireless card to pair with your new Wi-Fi 6 router, you're in luck: Laptop Wi-Fi cards are more often than not modular (not soldered) and can thus be upgraded. The simplest way to identify yours is to refer to your laptop's service manual or locate the card under the system's bottom cover. The wireless card is usually easy to differentiate from others in your notebook since it will have at least one antenna lead; the card in the HP shown below has two. This M.2 Wi-Fi card has two antenna connectors. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) The main factor that affects which wireless card you can use in your laptop is the interface. Laptops produced from the early-to-mid-2010s typically used Half Mini PCIe, while those made after that likely follow the newer M.2 Type-2230 (Key E) standard. The two kinds are not interchangeable or cross-compatible. The slots are keyed differently and won't even accept a card of the other type.Barring a service manual to tell you about your wireless card slot, you can figure it out just by examining the card. The one shown above is identifiable as an M.2 2230 card by its single centered retainer screw. A Half Mini PCIe card, as shown below, has two retainer screw holes, one at either corner. This is a Half Mini PCIe Wi-Fi card, also with twin antenna connectors. (Photo: Charles Jefferies) The other factor affecting your wireless upgrade choice is the number of antennas in your laptop. Most notebooks have two, though even if your laptop has just a single antenna, you can still install a wireless card that has two leads. Granted, with just one antenna connected, you won't get the signal-strength benefits of paired antennas. On the other hand, if your laptop already has two antennas, don't buy a card with just one lead connector; you'll lose a degree of signal strength.Sourcing a wireless card is easy enough; just poke around Newegg or Amazon. One key thing to note, though: Unless your laptop specifically supports Intel Integrated Connectivity (CNVi), which moves much of the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth functionality into the processor itself, don't buy a wireless card with a CNVi label; it won't work.Ready for installation? For Windows laptops, uninstall the old wireless card first. Open Device Manager by searching for it in the Start menu. Expand the Network Adapters list, right-click your wireless card, and click Uninstall. Afterward, shut down your laptop. Right-clicking in Windows 10's Device Manager helps you uninstall the old card. Before installing the new card, note how the old card's antenna or antennas connect, as you'll need to reconnect them to the same spot(s) on the new card. Installing a single-antenna card into a laptop with one antenna leaves no guesswork; otherwise, snap a quick reference photo. For laptops with two antennas, one is the main and the other is the auxiliary. The main connects to the wireless card's No. 2 lead (it should be labeled as such) while the auxiliary connects to No. 1. Sometimes, the antennas themselves are color-coded (black for main, and white for auxiliary).To remove the old card, start by disconnecting the antenna lead(s). Grip the metal part right where it connects to the card and tug vertically; it should pop out. (Don't yank the cable itself.) Next, remove the retaining screw (possibly two, if it's a Half Mini PCIe card). Last, pull the card out of its slot by gripping it with thumb and forefinger and, ever so slightly, wiggling it free while pulling horizontally.To install the new card, insert it into the slot, then put the screws in place. Take care not to touch the gold pins along the bottom of the card. Finally, connect the antenna leads; press them down until they snap in. Stash or route the antenna cables as they were, so they don't get pinched when you replace the bottom panel.The laptop's operating system should recognize the new card when you reboot and install it automatically.Summing It Up: What Can I Upgrade?Despite the modern movement towards soldered components, most laptops are at least in part upgrade- and repair-friendly. Adding memory, a larger and faster storage drive, and a fresh battery can revitalize your laptop and give it several more years' lease on life. In our experience, the most immediately impactful upgrades are moving from a platter hard drive to an SSD of any type, followed by installing more memory.Processor and graphics upgrades are a no-go in 99.9% of cases, but if those components no longer meet your needs, it's probably time for a new laptop anyway. And with that, we wish you happy and successful upgrading! Drop your own upgrade tips and experiences in the comments below. Like What You're Reading? Sign up for Tips & Tricks newsletter for expert advice to get the most out of your technology. This newsletter may contain advertising, deals, or affiliate links. Subscribing to a newsletter indicates your consent to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe from the newsletters at any time. Thanks for signing up! Your subscription has been confirmed. Keep an eye on your inbox! Sign up for other newsletters Dig Deeper With Related Stories. How to Run Your Laptop With the Lid Closed By Whitson Gordon How to Increase Laptop Battery Life By Tom Brant The Best Ultraportable Laptops for 2022 By Matthew Buzzi The Best 17-Inch Laptops for 2022 By Eric Grevstad PCMag Stories You’ll Like. About Charles Jefferies. Charles Jefferies is a native of the Philadelphia area who has been reviewing laptops and related hardware since 2005. A graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology, he enjoys all aspects of consumer and business tech, especially PCs, tablets, and photography. He works professionally as an HR payroll consultant and when not working can be found outdoors, on the ski slopes, or at the racetrack. Read the latest from Charles Jefferies. How to Choose the Right Laptop Docking Station in 2021 How to Choose the Best Laptop Processor in 2021 What Is Ray Tracing? (And What It Means for PC Gaming) Does Your Gaming Laptop Need a High-Refresh-Rate Screen? How to Clean Your Laptop the Right Way More from Charles Jefferies
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TitleHow to Upgrade Your Laptop | HP® Tech Takes
Urlhttps://www.hp.com/us-en/shop/tech-takes/how-to-upgrade-your-laptop
DescriptionLearn the basics of how to Upgrade your Laptop on HP® Tech Takes. Exploring today's technology for tomorrow's possibilities
Date6 Jul 2018
Organic Position3
H1Before you go..
H2HP TECH TAKES /..
Can you upgrade a laptop processor?
Is your laptop too slow?
Start with upgrading your laptop’s RAM
Consider upgrading your laptop's hard drive
Move up to an upgraded operating system
Upgrade your graphics card
If you want to add a CD/DVD drive
How to upgrade your laptop for gaming
Summary
About the Author
Popular articles
Need help?
H3Back to Business sale
There are some ways that you can boost your gaming experience:
Popular HP Laptops
Related tags
Also visit
Article archives
H2WithAnchorsHP TECH TAKES /..
Can you upgrade a laptop processor?
Is your laptop too slow?
Start with upgrading your laptop’s RAM
Consider upgrading your laptop's hard drive
Move up to an upgraded operating system
Upgrade your graphics card
If you want to add a CD/DVD drive
How to upgrade your laptop for gaming
Summary
About the Author
Popular articles
Need help?
BodyBefore you go...Check out today's top dealsShop NowPlus, get free shipping and easy returns.HP TECH TAKES /...Exploring today's technology for tomorrow's possibilitiesSubscribeHomeCopied link! How to Upgrade Your Laptop Dan Marzullo|July 6, 2018Deciding whether to upgrade your laptop or simply buy a new one is a big decision. For most of us, a laptop is an essential tool - for work and for play - so things like speed and memory are a huge deal.While conventional wisdom may fall into the “buy a new one” camp, replacing some parts or making a few changes can save the DIY-er a lot of money or give you a few extra months while you wait for the best time to buy a new laptop.Whether you’re hoping for better graphics, more RAM, or faster processing power, here's what you need to know before you start upgrading your laptop:Upgrading can void your warrantyThis process isn’t for the impatientNot all components can be changed outSome upgrades could damage your laptopCan you upgrade a laptop processor?Let’s start with the big question. And while we hate to be the bearer of bad news, in most cases, you can’t upgrade your laptop processor. There are some laptops with interchangeable processors, but these machines are expensive and difficult to find.Most processors are soldered right into the motherboard, presenting a challenge to the typical user, as you’ll need to remove the CPU and swap it out for a new one. If the processor is changeable, then you’ll need to make sure it fits in the same socket and that the motherboard can interact with the new CPU once it’s installed.If you have an HP desktop computer, the product specification page will be able to tell you which processors are compatible with your existing network. While this doesn’t answer the laptop question, long story short, processing power is more or less locked in…permanently.Is your laptop too slow?If your laptop is moving more slowly than it used to, it may be a sign of normal wear and tear. However, there are a few things you can do to get your computer humming along more quickly, more like when you first pulled it out of the box.Start by checking how much free space you have on hand. For example, if your laptop’s hard drive is running low on storage, this can make opening programs or files an exercise in extreme patience.Or, the culprit could be a lack of RAM, which serves to support your software. While increasing RAM won’t solve all of your speed problems, it can offload some of the pressure on your CPU, making for faster processing.Start with upgrading your laptop’s RAM. Most laptops allow the user to upgrade their RAM or memory by adding a stick to a compartment in the computer. Generally, you must purchase new memory for your computer from an authorized dealer or directly from the PC manufacturer. In some cases, third-party manufacturers make compatible memory sticks that work with a variety of notebooks.At HP®, most of our laptops have been designed so the user can open the unit with a Phillips screwdriver and add new or upgrade computer memory with relative ease. Other computers have soldered the device shut making it impossible for users to upgrade memory.We've put together a guide to installing RAM into an HP laptop, but we strongly advise double- and even triple-checking before committing to a specific unit.Consider upgrading your laptop's hard drive. Most manufacturers allow for the existing hard drive to be replaced with one that has more storage. How much you end up spending on this depends on how much room you'll need.A 480GB SSD can approach $400 or $500 rather quickly, while a 1TB standard hard drive can cost just $50 or $100. With laptops that make it easy to replace the hard drive, you'll usually be able to find a compartment that houses the hard drive.An external hard drive is an attractive solution for many users because you can simply plug it into the USB port to get started. Plus, you’re able to keep using it when you do end up buying a new laptop.Move up to an upgraded operating system. In most cases, you don't need to buy a whole new laptop to get the latest operating system. Yes, more modern laptops come equipped with newer OS, but you can generally install the updated system with minimal effort on your end.For example, if your laptop is still running on Windows 8 and you want Windows 10, you'll need to erase Windows 8 from your hard drive and download the newer version. If you've got the space, confirm the download. In some cases, you might not have enough RAM to support the update.If you need more RAM, you should be able to replace it, no problem. But, if you're downloading the new OS in hopes of faster processing speed, you may want to consider purchasing a new laptop with a faster CPU.Upgrade your graphics card. A lot of people want to know how to upgrade the laptop graphics card (GPU), typically within the context of gaming. Like your CPU, your GPU is generally soldered into the motherboard, making it difficult to change. Interestingly, there is a way to upgrade your graphics capabilities: buy an external unit that connects to your USB port. You’ll get improved graphics output that provides the ability for a second display to complement your laptop screen.If you want to add a CD/DVD drive. Thanks to streaming, discs aren’t as popular as they were in the past, so most newer laptops don’t come with a built-in disc drive.Fortunately, if you’d like to play a favorite game from a few years back or watch a DVD every now and again, you can buy an external optical drive. It’s one of the easier upgrades you can make, because all you need to do is plug in the drive via USB, and you’re ready to go.How to upgrade your laptop for gaming. In most cases, it’s not possible to upgrade your laptop’s graphics card for a better gaming experience. As we mentioned earlier, the bulk of modern laptops come with an integrated graphics card that’s soldered into the motherboard, allowing for minimal customization.There are some ways that you can boost your gaming experience:. Physically clean your laptop: Dust and dirt can harm performance by reducing airflow, causing your computer to overheat.Defragment hard drive: While Windows automatically defrags your files, you may want to manually check your defrag status as well.Make sure DirectX is up to date: Check which version you’re using by typing “dxdiag” into the menu. From there, run a Windows update to potentially get more performance out of your gaming-related hardware.Overclock your graphics card: There are tools that can help you push your graphics card to the limit by increasing your GPU’s voltage and clock frequency. The tool comes with a hardware monitor so can monitor system stability. You must proceed with caution here. Overclocking increases the risk your computer will overheat and shut down and let’s face it, that doesn’t exactly make for the most enjoyable gaming experience. It may also void your manufacturer's warranty so proceed with caution.Summary. Upgrading your laptop isn’t always the easiest route to a better computing experience, but as we’ve outlined here, most of these tips are easy to implement on your own.If you’re looking for a computer that can be customized, especially when it comes to gaming, your best bet may be a desktop. But if you simply need more RAM or space for your files, there are simple ways to make that happen with your laptop.About the Author. Dan Marzullo is a contributing writer for HP® Tech Takes. Dan produces strategic marketing content for startups, digital agencies, and established brands. His work can be found in Forbes, Entrepreneur Magazine, YFS Magazine, and many other media outlets.Popular HP Laptops. SubscribeRelated tags. computer componentscomputer cpucomputer gpucomputer memorycomputer processorscomputer ramgraphics cardslaptopsoverclockingpc upgradesolid state drivesssdupgrade laptopsPopular articles. 10 Best Minecraft Seeds for 2021How to Screenshot on HP Laptop or Desktop ComputersHow to Enter BIOS Setup on Windows PCsHow Do I Fix a Laptop that Won’t Turn On?3 Different Ways to Charge a Laptop without a ChargerHow to Boot from a USB Drive on Windows 10 PCs7 Ways to Improve Your Computer Performance10 Best Minecraft Shaders for 2021How to Turn Keyboard Lighting On / OffLag! Top 5 Reasons your Ping is so HighAlso visit. Article archives. 2021 Articles >2020 Articles >2019 Articles >2018 Articles >LaptopsHP Fraud Alert17 i7 Laptop Deals17 Inch Laptop17 Inch Laptop DealsTouch Screen Laptop 17 Inch1TB Gaming Laptop1TB Laptop Sale1TB Touchscreen LaptopLaptops With 1TB Hard Drive256GB SSD Laptop2GB RAM Laptop2-in-1 16GB RAM2-in-1 Laptop 8GB RAM1TB 32GB SSD32GB RAM Gaming32GB Laptop Deals4GB RAM Laptop500GB Laptop512GB SSD LaptopDisclosure: Our site may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.Shipping InformationOrder TrackingReturns InformationCancellation PolicyMy HP RewardsNeed help?Contact us nowChat with a sales repSend us an emailMore about these productsDisclaimerPrices, specifications, availability and terms of offers may change without notice. Price protection, price matching or price guarantees do not apply to Intra-day, Daily Deals or limited-time promotions. Quantity limits may apply to orders, including orders for discounted and promotional items. Despite our best efforts, a small number of items may contain pricing, typography, or photography errors. Correct prices and promotions are validated at the time your order is placed. These terms apply only to products sold by HP.com; reseller offers may vary. Items sold by HP.com are not for immediate resale. Orders that do not comply with HP.com terms, conditions, and limitations may be cancelled. Contract and volume customers not eligible.HP’s MSRP is subject to discount. HP’s MSRP price is shown as either a stand-alone price or as a strike-through price with a discounted or promotional price also listed. 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For more information about Microsoft’s support, please see Microsoft’s Support Lifecycle FAQ at https://support.microsoft.com/lifecycleUltrabook, Celeron, Celeron Inside, Core Inside, Intel, Intel Logo, Intel Atom, Intel Atom Inside, Intel Core, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Intel vPro, Itanium, Itanium Inside, Pentium, Pentium Inside, vPro Inside, Xeon, Xeon Phi, Xeon Inside, and Intel Optane are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.In-home warranty is available only on select customizable HP desktop PCs. Need for in-home service is determined by HP support representative. Customer may be required to run system self-test programs or correct reported faults by following advice given over phone. On-site services provided only if issue can't be corrected remotely. 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Title6 Ways to Upgrade a Laptop - wikiHow
Urlhttps://www.wikihow.com/Upgrade-a-Laptop
DescriptionDue to their compact size, laptop computers are far less modifiable than desktop computers. Typically, there are three things you can upgrade on a laptop: the RAM memory, the hard drive, and the video/sound cards. This articles describes..
