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Result 1
TitleToxic food for dogs | Battersea Dogs & Cats Home
Urlhttps://www.battersea.org.uk/pet-advice/dog-care-advice/toxic-food-dogs
DescriptionLearn nine toxic foods that are dangerous to your dog and should be avoided; from the experts at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home
Date
Organic Position
H1Toxic food for dogs
H21. Onions, garlic and chives
2. Chocolate
3. Macadamia nuts
4. Corn on the cob
5. Avocado
6. Artificial sweetener (Xylitol)
7. Alcohol
8. Cooked bones
9. Grapes and raisins
What should I do if my dog has eaten any of these?
H3WANT MORE ADVICE?
H2WithAnchors1. Onions, garlic and chives
2. Chocolate
3. Macadamia nuts
4. Corn on the cob
5. Avocado
6. Artificial sweetener (Xylitol)
7. Alcohol
8. Cooked bones
9. Grapes and raisins
What should I do if my dog has eaten any of these?
BodyToxic food for dogs Dogs can be opportunists when it comes to getting their paws on tasty treats, but not all everyday food and drink are safe if they come into contact with them. Learn which nine items are particularly dangerous to your dog. 1. Onions, garlic and chives. The onion family, whether dry, raw or cooked, is particularly toxic to dogs and can cause gastrointestinal irritation and red blood cell damage. Signs of illness are not always immediate and can occur up to a few days later.2. Chocolate. However enticing chocolate is for humans and dogs alike, chocolate is another poisonous food for dogs. Chocolate contains a stimulant called theobromine (dark chocolate has the highest content of this) which is toxic to dogs and can cause kidney failure.3. Macadamia nuts. Macadamia nuts contain a toxin that can affect your dog’s muscles and nervous system resulting in weakness, swollen limbs and panting.4. Corn on the cob. Corn on the cob could potentially be fatal if eaten by your dog. Although the corn is digested by dogs, the cob can cause a blockage in your dog’s intestine.5. Avocado. Avocados are another poisonous food for dogs. Avocado plants contain a substance called Persin which is in its leaves, fruit and seed and can cause vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs.6. Artificial sweetener (Xylitol). Our desire for sweet treats, chewing gum and drinks together with low-fat, diet and sugar-free products (including some peanut butters so always check the label before using this as a treat) are often laced with an artificial sweetener called Xylitol which causes an insulin release in our bodies. However, if your dog digests one of these sweetened foods they can go into hypoglycaemia which is linked to liver failure and blood clotting disorders.7. Alcohol. Alcohol has a huge impact on dogs even in small doses. The drink not only causes intoxication as it does in humans, but it can lead to sickness, diarrhoea and even central nervous system damage.8. Cooked bones. Giving your dog a raw uncooked bone to chew on is great, but avoid cooked bones at all cost. These can easily splinter and in large quantities cause constipation or at worst, a perforation of the gut which can be fatal.9. Grapes and raisins. Raisins are in many of the foods that we love to eat such as cakes, biscuits and cereals so it’s not just the fruit form we should be concerned with. The active ingredient which causes the toxin is unknown, however both grapes and raisins may cause severe liver damage and kidney failure.What should I do if my dog has eaten any of these?If consumed, even small amounts of these items can be fatal so always act immediately and take your dog to the vets. Download this information as a handy advice sheet to keep for reference: Download advice sheet Dog insurance Help guard against unexpected veterinary fees Get covered How to toilet train a dog Simple steps to toilet training your dog Start housetraining WANT MORE ADVICE?From new tricks to grooming tips, get expert pet advice straight to your inbox by signing up to The Battersea Way email. SIGN UP TODAY You currently have JavaScript disabled in your web browser, please enable JavaScript to view our website as intended. Here are the instructions of how to enable JavaScript in your browser.
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Result 2
TitleFoods poisonous to dogs
Urlhttps://www.hearingdogs.org.uk/training-our-puppies/dog-treat-recipes/dog-unsafe-food/
DescriptionHearing Dogs lists foods that may be hazardous or highly toxic to dogs. Get advice & information from dog welfare experts
Date
Organic Position
H1Foods poisonous to dogs
H2Want more, free, dog-friendly recipes?
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H3Ingredients and foods that dogs should never eat
H2WithAnchorsWant more, free, dog-friendly recipes?
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BodyFoods poisonous to dogs Ingredients and foods that dogs should never eat. Hearing Dogs’ Welfare Manager, Emma Golding says: “These foods may be hazardous or highly toxic* to dogs. If you think your dog may have eaten anything toxic, please take emergency action by contacting a veterinary professional immediately for advice.” You may also wish to consult our list of safe foods for dogs. Alcohol* Almonds (in large amounts) Almond flour (GF) Avocado* Bones Brazil nuts (in large amounts) Broccoli Cacao* Cacao nibs* Caffeine* (including tea, coffee etc...) Cherries Chives* Chocolate* – the darker it gets the more toxic it is Cocoa* Corn on the cob Currants* Dates Garlic* – large quantities Green tomatoes* Grapes* – the skins are highly toxic Grapefruit Lemons and limes Macadamia nuts* Milk and milk products (unless lactose-free) Moulds* – mouldy bread, nuts and dairy foods plus blue cheese like Stilton etc… Mushrooms Mustard seeds Nutmeg* Onions* – large quantities Peanut butter with added sweetener* (all artificial sweeteners such as Xylitol*, Aspartame* etc are toxic to dogs) Pecan nuts Pistachio nuts Rhubarb* Raisins* Saffron Salt Shallots* – large quantities Sugar Sultanas* Sweeteners* (all artificial sweeteners such as Xylitol*, Aspartame* etc are toxic to dogs) Walnuts* Yeast dough Want more, free, dog-friendly recipes? . Tasty treats are a great form of positive reinforcement for training our puppies, and our doggy testers soon let us know which ones are top favourites! We have lots more dog friendly treat recipes for you to try out on our recipes page. View more recipes Psst! Don’t miss all the latest Hearing Dogs news…. Would you like to know more about us, our dogs and our amazing community? We have a free monthly e-newsletter that we send out to 30,000 of our fantastic friends. It would be great if you joined, too. You’ll get: Updates on how we train our dogs and how they change deaf people’s lives. A monthly dose of our adorable puppies! Behind-the-scenes stories and photos. News of upcoming events and ways you can help us create more hearing dogs.   Sign up to our free e-newsletter Would you like to know more about us, our dogs and our amazing community? We have a free monthly e-newsletter that we send out to 30,000 of our fantastic friends. It would be great if you joined, too.You’ll get: Updates on how we train our dogs and how they change deaf people’s lives. A monthly dose of our adorable puppies! Behind-the-scenes stories and photos. News of upcoming events and ways you can help us create more hearing dogs.   Sign up to our free e-newsletter Find out how you can help. Sponsor a puppy . From just £3 a month you can follow a puppy's training and change a deaf person's life. Visit our shop . Browse our selection of pet products from quirky tags to cute dog bowls and more. Support us . Find out how you can support our life-changing work. Share this post with your friends. We use cookies to give you the best online experience. Please let us know if you agree to these cookies. I agree More information
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Result 3
TitleDiscover Common Plants & Substances Poisonous to Dogs
Urlhttps://www.dogsforgood.org/good-advice/common-plants-foods-and-other-items-that-are-poisonous-to-dogs/
DescriptionA surprising number of every day substances and common house and garden plants can harm your dog. Review our comprehensive list to keep your pet safe
Date
Organic Position
H1
H2Common plants, foods and other items that are poisonous to dogs
House plants poisonous to dogs
Garden plants poisonous to dogs
Food poisonous to dogs
Other items poisonous to dogs
What to do if you suspect poisoning
H3Suspected ingested poisoning:
Suspected chemical poisoning:
Help support our life-changing work..
H2WithAnchorsCommon plants, foods and other items that are poisonous to dogs
House plants poisonous to dogs
Garden plants poisonous to dogs
Food poisonous to dogs
Other items poisonous to dogs
What to do if you suspect poisoning
Bodyheight="1" width="1" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=659993921033594&ev=PageView&noscript=1"/> Skip to content Sponsor a puppy Donate now Home Good Advice Health and wellbeing Common plants, foods and other items that are poisonous to dogs Good advice to empower every dog owner to have a happy, rewarding relationship with their four-legged friend. Practical exercise Theory Video Common plants, foods and other items that are poisonous to dogs. This chart may be used as a guide to preventing your dog’s exposure to poisonous plants, foods and other items.  This list is not exhaustive and there are many other plants, foods and items that are potentially dangerous. However, here are the most common ones you are likely to come across. If you suspect your dog has been exposed to a poisonous substance, call your vet immediately. House plants poisonous to dogs. NameDescriptionSymptomsSpider Plant CyclamenCommon house plant with long stripy leaves.Vomiting, convulsions, local irritation.PoinsettiaFavourite Christmas plant with milky sap.Irritates mucous membranes, excessive salivation & vomiting.PhilodendronClimbing vines with shiny leaves & aerial roots.Immediate pain, local irritation to mucous membrane, renal failure.Mother-in-laws TongueSucculent tall erect pointed leaves.Vomiting & diarrhoea.Jerusalem CherryPopular Christmas plant with berries.Vomiting & diarrhoea. Garden plants poisonous to dogs. NameDescriptionSymptomsFoxgloveCommon biennial, all parts poisonous.Acute abdominal pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhoea.HollyEvergreen with berries.Abdominal pains, vomiting & diarrhoea.MistletoePerennial parasitic.Vomiting, profuse diarrhoea, etc., death from cardiovascular collapse within hours.Daffodils & HyacinthsBulbs in storage may be accessible to pets.Vomiting & diarrhoea, occasionally death.Azalea & RhododendronsEvergreen or deciduous shrub.Within hours of ingestion of toxic dose, salivation, vomiting, diarrhoea, convulsions, coma, death.YewEvergreen, fleshy red berries, very poisonous.Nervousness, trembling, death.Spring bulbs (flowers)E.g. tulips, daffodils, crocusesEffects from digestion can include vomiting, stomach upset and salivation. Can escalate to dogs appearing sleepy and unsteady when standing up or even collapsing. Food poisonous to dogs. NameSymptomsGrapes & raisinsBoth grapes and raisins can cause acute renal failure. Early signs are vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal tenderness and lethargy.Chocolate (particularly with high % of cocoa)Chocolate contains theobromine which dogs are particularly sensitive to. Clinical signs of ‘chocolate poisoning’ are vomiting, hyperactivity, restlessness, rapid respiration, raised heartbeat, muscle tremors and seizures.Garlic & onionsBoth garlic (in large amounts) and onions contain thiosulfate which causes haemolytic anaemia in dogs.Avocado seedAvocado plants contain a substance called Persin in their seeds which can cause vomiting and diarrhoea.Xylitol (artificial sweetener) found in sweets, chewing gum, drinks etc.Extremely dangerous and once digested is very quick to act. Can go into hypoglycaemia which is linked to liver failure and blood clotting disorders) which a dog’s body cannot cope with. Signs include dog appearing weak, lethargic, collapsing or having a fit. Other items poisonous to dogs. NameSymptomsHuman Medication e.g. Aspirin, IbuprofenAll of these can cause severe symptoms in dogs. Signs can include vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain.Slug PelletsSlug pellets contain metaldehyde which can cause excitement and seizures followed by depression and collapse.AntifreezeAntifreeze has a sweet taste that is palatable to dogs. Signs include vomiting, unsteadiness, dehydration and thirst, usually occur within 1 hour.Cocoa MulchCocoa mulch can be particularly appealing to dogs due to its ‘chocolate’ smell. It contains theobromine (see symptoms for chocolate overleaf).Tea Tree OilTea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) contains toxic cyclic terpenes which is poisonous when ingested.Mouse and Rat PoisonThese contain brodifacoum or bromadiolone and are toxic after a single ingestion. Signs include spontaneous and excessive bleeding internally and externally.Other rodenticides may contain cholecalciferol which causes hypercalcemia and leads to heart and kidney problems. Newer rodenticides may contain bromethalin which is a neurotoxicant that causes respiratory issues due to nerve damage.Signs include seizures, muscle tremors and depression.InsecticidesCommonly contain either organophosphates or carbamates. They can be absorbed through the skin, conjunctiva, gastrointestinal tract, and lungs. Toxicity occurs through over dosage (flea treatments), so be careful when you administer these.Signs for both include hyper-salivation, vomiting, lethargy, tremors, difficulty walking, weakness and death.Chlorine-based starches and detergentsCan cause corrosive injury to the mouth and gut and may cause further complications if splashed in the eye or on the skin. Detergents can cause salivation and stomach problems if drunk or licked. Can make a dog bring up frothy or foamy vomit. Remember – If you suspect your dog has ingested or been exposed to a poisonous substance, call your vet immediately. Time can be critical and delay without expert advice can result in severe debilitation, pain and discomfort or even loss of life. Puppies can be very curious so there is a need to carefully supervise what they explore with their mouths. What to do if you suspect poisoning. Suspected ingested poisoning:. Remove the poisonous substance immediately if safe to do so.Call your vet for advice immediately with information regarding the poison  (e.g. what it is and how much the dog has consumed) and the symptoms and status of the dog (e.g. vomiting, coughing, unconscious etc.)Check your dog and monitor their behaviour. Suspected chemical poisoning:. Contact your vet immediately.Assess the area for danger. If it’s too dangerous to enter, don’t do it.Make the area safe, if possible, by improving ventilation, e.g. open windows and doors.If the area is safe, assess the condition of the dog: look for blood, injury, burns, check for breathing and move the dog away from the poison.  Do not get contaminated yourself – wear gloves and cover skin. More details on poisoning of dogs can be found at: Veterinary Poisons information Service (VPIS) at vpisglobal.com. Help support our life-changing work... Imagine if everyday tasks were so challenging or physically demanding they affected your quality of life. For many people living with a disability of families with a child with autism, that is their reality. Now imagine if a specially trained four-legged friend could restore your, or your family’s, independence. The demand for our services is high and we can’t help as many people as we would like to without more funding. Please help us continue making life-changing differences for people with disabilities through the power of expertly trained dogs. Every contribution, whatever size, is important and helps us make a difference. Support us by Sponsor a puppy Donate now
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Result 4
Title13 foods that are poisonous to dogs | What can't dogs eat? | Vets Now
Urlhttps://www.vets-now.com/2017/01/foods-poisonous-to-dogs/
DescriptionThere are many human foods that are poisonous to dogs, including chocolate, onions and grapes. Find out more on our list of toxic foods dogs can't eat
Date
Organic Position
H113 human foods that are poisonous to dogs
H2Hello Are you worried about your Pet? We’re here to help…
What can't dogs eat?
Want to video chat with a vet professional?
1. Chocolate
2. Caffeine
3. Onions, garlic, and chives
4. Alcohol
5. Mouldy foods
Need some additional advice?
6. Grapes & raisins
7. Macadamia nuts
We offer one to one video consultations
8. Yeast dough
9. Bones
10. Corn on the cob
11. Xylitol
12. Milk
13. Blue cheese
H3More on this topic
More on this topic
H2WithAnchorsHello Are you worried about your Pet? We’re here to help…
What can't dogs eat?
Want to video chat with a vet professional?
1. Chocolate
2. Caffeine
3. Onions, garlic, and chives
4. Alcohol
5. Mouldy foods
Need some additional advice?
6. Grapes & raisins
7. Macadamia nuts
We offer one to one video consultations
8. Yeast dough
9. Bones
10. Corn on the cob
11. Xylitol
12. Milk
13. Blue cheese
Body13 human foods that are poisonous to dogs 12th November 2020 What can't dogs eat? It can be tempting to give your dog leftovers or to share your food with them, but what we consider to be tasty and perhaps even nutritious may be extremely dangerous, even poisonous, for our dogs.Foods you shouldn’t give your dog include:ChocolateOnions, garlic and chivesAlcoholGrapes and raisinsMany moreFind out more below on our list of popular human foods dogs can’t eat. Want to video chat with a vet professional? . Get personalised expert advice and peace of mind Book an appointment 1. Chocolate. Chocolate contains a stimulant called theobromine — a bit like caffeine — that’s poisonous to dogs.  The amount of theobromine depends on the type of chocolate.  Theobromine mainly affects the guts, heart, central nervous system, and kidneys and signs of theobromine poisoning will occur between four and 24 hours after your dog has eaten chocolate.  You may see vomiting, diarrhoea, restlessness, hyperactivity and seizures. Read our in-depth guide on the dangers of chocolate to dogs. 2. Caffeine. Like chocolate, caffeine is a stimulant. Dogs are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than people. A couple of laps of tea or coffee are unlikely to do any harm, but if your dog swallows a handful of coffee beans or tea bags they could be in danger. Signs and treatment of caffeine poisoning are similar to chocolate toxicity. 3. Onions, garlic, and chives. Eating these vegetables and herbs can cause stomach and gut irritation and potentially lead to red blood cell damage and anaemia.Onions are particularly toxic and signs of poisoning often only occur a few days after your dog has eaten the vegetable. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions or garlic. Left-over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness. Many prepared foods (including takeaways), sauces and gravies contain onion or garlic powder. 4. Alcohol. Alcohol is significantly more toxic to dogs than to humans. When consumed, even small quantities of alcoholic beverages and food products may cause vomiting, diarrhoea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, blood changes, coma and even death. So, remember to keep alcohol well out of your dog’s reach. 5. Mouldy foods. Mouldy food, including bread, nuts and dairy products, contain lots of toxins that could make your dog very ill. Make sure you dispose of leftovers carefully and be careful to keep your food waste bin well out of your dog’s reach. Need some additional advice? . Consult with our vets within the hour Book an appointment 6. Grapes & raisins. While the toxic substance in grapes and raisins is unknown, it can cause kidney failure in sensitive individuals. Dogs that already have underlying health problems are at greatest risk and just one raisin can be severely toxic. Experts agree that there is no “safe” dose of grapes and raisins.Our emergency vets have drawn up an advice guide on what to do if a dog eats grapes or raisins — or foods including them such as hot cross buns, mince pies and fruit loaf. 7. Macadamia nuts. Within 12 hours of ingestion, macadamia nuts can cause dogs to experience weakness, depression, tremors, vomiting and increased body temperature. These symptoms tend to last for approximately 12 to 48 hours. If you suspect your dog has consumed macadamia nuts note the possible quantity consumed and contact your vet. More on this topic. Can dogs eat grapes? Why are grapes and raisins bad for dogs? Go How much chocolate is poisonous to dogs? How much chocolate can kill a dog? Go We offer one to one video consultations . Here for you every day from 8AM to 11PM Book an appointment 8. Yeast dough. Yeast dough can cause gas to accumulate in your dog’s digestive system as a result of the dough rising. Not only can this be painful but it may also cause the stomach or intestines to become blocked. So while small bits of bread can be given as a treat — due to the fact that risks are diminished once the yeast has fully risen — never give your dog yeast dough. 9. Bones. While feeding your dog bones may seem like a good idea, it’s important to remember that dogs may choke on them, develop intestinal obstructions after swallowing pieces of bone, damage their teeth chewing them, or sustain internal injury as bone splinters can puncture your dog’s digestive tract.If you do choose to give your dog a bone be sure to keep an eye on him while he tucks in and avoid giving cooked bones, which splinter more easily, or bones that are small enough to get stuck in their intestines. Eating large quantities of bone can often cause constipation, so try to monitor the amount your dog manages to consume.Find out what happened to chocolate Labrador, Archie, when he eat an entire chicken carcass. 10. Corn on the cob. Corn on the cob may seem like a healthy table scrap to give your dog, but unlike most vegetables, it does not digest well in a dog’s stomach. If your dog swallows large chunks of the cob, or even whole, it can cause an intestinal blockage due to its size and shape. Signs to look out for are vomiting, loss of appetite or reduced appetite, absence of faeces or diarrhoea and abdominal discomfort.Our story on Henry, a two-year-old black Labrador, demonstrates what can happen if your dog eats corn on the cob. More on this topic. Xylitol poisoning in dogs. What should I look out for? Go Can dogs eat cat food? Is cat food bad for dogs? Go 11. Xylitol. The artificial sweetener xylitol is found in many foods including some sugar-free gums, diabetic cakes and diet foods. It causes insulin release in many species (but not in humans) leading to potentially fatal hypoglycaemia (lowered sugar levels).Dogs are extremely sensitive and even small quantities can cause toxicity. Some sugar-free sweets and gums have very high amounts per piece. Early symptoms of xylitol poisoning include lethargy, vomiting and loss of coordination. Seizures may also occur.Xylitol has also been linked to fatal acute liver disease and blood-clotting disorders in dogs. This effect is not thought to be dose related so even very small amounts can be extremely dangerous. If you think your dog has eaten any xylitol seek urgent veterinary advice. 12. Milk. As dogs do not have significant amounts of the enzyme lactase that breaks down lactose in milk, feeding your dog milk and other milk-based products can cause diarrhoea or other digestive upset. 13. Blue cheese. Like other dairy products, dogs find it difficult to break down cheese, while eating large amounts of higher fat varieties can cause sickness and diarrhoea.However, blue cheeses, such as stilton and roquefort, are particularly dangerous. Many contain a substance called roquefortine C, which dogs are especially sensitive to. Roquefortine C may cause vomiting and diarrhoea and potentially also tremors, twitching, seizures and a high temperature if eaten in large doses. If you think your dog has eaten blue cheese and is suffering from any of these clinical signs then you should seek emergency veterinary advice. close location review-star search arrow/right need-help/help social/email social/facebook-boxed social/facebook social/google-plus social/instagram social/linkedin social/pinterest social/twitter 13 human foods that are poisonous to dogsThere are many human foods that are poisonous to dogs, including chocolate, onions and grapes. Find out more on our list of toxic foods dogs can't eat.
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TitleToxic food for dogs | Battersea Dogs & Cats Home
Urlhttps://www.battersea.org.uk/pet-advice/dog-care-advice/toxic-food-dogs
DescriptionLearn nine toxic foods that are dangerous to your dog and should be avoided; from the experts at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home
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Organic Position2
H1Toxic food for dogs
H21. Onions, garlic and chives
2. Chocolate
3. Macadamia nuts
4. Corn on the cob
5. Avocado
6. Artificial sweetener (Xylitol)
7. Alcohol
8. Cooked bones
9. Grapes and raisins
What should I do if my dog has eaten any of these?
H3WANT MORE ADVICE?
H2WithAnchors1. Onions, garlic and chives
2. Chocolate
3. Macadamia nuts
4. Corn on the cob
5. Avocado
6. Artificial sweetener (Xylitol)
7. Alcohol
8. Cooked bones
9. Grapes and raisins
What should I do if my dog has eaten any of these?
BodyToxic food for dogs Dogs can be opportunists when it comes to getting their paws on tasty treats, but not all everyday food and drink are safe if they come into contact with them. Learn which nine items are particularly dangerous to your dog. 1. Onions, garlic and chives. The onion family, whether dry, raw or cooked, is particularly toxic to dogs and can cause gastrointestinal irritation and red blood cell damage. Signs of illness are not always immediate and can occur up to a few days later.2. Chocolate. However enticing chocolate is for humans and dogs alike, chocolate is another poisonous food for dogs. Chocolate contains a stimulant called theobromine (dark chocolate has the highest content of this) which is toxic to dogs and can cause kidney failure.3. Macadamia nuts. Macadamia nuts contain a toxin that can affect your dog’s muscles and nervous system resulting in weakness, swollen limbs and panting.4. Corn on the cob. Corn on the cob could potentially be fatal if eaten by your dog. Although the corn is digested by dogs, the cob can cause a blockage in your dog’s intestine.5. Avocado. Avocados are another poisonous food for dogs. Avocado plants contain a substance called Persin which is in its leaves, fruit and seed and can cause vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs.6. Artificial sweetener (Xylitol). Our desire for sweet treats, chewing gum and drinks together with low-fat, diet and sugar-free products (including some peanut butters so always check the label before using this as a treat) are often laced with an artificial sweetener called Xylitol which causes an insulin release in our bodies. However, if your dog digests one of these sweetened foods they can go into hypoglycaemia which is linked to liver failure and blood clotting disorders.7. Alcohol. Alcohol has a huge impact on dogs even in small doses. The drink not only causes intoxication as it does in humans, but it can lead to sickness, diarrhoea and even central nervous system damage.8. Cooked bones. Giving your dog a raw uncooked bone to chew on is great, but avoid cooked bones at all cost. These can easily splinter and in large quantities cause constipation or at worst, a perforation of the gut which can be fatal.9. Grapes and raisins. Raisins are in many of the foods that we love to eat such as cakes, biscuits and cereals so it’s not just the fruit form we should be concerned with. The active ingredient which causes the toxin is unknown, however both grapes and raisins may cause severe liver damage and kidney failure.What should I do if my dog has eaten any of these?If consumed, even small amounts of these items can be fatal so always act immediately and take your dog to the vets. Download this information as a handy advice sheet to keep for reference: Download advice sheet Dog insurance Help guard against unexpected veterinary fees Get covered How to toilet train a dog Simple steps to toilet training your dog Start housetraining WANT MORE ADVICE?From new tricks to grooming tips, get expert pet advice straight to your inbox by signing up to The Battersea Way email. SIGN UP TODAY You currently have JavaScript disabled in your web browser, please enable JavaScript to view our website as intended. Here are the instructions of how to enable JavaScript in your browser.
