Copywriteroffice

Serp data

Request Result Detail

The request result help you to show your API requests results.

Copywriteroffice - guitar pickups and their differences serp result detail
Keyword guitar pickups and their differences
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=guitar+pickups+and+their+differences&oq=guitar+pickups+and+their+differences&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Devicedesktop
Languageen
LocationGB
Search Enginegoogle.co.uk
No. Of Results110000000
RelatedSearch
guitar pickups explainedhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Guitar+pickups+explained&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAhAEAE
electric guitar pickups guidehttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Electric+guitar+pickups+guide&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAg_EAE
guitar pickups typeshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Guitar+pickups+types&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAhIEAE
acoustic guitar pickups typeshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Acoustic+guitar+pickups+types&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAg7EAE
humbucker pickupshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Humbucker+pickups&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAg5EAE
what makes guitar pickups sound differenthttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=What+makes+guitar+pickups+sound+different&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAg3EAE
electric guitar pickups explainedhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Electric+guitar+pickups+explained&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAg1EAE
electric guitar pickup typeshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Electric+guitar+pickup+types&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbt83U3qL1AhWDx4UKHTZ2CuYQ1QJ6BAgyEAE
Result 1
TitleThe Different Types of Guitar Pickups Explained: Electric - Acoustic - Bass | Gearank
Urlhttps://www.gearank.com/articles/guitar-pickups
DescriptionA good explanation of the different kinds of pickups for Electric, Acoustic and Bass Guitar and how they affect your tone
Date5 Dec 2017
Organic Position1
H1Gearank
H2What Is a Pickup?
Electric Guitar Pickups
Electric Bass Guitar Pickups
Acoustic Pickups
Active and Passive Pickups
Latest Gear Guides
H3Single Coil
Humbucker
P90
J-Pickups
Split-coil
Dual-coil
Soap bar
Transducer Pickups
Piezo Pickups
Soundhole Pickups
In-Body Microphones
Passive Pickups
Active Pickups
Active Bass Pickups
Related
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is a Pickup?
Electric Guitar Pickups
Electric Bass Guitar Pickups
Acoustic Pickups
Active and Passive Pickups
Latest Gear Guides
BodyGearank Gearank Ratings Explained The Different Types of Guitar Pickups Explained: Electric - Acoustic - Bass Submitted by Mason Hoberg on Dec. 5, 2017. Original photograph by Maja Dumat, modified by Jason Horton and published here under Creative Commons license. The pickup(s) in your guitar are what allows your instrument to be heard. They’re just as important as the wood your guitar is made from, your strings, and your amp; and they deserve an equal amount of consideration. However, pickups come in different shapes and sizes. Pickups also work towards different purposes. For example, you’re not going to use the same pickup to play country that you use to play hard rock and metal. And if you don’t get the right pickups for what you want to do, you’ll find it hard to get the tone you want. Because there are so many types of guitar pickups available, we’ve set out to create an introductory resource that you can use to figure out which pickup is going to be the best fit for you. We’re not going to delve into too many technicalities, or try and list every conceivable pickup and the pros and cons associated with them, but by reading this article you’re going to have essential knowledge to make an informed purchase. So without much further ado, let’s get started… What Is a Pickup? Before we get started, let’s make sure we’re all on the same page. A pickup is a magnet with wire wrapped around it that transforms the vibration of your strings into an electronic signal. Pickups are used on electric and acoustic instruments. Electric Guitar Pickups. Electric guitar pickups (and electric bass pickups) can be divided into three main categories: single coil, humbucker, and P90. Single Coil. Single coil pickups use a single magnet. A good example of a single coil pickup are the pickups on a standard Fender Stratocaster (though they’re used on countless guitars, not just those from Fender!). Single coil pickups don’t have one easy to define tone because they’re so widely used, but as a general rule they’re considered to be brighter than humbuckers or P90s. The genres that use single coil pickups famously include country and surf, though they sound great in almost any genre. They’re only weakness is that they don’t handle high levels of distortion (like what you’d hear in hard rock and metal) as well as humbuckers. Humbucker. Humbuckers are essentially two single coil pickups working together. Single coil pickups are subject to 60-cycle hum, a phenomenon where background electrical noise is transferred to your amp along with your strings’ vibrations. Humbuckers were designed to “buck” hum, hence the name. Humbuckers have a warm tone in comparison to single coil pickups, which is why they’re the pickup of choice for jazz. However, due to their higher output (output=volume) they outperform single coil pickups in genres where high levels of distortion are required. The only genres humbuckers don’t do well are country and surf, but beyond that they perform well in any circumstance (depending on their output of course!). P90. Last but not least, P90s. P90 pickups are the happy medium between single coil and humbucker pickups. They have a higher output than single coil pickups, but they don’t have the output of humbuckers. Their tone has a bit more depth than your standard single coil, but not to the extent of humbuckers. P90 pickups are best suited to blues and rock (but not hard rock), though they’re still relatively versatile. You can see our recommendations in our guide to Electric Guitar Pickups. Electric Bass Guitar Pickups. Bass pickups are designed the same as guitar pickups, but they’re separated into different categories: J-pickups (Jazz Bass), Split-Coil pickups, Dual-Coil pickups, and Soap Bar pickups. J-Pickups. J-pickups were first used on Fender’s Jazz Bass, and because of this are still associated with the instrument. These pickups have a warm and clear tonality, and are commonly used by jazz musicians. However, they’re also common in rock (Geddy Lee from Rush is a notable user). Split-coil. Split-coil pickups are two halves of a single pickup, with one half resting slightly higher (more towards the neck) than the other. These pickups are generally used by rock and punk musicians due to their punchy tone. Dual-coil. Dual-coil pickups are humbucking pickups, though they aren’t as common as j or split-coil pickups. Dual-coil bass pickups, like humbuckers on a guitar, have a significantly warmer tone than single coil alternatives. They’re great if you’re looking for a more vintage bass tone, though do know that they don’t have the clarity of the pickups above. Soap bar. Soap bar pickups are essentially J-bass pickups with a wider housing. A notable difference is that these pickups are actually sealed, which helps to protect them from degradation. They also have pins that protrude from the bottom of the pickup in order to facilitate different wiring combinations. Acoustic Pickups. Acoustic pickups can be divided into three categories: transducer, piezo, and soundhole. Transducer Pickups. These pickups are known for their lifelike representation of an acoustic instrument’s tone. These pickups work by adhering to your instruments soundboard and then translating its response into an electric signal. Because these pickups “hear” how your soundboard reacts to the vibration of your strings the sound it produces is more reflective of that. The only downside to transducer pickups is that they have a tendency to be more sensitive to feedback than piezo or soundhole pickups. Piezo Pickups. These are a type of transducer, but instead of being under the soundboard they’re under the saddle (where your strings pass over). These pickups “hear” your strings