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Method 1 Method 1 of 6:Getting the Laptop Memory Specifications
Method 2 Method 2 of 6:Upgrading Your Laptop's RAM Memory
Method 3 Method 3 of 6:Getting the Laptop Hard Drive Specifications
Method 4 Method 4 of 6:Upgrading Your Laptop's Hard Drive
Method 5 Method 5 of 6:Getting the Laptop Video and Sound Card Specifications
Method 6 Method 6 of 6:Upgrading Your Laptop's Video or Sound Card
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BodyHow to Upgrade a Laptop Download Article Explore this Article methods 1 Getting the Laptop Memory Specifications 2 Upgrading Your Laptop's RAM Memory 3 Getting the Laptop Hard Drive Specifications 4 Upgrading Your Laptop's Hard Drive 5 Getting the Laptop Video and Sound Card Specifications 6 Upgrading Your Laptop's Video or Sound Card + Show 3 more... - Show less... Other Sections Expert Q&A Video Tips and Warnings Things You'll Need Related Articles References Article Summary Co-authored by Matt Ham Last Updated: August 10, 2021 References Download Article X This article was co-authored by Matt Ham. Matt Ham is a Computer Repair Specialist and the CEO and President of Computer Repair Doctor. With over a decade of experience, Matt specializes in Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Smartphone repairs and upgrades. Matt holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University. Matt has expanded Computer Repair Doctor to seven different locations. He is also a Co-Owner of Repair Life, a full-scale marketing agency specializing in driving both online and offline leads to cell phone and computer repair shops and device retailers. There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 314,381 times. Due to their compact size, laptop computers are far less modifiable than desktop computers. Typically, there are three things you can upgrade on a laptop: the RAM memory, the hard drive, and the video/sound cards. This articles describes the general steps you'll need to take to upgrade a laptop, but if you get stuck, you'll want to check with your computer manufacturer's documentation. Steps . Method 1 Method 1 of 6:Getting the Laptop Memory Specifications . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/e6\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-1-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-1-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/e\/e6\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-1-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-1-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Look for your laptop's make and model number. Laptops will often have the manufacturer, make, and model number printed on the laptop itself. The make and model number is often printed on the bottom of the laptop, but is sometimes also printed above the keyboard on the inside of the laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/22\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-2-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-2-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/22\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-2-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-2-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Find the laptop's manual. In a search engine, type the manufacturer, make, and model number of your laptop, and then type manual. Among the search results, you'll find a link to the manual itself or to a page on the laptop manufacturer's website where you can download the manual or maintenance guide. You can also go directly to the manufacturer's website to get your laptop's manual or maintenance guide. If it's available, download the laptop's service and maintenance guide, because it will have detailed information about the specific hardware you can use to upgrade your laptop. Advertisement {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/97\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-3-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-3-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/97\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-3-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-3-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Determine how much memory your Windows Vista or Windows 7 laptop is using. Click the Start menu, right-click Computer, and then click Properties. In the System section, Installed memory (RAM) shows how much memory you have installed.[1] X Research source {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/14\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-4-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-4-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/14\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-4-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-4-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 Determine how much memory your Windows 8 laptop is using. On the desktop, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties. In the System section, Installed memory (RAM) shows how much memory you have installed.[2] X Research source {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/70\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-5-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-5-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/70\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-5-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-5-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 Determine how much memory your Mac laptop is using. Click the Apple menu, and then click About This Mac. In the About This Mac window, Memory shows how much RAM you have installed. For more information, click More Info, and then click the Memory tab. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/0f\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-6-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-6-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/0f\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-6-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-6-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 6 Determine if you have the maximum RAM or not. In the laptop manual you downloaded, check the system specifications to see if you're already using the maximum RAM or not. Advertisement Method 2 Method 2 of 6:Upgrading Your Laptop's RAM Memory . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/71\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-7-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-7-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/71\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-7-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-7-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Determine the kind of RAM your laptop uses. In the laptop manual you downloaded, look for the section on memory modules. If you can't find the information in the laptop manual, there are tools online that will show you the correct RAM for a specific make and model of laptop. Click here for an example of one of these tools. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/bf\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-8-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-8-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/bf\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-8-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-8-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Buy the RAM you need. You can buy the RAM you need in many different places. Once you've identified the specific type of RAM you want to buy, in a search engine, type the specific RAM type, and then choose an online store where you'd like to purchase the RAM. If you're using more than one RAM memory module, you need to make sure that they're each the same size. For example, you can't use a 2 GB RAM module with a 4 GB RAM module. They'll both need to be 2 GB, for example. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/89\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-9-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-9-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/89\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-9-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-9-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Before opening the computer or handling the RAM, ground yourself. Static electricity can destroy computer components. The simplest way to do this is to touch a piece of metal before handling computer components, but there are methods you can use too.[3] X Research source {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/d0\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-10-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-10-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/d\/d0\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-10-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-10-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 Use a screwdriver to open the RAM memory access panel. On many laptops, this panel is on the bottom of the laptop case and secured with one or more screws. Your laptop maintenance guide will have very specific instructions on how to do this. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/a\/a9\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-11-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-11-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/a\/a9\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-11-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-11-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 If you're replacing your old RAM completely, remove the old RAM memory. If you're adding RAM to an empty memory slot, you won't need to remove the old RAM first. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/89\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-12-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-12-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/89\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-12-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-12-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 6 Install the new RAM memory. Push the RAM gently, but firmly, into place Do not force the RAM if it isn't going easily. Do not do touch the RAM chips—hold the RAM only on the edges of the module. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/e3\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-13-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-13-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/e\/e3\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-13-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-13-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 7 Use the screwdriver to close the the access panel. Advertisement Method 3 Method 3 of 6:Getting the Laptop Hard Drive Specifications . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/8f\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-14-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-14-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/8f\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-14-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-14-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Look for your laptop's make and model number. Laptops will often have the manufacturer, make, and model number printed on the laptop itself. The make and model number is often printed on the bottom of the laptop, but is sometimes also printed above the keyboard on the inside of the laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/55\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-15-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-15-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/55\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-15-Version-3.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-15-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Find the laptop's manual. In a search engine, type the manufacturer, make, and model number of your laptop, and then type manual. Among the search results, you'll find a link to the manual itself or to a page on the laptop manufacturer's website where you can download the manual or maintenance guide. You can also go directly to the manufacturer's website to get your laptop's manual or maintenance guide. If it's available, download the laptop's service and maintenance guide, because it will have detailed information about the specific hardware you can use to upgrade your laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/b4\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-16-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-16-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/b4\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-16-Version-2.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-16-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Find out what hard drives are compatible with your laptop. In the user manual or maintenance guide, determine the hard drive models that are compatible with your laptop. In a search engine, search for the specific models of hard drives that are compatible with your laptop. If the hard drive isn't the right physical size, it won't fit in your laptop. Advertisement Method 4 Method 4 of 6:Upgrading Your Laptop's Hard Drive . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/44\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-17.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-17.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/44\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-17.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-17.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Plugin the laptop with its power cord and turn it on. Backing up a hard drive can take more time than a laptop battery has charge. If you plug it in, you won't need to worry about how much battery life you have. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/fb\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-18.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-18.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/fb\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-18.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-18.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Backup your laptop's hard drive. Before installing your new hard drive, copy the contents of your laptop's current hard drive to the new one. This will save some time, because you won't have to reinstall all of your applications. On Windows 8, System Image Backup is the program you can use to backup your hard drive. On Windows 7 and earlier, it's called Backup and Restore.[4] X Research source On Mac OS X 10.5 or newer, you can use Time Machine to back up your hard drive. You can also use the Disk Utility to back up your hard drive to CD or DVD. If you want to start fresh with your new hard drive, don't backup to the new hard drive. Install your operating system, and then install and copy over any files that you need. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/ba\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-19.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-19.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/ba\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-19.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-19.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Connect the new hard drive to your laptop's USB port. You will need a SATA-to-USB adapter to connect the two hard drives. You can also put the new hard drive into an external hard drive case which will have a USB connection. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/10\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-20.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-20.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/10\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-20.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-20.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 Install the cloning software on the old hard drive. Some hard drive manufacturers include their own cloning software, which may already be on your computer. You can also use a third-party application. Clonezilla is a multi-platform, free, open source disk cloning utility.[5] X Research source There is a large number of cloning software for all of the major operating systems.[6] X Research source {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/a\/a9\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-21.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-21.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/a\/a9\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-21.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-21.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 Clone the old hard drive onto the new hard drive. Before cloning the hard drive, be sure to read the help files to make sure you understand the process. The cloning software will check to make sure the new hard drive is large enough to clone the old hard drive to it. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/31\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-22.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-22.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/31\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-22.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-22.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 6 After the cloning is finished, shut down the laptop and unplug it. Be sure to unplug and turn off the new hard drive too. Wait at least one minute for the electricity in the laptop to dissipate before continuing. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/13\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-23.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-23.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/13\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-23.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-23.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 7 Remove the laptop's battery. If the battery is in the laptop, it can give you an electric shock. You may also need to remove it to reach the laptop's hard drive. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/46\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-24.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-24.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/46\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-24.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-24.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 8 Take out the old hard drive. As noted above, you may be able to reach the hard drive through the battery compartment. On other laptops, you may have to take off the entire outer case or detach the keyboard. A few laptops offer direct access to the hard drive through an access panel on the bottom. If you're not sure how to get to the hard drive for you laptop, refer to the user manual or maintenance guide for your laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f4\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-25.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-25.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f4\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-25.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-25.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 9 Install the new hard drive. Put the new hard drive in, but do not force it. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/15\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-26.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-26.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/15\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-26.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-26.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 10 Reassemble the laptop and boot it up. If you're starting up with a blank hard drive, you'll need to reinstall your operating system. Advertisement Method 5 Method 5 of 6:Getting the Laptop Video and Sound Card Specifications . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/64\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-27.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-27.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/64\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-27.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-27.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Look for your laptop's make and model number. Laptop's will often have the manufacturer, make, and model number printed on the laptop itself. The make and model number is often printed on the bottom of the laptop, but is sometimes also printed above the keyboard on the inside of the laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/21\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-28.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-28.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/21\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-28.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-28.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Find the laptop's manual. In a search engine, type the manufacturer, make, and model number of your laptop, and then type manual. Among the search results, you'll find a link to the manual itself or to a page on the laptop manufacturer's website where you can download the manual or maintenance guide. You can also go directly to the manufacturer's website to get your laptop's manual or maintenance guide. If it's available, download the laptop's service and maintenance guide, because it will have detailed information about the specific hardware you can use to upgrade your laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/98\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-29.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-29.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/98\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-29.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-29.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Find out what video and sound cards are compatible with your laptop. In the user manual or maintenance guide, determine the video and sound cards that are compatible with your laptop. In some cases, you won't be able to upgrade your video or sound card. The user manual will have that information. In a search engine, search for the specific video or sound cards that are compatible with your laptop. Advertisement Method 6 Method 6 of 6:Upgrading Your Laptop's Video or Sound Card . {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/b6\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-30.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-30.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/b6\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-30.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-30.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 1 Before starting, unplug the laptop and remove its battery. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/00\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-31.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-31.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/00\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-31.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-31.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 2 Consult your laptop's maintenance guide. Due to the wide variety of laptop models, the process for getting access to the video or sound card can be quite different. Your laptop's maintenance guide will have detailed instructions on how to do this. For some high-end laptops, removing a panel on the bottom will provide access to the graphics card. For the rest, you'll need to follow the remaining steps to get to the graphics card slot. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/37\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-32.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-32.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/37\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-32.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-32.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 3 Detach the laptop's keyboard. For many laptops you can get access to the video and sound card by removing the keyboard.This means removing the screws from under the hinge cover, then lifting out the keyboard and unplugging its connectors. In order to keep track of the different screws, use clear adhesive tape to tape related screws to a piece of paper or cardboard, and then label them. Some laptops secure the keyboard with latches that let you detach the keyboard without having to unscrew it. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/6e\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-33.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-33.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/6e\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-33.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-33.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 4 If necessary, remove the screen apparatus. For some laptops, you'll need to remove the laptop screen in order to get access to the video and sound card cables. Take out the screws that hold the display assembly in place, and then unplug the video and wireless antenna cables. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/4f\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-34.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-34.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/4f\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-34.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-34.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 5 If necessary, remove the CD/DVD drive. On most laptops, this means pushing in the release latch and sliding out the drive bay. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/56\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-35.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-35.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/56\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-35.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-35.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 6 If necessary, remove the laptop's upper shell. Take out the screws that hold it to the base of the laptop. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/ff\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-36.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-36.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/ff\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-36.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-36.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 7 Remove the old graphics card. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/ec\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-37.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-37.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/e\/ec\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-37.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-37.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 8 Install the new graphics card in its slot. Push the card in straight, but firmly. Do not force it. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/90\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-38.jpg\/v4-460px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-38.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/90\/Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-38.jpg\/aid1161557-v4-728px-Upgrade-a-Laptop-Step-38.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"License: Fair Use<\/a> (screenshot)\n<\/p><\/div>"} 9 Reassemble the laptop. Reverse the steps you followed to install the new card in order to reassemble the laptop. Advertisement Community Q&A . Search Add New Question Question Is it worth buying parts to upgrade a laptop? Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Matt Ham is a Computer Repair Specialist and the CEO and President of Computer Repair Doctor. With over a decade of experience, Matt specializes in Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Smartphone repairs and upgrades. Matt holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University. Matt has expanded Computer Repair Doctor to seven different locations. He is also a Co-Owner of Repair Life, a full-scale marketing agency specializing in driving both online and offline leads to cell phone and computer repair shops and device retailers. Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Expert Answer It depends on how much money you have and how old your laptop is. If it's only a year or two old, it's probably worth upgrading some of the components if you want to improve the speed. If you've got a dinosaur on your hands though, it may be worth just replacing it. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 1 Question If I could replace one component, what should it be? Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Matt Ham is a Computer Repair Specialist and the CEO and President of Computer Repair Doctor. With over a decade of experience, Matt specializes in Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Smartphone repairs and upgrades. Matt holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University. Matt has expanded Computer Repair Doctor to seven different locations. He is also a Co-Owner of Repair Life, a full-scale marketing agency specializing in driving both online and offline leads to cell phone and computer repair shops and device retailers. Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Expert Answer If you don't have a solid-state hard drive, that's probably the best choice. Switching from an old school hard drive to a solid state hard drive is like moving from a golf cart to a race car. If you've already got a solid-state drive, I'd probably look at upgrading your RAM. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 2 Question How can I keep my computer from slowing down without buying new pieces? Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Matt Ham is a Computer Repair Specialist and the CEO and President of Computer Repair Doctor. With over a decade of experience, Matt specializes in Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Smartphone repairs and upgrades. Matt holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University. Matt has expanded Computer Repair Doctor to seven different locations. He is also a Co-Owner of Repair Life, a full-scale marketing agency specializing in driving both online and offline leads to cell phone and computer repair shops and device retailers. Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Expert Answer Reinstall your operating system every 18 months or so. A lot of people don't do this, and it's a great way to keep your computer from getting clogged up with junk and old files. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 2 Question How can you update your graphics card in a laptop? Community Answer Getting the right drivers and making sure the computer runs as smooth as possible can help. Or maybe make sure it's cool enough for your laptop. Updating would only work if your laptop is able to get updated that way. Normally laptops don't come with cards you can put in or take out. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 15 Question How do I upgrade to iOS 9 on my HP 15.6 laptop? Community Answer You can't. It uses a Windows operating system, and Windows doesn't support iOS. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 9 Helpful 10 Question How do I upgrade to Windows 10? Community Answer Purchase Windows 10 and follow the installation instructions. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 4 Helpful 4 Question Can a laptop be changed from Windows 7 to Windows 10 through the internet? Community Answer You cannot upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10 via internet. You must download the Windows 10 file from Microsoft and install that to your computer. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 15 Helpful 4 Question Can I add a Bose speaker to my laptop? Community Answer Yes. Just follow the instruction manual that came with the speaker. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 2 Question Where can I buy a graphics card for my laptop? I'm currently using a Radeon R7 M360 on my Lenovo z-51. Please help me find the correct one. Bryan Beege Berry Community Answer If you're looking to buy a different graphics card, you may be out of luck. Laptops and graphics cards each have a specific form factor, and the likelihood of compatibility between any arbitrary two is unlikely. If you're looking to replace the existing one with the same model, it should be relatively easy to find the correct one based on the model number. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 1 Question I have Laptop compaq 58 Core i3, the hard desk is 500 GB, can I replace it by another that 2 TB? Community Answer Most computers can be upgraded to 2TB HDDs. However, you need to make sure that the HDD will fit in your computer. PS: If you want more speed (faster boot ups) get an SSD. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 3 Show more answers Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement Video .By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. . Warnings . While it is possible to upgrade a laptop in the ways described above, you should not shop for a laptop thinking you can upgrade it later. In most cases, it is more cost-effective to buy a laptop with all the features you need from the start, and perhaps a few more than to buy a lesser machine and upgrade it to the level you want. Thanks! Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0 While desktop computers usually allow users to select RAM memory and graphics cards from any manufacturer, laptop computers usually require users to obtain upgrade equipment from the laptop's manufacturer. Thanks! Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0 Advertisement Things You'll Need . Small, non-magnetic screwdriver (either regular or Phillips-head, depending on how the screws are slotted) Anti-static wrist strap (optional) Rubber mat or clean, non-static cloth (optional) For hard drive upgrades, a SATA-to-USB adapter You Might Also Like. How toCheck Computer RAM How toSave a Laptop from Liquid Damage How toEnter the BIOS on a Lenovo Laptop How toReformat a Laptop How toRepair a Laptop Key How toTake Good Care of Your Laptop Computer How toCheck the Temperature of Your Laptop How toRepair Dell Laptop Keyboard Keys How toReset a Gateway Laptop How toKeep Your Laptop from Overheating How toReset a Toshiba Laptop How toMake Your Laptop Work Faster How toReset a Dell Laptop How toFix a Laptop Screen Advertisement References . ↑ http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/how-much-computer-ram#1TC=windows-7 ↑ http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000149.htm ↑ https://www.wikihow.com/Ground-Yourself-to-Avoid-Destroying-a-Computer-with-Electrostatic-Discharge ↑ http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/what-happened-to-backup-restore ↑ https://www.wikihow.com/Use-Clonezilla ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_disk_cloning_software http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,2845,2345356,00.asp http://www.pcworld.com/article/192930/how_to_upgrade_your_laptops_hard_drive_to_an_ssd.html http://www.pcworld.com/article/148909/upgrading_your_laptops_graphics_card.html About This Article. Co-authored by: Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist This article was co-authored by Matt Ham. Matt Ham is a Computer Repair Specialist and the CEO and President of Computer Repair Doctor. With over a decade of experience, Matt specializes in Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Smartphone repairs and upgrades. Matt holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University. Matt has expanded Computer Repair Doctor to seven different locations. He is also a Co-Owner of Repair Life, a full-scale marketing agency specializing in driving both online and offline leads to cell phone and computer repair shops and device retailers. This article has been viewed 314,381 times. How helpful is this? Co-authors: 17 Updated: August 10, 2021 Views: 314,381 Categories: Laptop Maintenance and Repair Article SummaryX1. Find your laptop's exact model number. 2. Look up the maximum amount of memory and memory type. 3. Find out how much memory you have now. 4. Add or replace RAM. 5. Find out if you can add another drive to the laptop, and which type of drive it takes. 6. Add an external drive if desired. 7. Upgrade the video and sound cards if they aren't attached to the motherboard. Did this summary help you?YesNo In other languages Español:actualizar una laptop Italiano:Aggiornare i Componenti di un Portatile Русский:модернизировать ноутбук Français:moderniser un ordinateur portable Bahasa Indonesia:Meningkatkan Kualitas Laptop Nederlands:Een laptop upgraden العربية:ترقية الكمبيوتر المحمول Print Send fan mail to authors Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 314,381 times. Reader Success Stories. Sushma Tripathi May 28, 2017 "I was thinking that I have to buy a new laptop for my son but now I can upgrade it. Thanks for help!" Rated this article: More reader stories Hide reader stories Share your story Is this article up to date? Yes No Advertisement Cookies make wikiHow better. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Co-authored by: Matt Ham Computer Repair Specialist Click a star to vote % of people told us that this article helped them. Co-authors: 17 Updated: August 10, 2021 Views: 314,381 Sushma Tripathi May 28, 2017 "I was thinking that I have to buy a new laptop for my son but now I can upgrade it. Thanks for help!" Rated this article: Anonymous Jul 22, 2016 "Updated my chrome book, great advice." Share yours! More success stories Hide success stories You Might Also Like. How toCheck Computer RAMHow toSave a Laptop from Liquid DamageHow toEnter the BIOS on a Lenovo LaptopHow toReformat a Laptop Featured Articles. How toDeal With Password Reset HarassmentHow toInstall Microsoft Teams on a Mobile DeviceHow toInstall Microsoft Teams on WindowsHow toMake a Play TelephoneHow toMake Tomato SoupHow toUnclog a Bathtub DrainTrending Articles. 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How toSigns She Is Infatuated with YouHow toKeep Poinsettias Growing To Next ChristmasHow toCancel a Date over TextHow toImprove Your Health by GardeningHow toCover Brick FloorsHow toDate Your Ex Again CategoriesComputers and ElectronicsComputersLaptopsLaptop Maintenance and Repair wikiHow Newsletter You're all set! Helpful how-tos delivered toyour inbox every week! Sign me up! By signing up you are agreeing to receive emails according to our privacy policy. Home About wikiHow Experts Blog Jobs Contact Us Site Map Terms of Use Privacy Policy Do Not Sell My Info Not Selling Info Contribute Follow Us × wikiHow Tech Help Pro: Level up your tech skills and stay ahead of the curve Let's go! X 1210
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TitleHow to Upgrade a Laptop with RAM | Crucial.com
Urlhttps://uk.crucial.com/articles/pc-users/how-to-upgrade-laptop-memory
DescriptionTired of waiting for your laptop to load? Find out how to upgrade your laptop with Crucial to give it an immediate boost
Date
Organic Position6
H1How to upgrade your laptop memory
H2Find a product
Upgrading is easy
Compatibility is critical
How to install memory in your laptop
H3Precautions
Laptop memory installation instructions
H2WithAnchorsFind a product
Upgrading is easy
Compatibility is critical
How to install memory in your laptop
BodyHow to upgrade your laptop memory Is your computer slow to respond? There’s generally no need to buy a new computer, a memory upgrade is the easiest and most effective way to boost your computer’s performance.  Upgrading is easy . Adding or upgrading RAM in a laptop does not require any computer skills, just a screwdriver. First, determine how much memory you’d like to add. See our guide to estimate the amount of computer memory you need. Another way to improve performance is to upgrade your hard disk drive to a solid state drive. Read more about how to install an SSD in a laptop. Compatibility is critical . Laptops are designed with specific RAM requirements; how many modules, configuration of modules, memory technology, and storage size are all specific to each laptop. Due to each laptop’s uniqueness, you need to know what works with your system. In less than 60 seconds, the Crucial® Advisor™ and System Scanner tools browse a compatibility database filled with more than 100,000 systems to deliver guaranteed-compatible upgrades. How to install memory in your laptop . Adding memory makes your computer faster, increases system responsiveness, and makes multitasking seamless. Installation is a quick process that’s done in just 10 steps and the benefits are instant. Looking to install memory in a desktop? Use our quick guide to desktop memory installation. Precautions . Static electricity can damage the components in your system. To protect your system’s components from static damage during the installation process, touch any of the unpainted metal surfaces on your computer’s frame or wear an ESD wrist strap before touching or handling internal components. Either method will safely discharge static electricity that’s naturally present in your body.   To protect your memory module, avoid touching the gold pins or components (chips). It’s best to hold the module by the top or side edges. Laptop memory installation instructions . Installing memory can be done in a matter of minutes, but there’s no need to feel rushed. Work at your own pace and consult this guide or the video as often as you need to! 1. Gather supplies. Clear off your installation space and make sure you’re working in a static-safe environment. To do this, remove any plastic bags or papers from your workspace. Then, you’ll need the following items: Your laptop computer Crucial® laptop memory Screwdriver Owner’s manual 2.     Shut down your laptop computer. Because your files, documents, and data are on your storage drive; not your random access memory, they remain unaffected by installing RAM. 3.     Unplug the power cable. 4.     Remove the battery. Consult your owner’s manual for specific instructions. If your laptop doesn’t have a removable battery, you don’t need to do this. 5.     Hold the power button for 5 seconds. This discharges any residual electricity still in the system. If your battery is not removable, there’s no need to hold the power button down. 6.     Open the case. For instructions about opening your specific system, consult its owner’s manual. You can also take pictures with your phone to see where cables or screws are attached to make it easier to put back together. 7.     Ground yourself. Touch an unpainted metal surface – this is an extra safeguard that protects your memory and components from static damage during the installation process. 8.     Remove existing memory modules. Pull the side clips away from the module to release it. Then take the RAM modules out of the slots.   9.     Install Crucial memory. Holding the modules along the edges, align the notches on the module with the ridge in the slot, then apply even pressure and firmly press the module in. It usually takes about 30 pounds of pressure to fully install the module.   10.     Close the laptop case and reinstall the battery. Your memory is now installed! Boot up and enjoy a more responsive computer that’s now better equipped to run memory-intensive apps. ©2017 Micron Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Information, products, and/or specifications are subject to change without notice. Neither Crucial nor Micron Technology, Inc. is responsible for omissions or errors in typography or photography. Micron, the Micron logo, Crucial, and the Crucial logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Micron Technology, Inc. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners. ×
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Result 9
TitleHow to find out if you can upgrade your laptop | Windows Central
Urlhttps://www.windowscentral.com/how-find-out-if-you-can-upgrade-your-laptop
DescriptionPurchasing a laptop without topping out on the best specification doesn't necessarily mean you're out of luck when it comes to future proofing. There are plenty of laptops out there that can be upgraded. Here's how to can tell if you can do the same
Date29 Mar 2019
Organic Position7
H1How to find out if you can upgrade your laptop
H2Check if you can upgrade with Crucial
Our top equipment picks
How to find out if you can upgrade your laptop
Best M.2 SSD
Value SSD
Compact RAM
H3Products used in this guide
Best M.2 SSD
Value SSD
Compact RAM
Additional Equipment
These are the best NVIDIA RTX 2060 SUPER GPUs you can buy right now
The best GPUs for your Intel Core i5-10600K CPU are right here
Here's the best RAM for the AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
H2WithAnchorsCheck if you can upgrade with Crucial
Our top equipment picks
How to find out if you can upgrade your laptop
Best M.2 SSD
Value SSD
Compact RAM
BodyHow to find out if you can upgrade your laptop Rich Edmonds 29 Mar 2019 You've had your laptop for a few years and it's starting to feel sluggish when you're running demanding tasks. Maybe your RAM is just not up to snuff, or your old spinning-disk hard drive is starting to falter. It's time to upgrade! But instead of replacing the entire laptop, you might be able to swap out some bits inside to breath in some new life. Products used in this guide. Super-fast M.2 SSD: Samsung 970 EVO Plus ($128 at Amazon) Budget-friendly SSD: Western Digital Blue ($120 at Amazon) Tools to help you out: Yougai 38-piece ($13 at Amazon) Check if you can upgrade with Crucial. Unfortunately, unlike desktop PCs which you can normally upgrade, laptops are increasingly sealed units that may have certain limitations when it comes to accessing the insides and tinkering with what's contained within the chassis. Actually gazing at specific components is one thing, being able to remove said chips and boards and replace with enhanced replacements is a completely different ball game. The most common upgrades these days in laptops are RAM and storage drives. The latter is a recommended task on machines that sport a mechanical drive, which can be upgraded to a vastly superior SSD solution. The same goes for RAM when the total amount available to Windows and applications is 4GB. Moving up to 8GB or even 16GB can really boost productivity and multi-tasking. We'd avoid touching anything else inside most laptops, such as the Wi-Fi card or CPU, unless you absolutely know what you're doing and are sure everything is compatible. The easiest way to see just what you'll be able to do with the laptop is to look on the manufacturer's website or open up the PC and take a look inside. The latter usually involves removing a number of screws on the underside, but be sure to check with the manual (or online guides) for further details. If you want to be certain you'll be upgrading using the correct parts, Crucial — which sells branded RAM and SSDs — has a handy tool available that can quickly check if you're able to upgrade the memory or storage in thousands of laptop models. Head to Crucial's website. Select the manufacturer of your laptop. Choose the product family. Select the model of your particular laptop. Hit "Find upgrade". The tool should return results as to what type of RAM your laptop supports and whether an SSD upgrade is in on the cards. Crucial will, of course, recommend its own products for you to use (we highly recommend the brand), but you can use alternatives from other companies, so long as you match up specifications. Be wary when it comes to SSDs as there are multiple available. The same goes for RAM with regards to DDR2, DDR3 and DDR4. It's also worth noting that you'll need to clone the old drive to continue using your Windows installation on the new storage solution. That or you can re-install Windows on the new storage drive to start fresh. Our top equipment picks. For upgrades, take a look at our recommended options. Be sure to double check for compatibility, but this is what you should be aiming for in terms of capacity and speeds — so long as your laptop can support such component upgrades. Best M.2 SSD. Samsung 970 EVO Plus. Insane performance at an affordable price Samsung has long been at the forefront of the SSD market and its latest is certainly the greatest, with an incredible performance backed up with a great warranty and reliability. $128 at Amazon (500GB) $110 at Walmart Samsung did something incredible with the 970 EVO Plus, offering performance that matches (even supersedes) the 970 PRO but without the insane price tag. The 970 EVO Plus is based on Samsung's latest 96-layer V NAND memory, and with prices starting at less than $100 for the 256GB storage capacity, this is an extremely enticing SSD. Value SSD. Western Digital Blue. Great performance and value WD took full advantage of 3D NAND technology and came up with the latest iteration of Blue SSDs. $120 at Amazon (1TB) $128 at Walmart Sporting 560 MB/s and 530 MB/s for read and write speeds, the 1TB version of the Western Digital Blue SSD offers great value. Not only do you have a choice of capacity for 2.5-inch drives, but there are also M.2 modules to choose from. Compact RAM. Corsair Vengeance 16GB Kit. 16GBs of compact and speedy memory Crucial memory is both reliable and affordable. This 16GB kit will ensure your laptop has more than enough RAM to run multiple apps simultaneously and even tackle some of those more demanding PC games. $90 at Amazon (16GB) Upgrading from 4GB or 8GB of RAM, your laptop will feel quicker and more powerful with a 16GB kit like this example from Crucial installed. You'll be able to run numerous tabs on your favorite browser, play even more demanding games (so long as you have a decent GPU) and avoid sluggish performance. Additional Equipment. You'll need a toolkit to take apart your laptop to replace components. We've got you covered with this handy recommendation. Yougai 38-piece ($13 at Amazon) . Sometimes you don't need countless screwdriver tips, a brush, cable cutter, among other tools. This is what makes the Yougai toolkit more appealing for someone who won't be tinkering with hardware too often. We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more. Which SUPER are you? These are the best NVIDIA RTX 2060 SUPER GPUs you can buy right now . Choosing the right NVIDIA RTX 2060 SUPER isn't a difficult task. Simply pick the card that best balances your budget with the performance you desire. We've rounded up some recommendations to get you on the right path. GFX The best GPUs for your Intel Core i5-10600K CPU are right here . To get the most out of your Intel Core i5-10600K processor for gaming, you'll need a good GPU. Whether you plan on playing titles at 1080p, 1440p or 4K, these are the cards you'll need. RAM it up Here's the best RAM for the AMD Ryzen 7 3800X . We rounded up some excellent module kits for you to use with the AMD Ryzen 7 3800X. AMD's Ryzen 3000 series processors need fast RAM in order to perform as designed and these kits will get you well on the way to greatness. How to find out if you can upgrade your laptop. Best M.2 SSD. Samsung 970 EVO Plus. $128 at Amazon (500GB) Value SSD. Western Digital Blue. $120 at Amazon (1TB) Compact RAM. Corsair Vengeance 16GB Kit. $90 at Amazon (16GB)
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Result 10
TitleHow to Tell If You Can Upgrade Your Laptop | Laptop Mag
Urlhttps://www.laptopmag.com/uk/articles/laptop-upgrade-checker
DescriptionWant to replace the RAM or hard drive in your laptop? Here's how to tell if your laptop is upgradeable and which type of components it needs
Date1 Dec 2015
Organic Position8
H1How to Tell If You Can Upgrade Your Laptop
H2What Laptop Components Can You Upgrade?
Checking a Memory Finder
Reading the Service Manual
Bottom Line
Laptop Upgrade Guide
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat Laptop Components Can You Upgrade?
Checking a Memory Finder
Reading the Service Manual
Bottom Line
Laptop Upgrade Guide
BodyHow to Tell If You Can Upgrade Your Laptop By Avram Piltch published 1 December 15 Whether you just bought a brand new notebook that came with a slow-moving hard drive or your three-year-old system is struggling to keep up with today's apps, upgrading your laptop is great way to improve its performance without spending a lot of money. Unlike desktop towers, almost all of which are user-serviceable, many laptops are sealed boxes that are difficult or impossible to tinker with. In some cases, even if you can get at the guts, you'll find the key components drive-soldered to the motherboard.Fortunately, you don't need to crack open the chassis just to find out if you can replace the RAM or hard drive. Here's how to tell if you can upgrade your laptop and what components it needs.What Laptop Components Can You Upgrade?In the best-case scenario, you can replace both your RAM and storage drive. Upgrading from a mechanical hard drive to an SSD (solid state drive) will have an enormous impact on your performance, allowing you to boot, open applications and files, or switch tasks three to four times faster. Adding more memory, particularly going from 2GB or 4GB to 8GB, can make multitasking or working on large media files easier.Forget about swapping out the CPU, the graphics chip or display. And while it may be possible to replace the Wi-Fi card on some systems, doing so is difficult and probably not worth the effort. If you really want better wireless connectivity, consider a USB Wi-Fi dongle.MORE: Best SSDs You Can BuyChecking a Memory Finder. The best way to find out whether your laptop is upgradeable and what parts you need to upgrade it is with a configurator tool such as Crucial Memory's Advisor Tool. To use it:1. Navigate to http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/advisor.2. Select your laptop's manufacturer (ex: Lenovo).3. Choose the correct product line (ex: ThinkPad T Series).4. Pick the specific model of your laptop (ex: ThinkPad T450s).5. Click "find upgrade."The Advisor will then tell you what type of RAM your system takes and what type of SSDs it can handle. If your laptop can't have its memory or storage upgraded, the advisor will tell you so. Since this particular tool is from Crucial, it recommends Crucial's own products, but as long as you take note of the products' specs, you can buy memory or storage from other vendors. Here's what to look for.If your laptop has a hard drive right now and you're upgrading it to an SSD, it's almost certain that you'll need a 2.5-inch, 7mm SSD, the most common size. However, if your laptop came with an SSD and you want to replace it with a higher-capacity one, you may need an mSATA or M.2 drive, both of which are chips that slide into a slot on the motherboard. M.2 SSDs come in different lengths (60mm and 80mm are most common), so be particularly careful about checking which one you need.When buying RAM, find out if it's DDR2, DDR3 or DDR4 type, along with its voltage and speed. Most recent-era laptops take DDR3 RAM that's PC3-12800 speed and either 1.5 or 1.35 volts. Looking through RAM listings, you may also see specs that indicate whether it’s ECC or non-ECC and buffered or unbuffered. Except for a few high-end workstations, most laptops use non-ECC, unbuffered memory. In the upper left corner of the screen, the Advisor shows you just how much RAM your laptop can handle and how many DIMM slots it has. Some laptops have only a single slot, which comes filled, so you may need to completely replace your existing DIMM rather than just adding to it.Reading the Service Manual. Knowing that your laptop is upgradeable in theory is one thing, but performing surgery on the device is another. If there's one available, check the hardware maintenance manual (aka, service manual) to find what you need to do to access the components.To locate the service manual, navigate to the support page for your specific laptop model on the manufacturer's website (e.g., lenovo.com, dell.com, hp.com). Look for downloadable manuals, and select the service or hardware guide, not the general instructions.The maintenance manual should tell you how to open the laptop and replace these parts. In most cases, you can get to the laptop's innards by removing some screws and either opening an upgrade panel or removing the entire bottom surface.If the manual tells you that the memory or storage drive you want to remove are soldered onto the motherboard, you can't upgrade. Also, if you have to break through anything that is held together by glue or have to remove the entire motherboard, forget about adding RAM or an SSD.Bottom Line. Once you know that your laptop is upgradeable and what components you need, you can shop around for the best RAM or SSD for the money. For RAM, any compatible DIMM from a reputable brand should be good, but if you have two DIMM slots, you'll get slightly better performance by filling both with identical chips (e.g., 2 x 4GB). For help choosing a solid state drive, check out our list of best SSDs or read the extensive reviews at our sister sites, Tom's Hardware and AnandTech.Lead Image Credit: Kerdkanno/ShutterstockHow to Upgrade Your Laptop's Hard Drive to an SSDLaptop Finder - Get Personalized RecommendationsHow to Install an M.2 SSD in the Lenovo ThinkPad T440sLaptop Upgrade Guide. Previous TipNext TipHow to Install an mSATA SSD Boot DriveHow to Upgrade Your Laptop’s Hard Drive to an SSDHow to Install an M.2 SSD in the Lenovo ThinkPad T440sHow to Upgrade the RAM on the Lenovo ThinkPad T440sHow to Upgrade the RAM (Memory) on a LaptopHow to Upgrade the SSD in Your MacBook ProHow to Upgrade Your Alienware 17’s SSD and Hard DriveHow to Upgrade Your Alienware 17's RAMHow to Upgrade Your Dell XPS 13's SSDHow to Upgrade Your ThinkPad 13's RAMHow to Upgrade Your ThinkPad 13's SSDHow to Upgrade Your ThinkPad T460s' RAMHow to Upgrade Your ThinkPad T460s' SSD Avram Piltch The official Geeks Geek, as his weekly column is titled, Avram Piltch has guided the editorial and production of Laptopmag.com since 2007. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram programmed several of LAPTOP's real-world benchmarks, including the LAPTOP Battery Test. He holds a master's degree in English from NYU.