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TitlePeople Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets | ASPCA
Urlhttps://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/people-foods-avoid-feeding-your-pets
DescriptionView the list of poisonous foods to avoid, including: chocolate, xylitol, alcohol, avocado, coffee, caffeine, citrus, coconut, coconut oil, grapes, raisin, macadamia nuts, milk and dairy
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H1People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets
H2Primary Nav Menu
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BodyPeople Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Phone Number: (888) 426-4435Our Animal Poison Control Center experts have put together a handy list of the top toxic people foods to avoid feeding your pet. As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten any of the following foods, please note the amount ingested and contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.AlcoholAlcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death. Under no circumstances should your pet be given any alcohol. If you suspect that your pet has ingested alcohol, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center immediately.AvocadoAvocado is primarily a problem for birds, rabbits, donkeys, horses, and ruminants including sheep and goats. The biggest concern is for cardiovascular damage and death in birds and rabbits. Horses, donkeys and ruminants frequently get swollen, edematous head and neck.Chocolate, Coffee and CaffeineThese products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee, and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.CitrusThe stems, leaves, peels, fruit and seeds of citrus plants contain varying amounts of citric acid, essential oils that can cause irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression if ingested in significant amounts. Small doses, such as eating the fruit, are not likely to present problems beyond minor stomach upset.Coconut and Coconut OilWhen ingested in small amounts, coconut and coconut-based products are not likely to cause serious harm to your pet. The flesh and milk of fresh coconuts do contain oils that may cause stomach upset, loose stools or diarrhea. Because of this, we encourage you to use caution when offering your pets these foods. Coconut water is high in potassium and should not be given to your pet.Grapes and RaisinsAlthough the toxic substance within grapes and raisins is unknown, these fruits can cause kidney failure. Until more information is known about the toxic substance, it is best to avoid feeding grapes and raisins to dogs.Macadamia NutsMacadamia nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and can last approximately 24 to 48 hours.Milk and DairyBecause pets do not possess significant amounts of lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk), milk and other dairy-based products cause them diarrhea or other digestive upset.NutsNuts, including almonds, pecans, and walnuts, contain high amounts of oils and fats. The fats can cause vomiting and diarrhea, and potentially pancreatitis in pets.Onions, Garlic, ChivesThese vegetables and herbs can cause gastrointestinal irritation and could lead to red blood cell damage and anemia. Although cats are more susceptible, dogs are also at risk if a large enough amount is consumed. Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and BonesRaw meat and raw eggs can contain bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli that can be harmful to pets and humans. Raw eggs contain an enzyme called avidin that decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin), which can lead to skin and coat problems. Feeding your pet raw bones may seem like a natural and healthy option that might occur if your pet lived in the wild. However, this can be very dangerous for a domestic pet, who might choke on bones, or sustain a grave injury should the bone splinter and become lodged in or puncture your pet’s digestive tract.Salt and Salty Snack FoodsLarge amounts of salt can produce excessive thirst and urination, or even sodium ion poisoning in pets. Signs that your pet may have eaten too many salty foods include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, elevated body temperature, seizures and even death. As such, we encourage you to avoid feeding salt-heavy snacks like potato chips, pretzels, and salted popcorn to your pets. XylitolXylitol is used as a sweetener in many products, including gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. It can cause insulin release in most species, which can lead to liver failure. The increase in insulin leads to hypoglycemia (lowered sugar levels). Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to seizures. Elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days.Yeast DoughYeast dough can rise and cause gas to accumulate in your pet’s digestive system. This can be painful and can cause the stomach to bloat, and potentially twist, becoming a life threatening emergency. The yeast produce ethanol as a by-product and a dog ingesting raw bread dough can become drunk (See alcohol).                 Other Ways to Help:. Become a Monthly Member Fundraise with Team ASPCA Join the Mobile Action Team Share this page:. Help the ASPCA Put a Stop to Animal Cruelty. Donate
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Result 8
TitleToxic and Dangerous Foods Your Dog Should Never Eat
Urlhttps://pets.webmd.com/dogs/ss/slideshow-foods-your-dog-should-never-eat
DescriptionWebMD’s slideshow shows you which foods your dog should never eat, including fat trimmings and chocolate
Date
Organic Position4
H1Slideshow: Foods Your Dog Should Never Eat
H2Dangerous Foods for Dogs
Xylitol
Avocado
Alcohol
Onions and Garlic
Coffee, Tea, and Other Caffeine
Grapes and Raisins
Milk and Other Dairy Products
Macadamia Nuts
Chocolate
Fat Trimmings and Bones
Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums
Raw Eggs
Raw Meat and Fish
Salt
Sugary Foods and Drinks
Yeast Dough
Your Medicine
Kitchen Pantry: No Dogs Allowed
If Your Dog Eats What They Shouldn’t
What Dogs Can Eat
Safe: Lean Meats
Safe: Some Fresh Fruits
Safe: Some Vegetables
Safe: Cooked White Rice and Pasta
Next Slideshow Title
H3Up Next
Health Solutions
More from WebMD
H2WithAnchorsDangerous Foods for Dogs
Xylitol
Avocado
Alcohol
Onions and Garlic
Coffee, Tea, and Other Caffeine
Grapes and Raisins
Milk and Other Dairy Products
Macadamia Nuts
Chocolate
Fat Trimmings and Bones
Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums
Raw Eggs
Raw Meat and Fish
Salt
Sugary Foods and Drinks
Yeast Dough
Your Medicine
Kitchen Pantry: No Dogs Allowed
If Your Dog Eats What They Shouldn’t
What Dogs Can Eat
Safe: Lean Meats
Safe: Some Fresh Fruits
Safe: Some Vegetables
Safe: Cooked White Rice and Pasta
Next Slideshow Title
BodySlideshow: Foods Your Dog Should Never Eat 1 / 25 Dangerous Foods for Dogs. Who can resist those big brown eyes and cute doggie grin? Can a little reward from the table or getting into Mom or Dad’s stuff really hurt your dog? Well, that depends on what it is and what's in it. If it contains the sweetener xylitol, it can cause your dog some real problems. In fact, there’s a lot of people food your dog should never eat. And, it’s not just because of weight. Some foods are downright dangerous for dogs -- and some of these common foods may surprise you. Swipe to advance 2 / 25 Xylitol. Candy, gum, toothpaste, baked goods, and some diet foods are sweetened with xylitol. It can cause your dog's blood sugar to drop and can also cause liver failure. Early symptoms include vomiting, lethargy, and coordination problems. Eventually, your dog may have seizures. Liver failure can happen within just a few days. Swipe to advance 3 / 25 Avocado. Is a treat from the table OK for your dog? That depends on what it is. Avocados, for example, have something called persin. It’s fine for people who aren't allergic to it. But too much might cause vomiting or diarrhea in dogs. If you grow avocados at home, keep your dog away from the plants. Persin is in the leaves, seed, and bark, as well as the fruit. Also, the avocado seed can become stuck in the intestines or stomach, and obstruction could be fatal. Swipe to advance 4 / 25 Alcohol. Alcohol has the same effect on a dog’s liver and brain that it has on people. But it takes a lot less to hurt your dog. Just a little beer, liquor, wine, or food with alcohol can be bad. It can cause vomiting, diarrhea, coordination problems, breathing problems, coma, even death. And the smaller your dog, the worse it can be. Swipe to advance 5 / 25 Onions and Garlic. Keep onions and garlic -- powdered, raw, cooked, or dehydrated -- away from your dog. They can kill their red blood cells, causing anemia. That's even the onion powder in some baby food. Eating a lot just once can cause poisoning. Look for signs like weakness, vomiting, and breathing problems. Swipe to advance 6 / 25 Coffee, Tea, and Other Caffeine. Give your dog toys if you want them to be perky. Caffeine can be fatal.  Watch out for coffee and tea, even the beans and the grounds. Keep your dog away from cocoa, chocolate, colas, and energy drinks. Caffeine is also in some cold medicines and pain killers. Think your dog had caffeine? Get your dog to the vet as soon as possible. Swipe to advance 7 / 25 Grapes and Raisins. There are better treats to give your dog.  Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. And just a small amount can make a dog sick. Vomiting over and over is an early sign. Within a day, your dog will get sluggish and depressed. Swipe to advance 8 / 25 Milk and Other Dairy Products. On a hot day, it may be tempting to share your ice cream with your dog. Instead, give them some cold water. Milk and milk-based products can cause diarrhea and other digestive problems for your pup. They can also trigger food allergies, which can cause them to itch. Swipe to advance 9 / 25 Macadamia Nuts. Keep your dog away from macadamia nuts and foods that have macadamia nuts in them. Just six raw or roasted macadamia nuts can make a dog sick. Look for symptoms like muscle shakes, vomiting, high temperature, and weakness in their back legs. Eating chocolate with the nuts will make symptoms worse, maybe even leading to death. Swipe to advance 10 / 25 Chocolate. Most people know that chocolate is bad for dogs. The problem in chocolate is theobromine. It's in all kinds of chocolate, even white chocolate. The most dangerous types  are dark chocolate and unsweetened baking chocolate. Chocolate can cause a dog to vomit and have diarrhea. It can also cause heart problems, tremors, seizures, and death. Swipe to advance 11 / 25 Fat Trimmings and Bones. Fat trimmed from meat, both cooked and uncooked, can cause pancreatitis in dogs. And, even though it seems natural to give a dog a bone, they can choke on it. Bones can also splinter and block or cause cuts in your dog's digestive system. Swipe to advance 12 / 25 Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums. The problem with these fruits is the seeds or pits. Seeds from persimmons can cause problems in a dog's small intestine. They can also block their intestines. That can also happen if a dog eats the pit from a peach or plum. Peach and plum pits also have cyanide, which is poisonous to people and dogs. People know not to eat them. Dogs don't. Swipe to advance 13 / 25 Raw Eggs. Some people feed their dogs a "raw diet" that includes uncooked eggs. But the major veterinary medical associations don't think that's a good idea. There's the chance of food poisoning from bacteria like salmonella or E. coli. Talk to your vet if you have questions. Swipe to advance 14 / 25 Raw Meat and Fish. Like raw eggs, raw meat and fish can have bacteria that causes food poisoning. Some fish such as salmon, trout, shad, or sturgeon can also have a parasite that causes "fish disease" or "salmon poisoning disease." It's treatable, but get help right away. The first signs are vomiting, fever, and big lymph nodes. Fully cook the fish to kill the parasite. Swipe to advance 15 / 25 Salt. It’s not a good idea to share salty foods like chips or pretzels with your dog. Eating too much salt can make your dog seriously thirsty. That means a lot of trips to the fire hydrant and it could  lead to sodium ion poisoning. Symptoms of too much salt include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, high temperature, and seizures. It may even cause death. Swipe to advance 16 / 25 Sugary Foods and Drinks. Too much sugar can do the same thing to dogs that it does to people. It can make your dog overweight and cause problems with their teeth. It can even lead to diabetes. Swipe to advance 17 / 25 Yeast Dough. Before it’s baked, bread dough needs to rise. And, that’s exactly what it would do in your dog’s stomach if they ate it. As it swells inside, the dough can stretch your dog’s abdomen and cause a lot of pain. Also, when the yeast ferments the dough to make it rise, it makes alcohol that can lead to alcohol poisoning. Swipe to advance 18 / 25 Your Medicine. Dogs shouldn't take people medicine. It can make them very sick. Just as you do for your kids, keep all medicines out of your dog’s reach. And, never give your dog any over-the-counter medicine unless your vet tells you to. Ingredients such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are common in pain relievers and cold medicine. And, they can be deadly for your dog. Swipe to advance 19 / 25 Kitchen Pantry: No Dogs Allowed. Many other things often found on kitchen shelves can hurt your dog. Large amounts of baking powder or baking soda are both highly toxic. So are large amounts of nutmeg and other spices. Keep food high enough to be out of your dog’s reach and keep pantry doors closed.   Swipe to advance 20 / 25 If Your Dog Eats What They Shouldn’t. No matter how careful you are, your dog might find and swallow something they shouldn't. Keep the number of your local vet, the closest emergency clinic, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center -- (888) 426-4435 -- where you know you can find it. And, if you think your dog has eaten something  toxic, call for emergency help right away. Swipe to advance 21 / 25 What Dogs Can Eat. You can make sure your dog has a healthy, well-balanced diet by asking your vet to suggest a quality dog food. But that doesn't mean you can't sometimes give your dog people food as a special treat. Only give them a little. Be sure the  foods are cooked, pure, and not fatty or heavily seasoned. Here are some ideas. Swipe to advance 22 / 25 Safe: Lean Meats. Most dogs are fine eating lean cuts of meat that have been cooked well. Take off all visible fat -- including the skin on poultry. Be sure that there are no bones in the meat before you give it to your dog. Swipe to advance 23 / 25 Safe: Some Fresh Fruits. Slices of apples, oranges, bananas, and watermelon make tasty treats for your dog. Take out any seeds first. Seeds, stems, and leaves can cause serious problems. Swipe to advance 24 / 25 Safe: Some Vegetables. Your dog can have a healthy snack of carrot sticks, green beans, cucumber slices, or zucchini slices. Even a plain baked potato is OK. Don't let your dog eat any raw potatoes or any potato plants from your pantry or garden. Swipe to advance 25 / 25 Safe: Cooked White Rice and Pasta. Dogs can eat plain white rice or pasta after it’s cooked. And, a serving of plain white rice with some boiled chicken can sometimes make your dog feel better when they are having stomach problems. Swipe to advance Up Next. Next Slideshow Title. Skip Ad 1 / 25 Skip Ad Sources | Medically Reviewed on 02/13/2020 Reviewed by Amy Flowers, DVM on February 13, 2020 IMAGES: Jupiter Images Unlimited and Westend61 Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited and Sharon Montrose / The Image Bank Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited and Vicky Kasala / Digital Vision Yoshio Tomii / Superstock and Nicholas Eveleigh / White Dennis Drenner / Aurora Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited Jupiter Images Unlimited iStock Exclusive and FoodPix Tony Latham / Stone Image Source Photographer’s Choice and Dorling Kindersley Andreanna Seymore / Stone iStockphoto Brand X Pictures   SOURCES: ASPCA. American Veterinary Medical Association: "Raw Pet Foods and the AVMA's Policy." Dog Breed Info Center. Dog First-Aid 101. Oregon Veterinary Medical Association. Petalia. PetEducation.com. Provet Healthcare. Washington State University: "Salmon Poisoning Disease." Reviewed by Amy Flowers, DVM on February 13, 2020 This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information. THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE VETERINARY ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your pet’s health. Never ignore professional veterinary advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think your pet may have a veterinary emergency, immediately call your veterinarian. Health Solutions. Penis Curved When Erect? Could I have CAD? Treat Bent Fingers Treat HR+, HER2- MBC Tired of Dandruff? Benefits of CBD Rethink MS Treatment AFib-Related Strokes Risk of a Future DVT/PE Is My Penis Normal? 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TitlePoisonous Substances and Toxic Foods for Dogs | Purina
Urlhttps://www.purina.co.uk/articles/dogs/feeding/what-dogs-eat/harmful-dog-foods
DescriptionDogs love to eat, but some foods and substances pose health risks. Find out how to best avoid them to keep your dog happy and healthy
Date
Organic Position5
H1Harmful Substances and Toxic Foods for Dogs
H2What foods can't dogs eat?
Top toxic foods for dogs
Other potentially harmful foods for dogs
Which chemicals are bad for your dog?
Poisonous plants for dogs
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Related articles
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Can Dogs Eat Chocolate
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H3There are many common foods that dogs can’t eat and non-food substances, including plants, which are potentially poisonous. Some of these you’ll know, while others might come as a surprise
Raisins and sultanas
Grapes
Onions
Garlic
H2WithAnchorsWhat foods can't dogs eat?
Top toxic foods for dogs
Other potentially harmful foods for dogs
Which chemicals are bad for your dog?
Poisonous plants for dogs
Discover our dog brands:
Related articles
7 Healthy Dog Treats for Training
Can Dogs Eat Chocolate
Can Dogs Eat Strawberries?
Dog Nutrition for a Balanced Diet
Sign up to our free pet-parenting newsletters!
BodyHarmful Substances and Toxic Foods for Dogs 5 min read Related topics Dog Feeding AdviceExpert Dog CarePet Care Articles and Advice Our experts are here to help you Our experts are here to help Get in touch with us directly any time, any way. Message us Discover our range of dog food Buy Now Worried your pet may have eaten something they shouldn't? Contact now There are many common foods that dogs can’t eat and non-food substances, including plants, which are potentially poisonous. Some of these you’ll know, while others might come as a surprise. Many foods, medicines and plants which are safe for humans, can be toxic to our pets. In fact, some common household items can be life-threatening for dogs. We’ve put together this comprehensive guide so you can learn about poisonous foods for dogs, which plants to avoid and what chemicals to always keep out of reach of your four-legged friend. Some of the items on this list may surprise you!   What foods can't dogs eat? We all love to treat our pups to the occasional treat! While some human foods can be offered in moderation, others should be avoided entirely. When it comes to foods dogs can’t eat, many of the most common items in the fridge or cupboard are out of bounds for our pets, including grapes, garlic or onions.  Although there are also many fruits and vegetables which are fine for dogs to eat in small quantities, these can pose a choking hazard if they're not cut into small pieces and fed under supervision.  Top toxic foods for dogs. The following foods should be avoided, and can be very toxic, even in small amounts: Raisins and sultanas. Raisins are highly toxic to dogs and should be kept out of their reach. Some of the most common signs that might point to a toxic reaction are vomiting, diarrhoea and lethargy. It’s important to seek medical help immediately as raisins can lead to kidney failure when ingested by dogs, a condition which can be fatal.   Grapes. Grapes are toxic to dogs, so you should avoid offering them or their dried version (raisins) to your pet. If you suspect your dog helped themselves to a few grapes, let your vet know straight away so they can provide the vital support needed to get the fruit out of their system. Find out more with our article about dogs and grapes. Onions. Onion poisoning can be fatal to dogs which is why they’re one of the most dangerous foods a canine can come into contact with. They’re often found in many human foods, so make sure you read the label before offering your pet a bite of your meal or snack. Find out more about why dogs can’t eat onions with our easy guide. Garlic. Another toxic food to dogs is garlic. This is because it contains a substance that causes damage to the red blood cells when ingested by our canine friends. So, it’s important to avoid feeding it to your dog. If you suspect they helped themselves to food containing garlic, look out for signs of weakness, vomiting or panting and contact the vet straight away. We’re discussing why is garlic toxic for dogs in more detail in our handy article. Other potentially harmful foods for dogs . Macadamia nuts. Walnuts. Chocolate. Coffee. Tea. Alcohol. Xylitol – often found in certain types of peanut butter and chewing gum. Bread dough. Plants that can cause toxicity in dogs when eaten in large quantities include:  Rhubarb (mainly leaves). Potato leaves and stems. Tomato leaves and stems. Apple seeds, Cherry pits, Apricot pits, Peach pits, present a small risk only but can cause obstructions in the digestive system. Which chemicals are bad for your dog? There are a range of substances around your home that could harm your dog, so it’s important to know what these are so you can keep your pet away. Cleaning agents Many cleaning products are bad for your dog, so keep them behind a closed door and fit child locks if you have a particularly curious dog. Some chemicals may cause a mild stomach upset, while others could cause severe burns of the tongue, mouth and stomach, or even be fatal. Pest control products Pest control products can be extremely dangerous. For example, some types of rat poison can lead to severe bleeding and anaemia in dogs. Therefore, if you’re using rat or mouse baits, ant or cockroach traps, or snail and slug baits around your home or garden, place the products in areas that your dog can’t get to. Medication Never give your dog any medications unless they have been prescribed or recommended by your vet. Human medication can be dangerous to dogs, even in small doses. These include: ibuprofen and other pain killers, cold medicines, anti-cancer drugs, anti-depressants, vitamins, herbal remedies and diet pills. Keep all drugs out of your dog’s reach, preferably in a closed cabinet. Household items There are many common household items that can be potentially dangerous to dogs, even in low quantities. Some of these are toxic, while others can cause gastrointestinal obstructions. These include: pennies (high concentration of zinc), mothballs, potpourri oils, fabric softener sheets, automatic dish detergents (contain cationic detergents which could cause corrosive lesions), batteries (contain acids or alkali which can also cause corrosive lesions), homemade play dough (contains high quantities of salt), winter heat source agents like hand or foot warmers (contain high levels of iron), cigarettes, ground coffee and alcoholic drinks. Car products Car products such as oil, gasoline and antifreeze should be stored properly, somewhere your dog can’t get their paws on them. In particular, be careful about antifreeze (ethylene glycol) as this can be attractive to dogs and is deadly if ingested. In winter, be extra cautious as some people use antifreeze on their paths or spill it on the ground when filling their engine’s cooling system. It’s a good idea to wash your dog’s feet after a walk in case they lick their paws. Flea and tick products Always follow veterinary and manufacturer advice when applying flea and tick products to your pet. Never give products that have been prescribed for a different pet or species, and make sure to administer the correct dose. An overdose can be linked to neurological symptoms including seizures, and certain medications can be lethal if applied to the wrong species. Read all product information thoroughly and follow the instructions closely. If you’re in any doubt, contact the manufacturer or your vet to clarify the directions before using it. The same applies to house sprays – read the instructions carefully and remove all pets from the area for the time period specified on the container. Fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides If you’re treating your lawn or garden with fertilisers, herbicides, or insecticides, always follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully and keep your dog away from the treated area. This will be at least until the product is completely dry, but in some instances a longer period of time is necessary. Store these products safely away from your dog’s reach. Pollutants Take care if you’re using any household products that could contain potentially health-threatening pollutants such as cleaning agents, pesticides, paints and varnishes. Also be aware of any microbial and fungal agents found in air conditioners, air ducts, filters and humidifiers. Keep your dog away from the area where the pollutants are and provide plenty of ventilation. Lead-based paint, linoleum and caulking compounds should all be removed with extreme caution, due to their lead content, and must always be cleaned up thoroughly afterwards. Contact your vet immediately if your dog shows any signs of ingestion including: vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, loss of appetite, muscle co-ordination, blindness or seizures. Poisonous plants for dogs . The following is a list of poisonous plants for dogs, so keep a watchful eye on your dog if you have any of them around your home or garden, and consider whether you should remove them. The list isn’t exhaustive, but you can find more information at The Veterinary Poisons Information Service (VPIS). Although the VPIS only handles direct enquiries from vets (not pet owners), its website does provide some useful information. Aloe Vera. Apple (seeds). Apricot (pit). Autumn Crocus. Cherry (seeds and wilting leaves). Daffodil. Easter Lily. Elephant Ears. English Ivy, Poison Ivy, Devil's Ivy and other ivies. Foxglove. Geranium. Marijuana. Narcissus. Oleander. Oriental Lily. Peach (wilting leaves and pits). Primrose. Rhododendron. Tomato Plant (green fruit, stem and leaves). Yew. Amaryllis. Azalea. Bird of Paradise. Clematis. Cyclamen. Eucalyptus. Indian Rubber Plant. Lily of the Valley. Mistletoe. Nightshade. Onion. Peace Lily. Poinsettia (low toxicity). Swiss Cheese Plant. Tiger Lily. Weeping Fig. If you have any concerns that your dog may have ingested poisonous plants, toxic foods or anything else that is potentially harmful, you should always speak with your vet as soon as possible to obtain advice and guidance. Now you’ve learned all about poisonous foods for dogs, find out what treats are safe with our guide to healthy dog treats for training, next. Discover our dog brands: . Related articles . Dog Feeding Guides 5 min read 7 Healthy Dog Treats for Training . What Dogs Eat 5 min read Can Dogs Eat Chocolate . What Dogs Eat 3 min read Can Dogs Eat Strawberries? . Dog Feeding Guides 5 min read Dog Nutrition for a Balanced Diet . Newsletter Sign up to our free pet-parenting newsletters! . We believe people and pets are 'Better Together'. 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TitleWhat Can Dogs Not Eat? Lists Of Safe & Toxic Foods For Your Dog: Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts, Human Food, Fish, Meat, Bones, Etc. – CanineJournal.com
Urlhttps://www.caninejournal.com/foods-not-to-feed-dog/
DescriptionCan my dog eat that? We bring you a list of foods you should never feed your dog, as well as several safe human foods
Date
Organic Position6
H1What Can Dogs Not Eat? Lists Of Safe & Toxic Foods For Your Dog: Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts, Human Food, Fish, Meat, Bones, Etc
H2Article Overview
Human Food Is Not Always Dog-Friendly
Can My Dog Eat That? A List Of Foods Toxic To Dogs
Infographic: The Menu Of Foods Not To Feed Dogs
Keep These Foods Out Of Your Dog’s Reach As Well
Keep Your Dog On A Healthy Diet
Safe Human Foods For Dogs
Is CBD Safe For Dogs?
When In Doubt, Ask A Vet
What If You Can’t Reach Your Veterinarian?
Be Proactive & Save Yourself From Expensive Vet Bills
H3Fruits
Vegetables
Proteins
Pantry Items
Household Staples
Beverages
Miscellaneous
Can Dogs Eat Apple Seeds?
Can Dogs Eat Avocado?
Can Dogs Eat Grapes & Raisins?
Can Dogs Eat Persimmon, Peach & Plum Pits?
Can Dogs Eat Rhubarb & Tomato Leaves?
Is Corn On The Cob Safe For Dogs?
Can Dogs Eat Garlic?
Can Dogs Eat Mushrooms
Can Dogs Eat Onions & Chives?
Can Dogs Eat Almonds?
Can Dogs Chew On Cooked Bones?
Can Dogs Eat Fat Trimmings?
Can Dogs Eat Liver?
Can Dogs Eat Raw Meat & Fish?
Can Dogs Eat Chocolate?
Can Dogs Eat Macadamia Nuts?
Can Dogs Eat Popcorn?
Can Dogs Eat Salt?
Can Dogs Eat Sugar?
Can Dogs Eat Yeast?
Can Dogs Eat Candy, Chewing Gum, Toothpaste & Mouthwash?
Can Dogs Eat Human Vitamins?
Can Dogs Drink Alcohol?
Can Dogs Drink Coffee, Tea & Other Caffeinated Beverages?
Can Dogs Drink Milk & Eat Dairy Products?
Can Dogs Eat Cat Food?
Can Dogs Have Hops?
Can Dogs Eat Marijuana?
Can Dogs Eat Tobacco?
Old Food
Leftovers
Human Snacks
Fruits
Vegetables
Proteins
Grains
Can Dogs Eat Apple Slices?
Can Dogs Eat Bananas?
Can Dogs Eat Blueberries?
Can Dogs Eat Cantaloupe?
Can Dogs Eat Cranberries?
Can Dogs Eat Mangoes?
Can Dogs Eat Oranges?
Can Dogs Eat Peaches?
Can Dogs Eat Pears?
Can Dogs Eat Pineapples?
Can Dogs Eat Raspberries?
Can Dogs Eat Strawberries?
Can Dogs Eat Watermelon?
Can Dogs Eat Broccoli?
Can Dogs Eat Brussels Sprouts?
Can Dogs Eat Carrots?
Can Dogs Eat Celery?
Can Dogs Eat Cooked Potatoes?
Can Dogs Eat Cucumber?
Can Dogs Eat Green Beans?
Can Dogs Eat Peppers?
Can Dogs Eat Peas?
Can Dogs Eat Spinach?
Can Dogs Eat Sweet Potatoes?
Can Dogs Eat Eggs?
Can Dogs Eat Hot Dogs?
Can Dogs Eat Lean Meat?
Can Dogs Eat White Rice?
Human-Grade, Fresh Dog Food
Ask A Vet
H2WithAnchorsArticle Overview
Human Food Is Not Always Dog-Friendly
Can My Dog Eat That? A List Of Foods Toxic To Dogs
Infographic: The Menu Of Foods Not To Feed Dogs
Keep These Foods Out Of Your Dog’s Reach As Well
Keep Your Dog On A Healthy Diet
Safe Human Foods For Dogs
Is CBD Safe For Dogs?
When In Doubt, Ask A Vet
What If You Can’t Reach Your Veterinarian?