more that your guitar, and are considered to sound more synthetic than soundboard transducer. They also have a strong mid-range hump, generally described “piezo quack”. Piezo pickups are generally pretty resistant to feedback, making them a great option if you’re looking to play bigger venues or play with higher amounts of volume. Soundhole Pickups. These are essentially electric guitar pickups that fit in the soundhole of an acoustic guitar. These pickups have a definite “electric” quality to their tone, but higher end soundhole pickups actually sound really lifelike. Nicer soundhole pickups implement a technology that’s similar to a microphone, offering a similar response without being as sensitive to feedback. The cool thing about these pickups is that they’re generally pretty feedback resistant and can still pump out a lifelike tone, making them a happy medium between soundboard transducers and piezo pickups. Many of these systems are also affordable and non-invasive (meaning that they don’t require any permanent modification to your instrument). In-Body Microphones. Though they aren’t really pickups, many companies offer in-body microphones or systems that combine a pickup with an in-body microphone. These systems offer the most realistic acoustic tone, but they come with a couple of downsides. Microphones are significantly more feedback prone than acoustic guitars, and systems that use microphones are more expensive than other options. However, if you’ve got to have a genuine acoustic tone there is definitely enough of a difference between a microphone (or a system which uses a microphone and pickup simultaneously) and a pickup to justify the increase in price. Acoustic guitar pickups are more controversial than electric guitar pickups because acoustic guitar players are generally looking for a reproduction of a tone that already exists. Accuracy in reproduction is generally prized over the pickups’ intrinsic qualities, and because our view of how accurately a pickup is reproducing our unplugged tone is subjective we all get different opinions on how well certain types (and even certain models) of pickups perform. The best advice you can ever get when it comes to acoustic pickups is to keep an open mind, and to make your decisions with your ear instead of letting your preconceived notions decide for you. There are pickups that, through careful design and implementation, manage to avoid the pitfalls that plague other pickups of the same type. There are also advancements in pickup technology being made all the time, so just because you don’t like the tone of a certain pickup now doesn’t mean that will always be the case. To see which acoustic pickup systems we recommend, take a look at our guide to The Best Acoustic Guitar Pickups. Active and Passive Pickups. All of the pickups above fall under two classifications: active and passive. Active and passive pickups operate differently and have very different tones. So in order to get the tone you’re looking for it’s important that you know the difference between the two. Passive Pickups. These were the first pickups invented. They’re called passive because they don’t boost the signal. These pickups have a warm and organic tone, and as a general rule they’re great for just about everything. The only thing they don’t excel at is high levels of distortion. Active Pickups. As the name implies, active pickups utilize active circuitry that require a power source, which is usually a 9V battery embedded into guitars. These pickups boost your signal, resulting in a higher amount of output. On active pickups you can also boost frequencies (like treble, bass, or both) from your instrument, a feature that's commonly available on most acoustic-electric guitars. On electric guitars, active pickups are generally only used for genres that require high levels of distortion, like metal and hard rock. EMG is one of the most notable manufacturers of active pickups, and the pickups they produce are a great representation of active guitar pickups as a whole. Active Bass Pickups. Active Bass Pickups are a bit different, prized more for their tone sculpting capabilities than their higher output, which has led to their adoption in a variety of different genres. This is a stark contrast to active electric guitar pickups, which are seldom used outside of hard rock and metal). Related. 4 Things To Consider Before Upgrading Your Pickups The Best Electric Guitar Pickups The Best Acoustic Guitar Pickups The Best Electric Guitars Under $500 The Best Cheap Electric Guitars Under $200 The Best Electric Guitar Strings The Best Acoustic Guitar Strings - 6 String Sets The Best Acoustic Guitar Preamps Latest Gear Guides. The Best Open Back Headphones for Mixing and Mastering The Best Chorus Pedals - All Price Ranges The Best Channel Strips - All Prices The Best Volume Pedals for Guitar The Best Acoustic Guitar Strings: Extra Light - Light - Medium - Heavy
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 113
  • 1
  • guitar
  • 33
  • 1
  • coil
  • 22
  • 1
  • tone
  • 20
  • 1
  • acoustic
  • 19
  • 1
  • electric
  • 18
  • 1
  • guitar pickup
  • 17
  • 1
  • single
  • 16
  • 1
  • single coil
  • 14
  • 1
  • coil pickup
  • 14
  • 1
  • bass
  • 13
  • 1
  • active
  • 13
  • 1
  • electric guitar
  • 12
  • 1
  • string
  • 12
  • 1
  • humbucker
  • 12
  • 1
  • single coil pickup
  • 9
  • 1
  • acoustic guitar
  • 9
  • 1
  • pickup pickup
  • 8
  • 1
  • instrument
  • 8
  • 1
  • rock
  • 8
  • 1
  • microphone
  • 8
  • 1
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 7
  • 1
  • bass pickup
  • 7
  • 1
  • higher
  • 7
  • 1
  • output
  • 7
  • 1
  • generally
  • 7
  • 1
  • pickup electric
  • 6
  • 1
  • hard
  • 6
  • 1
  • p90
  • 6
  • 1
  • genre
  • 6
  • 1
  • transducer
  • 6
  • 1
  • piezo
  • 6
  • 1
  • soundhole
  • 6
  • 1
  • system
  • 6
  • 1
  • body microphone
  • 5
  • 1
  • split coil
  • 5
  • 1
  • hard rock
  • 5
  • 1
  • active pickup
  • 5
  • 1
  • type
  • 5
  • 1
  • great
  • 5
  • 1
  • soundboard
  • 5
  • 1
  • feedback
  • 5
  • 1
  • passive
  • 5
  • 1
  • guitar pickup electric
  • 4
  • 1
  • high level distortion
  • 4
  • 1
  • acoustic guitar pickup
  • 4
  • 1
  • guitar string
  • 4
  • 1
  • high level
  • 4
  • 1
  • level distortion
  • 4
  • 1
  • dual coil
  • 4
  • 1
  • pickup generally
  • 4
  • 1
  • acoustic pickup
  • 4
  • 1
  • soundhole pickup
  • 4
  • 1
  • dual
  • 4
  • 1
  • hard rock metal
  • 3
  • 1
  • pickup electric guitar
  • 3
  • 1
  • split coil pickup
  • 3
  • 1
  • rock metal
  • 3
  • 1
  • signal pickup
  • 3
  • 1
  • humbucker p90
  • 3
  • 1
  • higher output
  • 3
  • 1
  • soap bar
  • 3
  • 1
  • pickup acoustic
  • 3
  • 1
  • piezo pickup
  • 3
  • 1
  • microphone system
  • 3
  • 1
  • pickup active
  • 3
  • 1
  • active passive
  • 3
  • 1
  • passive pickup
  • 3
  • 1
Result 2
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position2
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 3
TitleAll the Types of Electric Guitar Pickups Explained and Compared | Stringjoy
Urlhttps://stringjoy.com/types-of-guitar-pickups-explained-compared/
DescriptionWith so many types of guitar pickups out there, how do you pick the right one? Check out our guide that explains and compares the major pickup types
Date
Organic Position3
H1All the Types of Electric Guitar Pickups Explained & Compared
H2Single Coil Pickups (Fender Style)
P90 Pickups
Humbucker Pickups
Mini Humbucker Pickups
Active Pickups
Gold Foil Pickups
Jazzmaster Pickups
Jaguar Pickups
Triplebucker Pickups
Z Coil Pickups
Filter-Tron Pickups
Toaster Pickups
Lots of Types of Guitar Pickups, Lots of Sounds
Our Best-Selling Strings
Other Posts you may like
H3Popular for: Blues, Classic Rock, Country, Pop
Popular for: Classic Rock, Punk Rock, Country
Popular for: Classic Rock, Blues, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Pop, Jazz
Popular for: Classic Rock, Blues
Popular for: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal
Popular for: Classic Rock, Blues
Popular For: Classic Rock, Indie Rock, Jazz
Popular for: Indie Rock, Classic Rock, Jazz
Popular for: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal
Popular for: Classic Rock, Jazz, Country, Blues
Popular for: Jazz, Country, Rockabilly, Indie Rock
Popular for: Classic Rock, Indie Rock, Pop
Tony Rice: King of the Flat Pick
Last-Minute Gifts for Guitar Players
Djent: How Low Can You Go?