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Result 11
TitleWhat You Need to Know About Upgrading Your Laptop’s Hardware
Urlhttps://www.howtogeek.com/192016/what-you-need-to-know-about-upgrading-your-laptops-hardware/
DescriptionLaptops aren’t as easy to upgrade as desktop PCs. In fact, newer laptops are becoming harder to upgrade — but you still may be able to upgrade your laptop with more RAM or a solid-state drive
Date9 Jul 2014
Organic Position9
H1What You Need to Know About Upgrading Your Laptop’s Hardware
H2Desktops vs. Laptops
Barriers to Upgrading a Laptop
Common Upgrades That Can Work
Do Your Research
H3
H2WithAnchorsDesktops vs. Laptops
Barriers to Upgrading a Laptop
Common Upgrades That Can Work
Do Your Research
BodyWhat You Need to Know About Upgrading Your Laptop’s Hardware Chris HoffmanChris HoffmanEditor-in-ChiefChris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He's written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami's NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times---and that's just here at How-To Geek. Read more...About How-To Geek @chrisbhoffman Updated Jul 9, 2014, 8:57 pm EST | 5 min read Laptops aren’t as easy to upgrade as desktop PCs. In fact, newer laptops are becoming harder to upgrade — but you still may be able to upgrade your laptop with more RAM or a solid-state drive. It’s generally a bad idea to buy a laptop with plans to upgrade it later. Buy the hardware you need to avoid headaches later. Some laptops can be upgraded fairly easily, but do your research here. Desktops vs. Laptops. RELATED: Don't Be Intimidated: Building Your Own Computer is Easier Than You'd Think When you build a desktop PC yourself, a typical case will come with plenty of room inside. You can open it by twisting a few screws and get easy access to all the hardware in the case. Components you install aren’t permanent, but can be removed and replaced later. Even if you buy a prebuilt desktop PC, its motherboard may come with empty RAM slots and empty PCI Express slots so you can install more RAM and expansion cards. Some manufacturers may try to make upgrading their prebuilt desktop PCs more difficult, but even those PCs aren’t as difficult to upgrade as the average laptop. Laptops are different. You don’t build your own laptop — instead, you buy a prebuilt laptop from a manufacturer. They build a custom chassis (case) for the laptop and choose components that will fit that case. Modern Intel Ultrabooks and Apple MacBooks are becoming increasingly thin and light, and they aren’t designed to be user-upgradable. Barriers to Upgrading a Laptop. RELATED: Should You Buy Extended Warranties? Here’s what often stops you from upgrading a laptop: Design: Many laptops just aren’t designed to be opened. Take Microsoft’s Surface Pro 2 for example — you need to use a blow dryer to melt the adhesive around the display and open it up. Once you get inside, you’ll find a tightly packed together mess of components — the battery is also adhered to the case, so you can’t easily replace that. Apple’s MacBooks can be opened with a screwdriver (theoretically — they use proprietary screws), but you’ll find a tight mess of components with the battery glued in place, too. Opening It: Even if opening your laptop is possible, it may not be a pleasant experience. Laptops have many components tightly packed together, so you may have to remove many other components from your laptop before servicing a specific component. For example, Microsoft’s Surface Pro 2 has over 90 screws inside it! Soldered on Components: Some devices come with components soldered on. For example, MacBooks come with the CPU, GPU, and RAM soldered onto their logic board (or motherboard, as PC users call it). You can’t just remove any of these components and install a new one. (Soldering is the process of applying a melted metal material at high heat to two objects. The metal cools and the two objects — RAM and motherboard, in this case — become joined together by the metal. In other words, you can’t just remove a component because it’s fused to your motherboard.) Warranty: Even if you can open your laptop and replace some of the components, most laptop manufacturers argue that this will void your warranty. If your laptop can easily be opened, you may have to remove a warranty-voiding sticker to get inside. The manufacturer may look for evidence you’ve tampered inside your laptop if you ever send it back. They’ll want to deny your warranty claim if they find any evidence you could have caused the problem. In theory, the manufacturer should have to honor the warranty whether you’ve opened the laptop or not if the problem isn’t your fault. But many PC manufacturers provide notoriously bad customer service, so good luck arguing that point with them! Common Upgrades That Can Work. RELATED: What Is a Solid State Drive (SSD), and Do I Need One? Many laptops can be upgraded in a few common ways. These upgrades will be easiest on older laptops, which are bulkier and often more upgrade-friendly. Install More RAM: If your laptop’s motherboard has available RAM slots, it may be easy to buy another stick of RAM and pop it in. If your laptop’s RAM slots are full, it may be possible to remove the current sticks of RAM and install new sticks of RAM with more capacity. Some laptops (generally older, bulkier laptops) actually came with a special memory panel located on the bottom of the laptop, which you could easily open up to access the RAM slots on your motherboard. Be sure to buy the correct type of RAM for your laptop if you’re going this route. Upgrade to an SSD: If you have a laptop that came with a slower mechanical hard drive, you may be able to upgrade it to a faster solid-state drive fairly easily. This process will involve opening up your laptop, removing the current hard drive, and installing the solid-state drive in its place. You’ll either need to create a copy of your operating system drive first or reinstall Windows afterward. Some larger laptops may have multiple hard drive bays, but don’t count on that. Replace an Optical Drive With an SSD: If you want to keep your laptop’s internal drive and install a solid-state drive, you may be able to replace the laptop’s optical (CD, DVD, or Blu-ray) drive with a solid-state drive. You’ll need the appropriate enclosure that allows the SSD to fit into the optical drive bay for this. Advertisement CPU and GPU upgrades may be possible on some laptops, but these will be harder. You’ll need to make extra sure to buy compatible components that will fit your laptop and be supported by its BIOS. Different CPUs and GPUs generate different amounts of heat, so your new components may generate too much heat for the fans and cooling solutions that came with your laptop to handle. These are all problems you’ll need to think about. Do Your Research. So, can you upgrade your laptop’s RAM or install a fast solid-state drive? Do your research! Look around online to see if your model of laptop is easily upgradable and if other people have upgraded its components successfully. Check exactly what type of RAM, solid-state drive, or other components your laptop supports. Some laptop manufacturers provide service manuals that will walk you through the process of opening up your laptop and removing various components. Do a search to see if your laptop has an official service manual you can use. If not, you may find an unofficial guide for opening up your laptop and installing components written by another user. Be sure to check the process ahead of time and see whether you’d feel comfortable following the instructions. Some upgrades will be much more difficult than others. You shouldn’t buy a laptop with plans on upgrading it. Ideas like, “Well, the RAM is a bit on the low side but I can always add more later,” or, “I’ll install a solid-state drive to speed it up,” can’t be taken for granted like they can with a desktop PC. Do your research ahead of time to see if this is even possible. Even if it is possible later, you may want to seek out  a laptop with your desired amount of RAM or a good solid-state drive and buy that instead, as it will save you a headache later. Many laptops are still upgradable, but we’re moving toward a future where most computers won’t be user-serviceable. Advertisement Image Credit: Ray Weitzenberg on Flickr, Ambra Galassi on Flickr, Christoph Bauer on Flickr, Mark Skipper on Flickr, Joel Dueck on Flickr READ NEXT › It’s Time: Why You Need to Upgrade to an SSD Right Now› How to Quickly and Cheaply Upgrade a Laptop or Tablet’s Storage› How to Clean the Dust Out of Your Laptop› Why Oil-Cooled PCs Aren’t Popular Anymore› 3 Critical Stats Every PC Gamer Should Monitor› How-To Geek’s Best of CES 2022 Award Winners: What We’re Excited About› What’s New in Chrome 97, Available Now› What 8K Content Is Actually Available? JOIN GEEK TALK ON FACEBOOK The above article may contain affiliate links, which help support How-To Geek. How-To Geek is where you turn when you want experts to explain technology. Since we launched in 2006, our articles have been read more than 1 billion times. Want to know more?
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Result 12
TitleCan You Upgrade an Old Laptop and Is It Worth It?
Urlhttps://helpdeskgeek.com/help-desk/can-you-upgrade-an-old-laptop-and-is-it-worth-it/
DescriptionLaptops are the most popular type of personal computer and it’s not hard to see why. It’s one simple, portable package that does the job for most people
Date17 Jan 2021
Organic Position10
H1Can You Upgrade an Old Laptop and Is It Worth It?
H2What You Can Usually Upgrade in a Laptop
What You Can’t Usually Upgrade in a Laptop
Some Laptops are More Upgradable Than Others
Don’t Forget About External GPUs
Are These Laptop Upgrades Worth It?
Good Uses for Old Laptops
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H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat You Can Usually Upgrade in a Laptop
What You Can’t Usually Upgrade in a Laptop
Some Laptops are More Upgradable Than Others
Don’t Forget About External GPUs
Are These Laptop Upgrades Worth It?
Good Uses for Old Laptops
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BodyCan You Upgrade an Old Laptop and Is It Worth It? Depends on what you will use it for Written by: Sydney Butler Posted on: January 17th, 2021 in: Help Desk Laptops are the most popular type of personal computer and it’s not hard to see why. It’s one simple, portable package that does the job for most people. However, one major sacrifice you have to make compared to a desktop is upgradability.  Does that mean you can’t upgrade a laptop at all? No! However, upgrading an old laptop may not be worth the cost and effort, depending on what you need it to do. Table of Contents What You Can Usually Upgrade in a Laptop. In general there are two components that can be upgraded or replaced in the typical laptop. The first is RAM or Random Access Memory. This is the fast memory that the computer uses to store information from currently running software. The more RAM you have, the more applications you can run (or browser tabs you can open) without needing to resort to slow hard drive access. Speaking of which, the other component that can usually be upgraded in the typical laptop is the hard drive. Most laptops have a 2.5” drive bay, but more recent models now come with an NVME slot for NVME format solid-state drives. Swapping out the existing drives for a larger one grants you the obvious benefit of more storage.  However, one of the best ways to breathe new life into an old laptop is by exchanging its mechanical hard drive for a solid state model. This will immediately make the general experience of using the computer much more snappy and pleasant. There are cases where the hard drive, RAM or both cannot be upgraded or removed at all. This is mostly true for ultrabook-class laptops such as the M1 MacBook Pro 13. The RAM and SSD are integrated into the mainboard, so you’re stuck with whichever model you bought at the outset. What You Can’t Usually Upgrade in a Laptop. It’s tempting to simply say that anything that’s not RAM or a hard drive can’t be upgraded, but we’ll break it down into specific components to make the implications clear. The most important general performance component in your laptop is the CPU or Central Processing Unit. This is the brain of the computer and performs general-purpose number crunching. On a desktop system, the CPU is connected to the motherboard using a socket system. Making it easy to swap it out for a better model. Typically laptops don’t use this method. Instead, the CPU is soldered permanently to the motherboard. Sadly, the same is usually true of the GPU or Graphical Processing Unit. It’s either integrated into the CPU or also soldered directly to the motherboard. This is the component that determines much of your performance in 3D applications and can also help in certain applications. Such as video editors, which often use the GPU to accelerate video encoding. Some Laptops are More Upgradable Than Others. While it’s true that typical laptops don’t let you upgrade the CPU or GPU, there are exceptions. Some workstation-class laptops use a socketed desktop CPU. Which means it’s possible to upgrade the model of chip it shipped with. This is incredibly rare, but not unheard of. When it comes to upgrading the internal GPU of a laptop, some models have a solution. It’s known as the Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM) and a few high-end laptops do make use of it. It’s essentially a mini, removable PCIe graphics card that can be exchanged for a better model. While uncommon, it’s worth checking if your laptop uses the MXM standard for its discrete GPU. Although be prepared to pay a steep price, since MXM versions of GPUs can carry a hefty price premium. Don’t Forget About External GPUs. If you’re lucky enough to have a laptop with a Thunderbolt 3 USB-C connection, you can actually connect an external GPU to the device and take advantage of desktop-class graphics. While you still need to confirm that your particular laptop model supports external GPUs, it’s a fantastic way to get access to a better GPU without having to buy an entirely new computer. The Razer Core eGPU Enclosure The main downside of these enclosures are that they need to be connected to mains power and are portable rather than mobile. However, if you only need to do basic tasks on the go and want to do heavy 3D graphics (such as gaming) when back at your desk, it’s a great option. If you want to know more, head over to Everything You Need to Know About External GPU Enclosures. Are These Laptop Upgrades Worth It? Now that you know what sorts of upgrades may be possible for your laptop, the next question is whether these upgrades are worth it. If you’re in the position where you can actually upgrade the CPU or GPU in your laptop, it’s certainly worth it from a performance perspective. Upgrading these components can add years to the laptop’s life. However, they may also have an impact on heat and battery life. Not to mention that actually installing these upgrades might involve extensive disassembly. You should also weigh up the cost of these components, as they may be so expensive that a whole new system could be a better option. When it comes to RAM or hard drive upgrades, it’s complicated. If your lack of performance is tied specifically to the CPU or GPU then upgrading your RAM isn’t going to do anything. If you’re running out of memory doing a task the CPU and GPU can handle (such as video editing on 4-8GB of RAM) then a RAM upgrade will make a big difference. If your laptop has very little RAM (4GB or less) then upgrading will let modern operating systems such as Windows 10 run properly. When it comes to hard drive upgrades, we’ll always recommend changing out a mechanical hard drive for a solid state model. At least when it comes to the system drive with the operating system. SSDs make older laptops feel modern and snappy for everyday tasks such as browsing the web. Combined with a RAM upgrade, an SSD can relieve bottlenecks on the CPU, letting it run at its maximum level. Good Uses for Old Laptops. If you really do need to replace your entire laptop, don’t throw the old machine out. If you can’t sell it for a good price, there are other uses you can put the old machine to: Use it as a media server (e.g. using Plex).Turn it into a network-attached storage device.Install Linux on it, it’s never too late to learn!Create a privacy-focused PC for sensitive browsing.Turn it into a retro-gaming emulation machine.Donate it to a young or old family member with only basic computing needs. These are just a few ideas, but if you put your mind to it you’ll find that even an old computer running the right software in the right context can be incredibly useful. Electronic waste is a huge problem, so getting the entire useful life out of a computer won’t just make your life better. It will also help the environment! Sydney Butler is a social scientist and technology fanatic who tries to understand how people and technology coexist. He has two decades of experience as a freelance computer technician and more than a decade as a technologies researcher and instructor. Sydney has been a professional technology writer for more than five years and covers topics such as VR, Gaming, Cyber security and Transhumanism. Read Sydney's Full Bio Subscribe on YouTube! Did you enjoy this tip? If so, check out our YouTube channel from our sister site Online Tech Tips. We cover Windows, Mac, software and apps, and have a bunch of troubleshooting tips and how-to videos. Click the button below to subscribe! Subscribe Read More Posts:. How to Stop Personalized Ads and Search Results in Google and Facebook How To Fix Amazon Fire Tablet Not Charging How To Block Sites With Free Parental Control Software What Is ehprivjob.exe and Do You Need It? Want to impress your friends and family with awesome tech geekery?Subscribe to Help Desk Geek and get great guides, tips and tricks on a daily basis! We only send useful stuff!  Thanks for subscribing! We hate spam too, unsubscribe at any time. Do not share my Personal Information.
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Result 13
TitleHow to upgrade your laptop - CNET
Urlhttps://www.cnet.com/tech/computing/how-to-upgrade-your-laptop/
DescriptionHas your laptop become agonisingly slow? Do you swear it used to be faster? What if you upgraded it instead of replacing it?
Date17 Jun 2012
Organic Position11
H1How to upgrade your laptop
H2Upgrading your battery
Upgrading your RAM
Upgrading your hard drive
Using mini PCI-E slots
Upgrading your wireless
Upgrading your CPU
Upgrading your optical drive
Upgrading your graphics
H3Tech
H2WithAnchorsUpgrading your battery
Upgrading your RAM
Upgrading your hard drive
Using mini PCI-E slots
Upgrading your wireless
Upgrading your CPU
Upgrading your optical drive
Upgrading your graphics
BodyHow to upgrade your laptop Has your laptop become agonisingly slow? Do you swear it used to be faster? What if you upgraded it instead of replacing it? Craig Simms June 17, 2012 10:09 p.m. PT Has your laptop become agonisingly slow? Do you swear it used to be faster? What if you upgraded it instead of replacing it? (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) DISCLAIMER: CNET Australia takes no responsibility for any damage or injury that may be incurred as a result of following these instructions. If you choose to upgrade a laptop, you do so at your own risk and may void your warranty. Upgrading your battery. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) Laptop batteries tend to start losing charge capacity even after the first year. If you think your laptop's not staying on as long as it used to, you're probably right. Either replace your battery or buy a higher-capacity one. A word of warning: third-party batteries are usually not tested to the same quality-control levels as those from the original laptop vendor — don't risk it; buy the official version. Upgrading your RAM. Many laptops include a user-accessible bay for replacing your RAM. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) RAM is one of the easiest of the internal components to replace, and most manufacturers will allow you to replace it or add more without voiding your warranty. Before you begin your journey, find out what RAM standard your laptop supports, and whether it can take larger-capacity chips. Quite often, older BIOS are limited in this fashion. Once you have your RAM, all you have to do is pop the tabs holding your existing RAM to one side, then replace the chip with the larger-capacity SODIMM. Upgrading your hard drive. Hard drives are often housed in caddies that have a pull tab on them for easy removal. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) Also very easy to do, hard-drive replacement is often user serviceable and won't void warranties. Pretty much all laptops take 2.5-inch hard drives — but the trick is to make sure that you get one that's the right height, or it might not fit. One of the biggest upgrades you can perform on your laptop is to install a solid-state drive (SSD) — although, as above, check the height before you buy. Usually, an SSD height of 7mm or under is a good bet, but check your existing drive to see what will fit. Using mini PCI-E slots. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) Many laptops come with a spare mini PCI-E slot, which all sorts of modules can be plugged into, including storage and wireless network cards. Before you buy, make sure there's enough clearance around your slot — mini PCI-E cards come in varying lengths, and not all may fit in your laptop. If your laptop is a few years old, you may also have an ExpressCard slot on the outside to add in extra things like TV tuners, network cards and extra USB ports, although this is a dying feature. We'd expect this functionality to be wiped out by Thunderbolt in the coming years. Upgrading your wireless. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) All vendors these days use standard mini PCI-E slots for wireless cards. While it's easy to get your hands on, say, Intel's top-of-the-line Centrino Ultimate-N 6300 for an upgrade, there are two factors to consider here. If your laptop is older, it may not have as many aerials as newer laptops, which could hobble the performance of the new card. Many laptop vendors, like HP, also whitelist — that is, through the BIOS they restrict which wireless cards can be used, rendering a potential new purchase useless. A safer, though not as streamlined, solution is to buy a USB wireless dongle. A decent dual-band one will set you back around AU$100. Just remember to connect via your new dongle, and not your old wireless card, as both will appear in your wireless connections dialog in Windows. For safety, you could always disable the old one through Device Manager, or via a hardware switch, if you have one. Upgrading your CPU. Yeah, good luck getting to that. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) This is one of the most difficult parts to replace, and swapping this out will definitely void your warranty. Laptop vendors will also do their utmost to make sure that this is housed in a nearly impossible-to-reach spot, and you can expect to deal with a heatsink integrated into the entire laptop, requiring a complete disassembly. If this hasn't turned you off, you can find some mobile CPUs on eBay, or, if you know the exact model number you're after, then you may be able to find one through StaticIce. Upgrading your optical drive. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) While you can replace your optical drive, it's likely going to be a hassle. Firstly, you'll have to free the drive bay from the chassis, which will be an adventure. Then you'll need to find an optical drive that has the same dimensions as your existing one, of which you may have varying luck, depending on the size and age of your laptop. When you're done, you'll need to swap the fascia from your existing drive on to your new one, so that things sit flush with your chassis. It's honestly easier to get yourself an external USB DVD&plusm;RW drive, which will run you somewhere between AU$60 and AU$80. If you want Blu-ray, you'll be paying around AU$180. Upgrading your graphics. Not only is this one hiding under a heatsink that's integrated into the chassis, but it's also attached directly to the board. (Credit: Craig Simms/CBS Interactive) Bad news: you're pretty much stuck with your original GPU. Most laptops have the graphics chip integrated onto the motherboard or CPU. Larger laptops can use MXM, which is technically a swappable technology, but good luck finding parts. If you want to upgrade your graphics, pretty much your only option is to upgrade your entire laptop. The best hope for upgradeable graphics in the future is Thunderbolt, via an external graphics box like MSI's GUS. It's limited to only PCI-E x4, but at least you can always put a more powerful card inside. Close Discuss: How to upgrade your laptop Sign in to comment Be respectful, keep it civil and stay on topic. We delete comments that violate our policy, which we encourage you to read. Discussion threads can be closed at any time at our discretion.