Be Proactive & Save Yourself From Expensive Vet Bills
BodyWhat Can Dogs Not Eat? Lists Of Safe & Toxic Foods For Your Dog: Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts, Human Food, Fish, Meat, Bones, Etc. By: Michelle Schenker | Reviewed By: Dr. JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM - DVM | Updated October 18, 2021 Dogs aren’t picky eaters by any stretch of the imagination. However, this doesn’t mean that everything that they eat is good for them. As a dog parent, you should know how certain foods affect your dog. All too often, our dogs get into foods they shouldn’t. Some of those foods are toxic to dogs and require immediate vet treatment, which can cost you hundreds or thousands of dollars. If you have pet insurance, accidental poisoning may be covered, which can help save you money and focus on your dog’s health. But whether you have pet insurance or not, you need to be aware of which foods are unsafe for your dog, so you can keep them safe. We help you by giving you lists of foods dogs can’t eat and some they can eat safely. Article Overview. Human Food Is Not Always Dog-Friendly. Foods that are perfectly suitable for human consumption may be toxic to your dog, posing a serious threat to their health and well-being. Some foods can cause vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach, weakened breathing, kidney problems, seizures, and even death. Why? Because a dog’s metabolism is different from our metabolism. Metabolism is the process of breaking down food and turning it into energy. Your dog’s body can’t process all types of food the way your body can, so foods that are just fine for you can be bad news for your dog. Please note, although we’re attempting to add every food we can find that is potentially unsafe for dogs to this article, there are foods that we may miss. Don’t consider a food safe to feed to your dog just because it’s not on this list of foods bad for dogs. Do your research if you are uncertain about a particular food. If you are worried about something your pet consumed, please call your vet immediately. Can My Dog Eat That? A List Of Foods Toxic To Dogs. Here’s an alphabetized list of foods that are unsafe for canine consumption. Be sure to look below this list for a helpful and shareable infographic to print out and keep on your fridge so you know what things dogs can’t eat. Fruits. Apple Seeds Avocado Grapes & Raisins Persimmon, Peaches & Plum Pits Rhubarb & Tomato Leaves Vegetables. Corn On The Cob Garlic Mushrooms Onions & Chives Proteins. Almonds Cooked Bones Fat Trimmings Liver Raw Meat & Fish Pantry Items. Chocolate Macadamia Nuts Popcorn Salt Sugar Yeast Household Staples. Candy, Chewing Gum, Toothpaste & Mouthwash Human Vitamins Beverages. Alcohol Coffee, Tea & Other Caffeine Milk & Dairy Products Miscellaneous. Cat Food Hops Marijuana Tobacco Can Dogs Eat Apple Seeds? The casing of apple seeds is toxic to a dog because it contains a small amount of natural chemical (amygdalin) that releases cyanide when digested. This becomes an issue if your dog eats a large amount and the seed is chewed up by the dog, causing it to enter the bloodstream. To play it safe, be sure to core and seed apples before you feed them to your dog. Can Dogs Eat Avocado? Avocados contain persin, which can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and heart muscle damage. The most dangerous part of an avocado is the pit because it is a choking hazard, and it contains a lot of persin. If you think your dog has ingested an avocado pit, call your vet asap. If your dog ate a small piece of avocado, they should be okay, but make sure you monitor your dog and call your vet for further care. Can Dogs Eat Grapes & Raisins? Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure for dogs. Even a small amount can make a dog ill. Vomiting is an early symptom followed by depression and low energy. We’ve heard stories of dogs dying from only a handful of grapes, so do not feed your pup this potentially toxic food. Can Dogs Eat Persimmon, Peach & Plum Pits? Pits and seeds from peaches, plums, and permissions can cause intestinal issues in dogs. Additionally, peach and plum pits have cyanide, which is poisonous to dogs (and people). Can Dogs Eat Rhubarb & Tomato Leaves? These contain oxalates, which can cause drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, tremors, and bloody urine. Is Corn On The Cob Safe For Dogs? While small amounts of corn are safe for a dog to ingest, giving your dog an ear of corn can be dangerous. If your dog is determined enough (which, let’s face it, most dogs are), they will eat the cob and all. The cob can be a choking hazard and can cause intestinal blockage. This could be fatal to your dog. Learn more in our can dogs eat corn article. Can Dogs Eat Garlic? While garlic can be okay for dogs in tiny amounts, more significant amounts can be poisonous. Garlic is related to onions which are toxic for dogs because it kills their red blood cell count, causing anemia. Signs may include weakness, vomiting, and trouble breathing. Can Dogs Eat Mushrooms. It depends. It’s okay to give a small piece of certain kinds here or there, and each situation is unique given what type of mushroom your dog ate and other factors like your pup’s health. Learn more about mushrooms that are safe and toxic. Can Dogs Eat Onions & Chives? No matter what form they’re in (dry, raw, cooked, powder, within other foods), onions are some of the absolute worst foods you could give your pup. They contain disulfides and sulfoxides (thiosulphate), both of which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Can Dogs Eat Almonds? If a dog eats almonds, it can cause diarrhea, gas, loss of appetite, lethargy, upset stomach, and vomiting. Almonds can also be a choking hazard and can obstruct your dog’s airways. Additionally, almonds can be high in salt and fat, which can cause your dog to retain water and gain weight. Learn more about dogs eating almonds. Can Dogs Chew On Cooked Bones? With bones, the danger is that cooked bones can easily splinter when chewed by your dog. However, raw (uncooked) bones are appropriate for both your dog’s nutrition and teeth. Learn more in our dog bone guide. You can also talk with your vet about what types of raw bones would be safe for your dog to chew. Can Dogs Eat Fat Trimmings? Cooked and uncooked fat trimmings can cause pancreatitis. Can Dogs Eat Liver? Liver can be okay in small amounts, but avoid feeding too much to your dog. Liver contains quite a bit of vitamin A, which can adversely affect your pup’s joints and cause gastrointestinal problems. Can Dogs Eat Raw Meat & Fish? Raw meat and fish can become contaminated with bacteria, such as E. coli, which can cause food poisoning. Additionally, some fish can contain a parasite that causes “fish disease” or “salmon poisoning disease (SPD).” Symptoms of food poisoning include vomiting, fever, and enlarged lymph nodes. Cooked, unseasoned fish is perfectly fine because the cooking process kills the parasites. Be sure to remove all bones to avoid choking or internal organ risks. Feeding raw meat is not recommended because there is a risk of food-borne disease for the dog, as well as the person preparing the food. Although raw diets for dogs are increasing in popularity, organizations like the FDA and American Veterinary Medical Association advise against feeding them. Can Dogs Eat Chocolate? Dogs should not eat chocolate ice cream Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which speed the heart rate and stimulate the nervous system. The type of chocolate, the amount your dog ingested, and your dog’s weight will determine how sick (or not sick) your dog may become. Ingesting too much theobromine and caffeine in chocolate may result in vomiting, diarrhea, restlessness, increased urination, tremors, elevated heart rate, seizures, and death. Typically, the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is for dogs. Below is a list of the most to least risky chocolate for dogs: Cocoa powder Unsweetened baker’s chocolate Semisweet chocolate Dark chocolate Milk chocolate White chocolate Can Dogs Eat Macadamia Nuts? Ingesting even small amounts of macadamia nuts can be lethal to your dog. Symptoms include muscle shakes, vomiting, increased temperature, and weak back legs. If your dog ingested chocolate with macadamia nuts, the symptoms can be worse. Can Dogs Eat Popcorn? The corn itself is fine for dogs to eat, but the hull (the corn seed or kernel) can be dangerous for pets, especially those with smaller throats. The kernel can get stuck between teeth, scrape the throat, or get lodged in your dog’s airway. Additionally, the toppings you put on popcorn could cause issues for dogs. Salt, butter, and other unhealthy popcorn additives can cause digestive problems, diarrhea, and dehydration. Over time, this could also contribute to kidney damage and obesity. If you’re interested in sharing your snack, learn how to give your dog popcorn safely. Can Dogs Eat Salt? Just like salt isn’t the healthiest thing for humans, it’s even less healthy for dogs. Too much of it can lead to sodium ion poisoning, resulting in symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, increased temperature, seizures, and even death. Can Dogs Eat Sugar? This applies to any food containing sugar. Make sure you check the ingredient label for human foods – corn syrup (a less expensive form of sugar or glucose) is found in just about everything these days. Too much sugar for your pup can lead to dental issues, obesity, and even diabetes. Can Dogs Eat Yeast? Just like yeast rises in bread, it will also expand and rise within your pup’s tummy. Make sure they don’t get any yeast. While mild cases will cause gas, lots of farting, and discomfort, too much yeast could rupture their stomach and intestines. Yeast dough is also dangerous because as it ferments and rises, it releases lots of ethanol into your dog’s bloodstream, which causes alcohol poisoning. Find out whether dogs can eat bread safely – our experts examine everything from banana bread to rye. Can Dogs Eat Candy, Chewing Gum, Toothpaste & Mouthwash? Not only do these items contain sugar, but they often contain xylitol. Xylitol is a sugar alcohol found in gum, candies, baked goods, and other sugar-substituted items. Although xylitol causes no apparent harm to humans, it is highly toxic to dogs. Even small amounts can cause low blood sugar, seizures, liver failure, and even death for your pup. Peanut butter is a common culprit. Always be sure to check the labels for xylitol. Can Dogs Eat Human Vitamins? Giving your dog one of your vitamins or supplements is not recommended. Human vitamin products often contain 100% of the recommended daily amount of various vitamins. This could cause a canine overdose. The most dangerous vitamin product for dogs is prenatal vitamins, which have a higher iron dose and can cause iron toxicity in pets. If your dog ingests many prenatal vitamins (or other vitamins with a high dosage of iron), you should immediately call your vet. See our reviews of the best vitamins and supplements for dogs. Can Dogs Drink Alcohol? Do not give your dog alcohol on purpose. Alcohol can cause not only intoxication, lack of coordination, weak breathing, and abnormal acidity but potentially even coma or death. Find out what dogs can drink safely. This includes rubbing alcohol and alcohol in hand sanitizers. When eaten or licked off the paws in large amounts, alcohol-based hand sanitizers can cause digestive upset such as vomiting or can even cause alcohol toxicity if the alcohol content is high enough. – Elizabeth Racine, Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Can Dogs Drink Coffee, Tea & Other Caffeinated Beverages? Caffeine is extremely dangerous to dogs. Within one to two hours, your dog could experience mild to severe hyperactivity, restlessness, vomiting, elevated heart rate, increased blood pressure, tremors, seizures, and death. Can Dogs Drink Milk & Eat Dairy Products? While small doses of milk and dairy products are okay for your dog, you could get some smelly farts and nasty cases of diarrhea. This is because dogs become lactose intolerant once weaned off of their mother’s milk. Milk and dairy products can cause digestive problems and could trigger food allergies. Learn more about how dog allergy tests can help you learn about potential health issues. Can Dogs Eat Cat Food? Cat food contains proteins and fats that target the diet of a cat, not a dog. The protein and fat levels in cat food are too high for your dog. Ingesting too much cat food can result in an upset stomach, obesity, and pancreatitis. Can Dogs Have Hops? Hops are an ingredient in beer that can be toxic to your dog. The consumption of hops by your dog can cause vomiting, panting, increased heart rate, fever, and even death. Can Dogs Eat Marijuana? Marijuana contains THC, a psychoactive chemical that causes a ‘high’ in people. Just a small amount of marijuana can be toxic to dogs. Here are the common symptoms of marijuana toxicity in dogs: slow response times, dribbling urine, heart rate change, neurological stimulation, hyperactivity, coma, and even death. Read more about dogs and marijuana. Can Dogs Eat Tobacco? Tobacco contains nicotine, which can be lethal to dogs. Symptoms include vomiting, abnormal heart rate, tremors, and weakness. Tobacco poisoning can present itself within one hour of ingestion. Infographic: The Menu Of Foods Not To Feed Dogs. Here’s a “menu” of things your dog should never eat. Keep These Foods Out Of Your Dog’s Reach As Well. While these foods don’t fall in a particular category above, you’ll want to avoid them as well. Old Food. You don’t like old and moldy food, so what makes you think your dog will? The bacteria in spoiled food contains all sorts of toxins that can be damaging to your dog’s health. Feed your dog only the freshest and best dog food. Leftovers. If you feed your dog leftovers regularly, they won’t get a proper diet. Plus, those leftovers can be high in fat and calories, causing your dog to pack on too much weight. If you decide to give your dog table scraps, make sure to remove any bones and trim down the fat. Human Snacks. Chips can contain garlic and onion powder, and cookies may contain raisins, chocolate, macadamia nuts, etc. Bottom line — there’s a reason there’s food and treats made especially for dogs. Keep Your Dog On A Healthy Diet. Choosing to raise a dog is a big responsibility. Just as with a child, you’ve welcomed another living being into your household and family. We probably don’t have to tell you to take care of your dog, but your dog will have very different needs from your child regarding food. Ask your veterinarian what kind of food would be best for your dog, given your dog’s size, age, and any special health needs. That way, you know what your dog can eat, and you’re less likely to have any food-related issues. Safe Human Foods For Dogs. While many human foods are safe to feed your dog, many are unsafe. As a general rule of thumb, it is far better to be safe than sorry. Avoid feeding your dog any human food unless advised to do so by your vet. By not feeding your dog human food or table scraps, you’re training your dog to not beg for them in the first place, paving the way for acceptable ‘food manners.’ Those good manners will mean that they’ll bother visitors less frequently at mealtime. Below is a list of human foods that are safe for dogs to eat in moderation. Fruits. Apple Slices Bananas Blueberries Cantaloupe Cranberries Mangoes Oranges Peaches Pears Peas Pineapples Raspberries Strawberries Watermelon Vegetables. Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Carrots Celery Cooked Potatoes Cucumber Green Beans Peppers Spinach Sweet Potatoes Proteins. Eggs Hot Dogs Lean Meat Grains. White Rice Can Dogs Eat Apple Slices? Apple slices are safe for your dog to eat and are a great source of fiber and carbohydrates. But be sure to remove the seeds because they’re not safe for dogs. Can Dogs Eat Bananas? Make sure to peel and slice the banana first Bananas can be a yummy and healthy treat for your dog to eat. Just be sure to peel the banana before letting your dog have it. The banana peel isn’t toxic to your dog, but it can be challenging to digest and could cause intestinal blockage issues. And remember to give your dog bananas in moderation. Too much could cause an upset tummy. Can Dogs Eat Blueberries? Blueberries can be a great low-calorie treat option for your dog. Blueberries contain antioxidants, fiber, and vitamins C and K, all of which help your dog’s overall health. You could use blueberries as a training treat if you’d like. Can Dogs Eat Cantaloupe? Cantaloupe is a great treat alternative for overweight dogs. You may want to remove the seeds, though, because they can be a choking hazard for your dog. Can Dogs Eat Cranberries? Cranberries and dried cranberries are safe for your dog to eat in small quantities. However, your dog may not be a fan of the tart fruit. If you find that your dog likes cranberries, feed them in moderation to prevent an upset tummy. Can Dogs Eat Mangoes? Make sure to remove the skin and pit Yes, mangoes are safe for dogs to eat. Just make sure you remove the skin beforehand. While the skin isn’t technically toxic to your dog, it can be difficult to digest, and your dog could choke on it. Remove the pit as well because it contains cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. Can Dogs Eat Oranges? Yes, dogs can eat the flesh of an orange. But be sure to remove any seeds and the peel before giving your dog any oranges. Can Dogs Eat Peaches? Peaches are a safe fruit for your dog to eat. Peaches are full of vitamins A and C, antioxidants, fiber, and more. However, peach pits can be poisonous to dogs. Peaches are higher in sugar, so it’s best only to give this food in small amounts. Can Dogs Eat Pears? Yes, dogs can eat pears. Pears have many nutritional qualities, including vitamins C and K, fiber, and copper. Like many other fruits, you should remove the seeds because they can contain traces of cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. Can Dogs Eat Pineapples? Pineapple is safe for your dog to eat. It has many vitamins and minerals, which can help boost your dog’s immune system and digestive health. However, pineapple is high in sugar, so moderation is key. If you’d like to learn more about safely giving your dog pineapple, read our can dogs eat pineapple article. Can Dogs Eat Raspberries? Yes, your dog can eat raspberries but only in moderation. Too many raspberries could cause your dog to experience some gastrointestinal (GI) problems like vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. Can Dogs Eat Strawberries? Strawberries are safe for dogs to eat. But feed your dog strawberries in moderation. Strawberries are high in natural sugar, which isn’t beneficial for dogs and can cause GI issues. Can Dogs Eat Watermelon? Yes, your dog can eat watermelon, but the seeds can cause intestinal blockage, so it’s best to give seedless watermelon or remove the seeds. Don’t give your dog the watermelon rind to chew on, as it can cause GI problems. Can Dogs Eat Broccoli? Broccoli is a safe vegetable for your dog to eat and can be nutritious. Give a small amount first to avoid upsetting your dog’s stomach. Can Dogs Eat Brussels Sprouts? Brussels sprouts are safe for your dog to eat, but you may want to avoid including them in their diet because they can cause flatulence. While your dog’s gas may not be harmful to him, it may cause you to leave the room. Can Dogs Eat Carrots? Carrots (cooked or raw) are a great low-calorie snack and can be a useful training tool. In fact, you can give your dog slices of carrots as a treat and a healthier alternative to other training treats. Stay away from canned or pickled carrots because they contain too much salt. Can Dogs Eat Celery? Celery is safe for dogs to eat, but it should be cut into smaller pieces or cooked to help soften it and prevent choking. If you’d like to start giving your dog celery, we have tips on feeding celery to your dog in our can dogs eat celery article. Can Dogs Eat Cooked Potatoes? Raw potatoes aren’t safe for dogs because they contain solanine which can be toxic to dogs and difficult to digest. However, cooked, unseasoned potatoes are perfectly safe for dogs to eat. Learn more in our can dogs eat potatoes article. Can Dogs Eat Cucumber? Cucumber slices can be a healthy snack for your dog. Your dog may like the crunch it offers, which can be similar to other dog treats. Cucumbers are low-calorie, so that they may be a good snack for overweight dogs. Can Dogs Eat Green Beans? You can give your dog raw, steamed, or canned green beans as long as they are plain (leave the salt and other seasonings off). Vets often recommend green beans as a healthy treat option for dogs. Can Dogs Eat Peppers? Bell peppers are okay to feed dogs. Dogs are carnivores and prefer meat to vegetables, but there are some benefits to veggies. For example, green peppers are a low-calorie snack packed with vitamin C and beta-carotene. Be sure to chop peppers into small pieces because the outer skin can be tough and difficult to chew. Pureeing or steaming the peppers makes them easier to consume and digest. As with most human food, don’t overdo it because too much could lead to sickness. Never give your dog a spicy variety such as jalapeños or hot peppers. Can Dogs Eat Peas? Green peas, snow peas, garden peas, and sugar snap peas are all safe for your dog to eat. Peas can be given to your dog fresh, frozen, or thawed, but you should avoid canned peas because they can often have high amounts of sodium in them. Can Dogs Eat Spinach? Spinach is okay for your dog to eat. However, it’s high in oxalic acid, which can lead to kidney damage. So while your dog can safely eat spinach, you won’t want them to make a habit of eating it. Can Dogs Eat Sweet Potatoes? Dogs can eat cooked, unseasoned, peeled sweet potatoes. The skin can be difficult for your dog to digest, and you should never feed your dog raw potatoes of any sort. Can Dogs Eat Eggs? Salmonella poisoning and biotin deficiency are two things to be cautious of when feeding your dog raw eggs. It is safest to give your dog a cooked egg over a raw egg. Eggs are an excellent source of protein and have a host of vitamins for your pup. Don’t cook eggs in butter, oil, salt, pepper, or other additives; dogs don’t need those things, and they can be harmful to them as well. Can Dogs Eat Hot Dogs? Most hot dogs made from beef, chicken, pork, or turkey are safe for dogs. However, it depends on the hot dog ingredients and your dog’s food allergies and intolerances. Plant-based hot dogs are generally safe for dogs to eat. Ultimately, remember to read the instructions carefully so you know if your dog can eat hot dogs. Can Dogs Eat Lean Meat? Lean meat includes the white, boneless meat from chicken or turkey and has had excessive fat removed. It provides a tasty treat for your dog and serves as a great source of protein. If feeding chicken and turkey, remove the fatty skin and cook or boil the meat without seasoning. Learn more about feeding turkey to dogs. Can Dogs Eat White Rice? Cooked white rice is a common recommendation for a dog with an upset stomach. Generally, boiled white chicken and white rice helps firm up stools and nourish a dog that is having trouble getting any nutrition from food as a result of illness. Human-Grade, Fresh Dog Food. While not exactly human food, there are fresh, human-grade dog foods available for delivery to your doorstep. Our favorite is The Farmer’s Dog if you want to check out our first-hand review to learn more. Visit The Farmer’s Dog Website Is CBD Safe For Dogs? CBD (cannabidiol) may be a natural way to treat anxiety, pain, skin conditions, neurological disorders, and more. But is it effective and safe for dogs? From the limited veterinary research performed so far, reports show that CBD is safe and effective for managing arthritis in many dogs. More research needs to be done to evaluate how CBD could help with other conditions in dogs, such as seizures. Be sure to choose a high-quality product from a reputable manufacturer. Many companies are joining the CBD hype, so the CBD product at the best price may not be the safest for your pup. Do your research before you get started. Also, your vet understands your dog’s unique needs better than you or the company selling the products, so be sure to check with them before administering. Be aware, though, that your vet is not legally allowed to recommend CBD treatment for your dog. Learn More About The Benefits Of CBD Oil For Dogs When In Doubt, Ask A Vet. If your dog is acting strangely or experiencing minor symptoms of weakness, lack of coordination, vomiting, diarrhea, etc., and you think he may have consumed something he shouldn’t have, seek a veterinarian’s attention immediately. If you wait too long, your dog could become gravely ill. What If You Can’t Reach Your Veterinarian? In an emergency, when you cannot reach your veterinarian, immediately contact your local animal emergency clinic or call one of these hotlines to speak to a toxicology specialist and vets who can assist 24/7.  Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-764-7661 North Shore America / ASPCA Hotline at 1-888-232-8870 ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435 Note: They may charge a small fee of $59 to $75 per incident and ask for age, weight, medical history of your pet, concern details, amount, when it happened, and current symptoms. Ask A Vet. Try using our “Ask a Vet” chat feature that is available 24/7 (see the lower right-hand corner of your browser window). You’ll get answers from a doctor within minutes. Depending on what your dog ate and how long it’s been since they ate it, your veterinarian may induce your dog to vomit. If the item is likely to cause further damage to your dog on the way back up, your veterinarian will not induce vomiting. In this case, other methods of helping your dog will be discussed, such as having your dog ingest something to bind with the offending food and neutralize it. Another option might be to perform surgery and remove it. Be Proactive & Save Yourself From Expensive Vet Bills. If your dog eats something and gets sick, the vet bill can be tough for pet parents to stomach. Take the proactive step and consider pet insurance (we compare top pet insurance companies in our comparison) before you find yourself rushing to the vet. That way, if an unsuspecting treat becomes a medical emergency, your dog (and your wallet) will be better off. Check out this video explaining what pet insurance is and why it’s worth it. See something we missed? Does your pup have a favorite food you’d like to learn more about? Filed Under: Food | Related Topics: Eating
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TitleToxic Food Guide for Pets | Pet Health Insurance & Tips
Urlhttps://www.petinsurance.com/healthzone/pet-health/pet-toxins/toxic-food-guide-for-pets/
DescriptionDogs and cats are curious by nature, particularly when it comes to food. They're also good at begging for a taste of whatever we may be eating or cooking. Unfortunately, our pets can't always stomach the same foods as us — some food can be toxic and even deadly to their health
Date
Organic Position7
H1Toxic Food Guide for Pets
H2What Not to Feed Dogs and Cats
1. Alcohol
H3Related Articles
H2WithAnchorsWhat Not to Feed Dogs and Cats
1. Alcohol
BodyToxic Food Guide for PetsWhat Not to Feed Dogs and Cats. Dogs and cats are curious by nature, particularly when it comes to food. They're also very good at begging for a taste of whatever we may be eating or cooking. As cute as they may be, though, our pets can't always stomach the same foods as us — some food can be toxic and even deadly to their health.Use this toxic food list as a guide to preventing accidental toxic exposure to your four-legged companion. Previous Next1. Alcohol. Alcohol is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and affects pets quickly. Pets can easily become attracted to a discarded cup of wine, beer or especially sangria left sitting on the ground during a party. Ingestion of alcohol can cause dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Intoxicated animals can experience seizures and respiratory failure. Desserts containing alcohol or yeast-containing dough are often the unknown culprits.1 of 17Share this article onShare this article onRelated Articles. Summertime Pet Poisoning HazardsAre you aware of several overlooked summertime toxins that can threaten the lives of your ...10 Toxic Summertime PlantsInspired to banish dull winter months with bright, blossoming plants? We asked the Pet Poi...Lily Plant Dangers and PetsLilies are popular plants with large, colorful flowers. They can be extremely deadly to pe...
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Result 12
TitleToxic Foods for Dogs and Cats (an A - Z guide)
Urlhttps://info.animalemergencyservice.com.au/toxic-foods-for-dogs-cats
DescriptionWhile resisting giving our pets treats from our plates is hard, it is the right thing to do. We've compiled a list of foods that are harmful to our pets
Date
Organic Position8
H1Toxic Foods for Dogs and Cats (an A - Z guide)
H2A - Z of toxic foods
H3
H2WithAnchorsA - Z of toxic foods
BodyToxic Foods for Dogs and Cats (an A - Z guide) Any pet parent knows the struggle of saying no when our pets beg for food while we are trying to eat. While resisting giving our fur babies treats from our dinner plates is hard, it is the right thing to do. Not only do our pets have different nutritional needs from us, but many human foods are toxic to them. We've put together a shortlist of foods that are harmful to our pets, as well as the signs and symptoms if they are ingested. A - Z of toxic foods. Below is an overview of foods that are toxic to our pets. This isn't a full list, and it's alway best to avoid feeding your furry friend human foods. If your pet does eat something and your are unsure of whether it could be harmful, call your vet immediately. A. Alcohol If ingested in large enough amounts alcohol can be toxic to our pets and can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, decreased coordination, difficulties breathing, and tremors. Avocado The skin and leaves of the avocado contain persin which can be toxic to animals, particularly birds. While cats and dogs aren't as susceptible as other animals it is still something to be aware of. Avocados are also high in fat and can contribute to pancreatitis in dogs. C. Caffeine Dogs especially are more sensitive to caffeine than us humans. While a lap or two of your coffee is unlikely to do them any harm, if ingested in large enough amounts can be fatal. Symptoms of caffeine poisoning include, vomiting, diarrhoea, restlessness, tremors, rapid breathing, heart palpitations. Citrus All parts of citrus fruits (the fruit, peel, seeds, leaves and stems) contain citric acid which can be harmful to our pets. If only a small amount is ingested your pet should only experience mild symptoms like an upset stomach. However, if a large amount is ingested it can cause diarrhoea and vomiting. Citrus to avoid include lemons, limes, oranges and grapefruits. Chocolate It is well known chocolate is toxic to cats and dogs but it is still something we see all too often in our hospitals. Chocolate contains the toxins caffeine and theobromine which cause vomiting and diarrhoea on the mild end of the toxicity range, and seizures and heart arrhythmias on the severe end. G. Garlic and Chives While garlic and chives ingested in small amounts shouldn't cause any problems. If ingested in large quantities they can cause gastrointestinal irritation and red blood cell damage. Grapes, Raisins, Sultanas and Currants Grapes, raisins, sultanas and currants contain a toxin that can cause severe liver damage and kidney failure. It doesn't take many for dogs to become critically ill. Symptoms include, vomiting, diarrhoea, excessive thirst, excessive urination, lethargy, abdominal pain, tremors and seizures. By the time clinical signs begin, the pet is already experiencing kidney failure. M. Macadamia Nuts Macadamias are toxic to dogs. It is unknown which part of the macadamia causes poisoning. Symptoms include, lethargy, vomiting, tremors, abdominal pain, joint stiffness and pale gums. Milk and Milk-based Products Did you know cats and dogs are lactose intolerant? Avoid giving your furry friends cow's milk, as drinking it can cause diarrhoea, craps and digestive upset. O. Onion Did you know onions can be lethal? Onions contain thiosulphate which is toxic to both cats and dogs. Ingestion of this food causes a condition known as haemolytic anaemia which is where red blood cells throughout the body burst. This condition can be fatal, so keep a watchful eye on your furry family members. S. Salt Just like us humans, when our pets ingest too much salt they can suffer from excessive thirst and urination, and potentially sodium ion poisoning. Symptoms from consuming a large amount include, depression, diarrhoea, elevated body temperature, seizures, tremors and vomiting. Stone Fruit The stone in stone fruits is toxic and can cause obstructions if ingested. X. Xylitol Xylitol is a sweetener found in an alarming amount of foods, including sweets and treats, chewing gum and peanut butter. It is toxic to our pets and can cause liver failure and seizures. So, if you are planning on treating your pet with a delicious snack, check the label to ensure products don't contain xylitol. Y. Yeast Dough Should our pets eat raw yeast dough it can continue to rise and cause gas to accumulate in their digestive system. Not only will this be painful for them it can also cause their stomach to bloat and potentially twist. Yeast also produces ethanol (a type of alcohol) which is also toxic to our pets.     If you suspect your pet has eaten something they shouldn't, contact your local vet immediately or your closest Animal Emergency Service hospital. For more information about what is toxic to pets, visit our Pets and Poisons Guide.  Disclaimer Privacy Policy © 2018 Animal Emergency Service.