Stringjoy At The OKC FX Pedal Pop Up
Tuning Your Guitar: 5 Guitar Tuning Tips for Beginners
An Express History of Expression Pedals
Killer Tone Tips, Delivered
H2WithAnchorsSingle Coil Pickups (Fender Style)
P90 Pickups
Humbucker Pickups
Mini Humbucker Pickups
Active Pickups
Gold Foil Pickups
Jazzmaster Pickups
Jaguar Pickups
Triplebucker Pickups
Z Coil Pickups
Filter-Tron Pickups
Toaster Pickups
Lots of Types of Guitar Pickups, Lots of Sounds
Our Best-Selling Strings
Other Posts you may like
BodyAll the Types of Electric Guitar Pickups Explained & Compared by Matt Dunn |    May 31, 2019 Whether you are interested in upgrading to a better set of pickups or finding a different set to add some tonal variation to your rig, there are so many types of guitar pickups out there that it can be hard to understand which pickups are right for you. So, helpful folks that we are, we put together a brief overview of all the major types of guitar pickups you’ll find on common—and some uncommon—guitar models. Below you’ll find a rundown of the major pickup families, along with some great videos that show the tones these fellas are capable of. As with most things, each brand and pickup maker adds their own unique touches to their products. Two humbuckers—take a Gibson PAF humbucker and a Reverend Railhammer humbucker, for example—may have some subtle or not-so-subtle sonic differences that make one a better fit for a given player. But for the purpose of this article we’re just going to compare the main families of pickups, to give you a general sense of what each has to offer. But first, before we jump in, let’s start with a brief rundown of how pickups work to create that beautiful guitar tone we all know and love. All pickups convert your string’s vibrational signal into an electrical signal that can then be amplified and altered throughout your rig. The magnets, wrapped in copper or other metallic wire, in the pickup create and project a magnetic field around the strings. Once a string vibrates, it disrupts this magnetic field. The stronger the signal, the stronger the volume or output of the pickup, which is a big part of what drives us to choose certain pickups for guitars, genres, or playing styles. Looking for info on Acoustic Pickups? Check out our guide to the major Acoustic Guitar Pickup Types. Single Coil Pickups (Fender Style) . One of the most well-known types of guitar pickups alongside the Gibson PAF, single coil pickups have often become colloquially known as Fender or Strat style pickups. They are also one of the most basic pickup setups featuring the magnets wrapped in a single coil of wires, giving a simple and clear signal that can capture many distinct tones based on where they are in the guitar body. The normal Strat-style three pickup setup allows for bright and warm neck tones and hotter, louder output bridge tones. In this setup, the middle pickup is most often used in conjunction with either of the other two pickups via the 5 way selector switch to get what many call that Fender “snap” or “spank”. The Telecaster also popularized its own version of single clil pickups with a few small modifications such as two pickups as opposed to three, and with modifications to the base plates. The well-known downside to single coils is their susceptibility to electrical interference, creating a “hum” or buzz noise at loud volumes known as “60 cycle” hum. Popular for: Blues, Classic Rock, Country, Pop  . P90 Pickups. Frequently seen on early Gibson guitars, P90’s are still a single coil pickup but provide more output than Fender Strat-style single coils and tend to break up an amp at a lower volume. Often recognized for their presence on Gibson Les Paul juniors, they are regarded as very versatile pickups and feature a bit of a fatter sound than standard single coils with magnets featured under the coil instead of being wrapped in the coil. The pole pieces are also more similar to that of a humbucker than a Fender single coil—there was undoubtedly some co-evolution between the P90 and ‘bucker during Gibson’s formative design years. Popular for: Classic Rock, Punk Rock, Country . Humbucker Pickups. Humbuckers are one of the most popular and well known types of guitar pickups (along with the Strat-style single coil and P90). The Humbucker arose from the need to get more volume and output from pickups while also negating the loud hum that was generated by single coils. A humbucker is essentially two coils right next to each other with reversed polarity that cancel out each other’s extraneous noise, or “buck the hum”, thus the name. A byproduct of having these two coils together is that they produce a big, warm sound that has become associated with the fat sound of Gibson guitars. One modern twist that has made them even more popular is the addition of “coil tapping” where at the pull of a knob, only one of the two coils will be engaged. This gives the player more a brighter, cleaner, single coil sound. This addition now gives players with humbuckers even more tonal options at their fingertips. Popular for: Classic Rock, Blues, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Pop, Jazz . Mini Humbucker Pickups. Originally created by Epiphone, a mini humbucker is in a lot of ways, just a shrunken humbucker (who would have known??), but it does have some subtle differences from it’s big brother. Sensing a shorter length of string vibration above it, the pickup produces clearer and brighter sounds that are quite a ways from the warm, fat, and rounded tones of Gibson PAFs or other humbuckers. With the increased output and hum cancelling properties of full sized humbuckers, mini humbuckers are a great way to get a little more of a clear, almost Fender-style sound on Gibson or similar guitars. Popular for: Classic Rock, Blues. Active Pickups . Using active circuitry—usually requiring a 9 volt battery—these bad boys create way more output and volume by essentially having a built in signal boosting preamp. Active pickups are a relatively new addition to the guitar world, first popularized by heavy metal players looking for even more gain than was possible from a passive humbucker. The most recognized brand, EMG, has seen their pickups gain some competition over the years from mainstay brands like Seymour Duncan. Active pickups also are less susceptible to electronic interference than their passive counterparts and can come with onboard EQ meaning you can modify the tone of your pickups before they reach your amp or effects. Popular for: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal . Gold Foil Pickups. Goil foil pickups are maybe best known for their appearances on vintage Supro and Silvertone guitars, as well as on Ry Cooder’s “Coodercaster”, and are without a doubt one of the vibiest types of guitar pickups out there. In these pickups, gold foil covers the whole pickup just under the metal casing. The screws being placed right above the coils is said to allow them to sense more of the string, helping make the pickup clearer and louder. Gold foil pickups can come in single coil or humbucker versions, and are noted for their smooth, super clear, and bright high end sounds (funny, considering their humble beginnings on 60’s and 70’s foreign made student guitars). While these were difficult to find for many years, they’ve recently been reissued by several brands and are once again an easily accessible option for players looking to stand out a bit. Popular for: Classic Rock, Blues . Jazzmaster Pickups. Technically, these are just another type of Fender single coil that is often confused with P90’s (understandable, considering that there have even been versions of Jazzmaster pickups that are nothing but a P90 under the hood). The main difference between a Jazzmaster pickup and a  P90 is that the pole pieces of the coils on these are magnets where as P90’s have the magnets underneath the coil. This style is often popular with jazz, surf, and indie rock guitarists who have adapted the Jazzmaster as their main instrument. Jazzmaster pickups also feature “Pancake” winding, which is wider and flatter than P90’s, giving it a warmer tone while retaining that single coil clarity. Popular For: Classic Rock, Indie Rock, Jazz. Jaguar Pickups. Jaguar pickups are very similar to strat pickups but with metal “teeth” around