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Result 14
TitleComputer & Laptop Upgrades | PC Doctor
Urlhttps://computer-support-nottingham.co.uk/computer-laptop-upgrades
DescriptionHaving computer problems? Call the PC Doctor, specialists in Laptop repairs and computer repairs in Nottingham. Visit our computer shop today!
Date
Organic Position12
H1Computer & Laptop Upgrades
H2The most popular upgrades for a desktop PC are:
The most popular upgrades for a laptop are:
Benefits of Upgrading Your PC or Laptop
For More Information On Our Computer Repairs In Nottingham, Call PC Doctor Today On: 01159 701 283
H3
H2WithAnchorsThe most popular upgrades for a desktop PC are:
The most popular upgrades for a laptop are:
Benefits of Upgrading Your PC or Laptop
For More Information On Our Computer Repairs In Nottingham, Call PC Doctor Today On: 01159 701 283
BodyComputer & Laptop Upgrades Are you looking to upgrade your PC or laptop? Would you like it to run faster or have a bigger hard drive or just watch movies in 4K? Then PC Doctor can help. The most popular upgrades for a desktop PC are:. Upgrading Ram Replacing Mechanical Hard Drive with a Solid State Drive (SSD) Upgrading the Graphics Card Upgrading the CPU Upgrading the CPU Cooling Due to the way that laptops are manufactured, there are not as many upgrade options as there are for a desktop PC. The most popular upgrades for a laptop are:. Upgrading Ram Replacing Mechanical Hard Drive with an Solid State Drive (SSD) Adding a port replicator Benefits of Upgrading Your PC or Laptop. Upgrading RamBasically adding more RAM makes your computer able to have more applications opened at the same time and helps to keep most important and most used data in RAM so the access times will be faster. Replacing a HDD with an SSDReplacing a mechanical hard drive(HDD) with an SSD increases the speed of PC significantly. By speed, we mean booting time, file opening speed, write-up speed, the time taken to open apps. Installing an SSD typically reduces booting time of PC to one-third and opening a file is around 30%–40% faster. Upgrading the Graphics CardIf you want to boost your computer’s visual performance, you need to improve its graphics. Although the primary goal is running more powerful games at a better image quality, upgrading your graphics also helps with image modification, video editing, and playing high-resolution video (think Netflix in 4K). Upgrading the CPUReplacing your CPU with a newer CPU will increase overall system speed & performance, improve system responsiveness and provide more processing power for today's latest applications. Upgrading the CPU CoolingRegardless of what you use your PC for, be it a Pre-built Gaming PC or Workstation, having a sufficient cooling solution is just as important as having the right processor. Processors start to slow down as they reach higher temperatures, and this can mean poorer performance in a range of applications. We can upgrade all makes and models of PC home and office computers and laptops. For more information or to see what type of upgrade may be a best match for you, why not call to talk about upgrading your system. For More Information On Our Computer Repairs In Nottingham, Call PC Doctor Today On: 01159 701 283. Find Us On Facebook Cookies This website uses cookies. Please let us know if you agree to the use of these cookies : I Accept I Decline Privacy Policy | 3rd Party Data Processors | Disable Cookies Cookies
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Result 15
TitleShould You Upgrade or Replace Your Laptop?
Urlhttps://www.lifewire.com/upgrade-or-replace-laptop-4153342
DescriptionNot sure if you should upgrade or repair your laptop or just replace it? Here are several things to consider before making your decision
Date6 Jul 2020
Organic Position13
H1Should You Upgrade or Replace Your Laptop?
H2How to know when to replace or upgrade a Windows laptop
My Laptop Is Too Slow
Need More Laptop Storage
The Laptop's Hard Drive Doesn't Work
The Laptop Screen Is Bad
The Laptop Won't Charge
You Want a Newer Operating System
Laptop Doesn't Have a CD/DVD/BD Drive
You Just Want Something New
H3See How Much Free Storage You Have
Delete Junk Files
Defrag Your Hard Drive
Check for Malware
Physically Clean the Laptop
H2WithAnchorsHow to know when to replace or upgrade a Windows laptop
My Laptop Is Too Slow
Need More Laptop Storage
The Laptop's Hard Drive Doesn't Work
The Laptop Screen Is Bad
The Laptop Won't Charge
You Want a Newer Operating System
Laptop Doesn't Have a CD/DVD/BD Drive
You Just Want Something New
BodyShould You Upgrade or Replace Your Laptop? How to know when to replace or upgrade a Windows laptop. By Tim Fisher Tim Fisher Senior Vice President & Group General Manager, Tech & Sustainability Emporia State University Tim Fisher has more than 30 years' of professional technology experience. He's been writing about tech for more than two decades and serves as the VP and General Manager of Lifewire. lifewire's editorial guidelines Updated on July 6, 2020 Tweet Share Email Working From Home The Ultimate Guide to Shopping Online The Ultimate Guide to Online Learning at Home The Ultimate Guide to Skype In This Article Laptop Is Too Slow Need More Laptop Storage Laptop Hard Drive Doesn't Work Laptop Screen Is Bad Laptop Won't Charge You Want a Newer Operating System Laptop Doesn't Have a CD/DVD/BD Drive You Want Something New Deciding whether to upgrade or replace a laptop is a big decision, and it can be complicated to know when or even if you should. You need to consider if the labor is worth it—if it's cheaper to replace or rebuild, and whether or not you actually need to do it. The different components on a laptop aren't as easy to replace as are the ones in a desktop computer, but it certainly is possible to upgrade a laptop if you have the patience and proper tools. That said, some of the suggestions below involve using external hardware to supplement for outdated, missing, or damaged internal components. Skip down to the section below that relates to your specific reason for wanting to upgrade or replace your laptop. You'll find your options and our recommendations for what to do in each scenario. Muriel de Seze / Getty Images If your laptop isn't working properly, you could avoid spending time upgrading it, or money replacing it, by simply following some how-to guides on getting things working again. My Laptop Is Too Slow . The primary hardware that determines the speed of a computer is the CPU and RAM. You could upgrade these components but it's not super easy to do in a laptop. In fact, if you find that either is damaged or not up to par with your requirements, replacing the laptop is probably a wise decision. However, of the two, the memory is the easier one to deal with. If you need more RAM or would like to replace bad memory sticks, and you're okay with doing this yourself, you can often open the bottom of the laptop to do that. With that being said, before you tear down your laptop and replace something, or trash the whole thing and buy a brand new one, you should try out a few easier, and less expensive, things first. A slow laptop can make it seem like it needs to be replaced or upgraded when maybe all it really needs is just a little TLC. See How Much Free Storage You Have . If your laptop's hard drive is running low on free space, it can certainly grind things to a halt and make programs open more slowly or files take forever to save. So be sure to check your available hard drive space just to be sure. If you need to move some large files off of your hard drive to quickly free up space to see if that helps the overall performance, use a free disk space analyzer tool to see where all the used space is going. Delete Junk Files . Temporary files can take up loads of free space over time, contributing not only to a full hard drive but also compounding the performance hit by making programs work harder or take longer to do their everyday tasks. Start by clearing the cache in your web browser. Those files are safe to remove, but when left, and given time, will definitely slow down page loads and potentially even the whole computer. Also, delete any temporary files your computer might be holding onto. They can often be using multiple gigabytes of storage. Defrag Your Hard Drive . As more and more files are added and removed from your laptop's hard drive, the overall structure of the data becomes fragmented and slows down read and write times. Defrag the hard drive with a free defrag tool like Defraggler. If your laptop uses an SSD instead of a traditional hard drive, this is irrelevant and you can skip this step. Check for Malware . It might seem odd to check for viruses when you're considering whether you should replace or update your laptop, but malware can absolutely be a reason for a slow laptop. Install an antivirus program to always stay protected from threats, or scan your computer for viruses before it boots if you aren't able to log in. Physically Clean the Laptop . If the vents to your laptop's fans are caked with dust, hair, and other grime, the internal components can heat up much faster than what's considered safe. This can force them to work overtime which can take away their primary purpose of keeping your laptop in tip-top working order. Cleaning these areas of the laptop can cool down the inside as well as help prevent any hardware from overheating. Need More Laptop Storage . If performing the above tasks didn't clear out enough storage or if you need additional hard drives in your laptop to back up files or store data, consider using an external hard drive to expand the laptop's storage. The best thing about external devices is that they're external, connecting to the laptop over USB instead of sitting inside the laptop's casing like the primary HDD. These devices provide instant additional hard drive space for whatever reason; software installation files, collections of music and videos, etc. Buying an external hard drive is cheaper and much easier than replacing the internal one. If you don't want to use an external drive, there are a few more ways to expand your laptop's storage. The 9 Best External Hard Drives of 2022 The Laptop's Hard Drive Doesn't Work . Generally, you should replace your bad hard drive over buying an entirely new laptop. However, your decision to do this should only be made after making sure that the drive is truly irreparable. If you think you need to replace your laptop hard drive, first run a free hard drive test against it to double-check that there are actually problems with it. Some hard drives are in perfect working order but just give off an error that makes them halt the regular boot process and appear to be bad and in need of replacement. For example, your hard drive might be entirely fine but your laptop is set up to boot to a flash drive each time your computer starts, and that's why you can't access your files or operating system. On the other hand, some hard drives are actually faulty and need to be replaced. If your laptop hard drive is bad, it might be worth considering replacing it with a working one. The Laptop Screen Is Bad . A broken or just generally less-than-perfect laptop screen might make it impossible for you to do anything. Repairing or replacing the screen is definitely doable and isn't as expensive as replacing the entire laptop. Visit the iFixit website and search for your specific laptop or at least one that's similar to your laptop. You might be able to find a step-by-step repair guide on replacing your particular laptop screen or at least a guide that you can adapt to make work for your specific laptop. However, an easy solution if your laptop is more stationary than mobile is to simply plug a monitor into a video port (e.g., VGA or HDMI) on the side or back of the laptop. The Laptop Won't Charge . Replacing an entire laptop when it's not powering on is usually overkill; it's likely just having trouble charging. The problem could rest with the power cable, the battery, or (less likely) the power source, like the wall. In the case of a bad laptop battery or charging cable, either can simply be replaced. Confirm whether the battery is the problem by plugging the laptop into the wall without the battery plugged in; if the laptop turns on, then the battery is to blame. You can remove the battery from the back of the laptop to see what kind of battery your laptop uses and use that information to research a replacement. It's best to try out a separate charging cable, if you can, before you buy your own replacement, just to be sure that yours is actually faulty. If your dead or dying laptop isn't caused by the battery or charging cable, consider plugging it in somewhere else, like in a different wall outlet or battery backup. If you find that the internal components are what's to blame for the laptop not keeping a charge, you should probably replace the laptop. You Want a Newer Operating System . You generally shouldn't purchase an entirely new laptop just to upgrade the operating system. While it's true that newer laptops ship with the newest operating system, you can almost always install or upgrade to a new OS on your existing hard drive without replacing anything. For example, if your laptop is running Windows XP and you want to install Windows 10, there's already a good chance that your laptop supports the upgrade, in which case you can just purchase Windows 10, erase XP from the hard drive, and install the newer OS. The only thing to consider is what the system requirements are for the operating system that you want. If you find that the OS requires at least 2 GB of RAM, 20 GB of free hard drive space and a 1 GHz or faster CPU, and your laptop already has those things, then it's perfectly fine to upgrade the operating system without having to upgrade the laptop. However, not all laptops can meet that requirement. If you need more RAM, you can probably replace it just fine, but a faster CPU likely requires purchasing a whole new laptop. You can use a free system information tool to check what kind of hardware is inside your computer. Can I Run Windows 11 on My Computer? Laptop Doesn't Have a CD/DVD/BD Drive . Most laptops today don't have an optical disc drive. The good thing is that for most of you, you don't need to upgrade the drive or replace your laptop to remedy it. Instead, you can buy a relatively small external optical drive that plugs in via USB and lets you watch Blu-rays or DVDs, copy files to and from discs, etc. If you do have an optical disc drive but it's not working properly, attempt to fix your DVD/BD/CD drive before looking into replacing the whole system or buying a new ODD. You Just Want Something New . Sometimes it's just time to move on, if only because you're ready for something new and better. Do your research, educate yourself on the newest models, and get the right laptop for your needs. Was this page helpful? Thanks for letting us know! Tell us why! Other Not enough details Hard to understand More from Lifewire How to Increase Storage on a Laptop Should You Buy a Tablet or a Laptop? How to Fix It When Your Laptop Won't Turn On Why Your Laptop Is Running So Slowly How Long Does a Laptop Battery Last? How to Upgrade a Laptop Graphics Card The 9 Best Laptops of 2022 How to Fix it When Your Chromebook Won't Turn On How to Replace a Motherboard How Do I Replace a Hard Drive? Can EV Batteries be Replaced or Upgraded? How to Fix It When a Lenovo Laptop Has a Black Screen How to Recycle a Laptop The 8 Best Laptops for Under $200 in 2022 What Is an External Hard Drive? How to Fix a Broken Laptop Screen
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Result 16
TitleComputer Memory RAM SSD Upgrades - Laptop, Desktop ...
Urlhttps://www.mrmemory.co.uk/
DescriptionMemory RAM SSD Computer Upgrades - Use our simple upgrade finder. Low Prices, FREE & FAST Delivery, Lifetime Warranty, Guaranteed Compatible. Upgrade your ...