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Result 13
Title30 Foods that Are Poisonous to Dogs | Stacker
Urlhttps://stacker.com/stories/3506/30-foods-are-poisonous-dogs
DescriptionStacker showcases 30 foods that can potentially be poisonous to dogs. The list includes things like nutmeg, garlic, cherries, peaches, onions, and other everyday foods
Date26 Oct 2021
Organic Position9
H130 foods that are poisonous to dogs
H230 foods that are poisonous to dogs
Garlic
Avocado
Yeast
Chocolate
Rhubarb
Citrus oil
Macadamia nuts
Cat food
Grapes and raisins
Spinach
Milk
Xylitol
Wild mushrooms
Iron supplements
Apples
Tobacco
Black walnuts
Nutmeg
Peaches
Currants
Alcohol
Leeks
Mustard
Fat trimmings
Coffee
Cherries
Onions
Green tomatoes
Chives
Potato
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H3
H2WithAnchors30 foods that are poisonous to dogs
Garlic
Avocado
Yeast
Chocolate
Rhubarb
Citrus oil
Macadamia nuts
Cat food
Grapes and raisins
Spinach
Milk
Xylitol
Wild mushrooms
Iron supplements
Apples
Tobacco
Black walnuts
Nutmeg
Peaches
Currants
Alcohol
Leeks
Mustard
Fat trimmings
Coffee
Cherries
Onions
Green tomatoes
Chives
Potato
Trending Now
Best Law & Order SVU episodes
100 best tv shows of all time
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Body30 foods that are poisonous to dogs Written by: Rachel Cavanaugh October 26, 2021 Canva Republish this story 30 foods that are poisonous to dogs . As man’s best friend, dogs do everything with us: walk around town, ride in the car, play in the yard, and snuggle on the couch. It’s natural, then—given how much time we spend with our four-legged companions—to assume they can eat with us, too. However, human food can be dangerous for dogs, even types of food that are completely safe for us. Part of the reason we can eat foods that they can’t is that dogs are so much smaller than us. They also weigh far less, which means their bodies can’t absorb things as quickly. “Foods that are perfectly suitable for human consumption, as well as other animals, may be toxic and even poisonous to your dog, posing a serious threat to their health and well-being,” writes Canine Journal co-founder Michelle Schenker. “Why? Because all animals have very different rates of metabolism.” Another problem is that dogs have voracious appetites and don’t always know when to stop. Although some foods are not toxic in small doses, larger quantities can be fatal. Signs of food poisoning in dogs can vary widely, but key symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, dilated pupils, loss of appetite, restlessness, staggering, and disorientation. If you suspect your dog has eaten something toxic, VetsNow recommends never to induce vomiting unless a poison control expert has instructed you to do so. Certain substances can actually cause more damage coming back up and are best left in a dog's stomach. To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet’s phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call for advice at (888) 426-4435. Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is preventing it in the first place. To give you an idea of which human foods can be dangerous, Stacker put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you. You may also like: Most popular house-friendly dogs 1 / 30 Canva Garlic . Garlic is an allium, a family of foods that can be fatal to dogs due to a compound called thiosulfate that damages red blood cells. It takes a lot of garlic to cause toxicity but some breeds, particularly Japanese ones (such as Akitas and Shiba Inus), are particularly susceptible. “Signs of garlic poisoning can be delayed and not apparent for several days,” explains the Pet Poison Helpline. “While tiny amounts of these foods in some pets, especially dogs, may be safe, large amounts can be very toxic.” 2 / 30 Canva Avocado . Avocados are dangerous to many animals, not just dogs, partly due to a fungicidal toxin called persin. It’s generally understood that only high doses of poison are actually lethal, but even more mild symptoms—including vomiting and diarrhea—should obviously be avoided, not to mention the large pits that can be choking hazards. 3 / 30 Canva Yeast . Eating unbaked bread dough can be extremely dangerous for your dog because the fermenting yeast gets rapidly absorbed in the bloodstream, where it produces enough ethanol to cause alcohol poisoning. Additionally, yeast dough can rise as it moves through the digestive system, potentially twisting the stomach—a situation that can lead to death. Even if the yeast doesn’t cause a life-threatening emergency, it can severely bloat your pup’s stomach, causing intense pain and discomfort. 4 / 30 Canva Chocolate . Chocolate is one of the most commonly recognized toxins for dogs. The culprit is theobromine, an alkaloid that can cause cardiac arrhythmias and central nervous system dysfunction in dogs. Dark chocolate, semisweet chocolate, and unsweetened baker’s chocolates are the most dangerous, while milk and white chocolates have smaller amounts (though they can be toxic, too). Toxicity depends on many factors including the amount consumed and the size of the dog. 5 / 30 Canva Rhubarb . Although humans love rhubarb pies, the sweet treat can cause kidney failure in dogs due to an antinutrient called oxalic acid. The substance creates crystals in the urinary tract and can cause the kidneys to shut down. Signs of rhubarb poisoning can include drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, bloody urine, changes in thirst, and other symptoms. You may also like: Most popular large dog breeds 6 / 30 Canva Citrus oil . While oranges are typically fine for your dog to eat, citrus oil—often used medicinally—is not. This is because of the insecticidal properties of the oil, which can lead to liver failure in dogs. In addition to preventing your pup from ingesting it, you should never rub it on your dog’s skin medicinally because they are likely to lick it off. (Note: Many essential oils contain citrus, not just citrus oil itself.) 7 / 30 Jessica Merz // Flickr Macadamia nuts . Many nuts are not good for dogs. Macadamia nuts, however, rank among the most toxic. The reason for this is not fully understood by vets, but it’s known that it leads to vomiting, weakness, hyperthermia, and loss of bodily functions. Weakness, particularly behind the hind legs, is one of the most common symptoms. Always call your veterinarian if you suspect your dog has consumed a dangerous amount of macadamia nuts. 8 / 30 Canva Cat food . Although cat food won’t poison your dog immediately, it can lead to pancreatitis and other health complications over time, causing organ damage and potentially sudden death. Every now and then it’s OK if you're in a pinch—but be sure not to feed cat food to your pup on an ongoing basis. 9 / 30 Canva Grapes and raisins . No one knows what ingredient or compound in grapes and raisins makes them so poisonous to dogs, but they rank among the most serious food threats. Even small amounts can cause sudden kidney failure, often signaled by your dog ceasing to urinate. Other symptoms include foul breath, loss of appetite, vomiting, and diarrhea. Some dogs are extremely susceptible to grape and raisin poisoning while others can eat them with no problem—something else that confounds experts. 10 / 30 Canva Spinach . Spinach is the subject of widespread debate among veterinarians and other dog experts. It contains a high amount of oxalic acid, a substance known to interfere with dogs’ abilities to absorb calcium, causing kidney damage. Like many foods on this list, how much is consumed has a lot to do with how toxic it is. It’s probably OK for your dog to have a small amount of spinach every now and then, but regular consumption can lead to serious health problems. You may also like: Most popular dog breeds that don’t shed 11 / 30 Canva Milk . All mammals are designed to drink milk from their mothers as infants, gradually weaning off as they grow and transition to water and solid foods. After infancy, it’s not uncommon for mammals to experience some level of lactose intolerance when consuming milk products in general and certainly those from other species (different mammals react differently, as will individuals within those groups). So while milk is not technically poisonous for dogs; it’s worth keeping it on their “do not feed” list. Some dogs are OK with it, others experience extreme discomfort in addition to potential health problems, especially among certain breeds. 12 / 30 Canva Xylitol . Xylitol is a sugar alternative found in human foods such as candy, chewing gum, and many baked sweets. It’s extremely toxic to dogs, causing rapid insulin release that can put them in a coma within 15 to 20 minutes. Veterinarians may advise feeding your dog syrup or honey on the way to the emergency clinic to boost their blood sugar during the drive. However, you should only do this if you receive instructions to do so. 13 / 30 Canva Wild mushrooms . While the types of mushrooms you purchase in the grocery store are typically safe for dogs, wild mushrooms growing in your yard or out in nature can be toxic. If you have mushrooms around your house, make sure to pull them up regularly. If you catch your dog trying to eat them in the wilderness, stop them immediately. 14 / 30 Canva Iron supplements . Vitamins containing iron can be toxic for dogs, particularly prenatal supplements, which tend to have higher amounts than standard vitamins. That’s because dogs don’t have a way of excreting excess iron, causing buildups up in the body. In addition to vitamins, cases of iron toxicity can also come from dogs eating oxygen absorbers (those small silica packets found in things like beef jerky). 15 / 30 Canva Apples . Although the flesh of apples is not toxic, the seeds can be poisonous due to the presence of a compound called amygdalin. They have to be consumed in large quantities and they must be chewed to be toxic, so a few seeds are unlikely to kill your dog. However, if you plan to feed your dog apples, veterinarians recommend seeding and coring them first. You may also like: Most popular dog breed the year you were born 16 / 30 Canva Tobacco . Tobacco isn’t technically a food, but it’s certainly something that humans ingest that can be extremely lethal to your pooch. If you’re a smoker, it’s important to always keep cigarettes out of reach of dogs, especially if your pup is prone to chewing on random objects. The same goes for e-cigarettes, liquid nicotine, chewing tobacco, nicotine inhalers, and cigars, all of which are common sources of tobacco poisoning. 17 / 30 Canva Black walnuts . Regular walnuts (often called English walnuts) are safe for dogs to eat, but the less common black walnut can be toxic. These specialty nuts are used in desserts and baked goods, although poisoning usually occurs in nature when dogs find them on the ground or eat bark from the tree. In fact, the black walnut ranks among the five most poisonous trees to large animals. 18 / 30 Canva Nutmeg . Nutmeg contains a compound called myristicin which, when ingested in large quantities, can lead to rapid heart rate, hallucinations, and seizures in dogs, according to Dr. Stephanie Liff, co-owner of Pure Paws Veterinary Care of Hell’s Kitchen. Baked goods or other recipes containing small amounts of the spice do not pose a threat; however, if your dog chews on the spice container or gets into the small packets from the bulk spice aisle, it could potentially be very serious. 19 / 30 Canva Peaches . Although the peach flesh itself is fine for dogs to eat, the pits of peaches contain amygdalin, the same substance found in apple seeds—which releases cyanide. Your pup would have to consume several peach pits to get sick; however, this isn’t beyond the realm of possibility if you have a dog who gets into everything. For this reason, it’s best to keep peaches out of dogs’ reach. In addition to the cyanide issue, the pits pose a choking hazard. 20 / 30 Canva Currants . This one is tricky because even though true currants are not toxic, many currants sold in the United States (sometimes called Zante currants) are actually just tiny raisins made from Corinth grapes. These cause the same issues with toxicity that regular grapes and raisins do, potentially leading to kidney failure. You may also like: Least obedient dog breeds 21 / 30 Canva Alcohol . Although small amounts are not likely to kill most dogs, the potential for severe poisoning and other health issues exists. Alcohol can cause significant drops in blood pressure, body temperature, and blood sugar, which can lead to seizures and even respiratory failure in worst-case scenarios. 22 / 30 Canva Leeks . Leeks contain thiosulfate, the same compound in the allium family that makes garlic unsafe for dogs. In fact, Live Science lists alliums among the seven foods that cause the most pet deaths. 23 / 30 Canva Mustard . Mustard is not likely to be lethal to dogs in small doses; however, it can be toxic in higher amounts and, generally speaking, it’s not a good thing for your dog to consume. In fact, due to mustard’s mildly toxic nature, it is often something that’s suggested by vets as a way to induce vomiting. The same goes for mustard seeds, which are often used in cooking. 24 / 30 Canva Fat trimmings . Although it might seem harmless to treat your pup to the fat you’ve trimmed off meat, veterinarians advise against it. High-fat foods and raw fats can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and even pancreatitis or blood infections. 25 / 30 Canva Coffee . Caffeine is toxic for dogs and, although one or two sips won’t kill them, it doesn’t take a huge amount to cause serious consequences. Coffee grounds and other sources of condensed caffeine can also pose serious threats. You may also like: History of dogs in space 26 / 30 Canva Cherries . Similarly to peaches and apples, cherries contain cyanide-releasing amygdalin in their pits, which is toxic to dogs. Cherries can be even more dangerous than peaches because the pits are much smaller, making dogs more likely to eat them. In addition to the toxic pits, cherry flesh can make their stomach upset. 27 / 30 Canva Onions . Onions are another example of food in the allium family that can be poisonous to dogs due to the thiosulfate it contains. Like with other alliums, certain dog breeds are more vulnerable, and their size makes a huge difference. 28 / 30 Canva Green tomatoes . Once tomatoes are red and ripe, they are generally safe for dogs, as long as the stem is completely removed. However, green tomatoes or not fully ripe red tomatoes can be toxic for dogs. This is because of a substance called solanine found in the stems and leaves. If you have a garden where tomatoes grow, it is best to keep your dogs out so they don’t chew on the green fruits or their vines. 29 / 30 Canva Chives . Chives are yet another food in the allium family which, like garlic, leeks, and onions, can be poisonous to dogs in large amounts. “Toxic doses of chives can cause damage to the red blood cells (making them more likely to rupture) leading to anemia,” Pet Poison Helpline explains. Additionally, the hotline warns that symptoms can be delayed, sometimes not appearing for several days. 30 / 30 Canva Potato . Potatoes are examples of another food where solanine is the culprit for toxicity. The compound blocks a chemical called acetylcholine, which dogs need to transmit nerve impulses. The result can be issues with their nervous systems and intestinal tracts. Like with tomatoes, the risk occurs when potatoes are green or unripe, and in the green sprouts, or eyes, that grow on them. You may also like: Every new dog breed recognized in the 21st century Republish this story Trending Now. TV Best Law & Order SVU episodes . TV 100 best tv shows of all time . 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TitleDangerous Foods for Dogs - Wet Nose Waggy Tail
Urlhttps://www.wetnosewaggytail.co.uk/blog/dangerous-foods-dogs.html
DescriptionThere are some foods that are dangerous for dogs and you should really steer clear of them as it can make them very poorly
Date
Organic Position10
H1Dangerous Foods for Dogs
H2Award Winning Dog Walking and Pet Care
SOME OF OUR LOVELY CUSTOMERS
RACHEL MOSIER
HANNAH HAYWOOD
DEBRA TURLAND
H3Keeping your dog safe
Chocolate
Sultanas and raisins
Dairy
Medication
Raw fish
Garlic
Fatty foods
Sugar
Alcohol
Grapes
Cooked bones
Mushrooms
Caffeine
Nuts
Corn on the cob
Avocado
Chewing gum and sweets
Cat food
H2WithAnchorsAward Winning Dog Walking and Pet Care
SOME OF OUR LOVELY CUSTOMERS
RACHEL MOSIER
HANNAH HAYWOOD
DEBRA TURLAND
BodyDangerous Foods for Dogs Keeping your dog safe.   Let’s be honest, the vast majority of dogs are greedy, there’s no other word for it! They will attempt to eat anything in sight regardless of whether it’s part of their natural diet or indeed good for them. On the whole their little snacks on ‘thing’s they shouldn’t eat’ doesn’t do them too much harm if it’s only an occasional incident. However, there are some foods that are dangerous for dogs and you should really steer clear of them as it can make them very poorly. In the worst case some foods are toxic and can actually kill your beloved pet. Here’s our guide of dangerous foods for dogs and the effects eating them can have on your dog. If you have any concerns over something your pet has eaten please seek the advice of a vet, don’t take anything to chance or rely on Google for the answer.   Chocolate .   If you drop a chocolate button on the floor and your dog beats you to it, there’s probably no need to panic. ‘Human’ chocolate should never be given to dogs on purpose. When consumed in large amounts or over a period of time chocolate is extremely bad for dogs, in the worse cases it has been known to be fatal. The toxic ingredient in chocolate is called theobromine. Theobromine can be digested by humans but not dogs. It goes without saying, the smaller the dog, the less they can consume before there is a problem. The usual treatment if your dog has eaten too much chocolate is to force vomiting; this has to be done by a veterinary professional within a couple of hours. Please do not delay; it could be life or death.   Sultanas and raisins .   For such tiny little dried fruits they can cause huge problems for dogs of all shapes and sizes. Dogs should never be given sultanas and raisins. In the most serious of cases the toxicity of these fruit ninjas causes acute kidney failure and ultimately death. Even in relatively small amounts sultanas and raisins can be toxic. If you think your dog has eaten more than a couple of raisins dropped on the floor it could be a medical emergency, advice from a vet should be taken immediately. Some of the signs of poisoning include vomiting, pain in the abdomen and diarrhoea, following my weakness and lethargy.   Dairy .   Surprisingly dairy is not good for all dogs; this is due to lactose found in most milk, ice cream and other dairy products. Lactose is actually two different kinds of sugar which some dogs find difficult to break down as part of the digestive process. For many dogs there is nothing more exciting than the ice cream van, we’ve all seen the video on YouTube but for many a little dairy snack can cause acute intestinal and stomach pain, vomiting, and diarrhoea. So, dairy is not a definite ‘no’, it’s watch your dog and see how they respond. In many cases, they still eat it even if it hurts later; after all, they are dogs!   Medication .   Never be tempted to give your dog human medication for any reason unless directed by a vet. Ibuprofen may help with your aches and pains it can be lethal to your dog. There are some websites that state a small dose of aspirin is ok for adult dogs, however this is never recommended unless the advice is given by a vet as they will take into account any other medications your dog is on, their age, weight and medical history. Be aware, it’s not always the main ingredient in human medication that causes the issue, brands vary greatly on their ‘additional ingredients’ and these can prove to be very toxic to dogs, for example some antihistamines use decongestants which can be incredibly toxic for dogs.   Raw fish .   Dogs can eat fish, the omega 3 and natural glucosamine is actually very good for them. The issue is feeding raw fish; the experts have varying opinions on this one so moderation and preparation is the key. The issue with feeding raw fish is your dog may end up with parasitic infections caused by three types of parasites on the fish; a solution to this is to freeze the fish which kills off the parasites. The other issue is the enzyme found in raw fish that breaks down vitamin B2. If you feed your dog too much raw fish you may actually find your dog has a vitamin deficiency. The safer option is to cook the fish which kills off the enzyme.   Garlic .   The health benefits of garlic for humans are well documented, for dogs it is a little more confusing with conflicting information across the whole of the internet. Garlic is part of the allium family, which also includes chives, shallots and onions, it’s actually a plant, you can sometimes smell wild garlic when you’re out on a walk. In large amounts it is pretty much agreed that garlic (and onions, chives etc) are all very toxic for dogs. In rare but extreme cases garlic poisoning can lead to diarrhoea, vomiting, weakness and eventually your dog may collapse. Onions are particularly bad, although the symptoms may not appear for a few days. However, it is argued even in smaller doses damage may be caused to your dog, although the signs are not apparent immediately it may affect your dog’s health because of the damage caused to the red blood cells. A video from a veterinary toxicologist, Dr. John Tegzes, explains the risks.   Fatty foods .   We all like a takeaway or a piece of cake every now and then, the majority of us will admit to slipping our dog an odd bit of food from our plate, we know we shouldn’t but it’s hard to resist those puppy eyes. However, it is important to be aware that all fatty foods can cause issues for your dog. Their bodies are not designed to digest fats in the same way we are so fatty foods can cause pancreatitis which can be extremely painful for your dog. Symptoms include of lethargy, depression, a painful swollen abdomen and fever. Veterinary intervention is needed immediately. The other issue of course is obesity which can lead to diabetes, joint pain and a raft of related illnesses which can contribute to an early death.   Sugar .   An excessive amount of sugar in your diet is not good for you, it can lead to a vast array of health issues; sugar is not good for your dog either, for much the same reasons. In tiny amounts a little sugar won’t do your dog any harm. However, it shouldn’t be offered regularly or it can be more of a problem that it first appears; it can lead to weight gain which leads to problems with joints and mobility, diabetes and issues with dental care which can be painful for your dog. Beware, many human foods may be advertised as “sugar free” but they do contain artificial sweeteners, particularly xylitol which is deadly for dogs, so please always read the label. If in doubt just stick to dog treats.   Alcohol .   If you’re sat in with your feet up enjoying a glass or wine or bottle of beer you may be tempted to share the experience with man’s best friend, sadly this is not a good idea. The main ingredients that make up alcohol are all bad for dogs. For example, wine is of course grapes; with beer it is the hops that are toxic to dogs. If your dog was to ingest either of these there are likely to be immediate symptoms such as vomiting but there are also long term side effects and damage that may be caused, particularly to the kidneys. Dogs are not designed to drink alcohol; it’s very much a human thing. The risk of alcoholic poisoning for a dog is quite high, their bodies are not made for alcohol and the consequences can be severe. Depending on the amount consumed signs of alcoholic poisoning range from sickness and diarrhoea through to heart failure.   Grapes .   It’s not completely understood why grapes cause the reaction in dogs they do. However, it is known that grapes can cause kidney damage and even kidney failure in extreme cases. It has also been reported on some veterinary websites that grapes can affect the liver function. They really are little fruit ninjas so should be avoided for dogs altogether. If you think your dog has eaten grapes it could be a medical emergency depending on the size of your dog and the number of grapes ingested; advice from a vet should be taken immediately. Some of the signs of poisoning include vomiting, pain in the abdomen and diarrhoea, followed by weakness and lethargy.   Cooked bones .   Almost every cartoon you see of a dog there is a bone close by, it is therefore no wonder why dog owners like to give their dogs bones as a treat. We are conditioned to thinking it’s a good thing. The issue is not bones, raw bones are fine for dogs, in fact they love them and they are good for their teeth and nutrition. The issue is feeding dogs bones that have been cooked, usually as part of a Sunday roast. It seems the kind thing to do to offer your dog the bone to chew on. However, cooked bones splinter easily and can cause your dog to choke or perforate your dog’s digestive system on the way down and need extreme and emergency surgery to save your dog’s live and repair the damage. Many people also advise never to give chicken or fish bones because they are so small and can cause choking.   Mushrooms .   The controversy around mushrooms is always up for debate. As with humans some mushrooms, particularly wild mushrooms are extremely toxic. It is therefore wise to call dogs away from patches of wild mushrooms whilst out on walks and pick mushrooms out of your lawn once they start sprouting to stop your dog eating them. The natural curiosity of dog’s means they can get themselves into trouble without even knowing they’re doing it. Mushrooms in small quantities and shop bought can offer some health benefits to dogs according to some experts. Button mushrooms are often a favourite because they are low fat and they contain high levels of vitamin D which is good for the immune system. If you feed your dog mushrooms it should only be in small quantities or as an occasional treat. Some dogs are allergic to them, even shop bought ones so it’s important to always monitor your pet for an adverse reaction.   Caffeine .   As much as the British love a nice cup of tea or American’s love their coffee, neither of these is a good option for our canine companions due to the large amount of caffeine. As caffeine is a stimulant for both humans and dogs it can cause increased heart rate, tremors, restlessness, vomiting and diarrhoea. An odd slurp of tea your dog sneaks from your cup probably won’t do them any immediate harm but it should not be encouraged or happen frequently. However, if your dog manages to eat ground coffee beans or guzzle too much tea or coffee a phone call to the vet is probably your best option. In smaller dogs who consume too much caffeine it can actually be deadly so it’s not something to be taken lightly.   Nuts .   There are so many nuts around it’s hard to remember which are safe and which are not, if it doubt, steer clear of them all. Please also remember that any dog can have an allergic reaction to nuts, they also pose a chocking risk, especially to smaller dogs. The definite no –no nuts are macadamia which are actually part of the grape family; they are high in fat and can cause pancreatitis. Others no-no nuts include almonds, walnuts, pecans and pistachios all of which are known to cause gastric issues or seizures in dogs. Some nuts are ok for dogs; these include peanuts, cashews and hazelnuts. They should never be given in large quantities or frequently because they can cause stomach upsets and abdominal pain. For further details, there’s a great article here on dogs and nuts.   Corn on the cob .   Your dog will probably enjoy a little sweetcorn every now and then with their meal, as with most veg it is quite good for them to complement their meat diet. It is very sweet though so shouldn’t be given in vast quantities. The issue with corn on the cob is not the corn itself, it’s the cob. Dogs don’t know the etiquette of nibbling the corn delicately and therefore attempt and usually succeed in swallowing the corn on the cob whole or in large chunks. There’s no surprises that they end up choking or have a blockage that needs to be surgically removed.   Avocado .   The advice on dogs and avocado is divided, on the surface it may seem healthy, it contains 20 vitamins and minerals so there should be some benefit. The reasons given for not allowing your dog to eat it are that it contains a toxin called persin that is known to cause issues for some animals, particularly birds and larger animals like horses. Persin levels are higher in unripened fruit and the leaves of the plants. Mild stomach upsets have been reported in dogs and rescue organisations list avocado as unsafe for dogs. However, some dog related websites state that avocados are in fact fine for dogs because dogs are unaffected by the persin. So, even if the fruit itself is ‘ok’ for dogs, there is still the worrying issue of the stone, particularly if you have a small dog where it could be a genuine choke or obstruction hazard.   Chewing gum and sweets .   There are several issues with sweets (candy) and chewing gums for dogs, the main one’s being the sugar content and more importantly the presence of xylitol, an artificial sweetener used in lots of gums and sweets which is deadly to dogs. Please be aware, a favourite of dog owners is to give dogs peanut butter, some brands now use xylitol, always read the label. A dog that has digested xylitol may become extremely poorly with symptoms ranging from seizures and low blood sugars to liver failure and even fatal consequences.   Cat food .   To the untrained eye, commercial cat and dog food look very similar, after all, they are both meat based, usually with a few veggies and a bit of meat jelly thrown in for good measure. The dietary needs of cats and dogs differ quite substantially; cat food is too high in both fat and protein for dogs to safely digest it although a small amount would do them no harm. This advice is provided as guidance only. It is not intended to be a substitute for a veterinary advice. If in any doubt we always urge you to speak to your vet. It’s never worth the risk. all images adapted from freepik.com SOME OF OUR LOVELY CUSTOMERS. 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TitleFoods that can be poisonous to pets | The Humane Society of the United States
Urlhttps://www.humanesociety.org/resources/foods-can-be-poisonous-pets
DescriptionSome foods that are safe for people can be very dangerous for pets. Protect your pets by reading our list of some common foods that can be poisonous for dogs, cats and other pets
Date
Organic Position11
H1Foods that can be poisonous to pets
H2The following foods may be dangerous to your pet:
Also of interest:
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H2WithAnchorsThe following foods may be dangerous to your pet:
Also of interest:
BodyFoods that can be poisonous to pets Find out what foods are safe for people but dangerous for pets Share Some foods that are considered good for people can be very dangerous for pets. The list below highlights some of the most common foods that can be dangerous to animals. This is not an exhaustive list; any decision to provide your pet with food not specifically intended for animals should be discussed with your pet’s veterinarian or a board certified veterinary nutritionist. Top 10 tips Sign up to receive our exclusive e-book full of important information about caring for your pet, including training techniques and answers to frequently asked questions. Get Your Copy The following foods may be dangerous to your pet:. Alcoholic beverages  Apple seeds  Apricot pits  Avocados Cherry pits Candy (particularly chocolate—which is toxic to dogs, cats, and ferrets—and any candy containing the toxic sweetener Xylitol)  Chives Coffee (grounds, beans, and chocolate-covered espresso beans) Garlic Grapes  Gum (can cause blockages and sugar-free gums may contain the toxic sweetener Xylitol) Hops (used in home beer brewing)  Macadamia nuts  Moldy foods  Mushroom plants  Mustard seeds  Onions, onion powder and onion flakes  Peach pits  Potato leaves and stems (green parts)  Raisins  Rhubarb leaves  Salt  Tea (because it contains caffeine)  Tomato leaves and stems (green parts)  Walnuts  Xylitol (artificial sweetener that is toxic to pets) Yeast dough Also of interest:. Halloween safety tips for petsHow to keep your pets safe around cleaning productsWhole Foods Deserves Whole Praise for...
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Result 16
TitleThe 10 Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs - The Farmer's Dog
Urlhttps://www.thefarmersdog.com/digest/the-most-dangerous-foods-for-dogs/
DescriptionIgnore the puppy eyes and get informed: these are the top ten most dangerous foods you could feed your dog
Date28 Jul 2016
Organic Position12
H1The 10 Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs
H2
H3Stay in the Know
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BodyThe 10 Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs By The Farmer's Dog | July 28, 2016 One of the myths of dog nutrition is that you should never feed your dog “people food.” There are many foods commonly found on your own table—like fresh fruit and vegetables and lean meat—that dogs can happily, and healthily partake in. But there are also things in your kitchen that you should keep well away from your dog’s bowl, no matter the intensity of the puppy-dog eyes. Dangerous foods for dogs: what they can’t eat. Alcohol Your dog may be drunk in love with you, but that’s the only kind of intoxication he needs. Alcohol has the same effect on a dog’s liver and brain that it has on yours, but it can do big damage to a dog in much smaller quantities. Even a small amount of alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, central nervous system depression, problems with coordination, difficulty breathing, comas, and even death. And just like humans, the smaller the dog, the greater the effect. Onions and garlic Make sure your dog stays away from these two, and not just because of garlic breath. Garlic is a controversial ingredient; it has many medicinal purposes and it is an immune booster, but the potential risks outweigh the benefits. Both onion and garlic contain a substance that can damage and/or destroy a dog’s red blood cells, potentially leading to anemia. Did your dog scarf down the last onion ring when you weren’t looking? Keep an eye out: symptoms of anemia include weakness, pale gums, disinterest in food, dullness, and breathlessness. This risk is present in all forms of garlic and onion—raw, powdered, cooked, or dehydrated. Caffeine Does your dog need a little extra pep in his step in the morning? Try an invigorating AM jog, but don’t even think about sharing your Starbucks. Coffee can cause irreparable damage and even caffeine poisoning if consumed in large enough quantities. This risk extends from tea, coffee, and energy drinks to soda, cocoa, and even some painkillers. Symptoms of caffeine poisoning include restlessness, rapid breathing, heart palpitations, and muscle tremors, not entirely unlike how we feel after drinking two cold brews in one sitting. Grapes and raisins While some fruits are great healthy snack choices for your dog, grapes and raisins do not make the cut. They make look innocent, but these sweet snacks can cause vomiting, lethargy, and ultimately kidney failure in dogs. It’s unclear why grapes and raisins have this effect, but make sure your pup steers clear of the grapes on that cheese plate to be safe. Macadamia nuts Macadamia nuts may be an excellent source of dietary fiber for humans, but dogs should look elsewhere for their crunch. Although the prognosis for many cases is extremely good, these nuts can be fatal to dogs. Toxicosis depends on the size of the dog, but consumption of as little as 2.4 g/kg of macadamia nuts can cause clinical signs of poisoning, including muscle tremors, weakness, paralysis of the hindquarters, vomiting, fever, and rapid heartbeat. Combining these nuts with chocolate exacerbates clinical signs and increases the risk of death, so do everyone a favor and close that bag of white chocolate macadamia nut cookies. Xylitol An artificial sweetener often found in candy, gum, toothpaste, and certain diet foods, this substance can have quick and traumatic consequences for your dog. Xylitol causes a sudden increase in insulin circulation that can result in a severe drop in blood sugar and even liver failure. Early symptoms include repeated vomiting, lethargy, and loss of coordination that can evolve into seizures. Liver failure from xylitol ingestion can occur within just a few days, so don’t forget to put the cap back on the toothpaste in the morning. Your dog (and roommate) will thank you. Chocolate This sweet treat is the most commonly cited forbidden food for dogs. What makes chocolate toxic to dogs is a substance called theobromine, which can cause abnormal heartbeats, tremors, seizure, and death. All chocolate is dangerous for dogs, but dark and unsweetened baking varieties are the strongest sources of theobromine and are therefore the deadliest. Fat Trimmings and bones We might feel tempted to give our dogs leftover bacon scraps at brunch, but it isn’t worth it. Both cooked and uncooked fat trimmings can cause pancreatitis in dogs. In addition, bones are choking hazards and can also splinter and puncture a dog’s throat or digestive tract. Freshly cooked, high-quality meats, on the other hand, are a great source of safe, pup-friendly protein. Yeast dough There’s a good reason cookie dough dog treats aren’t a trend. Basic baking 101: uncooked dough needs to rise. If your dog ingests it when it’s still raw, it will rise inside the stomach and cause swelling and severe pain. The yeast will also ferment, producing alcohol, which by now you should know is risky business. Fruits pits and seeds Pits and seeds can obstruct a dog’s digestive tract, so always exercise caution when sharing peach slices or watermelon chunks with your pup. Certain agents within the pits themselves can also be dangerous: both peach and plum pits contain cyanide, which is poisonous for dogs — and humans. Not all fruits should be feared, though: once you remove the pits and seeds, certain fruits can be the perfect healthy snack for your pup. Image: @sophiegamand Top Stories 30 Mistakes the “Seinfeld” Humans Make with Farfel in “The Dog” In honor of the 30th anniversary of the Seinfeld episode "The Dog," here are 30 ways the humans of... By Jon Zeller Decoding Your Dog’s Poop How to "read" your dog's poop, and understand what it might be telling you about their health. 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By The Farmer's Dog The Corgi Care Guide: Personality, History, Food, and More. Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgis have tiny legs and an infectious smile—but they’re working... By Jon Zeller
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Result 17
Title20 Foods Dogs Should Never Eat
Urlhttps://www.petsbest.com/blog/20-foods-dogs-shouldnt-eat/
DescriptionLearn 20 foods dogs should never eat! A must have list for all dog owners
Date17 Mar 2016
Organic Position13
H120 Foods Dogs Should Never Eat
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Body20 Foods Dogs Should Never Eat Dr. Jack Stephens March 17, 2016 Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin By Dr. Eva Evans, a veterinarian and writer for Pets Best, a nationwide pet health insurance agency since 2005. These common items may be found in or around your house and they can make your dog very ill, many are toxic. So keep dogs safe, by keeping these potential poisons away. 1. Alcohol Causes weakness, vomiting, dangerously low blood pressure, coma and death in pets. 2. Apple, Apricot, Cherry and Plum Seeds/Pits These pits contain cyanide which can cause vomiting, irregular and fast heartbeat, seizures, coma and death due to the inability of red blood cells to properly carry oxygen to cells. 3. Avocado Contains persin, a toxic compound that causes vomiting and diarrhea. 4. Broccoli Contains isothiocyanate which can be harmful to pets in very large doses. 5. Caffeine Contains methylxanthines which can cause potentially fatal diarrhea, vomiting, seizures and irregular heart beats. 6. Chives Can cause potentially fatal anemia in dogs (and cats). 7. Chocolate Contains methylxanthines which can cause potentially fatal diarrhea, vomiting, seizures and irregular heart beats. 8. Garlic Can cause potentially fatal anemia in dogs (and cats). Download a PDF of the postcard: Help keep dogs safe by sharing this with friends! Click here to download a PDF version of the “20 Foods Dogs Should Never Eat” that you can email or print. 9. Grapes and Raisins Can cause severe and potentially fatal kidney failure. 10. Ham May cause pancreatitis, a potentially fatal disease, due to high fat content. 11. Macadamia Nuts Contains an unidentified toxin that can cause vomiting, weakness, joint pain and inflammation. Related Article:  Do animals grieve the loss of another pet?12. Milk & Dairy Products May cause diarrhea and gas in adult animals who are lactose intolerant. 13. Mushrooms Many types contain many different toxins that may cause kidney and liver failure, vomiting, diarrhea, hallucination and damage to red blood cells. 14. Nutmeg May cause hallucinations and severe vomiting. 15. Onions Causes potentially fatal oxidation of red blood cells leading to their destruction and causing anemia. 16. Salt Excessive amounts of salt can cause a change in the fluid balance of cells thus causing tremors, seizures and coma (this includes rock salt and homemade playdough). 17. Spicy Food Extra heat added to a dish could potentially cause vomiting, stomach ulcers or diarrhea. 18. Sugar-Free Gum & Candy (Xylitol) Causes a potentially fatal drop in blood glucose (blood sugar) followed by severe liver damage. 19. Tobacco Nicotine containing products can cause excitement, vomiting and tremors that are usually followed by fatal paralysis. 20. Yeast Dough Yeast in the raw dough can cause an excess buildup of gas in a pet’s stomach causing severe pain and potential life threatening torsion or rupture of the stomach.   Protect Your Pup with Pet Insurance Get a Quick, Free Quote Online or Call Pets Best at 877-738-7237 Dr. Jack Stephens. Dr. Jack L. Stephens, founder and former president of Pets Best Insurance, began the pet insurance industry in the U.S. in 1981 with a mission to end euthanasia when pet owners couldn’t afford veterinary treatment. Dr. Stephens went on to present the first U.S. pet insurance policy to famous television dog, Lassie. Read More PrevPreviousHow to Brush Your Pet’s Teeth Next10 Tips for Allergies to Your PetNext Protect your loved ones with Pet Insurance! Get a Quote Legal Underwriters & Licensing Application Agreement Privacy Agreement Notice To California Residents Accessibility Statement For Partners Agent Login Veterinarians Affiliates Employers And Brokers Shelter And Rescue Stay Connected Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Pinterest Pet eCards Get In Touch Contact Careers Media & Press
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Result 18
TitleYour Guide to Foods That Are Poisonous to Dogs | FirstVet
Urlhttps://firstvet.com/us/articles/what-foods-are-toxic-to-dogs
DescriptionHere’s a brief guide to help you know which foods to avoid feeding your dog and which are absolute no-nos due to severe risk of poisoning
Date11 Nov 2021
Organic Position14
H1What foods are toxic to dogs?