them to help remove some of the hum that is usually associated with single coils. These pickups are also mounted directly to the body, unlike stratocasters where the pickups are screwed into the pickguard. Popular with indie rock bands, the Jaguar pickup has been described in an unflattering sense as a “castrated Strat pickup” despite being similar in construction and components. Because of the Jaguar’s 24” scale length, these instruments have a bit of a snappier tone, though that has as much to do with string tension than the pickups underneath. Popular for: Indie Rock, Classic Rock, Jazz . Triplebucker Pickups. Here we have a Fender attempt at creating a modern, high output pickup. The idea was to create a higher-output humbucker, with even less noise than a typical humbucker, by basically adding a third coil to a humbucker. These were briefly found on Fender’s Modern Player Marauder and were noted for sounding great, so long as you had an overdrive or distortion pedal in your signal chain. Surprisingly, according to many Marauder players, the triplebucker doesn’t naturally break up an amp as well as you’d think it would. Though you don’t see these in production any longer, I wouldn’t be surprised if someone tried to revitalize and perfect this pickup in the coming years, especially for heavier, metal music. Popular for: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal . Z Coil Pickups. Featured on G&L guitars most notably and invented by Leo Fender for some previous Fender models, these are essentially the same as standard Strat pickups except that they are split into the Z shape which helps make them hum-cancelling—another attempt at removing the hum of single coils without giving up the clarity or tone. They are noted for sounding almost identical to Fender Strat pickups (sans hum of course) and G&L has done some interesting wiring work to enhance the pickup combinations on models featuring these, such as the three-at-once pickup mode on their Comanche model. Popular for: Classic Rock, Jazz, Country, Blues . Filter-Tron Pickups. Popularized by many of Gretsch’s most famous hollowbody models, the Filter-Tron pickup (and its recent copies by companies such as Lollar, TV Jones, and Seymour Duncan) is a retro-looking humbucker-type pickup loved by players of many genres, but especially famous for its use in rockabilly music. Smaller than traditional PAF-style humbuckers, the Filter-Tron features two single coils very close together with a much larger magnet than normally seen on pickups. This design, combined with the taller bobbins placed on the pickup contribute to what is a brighter, less warm tone than other humbuckers while still minimizing the hum and buzz. These pickups were popularized by country, western, and rockabilly music which featured such playing styles, which rely on tonal clarity to help distinguish individual notes despite the fast, hectic finger picking. These pickups have also seen a bit of a re-popularization recently after their inclusion on the Fender Cabronita Telecaster. Popular for: Jazz, Country, Rockabilly, Indie Rock . Toaster Pickups . Potentially better known as Rickenbacker pickups, these vintage single and double coil pickups have helped spawn some of rock’s greatest hits in the hands of John Lennon and Pete Townshend, among others. The two-slotted “Toaster Top” pickup is generally considered the quintessential British Invasion sound. Both the single coil and humbucker variants of these models are noted for their loud, clean, and treble-forward sounds. One description you’ll often find associated with these guitars is “chime”, especially when paired with British Invasion-era amps such the Vox AC30. Popular for: Classic Rock, Indie Rock, Pop . Lots of Types of Guitar Pickups, Lots of Sounds . While there is a nearly infinite supply of types of guitar pickups available to today’s electric guitarist, these are generally the most common models you will run into. While some of the similarities may seem trivial or technical, the best way to truly understand all the versions is to hear them all for yourself. Be it by listening to YouTube videos like the ones embedded above, or going to your local guitar shop and trying a few guitars, get out there and listen for yourself if one has more treble, bass, or that unquantifiable magic sound that inspires your playing. We couldn’t cover every single pickup subtype here, so if you’re feeling like getting even more adventurous, check out other some more specific variants of the types above, like Lipstick Pickups or Firebird Pickups, just to name a few. Our Best-Selling Strings. CLICK A SET TO MAKE IT YOURS. Other Posts you may like. Tony Rice: King of the Flat Pick . Last-Minute Gifts for Guitar Players . Djent: How Low Can You Go? . Stringjoy At The OKC FX Pedal Pop Up . Tuning Your Guitar: 5 Guitar Tuning Tips for Beginners . An Express History of Expression Pedals . Back to blog. Killer Tone Tips, Delivered. Sign up to get tone advice, playing inspiration, early access to new products and more. Share this post with your friends. Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on reddit Share on email 0 0 Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop Apply Free shipping on orders over $25 EASY 90-DAY RETURNS SHOP NOW
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 85
  • 3
  • coil
  • 32
  • 3
  • guitar
  • 28
  • 3
  • humbucker
  • 26
  • 3
  • single
  • 22
  • 3
  • rock
  • 21
  • 3
  • single coil
  • 20
  • 3
  • popular
  • 16
  • 3
  • p90
  • 14
  • 3
  • type
  • 14
  • 3
  • fender
  • 14
  • 3
  • tone
  • 13
  • 3
  • style
  • 12
  • 3
  • sound
  • 11
  • 3
  • gibson
  • 10
  • 3
  • hum
  • 10
  • 3
  • guitar pickup
  • 9
  • 3
  • classic rock
  • 9
  • 3
  • player
  • 9
  • 3
  • classic
  • 9
  • 3
  • type guitar
  • 8
  • 3
  • string
  • 8
  • 3
  • metal
  • 8
  • 3
  • output
  • 8
  • 3
  • strat
  • 8
  • 3
  • type guitar pickup
  • 7
  • 3
  • popular classic rock
  • 7
  • 3
  • coil pickup
  • 7
  • 3
  • popular classic
  • 7
  • 3
  • magnet
  • 7
  • 3
  • model
  • 7
  • 3
  • subtle
  • 6
  • 3
  • indie rock
  • 6
  • 3
  • signal
  • 6
  • 3
  • jazz
  • 6
  • 3
  • indie
  • 6
  • 3
  • share
  • 6
  • 3
  • heavy metal
  • 5
  • 3
  • jazzmaster pickup
  • 5
  • 3
  • blue
  • 5
  • 3
  • country
  • 5
  • 3
  • jazzmaster
  • 5
  • 3
  • single coil pickup
  • 4
  • 3
  • gibson paf
  • 4
  • 3
  • strat style
  • 4
  • 3
  • coil humbucker
  • 4
  • 3
  • strat pickup
  • 4
  • 3
  • single coil humbucker
  • 3
  • 3
  • classic rock blue
  • 3
  • 3
  • hard rock heavy
  • 3
  • 3
  • rock heavy metal
  • 3
  • 3
  • output pickup
  • 3
  • 3
  • fender strat
  • 3
  • 3
  • rock blue
  • 3
  • 3
  • hard rock
  • 3
  • 3
  • rock heavy
  • 3
  • 3
  • mini humbucker
  • 3
  • 3
  • active pickup
  • 3
  • 3
  • gold foil
  • 3
  • 3
  • foil pickup
  • 3
  • 3
  • rock jazz
  • 3
  • 3
  • jaguar pickup
  • 3
  • 3
  • filter tron
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
TitleGuitar Pickups - Your Ultimate Guide from Andertons Music Co
Urlhttps://www.andertons.co.uk/guitar-pickup-guide
DescriptionThey're the reason your guitar squeals, roars, sings and purrs - where do you begin with guitar pickups? Click here to read our comprehensive guide and find your next set of pickups at Andertons Music Co!
Date
Organic Position4
H1Ultimate Guide to Guitar Pickups
H2Pickups: An Introduction
Humbuckers vs. Single Coils
Active vs. Passive
Types of Pickup Magnets
What's A Split Coil / Coil Tap?
Acoustic Guitar Pickups
Most Popular Brands
Seymour Duncan Pickups
Fishman Pickups
Bare Knuckle Pickups
DiMarzio Pickups
EMG Pickups
How Do I Install New Pickups?
Jargon Buster
Recently Viewed Items
H3This item has been successfully added to your list.
Andertons Loyalty Points Scheme
How Loyalty Points Work
Single Coils
Humbuckers
What is a Single Coil Pickup?
What is a Humbucker?
What is a P90 Pickup?
Honourable Mentions
Active
Passive
Servicing at Andertons Music Co
H2WithAnchorsPickups: An Introduction
Humbuckers vs. Single Coils
Active vs. Passive
Types of Pickup Magnets
What's A Split Coil / Coil Tap?
Acoustic Guitar Pickups
Most Popular Brands
Seymour Duncan Pickups
Fishman Pickups
Bare Knuckle Pickups
DiMarzio Pickups
EMG Pickups
How Do I Install New Pickups?