Date
Organic Position14
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Result 17
TitleHow to upgrade your work laptop without ruining it | Popular Science
Urlhttps://www.popsci.com/diy/upgrade-work-laptop/
DescriptionDon't wait for your IT guy to find, pack, and ship a new laptop. Take matters into your own hands and give your work laptop an overhaul
Date22 Oct 2021
Organic Position15
H1How to upgrade your work laptop without ruining it
H2Before you begin
Improving performance
Adding more ports or upgrading virtually
Upgrading audio and video
Gut upgrades
H3It’s time to upgrade your webcam
Make your laptop battery last all day
As more people work from home, internet speed requirements have become a critical issue
H2WithAnchorsBefore you begin
Improving performance
Adding more ports or upgrading virtually
Upgrading audio and video
Gut upgrades
BodyHow to upgrade your work laptop without ruining it Yes, it may not be yours, but you still want to keep it in shape. By Dan Seitz | Published Oct 22, 2021 6:00 PM Technology DIY From looks to guts, there's a lot you can upgrade in your machine. Michael Dziedzic / Unsplash SHARE Working remotely has become the norm, and that means work laptops are seeing even more wear and tear. Or, even worse, your laptop is at the end of its life and beginning to chug as you try to get work done.  Instead of waiting for your IT guy to find, pack, and ship a new laptop, you can take matters into your own hands and give your work laptop an overhaul to get it back into tip-top shape. Before you begin. Don’t even think about doing anything to your work laptop before checking your company’s IT and device policies. Depending on their concerns, and what contracts they’ve signed with clients, you might be limited in what you’re allowed to do. Also ask if they have a “bring your own device” policy, and see if another laptop you own fits the bill. If they give you the green light, the next step is to get a full list of the machine’s specs, including any information on the make and model, which you can find by looking at the bottom of your laptop. This will give you a shortcut when determining whether a part or external gadget will work with your machine. Take note of what ports you have, and whether or not they’re powered—the more ports, the more you can add.  [Related: Add USB ports to your outlets without springing for an electrician] While you’re checking the bottom of your laptop look for removable panels and access points. Ultralight, newer laptops tend to have more parts glued into place, or to be made entirely out of one piece of metal. In some cases, cracking open the case is impossible, so you’ll be stuck with external accessories for those. This is also a good time to back up your files. Put anything you need easy access to into cloud storage, and everything else onto a USB stick or an external hard drive. Once that’s done, clean out any files you don’t need and perform some basic maintenance, like defragmenting your hard drive. This will improve performance by getting all your information in one place, and give you more room.  Improving performance. There are some quick ways to improve your laptop’s performance, in some cases with stuff you already have at your desk. Start with your RAM. This is your computer’s “short-term memory,” where they store all the data they need to keep things running—and there’s only so much of it to go around. When the built-in RAM runs out, your computer will start using your hard drive’s memory to keep the system going. This isn’t ideal: Hard drives have strict speed limits thanks to their moving parts, so programs will slow down waiting for data to come. USB sticks, though, are limited only by the speed of your USB port, so you can turn them into “virtual RAM” with a few clicks.  In Windows, connect the USB drive and, in File Explorer, right-click on its icon. Choose Properties and under the ReadyBoost tab, select Dedicate this device to ReadyBoost. Click on Apply and OK, and finish by rebooting your machine.  There is one caveat—your USB stick will burn out faster than it normally would, due to the high workload. It’s a good idea to dedicate a few sticks specifically for this job, and remove any files you have stored on them first. You don’t want any of these flash drives to die on you while storing important files.  If your hard drive is taking forever to open large files, consider an external solid-state drive, or SSD, which you can also connect via USB-C. SSDs have no moving parts, so they’re much faster than traditional magnetic disc drives. They usually set themselves up automatically and are portable as well, so it can come with you. If work for you involves a lot of graphically intense tasks like CAD design or data visualization, an external graphics processing unit, or GPU, can help out. External GPUs are more popular among gamers, but they can work for any application, and if you have a spare graphics card, you can buy an enclosure for it and plug it into a port without having to open up your laptop. Adding more ports or upgrading virtually. You can upgrade pretty much anything on your laptop, from the keyboard to the camera, by connecting it to your machine’s ports. But Josh Smith, a threat analyst with cybersecurity firm Nuspire, says you need to be careful where you get your gadgets, as they could be modified to infiltrate the systems of unsuspecting victims.  “Devices could be planted with backdoors and keyloggers that make these devices ripe for fraud, theft, or something more nefarious,” he explains.  Before you plug anything into your computer, do your research and make sure you’re buying from reputable sources, warns Chris Hickman, Chief Security Officer at online security firm Keyfactor. “Look for products which are certified, recommended, or endorsed by the laptop vendors,” he says. If you’re sick of everything about your laptop and just need the processor and hard drive, it’s time to get a docking station, generally called a dock. Docks are accessories you connect to your laptop to essentially turn it into a desktop machine, with more USB ports, a monitor connection and in some cases even more oomph for graphics and other tasks. These are most handy when you’ve got a dedicated workspace to set it up in, or need more or different ports than your laptop offers.  But a dock is not an end-all solution. First, getting one doesn’t mean you can connect anything to it—for example, if your laptop’s graphics card can’t support the high resolution you want on your monitor, a dock likely isn’t going to change that. Second, you’ll lose mobility as you’ll be tied to your home desk.  Upgrading audio and video. Videoconferencing is crucial to remote work, but unfortunately not every laptop is built for it. Older models might have poorly placed microphones and cameras (such as one right above the keyboard, perfect for looking up your nose,) or have resolution limits that leave you looking blocky.  If your camera stinks, look at the external ones you already have. Action cams like the GoPro have webcam apps and modes, and you can place them anywhere you’d like with a suction cup mount. You’ll just need to remember to keep them charged. Any camera is dependent on how much light is shining on its subject. The lower resolution of the camera, the more light you’ll need. If your laptop is making you look bad, literally, use a USB-powered light source to see if you get a better look. There are LED panels or ring lights that clip to the top of your laptop, or stick to the back with a suction cup, to put a light directly on your face. Get one with adjustable brightness and color settings, so you can fill in shadows, and tweak it so you’re happy with how you look on video chat. A Bluetooth receiver can strip a few wires out of your workspace while giving you better audio. There are some out there you can plug into a headphone jack and pair with the headphones you already have, giving you an instant audio upgrade. Just as with an external camera, you’ll need to keep them charged, so consider putting a USB hub on your desk to keep your batteries topped up. Gut upgrades. If you’ve gotten the all-clear from your IT department, or work for a company with a bring-your-own-device policy, you can go even further by swapping out some internal parts. Replacing or leveling up your battery and RAM memory are two of the easiest hardware upgrades. But they both require you to get up close and personal with your computer’s guts.  But before you open up your machine, get an anti-static wrist strap, as even small amounts of electricity can fry components.  Depending on the age and design of your machine, you might need specialized screwdrivers called Torx bits. These have a star shape to them and you can find a set at auto supply stores, bike shops, and online. Once you get the tools you need, make sure the parts you’ll be replacing can work with the RAM and processor you have. Check their required specifications on the manufacturer’s website. The battery is the easiest part to upgrade or replace. Consult your laptop’s manual to check if you can swap out the battery. If it’s possible, there will be instructions on how to do so, usually by popping it out and swapping in a new one. The battery should slide in and click firmly into the electrical connections. If it’s too loose, or too tight, don’t force it in. [Related: One telltale sign it’s time to replace your laptop battery] Stick with the original manufacturer for your battery if at all possible, since that will generally keep your warranty and limit frustration. If you have to buy a third-party battery, verify with the manufacturer that it’s compatible with your model. You may also want to check user reviews for people with the same laptop. Memory, more specifically the RAM in the motherboard, is a cheap way to get more from your computer—the more RAM it has, the faster it’ll go. However, the motherboard will determine how much RAM your laptop can take, so before you try anything, check the user manual for that maximum amount. RAM clips into the motherboard, so depending on where in your machine that is, it may be really easy to get to it—or really hard. If you can access it, just pop up the current RAM and swap in your new module. When you’re done, boot up your computer and make sure everything works fine before you screw everything back together. If you see any problems, reverse course by popping in the old RAM module back into place.  computer computer setup computers DIY tech MORE TO READ. RELATED It’s time to upgrade your webcam. Blow your unspent 2020 pants budget on a fancy camera. READ NOW RELATED Make your laptop battery last all day. Take these steps to reduce your battery anxiety. RELATED As more people work from home, internet speed requirements have become a critical issue. Millions of American students and employees lack the necessary connection. Like science, tech, and DIY projects? Sign up to receive Popular Science's emails and get the highlights. LET'S GO
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Result 18
TitleWhat can I upgrade in a laptop?
Urlhttps://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000618.htm
DescriptionInformation about what you can upgrade in a laptop computer
Date
Organic Position16
H1What can I upgrade in a laptop?
H2What can I upgrade in my laptop?
Can I upgrade the memory in my laptop?
Can I upgrade the processor in my laptop?
Can I upgrade my video card in my laptop?
Can I upgrade the laptops hard drive?
Can I upgrade the laptops LCD to a bigger size?
Can I upgrade other peripherals such as the modem or network card?
Related information
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat can I upgrade in my laptop?
Can I upgrade the memory in my laptop?
Can I upgrade the processor in my laptop?
Can I upgrade my video card in my laptop?
Can I upgrade the laptops hard drive?
Can I upgrade the laptops LCD to a bigger size?
Can I upgrade other peripherals such as the modem or network card?
Related information
BodyWhat can I upgrade in a laptop? Updated: 04/12/2021 by Computer Hope Unlike a desktop computer, laptops and other portable computers often do not offer many upgrade options for improved functionality. Below is a listing of common laptop upgrade questions and the answers to each of the questions regarding laptop and portable computer upgrades. These upgrades refer to the upgrade done to a laptop after its been purchased. What can I upgrade in my laptop? Can I upgrade the memory in my laptop? Can I upgrade the processor in my laptop? Can I upgrade my video card in my laptop? Can I upgrade the laptops hard drive? Can I upgrade the laptops LCD to a bigger size? Can I upgrade other peripherals such as the modem or network card? What can I upgrade in my laptop? This answer varies on the manufacturer and model of the laptop or portable computer. However, the majority of laptops and other portable computers only allow a user to easily upgrade or change the system memory, hard drive, and have options for a better battery. Can I upgrade the memory in my laptop? Almost every laptop and portable computer allows a user to upgrade the memory (RAM) in the computer. Often this is done by opening a compartment on the bottom of the laptop and adding an additional stick of memory or replacing existing memory. Many times you must purchase the memory for your laptop through the laptop manufacturer or an authorized dealer. However, many memory manufacturers and companies also make compatible memory for many of the newer laptops. If you have questions about your laptop's memory specifications or how to upgrade the memory, contact the manufacturer of your laptop. A listing of memory manufacturers and related web pages is also on our memory network section. Can I upgrade the processor in my laptop? Some laptop and portable computer manufacturers allow their customers to upgrade their processor speeds. However, the amount of money spent on a faster processor usually results in a small increase in performance and may not be worth the upgrade. This upgrade often requires the laptop computer or portable computer manufacturer or authorized repair shop to perform the upgrade and is not something an end-user can do. If you are curious about the availability of upgrading your laptop or portable computer processor and the cost involved, you must contact the laptop manufacturer for additional information. Can I upgrade my video card in my laptop? Some high-performance laptop and portable computer manufacturers offer models that enable users to upgrade the laptop's video card or graphics accelerator. Unless you're one of the lucky few who have one of these laptops or portable computers, you can't upgrade your video card. If you are unsure, contact the laptop manufacturer for additional information. Instead of replacing the laptop video card you may also consider an eGPU, if your laptop supports the necessary connections. Can I upgrade the laptops hard drive? Most manufacturers allow a hard drive to be replaced by a larger hard drive or even a traditional hard drive to an SSD hard drive. For laptops that allow the user to easily replace the hard drive, there is usually a compartment that allows access to the hard drive. Alternatively, you can consider an external hard drive solution that utilize connectivity technology such as USB or FireWire. Although these solutions take up additional space and may be a bit slower, they are fairly inexpensive and might be your only option. Can I upgrade the laptops LCD to a bigger size? We are unfamiliar with any laptop or portable computer manufacturer that offers an upgrade for the LCD or screen that comes pre-shipped with the computer. Therefore, this is not an upgrade option. However, you can always connect the laptop to an external monitor, projector, or another display of any size. How to connect an external display to my laptop. Can I upgrade other peripherals such as the modem or network card? We are unfamiliar with any laptop or portable computer manufacturer that offers an upgrade for the internal modem or network card. However, users can purchase a new PC Card or ExpressCard modem, network card, and numerous other peripherals and connect them externally to replace the component that came with the laptop. Related information. How to remove or replace a laptop keyboard. See our upgrade definition for further information and related links. Laptop help and support.
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Result 19
TitleWhich Upgrades Will Improve Your PC Performance the Most?
Urlhttps://www.makeuseof.com/tag/upgrades-will-improve-pc-performance/
DescriptionNeed a faster computer but aren't sure what you should upgrade on your PC? Follow our PC upgrade checklist to find out
Date18 Oct 2021
Organic Position17
H1www.makeuseof.com
H21. Why You Should Upgrade RAM
2. Consider Upgrading the Graphics Card
3. Get a Faster Storage Drive
4. Upgrading the Processor
5. How Upgrading Software Can Improve Performance
What Else Should You Upgrade?
The Best PC Upgrades for You
H3Read Next
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The 20 Best Android TV Apps Worth Installing ASAP
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26 Awesome Uses for a Raspberry Pi
H2WithAnchors1. Why You Should Upgrade RAM
2. Consider Upgrading the Graphics Card
3. Get a Faster Storage Drive
4. Upgrading the Processor
5. How Upgrading Software Can Improve Performance
What Else Should You Upgrade?
The Best PC Upgrades for You
Bodywww.makeuseof.com Follow Us Follow MUO. Which Upgrades Will Improve Your PC Performance the Most? By Andy Betts Updated Oct 18, 2021 Share Share Tweet Email Need a faster computer but aren't sure what you should upgrade on your PC? Follow our PC upgrade checklist to find out. Is your PC fast enough for the things you want to do? Does it take forever to boot or grind to a halt when you try to use Photoshop? If so, it's probably time to upgrade your hardware. But now you're wondering, "What should I upgrade on my PC?" What gives the best bang for your buck, and which upgrades are a waste of time? Here's our guide to the best PC upgrades you can make. 1. Why You Should Upgrade RAM. Image Credit: Kingston Adding more memory is the easiest and most accessible way to upgrade your PC. It's affordable, you can do it on almost any computer, and it doesn't require much tech know-how. It's also one of the best laptop upgrades if your machine allows it. If you've never cracked open your PC case before, this is the place to start. A RAM upgrade delivers an instant performance boost to almost all PCs that are running slow. The more RAM you've got for resource-hungry tasks like video editing or gaming, the better. Even for casual use, extra RAM will enable you to have more apps running in the background or keep a greater number of tabs open in your browser. So, how much RAM do you need? 4GB is the minimum amount. It's fine for general use, with up to around ten browser tabs, a little photo editing, and video streaming. You'll notice a significant improvement if you upgrade to 8GB. This is good for serious multi-tasking, browsing with up to 30 tabs open, editing RAW photos, and mid-range gaming. For heavier tasks, you should look to 16GB for best results. Serious gaming, media editing, or any pro-level tasks will be best with this much memory. You might also take a look at Superfetch on Windows and its effect on your RAM, along with the best DDR4 RAM to improve your PC's performance. If you need to know what RAM is compatible with your computer, memory maker Crucial has a PC upgrade advisor tool that helps you identify the type of memory you need. 2. Consider Upgrading the Graphics Card. Image Credit: Gigabyte We've got this second on the list, but if you're a serious gamer, then it should probably be the first thing you upgrade. If you aren't a serious gamer, 3D modeler, or 3D animator, then you might not ever need to upgrade it at all. Skimping out on graphics is an easy way to save on costs, so PC manufacturers tend to go with integrated graphics cards rather than dedicated graphics cards. And on modern systems, integrated graphics is good enough for most users. It'll let you do some Photoshop work or watch 4K video. Around 10 percent of users on Steam are even gaming with integrated graphics. But if you do need superior graphics performance for gaming or VR work, then upgrading to something like a Radeon RX 5700-XT will give you a big boost. You can compare the performance of dedicated cards against your current option at gpu.userbenchmark.com. 3. Get a Faster Storage Drive. Image Credit: Samsung There are two reasons to upgrade your hard drive: you're running out of space, or you want faster performance. If you've done everything you can to free up your hard disk storage and still regularly run out of space, then you will need to swap it out for a larger one. Not only does a full hard drive make it impossible to save new data, but it can also impact performance. At the very least, try to keep 10GB of free space for the operating system to use. For hard disk drives, consider upgrading the physical speed. For example, if your PC currently has a 5400RPM drive, upgrading to a 7200RPM model will give you a nice speed boost. But one of the most useful computer upgrades is to switch to a solid-state drive. These use flash memory instead of a spinning disk and are many times faster than a standard hard disk drive. On average, a 5400RPM drive might achieve write speeds up to 100Mbps, a 7200RPM drive up to 150Mbps, and a solid-state drive over 500Mbps. High-end SSDs like the Samsung 970 EVO Plus have incredibly high write speeds of 3300Mbps and more. Ultimately, a faster data drive impacts your entire system. It means faster boot times, faster program loading times, faster speeds for launching games, and more responsiveness in programs that use large files (like video editing or RAW photo editing). The big complaint about solid-state drives was that they had much smaller capacities and were more expensive than hard disk drives. While this is still technically true, it's much less of an issue today. 1TB SSDs are now pretty common and very affordable—take a look at the SanDisk SSD Plus as a great example. That should be big enough for many people, but you could consider a hybrid drive if you need more space. This combines both technologies to give you a balance between speed and size. 4. Upgrading the Processor. Upgrading your PC's processor is a far more advanced task than the other upgrades we've covered so far. Not only is it physically trickier to install, but it's also one of the more expensive upgrades. There are socket compatibility issues to worry about, too. More importantly, a processor upgrade isn't always a good thing and may not bring you the performance improvement you're looking for. The benchmark tests at cpubenchmark.net can help you compare the relative performances of different processors. In general, these tests show that modest updates don't deliver big improvements. A processor is only worth upgrading if the upgrade is significant, like moving from an Intel Core i3 to a Core i5, or from an older generation to a newer one. Don't go for something just because it has a faster clock speed. Processors are expensive and may require you to upgrade your motherboard (and that might require you to buy new RAM). Even if your motherboard is compatible with a new processor on paper, it may need a BIOS update to work. It can be a pain, so check before you buy. Ultimately, if your processor is the speed bottleneck in your system, you might want to consider buying a whole new system altogether. 5. How Upgrading Software Can Improve Performance. Chances are that the programs on your PC are set to update automatically. If not, you probably click the Update button as soon as you're alerted to the release of new program versions. In most cases, this is the right thing to do. But not always. For a lot of software, the version number is depicted in the form of Major.Minor.Revision. So, if an update is 0.0.1, then it's likely to be bug fixes. If it's 0.1.0, then it likely includes optimizations and small new features. Minor and Revision updates should be installed right away. But Major updates—a change in the full version number—are a different matter. It's almost a given that new versions of programs will use more resources than old versions, so if your PC's hardware is already being stretched to the max, you should deal with that first. The same goes for operating system updates. The regular incremental updates are essential for performance and security reasons, but whole new versions aren't. They will almost certainly have bugs and may run slow on your system. If your PC is running fine, it's worth holding off on operating system upgrades until you're absolutely sure they won't turn out to be a downgrade. Software tweaks are often a good way to make your computer feel faster without needing to spend any money. Our guide on how to make Windows 10 faster is a good place to get started. What Else Should You Upgrade? The motherboard is the most difficult of all upgrades since all of the other PC parts attach to it. It's only worth considering if you're dead set on a new processor that's not compatible with your current setup. It won't give you much of a speed boost on its own. There are other components to consider, too. A keen photographer, for instance, would surely benefit more from having a better monitor than from making Lightroom run a little quicker. Equally, a writer could become more productive with a mechanical keyboard. Instead of focusing purely on performance, think about how you can upgrade your PC experience. Speed is important, but it's not the only thing that matters. Make sure you buy parts that are compatible with your existing kit. A good PC upgrade checker is PCPartPicker, which helps you identify and shop for the right components. The Best PC Upgrades for You. When you're deciding how to upgrade your PC, we recommend RAM, SSDs, and graphics cards as the main areas to focus on. Ideally, you should always tailor your upgrades to your precise needs. Taking a moment to figure out where the issues are in your system will help you make the right decision regarding a hardware upgrade. We hope you like the items we recommend and discuss! MUO has affiliate and sponsored partnerships, so we receive a share of the revenue from some of your purchases. This won’t affect the price you pay and helps us offer the best product recommendations. 5 Common Mistakes Slowing Down Your Windows PC (And What to Do Instead) Is your computer running slow? You might be the cause! Here are several mistakes that slow down your PC and how to avoid them. Read Next Share Share Tweet Email Related Topics Technology Explained Computer Memory CPU Hard Drive Computer Maintenance Solid State Drive Graphics Card Computer Parts About The Author Andy Betts (217 Articles Published) Andy is a freelance writer and junior editor for Android at MUO. He's been writing about consumer tech since the early 2000s for a wide range of publications, and has a passion for all things mobile. More From Andy Betts Subscribe to our newsletter. Join our newsletter for tech tips, reviews, free ebooks, and exclusive deals! Click here to subscribe Read Next. 9 DIY Projects for Your Old Hard Drive . The 20 Best Android TV Apps Worth Installing ASAP . 5 Ways to Utilize All of Your Fitbit's Fitness Features . The Samsung Freestyle Lets You Take Your Entertainment Anywhere . An Introduction to Dates and Times in JavaScript . How to Reset Your AirPods to Factory Settings . How to Schedule Messages Using Truecaller . How to Use Proportional Editing in Blender: A Beginner's Guide . 26 Awesome Uses for a Raspberry Pi .