H2Other foods to avoid feeding your dog:
Read more:
Need to speak with a veterinarian regarding foods that make your dog sick or another condition?
Are you concerned about your pet?
More articles about Dog
H3How to Road Trip With Your Dog
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H2WithAnchorsOther foods to avoid feeding your dog:
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BodyWhat foods are toxic to dogs?Many of us like to share our meal with our favorite, furry, four-legged companion or feed them “human food” treats. Here’s a brief guide to help you know which foods to avoid feeding your dog and which are absolute no-nos due to severe risk of poisoning. Are you concerned about your pet?Book a video consultation with an experienced veterinarian within minutes.Professional vet advice onlineLow-cost video vet consultationsOpen 24 hours a day, 365 days a year Book Video Consultation Looking for more information? Follow each link to learn more about each food item’s toxic effects. The most common or general result of toxicity by these foods is listed with each item. Be aware! Many of these foods can lead to death, depending on the age, weight, and health status of the animal and the amount they consumed.Foods Toxic to Dogs:Alcohol: CNS (Central nervous system) depression, gastrointestinal upsetAvocado: Gastrointestinal upset, possible heart tissue deathChocolate/coffee/caffeine: Arrhythmias, increased heart rate, seizuresGarlic/onion/leeks/scallions/chives: Heinz Body Anemia (destruction of red blood cells leading to anemia)Grapes/raisins: Kidney failureMacadamia nuts: CNS depressionXylitol (sugar substitute): Decreased blood sugar (hypoglycemia), seizuresFruit pits (apricot, peach, cherry): Cyanide, choking, gastrointestinal obstructionOther foods to avoid feeding your dog:. Bread dough (raw, still rising, containing yeast): BloatCitrus (in large amounts or concentrated essential oils): Gastrointestinal irritation, CNS depressionCoconut/coconut oil: Diarrhea, pancreatitisCoconut water (high in potassium): Bradycardia (slowed heart rate)Milk/dairy: Diarrhea, gastrointestinal upsetNuts (high in fat content): Pancreatitis, vomiting, diarrheaRaw meat: Salmonella, E. coli, vomiting, diarrhea, pancreatitisBones: Choking, stomach/intestinal obstruction, perforated stomach/intestinesSalty food: Increased thirst and urination, possible sodium ion poisoningOily/fried food: Vomiting, diarrhea, pancreatitisRead more:. People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your PetsDangerous Foods for DogsFoods That Can Poison PetsNeed to speak with a veterinarian regarding foods that make your dog sick or another condition?Click here to schedule a video consult to speak to one of our vets. You can also download the FirstVet app from the Apple App Store and Google Play Stores.Are you concerned about your pet?Book a video consultation with an experienced veterinarian within minutes. Book Video Consultation Low-cost video vet consultations, 24 hours a day Experienced, licensed vets Over 700,000 satisfied pet owners More articles about Dog. How to Road Trip With Your Dog. Going on a road trip with a dog is not as easy as it sounds. The road-tripping experience can be a fun adventure both fo... Read full article Umbilical Hernias in Dogs and Cats. An umbilical hernia is a congenital abnormality where the body wall does not close properly at the location where the um... Read full article Pet Medication 101: Gabapentin. It’s important to understand a medication’s uses and side effects before giving it to your pet. This medication info she... Read full article
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TitlePoisonous food for dogs | Health | The Kennel Club
Urlhttps://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/health-and-dog-care/health/health-and-care/a-z-of-health-and-care-issues/poisonous-food/
DescriptionIt is important to remember that some human foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Ensure treats are dog friendly and avoid any of these listed foods
Date
Organic Position15
H1Poisonous food
H2The dangers of human food
Alcohol
Blue cheese
Bones
Bread dough
Chocolate
Macadamia nuts
Mouldy foods
Onions (Allium species)
What about garlic capsules/supplements?
Raisins (fruits of the Vitis vinifera)
Sweets/sugar
Xylitol
Tips on how to poison-proof your home
What to do if you think your dog is poisoned
Things to tell your vet
What to take to your vets
How to use this information
Think your dog may be affected?
Find a vet near you
Related Topics
H3
H2WithAnchorsThe dangers of human food
Alcohol
Blue cheese
Bones
Bread dough
Chocolate
Macadamia nuts
Mouldy foods
Onions (Allium species)
What about garlic capsules/supplements?
Raisins (fruits of the Vitis vinifera)
Sweets/sugar
Xylitol
Tips on how to poison-proof your home
What to do if you think your dog is poisoned
Things to tell your vet
What to take to your vets
How to use this information
Think your dog may be affected?
Find a vet near you
Related Topics
BodyPoisonous food The dangers of human food. It is important to remember that some human foods can be very dangerous to dogs. If you wish to give your dog a treat, ensure that it is something dog friendly and avoid giving them any of the foods listed below. Alcohol. Dogs are believed to be more sensitive to ethanol than humans and so drinking even a small amount of alcohol can cause effects. Certain alcoholic drinks may be more appealing to dogs, such as cream or egg based drinks. Dogs may develop similar effects to those expected in humans, including becoming drowsy, wobbly on their feet and in more severe cases they can develop low body temperature, low blood sugar, seizures and coma. Blue cheese. Roquefort and other blue cheeses contain a substance called roquefortine C, which is a substance produced by the fungus used to make these cheeses. Dogs appear sensitive to this substance and in more extreme cases can cause dogs to quickly develop muscle tremors and seizures, which may last for up to two days. Bones. When cooked, all bones become brittle and can easily splinter. Eating chicken, turkey or goose carcasses may cause larger pieces of bone to cause an obstruction, while smaller pieces may irritate the gut, or even penetrate the stomach or intestinal wall, which may require surgery.  Safety tip: When preparing your Christmas Day meal, ensure that any meat is kept on the kitchen surface, or out of reach of your dog. When throwing away a carcass, take it to the outside bin, therefore avoiding any temptation for your dog to raid your kitchen bin during the night. Bread dough. Raw bread dough containing live yeast can expand in the warm and moist environment of the stomach. As the bread dough rises, or increases in size, it can lead to bloat and may escalate to causing the stomach to twist. Signs may appear as vomiting, retching, the dog's stomach appearing bigger than usual, weakness, collapse and possibly even death. The dough can swell to such a degree that it may decrease blood supply to the stomach wall, or may put pressure on the diaphragm and could interfere with breathing. Secondary problems: As well as the expanding dough causing problems, the multiplying yeast can start to produce alcohol. If absorbed into the blood, dogs may develop similar effects to those expected in humans, including becoming drowsy, wobbly on their feet and in more severe cases they can develop low body temperature, low blood sugar, seizures and coma. Chocolate. Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine which is poisonous to dogs and other animals. Generally speaking, the darker the chocolate, the more theobromine it contains, and therefore the more poisonous it is. White chocolate contains very little theobromine and although it is unlikely to cause theobromine poisoning, it is still very fatty and can make your dog ill. Chocolate poisoning can initially cause vomiting and diarrhoea, but may lead to excitability, twitching, tremors, fitting and life-threatening problems with the heart. Chocolate at Christmas and Easter: each year, reports of dogs with chocolate poisoning increase dramatically around Christmas and Easter. During these periods take extra care to ensure that all chocolate is kept out of the reach of your dog. Although chocolate wrappers are not poisonous, they can cause an obstruction if eaten. This can be very dangerous and may require surgical intervention. Signs of an obstruction may include vomiting, lethargy, your dog being off their food, not defecating or finding it difficult to defecate.Find out more about chocolate poisoning. Macadamia nuts. Why these nuts are poisonous to dogs is not known, but macadamia nuts can cause your dog to appear weak (particularly in their hind limbs), dull, sleepy and they can sometimes appear wobbly on their feet, or they may appear in pain or stiff when walking. Vomiting, tremors, lethargy and an increased body temperature can also occur. These effects usually appear within 12 hours and may last up to two days. Some macadamia nuts are covered in chocolate and so pose a double risk to dogs. Mouldy foods. Mouldy foods can contain lots of different toxins and, if eaten, may make your dog ill. One particular substance, which is mostly found on mouldy dairy products, bread and nuts, can cause dogs to quickly develop muscle tremors and seizures, which may last for up to two days. If you compost your food scraps, then make sure that they are kept outside in a sealed container that your dog cannot access. Onions (Allium species). Onions, garlic, leeks, shallots and chives all belong to the Allium family. These plants all contain a substance which can damage red blood cells in dogs and can cause life-threatening anaemia. Signs may not present for a few days, but can include stomach problems and may cause your dog to become sleepy, dull, weak, or develop rapid breathing. Poisoned dogs may also have discoloured urine. Ensure that your dog does not eat cooked foods that contain these vegetables, e.g. onion gravy, onion bhaji etc. What about garlic capsules/supplements? Based on current scientific findings, there is evidence to suggest that raw or cooked garlic is toxic to dogs. Therefore we would recommend that you do not feed your dog garlic unless it is in a licensed and authorised veterinary medicine or a supplement specifically formulated and produced for dogs (never give human supplements). Make sure the supplements are from a reputable source that has quality standards. Raisins (fruits of the Vitis vinifera). Grapes, raisins, currants and sultanas are all toxic to dogs and it is believed the dried forms of these fruits are more toxic. It is not known why these fruits are poisonous to dogs, or how much is dangerous. Some dogs have eaten large quantities of these fruit and experienced no ill effects, while others have become unwell after very small amounts. As well as possibly causing stomach problems, these fruits can cause kidney failure, which can sometimes be delayed by up to three days. Kidney failure may sometimes present as a decrease in urination, or your dog may also appear dull and show signs of increased thirst. Prompt treatment is important. If your dog does eat any amount, contact your veterinarian immediately. It is important not to let your dog eat any foods that contain these fruits, such as hot cross buns, Christmas cake, Christmas pudding, fruit cake, mince pies, stollen etc. Sweets/sugar. If available in large quantities some dogs may gorge themselves on sugary sweets kept aside for, or collected by, trick or treaters. After eating lots of sugar, or even lots of fat, dogs can develop pancreatitis (an inflammation of the pancreas), which may cause them to be off their food, develop vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy and go into organ failure.  Xylitol. Some sugar-free sweets, sugar replacements, chewing gums, nicotine replacement gums and even some medicines, contain an artificial sweetener called xylitol, which can be very poisonous to dogs. Xylitol is more commonly found in food products in America, but is beginning to appear in sugar-free products in the UK as well. Xylitol can cause an otherwise healthy dog's blood sugar to quickly drop to dangerous levels and larger amounts can also cause liver failure. Signs of poisoning can include your dog appearing weak, lethargic, or they may collapse or develop fits. Tips on how to poison-proof your home. Keep all chocolate out of the reach of your dog. At Christmas, this includes chocolate coins hung from Christmas trees, advent calendars, boxes of chocolate put out on Christmas Day and don't forget the wrapped chocolate presents under your Christmas tree (just because its wrapped doesn't mean your dog can't smell it!). What to do if you think your dog is poisoned. If you think that your dog may have eaten, touched or inhaled something that it shouldn't have, speak to your vet straight away. Never try to make your dog sick. Trying to do this can cause other complications, which may harm your dog. Things to tell your vet. In an emergency you can help your veterinary practice make an informed decision as to whether your dog needs to be treated by them and, if so, what the best treatment would be. Where possible you should provide your veterinary practice with the following information: What poison you think your dog has been exposed to (i.e. chocolate, ibuprofen etc.). Include any product names, or lists of ingredients if relevant How much they may have been exposed to (i.e. 500mg, 500ml, one tablet etc, even approximations may help) When your dog was exposed to the poison (i.e. five minutes, five hours or five days ago) If your dog has been unwell and, if so, what clinical effects have been seen It is easier for a vet to care for a poisoned dog if it is treated sooner rather than later. If you are in any doubt, don't wait for your dog to become unwell before calling for advice. What to take to your vets. If you do need to take your dog to your veterinary practice, make sure that you take along any relevant packaging, or a sample of the poison, e.g. parts of plant or fungi. Always make sure that you yourself are protected and cannot be poisoned in turn. How to use this information. The information is intended to be used to prevent poisoning by raising awareness of certain poisons, rather than as a document to be used in an emergency. If you think that your dog has been poisoned, or has come into contact with potentially poisonous substances, contact your local veterinary practice immediately. Think your dog may be affected? If you're worried about your dog's health, always contact your vet immediately! We are not a veterinary organisation and so we can't give veterinary advice, but if you're worried about any of the issues raised in this article, please contact your local vet practice for further information. Find a vet near you. If you're looking for a vet practice near you, why not visit the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons' Find a vet page. Related Topics. Poisons - general Poisons in your cleaning cupboard Poisons in your garden Poisons in your medicine cabinet Poisons in your shed/garage Poisons out and about
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Title20 Toxic Foods Poisonous to Dogs and Cats
Urlhttps://blog.nationwide.com/toxic-foods-for-dogs-and-cats/
DescriptionCertain foods can be dangerous or even fatal for animals. Check out our list of toxic foods to avoid sharing with your cats and dogs
Date16 Nov 2020
Organic Position16
H120 Foods Poisonous to Dogs and Cats
H2Beverages can be hazardous, too
Ingredients can also cause illnesses
H3
H2WithAnchorsBeverages can be hazardous, too
Ingredients can also cause illnesses
Body20 Foods Poisonous to Dogs and Cats Certain foods that are good for humans can be dangerous and even toxic to pets – leading to a variety of health problems. Protect your dog or cat by not letting them get their paws on these dangerous foods.  Print out this handy PDF to hang on your fridge as a reminder of what foods are toxic to our beloved animals. Click to download   Chocolate When you ask someone “What foods are toxic to dogs?” chocolate is often the first to come to mind. Chocolate toxicity can cause vomiting, diarrhea, heart arrhythmias and seizures, and can even be fatal. This is due to an ingredient in chocolate called theobromine, which can be poisonous to pets. The darker the chocolate and the smaller the dog, the greater the danger. Consult your veterinarian if your dog eats any. Fatty foods Tails wag at the scent of greasy and high-fat cheeseburgers, bacon and fried foods, but don’t give in to their begging. While these foods aren’t toxic, consumption can lead to vomiting, diarrhea and gas, and can result in pancreatitis and gastrointestinal issues. Fat trimmings and bones No more rewarding your pet with fat trimmed from your steak, chicken or pork. You run the risk of causing pancreas and liver problems. Be cautious of leftover bones, too; cooked bones are more likely to splinter, and the sharp pieces of bone can tear digestive organs and cause internal bleeding. Onions and garlic Onions and garlic can be lethal because of an ingredient called thiosulphate, which can damage your pet’s red blood cells and cause anemia. Thiosulphate is found in onions, shallots, chives and onion powder. It’s especially potent in garlic. Nuts If your dog is experiencing seizures, lethargy, vomiting or loss of muscle control, nut toxicity may be the cause. Macadamia nuts are a food especially toxic to dogs and cats. Many nuts are also high in fat and salt, which can cause a variety of health issues. Raw eggs Cooked eggs can make a healthy addition to your dog or cat’s diet, if eaten in moderation. Excessive consumption of raw eggs, however, can lead to a biotin deficiency that is bad for dogs’ skin and fur. Raw fish While not inherently a food poisonous to dogs and cats, raw fish may contain harmful bacteria that can lead to food poisoning in your pet. In addition, your pet may also be at risk of catching “fish disease” due to a parasite commonly found in salmon, trout, sturgeon and other upstream-swimming fish. Be sure to monitor your pet closely during fishing trips or at the beach. Salt A pretzel here or a potato chip there is mostly harmless. But large quantities of salt can lead to salt poisoning, which has severe neurological symptoms, including seizures and brain swelling. Be sure to monitor your pooch at the beach, since drinking salty ocean water is a common cause of salt poisoning. Mushrooms If your dog or cat can roam your yard, remove any wild mushrooms. The wild variety typically causes the most harm, as opposed to grocery store mushrooms. Even a few bites can cause seizures and vomiting. Avocado The large seeds found in avocados can become lodged in your pet’s stomach, esophagus or intestinal tract. If you live near avocado trees, be sure to monitor your pet to prevent choking.  Grapes and raisins Grapes and raisins can cause kidney issues in dogs and cats. Even small amounts can result in lethargy, shivers and a decreased appetite. More extreme cases of grape poisoning can cause kidney failure and even death.  Cherries These fruits are toxic to dogs and cats, causing dilated pupils, breathing problems and, in extreme cases, shock or even death. Beware of cherry trees and shrubs as well. With the exception of the ripe pulp around the seeds, these plants are poisonous to pets, as the non-pulp parts contain cyanide. Fruit with pits Beware of fruits with pits. They can cause your pet to choke or obstruct their intestines, particularly plum and peach pits, which also contain poisonous cyanide. Beverages can be hazardous, too. Alcohol, even in small amounts, can lead to poisoning. And it’s not just cocktails you should steer your pet clear of. Mouthwash and fermented foods can be poisonous to dogs and cats, as well. Symptoms range from loss of coordination, drowsiness and vomiting to seizures, respiratory failure and even death. Caffeine is a stimulant that can damage your pet’s nervous system, heart and other organs. In addition to coffee and tea, soda, ice cream and medications should be off-limits. Milk wouldn’t necessarily count as a food poisonous to cats, but it’s definitely not the prized treat most people think it is. In fact, most cats’ and dogs’ ability to digest milk decreases as they grow, making them lactose intolerant as adults. Consuming milk, cheese or yogurt can result in diarrhea and other issues for both cats and dogs. Ingredients can also cause illnesses. Yeast is a common ingredient in bread dough that is dangerous for dogs, as it can expand in their stomach and cause organs to tear or twist. Symptoms of yeast consumption include vomiting, diarrhea and stomach bloating. If you detect any of these symptoms, call your veterinarian. Some yeast dough also ferments, which can lead to alcohol toxicity. Rhubarb can be bad for pets’ kidneys and digestive organs, so be careful what jams and jellies your pet can get ahold of. Nutmeg, a spice often found in desserts, can cause tremors and seizures in your pet. The sugar substitute xylitol can cause your pet’s insulin to spike, so keep sugarless chewing gum, candy, medicines, vitamins, condiments, some peanut butters and even mouthwashes locked away. Help avoid toxic mold by storing pet food in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.   If your dog or cat consumes any of these potentially dangerous foods, contact your veterinarian immediately. It’s also a good idea to stay on the safe side with pet insurance coverage, which can cover unexpected costs. In the event something does happen, you can take comfort in knowing your pet is protected.
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Result 21
TitleDangerous Foods for Dogs and Cats | Petopedia
Urlhttps://petopedia.petscorner.co.uk/dangerous-foods-for-dogs-and-cats/
DescriptionAn ever-expanding compendium of our pet care knowledge. Get tips, tricks and expert advice straight from Pets Corner, so you can provide the best care for your pets. Browse Petopedia for help with dog nutrition, cat dental care, small animal hygiene, reptiles, wildlife and more!
Date
Organic Position17
H1
H2Dangerous Foods for Dogs and Cats
It's All About FOOD!
Inside and Out
Cats and Flea Treatments
If You Suspect Potential Poisoning
H3Search
Chocolate
Apple Seeds
Onion
Grapes and Raisins
Nuts
Avocado
Milk and Dairy Products
Cooked Bones
Mushrooms
Rhubarb
Tomato Plants
Xylitol
Yeast
Persimmons, plums and peaches
Rotten/Mouldy Foods
Anti-Freeze
Acorns
Batteries
Human Medications
Poisonous Plants (Inside and Outside)
Plant Chemicals and Plants Foods
Ant Bait, Powders and Gels
Rodent Baits
Toad Toxicity
Glow Sticks/Glow Jewellery
Slug and snail pellets
Animal Medications
H2WithAnchorsDangerous Foods for Dogs and Cats
It's All About FOOD!
Inside and Out
Cats and Flea Treatments
If You Suspect Potential Poisoning
BodyReturn to pets corner Search. Dangerous Foods for Dogs and Cats. Our beloved dogs and cats are very curious creatures. Unfortunately, it’s this curiosity that can lead our pets to consume dangerous and inappropriate items. Our pets are also often highly skilled at begging for a cheeky taste of our dinner/cooking.  This could mean we unknowingly allow them to ingest harmful foods or ingredients. It is so important as pet owners that we can protect our dogs and cats from harm and keep anything dangerous safely tucked away. The key to keeping our pets safe is recognising these potential toxins in and around our home. It's All About FOOD! .  . There are several foods that we consume and enjoy ourselves that are in fact toxic to our pets. Below is a guide to just some of the foods that we should be on the lookout for: Chocolate . Most dog and cat owners are already aware that chocolate is extremely toxic to our four-legged furry friends. Not only is the caffeine present in chocolate a threat, but chocolate also contains high levels of fat and a multitude of toxic chemicals including Theobromine. In general, the darker and richer the chocolate the higher the risk of toxicity.  Just small amounts of chocolate can cause panting, vomiting, diarrhoea, and damage your pet’s heart and nervous systems. Remember chocolate can be life threatening so always take care to keep it locked away from your pet. Apple Seeds . Apples seeds contain a natural chemical that releases cyanide when digested. Whilst the flesh is perfectly safe and often seen in many dog foods for their appetising taste, the seeds should never be fed. Onion . Onion in any form, is extremely poisonous to dogs and even more so for cats. They contain disulphides and thiosulphate, both of which can cause anaemia and damage red blood cells. Keep in mind this substance is found in most members of the Allium family including leeks, chives, and shallots. Onion powder is also dangerous and can be a sneaky ingredient found in lots of human foods. It can often be found in pizza or pasta sauces, baby foods, Chinese dishes and rather frequently in crisps! Grapes and Raisins . Grapes contain a toxin that can cause severe damage to your pet’s health, more specifically it has been known to cause kidney failure. The exact substance that causes this reaction is unknown, but these foods should most definitely be avoided. Nuts . Often forgotten, nuts can prove dangerous to your pet’s health due to either toxicity or by causing intestinal obstructions. The key ones to most definitely steer clear of are: Almonds, black walnuts, English walnuts, hickory nuts, Japanese walnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans and pistachios. Avocado . This contains persin, which can cause diarrhoea, vomiting, and heart congestion. Persim is present in the pit of the fruit, this then seeps into the flesh, meaning all parts of the avocado are incredibly toxic to pets. Milk and Dairy Products . Our dogs and cats should not be given cow’s milk because they can be intolerant of lactose which is a sugar naturally found in milk. Giving your pet cow’s milk, especially in large quantities, may cause diarrhoea and other symptoms such as vomiting.  This is because as they don’t have enough of the lactase enzyme needed to properly digest dairy foods. Cooked Bones . The danger with cooked bones is that they can easily splinter when chewed, which can cause obstruction of the gut or airways. Raw (uncooked) bones, however, are appropriate and good for both your pet’s nutrition and teeth. Even cats like to have nibble on a raw bone as part of a healthy diet. Mushrooms . Mushroom poisoning occurs as a result of ingesting toxic mushrooms. This is a common hazard for dogs because of the amount of time they spend outdoors or in wooded areas, particularly during the summer and autumn months.  Be sure to check your gardens for any wild growing mushrooms. Rhubarb . This can be dangerous if ingested by your pets. The leaves contain soluble oxalate crystals, with less of the crystals being prevalent in the stalk. That’s why rhubarb stems are edible, but the leaves are not. Although it is best not to let your pet have any parts of the rhubarb plant. Tomato Plants . Tomatine is found in the leafy greens, the fruit blossoms, and in small green tomatoes; this concentration rapidly decreases as the tomato ripens. When stems, vines and green fruit are ingested, it can cause serious illness to our pets. Xylitol . Xylitol is an artificial sugar substitute commonly used in toothpastes, mouthwash, sugarless gum, certain cough medicines and chewable multi-vitamins. It is also used in many baked goods and sweet treats. This ingredient is potentially lethal if ingested by our furry friends, so be sure to keep anything labelled ‘sugar free’ out of reach. Yeast . Yeast, be it on its own or in dough, can be potentially dangerous to pets. Just like yeast rises and expands in bread, it will do the same in our pets’ stomachs and intestines resulting in a potentially life-threatening situation.  Some yeasts can also ferment in the gut to produce alcohol, which can lead to alcohol toxicity. Persimmons, plums and peaches . They are perfectly safe and nutritious if seen within your cat/dog food. It is the seeds and pits of these fruits that can be incredibly dangerous if ingested by your pet. Not only do they pose a risk of causing intestinal obstruction, but there is also a risk of cyanide toxicity. Caffeine Coffee, tea, energy drinks, dietary pills or anything containing caffeine should never be given to your pet. The detrimental effect of caffeine products can be extensive as they can affect the heart, stomach, intestines and nervous system. So, resist the temptation to share that cup of tea. Rotten/Mouldy Foods . Bacteria in spoiled foods cause stomach upsets and illnesses to our pets, just as they would to us. While there are some human foods that are safe to feed, it is always better to stick to pet safe foods, treats and products. A good place to start is by finding a high-quality natural diet for your dog or cat. The right food can do wonders for your beloved pet, from helping to relive itchy skin to supporting their hardworking joints.   For more advice and guidance on identifying and finding those wholesome foods check out this handy Nutrition Guide. Inside and Out. As well as foods in the home being potentially dangerous to our pets, there are also many things around the home, both inside and outside that can also health problems. Below is a guide to some of the things we as pet owner should be aware of: Anti-Freeze.  Anti-freeze that contains ethylene glycol has a sweet taste that attracts animals but is deadly if consumed in even small quantities. Often found in the colder seasons on footpaths and roads, in car cooling systems/ screen wash, and surprisingly in many snow globes. It is best to always watch your pet, keep potential antifreeze products out of reach and to wash and dry their paws when coming in from outdoors in the winter.   Acorns. Dogs can be particularly at risk of exposure to acorns in the autumn and winter months. The toxic ingredient is thought to be tannic acid which can cause significant damage to the liver and kidneys.   Batteries. If the batteries are chewed and pierced it can cause chemical burns and heavy metal poisoning.   Human Medications. Medications such as aspirin, paracetamol, ibuprofen, cold medicines, anti-depressants, vitamins and diet pills can all be toxic to animals. Medicines should always be kept out of reach from pets and should never be given to them unless specifically direct by a veterinary surgeon. Be sure to also keep tubes of cream out of reach as well.   Poisonous Plants (Inside and Outside). There are almost 1000 different plants that can prove toxic to our pets. When keeping plants indoors or out, always do your research to ensure you are not growing anything that could be harmful. A special mention of lilies should be made – as these are incredibly toxic to cats. All parts including the pollen are harmful, by simply rubbing against this plant and grooming themselves cats could be in danger.   Plant Chemicals and Plants Foods. Plant foods such as fertilizer can be toxic if ingested by our furry friends. Always ensure your pets are supervised if you have used any of these products.   Ant Bait, Powders and Gels. If ingested, in large quantities this can cause severe reactions. Always keep them safely locked away from your pets.   Rodent Baits. Repeated exposure to rodent baits that contain anti-coagulant compounds can have a very detrimental effect on our furry friends.   Toad Toxicity. Exposure to toads is most common at the time of spawning, between June and August. Most toad-related incidents occur in the evening when cats or dogs lick or eat them. Be sure to supervise your pets to reduce the risk of interaction with toads.   Glow Sticks/Glow Jewellery. These contain dibutyl phthalate (DBP) inside, which is the clear to yellow, oily liquid that has a very bitter taste. This is incredibly toxic to pets, it important to keep them out of reach and out of chewing range.   Slug and snail pellets. Slug and snail pellets are one of the most common poisons we see affecting dogs. They contain Metaldehyde which even in small amounts can have horrifying effects. Never use these in areas that your pets can reach.   Animal Medications. Animal medications are now flavoured to improve palatability for our pets and make it easier for us owners to give them their required dosage. However due to their yummy taste if your pet manages to get hold of them there is a potential for overdose. Keep them locked away and safely out of reach.  Cats and Flea Treatments. A special mention should be made with regards to cats and flea treatments. Permethrin is an insecticide commonly found in spot on and shampoo products for dogs. The concentrated permethrin found in these dog products is extremely toxic to cats and can be life threatening. Poisoning often occurs by accident when owners use a flea treatment intended for dogs on their feline.  Toxicity can also occur by the cat being in close proximity to a recently treated dog. Cats can lick off their canine friends directly or lick it from themselves. Never use a dog specific treatment on your cat unless specifically advised to by a veterinary surgeon. If You Suspect Potential Poisoning. If you suspect that your pet may have been exposed to any of the toxins mentioned above, is acting strangely, or experiencing even minor symptoms including weakness, lack of coordination, vomiting or diarrhoea you must seek veterinary assistance immediately. When you go to the vets with your pet, if possible take with you the toxin that may be the cause to help achieve prompt diagnosis and treatment. If the poison has been swallowed, DO NOT induce vomiting unless specifically instructed to do so by a veterinary surgeon. The above lists and descriptions are to be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a veterinary surgeon. Please contact your veterinary surgeon for advice or treatment immediately if you are worried about your pet’s health.   Dangerous Foods for Dogs and Cats It's All About FOOD! Inside and Out Cats and Flea Treatments If You Suspect Potential Poisoning Tags Cat Food Dog Food Feeding Nutrition Related Articles Choosing Where to Get your Kitten/Cat FromCat Ownership – Think TwiceHow To Keep Your Pets Safe During Firework SeasonOur Essential Winter GuideHow Important Is Dental Hygiene for Dogs and Cats? Mailing List Subscribe to our mailing list to receive updates on all things Petopedia. 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Title5 Human Foods that are Dangerous to Dogs | Hill's Pet
Urlhttps://www.hillspet.com/dog-care/nutrition-feeding/toxic-foods-for-dogs
DescriptionRead to learn about 5 human foods that are toxic to dogs. Learn their effects on a dog's health and what to do if they accidentally eat one of these foods
Date8 Oct 2021
Organic Position18
H1Human Foods That Are Dangerous for Your Dog
H2Chocolate and Caffeine
Grapes and Raisins
Alcohol and Raw Bread Dough
Xylitol
Onions and Garlic
Other Foods Harmful to Dogs