Jargon Buster
Recently Viewed Items
BodyUltimate Guide to Guitar Pickups They are the reason that your guitar sings the way that it does...but how much do you really know about your pickups? In our Ultimate Guide, we'll look at why pickups make such a difference to your tone, and explore how you can find the perfect set for you! Home≥ The Ultimate Guide To Guitar Pickups Pickups: An Introduction. Have you ever noticed that if you pluck the string close to the bridge the note will sound bright and twangy, whereas if you pick right down by the neck you’ll hear a softer, rounder tone? Similarly, if you place a pickup near the bridge of the guitar it will sound sharper and brighter compared to one that’s placed near the neck. This is why the majority of guitars have more than one pickup: so you can select different sounds from the full and warm to the thin and snappy. The simplest way to think of a pickup is as if were a microphone for an electric guitar. A guitar pickup is a magnet that senses the vibrations of your strings, then converts them into an electrical signal that can be amplified, thus making noise! A pickup's magnet is usually made with a core material such as alnico or ferrite, then wrapped with coils of copper wire, but if you start changing these properties, i.e. the core material or the number of coils, you can attain different sounds! Shop Guitar Pickups! Humbuckers vs. Single Coils. There are two main types of pickups: single coils and humbuckers. Let’s have a look at each, and what they do, and then go into a little more detail. Single Coils. How they work: Insulated wire is wrapped around six individual magnets. When the steel guitar string is plucked, the magnetic field is disturbed, and this change is captured by the wire and sent to the amplifier. How they sound: Clear and detailed: snappy, twangy, bell-like, jangly. Humbuckers. How they work: A humbucker is made up of two coils instead of one, each with their magnets going in different directions (one with north ‘up’ and the other with north ‘down’). When connected together, the characteristic single coil hum is cancelled. How they sound: Full, thick, ‘hot,’ loud, smooth. What is a Single Coil Pickup? Single coils (like you might find on a Fender Telecaster or Stratocaster) have a clear, twangy sound, and they tend to sound really great through a clean, un-distorted amp setting. This type of single coil pickup is made by wrapping wire around six ‘slug’ pole pieces (which are held in place by flatwork to create a bobbin). A cover is usually placed over the pickup to protect the wire. But single coils have a drawback: you’ll notice a bit of background buzz which is just part and parcel of the single coil experience. Some players swear by this excess noise, as it evokes a vintage sound. Others want to get rid of it, and simply enjoy the pristine single coil sound minus the hum. Various noiseless single coils are available from companies like Fender, DiMarzio, and Seymour Duncan. Single coils are great for country, blues, indie and alternative styles. What is a Humbucker? The idea behind humbuckers is to use two separate pickup coils, each wound in a different direction, over a central magnet. The hum is cancelled out by the two different coil directions (hence the name 'hum-bucker'), and the overall tone is generally thicker, louder, warmer and fuller than single coils. Humbuckers are great for heavier styles like classic rock, hard rock and metal, and they can add some toughness and raunch to blues too. And the softer, smoother tone of humbuckers makes them great for jazz as well, especially if you use a humbucker in the neck position on a big hollow-body guitar. Gibson guitars are closely associated with the humbucker as their iconic models, such as the Les Paul, SG, and ES-335, all use them. Bare Knuckle, Fishman, EMG, Seymour Duncan and more all make humbuckers ranging from vintage-style, to high-gain metal monsters. In some cases, you'll see single coils and humbuckers in the same guitar. Popular configurations include a humbucker in the bridge position with single coils in the middle and neck spots, humbuckers in the bridge and neck with a single in the middle, or a single coil in the bridge position of a Telecaster with a humbucker in the neck position. What is a P90 Pickup? P90s are also a type of single coil pickup, but it’s larger than a Strat-style pickup and its sound is warmer, thicker, and grittier. It’s a great choice for alternative, punk, country and blues, goes great with slide guitar, and is even suited to styles like vintage metal: flip to the neck pickup of a P90-loaded guitar and play Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid” to see what I mean. Because they’re single coils, P90s are prone to the same noise issues - but just like other single coils, various companies also make noiseless versions to counteract this. Honourable Mentions. Hot Rails - Are you after a fatter, warmer sound but stuck with a single coil guitar? Hot Rail pickups are single coil-sized humbucking pickups, and are available in various forms from most pickup manufacturers! Hybrid Pickups - Some more specialist pickups use more than one type of coil, pole or material in their design, allowing you to attain unique sounds and an unusual look too! See the Reverend Reeves Gabrels Signature for a killer example! Custom Pickups - Many manufacturers offer made-to-order pickups, handwound and with materials of your choosing. This often means extra attention to detail and unique tone that you can truly call your own. For info on ordering custom pickups click here. Sustainers - Companies like Fernandes provide pickups that use a different combination of strong magnets and high output to create an infinite sustain effect. Ed O'Brien of Radiohead has a sustainer-type pickup fitted to his signature Strat - it has to be heard to believed! Active vs. Passive. A passive pickup is the most common kind (to the point where people rarely even use the term ‘passive pickup’ unless they’re comparing it to an active pickup: they simply say ‘pickup’). An active pickup is usually wound much weaker than a passive pickup, but its signal is amplified from within the pickup itself, often via an internal 9V battery. There are several advantages: the output is usually more powerful, with greater sustain, tonal consistency and strength of signal regardless of cable/chain length. Active pickups are available in humbucker and single coil versions, and they’re both very quiet. Companies like EMG and Seymour Duncan offer a wealth of active humbucker options that are great for heavier styes of music, notably brandished by some of the biggest names in modern rock and metal. It’s generally very difficult to install active and passive pickups in the same guitar, so usually you’ll find one kind or the other, not both. Active. How they work: Built like a ‘regular’ pickup but additional electronics (powered by a battery) are used to enhance the sound before it leaves the guitar. How they sound: Very low noise; crisp; full; sustaining; ‘hi-fi’; sometimes compressed/squished. The extra power means the sound will sound good no matter how long your cable is. Why you’d want them: For playing in environments that might otherwise cause a lot of interference and noise; for when you’re using a very long cable; or because you like the tone. Especially great for very clean or very distorted sounds. Passive. How they work: All onboard sound-shaping is handled by parts that don’t require additional power. How they sound: Organic, smooth, natural, ‘vintage.’ The sound will grow darker and more muffled when you use (very) long cables. Why you’d want them: If you want a more natural, organic sound. Less processed, plenty of dynamics, responsive to your playing style regardless of what it is! Types of Pickup Magnets. Whether you choose single coil or humbucker, active or passive, the size, type and configuration of magnet/s used in your pickup all have a big influence on the sound that the pickup produces, as does the type of wire: how thick it is, how it’s insulated, how it’s wound around the bobbins, how many turns of wire.  All of these factors influence the sound of a pickup, but one of the easiest to quantify is the magnet type. There are a few magnets that are typically used in pickups, and by knowing a little bit about them you can more easily figure out which one might work for the sound you’re going for. Let's take a look: Alnico III - The 'weakest' of the magnets used in pickups because it has no cobalt. But I guess it’d be confusing to just call it ‘Alni.’ It has the lowest magnetic pull, which means the strings are less influenced by the pickup’s magnetic pull, and this makes it a popular choice for neck pickups. It’s a little more ‘confident’ in its tone compared to Alnico II, although both exhibit a similar ‘softness.’ Many players like to balance an Alnico III neck pickup against an Alnico II in the bridge. Alnico II - Associated with the original PAF humbucker, and it’s still used today in a great number of pickups. The tone is relatively soft and clear, often described as sweet, with a slight rounding off of the more brittle treble frequencies. It can sound very musical and mellifluous with a clean tone, and rather ’singing’ with overdrive. If you’re running a hotter, more distorted tone you may find that Alnico II humbuckers tend to provide excellent note separation for complex chords. Alnico V - These usually sound hotter and more ‘edgy’ than their Alnico II and III counterparts. They’re great at more aggressive tones and in situations where you need a little more ‘unity’ in your chords: notes may knit together a little more tightly when you’re chording through heavy distortion with an Alnico V pickup. It’s also a little warmer in the midrange, which makes it great for lead guitar. Alnico VIII - Possibly the least common magnet type, but many players consider it to be an undiscovered gem. It gives you the power of a ceramic magnet but with the warmth and harmonics of an Alnico V, and is a great way of preserving some of the woodiness of your guitar tone while still hitting your amp with plenty of output. Ceramic - Usually characterised as more ‘modern,’ with a tighter low end, more ‘cut’ and higher output compared to Alnico magnets. You can usually bet that a ceramic-loaded guitar will sound pretty powerful, maybe with a little more bold midrange, especially in the upper mids. Some early ceramic pickups sounded rather flat and pinched, but as pickup companies further explored the capabilities of the magnets they discovered how to really get the most out of the tone. What's A Split Coil / Coil Tap? Many players confuse ‘coil split’ and ‘coil tap,’ using the terms interchangeably, but they’re actually quite different. Coil Split - A coil split involves a humbucker pickup whose wiring lets you essentially switch one coil off, thereby turning it into a single coil. Many players