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Result 20
TitleLaptop Repair London, Upgrade your Laptop - Any Make and Model
Urlhttps://www.itfixlondon.com/page/laptop-repair-upgrade-services/3
Description
Date
Organic Position18
H1Laptop Repair London, Upgrade your Laptop - Any Make and Model
H2Request Quote!
Laptop Repair & Upgrade Services
Upgrade laptop
H3Our Services
H2WithAnchorsRequest Quote!
Laptop Repair & Upgrade Services
Upgrade laptop
BodyLaptop Repair London, Upgrade your Laptop - Any Make and Model Request Quote! Laptop Repair & Upgrade Services. IT fix London has over 10 years of laptop repair experience and  we have built an excellent reputation for providing high quality repair service with lowest fee, fixed rate laptop repairs and maintenance services at laptop repair London.   Our experienced technicians are fully capable with all the necessary equipments and expert knowledge to resolve any issue and not only fixing your laptop also to provide to a complete solutions of your IT needs. We can repair laptop at your home or office at your convenience time so you don't have to curry a faulty laptop to your local repair shop. If you would like to take advantage of our walk in repair service, we can diagnose and repair it while you wait. Upgrade laptop. We can upgrade your laptop easily and cheaply. Here are more common upgrades people usually request: Install more RAM: if your laptop is performing sluggish, upgrading your laptop ram may solve the problem. We can investigate if you laptop’s motherboard has free available RAM slots, if there is no free ram slot available we can still upgrade it by remove your old RAM stick and replacing with faster Ram with more capacity. We can Upgrades laptops hard drive to faster SSD drive. Fastest turnaround time we deal with all brands , makes and model include Acer laptop, Toshiba, Sony laptop, Alienware, Asus, Dell, eMachines, Gateway, HP, Lenovo, MSI, Packard Bell, Advent and Compaq Presario Laptop. Our Services. Laptop Repairs MAC Repairs Desktop Repairs Data Recovery © COPYRIGHT BY IT FIX LONDON.
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Result 21
TitleHow to Upgrade Your Laptop With a Solid State Drive (SSD) | Seagate US
Urlhttps://www.seagate.com/gb/en/do-more/upgrade-laptop-with-ssd-master-dm/
DescriptionIncrease your system performance with an easy SSD upgrade
Date
Organic Position19
H1How to Upgrade Your Laptop With a Solid State Drive (SSD)
H2Reasons to upgrade to an SSD:
Before you begin your upgrade:
What you need to have on hand:
How to upgrade your laptop drive:
Cloning the contents from your HDD to your BarraCuda SSD:
Installing the BarraCuda SSD on your laptop:
FAQ: How can I tell if a 7mm BarraCuda SSD will fit in my laptop?
H3Select Your Country/Region
Related Products
H2WithAnchorsReasons to upgrade to an SSD:
Before you begin your upgrade:
What you need to have on hand:
How to upgrade your laptop drive:
Cloning the contents from your HDD to your BarraCuda SSD:
Installing the BarraCuda SSD on your laptop:
FAQ: How can I tell if a 7mm BarraCuda SSD will fit in my laptop?
BodyHow to Upgrade Your Laptop With a Solid State Drive (SSD) Do you have an older model laptop computer that doesn’t deliver the performance you need? If so, you can breathe new life into your existing computer and increase your system performance without having to purchase a new laptop. Simply replace your existing 2.5-inch hard drive with a Seagate® BarraCuda SSD (solid state drive). Don’t be afraid to tackle this simple but effective way to boost performance and add needed capacity to your aging laptop. You’ll be up and running in no time—and feel like you’ve purchased a brand new system! Reasons to upgrade to an SSD:. Faster boot up and application load times More robust data protection Very easy to install Before you begin your upgrade:. Be sure that you are aware and understand any information regarding your warranty. Any unauthorized work on your system may void the system manufacturer’s warranty. Review the safety instructions inside of your system’s product manual before working on your computer. For PC users, it is recommended that your system is running Windows 7 or later. Also, check your BIOS settings and update them as needed for SSD compatibility. What you need to have on hand:. The product manual for your laptop. Go to the laptop manufacturer’s website and download it. It will provide you with specific instructions on how to remove your laptop hard drive. An ESD wrist strap. If you do not have an ESD wrist strap, be sure you ground yourself by touching something metal before touching and working with the hard drive. Static electricity can permanently damage your hard drive, so please use caution. An external USB drive enclosure, a USB cable, and data transfer software. Alternatively, you can buy a data transfer kit that includes all of these items (e.g., CMS products). If you already have an external USB drive enclosure and cables, you can download the free DiscWizard software application. A small screwdriver. How to upgrade your laptop drive:. Follow these instructions when duplicating the data on your old drive, moving the data to your new BarraCuda SSD and installing your new SSD drive on your laptop. Please note that since there are differences between laptop systems, there may be some variation in these instructions. Cloning the contents from your HDD to your BarraCuda SSD:. 1. Open the USB drive enclosure and place the new SSD inside (on the tray), making sure that the top of the drive is facing up. Slide the tray and your new drive back into the enclosure. Tighten the screws. 2. Use the data transfer software you installed on your laptop to prepare your data. Follow the simple instructions and screen prompts. 3. Connect the USB cable to the USB drive enclosure (with the new drive installed) and to the laptop. It will take a few moments for the external USB drive enclosure to be recognized by your laptop. Once the USB external drive is recognized, you are ready to launch the data transfer software. 4. Launch the data transfer software then wait until the software lets you know that the transfer is complete. Installing the BarraCuda SSD on your laptop:. 1. Unplug your laptop and remove the battery. 2. Remove the existing hard drive. Consult the laptop product manual for any further instructions, if necessary. 3. Remove the cradle (mounting clamp) from the drive and attach it to the new drive. 4. Insert the new drive (with your data on it) into the laptop then replace and tighten the screws. 5. Replace the battery and plug the laptop back into the power source. Once you have completed these steps, you will be up and running with outstanding system performance. FAQ: How can I tell if a 7mm BarraCuda SSD will fit in my laptop? Most existing laptops contain a standard 5400- or 7200-RPM drive that is 9.5mm in height (Figure 1). The BarraCuda SSD comes in 7mm z-height (Figure 2). These sizes represent the height—or thickness—from top to bottom of the drive. The original bracket for the OEM hard drive that you are replacing will almost always be able to fit the new BarraCuda SSD. The side mounting holes relative to the interface connector will be the same as the original HDD, thereby ensuring that the new BarraCuda SSD will fit. Related Products. FireCuda SSHD LEARN MORE LEARN MORE A Seagate Report Rethink Data: Put More of Your Business Data to Work About SeagateOur StoryGlobal CitizenshipTrust CenterQuality Assurance SupportProduct SupportSoftware DownloadsWarranty & ReplacementsContact Us Press CenterNewsMedia KitsBrand Portal Investors PartnersIndirect Partners & ResellersSeagate Champions Seagate Direct & SuppliersSeagate Technology Alliance Program JobsLife at SeagateDiversity, Equity, and InclusionUniversity Programs Where to BuyProduct Finder ©2021 Seagate Technology LLC Legal & PrivacyVulnerability Disclosure Cookies Settings LaCie Maxtor Lyve Labs Seagate Government Solutions Site Map ×
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Result 22
TitleCan I upgrade my laptop RAM and a processor? - Quora
Urlhttps://www.quora.com/Can-I-upgrade-my-laptop-RAM-and-a-processor
Description
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TitleHow to Upgrade my Laptop to Windows 11 | Box.co.uk
Urlhttps://www.box.co.uk/blog/how-to-upgrade-my-laptop-to-windows-11
Description
Date1 Oct 2021
Organic Position21
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BodyBox.co.uk uses cookies to deliver and improve the website experience. See our privacy policy for further details on how we use cookies and how to change your cookie settings. Accept
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TitleUpgrade to the New Windows 11 OS | Microsoft
Urlhttps://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/windows-11
Description
Date
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H1Bring balance to your desktop
H2Life’s better together
New ways to connect
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The browser that puts you first
The latest in PC gaming performance
A PC that adapts to you
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This PC will run Windows 11
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BodyBring balance to your desktop Windows 11 has easy-to-use tools that can help you optimise your screen space and maximise your productivity. Combine that with a Microsoft 365 subscription* and nothing will stop you from getting tasks done. Learn more about Windows 11 tips and tricks. Maximise productivity with Windows 11 Video shows Snap Assist in Windows 11 with Microsoft Word, Microsoft Teams, and Microsoft Edge Life’s better together. Life is better together with Windows 11 Video shows ways to connect with anyone, however you want New ways to connect. With Chat from Microsoft Teams you can reach anyone however you prefer (call, chat, text, video) right from your desktop.2 Connect with anyone. Chat and calling are built into your taskbar and seamlessly integrate with Outlook and Calendar - making it easy to connect in just a couple of clicks.2 Refocus your workflow. PowerPoint, Microsoft Edge, Microsoft Teams—the apps* you need work seamlessly with new multi-tasking tools like Snap layouts, Desktops, and a new more intuitive redocking experience. Your content, curated. Your favourite photos. The world news. Today’s to-do list and tomorrow’s weather. Widgets help you find content that matters to you. It’s all things “you” - always a swipe away.1 Work and play. The apps you need. The shows you love to watch. Find them fast in the new Microsoft Store.10 The browser that puts you first. Work, play, shop, stream, connect - whatever you set out to do, Microsoft Edge on Windows 11 helps you do it with speed and security. The latest in PC gaming performance. Play the latest games with graphics that rival reality. Play with players on console. Play with the peripherals that you love. When it comes to playing your way, Windows 11 makes it happen.1 6 Play on Day One. Halo Infinite, Forza Horizon 5, Age of Empires IV - these are just some of the big names Xbox Game Pass gives you Day One access to (subscription sold separately).3 A PC that adapts to you. With a broad choice of devices — across style, price, features, and forms — you’re sure to find the right fit with Windows 11. SHOP LAPTOPS SHOP 2-IN-1S SHOP ALL-IN-ONES SHOP GAMING PCS How to get Windows 11. PCs preloaded with Windows 11 are available now! And more good news: Many Windows 10 PCs are eligible for a free upgrade.7 LEARN MORE Check for compatibility. Use the PC Health Check app9 to see if your PC can run Windows 11. DOWNLOAD PC HEALTH CHECK APP See minimum system requirements Check for compatibility. See if you’re eligible for upgrade. Go to your PC and download the PC Health Check app to see if your PC can run Windows 11. This PC will run Windows 11. Your PC meets the hardware requirements and is eligible for a free upgrade when it rolls out.4 7 SEE FAQs IF I UPGRADE, WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO MY FILES? This PC will not run Windows 11. Your PC does not currently meet the needed requirements. You can continue to get Windows 10 updates7 8, or you can shop for a new Windows 10 PC that does meet the requirements.4 CAN I CONTINUE TO USE WINDOWS 10? SHOP NEW PCs We’re working on it. We’re doing some extra testing to make sure Windows 11 is ready for certain PCs - yours included. SEE SPECIFICATIONS Get Windows news and updates. Subscribe to our newsletter to get the latest Windows news, feature updates, how-to tips, deals, and more. SUBSCRIBE NOW Links Features and app availability may vary by region. * Some apps and games sold separately. Microsoft 365 subscription sold separately. Some layouts only available based on display resolution and scale settings. 1 Internet access required. Service fees may apply. 2 Certain features require specific hardware, see Windows 11 Specifications. Chatting via SMS is available in limited countries and will be made available to other geos on a rolling basis. Please refer to this page for more details. Internet access required; ISP fees may apply. 3 Xbox Game Pass subscription sold separately (https://www.xbox.com). May require additional hardware and subscriptions. Game titles, number, features and availability vary over time and by device, region and platform (https://www.xbox.com/regions). Recurring memberships are automatically charged at the then-current regular price (subject to change; plus applicable taxes) unless cancelled (account.microsoft.com/services). 4 Certain features require specific hardware, see https://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-11-specifications. 6 Some apps and games sold separately. 7 The Windows 11 upgrade will be delivered to qualifying devices late 2021 into 2022. Timing will vary by device. 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Title16 ways to speed up your laptop | IT PRO
Urlhttps://www.itpro.co.uk/laptops/26047/how-to-speed-up-a-laptop
DescriptionDoes your ageing laptop need a boost? We look at the software tweaks and hardware upgrades that will give your computer a new lease of life
Date
Organic Position23
H116 ways to speed up your laptop
H2Does your ageing laptop need a boost? We look at the software tweaks and hardware upgrades that will give your computer a new lease of life
H3Delete unused programmes
Limit startup programmes
Get rid of 'bloatware'
​Remove malware
Delete unnecessary system resources
Defrag your hard disk
Use ReadyBoost to increase your memory
Switch off unnecessary animations
Disable automatic updates
Remove web results from Windows 10 search
Make Windows 10 search faster
Improve your cooling
Add more RAM
Swap out your hard drive for an SSD
Switch to Linux
Bite the bullet and buy a new laptop
H2WithAnchorsDoes your ageing laptop need a boost? We look at the software tweaks and hardware upgrades that will give your computer a new lease of life
Body16 ways to speed up your laptopDoes your ageing laptop need a boost? We look at the software tweaks and hardware upgrades that will give your computer a new lease of life. by: Adam Shepherd8 Dec 20218 Dec 2021ShutterstockThe saying 'time heals all wounds' can be applied to most things, such as physical injuries or troubled relationships, but it's somewhat redundant for hardware. For desktop PC time is rather unkind; their average lifespan is around five to eight years, and it's even shorter for laptop-owners (three to five). Unfortunately technology doesn't last forever (it's an industry built on upgrades) but that isn't necessarily a bad thing, as it can lead to new, innovative products that make our lives that little bit easier.Raspberry Pi: Top projects to try yourselfHow to unlock Windows 10's secret modesMake Linux look like Windows 7Still, letting go is not easy, especially if you've invested a lot into a laptop or desktop. But if your hardware starts to get increasingly slow, and starts to impact your productivity, you're going to have to find ways to fix it. Luckily, there are some helpful hacks to extend the lifespan of most laptops and desktop computers.Nothing is guaranteed, and you will have to upgrade, eventually, but we've compiled the best advice to help buy you some more time to find a suitable replacement.Delete unused programmes. The internet is full of helpful tools and utilities that can be downloaded to accomplish various tasks, from data backup to desktop customisation, but these applications tend to accumulate over time. It's easy to build up a large collection of programmes on your hard drive that you don't really use any more, and these can often contribute to laptops feeling slower in day-to-day use. Utility programmes you might have installed over the lifetime of your device, such as virus scanners, disk cleaners, and backup tools, often run automatically at startup, quietly chugging along in the background where you can't see them. "Many people have no idea they're even running," Microsoft warns. A good rule of thumb is to regularly audit your installed applications (which you can do from Windows 10’s settings menu) and remove any that you no longer use regularly. If you need to download tools for specific one-off jobs (such as cloning a hard drive) then you should also uninstall these once you're finished with them, to prevent similar situations in the future.Limit startup programmes. Related ResourceThe path to CX excellenceFour stages to thrive in the experience economyFree downloadMany programmes (including some of the utilities mentioned above) are designed to start automatically as soon as Windows boots. Software manufacturers often set their programmes to open in the background, out of sight, so they'll open right away when you click their icons. That's helpful for programmes you use a lot, but for programmes you rarely or never use, this wastes precious memory and acts as a drag on overall system speed as well as making your machine slower to boot to the desktop.Thankfully, it’s now easier than ever in Windows 10 to adjust what applications are allowed to run on startup. Simply head to the settings menu, click on ‘Apps’ followed by the ‘Startup’ tab; this will show you a list of every program or service that has the option of running at startup, a label showing the impact on system resources and performance, and a toggle switch to block or allow it from running on boot. Simply flip the switch on any services that you don’t want running all the time, and you should start to see an improvement in performance and boot times.Get rid of 'bloatware'. It's not just old computers that can suffer from latency. New computers can too and that's often down to the bloatware manufacturers preinstall on their laptops. This sometimes takes the form of the manufacturer’s own software and services, but it can also include third-party applications which are preinstalled as part of commercial distribution deals between the manufacturer and software vendors. Whether you refer to it as bloatware, crapware or PUP (potentially unwanted programmes), this unwelcome software can really slow down a computer. Similarly to the old programmes and utilities mentioned above, these services can clog up processing power and memory and can eat into valuable storage space. You may find that some preinstalled programmes - such as the Microsoft Office suite or Dropbox desktop client - are useful additions, but there’s a good chance that at least a couple of them will be surplus to requirements, so it’s worth taking the time to go through a new laptop and identify any preinstalled apps that can be given the boot. Remove malware. ShutterstockIt’s frighteningly easy to pick up malware on the modern web, whether through watering hole attacks, drive-by downloads or malicious email attachments. Malware isn’t necessarily something that instantly renders your computer unusable though; it can often lurk on your system for years, leaking data and spying on your activities. It can also slow down your machine, and unlike startup programmes, it can be difficult to identify when malware is the cause of a slowdown.Fortunately, this is a relatively easy problem to fix. A free security suite should protect your system from the majority of common threats on the web, and setting up regular recurring virus scans will help keep your system zipping along without being gummed up by malicious processes.Delete unnecessary system resources. ShutterstockA simple but effective way of making things run a little smoother is to delete any unused resources. You can do this fairly easily using a file scanner tool, which will tell you whether there are any older folders or files you haven’t accessed or used in some time. This might come in the form of older documents, or maybe even data stored on your laptop, including temporary files and cookies that could be affecting your PC’s performance.A number of tools exist to help you with this. One of the most widely used is CCleaner, developed by Avast, which will clean potentially unwanted files and invalid Windows Registry entries from a computer. In 2019, the app made the news after hackers managed to breach the company and used the software to spread malware to its customers. Avast claims to have fully recovered from this incident, and today CCleaner remains an incredibly useful tool, one that we would recommend using if you're new to PC maintenance.The tool