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BodyHuman Foods That Are Dangerous for Your Dog tags nutrition-feeding Dog Published by min read While we consider dogs to be members of our family, feeding them the same food we eat can cause injury to them. Dogs are not used to eating the oily, fatty foods that we do, and they can get diarrhea and upset stomachs from them. It’s important to know what foods are toxic to dogs and avoid them. Chocolate and Caffeine. It’s a pretty well-known fact that chocolate is harmful to dogs. Unlike their feline friends, most dogs don’t have an “off” button when it comes to finding food. The amount and type of chocolate your dog consumes determines the symptoms and toxicity level he will experience. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhea, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort, lethargy, muscle tremors, irregular heartbeat, high body temperature, seizures and death. The darker the chocolate is (for instance, baker’s chocolate or cocoa powder), the more dangerous it is to your puppy. They contain a higher concentration of caffeine and theobromine, both of which cause toxicosis in dogs. Keep your dog away from caffeinated beverages as well. Learn more about the dangers of your dog consuming chocolate here. Grapes and Raisins. While grapes and raisins are not harmful to some dogs, they have been associated with kidney failure in others. Simply put, it’s not worth the risk to find out! Vomiting, lethargy and diarrhea can occur within 12 hours of ingestion. If the symptoms are not treated, they can lead to dehydration, decreased appetite and increased urination followed by decreased urination. If your dog has consumed grapes or raisins and these signs occur, take her to a vet immediately. Your dog can develop long-term kidney disease or even die from kidney failure within three to four days. Alcohol and Raw Bread Dough. Small amounts of alcohol found in drinks, syrups and raw bread dough can be poisonous to dogs. These products contain ethanol, and beer also contains hops, both of which can cause alcohol intoxication. Signs of intoxication include vomiting, disorientation, high body temperature, restlessness, excessive panting, muscle tremors and seizures. Dogs who show signs of alcohol intoxication should be monitored by a vet until they recover, as it can cause failure of the organ systems and even death. The yeast in raw bread dough can also cause stomach expansion, which can result in tissue damage and difficulty breathing. Xylitol. Xylitol is an artificial sweetener found in foods like sugarless gum, sugar-free candy and baked goods. It can also be found in toothpaste, mouthwash, chewable vitamins and cough drops. Ingestion can cause a life-threatening drop in your dog’s blood sugar, as well as liver damage. Symptoms include vomiting, seizures and loss of coordination, which can occur anywhere from a few minutes to several hours after ingestion. According to the Pet Poison Helpline, a 10-pound dog would only need to eat a single piece of sugar-free gum to reach a potentially toxic dose. Dogs that ingest large amounts of xylitol can also develop liver failure. If you suspect that your dog has consumed anything that might contain Xylitol it is important that you contact your vet immediately. Onions and Garlic. Anything in the onion family–from garlic to shallots to scallions to chives–is toxic to dogs. They contain compounds that can cause gastroenteritis, anemia and serious damage to the red blood cells. Garlic is considered to be five times as potent as onions. Signs of onion or garlic poisoning often do not appear for several days after ingestion, but include lethargy, weakness and orange- to dark red-tinged urine. Japanese breeds of dogs such as Akitas and Shiba Inus tend to be more sensitive to garlic and onions. Other Foods Harmful to Dogs. Dairy products can upset your dog’s digestive system and cause diarrhea as well as food allergies. Ingestion of just a few macadamia nuts can cause weakness, paralysis and lack of coordination. Avocados contain persin, which can cause mild stomach upset in dogs. The bones in meat, chicken and fish can also be very hazardous to your dog. They can splinter and stick in the throat, break teeth or cut the intestines. If you are unsure if you can feed a food to your dog, always consult your veterinarian first. As a general rule of thumb it is best to avoid feeding your dog human food anyways. While it can be hard to ignore those puppy dog eyes looking at you at the dinner table, feeding your dog can often result in weight gain among other more serious issues. To keep your dog out of harm’s way, it is best to stick to a diet of food specifically formulated to meet your dog’s nutritional needs. Related Articles. Water . Water is the most important nutrient of all and essential for life. Animals can lose almost all their fat and half their protein and still survive, but if they lose 15% of their water, it will mean death. Pet Food Storage Tips . Where you store your cat and dog food can make a big difference in the quality and freshness once it is opened. Here are some common questions and recommendations for optimal storage for all of Hill’s dry and canned cat and dog food. The Right Diet For Your Pet . Learn what to look for in healthy pet food & nutrition, including ingredients, quality of the manufacturer, your pet's age, and any special needs they have. Proteins . To make a protein, amino acids are linked together in a long chain. The chain is then bundled into to a three-dimensional structure, like a tangled ball of yarn. Although there are hundreds of different amino acids, only 21 are used in animal proteins. Related products. Hill's® Science Diet® Adult Small Paws™ Chicken Meal & Rice Recipe dog food . 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TitleTop 10 most poisonous foods for dogs | Animal Friends
Urlhttps://www.animalfriends.co.uk/dog/dog-blog/poisonous-foods-for-dogs/
DescriptionWe all like to treat our pets every now and again, but sometimes our good deed can put our dog’s health in danger. In this blog post we’ll outline the top
Date
Organic Position19
H1Top 10 most poisonous foods for dogs
H2Avocado
Alcohol
Onions and garlic
Caffeine
Dairy
Chocolate
Fruit with pips
Raw eggs
Sugary foods and drinks
Coconut
Dog advice
H3Share this article:
H2WithAnchorsAvocado
Alcohol
Onions and garlic
Caffeine
Dairy
Chocolate
Fruit with pips
Raw eggs
Sugary foods and drinks
Coconut
Dog advice
BodyTop 10 most poisonous foods for dogs Discover the top 10 foods you should never feed your dog, and why they’re harmful to your pet’s health. We all like to treat our pets every now and again, but sometimes our good deed can put our dog’s health in danger. In this blog post we’ll outline the top 10 foods you should never feed your dog, and why they’re harmful to your pet’s health. Avocado. Although they are known as a super food for humans, avocados are very dangerous for dogs. They contain a toxin called Persin which is harmless to humans, but too much of it can hurt your pet. If you grow avocados, keep your dog away from the plant as Persin is also found in the leaves, seeds and bark. Alcohol. Even a small amount of alcohol can have harmful effects on your pet. Drinks such as beer, wine and spirits will have the same effect on your dog’s liver and brain as it does yours, although the experience won’t be as fun as it is for you! The smaller your dog is, the worse the effects of alcohol will be. The effects can include vomiting, breathing problems and the effects can potentially be fatal. Onions and garlic. Any type of onions or garlic, whether raw, powdered or cooked, can kill your dog’s red blood cells and cause anaemia and food poisoning. Whilst a very small dose of onion or garlic on the odd occasion won’t do any harm, large quantities of these foods can be harmful. If your dog has ingested either of these foods, look out for weakness, breathing problems and vomiting and take them to your vet if you are concerned. Caffeine. Caffeine may be man’s best friend, but it should be kept well away from your pet. It’s not just the freeze-dried stuff, but coffee beans and grounds can harm your dog too. Signs that your dog has ingested caffeine include restlessness, fast breathing and muscle twitching. Dairy. We’ve all done it – given our dog a couple of licks of our ice cream on a hot summer day, but any dairy based product can make your pet ill. Dairy foods can give your pet digestive problems, and can also trigger food allergies and potentially leave your dog with a skin infection. Chocolate. It’s not chocolate itself that can hurt your dog, its theobromine, a chemical found in chocolate, even dark and white chocolate. It can give your dog non-life threatening symptoms like vomiting and diarrhoea, but it can also cause seizures, heart problems and potentially even death. Make sure you keep chocolate well out of the reach of your dog! Fruit with pips. Any seeds will cause serious issues with your dog’s digestive system. They can become lodged in their small intestines, in some cases blocking it completely. Peach and Plum pits are extremely dangerous to dogs as they contain cyanide. We understand that we shouldn’t eat the pit, but your furry friend doesn’t. Raw eggs. There was a trend not long ago which included dog owners feeding their pet a ‘raw diet’ full of nutrients, which included raw eggs. Veterinary associations publicly warned pet owners against this diet as raw food, especially eggs, carry the risk of bacteria such as E. coli or salmonella. Sugary foods and drinks. If you’re sharing your sugary foods with your dog, stop immediately. Sugar does the same thing to dogs as to humans, including inducing weight gain, teeth problems and diabetes. Even the occasional sweet treat can cause upset to your dog’s stomach. Try giving them a special dog treat instead. Coconut. If coconut is given to your dog as a once a while treat, it shouldn’t do much harm to them. However, if ingested regularly, the milk and flesh of a coconut can cause stomach pains, vomiting and diarrhoea. Coconut water is also not good for your dog, as the high levels of potassium can cause heart problems for your pet. So, there you have it, the top 10 foods that you should avoid giving to your dog. If you have any questions about food you’ve fed to your pet, contact your local vet. For more information on how you can protect your dog with insurance, give our team a call and they’ll be happy to help.   Share this article:. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Dog advice . If you found this blog useful, why not check out our other articles in our dog advice section? From health and nutrition, to behaviour and training, they're full of information and tips to support you as a dog owner. Go to dog advice
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Result 24
TitlePoisons and Hazards for your pets - PDSA
Urlhttps://www.pdsa.org.uk/pet-help-and-advice/looking-after-your-pet/all-pets/poisons-and-hazards-for-your-pets
DescriptionKeep your pet safe with our vets’ guide to some common hazards around our homes
Date
Organic Position20
H1Hidden Hazards: keeping your pets safe
H2Poisons and Hazards
Toxic Foods
Household hazards
Help us keep pets and owners together
Electrical safety
Poisonous plants
Garden dangers
Out and about
Pet treatments
Want to know more? Check out our handy video
Our hazards guide
FREE First Aid guide
Get the latest pet care tips
H3Why not sign up for our newsletter to receive regular pet health advice from our vets?
H2WithAnchorsPoisons and Hazards
Toxic Foods
Household hazards
Help us keep pets and owners together
Electrical safety
Poisonous plants
Garden dangers
Out and about
Pet treatments
Want to know more? Check out our handy video
Our hazards guide
FREE First Aid guide
Get the latest pet care tips
BodyHidden Hazards: keeping your pets safe Our pets are curious creatures and, sadly, there are many potential dangers in our homes and gardens. This is a guide to some of the common hidden hazards. Contact your vet immediately if your pet is ill or you think they’ve eaten something poisonous. Toxic foods Household hazards Electrical safety Poisonous plants  Garden dangers Out and about Pet treatments   For more information about hazards around the home and how to pet-proof, you can download our free guide. Visit the link below if you think your dog may have eaten something poisonous or harmful to them:   Has your dog eaten something poisonous Toxic Foods. Lots of food that we consider a tasty treat can be deadly for our pets. This includes: Chocolate: human chocolates contains theobromine, a chemical that can be fatal to pets. The darker the chocolate, the higher the risk. Keep pets away from any foods containing chocolate, such as cakes, sweets, cookies and cocoa powder. Caffeine: in large quantities it can affect a pet’s heart. Keep tea bags and coffee out of reach of cats and dogs. Caffeine is also in many energy drinks, chocolate and even human painkillers, so keep all these away from curious paws. Grapes, Currants, Raisins and Sultanas: toxins in these fruits are potentially fatal to dogs. Make sure your pets don’t eat any food with these ingredients, e.g. cakes. Onions, Garlic and Chives: they have chemicals called organosulphoxides, which can poison dogs and cats if enough is eaten over a number of days. Avocados: these can affect birds as they contain the chemical persin. Throw away the avocado stone as it can obstruct a pet’s intestines. Macadamia Nuts and Peanuts: they can cause weakness and tremors. Macadamia butter can also affect pets. Peanuts can cause upset tummies and occasionally lead to fits. This might be due to the salt on the peanut. Salt: salt, or sodium chloride, is extremely poisonous to pets. It’s common in human food and can also be found in dishwasher tablets and salts, bath salts, rock salt for de-icing roads and pavements, play dough and, of course, sea water. Vitamin D: this vitamin is in supplement tablets, cod liver oil, human medicines and rat poisons. It’s also in skin creams and can be very poisonous as it affects a pet’s heart, liver and kidneys. Alcohol: alcoholic drinks are toxic to pets so keep them well away from prying paws. Some household products also contain alcohol, including mouthwashes, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes and glues. Iron: foods rich in iron can be fatal to pets. Watch out for human supplements and iron tablets. Iron is also usually in lawn moss killers and lawn ‘feed and weed’. Xylitol: is extremely harmful to dogs. It’s in sugar-free chewing gum, sweets – and increasingly used in medications and nicotine replacement chewing gums. Household hazards. Help us keep pets and owners together. COVID-19 has left thousands of people unable to afford their pet’s care. Often, we are their only emergency service. Donate Cleaning products, medicine, and batteries – all common household items that can cause big problems for your pets: Antifreeze: this is very poisonous to pets. It can be very tempting, especially for cats as it has a sweet taste. It’s in screen washes, brake fluids and inks – so wipe up any spills when topping your car up in the cold winter months. Rat and mouse poisons: as you’d imagine, many of these are highly poisonous to pets. Human Painkillers: they can be poisonous to dogs and cats. Never give human medication to your pet. Always seek your vet’s advice if you suspect that your pet is ill or in pain. Store medicine well out of reach of your pets. Batteries: batteries contain strong acids and lots of metal. If your pet eats a battery it could cause burns to their mouth, throat and stomach, as well as causing difficulties breathing and swallowing. Ethanol: Ethanol is a type of alcohol found in many household products, such as mouthwashes, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes and glues. Alcoholic drinks like wine, beer and spirits are also toxic to pets. Dustbins: Bins can be very enticing for dogs and cats, with all their food smells. Given a chance, they’ll rip open bin liners and eat whatever’s inside. Cats often find it hard to resist bin bags with meat or fish in them. Dogs will eat anything that takes their fancy. Make sure bins are sealed and can’t easily be knocked over.  E-Cigarettes: The liquid inside an e-cigarette is highly toxic to pets, they usually contain very high levels of nicotine and only a small amount can kill your pet. E-liquids often have tempting scents which attract pets to the liquid inside the E-cigarette. Not only is the liquid poisonous, but pets are at risk from cuts from chewing the glass vials and there is the added risk of swallowing pieces of the E-cigarette itself or its battery. So keep them well out of the way of pets.   Electrical safety. Electrics in your home can turn into a hazard, especially if your pets are left home alone. Follow these tips to make your home safer: Household appliances: Don’t leave appliances like washing machines or dishwashers running while you’re out. They could catch fire and put your pets in danger. Portable heaters: Keep pets away from portable heaters and never leave pets unattended around them. Your pet could knock them over and hurt themselves or cause a fire. Wires and cables: Trailing cables can be really tempting for pets to chew on. Keep any wires and cables out of harm’s way. Check your appliances and plugs regularly to make sure they’re safe. Find out more on the Electrical Safety First website. Poisonous plants. They might look beautiful but some plants and flowers are best kept well away from pets. Here are some of the most common poisonous plants, but there are others. If in doubt, ask your local nursery or florist for advice before bringing a new plant into your home. Azalea/Rhododendron: (Rhododendron spp) Highly poisonous to cats and dogs, even if just a few leaves are eaten. Cherry laurel: (Prunus laurocerasus) This hedging plant is often used in gardens and public parks. Be careful how you dispose of hedge cuttings as the most common cause of dog poisoning is from eating or chewing these leaves. Castor oil bush: (Ricinus communis) The seeds, or more frequently oil cakes used as fertiliser, are very attractive to dogs, but can be fatal. Conkers and acorns: These are toxic to dogs. Although serious cases of poisoning are rare, they can cause stomach problems, vomiting and intestinal blockages. Daffodil: (Narcissus) All parts of the daffodil are harmful. Dogs sometimes eat the bulbs, but even a small bite can kill a small animal. Even drinking the water in which cut daffodils have stood is potentially hazardous. Laburnum: (Cytisus alpinus) All parts of this plant are poisonous, but especially the seeds. Even chewing laburnum bark or twigs can affect a dog. Yew: (Taxus baccata and related species) Nearly all parts of the plant are harmful, including dried clippings. A mere 30g of leaves can kill a dog. Lily of the valley: (Convallaria majalis) Lily of the valley flowers and leaves, often used in bouquets, contain a toxin that can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, heart problems, fits and collapsing in dogs and cats. Lilies: (Lilium) Some lilies, such as Tiger, Easter, Stargazer and Arum, are potentially poisonous, especially to cats. Pets can be poisoned by eating or chewing the leaves, stems or flower heads. Even the pollen can be harmful, as cats may lick this off their fur after brushing against the flower head. Always seek advice from your florist or garden centre. Philodendron: (Philodendron and related species) All parts of this ornamental houseplant are poisonous, but pets usually just chew or eat the leaves. Contact with the plant can irritate the eyes and mouth causing excessive dribbling. This can be fatal for cats. You can view a more extensive list of poisonous plants by season here.    Garden dangers. Our pets often spend a lot of time out and about in the garden, so how can we make is a safe place for them? Dangerous garden chemicals: Store garden chemicals safely out of the way of children and pets. Liquids such as white spirit and barbecue lighter fluids can cause serious poisoning if swallowed, licked off fur, absorbed through the skin, or inhaled. Weedkillers (herbicides): Follow the instructions very carefully, before using them. Some can harm pets if accidentally swallowed and plants treated with them may also be poisonous if eaten. Some pets absorb chemicals through their skin, through spillages or even from a walk through treated plants. Pestkillers (pesticides): Many garden chemical pesticides can harm pets. Always follow the instructions carefully and keep pets away from the treated areas. Slug pellets: Slug and snail pellets containing metaldehyde can poison and kill a dog or cat within hours. We highly recommend not using these in gardens where pets play. Try using pet-proof slug traps or organic alternatives to poisons. Ask your local nursery for expert advice about traditional and organic chemical-free pest controls. Foxes and other predators: Urban foxes are especially successful at sneaking into your garden and could kill outdoor pets like rabbits, guinea pigs or chickens if they aren’t kept out of harm’s way. Keep small pets safely in their hutches at night and always supervise them when they’re out of their cages. Regularly check that your chicken coop is secure from foxes, rats and other predators. Bees, wasps and hornets: These can give pets a nasty sting. This can be very dangerous if they’re stung several times at once, or stung in the throat while eating one. Check gardens for nests and contact your local pest control. Toads: When threatened, toads give off a poison that can hurt a curious pet’s tongue or skin. If this happens, rinse the affected area with plenty of water and phone the vet immediately. Physical objects: Remove broken bottles, sharp stones and other obvious hazards. Grass seeds: Check your pet regularly, as grass seeds can pierce a pet’s skin or become lodged in ears, eyes or toes. Lawnmowers and strimmers: Check your garden before using hedge-trimmers, strimmers and lawnmowers. These can injure small pets and wildlife. Tortoises and hedgehogs are particularly vulnerable, as they are easy to miss in long grass and can’t escape fast enough. Avoid trimming hedges between 1 March and 31 August when birds could be nesting and raising young. Bonfires: Hedgehogs find unlit bonfires an irresistible place to shelter and sleep. Always check for prickly visitors and other creatures before lighting your bonfire. Out and about. It’s great to get out and about with your dog, taking long walks together and exploring the countryside. Here are a couple of hazards to watch out for: Adder bites: Adder bites are extremely dangerous to pets, especially if they’re bitten on the face. Bites can cause severe swelling, bleeding, fever and shock. If you think your pet has been bitten, contact your vet immediately. Adders are the only poisonous snake in the UK and are mostly seen in spring and summer. They’re not aggressive and only bite when they feel threatened, so if you spot one put your dog on a lead and keep well away. If you’re walking your dog in an area that’s know to have adders, keep them on a lead and stick to footpaths. Adders are protected by law so it’s illegal to kill or harm them. Blue green algae: This algae is really toxic and can kill pets quickly if they eat it. The symptoms of poisoning include severe vomiting and diarrhoea, breathing difficulties, coma and fits. If you are worried, call your vet immediately. It’s found in fresh, brackish and sea water in the UK. It blooms from late spring to early autumn and looks like blue-green scum on the surface of the water. The best way to avoid your pet getting poisoned is to keep them out of any water that looks like it’s got algae growing in it. Pet treatments. Always make sure you’re using the right treatments for your pet, to avoid accidental poisoning: Permethrin: This is a chemical in some dog flea treatments. It’s highly toxic to cats. Never use dog flea treatments on cats. Always read and follow the instructions on flea treatments, including household sprays. Ask your vet what’s best for you and your pets.   Want to know more? Check out our handy video. Video found at youtu.be/Xaaeb37qzbc Our hazards guide . Download our guide to common household hazards and pet-proof your home.  Download the guide FREE First Aid guide . Be prepared for an emergency by downloading our FREE first aid guide download the guide Get the latest pet care tips . Sign up to our newsletter and get regular pet care tips and exciting news. Enews Sign Up Before you go! Why not sign up for our newsletter to receive regular pet health advice from our vets? Sign up × ×
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Result 25
TitleThe Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can't Eat
Urlhttps://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-health/dog-health/dog-diet-nutrition/the-ultimate-guide-to-what-dogs-cant-eat/
DescriptionDogs love to get into food, but what can't dogs eat? Our vets go through different foods to help you understand what is harmful and what is safe
Date6 Feb 2019
Organic Position21
H1The Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can’t Eat
H2Safe Food for Dogs
Safe Treats for Dogs
What Dogs Can’t Eat: Foods Not Safe for Dogs
Best Treats for Dogs
Popular Posts
H3Safe Foods and Treats for Dogs
Human foods that are safe for dogs include those in the list below. These foods are considered to be fresh, seedless, shelled, sliced, peeled, and in some cases, washed, and/or cooked depending on the particular product. Butter and seasonings can create their own dangers
Tips for Giving Human Food as Treats to Your Dog
Additional Articles About What Dogs Can’t Eat
Why You Should Consider Making the ..
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BodyThe Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can’t Eatpet healthdog healthdog diet nutritionThe Ultimate Guide to What Dogs Can’t EatThere are human foods that are completely safe for dogs and also foods that are dangerous and even potentially fatal. Many pet owners learn about toxic foods only after their dog has ingested something and started having abnormal symptoms. Since dogs are naturally curious and have an amazing sense of smell, this combination often leads to them getting into purses, getting food off of counters, getting into trash cans, stealing food from grills, and sneaking food from plates. Other times, well-intentioned pet owners offer tables scraps or human foods without understanding that they are toxic. Below, we will review what can’t dogs eat as well as list what is safe. It is important to have healthy alternatives once you know what is not safe. Safe Food for Dogs. There are many human foods that are “safe” for dogs. However, dogs do not need human food. What dogs need is a good quality food formulated for the size, age, body condition, activity, or for any underlying medical problems they may have. Learn more about Nutrition for Dogs. Safe Treats for Dogs. The ideal dog treat is one made of good quality ingredients that is moderate to low in calories, consistent in ingredients (thus unlikely to cause stomach upset from bag to bag), very appealing to your dog, and safe. Higher-quality treats tend to be more consistently produced, so it is best to avoid discount and supermarket brands if possible. There are also many human foods that you can feed your dog safely. By safely, I mean the foods listed below are not toxic to dogs. However, large quantities of any food or food given to dogs with sensitive gastrointestinal tracts can lead to problems such as vomiting, diarrhea, and/or pancreatitis. Treats should make up less than 5% of your dog’s caloric intake. Safe Foods and Treats for Dogs. Human foods that are safe for dogs include those in the list below. These foods are considered to be fresh, seedless, shelled, sliced, peeled, and in some cases, washed, and/or cooked depending on the particular product. Butter and seasonings can create their own dangers. Almonds Apples – small amounts without the seeds Asparagus Avocado –small amounts without the seeds Bananas Blackberries Blueberries Broccoli – cooked or raw clean/washed Brussels sprouts Cantaloupe Carrots – cooked or raw clean/washed Cauliflower Celery – cooked or raw clean/washed Cheese Chicken – cooked Clementine Cooked fish such as salmon Cooked green beans. In fact, some pet owners give green beans to aid in weight loss. Learn more about the Green Bean Diet for Dogs Cooked ground beef or steak Cottage cheese Cranberries Eggs Fish Freshly cooked lunch meat Iceberg Lettuce Kiwis Oatmeal Oranges Papaya Pasta Peanuts Pineapple Popcorn Pork – cooked Potato – raw or cooked plain or sweet Pumpkin – cooked Rice or rice cake Shrimp Strawberries Spinach Tangerine Turkey – cooked Yogurt Watermelon Tips for Giving Human Food as Treats to Your Dog. Treats are never a replacement for a good quality core dog food. Consider low-calorie treats for dogs with weight control problems. Give only fresh food. Moldy or rotten food can cause gastrointestinal upset. What Dogs Can’t Eat: Foods Not Safe for Dogs. Any food in large pieces or chunks can cause difficulty chewing or swallowing and can be a choking hazard. Specific foods that veterinarians commonly recommend NOT to give to dogs include the following: Apples, Apricots, Cherries, Peaches, and Plums. Ingestion of large amounts of stems, seeds, and leaves of these fruits can be toxic. They contain a cyanide type compound and signs of toxicity include anxiety, dilated pupils, labored breathing, fast breathing, and shock. Small pieces of cleaned apple without the seeds can be safe. Avocados. The leaves, fruit, bark, and seeds of avocados have all been reported to be toxic in some animals. The toxic component in the avocado is “persin,” which is a fatty acid derivative. Symptoms of toxicity include difficulty breathing, abdominal enlargement, abnormal fluid accumulations in the chest, abdomen, and sac around the heart, which can occur in some animals such as cattle and horses. The amount that needs to be ingested to cause signs is unknown. The biggest danger of avocado in dogs is the ingestion of the pit that can cause life-threatening gastrointestinal obstruction. Learn about the safety of avocados here. Baked Goods. The products which are made with xylitol are highly toxic to dogs. Xylitol is a sweeter used in place of sugar primarily because it is lower in calories. Xylitol is also an ingredient in many different types of gums. It is in many products designed for people with Diabetes due to its low glycemic index. Xylitol can cause low blood sugar and liver failure in dogs. Learn more with this article on Xylitol Toxicity in Dogs. Baking Powder and Baking Soda. Baking soda and baking powder are both leavening agents. A leavening agent is a common ingredient in baked goods that produces a gas causing batter and dough to rise. Baking soda is simply sodium bicarbonate. Baking powder consists of baking soda and an acid, usually cream of tartar, calcium acid phosphate, sodium aluminum sulfate or a mixture of the three. Ingestion of large amounts of baking soda or baking powder can lead to electrolyte abnormalities (low potassium, low calcium and/or high sodium), congestive heart failure, or muscle spasms. Bones. There are many bones that aren’t safe for dogs. This can be due to the danger of them getting stuck or caught in the mouth, sharp splinters injuring the intestines, risk of constipation when passing relatively indigestible bone fragments, as well as possible bacterial contamination on the bone that can lead to illness. Learn more about The Danger of Bones. Bread Dough. The dough contains yeast which rises in moist, warm environments, such as in the stomach. After ingestion, the rising dough can expand the stomach and decrease blood flow. Fermentation of the yeast can be reduced to alcohol causing signs of intoxication. Chewing Gum. Gums that are made with xylitol can be toxic. Learn more with this article on Xylitol Toxicity in Dogs. Chocolate. Chocolate, in addition to having a high-fat content, contains caffeine and theobromine. These two compounds are nervous system stimulants and can be toxic to your dog in high amounts. Learn more about the specific amount of each toxin that is based on body weight in this article: Chocolate Toxicity in Dogs. Coffee (grounds and beans). Dogs that eat coffee grounds or beans can get “caffeine” toxicity. The symptoms are very similar to those of chocolate toxicity and can be just as or even more serious. Dairy Products. Human dairy products are not highly dangerous but can pose problems for two reasons. One is their high-fat content and like other foods with high-fat content, there is a risk of pancreatitis. The second reason is that dogs poorly digest dairy products since they lack the enzyme required to digest lactose. This affects some dogs more than others and can cause issues from gas to diarrhea. Small amounts of plain yogurt or cheese are tolerated by most dogs but it is probably safest to avoid dairy products altogether. Diet Foods. Foods made for weight loss or diabetes may have the ingredient xylitol. Fatty Foods. Rich and fatty foods are favorites of dogs. They often get them as treats, leftovers, or from getting into the trash. These fatty foods can cause pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can affect any dog but miniature or toy poodles, cocker spaniels, and miniature schnauzers are particularly prone. Signs of pancreatitis generally include an acute onset of vomiting, sometimes diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Abdominal pain is often evidenced by the hunched posture or “splinting” of the abdomen when picked up. The dog may become very sick quickly and often needs intensive fluid and antibiotic therapy. Grapes and Raisins. Ingestion of grapes and/or raisins can cause kidney failure in some dogs. Some pet owners feed grapes thinking they are a healthy treat or give a piece of a cookie with raisins. Aggressive, and sometimes prolonged, treatment may be necessary to give the affected dog a chance at survival. Despite testing, the reason for the kidney failure and the amount necessary for toxicity remains unknown. Learn more about Grape and Raisin Toxicity. Onions and Garlic. Dogs and cats lack the enzyme necessary to properly digest onions which can result in gas, vomiting, diarrhea or severe gastrointestinal distress. If large amounts of onion or garlic are ingested or onions are a daily part of your dog’s diet, the red blood cells may become fragile and break apart. This is due to the toxic ingredient in onions and garlic, thiosulphate. Learn more at Why You Shouldn’t Feed Your Dog Garlic. Peanut Butter. Some peanut butter manufacturers add xylitol to peanut butter, which is toxic to dogs. Learn more about Peanut Butter Toxicity in Dogs. Rawhides. Like bones, rawhides can also get stuck in the esophagus or stomach of dogs, causing problems. There is also a risk of bacterial contamination. Although this is not human food, it is worth a mention with the goal to prevent your dog from getting sick. Learn more about The Good and Bad of Rawhides. Table Scraps. Scraps, especially those that are fatty can cause gastrointestinal upset or pancreatitis in dogs. Some dogs tolerate table scraps well but others can become very ill. Best Treats for Dogs. When shopping for treats, look for the seal of approval from the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), which publishes feed regulations and ingredient definitions. The best treats for dogs are either kibble from their regular dog food or treats made for dogs that meet the AAFCO requirements. If the dog food or treat follows their guidelines, the label will include a statement that proclaims it is, “formulated to meet the AAFCO Dog Food Nutrient Profile for Puppies/Adults/Senior.” Some companies create treats specifically to be compliant with the AAFCO standards. It is not a requirement to meet AAFCO standards in order to sell pet food or treats, so buyers beware. It is also possible to make your own dog treats. Here are a couple of good articles with recipes: Instructions for Homemade Dog Treats Healthy Treats Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits Pumpkin Dog Treats Additional Articles About What Dogs Can’t Eat . Can Dogs Eat Oranges? Can Dogs Eat Strawberries? Can Dogs Eat Shrimp? Can Dogs Eat Carrots? Can Dogs Eat Apples? Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes? Can Dogs Eat Lettuce? Can Dogs Eat Eggs? Can Dogs Eat Bananas? Can Dogs Eat Watermelon? Can Dogs Eat Almonds? Can Dogs Eat Peanuts? Can Dogs Eat Popcorn? Can Dogs Eat Fish? Can Dogs Eat Papaya? Can Dogs Eat Avocado? Grape and Raisin Toxicity Green Bean Diet for Dogs The Good and Bad of Rawhides The Danger of Bones What You Should Know Before Feeding Your Dog Table Scraps Human Foods That are Dangerous to Dogs Pancreatitis in Dogs Xylitol Toxicity in Dogs Peanut Butter Toxicity in Dogs Chocolate Toxicity in Dogs Nutrition in Dogs Why You Shouldn’t Feed Your Dog Garlic 0 paws upShare: Dr. Debra Primovic - DVMFebruary 06, 2019Share: Popular Posts. Pet CareWhy You Should Consider Making the ...Pet Wellness and HealthCBD for Dogs: 3 Myths and 3 Freque ...Pet Wellness and HealthThe World’s Most Accurate Dog DNA ...Previous / Next ArticleDog Diet & NutritionCan Dogs Eat Bananas?Previous Article. Dog Diet & NutritionCan Dogs Eat Cheese?Next Article. Dog Diet & NutritionCan Dogs Eat Bananas?