like having the tonal flexibility of having single coil and humbucker tones available in the same guitar. Unless you’re buying an intentionally vintage-styled pickup, most pickups these days come with four conductor wiring as stock. That usually entails four separate wires (a ‘start’ and ‘end’ for each pickup coil), plus a ground wire. You can have your guitar wired so you can turn off one coil via a push-pull switch built into a volume control, or you can use a separate toggle switch, or (depending on the type of switch you’re using) special custom wiring. You will get single coil hum when using single coil mode, but not humbucker mode. Coil Tap - A coil tap is different: it involves a single coil pickup which is made with an extra wire coming off it to give you two different levels of output. The full output and a lower ‘tapped’ output. Again you can use a push-pull knob, a toggle switch or special wiring to engage the tapped mode. The benefit here is that you can have a ‘full-power’ sound for solos and huge riffs, then flip to tapped mode to reduce the output, distortion and volume for quieter moments when you need to drift into the background a bit. Acoustic Guitar Pickups. Amplifying an acoustic guitar can be tricky. Part of what makes an acoustic guitar great – perhaps the most major part, really – is the resonance that occurs within the body itself. But the most popular type of pickup for acoustic guitars is the piezo element, which lives underneath the bridge saddle and translates the vibration of the strings through the bridge into amplifiable sound. But this process gives you a distinctive harsh ‘quack’ tone which you then need to either live with or eliminate. Acoustic guitars often contain different types of preamps that allow you to thicken/smoothen the otherwise synthetic effect of the piezo pickup. Check out our comprehensive guide to Acoustic Guitar Pickups for more info, or click the link below to browse our selection! Shop Acoustic Pickups! Most Popular Brands. These brands are just a selection of what we offer at Andertons Music Co! Click here to view our full range of pickups - you're bound to find something that works for you! Seymour Duncan Pickups . [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711928", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-california-50s-strat-set-ssl-1-1611208-01", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1478-1611208-01_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1478-1611208-01_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1478-1611208-01_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan California 50's Strat Set (SSL-1) £199.00 {"id":"P+1611208-01","name":"Seymour Duncan California 50\u0027s Strat Set (SSL-1)","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611208-01","position":"9","price":"199.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711952", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-shpr-is-prails-set-black-1611303-03b", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1482-1611303-03B_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1482-1611303-03B_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1482-1611303-03B_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan SHPR-IS P.Rails Set Black £209.00 {"id":"P+1611303-03B","name":"Seymour Duncan SHPR-IS P.Rails Set Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611303-03B","position":"12","price":"209.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711894", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-shr-1b-hot-rails-strat-white-hum-canc-1611205-02w", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1468-1611205-02W_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1468-1611205-02W_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1468-1611205-02W_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan SHR-1B Hot Rails Strat White £89.00 {"id":"P+1611205-02W","name":"Seymour Duncan SHR-1B Hot Rails Strat White","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611205-02W","position":"7","price":"89.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711714", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-sh-4-jb-model-blk-1611102-13b", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1439-1611102-13B_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1439-1611102-13B_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1439-1611102-13B_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan SH-4 JB Pickup in Black £95.00 {"id":"P+1611102-13B","name":"Seymour Duncan SH-4 JB Pickup in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611102-13B","position":"2","price":"95.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711732", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-sh-8b-invader-white-1611102-31w", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1447-1611102-31W_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1447-1611102-31W_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1447-1611102-31W_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan SH-8B Invader Bridge in White £99.00 {"id":"P+1611102-31W","name":"Seymour Duncan SH-8B Invader Bridge in White","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611102-31W","position":"3","price":"99.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711848", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-pearly-gates-neck-and-bridge-set-nickel-covers-4-conductor-standard-spacing-1611108-49nc", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/138945-tmp474.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/138945-tmp474.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/138945-tmp474.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates Humbucker Pickup Set £299.00 {"id":"P+1611108-49NC","name":"Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates Humbucker Pickup Set","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611108-49NC","position":"6","price":"299.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711896", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-sthr-1b-hot-rails-lead-for-tele-1611205-03", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1469-1611205-03_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1469-1611205-03_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1469-1611205-03_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan STHR-1B Hot Rails Mini Humbucker for Tele Bridge £99.00 {"id":"P+1611205-03","name":"Seymour Duncan STHR-1B Hot Rails Mini Humbucker for Tele Bridge","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611205-03","position":"8","price":"99.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711694", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-antiquity-ii-adjustable-mini-humbucker-neck-1611014-11", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69998-tmp91D9.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69998-tmp91D9.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69998-tmp91D9.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan Antiquity II Mini Neck Humbucker Pickup in Nickel £169.00 {"id":"P+1611014-11","name":"Seymour Duncan Antiquity II Mini Neck Humbucker Pickup in Nickel","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611014-11","position":"1","price":"169.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711938", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-everything-axe-strat-set-white-1611208-15w", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1479-1611208-15W_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1479-1611208-15W_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1479-1611208-15W_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan Everything Axe Strat Set White £249.00 {"id":"P+1611208-15W","name":"Seymour Duncan Everything Axe Strat Set White","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611208-15W","position":"10","price":"249.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711950", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-phat-cat-in-gold-bridge-1611302-160gc", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/121212-tmpDC26.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/121212-tmpDC26.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/121212-tmpDC26.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan Phat Cat in Gold - Bridge £119.00 {"id":"P+1611302-160GC","name":"Seymour Duncan Phat Cat in Gold - Bridge","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611302-160GC","position":"11","price":"119.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711774", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-nazgul-7-string-bridge-soapbar-1611102-96-asb7", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/55443-tmp4CFD.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/55443-tmp4CFD.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/55443-tmp4CFD.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan Nazgul 7 String Bridge Soapbar Pickup £129.00 {"id":"P+1611102-96-ASB7","name":"Seymour Duncan Nazgul 7 String Bridge Soapbar Pickup","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611102-96-ASB7","position":"4","price":"129.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616711804", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/seymour-duncan-ahb-1s-blackout-h-b-set-black-1611106-32b", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1454-1611106-32B_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1454-1611106-32B_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/1454-1611106-32B_super.jpg" } ] Seymour Duncan AHB-1S BLACKOUT H/B Set in Black £179.00 {"id":"P+1611106-32B","name":"Seymour Duncan AHB-1S BLACKOUT H/B Set in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310723","brand":"Seymour Duncan","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"1611106-32B","position":"5","price":"179.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} Seymour Duncan are one of the all-time biggest names in the pickup and guitar electronics category. You'll see Seymour Duncan pickups adorning countless guitars, and their vast range reflects their experience. These guys specialise in high-output passive humbuckers, but that's only scraping the surface of what they're capable of! Shop Seymour Duncan! Fishman Pickups . [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345618137175", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishman-fluence-multi-voice-pick-up-classic-humbucker-set-nickel-prf-chb-sn2", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/339757-1561040312770.png", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/339757-1561040312770.png", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/339757-1561040312770.png" } ] Fishman Fluence Multi Voice Pickup Classic Humbucker Set in Nickel £229.00 {"id":"P+PRF-CHB-SN2","name":"FISHMAN FLUENCE MULTI VOICE PICK UP - CLASSIC HUMBUCKER SET- NICKEL","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-CHB-SN2","position":"6","price":"229.