will scan your PC’s hard drive and look for any folders or files that haven’t been accessed in a while. It will then delete anything you allow it to, while also taking a look at any problems that may exist in the registry that might be slowing down your PC. The tool also has a tab that allows you to uninstall programmes directly through the utility, instead of having to go through the Control Panel, as well as a function for turning off startup programmes, and another that locates hidden files that may be using up too much storage.You can download and install CCleaner from here. Once installed, start the application. This will open on the ‘Health Check’ tab, which runs an overall system scan for a variety of problems, but we’d recommend running a custom clean to get a little more granularity. In the ‘Custom Clean’ tab, click on ‘Analyse’ to scan the selected components, followed by ‘Run Cleaner’ to perform the actual operation. This will scan the drive looking for items such as temporary internet files, memory dumps and more advanced stuff like cleaning out Prefetch data. You can choose what items you want to scan for, such as specific applications or system components. The Registry tab can also help you clean up any unnecessary registry entries that could slow down your laptop.You can also use the Tools tab to explore various other features offered by CCleaner, including disk analysis and application removal. You may also want to head into CCleaner’s settings menu and disable the update notifications, as these may become irritating if you’re only planning on using the application every couple of months.Defrag your hard disk. Old mechanical hard drives can often suffer from fragmentation. This happens when the various bits that make up a complete file are scattered across the physical surface of the drive platter. Because the drive head has to travel further across the surface of the disk to read all the separate portions, this slows the machine down. Defragmentation - or defragging - restructures the disk so that all of the bits that make up various files are grouped in the same physical area, which hopefully increases the speed of hard drive access at the same time. Note, however, that because solid-state drives (SSDs) do not use spinning-platter disks, they are immune to fragmentation.It’s easy to check whether a physical disk needs defragging; simply head to the storage tab in Windows 10’s system settings menu, and click the option labelled ‘Optimise drives’. This will open the optimisation wizard, which allows you to analyse all of your machine’s drives individually and presents you with a percentage showing how fragmented each one is. From there, you can defrag the drive, which should result in more stability and faster performance.Use ReadyBoost to increase your memory. ReadyBoost is a clever little feature that was introduced by Microsoft as part of Windows Vista. It essentially allows you to boost your system memory by using a flash drive as additional capacity.Although it’s not as effective as swapping a traditional hard drive for a solid-state one or adding more RAM, ReadyBoost will give a little uptick to the performance of your system, particularly if you’re using a low-powered laptop with only a couple of gigabytes of RAM. It puts aside a part of the flash drive memory for things such as caching, assisting often-used apps to open quicker, and increasing random read access speeds of the hard disk.To use ReadyBoost, first insert a USB memory drive into an empty USB slot on the laptop you wish to speed up. A dialogue box will open asking you what you want to do with the flash drive. Choose ‘Speed up my system using Windows ReadyBoost'. Another window will open and here you can select how much of the drive you wish to give over for boosting. It’s generally a good idea to use as much of the drive as possible.Once that’s done, confirm the settings and the window will close. The drive will be automatically detected and used whenever it’s plugged in.One last note: if your machine is fast enough already, Windows will prevent you from using ReadyBoost, as your system won’t be able to see any benefit from it.Switch off unnecessary animations. Ever since Windows Vista (and some would argue Windows XP), Microsoft’s operating system has become cluttered with fancy graphics and animated flourishes that do little to improve productivity. By default, Windows will automatically disable some of these based on how powerful your system is, but if you’re willing to sacrifice a bit more aesthetic appeal for the sake of speed, it’s easy to switch all of the graphics off and run on the bare essentials.To do this, open that Start Menu and start typing in 'Adjust the appearance and performance of Windows'. Click on this option and from the scroll menu untick everything you don't wish to see on the desktop (such as shadows, smooth fonts, et cetera). Click OK and this will change the desktop to something more basic looking.On systems other than Windows 10, switching everything off gives the desktop a Windows 95-style look and feel. It’s surprising to note how much of the so-called 'flat look' of Windows 10 relies on graphical flourishes once everything is switched off. Disable automatic updates. Normally, we wouldn’t advise you to disable automatic software updates, as they’re the simplest way to keep your machine safe and secure from an array of cyber attacks and compatibility issues. After all, turning off the automatic updates has the potential to cause your device to become plagued with serious security holes. On the other hand, there are some cases in which this may be considered excusable.For example, if your work laptop doubles as a gaming device, there’s a high possibility that games distribution platforms such as Steam and the Epic Games Store are often installing multiple large updates and patches in the background. The Adobe Creative Suite is also prone to significant updates. By turning this option off and updating only when you actually want to use the software, you can ensure that these updates aren’t getting in the way when you’d rather be doing something else.We would still advise that any critical software or frequently-used services - such as Windows or antivirus updates - are left on automatic, but if you’re really pushed for processing headroom, you can set these to download and install at a specific time when you’re unlikely to be using the device, such as late at night or at the weekend.Remove web results from Windows 10 search. Search indexing in Windows 10 has come a long way from its origins in previous Windows versions. What this feature does is create an index of files and folders throughout your system, along with their metadata, to find them more efficiently when you try and look them up using the operating system’s built-in search function. In recent years, the way Windows handles search indexing has been radically improved, but it can still be worth optimising if you want to make your system more efficient. First, you can disable the web results that appear in Windows 10’s search menu, because let's face it, you’ll almost certainly use a web browser for searching. Simply hit the Windows key, type gpedit.msc and hit enter to bring up the Group Policy Editor. With this open, click on Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Search.Find the policies labelled 'Do not allow web search', 'Don't search the web or display web results in Search' and 'Don't search the web or display web results in Search over metered connections', then double-click to edit them and set preference for each one to ‘enabled’. You’ll need to restart your computer for the changes to take effect, but once they do, you should stop seeing web results and suggestions in your system search bar.Make Windows 10 search faster. If you want to further improve the speed of your machine’s search function, you can also change the locations that Windows Search indexes to exclude stuff you know you don't need to find. This can include locations such as the App Data folder that contains web browser cache and cookies, among other things. If you don't use Internet Explorer or Edge you may not want these indexed either.To manage these, open the Indexing Options by pressing Windows and Pause to open the System control panel, then click on 'All control panel items' in the location bar at the top, and then find and click on Indexing Options. This then opens a window that shows all the locations that are included in Windows 10's search indexer. Here you can choose which locations to include or exclude to speed up this search function.Improve your cooling. Have you ever witnessed your laptop getting disturbingly warm during the summer months, sometimes accompanied by the sound of a starting plane? Sadly, this means that your laptop has reached its maximum safe operating temperature, making its processors reduce their heat output by suppressing their performance.A lot of laptops come with built-in cooling systems such as fans or heatsinks which aim to facilitate delivering its topmost speeds before the processor’s temperature escalates too much. However, in many cases, this simply isn’t sufficient to experience the full potential of your processor’s capabilities.Fortunately, there are some options available on the market which are worth investing in, such as an external cooling pad. This device is placed underneath your laptop to cool it down by blowing cold air into its underside, keeping the internal components from overheating. These are optimal when used with laptops that have airflow vents situated at the bottom of their chassis, and are available for as low as £10.Add more RAM. Many of the tweaks we’ve listed already are based on freeing up additional system memory to be used in general operation. However, if your laptop has 2GB of memory or less, adding some additional capacity is a great way of eking out extra performance. There are some caveats to this, however.If you’re running a 32-bit version of Windows, the maximum amount of RAM you can have in one system is 3GB. With these systems, if you have 2GB and you add another 2GB, Windows will only use 3GB of RAM. This is because of the limits 32-bit operating systems have when addressing memory.Related ResourceChoosing a collaboration platformEight questions every IT leader should askDownload nowA more important point to note is that for many laptops, this simply won’t be an option. In the past, laptops featured removable RAM sticks, meaning they could be swapped out for repairs or upgrades. However, the drive for an ever-thinner chassis has led to many manufacturers soldering their RAM directly to the motherboard, which makes an upgrade all but impossible. Even if your laptop does use replaceable SODIMMs for its RAM, actually opening up and tinkering with the chassis is likely to be a fiddly and involved process, and is almost certain to void the machine’s warranty. On the other hand, if your laptop is slow enough that you’re considering a RAM upgrade, chances are that it’s already old enough to be out of warranty, but it’s worth bearing in mind regardless.Swap out your hard drive for an SSD. If your laptop has a mechanical hard drive, then swapping it for a solid-state drive (SSD) could pay dividends. As there are no moving parts, an SSD has read and write speeds far quicker than any traditional drive, as well as better reliability, and can revitalise an ailing system. If your laptop already uses an SSD, it might also be worth considering an upgrade to a faster SSD.Over the past few years, SSD prices have gone down and capacities up, so putting one in your laptop won't break the bank. However, as with RAM, many laptop hard drives won’t be replaceable or will use specialised form-factors which prevent the use of third-party drives. Assuming your laptop will support an upgrade, you can use a cloning tool to copy everything from your old disk to an SSD rather than reinstalling Windows from scratch. Numerous freeware tools can be used for this task, such as Todo Backup Free 9.0. Many SSD manufacturers will also include a license key for disk imaging tools with the purchase of a new drive. Switch to Linux. If all else fails, your last resort in reviving your laptop might be to switch to a Linux-based OS. Of course, this might not be an option for everyone but is definitely worth considering. Taking the leap to Linux means a significantly less resource-intensive operating system for your computer, with numerous versions designed with the sole purpose of being gentle on your old hardware. Gentler than Windows, at least.However, one downside to this option is that trading in your Windows OS for Linux isn’t the most straightforward journey. In fact, it’s a task that will require you to come prepared with time, patience, a USB stick, as well as copious amounts of troubleshooting.On the other hand, the challenging installation process might be worth it. Linux is, after all, a truly impressive and useful operating system and you’re likely to find it easier to use than it at first seems.Bite the bullet and buy a new laptop. ShutterstockIt is worth considering this as an option, although it might be seen as a last resort. Buying a new laptop, of course, isn’t some frivolous purchase. It can be, in fact, quite expensive to do so. However, if you’re already spending more than you’d like on repair costs, it could actually be better, and more financially sustainable, to invest in a brand new device. After all, most devices come with at least a year of warranty, which means that some issues will be eligible for repairs, like faulty hardware or operating system malfunctions.Furthermore, there are plenty of good quality, affordable laptops on the market. Even though some may find it difficult to let go of their beloved hardware, there are still lots of good options available to purchase, and you might find some to be just as good, if not better, than your legacy device.It is worth doing some research if you decide to get a new laptop. It’s the perfect opportunity to reevaluate your hardware needs, whether they are business-related or personal, as well as any other requirements you’d like to see in your new device.Many manufacturers have reimagined their offerings following last year’s shift to remote working, by making their devices more suitable to the current working conditions. For example, HP unveiled a new line of home office laptops “designed to power hybrid work environments and growing personal creative studios”.Buying a new device is also a great time to think outside the box. Would you get more benefit from a PC? What about a tablet or even a 2-in-1? Now is your best time to take all the options into account.Hardwareoperating systemsLaptopslaptopWindows 7Windows 10Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare via EmailFeatured ResourcesThe Total Economic Impact™ of deploying Dell EMC PowerScale storageCost savings and business benefits of deploymentFree DownloadThe definitive guide to migrating to the cloudMigrate apps to the public cloud with multi-cloud infrastructure solutionsFree downloadAchieving network modernisation for the decade aheadAn IDC whitepaperFree downloadAPEX custom solutionsA study of usage-based consumption models for storage Free downloadRecommended. 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Result 26
Title5 Things You Need to Know Before Upgrading Laptop Hardware
Urlhttps://www.minitool.com/news/upgrading-laptop-hardware-019.html
DescriptionBefore upgrading laptop hardware, here are 5 things you need to know. It involves what you can upgrade in your laptop, is it worth to upgrade and so on
Date25 Nov 2020
Organic Position24
H15 Things You Need to Know Before Upgrading Laptop Hardware [MiniTool News]
H2MiniTool News
Whether Your Laptop Can Be Upgraded?
Which Parts Should You Upgrade?
Some Parts Should Not Be Upgraded
How to Find Compatible Parts
Should You Upgrade or Buy a New Product?
Final Words
H3Summary :
H2WithAnchorsMiniTool News
Whether Your Laptop Can Be Upgraded?
Which Parts Should You Upgrade?
Some Parts Should Not Be Upgraded
How to Find Compatible Parts
Should You Upgrade or Buy a New Product?
Final Words
Body5 Things You Need to Know Before Upgrading Laptop Hardware [MiniTool News] By Daisy | Follow | Last Updated November 25, 2020 Facebook Twitter Linkedin Reddit Summary :. When your laptop gets older as time goes, there are two choices for you- buy a new laptop or upgrade your notebook. However, the former will cost you more money. So, you may choose the latter. But there are 5 things you need to know. Click MiniTool to learn more.Whether Your Laptop Can Be Upgraded? Compared to a desktop, several parts of a laptop cannot be removed because they are soldered together. Thus, you can’t upgrade everything on your laptop. Firstly, before upgrading laptop hardware, you need to know whether your laptop can be upgraded or if there are soldered components. How to find which parts can be upgraded? You can read the manufacture’s manual first. If there is no manufacturer’s manual, then you can try a system scanner. Run it on a Windows laptop or Macbook and it will scan your machine to find out the parts that can be upgraded in your laptop. Or you can search for the method on the Internet by inputting "How to upgrade RAM in XYZ" in Google. XYZ means the exact model of your laptop. If you see a correct guide, go ahead. If you don't, it's best to skip the upgrade. Which Parts Should You Upgrade? What can you upgrade in your laptop? The most common laptop components that can be upgraded are RAM modules, batteries, hard drives, and wireless cards if these components are not soldered together. Among them, hard drives and RAM modules are the most common and easiest. You can add more RAM or install an SSD rather than an HDD, which are the best upgrades to improve PC performance. SSD VS HDD: What's Difference? Which One Should You Use in PC? SSD VS HDD: what's the difference between them? Which one should you use in your PC? Read this post to look for the answers now! Read More However, the battery and the wireless card cannot always be upgraded. It’s necessary to figure out first research and check if you can change them on the laptop. If yes, then you should find a compatible battery through the same vendor. Laptop Battery Life Is Boosted in Windows 10’s New Build A pair of Windows 10 preview builds has been launched by Microsoft. There are some changes like laptop battery life is boosted. Let’s see the details. Read More You can purchase wireless cards that are simple mini-PCIe cards. If you want to make your old laptop be compatible with Wireless AC standards, you can replace the mini-PCIe card. Additionally, you could even get a Wi-Fi USB dongle. Some Parts Should Not Be Upgraded. The processor, motherboard, and screen are the main parts that should not be upgraded among the components of a computer. Most laptops take into account specific motherboards and processor series, and how much heat the laptop generates is largely determined by these two parts. Therefore, the case is designed to effectively dissipate the estimated heat. On the other hand, you don’t need to upgrade the screen and I’m not sure whether it can be upgraded. You can replace your broken screen with the same type. If you want to upgrade the screen, you need to buy a new laptop. How to Find Compatible Parts. Now you know the basic hardware that brings a new life to your laptop, then you need to know exactly what to buy. For example, laptop RAM and desktop RAM are not the same. If your laptop is old, it might use older DDR2 RAM instead of DDR3 or DDR4 RAM. There are some guides on the Internet to find out compatible parts for your notebook when you want to purchase RAM and SSD. All you need to do is choose your laptop manufacturer and model. And a list of compatible RAM and SSDs will be given to you. You can also find out how many DIMM expansion slots the laptop has and how much memory it can support, in addition to the specifications for the acceptable RAM or SSD. Then you can use the specifications to search for similar memory or storage on Amazon or other sites. It will be compatible with your laptop if it matches the specs. Should You Upgrade or Buy a New Product? If your laptop has such issues, you may choose to buy a new laptop: Your laptop is running too slowly. You can't install a new operating system or your laptop doesn't support new software. You have frequent problems. But sometimes there is only one damaged part in your notebook and you have purchased it recently. By this time, you just need to upgrade your notebook. Thus, you can do the choice based on your need. Final Words. It’s based on your actual need to buy a new laptop or upgrade your old laptop. Additionally, before upgrading laptop hardware, you should learn more about all aspects of your laptop. This piece of news has given you some details, you can refer to it. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Reddit Scroll down for the next news Scroll down
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TitleAre you a human?
Urlhttps://www.newegg.com/insider/best-upgrades-to-boost-your-laptops-performance/
Description
Date2 Oct 2013
Organic Position25
H1Human?
H2Are you a human?
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H2WithAnchorsAre you a human?
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