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Result 26
TitlePotentially Dangerous Items for Your Pet | FDA
Urlhttps://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/animal-health-literacy/potentially-dangerous-items-your-pet
DescriptionMany edible and non-edible dangers for your pet may exist within or around your home
Date1 Sept 2021
Organic Position22
H1U.S. Food and Drug Administration
H2Edible Dangers
Non-Edible Dangers
Plants and Flowers
Toxicity Can Vary
Act Quickly
Pet Poison Control Centers
Resources for You
H3
H2WithAnchorsEdible Dangers
Non-Edible Dangers
Plants and Flowers
Toxicity Can Vary
Act Quickly
Pet Poison Control Centers
Resources for You
BodyU.S. Food and Drug Administration   Search   Menu In this section: Animal Health Literacy Home Animal & Veterinary Resources for You Animal Health Literacy Potentially Dangerous Items for Your Pet Animal Health Literacy Potentially Dangerous Items for Your Pet Share Tweet Linkedin Email Print Español We all know to childproof our homes to keep young children safe, but what about “pet proofing” our homes too? Many edible and non-edible dangers for your pet may exist in or around your home. Knowing about these dangers can help you make your home a safer place for your pet. Edible Dangers. Some food and drink items that you consider tasty treats may be dangerous for your pet. As tempting as it might be to share your food or drink with your four-legged friend, please resist! Some of the more hazardous edible items include: Alcoholic drinks and food products containing alcohol Avocado (only mildly toxic to dogs and cats, but can be severely toxic, even deadly, to birds, rabbits, horses, and ruminants such as cattle, goats, and sheep) Caffeine (found in a lot of drinks such as coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks) Chocolate Fatty foods Garlic Grapes and raisins Macadamia nuts Marijuana Medicine intended for people or another pet, unless directed by your veterinarian (for example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for people, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, may not be right for your pet and may even be harmful; and the common pain reliever acetaminophen is fatal to cats) Onions Salt Tobacco products (including e-cigarettes and their refills) Xylitol (a sweetener found in products such as some sugar-free chewing gum, sugar-free candy, cough syrup, mouthwash, and toothpaste) Yeast products (like raw bread dough) While not necessarily toxic, some food items can cause a gastrointestinal obstruction (a blockage in the digestive tract) if your pet swallows them. For example, avocado pits, corn cobs, and bones can get stuck in your pet’s esophagus, stomach, or intestines. Fruit pits in the Prunus genus of trees and shrubs, which includes cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums, contain cyanide, but cyanide poisoning is rare unless your pet eats a lot of pits and chews them up. The pits must be crushed or ground up to release the cyanide. A gastrointestinal obstruction is the bigger risk for dogs and cats that eat these fruit pits. While not edible themselves, food bags, especially the mylar-type potato chip bags, cereal bags, and snack bags, can be a danger for pets. Dogs are typically more likely than cats to sniff out food bags. These bags are thin enough that if your dog puts his head far enough into one and breathes in, the bag can wrap around his nose and mouth, suffocating him. The more your dog breathes in, the tighter the bag gets around his face. He can’t easily pull the bag off with his paws because it’s tightly stuck to his face, like shrink wrap. Non-Edible Dangers. Pets, especially dogs, will often eat non-edible items. Some non-edible items in your house or yard that may be dangerous for your pet include: Antifreeze Cocoa mulch Fabric softener sheets Ice melting products Insecticides and pesticides (even flea and tick products for dogs can be dangerous, or possibly life-threatening, if used on cats or other animals) Lawn fertilizers and week killers Liquid potpourri Mothballs Paints and solvents Rat and mouse bait Various household cleaners (including bleach and toilet bowl cleaners) Swimming pool chemicals Salt dough Christmas tree ornaments and play dough Plants and Flowers. Threats to your pet’s health can also come from outside the home. Some plants and flowers can be harmful if your pet eats them. Below is a list of the more common plants and flowers that may be dangerous for your pet: Almond, apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach, and plum trees and shrubs Aloe Vera Amaryllis Caster Bean Chrysanthemum Cyclamen Corn Plant Daphne Daylily and True Lily Dogbane English Ivy Foxglove Gloriosa Lily Golden Pothos Hibiscus Hyacinth and Tulip (especially the bulbs) Hydrangea Kalanchoe Lily-of-the-Valley Mother-in-Law Tongue Mountain Laurel Narcissus, Daffodil, Paperwhite, and Jonquil Oleander Peace Lily Philodendron Poinsettia Rhododendron and Azalea Rosary Pea Sago Palm Schefflera Stinging Nettle Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow Plant Yew Bush Toxicity Can Vary. The potentially dangerous items listed above can vary in how toxic they are to pets. Some may be only mildly toxic while others may cause severe illness or even death. Also, the degree of toxicity often depends on several factors, such as: The type of animal (cat, dog, or other species) that ate the item; How much the animal ate; and, For plants, which part was eaten (if it was the bulb, leaf, or flower). You can find complete toxicity information for the above items and other dangers for pets on the website of a pet poison control center (see contact information below).  Act Quickly. If you think your pet has eaten something potentially dangerous, call your veterinarian or a pet poison control center right away. Pet Poison Control Centers. Pet Poison Helpline, 855-764-7661, http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, 888-426-4435, www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control Resources for You. Good Dog, Bad Food: Foods for People That Are Bad for Your Dog Keep Your Dogs and Cats Safe From Holiday Hazards Take the “Oh No!” Out of Your and Your Pets’ Holiday “Ho-Ho-Ho!” Household Hazards (American Veterinary Medical Association)   Back to Top
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TitleToxic Dog Food List | Dangerous Human Foods for Canines
Urlhttps://www.theukrules.co.uk/rules/lifestyle/animals/dogs/toxic-dog-food.html
DescriptionTOXIC FOOD GUIDE: A list of fruits and vegetables with essential explanations why pet owners should never give some types of human foods to canines
Date7 days ago
Organic Position23
H1Toxic Dog Food List: Dangerous Foods for Dogs
H2List of Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs
Grapes, Currants, Raisins
Garlic, Onions, Chives
Avocado is a Toxic Dog Food
Mushrooms are Dangerous for Dogs
Potatoes are a Foodstuff Poisonous to Dogs
Peaches, Plums, Cherries, Apricots, Persimmons
Rhubarb and Tomato Leaves
A Toxic Dog Food List includes Alcohol, Beer, and Nuts
Chocolate, Candy, Chewing Gum
Cat Food: In a List of Foods Poisonous to Dogs
Dog Foods Not Recommended
Dog Foods Allowed in Moderation
Can Dogs Eat Human Food at All? Safe Human Dog Foods
Dog Vet: Keep Dogs Safe from Toxic Food
H3
H2WithAnchorsList of Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs
Grapes, Currants, Raisins
Garlic, Onions, Chives
Avocado is a Toxic Dog Food
Mushrooms are Dangerous for Dogs
Potatoes are a Foodstuff Poisonous to Dogs
Peaches, Plums, Cherries, Apricots, Persimmons
Rhubarb and Tomato Leaves
A Toxic Dog Food List includes Alcohol, Beer, and Nuts
Chocolate, Candy, Chewing Gum
Cat Food: In a List of Foods Poisonous to Dogs
Dog Foods Not Recommended
Dog Foods Allowed in Moderation
Can Dogs Eat Human Food at All? Safe Human Dog Foods
Dog Vet: Keep Dogs Safe from Toxic Food
BodyToxic Dog Food List: Dangerous Foods for Dogs A list of fruits and vegetables with essential explanations why pet owners should never give some types of human food to canines. Check which human food dogs can eat. TOXIC FOOD GUIDE FOR DOG OWNERS: Do you have a dog or pet at home? If so, take extra care on these seemingly 'healthy and common' people foods. Some fruits and vegetables, which most humans relish, can be very toxic for dogs and animals. Feeding them to your pet pooch could be fatal. List of Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs. The list of dangerous dog foods is essential for all animal lovers. It explains why you should only feed certain human food products in moderation. The toxic dog food list also provides warnings about some edibles. There are a lot of foodstuffs you should never feed to your dog on any occasion. This summation of killer foods applies to all our four legged friends. But, we accept some individual cases will vary. This would include the breed of dog, its weight, and certain other relevant factors. Note: It would be a good idea to use this guide as a printable list of foods your dog should never eat! Grapes, Currants, Raisins. Most grapes, raisins, and some currants are a nutritional human snack. But, they are one of the most dangerous and toxic of all people foods that small dogs can ingest. Puppies consuming a handful of grapes or raisins can suffer irreversible kidney failure. It can also lead to liver damage within hours. Typical symptoms of a poisoned dog include vomiting, uncontrollable diarrhea, and abdominal pain. You may also notice a stumble as they walk around. Garlic, Onions, Chives. Your canine is likely to suffer serious health problems if you feed them even a teaspoon of powdered, raw, or cooked onions, garlic, or chives. These human food products (also found in baby food) contain disulfides and sulfoxides. Eating them can destroy dogs' blood cells and the outcome is even more serious for cats. The result is anemia and irreparable kidney damage. Your dog may exhibit signs of tiredness, weakness, and breathlessness. Dogs also experience vomiting with bloody urine after consuming garlic or onions. Avocado is a Toxic Dog Food. Avocados and guacamole contain Persin. Always keep this single-seeded berry far away from a pets' digestive system. Avocado trees contain the toxin in their fruit, leaves, seed, and bark. Avocado fruit is harmless to most humans. But, it can cause some dangerous side effects for dogs. It can cause diarrhea, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and heart congestion. Mushrooms are Dangerous for Dogs. As most humans know certain types of wild mushrooms can be poisonous. In fact, consuming certain types of mushroom can be fatal. The same is true if they get consumed by dogs. Dogs may exhibit symptoms such as changes in heartbeat, wheezing, and vomiting. Diarrhea is typical if they have eaten and ingested a toxic mushroom. The most dangerous mushrooms can induce seizures, comas, and some organ failure. Potatoes are a Foodstuff Poisonous to Dogs. Neither humans nor dogs should eat and ingest raw potatoes if they are green or have a green rim. Raw and green potatoes may contain solanum alkaloids (solanine). This chemical can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and irregular heartbeats in dogs. Like their relatives tomatoes, raw potatoes also contain harmful oxalates. They cause problems in the kidneys, digestive tract, and nervous system. Peaches, Plums, Cherries, Apricots, Persimmons. Do not feed persimmon and pomegranate seeds (or corn kernels) to dogs. It may cause inflammation of the small intestine if consumed by canines. Likewise, the seeds or pits in peaches, plums, apricots, and cherries contain cyanide. This poisonous chemical can cause intestinal obstruction (enteritis) and respiratory failure. Apple seed casings are also toxic for dogs. That is because they contain a natural chemical called amygdalin. This can release cyanide after digestion by your pet. Citrus oil extracts may also cause vomiting. Rhubarb and Tomato Leaves. Like potatoes, rhubarb leaves also contain oxalates. This can cause problems with your pet's kidneys, nervous system, and digestive tract. Rhubarb also reduces a dog's calcium content. That is important because it causes renal failure and other health issues. Take your pet immediately to an animal emergency clinic if this occurs. The vet will most likely induce vomiting and provide oxygen therapy. They may also begin a doggy blood transfusion. Atropine and tomatine are also poisonous for some dogs. These substances are present in the stems, vines, and leaves of tomato plants. The resulting effect for your canine is seizures, coma, dilated pupils, and tremors. Watch out for dog diarrhea, vomiting, and drooling (along with death in some severe cases). Consuming unripe tomatoes may cause gastronomical pain for small puppies. Large dogs will generally handle eating and ingesting red ripe tomatoes quite well as a rule. A Toxic Dog Food List includes Alcohol, Beer, and Nuts. Hops is an ingredient found in beer that can be toxic for dogs. Alcohol causes animal intoxication, increased heart rate, fevers, and a lack of coordination. Keep an eye out for poor breathing and abnormal acidity. The biological effects may cause coma or death for smaller animals. Macadamia nuts and walnuts contain a toxin which can inhibit locomotory activities. The result is panting, weakness, swollen limbs, and tremors. Worse cases may see possible damage to a dog's digestive, nervous, and muscular systems. Marijuana has an adverse effect on a puppy's nervous system and heart rate. Too much salt can lead to an imbalance in electrolyte levels. This causes dehydration and will often lead to diarrhea. The effect nicotine has on small dogs is far worse than it has on humans. Nicotine can damage a pup's digestive and nervous system. This can result in an increased heart rate, make them pass out, and often results in death. Chocolate, Candy, Chewing Gum. The caffeine content found in chocolate and coffee may be high enough to harm your dog. That is because it contains theobromine and theophylline. These chemicals are toxic for some animals. It can cause vomiting, diarrhea, excessive panting, and heart or nervous system maladies. Candy contains sugar and Xylitol. It may induce an over-release of insulin, kidney failure, and death. Too much sugar for a small puppy can lead to dental issues, obesity, and even diabetes. Xylitol is a sugar alcohol found in gum, candies, baked goods, and other sugar-substituted items. Cat Food: In a List of Foods Poisonous to Dogs. Cat food contains proteins and fats - meant for a cat welfare. They are not healthy for a hound if they get eaten in high levels. Dogs are lactose intolerant. It is one of the human traits that dogs share, to a degree. They rarely have enough lactase enzymes to properly digest dairy foods. Try to give dogs lactose-free dairy products instead. Dog Foods Not Recommended. The following human food products receive cautionary advice from veterinarians. Dog experts suggest these items are not the best recommendation for dogs welfare. Popcorn Shrimp Almonds Celery Cherries Peppers Corn on the cob Marshmallow Dog Foods Allowed in Moderation. The following human food products also receive a cautionary warning from veterinarians. Dog experts suggest feeding these foodstuffs to dogs 'in moderation'. Hot dogs Pineapple Potatoes Watermelon Cheese Bread Liver (in small amounts) Apples Strawberries Blueberries Tomatoes Broccoli Can Dogs Eat Human Food at All? Safe Human Dog Foods. The following food products that most people eat do not receive any specific warnings or cautionary advice from veterinarians. There seems to be no reason to avoid giving these human foods to dogs. Rice Lettuce Bananas Carrots Pears Cantaloupe Peanut butter Fish (except raw salmon and trout) Spinach Pumpkin Meat (fat trimmings can cause pancreatitis) Dog Vet: Keep Dogs Safe from Toxic Food. Always consider contacting a dog vet if your doggy acts stranger than normal. Minor symptoms of illness can be a sign of a worsening situation. Typical signs of an unwell canine are weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, and a lack of coordination. Most dog owners soon recognize the signs and symptoms of abnormal doggy behavior. The best advice is to ask a veterinarian to check your dog immediately. Do not delay treatment if you have any suspicion that it was one of the foods harmful to dogs. Waiting too long to seek professional advice is a common reason why some dogs suffer. In the worst cases it can also lead to the death of the dog. Toxic Dog Food List and Foods Harmful to Dogs Last Updated 2022 © 2022 | ALL RULES | CONTACT | PRIVACY | SITEMAP
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Result 28
TitleIn Summary: Toxic food for dogs - Naturavetal® Guide
Urlhttps://www.naturavetal.co.uk/at-a-glance-toxic-food-for-dogs/
DescriptionAt a glance: Toxic foods for dogs - Your guide to appropriate dog nutrition from Naturavetal® » Learn more now!
Date
Organic Position24
H1In Summary – Toxic food for dogs
H2Dangerous foods found in the home and outdoors
Raising awareness to sitters, friends and relatives
Caution must be exercised with these foods
Toxic and deadly foods
Symptoms
What action to take if you dog eats toxic food
These subjects might be of interest to you
H3Chocolate and Cocoa
Grapes and Raisins
Avocado
Falling fruit and stoned fruit
Star fruit (Carambola)
Raw potatoes
Canis Plus Beef
Canis Plus Rabbit
Canis Plus Salmon
Tomatoes and Aubergines
Goldenberry / Physalis
Rhubarb​
Onions and Leeks
Legumes​
Raw Pork
Horse Chestnuts and Sweet Chestnuts
Nuts
Sugar substitutes/Artificial Sweeteners/ Xylitol/ Birch Sugar/E 967
Raw Elderberries
H2WithAnchorsDangerous foods found in the home and outdoors
Raising awareness to sitters, friends and relatives
Caution must be exercised with these foods
Toxic and deadly foods
Symptoms
What action to take if you dog eats toxic food
These subjects might be of interest to you
BodyIn Summary – Toxic food for dogs What we enjoy on our daily menu is often a huge problem for our four-legged family friends, because not everything that we find tasty is suitable for our dogs and cats.  Sometimes feeding them human treats can be very dangerous. Unfortunately, dangers lurk everywhere, they could be in your own house, on a daily walk or on an excursion. An example being that dogs love cherries, plums, peaches and other fruit. Why? This is because falling fruit tastes sweet. However, large amounts consumed can lead to indigestion. If the kernels/pips in the fruit are also ingested and chewed, there is a risk of hydrocyanic acid poisoning. Fruit kernels contain a hydrocyanic acid-releasing glycoside that can cause neurological disorders. What we enjoy on our daily menu is often a huge problem for our four-legged family friends, because not everything that we find tasty is suitable for our dogs and cats.  Sometimes feeding them human treats can be very dangerous. Unfortunately, dangers lurk everywhere, they could be in your own house, on a daily walk or on an excursion. An example being that dogs love cherries, plums, peaches and other fruit. Why? This is because falling fruit tastes sweet. However, large amounts consumed can lead to indigestion. If the kernels/pips in the fruit are also ingested and chewed, there is a risk of hydrocyanic acid poisoning. Fruit kernels contain a hydrocyanic acid-releasing glycoside that can cause neurological disorders.In addition to the fruits from your own garden or the fruit found elsewhere, there are other seemingly innocent sources of danger ranging from ordinary foods to luxury foods. Puppies like to try everything, even foul-tasting items such as cigarette butts. A lethal dose would be 5 to 25g of dried tobacco. Even if your dog drinks from puddles containing cigarette butts, there is a risk of fatal poisoning. In the following guide explains which foods dogs should not eat because they can be toxic or even fatal to them. Dangerous foods found in the home and outdoors. There are many hidden objects and foods that are dangerous lurking within the household, that seem harmless at first glance. Textiles lying around, such as socks, can be swallowed by dogs and lead to intestinal obstruction. The same applies to cables or dog toys made of soft plastic. Toys that are too small, can be life-threatening, because if swallowed there is a risk of suffocation or a blockage in the gastrointestinal tract. Some medications that are helpful for humans are dangerous for dogs. A dog should never be given aspirin, paracetamol, ibuprofen, or diclofenac. Care should also be taken with household cleaners, detergents and disinfectants. Drain and toilet cleaners are particularly toxic too. Disposable wipes for wiping can also contain chemicals that can get into the skin via the paws and then into the body through licking and cleaning of the paws. With regular use of these wipes and contact with the animal, an unhealthy amount of chemicals can accumulate in the dog’s body and cause a slow creeping poisoning. Please also pay attention to what you throw in the bin and, above all, whether your dog can ransack the bin. A dog should never eat anything that has already been disposed of.There are dangers lurking in the bin from various foods that people love to eat. Even if it contains only a small amount of chocolate or onion, it can be very harmful to the dog. In addition to the autumnal fruit already mentioned, there are more hidden food dangers in their own gardens or out on the road, especially in the form of invisible chemicals or pesticides. Pesticides adhere to cereal stalks and vines, among other things. They can be washed out by the rain and collect in puddles. The danger lies in picking up the stalks and grains or drinking from puddles. Small animals that have died from pesticides can also be dangerous if eaten. Fertilizers or pesticides such as mouse or rat poison and ant litter are extremely toxic. Slug pellets are very dangerous because it tastes sweet and dogs like to eat it. The effect of slug pellets reacts even faster than that of rat poison – your dog could be dead within 30 minutes after ingestion. So be careful at home and on the go outdoors and teach your dog not to eat anything that you have not given to them. Raising awareness to sitters, friends and relatives. It’s the weekend and it’s time to visit your friends and relatives and they have baked some cakes, using xylitol (a sugar-free sweetener) and because the dog looks so dear, he gets fed a generous portion. Perhaps it’s even chocolate cake! This could result in a rushed journey to the nearest veterinary clinic. Dog sitters who are so happy to look after the dog can’t resist giving them a special treat, such as a chocolate. It is important to inform family, friends, acquaintances and dog sitters about what is tolerable for dogs. Once you are away from your pet, make sure that the person your pet is with, is aware of what a dog or cat can eat and what can be dangerous. The entrusted animal should also not be left unattended. Caution must be exercised with these foods. Chocolate and Cocoa. Chocolate and cocoa-containing foods DO NOT belong in the diet of dogs and cats. Chocolate contains a substance called theobromine, which varies depending on the cocoa content. The lethal dose for a dog is around 100 mg theobromine per kg body weight. This corresponds to approximately 60g milk chocolate or 8g dark chocolate. Incidentally, theobromine is also produced when coffee, cola, high-caffeinated drinks and alcohol are broken down. It should follow that these drinks are taboo for dogs. You can find out more about chocolate poisoning in dogs in our Naturavetal guide. Grapes and Raisins. Delicious for us but toxic for dogs. 11.6g of grapes per kg of body weight can lead to the first signs of poisoning. In the case of raisins, even a smaller amount is enough for poisoning, as they have a higher concentration of the harmful substances due to the drying. The first signs of poisoning in dogs are vomiting and diarrhoea. If a lot of grapes or raisins have been eaten, the kidneys can also fail. Avocado. Avocados are high in fat and dogs love fatty foods. However, the avocado also contains a substance called persin, which is a fungicidal toxin and very toxic to dogs. Persin can lead to severe cardiac muscle disorders and even death. Falling fruit and stoned fruit. Dogs love falling fruit because of its sweetness. However, large amounts of it can lead to indigestion. If the kernels are eaten too, the hydrocyanic acid contained can lead to neurological disorders. Quinces are indigestible to dogs, contain many tannins and therefore taste very bitter. Star fruit (Carambola). The star fruit is not suitable for dogs with renal problems. A reduction in cardiac activity has been observed after consumption. Raw potatoes. Raw potatoes are indigestible to dogs and are also not tolerated but the stomach. They contain the steroid-alkaloid solanine (a glycoalkaloid poison) directly under the potato skin. It is mainly found in the green areas, and in the seedlings. The greener the potato, the higher the solanine content. If you ever cook potatoes, do not give the dog the remainder of the cooking water, because it contains the water-soluble solanine, which is very heat stable. The potato also contains a lot of starch which is unhealthy in large quantities. Feeding home cooked potatoes now and then is not a problem for the healthy dog. However, permanent feeding of potatoes should be avoided. Naturavetal Tip Many dog food manufacturers offer grain free dry kibble with a high proportion of potatoes. With a daily feed we recommend not to give potatoes due to the high starch content. For dry food, we recommend using a healthy, high-quality grain substitutes such as millet or buckwheat. Canis Plus Beef . Canis Plus Rabbit . Canis Plus Salmon . Tomatoes and Aubergines. As with potatoes, the greener the tomatoes, the higher the solanine (a glycoalkaloid poison) content. Ripe to overripe tomatoes are less harmful due to the lower solanine content. The situation is similar with green peppers. Red, yellow or orange peppers are preferable. Feed them cooked, never feed them raw. Eggplants contain large amounts of solanine, so never feed this. Goldenberry / Physalis. Goldenberries/Physalis belong to the nightshade family like potatoes and tomatoes and are not digestible for dogs. Rhubarb . Rhubarb contains oxalic acid and should not be fed to puppies and young dogs until after the first year of life. It is also taboo for dogs with iron metabolism disorders. Onions and Leeks. Whether raw, cooked, fried or dried, onions should not be part of a dog’s diet. Not even the scraps that some dogs would like to get out of the dust bin. This is due to the sulphur compounds contained in the onions and leeks, allyl propyl sulphide and N-propyl disulphide. They destroy the red blood cells in the dog and can lead to life-threatening case of anaemia. This can happen when you feed large quantities of onions or leeks for several days. The toxic dose for onions is 50g per day per kg body weight. The first signs of poisoning can be diarrhoea, vomiting, weakness, rapid heartbeat and accelerated breathing. Constant over excitedness with too high doses can also cause problems with the digestive system. Also use caution with garlic. As Paracelsus already emphasized – the dose makes the poison. Small amounts of garlic are harmless and even beneficial to a dog’s health. Legumes . Beans, peas and lentils are legumes. They are unsuitable for dogs when raw and are also difficult to digest when cooked. Legumes and all types of cabbage can cause bloating and tend to produce gas, which in turn can promote stomach rotation. Naturavetal Tip If you have nothing else on hand and cook a small amount of peas, please add fat, because the addition of fat reduces the gas formation of the intestinal bacteria. Nevertheless, peas should only be fed in exceptional cases. Raw Pork. Raw pork can contain the Aujeszky (pseudorabies) virus, which is deadly to dogs and cats. However, the viruses are unstable when heated, so pork should only be fed cooked. Horse Chestnuts and Sweet Chestnuts. It is possible to give your dog boiled or peeled cooked chestnuts. Chestnuts are low in fat and contain many B vitamins. Snacking is allowed, but chestnuts should not be at the main meal. Unfortunately, some dogs really enjoy cracking the chestnuts lying around, within the green prickly shell, and then gobble it all up with relish. Unfortunately, when dog owners kick chestnuts as a substitute for balls, the dog also learns that chestnuts are great fun. In large quantities there are dangerous ingredients to the dog in the green shell as well as in the chestnut. Smaller quantities can lead to indigestion. When dogs eat chestnuts, the surface is still smooth, but if they swallow them, the surface of the chestnut is roughened by the stomach acid, this can get stuck in the intestine and thus lead to intestinal obstruction. The same applies of course to the kernel, which can lead to intestinal obstruction. Nuts. Nuts are difficult for dogs to digest and generally contain a lot of fat. Even if they are rich in many trace elements, you would have to feed a lot of them to meet the required need. In addition, nuts contain a lot of phosphorus. Unripe, unpeeled walnuts should be avoided. They can be infected with a toxic mould that can cause epileptic seizures with convulsions and tremors. Eating the green peel can also cause severe indigestion. Black walnuts, which are related to the walnut, can also be affected by a toxic mould. Macadamia nuts are completely unsuitable for dogs because they contain an active ingredient that can cause neurological disorders and even paralysis. Sugar substitutes/Artificial Sweeteners/ Xylitol/ Birch Sugar/E 967. The sugar substitute xylitol causes a massive insulin release in dogs, if left untreated, it could lead to hypoglycaemia and death. It is absorbed through the mucous membranes, therefore spontaneous vomiting or vomiting initiated by the veterinarian will have no effect. The first symptoms of hypoglycaemia appear within 10 minutes and are manifested by vomiting, apathy, coordination problems and seizures. If the dog has eaten xylitol, birch sugar or any other substitute, sugar water, glucose or honey should be given as first aid to bridge the way to the vet. In the course of poisoning from sugar substitutes, liver damage occurs, which often ends in acute liver failure. This disrupts blood coagulation so that blood or coagulation factors must be transfused. If these measures are not taken or are delayed, the dog will bleed to death internally. Raw Elderberries. Elderberries are poisonous for dogs. They contain a toxic alkaloid, sambunigrin which is a hydrocyanic acid-releasing glycoside. This is also found in unripe fruits and the green branches. It can cause severe diarrhoea and vomiting. This poison is destroyed by cooking. Toxic and deadly foods. AvocadoThe core can be swallowed with a risk of suffocation. Some varieties contain persine, which is toxic to the dog and attacks the heart.  Onions and LeeksOnions and leeks whether raw, cooked, fried or dried and are unsuitable for dogs. LegumesRaw beans and other legumes can cause flatulence, are difficult to digest and promotes gas formation in the stomach Potatoes, eggplants and tomatoesThe following applies to all nightshade plants: The unripe, green areas, but also the green underside of the skin/peel containsolanine which  is poisonous to dogs Grapes and RaisinsDepending on the amount ingested, grapes and raisins are toxic to dogs. Excessive consumption can lead to kidney failure Fall fruit and stoned fruitStoned fruit can cause digestive problems in dogs. An excess of kernels ingested can lead to  hydrogen cyanide poisoning Star fruit (Carambola)The star fruit is not suitable for dogs. It is especially not suitable for those with impaired kidney function. Cape GooseberriesThe Cape Gooseberries belongs to the nightshade family and are indigestible for dogs RhubarbRhubarb is not suitable for puppies, young dogs and dogs with iron metabolism disorders. It contains oxalic acid  NutsDepending on the variety, nuts are difficult to digest or are completely unsuitable. They can also be toxic due to mould.  NutsDepending on the variety, nuts are difficult to digest or are completely unsuitable. They can also be toxic due to mould. Sweet Chestnuts and Horse chestnutsThe green shells contain ingredients that can be dangerous for the dog in large quantities, therefore  only allow smaller quantities Raw PorkRaw meat should not be fed from wild or domestic pigs. There is a risk of Aujeszky virus being transferred Chocolate and CocoaTheobromine, which is toxic to dogs, is found in chocolate and cocoa. The darker the chocolate, the higher the cocoa content and therefore more toxic Sugar substitutes and artificial sweeteners such as xylitol / birch sugar / E967All sugar substitutes are taboo for dogs and cats. If not treated, the hypoglycaemia can lead to death Toxic food Unhealthy food Naturavetal Information The dose determines the poison. The dog’s weight and size determine whether the poison can be tolerated or whether it becomes a fatal situation. A good example of this is the consumption of chocolate or cocoa. A lethal dose is around 100mg theobromine per kg body weight. Depending on the cocoa content, this corresponds to about 60g milk chocolate or 8g block chocolate. For a small chihuahua, two pieces of dark chocolate with the corresponding theobromine content would be life threatening.You can find more information here. Symptoms. The symptoms of poisoning are not always immediate or clearly recognisable. Several symptoms can occur at the same time. Every attentive pet owner knows when his pet behaves differently. Below is a list of possible symptoms of poisoning. diarrhoeavomitingStrong salivationLoss of balance up to apathyStrong arousal, dilated pupils, restless running back and forthFeverFoaming in/on the mouthDrastic drop in temperature, for example due to a shockSudden, strong tremorsCramps / malaise, dog looks towards the belly or convulsesHeart / circulatory problems up to collapseBreathing problems up to shortness of breathBleeding of unknown cause in the vomit or the faeces Not all symptoms appear at the same time.  It depends on the type of poisoning; some symptoms are immediately recognisable and some only appear after a few hours. Poisoning from rat poison can only occur after a period of 36 hours, but it can be life-threatening. A trip to the vet should take place immediately. Depending on the toxin, the symptoms can also be varied. What action to take if you dog eats toxic food. Emergency plan Telephone hotline: Veterinarians or veterinary clinics usually offer an emergency hotline. Save the number in your cell phone. So, you can carry them with you all the time. Veterinarian or veterinary clinic: The sudden onset of tremors, vomiting, or loss of balance indicates that your dog has consumed toxic foods. In this case, you should immediately consult a veterinarian or the veterinary clinic. If you have noticed which food or poison your animal has eaten, please let the veterinarian know during the phone call or on the way to the practice so that valuable time does not pass when the dog arrives and the veterinarian can prepare adequately. Animal Charity - There are animal rescue services in some cities that offer a 24-hour emergency call service e.g. RSPCA. Maybe one exists in your area? Our team of experts will be happy to help you with all your questions. Monday to Friday from 10am to 4pm on 0208 – 531 7804 or by email to [email protected] These subjects might be of interest to you. Important secondary phytochemicals Barf – the correct way to feed raw meat Holidaying with your dog: Naturally, healthy food – even on the go Share this entry. Share on email Email Share on print Print Search > Cancel > Search results Shop Es wurde leider kein Ergebnis gefunden... Search results Website Naturavetal Newsletter Our Newsletter with valuable tips and information on innovationsIt’s quick and easy to register for our Newsletter! In it we tell you our news about all-natural healthy dog food and species-appropriate cat food – and give you valuable tips on feeding and care – for a long, healthy active life for your cats and dogs.