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616741159", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishman-fluence-multi-voice-single-width-strat-set-in-white-prf-str-wh3fluence", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150758-tmp9B89.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150758-tmp9B89.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150758-tmp9B89.jpg" } ] Fishman Fluence Multi Voice Single Width Strat Set in White £179.00 {"id":"P+PRF-STR-WH3Fluence","name":"Fishman Fluence Multi Voice Single Width Strat Set in White","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-STR-WH3Fluence","position":"4","price":"179.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616741161", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishmanfluence-greg-koch-gristle-tone-signature-tele-set-prf-tel-gk1fluence", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150510-tmp6023.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150510-tmp6023.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150510-tmp6023.jpg" } ] Fishman Fluence Greg Koch Gristle-Tone Signature Tele Pickup Set £299.00 {"id":"P+PRF-TEL-GK1Fluence","name":"Fishman Fluence Greg Koch Gristle-Tone Signature Tele Pickup Set","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-TEL-GK1Fluence","position":"5","price":"299.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345618734175", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishman-fluence-modern-humbucker-set-black-nickel-prf-mhb-sk2", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/272840-1524064615936.png", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/272840-1524064615936.png", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/272840-1524064615936.png" } ] Fishman Fluence Modern Humbucker Set in Black Nickel £179.00 {"id":"P+PRF-MHB-SK2","name":"Fishman Fluence Modern Humbucker Set in Black Nickel","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-MHB-SK2","position":"8","price":"179.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616741149", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishman-fluence-7-string-modern-humbucker-ceramic-black-prf-mh7-cb1", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/139207-tmpFB2A.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/139207-tmpFB2A.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/139207-tmpFB2A.jpg" } ] Fishman Fluence 7 string Modern Humbucker Ceramic - Black £115.00 {"id":"P+PRF-MH7-CB1","name":"Fishman Fluence 7 string Modern Humbucker Ceramic - Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-MH7-CB1","position":"2","price":"115.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345618733675", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishman-fluence-loaded-pickguard-white-3-single-width-pickups-for-strat-prf-str-wpg", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/272857-1524128569909.png", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/272857-1524128569909.png", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/272857-1524128569909.png" } ] Fishman Fluence loaded pickguard white - 3 single width pickups for strat £229.00 {"id":"P+PRF-STR-WPG","name":"Fishman Fluence loaded pickguard white - 3 single width pickups for strat","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-STR-WPG","position":"7","price":"229.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616741145", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/fishman-fluence-devin-townsend-humbucker-set-prf-csb-dt2fluence", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150744-tmpB907.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150744-tmpB907.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/150744-tmpB907.jpg" } ] Fishman Fluence Devin Townsend Humbucker Set £269.00 {"id":"P+PRF-CSB-DT2Fluence","name":"Fishman Fluence Devin Townsend Humbucker Set","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-CSB-DT2Fluence","position":"1","price":"269.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ ] Fishman Fluence Stephen Carpenter 6-String Humbucker Set Price pending {"id":"P+PRF-MS6-SC1Fluence","name":"Fishman Fluence Stephen Carpenter 6-String Humbucker Set","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618310724","brand":"Fishman","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"PRF-MS6-SC1Fluence","position":"3","price":""} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} Fishman are favoured by numerous artists from Blues & Country supremo Greg Koch to Deftones Chugmaster Stephen Carpenter. Fishman offer pickups with a specialist edge, including active 7 / 8-string pickups, and crystal-clear acoustic pickup systems. Shop Fishman! Bare Knuckle Pickups . [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616721590", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/bare-knuckle-6-string-black-hawk-set-open-black-short-leg-50mm-4-conductor-barehawkset", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/11744-BAREHAWKSET_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/11744-BAREHAWKSET_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/11744-BAREHAWKSET_super.jpg" } ] Bare Knuckle Black Hawk Humbucker | Calibrated Set | 6 String £289.00 {"id":"P+BAREHAWKSET","name":"Bare Knuckle Black Hawk Humbucker | Calibrated Set | 6 String","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278692","brand":"Bare Knuckle","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"BAREHAWKSET","position":"5","price":"289.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616721508", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/bare-knuckle-piledriver-tele-set-bare147", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/11715-BARE147_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/11715-BARE147_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/11715-BARE147_super.jpg" } ] Bare Knuckle Piledriver Tele Pickup Set £199.00 {"id":"P+BARE147","name":"Bare Knuckle Piledriver Tele Pickup Set","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278692","brand":"Bare Knuckle","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"BARE147","position":"1","price":"199.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616721526", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/bare-knuckle-6-string-juggernaut-set-tyger-covers-black-bolts-short-leg-50mm-4-conductor-bare258", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69752-tmp2EB1.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69752-tmp2EB1.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69752-tmp2EB1.jpg" } ] Bare Knuckle 6 String Juggernaut Humbucker - Tyger Covers £399.00 {"id":"P+BARE258","name":"Bare Knuckle 6 String Juggernaut Humbucker - Tyger Covers","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278692","brand":"Bare Knuckle","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"BARE258","position":"2","price":"399.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616721560", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/bare-knuckle-7-string-juggernaut-set-black-covers-black-bolts-short-leg-50mm-4-conductor-bare276", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69800-tmp1B48.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69800-tmp1B48.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/69800-tmp1B48.jpg" } ] Bare Knuckle 7 String Juggernaut Humbucker - Calibrated Black £399.00 {"id":"P+BARE276","name":"Bare Knuckle 7 String Juggernaut Humbucker - Calibrated Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278692","brand":"Bare Knuckle","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"BARE276","position":"3","price":"399.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616721592", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/bare-knuckle-6-string-black-hawk-set-chrome-radiators-short-leg-50mm-4-conductor-barehawkset1", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/85082-tmpCC75.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/85082-tmpCC75.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/85082-tmpCC75.jpg" } ] Bare Knuckle Black Hawk Humbucker - Calibrated Covered Set £299.00 {"id":"P+BAREHAWKSET1","name":"Bare Knuckle Black Hawk Humbucker - Calibrated Covered Set","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278692","brand":"Bare Knuckle","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"BAREHAWKSET1","position":"6","price":"299.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616721570", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/bare-knuckle-6-string-abraxas-bridge-open-white-short-leg-53mm-4-conductor-bare282", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/111676-tmpEF7E.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/111676-tmpEF7E.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/111676-tmpEF7E.jpg" } ] Bare Knuckle 6 String Abraxas humbucker Open Bridge - White, £119.00 {"id":"P+BARE282","name":"Bare Knuckle 6 String Abraxas humbucker Open Bridge - White,","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278692","brand":"Bare Knuckle","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"BARE282","position":"4","price":"119.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} Bare Knuckle make a range of single coils, humbuckers, p90s and bass pickups. They even do humbucker sized p90s if you have an HH guitar that needs a bit more clarity. As their name might suggest, these pickups are favoured by rock and metal players for their raw edge, adding some extra organic grit to the high-output formula! Shop Bare Knuckle! DiMarzio Pickups . [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725306", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-air-norton-neck-pickup-black-f-spacing-dp193bk", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12883-DP193BK_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12883-DP193BK_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12883-DP193BK_super.jpg" } ] DiMarzio Air Norton Neck Pickup in Black - F Spacing £69.99 {"id":"P+DP193BK","name":"DiMarzio Air Norton Neck Pickup in Black - F Spacing","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP193BK","position":"5","price":"69.99"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725284", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-air-norton-s-dp180-black-dp180bk", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/85576-tmp65A8.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/85576-tmp65A8.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/85576-tmp65A8.jpg" } ] DiMarzio Air Norton S DP180 Black £77.99 {"id":"P+DP180BK","name":"DiMarzio Air Norton S DP180 Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP180BK","position":"4","price":"77.99"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725202", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-dp102-x2n-humbucker-in-black-dp102bk", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/48718-tmpFC68.