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Result 29
TitlePeople Food Dogs Can Eat and Can’t Eat – American Kennel Club
Urlhttps://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/human-foods-dogs-can-and-cant-eat/
DescriptionBefore sharing a meal or treat of people food with your dog, learn about which people food dogs can and can't eat and learn alternatives
Date14 May 2015
Organic Position25
H1People Foods Dogs Can and Can’t Eat
H2Human Food Safety for Dogs
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H2WithAnchorsHuman Food Safety for Dogs
BodyPeople Foods Dogs Can and Can’t Eat By AKC Staff Apr 24, 2020 | 7 Minutes Apr 24, 2020 | 7 Minutes allergies obesity treats dog food Dedicated dog lovers tend to be very kind people. We share our hearts and homes (and for some lucky pups, even the foot of our beds) with our canine pals. Surely there is nothing wrong with sharing our favorite people foods with our dogs too, right? Not necessarily. Many of the foods, such as fruits and vegetables, that people digest just fine can wreak havoc on a dog’s body, causing severe health problems. On the other hand, some of the foods people eat can be introduced to a dog’s diet just fine, and even provide health benefits such as joint strength, better breath, and allergy immunity. But before giving your dog foods that you crave, read on and learn which foods are safe, and which can send your dog straight to the emergency vet. And always be mindful that even healthy foods fed in excess can lead to canine obesity, a major health concern for U.S. dogs. Always choose a quality dog food as your dog’s main diet. Human Food Safety for Dogs. Almonds: No, dogs shouldn’t eat almonds. Almonds may not necessarily be toxic to dogs like macadamia nuts are, but they can block the esophagus or even tear the windpipe if not chewed completely. Salted almonds are especially dangerous because they can increase water retention, which is potentially fatal to dogs prone to heart disease. Bread: Yes, dogs can eat bread. Small amounts of plain bread (no spices and definitely no raisins) won’t hurt your dog, but it also won’t provide any health benefits either. It has no nutritional value and can really pack on the carbohydrates and calories, just like in people. Homemade breads are a better option than store-bought, as bread from the grocery store typically contains unnecessary preservatives, but it’s best to avoid it altogether. Cashews: Yes, dogs can eat cashews. Cashews are OK for dogs, but only a few at a time. They’ve got calcium, magnesium, antioxidants, and proteins, but while these nuts contain less fat than others, too many can lead to weight gain and other fat-related conditions. A few cashews make a nice treat, but only if they’re unsalted. Cheese: Yes, dogs can eat cheese in small to moderate quantities. As long as your dog isn’t lactose intolerant, which is rare, but still possible in canines, cheese can be a great treat. Many kinds of cheese can be high in fat, so go for lower-fat varieties like cottage cheese or mozzarella. Many dogs enjoy their very own dog-specific Himalayan dog chew made of dried cheese (but we don’t recommend sharing it). Chocolate: No, dogs should never eat chocolate. This isn’t just an urban legend. Chocolate contains toxic substances called methylxanthines, which are stimulants that stop a dog’s metabolic process. Even just a little bit of chocolate, especially dark chocolate, can cause diarrhea and vomiting. A large amount can cause seizures, irregular heart function, and even death. Do not have chocolate in an accessible location for your dog. If your dog does ingest chocolate, contact a veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline as soon as possible. Cinnamon: No, dogs shouldn’t eat cinnamon. While cinnamon is not actually toxic to dogs, it’s probably best to avoid it. Cinnamon and its oils can irritate the inside of dogs’ mouths, making them uncomfortable and sick. It can lower a dog’s blood sugar too much and can lead to diarrhea, vomiting, increased, or decreased heart rate, and even liver disease. If they inhale it in powder form, cinnamon can cause difficulty breathing, coughing, and choking. Coconut: Yes, coconut is OK for dogs. This funky fruit contains lauric acid, which can help combat bacteria and viruses. It can also help with bad breath and clearing up skin conditions like hot spots, flea allergies, and itchy skin. Coconut milk and coconut oil are safe for dogs too. Just be sure your dog doesn’t get its paws on the furry outside of the shell, which can get lodged in the throat. Corn: Yes, dogs can eat corn. Corn is one of the most common ingredients in most dog foods. However, the cob can be hard for a dog to digest and may cause an intestinal blockage, so if you’re sharing some corn, make sure it is off the cob. (Or just opt for a squeaky corn toy instead.) Eggs: Yes, dogs can eat eggs. Eggs are safe for dogs as long as they are fully cooked. Cooked eggs are a wonderful source of protein and can help an upset stomach. However, eating raw egg whites can contribute to biotin deficiency, so be sure to cook the eggs all the way through before giving them to your pet. Fish: Yes, dogs can eat fish. Fish contains good fats and amino acids, giving your dog a nice health boost. Salmon and sardines are especially beneficial — salmon because it’s loaded with vitamins and protein, and sardines because they have soft, digestible bones for extra calcium. With the exception of sardines, be sure to pick out all the tiny bones, which can be tedious but is definitely necessary. Never feed your dog uncooked or undercooked fish, only fully cooked and cooled, and limit your dog’s fish intake to no more than twice a week. Garlic: No, dogs shouldn’t eat garlic. Like onions, leeks, and chives, garlic is part of the Allium family, and it is five times more toxic to dogs than the rest of the Allium plants. Garlic can create anemia in dogs, causing side effects such as pale gums, elevated heart rate, weakness, and collapse. Poisoning from garlic and onions may have delayed symptoms, so if you think your dog may have eaten some, monitor him or her for a few days, not just right after consumption. Ham: Yes, dogs can eat ham. Ham is OK for dogs to eat, but certainly isn’t the healthiest for them. Ham is high in sodium and fat, so while sharing a small piece is all right, it shouldn’t be a continuous habit. Honey: Yes, dogs can eat honey. Honey is packed with countless nutrients such as vitamins A, B, C, D, E, and K, potassium, calcium, magnesium, copper, and antioxidants. Feeding dogs small amounts of honey can help with allergies because it introduces small amounts of pollen to their systems, building up immunity to allergens in your area. In addition to consuming honey, the sticky spread can also be used as a topical treatment for burns and superficial cuts. Ice cream: No, dogs shouldn’t eat ice cream. As refreshing of a treat as ice cream is, it contains lots of sugar so it is best not to share with your dog. Also, some dogs have an intolerance to lactose. To avoid the milk altogether, freeze chunks of strawberries, raspberries, apples, and pineapples to give to your dog as a sweet, icy treat. Macadamia nuts: No, dogs should never eat macadamia nuts. These are some of the most poisonous foods for dogs. Macadamia nuts, part of the Protaceae family, can cause vomiting, increased body temperature, inability to walk, and lethargy. Even worse, they can affect the nervous system. Never feed your dog macadamia nuts. Milk: Yes, dogs can have milk. But be cautious. Some dogs are lactose-intolerant and don’t digest milk well. While it is OK for dogs to have a little milk, owners should be cognizant of the symptoms of lactose-intolerance and might want to stick to giving their dogs water. Peanut butter: Yes, peanut butter is OK for dogs. Peanut butter can be an excellent source of protein for dogs. It contains heart-healthy fats, vitamins B and E and niacin. Raw, unsalted peanut butter is the healthiest option. Read the label carefully to be sure the peanut butter does not contain xylitol, a sugar substitute that can be toxic to dogs. Peanuts: Yes, dogs can eat peanuts. Unlike almonds, peanuts are safe for dogs to eat. They’re packed with good fats and proteins that can benefit your dog. Just be sure to give peanuts in moderation, as you don’t want your dog taking in too much fat, which can lead to pancreas issues. Also, avoid salted peanuts. Too much salt is hard for dogs to process. Popcorn: Yes, dogs can eat popcorn. Unsalted, unbuttered, air-popped popcorn is OK for your dog in moderation. It contains riboflavin and thiamine, both of which promote eye health and digestion, as well as small amounts of iron and protein. Be sure to pop the kernels all the way before giving them to your dog, as unpopped kernels could become a choking hazard. Pork: Yes, dogs can eat pork. Pork is a highly digestible protein, packed with amino acids, and it contains more calories per pound than other meats. Pork also may be less likely to cause an allergic reaction in some pets compared to other proteins. Quinoa: Yes, quinoa is OK for dogs. You can now find quinoa in some high-quality dry dog foods. The strong nutritional profile of quinoa makes it a healthy alternative to corn, wheat, and soy — starches that are often used to make kibble. Salmon: Yes, dogs can eat salmon. As mentioned above, fully cooked salmon is an excellent source of protein, good fats, and amino acids. It promotes joint and brain health and gives dog-immune systems a nice boost. However, raw or undercooked salmon contains parasites that can make dogs very sick, causing vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, and, in extreme cases, even death. Be sure to cook salmon all the way through (the FDA recommends at least 145 degrees Fahrenheit) and the parasites should cook out. Shrimp: Yes, shrimp is OK for dogs. A few shrimp every now and then is fine for your dog, but only if they are fully cooked and the shell (including the tail, head, and legs) is removed completely. Shrimp are high in antioxidants, vitamin B-12, and phosphorus, but also low in fat, calories, and carbohydrates. Tuna: Yes, dogs can eat tuna, but only in small amounts. In moderation, cooked, fresh tuna is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which promotes heart and eye health. As for canned tuna, it contains small amounts of mercury and sodium, which should be avoided in excess. A little bit of canned tuna and tuna juice here and there is fine — prepared only in water, not oil — as long as it doesn’t contain any spices. Turkey: Yes, dogs can eat turkey. Turkey is fine for dogs, but be sure to remove excess fat and skin from the meat. Don’t forget to check for bones; poultry bones can splinter during digestion, causing blockage or even tears in the intestines. Any meat with excessive salt, seasonings, onions or garlic should not be fed. Wheat/grains: Yes, dogs can eat wheat and other grains. Dogs do not have to be grain-free; it is perfectly OK for them to have grains. In fact, grains like wheat and corn are great sources of protein, essential fatty acids, and fiber. If your dog has certain allergies, however, it might be best to avoid grains, but it truly depends on your dog. Ask your veterinarian for recommendations. Yogurt: Yes, yogurt is OK for dogs. Plain yogurt is a perfectly acceptable snack for dogs. However, some dogs may have trouble digesting dairy products. If your dog can digest it, the active bacteria in yogurt can help strengthen the digestive system with probiotics. Plain yogurt is the best choice. Avoid any yogurts with added sugar, and skip all yogurt with artificial sweeteners. AKC is a participant in affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to akc.org. If you purchase a product through this article, we may receive a portion of the sale. https://www.akc.org/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php Get Your Free AKC eBook Emergency First Aid for Dogs. Even the most responsible pet owner can't always protect their pet from a sudden accident or illness. Getting your pet immediate medical attention can be the difference between life and death. Download this e-book to learn more about what to do in an emergency situation. DOWNLOAD E-BOOK *Turn off pop-up blocker to download AKC Privacy Policy TOP Founded in 1884, the not-for-profit AKC is the recognized and trusted expert in breed, health, and training information for all dogs. AKC actively advocates for responsible dog ownership and is dedicated to advancing dog sports. ABOUT AKC + . Our Mission Our History Minutes & Reports AKC Library & Archives Awards & Honors Press Center Board of Directors & Executive Officers Careers Newsletter Subscriptions Contact Us Top Services + . Find a Puppy Find a Groomer Purebred Registration Enroll a Mixed Breed GoodDog Helpline Shop AKC Store Top Resources + . 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Result 30
Title9 human foods your dogs can’t eat - Wagr Petcare Guide
Urlhttps://www.wagr.ai/pet-guide/9-human-foods-your-dogs-can-t-eat
DescriptionIf there’s one thing your dog loves more than you, it’s food. Some dogs eat anything and everything, especially what you consume. However, dogs are physiologically different from humans and some common human foods can be very toxic for them. Here’s our list of food dogs can’t eat: Contents: Grapes & Raisins - Chocolate & Caffeine - Onion & Garlic - Avocado - Alcohol & Marijuana - Human Medicine - Apple, Plum & Peaches - Candy, Gum & Toothpaste - Excess Salt & Sugar Foods Harmful human foods #1
Date15 Dec 2021
Organic Position26
H19 human foods your dogs can’t eat
H2Harmful human foods #1: Grapes & raisins
Harmful human foods #2: Chocolate & caffeine
Harmful human foods #3: Onion & Garlic
Harmful human foods #4: Avocado
Harmful human foods #5: Alcohol & marijuana
Harmful human foods #6: Human medicine
Harmful human foods #7: Apple, plum & peaches
Harmful human foods #8: Candy, gum & toothpaste
Harmful human foods #9: Excess salt & sugar foods
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H3Have a non-medical question about your pet?
H2WithAnchorsHarmful human foods #1: Grapes & raisins
Harmful human foods #2: Chocolate & caffeine
Harmful human foods #3: Onion & Garlic
Harmful human foods #4: Avocado
Harmful human foods #5: Alcohol & marijuana
Harmful human foods #6: Human medicine
Harmful human foods #7: Apple, plum & peaches
Harmful human foods #8: Candy, gum & toothpaste
Harmful human foods #9: Excess salt & sugar foods
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Body9 human foods your dogs can’t eatUpdated: Dec 15, 2021If there’s one thing your dog loves more than you, it’s food. Some dogs eat anything and everything, especially what you consume. However, dogs are physiologically different from humans and some common human foods can be very toxic for them. Here’s our list of food dogs can’t eat: Contents: Grapes & Raisins - Chocolate & Caffeine - Onion & Garlic - Avocado - Alcohol & Marijuana - Human Medicine - Apple, Plum & Peaches - Candy, Gum & Toothpaste - Excess Salt & Sugar Foods Harmful human foods #1: Grapes & raisins . Grapes and raisins are high on the list of dangerous human foods for dogs. Even a very small amount of grapes or raisins can rapidly cause acute kidney failure in dogs. Symptoms include vomiting, appetite loss, lethargy, dehydration, seizures and coma. Harmful human foods #2: Chocolate & caffeine . Chocolate contains theobromine, which are easily metabolised by humans but are toxic for dogs. The chemical can cause tremors, seizures and heart attacks. Even a small amount of caffeine — found in chocolates, coffee, tea, energy drinks — can cause restlessness, hyperactivity, vomiting, elevated heart rate and seizures. Coffee beans and grounds as well as tea bags can be potentially lethal to your dog. Harmful human foods #3: Onion & Garlic . Consuming onions and garlic can damage red blood cells and lead to life-threatening anemia in dogs. Since both are common ingredients in most Indian dishes, be very careful what you offer your dog. Harmful human foods #4: Avocado . Avocado is also on the list of food dogs can’t eat. The fruit contains a toxin called persin and can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. The large seeds can cause intestinal obstructions. In fact, every part of the plant is toxic to dogs, so keep them well away from your pet. Harmful human foods #5: Alcohol & marijuana . Both these dangerous human foods have a similar effect on dogs as humans, except that even small quantities can be devastating for your dog. It can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy and even comas. Remember to party responsibly around your dog and keep this stuff well out of reach. Harmful human foods #6: Human medicine . Never try human medication on your pet without consulting your vet. While there are some human medicines that are also used for dogs, the dosage needs to be modified drastically to fit the dog’s size. Even common medication such as paracetamol can cause severe kidney and liver problems if not given in the right dosage. Harmful human foods #7: Apple, plum & peaches . While the fruits themselves might not cause much damage, the seeds are dangerous for your dog as they contain cyanide. Some dogs may not know to instinctively avoid these, so always core, pit and remove seeds from these fruits before offering them to your pet. Harmful human foods #8: Candy, gum & toothpaste . All of these contain a sugar alcohol called Xylitol which is harmless to humans but is highly dangerous for dogs and can cause vomiting, lethargy, hypoglycemia, seizures and liver failure. Look for dog-friendly toothpaste for your pet. Harmful human foods #9: Excess salt & sugar foods . A lot of common human snacks like popcorn, chips, cakes etc. contain large amounts of salt and sugar. If your dog consumes this and suffers from salt poisoning, he will drink excessive amounts of water and display symptoms of confusion, convulsions, lethargy etc. which may lead to death. Also, excess sugar can lead to obesity, diabetes etc. Apart from these, you should watch out for other dangerous foods present in your garden such as raw tomatoes, wild mushrooms. Some dogs may also have allergies to specific fruits like jack fruit. Always consult your vet before introducing a new food to your dog. If your dog ingests these dangerous human foods and displays signs of poisoning, get him to a vet as soon as possible. Pet Care•Getting Started0 viewsPost not marked as likedSubscribe to our newsletter!Once-a-week short reads on pet care tips, advice from experts and more.Let's GoDownload the app now!Access vet consultations directly on your mobile app. A whole host of new features are coming soon. Pet advice, community, guides and much more!Have a non-medical question about your pet?Get Free Advice  
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TitleThe World's Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs | The Bark
Urlhttps://thebark.com/content/worlds-most-dangerous-foods-dogs
Description​Alcohol: Coma, death, intoxication Avocado (skin and pits contains persin): Vomiting, diarrhea Raisins/Currants: Kidney failure Cooked Bones: Stomach lacerations Walnuts/Macadamias​ Nuts: Nervous system and muscle damage Onions/Garlic (too much of): Blood cell damage, anemia Dairy (too much of): Diarrhea Mushrooms (some varieties): Shock, death Caffeine: Vomiting,
Date
Organic Position27
H1The World's Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs
H2We Recommend
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H3GET THE SCOOP!
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BodyThe World's Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs Alcohol: Coma, death, intoxicationAvocado (skin and pits contains persin): Vomiting, diarrheaRaisins/Currants: Kidney failureCooked Bones: Stomach lacerationsGET THE BARK NEWSLETTER IN YOUR INBOX!Sign up and get the answers to your questions.Email Address:Walnuts/Macadamias Nuts: Nervous system and muscle damageOnions/Garlic (too much of): Blood cell damage, anemia Dairy (too much of): Diarrhea Mushrooms (some varieties): Shock, death Caffeine: Vomiting, diarrhea, toxic to heart and nervous system Medications (Tylenol, Advil, etc): Kidney failure, GI ulcersGrapes: Kidney failureFatty Foods (too much of): pancreatitis Chocolate: Toxic to heart and nervous system, deathXylitol: Liver failure, hypoglycemia, death If you think your dog ate something dangerous call your vet or:ASPCA Poison Control Hotline (888) 426-4435National Pet Poison Helpline (800) 213-6680 The World's Most Dangerous Foods for Dog We Recommend. Related Content. Can Dogs Eat Apples? Super Foods for DogsCan Dogs Eat Carrots? Super Foods for DogsSourdough Treats for Dogs GET THE SCOOP!Sign up for our newsletter and stay in the know.
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Result 32
Title12 fruits and vegetables toxic to dogs | Love The Garden
Urlhttps://www.lovethegarden.com/uk-en/article/12-fruits-and-vegetables-are-toxic-dogs
DescriptionAre you harming your dog? Of course not, you’re probably shouting at the screen your dog is part of the family!
Date
Organic Position28
H112 fruits and vegetables that are toxic to dogs
H2Miracle-Gro® Patch Magic® Dog Spot Repair
Miracle-Gro® Peat Free Premium All Purpose Compost
Miracle-Gro® All Purpose Soluble Plant Food
Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics Fruit & Veg Granular Plant Food
Pesticides and children, pets and wildlife
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The best plants and vegetables for beginner gardeners
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H3Our guide to fruit and vegetables which are toxic for dogs
Keep on the lookout!
H2WithAnchorsMiracle-Gro® Patch Magic® Dog Spot Repair
Miracle-Gro® Peat Free Premium All Purpose Compost
Miracle-Gro® All Purpose Soluble Plant Food
Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics Fruit & Veg Granular Plant Food
Pesticides and children, pets and wildlife
What are the easiest vegetables to grow?
The best plants and vegetables for beginner gardeners
Gardening with children with David Domoney
Body12 fruits and vegetables that are toxic to dogs Are you harming your dog? Of course not, you’re probably shouting at the screen your dog is part of the family! But there are many common fruit and vegetables which are toxic to dogs and if you don’t know what they are, you might accidentally be giving your dog a treat which is in fact causing him or her harm. Our guide to fruit and vegetables which are toxic for dogs. 1. Grapes and raisins. The first on our list has to be raisins and grapes. A small amount of this innocuous little fruit so common in our homes can cause irreversible kidney damage and failure quite quickly, depending on the size of dog that ingests them. If your dog eats some or your suspect they have, get them to the vets straightaway. 2. Avocados. There is some debate about avocados but as a rule of thumb it is best to avoid giving any part of this fruit to your dog including the stone in the middle and the skin. They can cause breathing problems, sickness and diarrhoea. 3. Pips, seeds and stones. Tempting as it is to throw your dog an apple core, the pips, seeds and stones from fruits such as apples, cherries, plums, peaches etc. contain cyanide and can be extremely harmful to your dog and even prove fatal. 4. Mushrooms. Whilst your ordinary mushrooms that you use in cooking should be ok, wild mushrooms can be very poisonous but also one of those things that dogs forage around for whilst out walking. Symptoms vary according to the mushroom but include the usual diarrhoea, vomiting, restlessness and if you suspect your dog has eaten wild mushrooms or is behaving unusually, get them to the vets. 5. Nuts. Always avoid giving your dog nuts. The different types carry a variety of different symptoms and effects and some can be fatal to your dog. Particularly bad are Brazil nuts, walnuts, pecan nuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts and peanuts. The best advice is always to keep nuts out of reach. 6. Unripe tomatoes. While ripe tomatoes are probably ok for your dog, unripe tomatoes and tomato plants can be harmful. They contain something called ‘tomatine’ which can cause damage to the nervous system, kidneys and digestive tract so if you are growing your own, make sure they are well fenced off from your furry friend. 7. Onions and garlic. In appropriate quantities garlic can be good for your dog but if they eat too much garlic or onions and chives, it can also be harmful and can destroy your dog’s red blood cells. It doesn’t matter whether it is raw, cooked or dried, make sure you avoid feeding these offenders to your dog. 8. Nutmeg. Not necessarily something that will be lying around your home in large quantities but something to be aware of. Nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures and even death in dogs so just make sure your dog doesn’t get hold of any. 9. Broccoli. While broccoli has so many health benefits for us and our families, the same is not true for man’s best friend. It can irritate their stomach and while that may not sound bad it can be very dangerous particularly in certain breeds. 10. Rhubarb. Another one of our commonly home grown fruits which can be toxic to dogs is rhubarb which again can cause damage to the nervous system, kidneys and digestive tract. Symptoms include tremors, seizures and heart problems so don’t let your dog get stuck into your rhubarb crumble or vegetable patch. 11. Potatoes. It’s not so much the potatoes themselves you have to worry about but the potato plants so beware if you are growing your own. The plants contain something called solanine which can cause a variety of complaints including diarrhoea, vomiting and confusion and it can be very dangerous to your dog. 12. Persimmon seeds. Not terribly common in the UK, the persimmon fruit is an exotic orange fruit that we do find in our supermarkets sometimes. But the seeds are very harmful to dog and can cause diarrhoea and a high temperature so they are another important fruit to avoid giving your four-legged friend. Keep on the lookout! There’s no doubt that we’re a nation of dog lovers and we welcome our furry best friend into our families as one of our own. But tempting as it is to throw your dog the odd tip bit, let them forage or give them your scraps, it is very important to make sure you know what could be harmful to your dog. If you have any doubt that they might have eaten something they shouldn’t or if they are showing any signs of unusual behaviour, take advice from your vet straightaway. Related products Miracle-Gro® Patch Magic® Dog Spot Repair . Buy now Miracle-Gro® Peat Free Premium All Purpose Compost . Buy now Miracle-Gro® All Purpose Soluble Plant Food . Buy now Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics Fruit & Veg Granular Plant Food . Buy now Related articles Pesticides and children, pets and wildlife . Children and pets In the case of most products the label will contain a warning to ‘Keep Product Away From Children and... What are the easiest vegetables to grow? . Interest in grows your own continues to rise and growing your own tasty and healthy fruit and veg at home are easier... The best plants and vegetables for beginner gardeners . We like to help our budding gardeners out over here at LoveTheGarden, by making sure we always include a range of how-to... Gardening with children with David Domoney . Using time in the garden to occupy kids is a smart way to get some much-needed fresh air. Our products Take a look at all our product categories. Discover our products Where to buy our products Search for a store near you. Find a store What to do this month Find hands-on guidance for what to plant and when. To the garden calendar Compost & Mulch Calculator See how much you need for your garden. 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