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/48718-tmpFC68.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/48718-tmpFC68.jpg" } ] DiMarzio X2N Humbucker in Black £79.00 {"id":"P+DP102BK","name":"DiMarzio X2N Humbucker in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP102BK","position":"1","price":"79.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725382", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-titan-bridge-pickup-gold-covers-w-black-screws-f-spaced-dp259g", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/57959-tmp2F14.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/57959-tmp2F14.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/57959-tmp2F14.jpg" } ] Dimarzio Titan F Spaced Bridge Pickup in Gold (Covered) £99.00 {"id":"P+DP259G","name":"Dimarzio Titan F Spaced Bridge Pickup in Gold (Covered)","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP259G","position":"7","price":"99.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725356", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-crunch-lab-dp228-black-dp228", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12898-DP228_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12898-DP228_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12898-DP228_super.jpg" } ] Dimarzio Crunch Lab Humbucker Pickup DP228 in Black £84.99 {"id":"P+DP228","name":"Dimarzio Crunch Lab Humbucker Pickup DP228 in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP228","position":"6","price":"84.99"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725400", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-dp415-area-58-single-coil-strat-pickup-in-white-dp415", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12908-DP415_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12908-DP415_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12908-DP415_super.jpg" } ] DiMarzio DP415 Area 58 Single Coil Strat Pickup in White £77.99 {"id":"P+DP415","name":"DiMarzio DP415 Area 58 Single Coil Strat Pickup in White","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP415","position":"8","price":"77.99"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725228", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-paf-pro-in-black-standard-string-spacing-dp151bkbk", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12867-DP151BKBK_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12867-DP151BKBK_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12867-DP151BKBK_super.jpg" } ] DiMarzio DP151 PAF Pro Pickup in Black £77.99 {"id":"P+DP151BKBK","name":"DiMarzio DP151 PAF Pro Pickup in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP151BKBK","position":"2","price":"77.99"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616725248", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/dimarzio-dp158bk-evolution-neck-pickup-black-regular-spacing-dp158", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12877-DP158_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12877-DP158_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/12877-DP158_super.jpg" } ] DiMarzio DP158 Evolution Pickup in Black F-Spaced £79.99 {"id":"P+DP158","name":"DiMarzio DP158 Evolution Pickup in Black F-Spaced","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278705","brand":"DiMarzio","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"DP158","position":"3","price":"79.99"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} DiMarzio made a name for themselves by offering one of the first after-market guitar pickups: The Super Distortion. It remains one of their most popular models, but their range is known for high output, incredible sustain and versatile applications! Shop DiMarzio! EMG Pickups . [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616727214", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/emg-66-7-neck-soapbar-7-string-black-emg-66-7", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/55432-tmpD3FD.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/55432-tmpD3FD.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/55432-tmpD3FD.jpg" } ] EMG 66-7 Neck Soapbar Pickup in Black for 7 String Guitars £95.00 {"id":"P+EMG-66-7","name":"EMG 66-7 Neck Soapbar Pickup in Black for 7 String Guitars","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278707","brand":"EMG","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"EMG-66-7","position":"1","price":"95.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616727252", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/emg-dg20-david-gilmour-set-of-pickups-pickguard-emgdg20", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13487-EMGDG20_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13487-EMGDG20_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13487-EMGDG20_super.jpg" } ] EMG DG20 David Gilmour Set of Pickups & Pickguard £249.00 {"id":"P+EMGDG20","name":"EMG DG20 David Gilmour Set of Pickups \u0026 Pickguard","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278707","brand":"EMG","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"EMGDG20","position":"4","price":"249.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616727236", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/emg-81-pickup-in-black-emg81blk", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13469-EMG81BLK_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13469-EMG81BLK_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13469-EMG81BLK_super.jpg" } ] EMG 81 Pickup in Black £79.00 {"id":"P+EMG81BLK","name":"EMG 81 Pickup in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278707","brand":"EMG","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"EMG81BLK","position":"2","price":"79.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616727242", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/emg-85-pickup-in-black-emg85blk", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13478-EMG85BLK_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13478-EMG85BLK_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13478-EMG85BLK_super.jpg" } ] EMG 85 Pickup in Black £79.00 {"id":"P+EMG85BLK","name":"EMG 85 Pickup in Black","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278707","brand":"EMG","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"EMG85BLK","position":"3","price":"79.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616727270", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/emg-slv-steve-lukather-single-coil-for-strats-and-teles-emgslv", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13510-EMGSLV_super.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13510-EMGSLV_super.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/13510-EMGSLV_super.jpg" } ] EMG SLV Steve Lukather Single Coil for Strats and Teles £70.00 {"id":"P+EMGSLV","name":"EMG SLV Steve Lukather Single Coil for Strats and Teles","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278707","brand":"EMG","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"EMGSLV","position":"6","price":"70.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} [ { "catentry_id" : "3074457345616727266", "seo_url" : "https://www.andertons.co.uk/emg-sav-%28single%29-ivory-cover-strat-pickup-active-emgsavivory", "displaySKUContextData" : "", "buyable" : "true", "Attributes" : { }, "ItemImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/41578-tmp5E89.jpg", "ItemImage467" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/41578-tmp5E89.jpg", "ItemThumbnailImage" : "https://andertons-productimages.imgix.net/41578-tmp5E89.jpg" } ] EMG SAV Active Strat Electric Guitar Pickup in Ivory £75.00 {"id":"P+EMGSAVIVORY","name":"EMG SAV Active Strat Electric Guitar Pickup in Ivory","list":"Widget_CatalogEntryRecommendation_3074457345618278707","brand":"EMG","category":"Electric Guitars/Electric Guitar Accessories/Electric Guitar Pickups \u0026 Electronics","variant":"EMGSAVIVORY","position":"5","price":"75.00"} {"category":"","parentCategory":"","lastItem":""} EMG - In the 1980s, guitarists found themselves looking for more and more gain as hard-rock and heavy metal picked up traction. EMG answered the call, pioneering active pickup systems that had a far higher output than anything else on the market. Our range includes their staple sets, such as the classic 81 & 85 Active combo, as well as a range of signature pickups from Steve Lukather, Kerry King and many more! Shop EMG! Shop All Guitar Pickups! How Do I Install New Pickups? For some, even simple guitar maintenance can be daunting! This is your precious instrument - the last thing you want to do is fiddle with it and cause problems! Installing pickups is, on paper at least, relatively straightforward. It usually involves careful removal of strings and pickguard (if you have one), un-mounting and disconnecting your current pickups, a little bit of soldering - and then going back the way you came! Servicing at Andertons Music Co. All of this having been said, I still find the prospect slightly daunting myself at times. Luckily, we offer full servicing and repair options at Andertons Music Co! We aim to have all services turned around within 3-5 days, with a maximum 10-day turnaround at peak times. Single pickup installation starts at £50/hr + parts; our dedicated repair and QC team is incredibly experienced and flexible in what they offer. Check out our Workshop & Repairs page for more information! Jargon Buster. Pole Piece - A metal slug or screw which corresponds to each individual guitar string, focusing the pickup’s magnetic field at the optimal position to do its job. Coil - The basic structural foundation of a pickup: wire wrapped around pole pieces, either as a self-contained unit (in a single coil) or as part of a slightly more complex assembly which shares a single magnet (humbucker). Single coil - a pickup style which provides excellent clarity and translation of the sound of the string, but which is susceptible to certain kinds of background hum. Humbucker - a pickup designed to eliminate the hum of single coils by cancelling it out with an opposite coil. It has more power and a thicker, warmer sound than a single coil. Trembucker - Seymour Duncan’s term for a pickup whose pole pieces are spaced slightly wider apart for a guitar with a Fender or Floyd Rose-style bridge. F-Spaced - DiMarzio’s term for a pickup whose pole pieces are spaced slightly wider apart for a guitar with a Fender or Floyd Rose-style bridge. Coil Split - A type of wiring option which ‘turns off’ one coil of a humbucker to approximate the sound of a single coil. Usually requires a pickup with four conductor wiring. Coil Tap - A type of wiring available with certain kinds of single coil where a ‘tap’ is run off the wire at a certain point, giving you two switchable power levels. Series - When two coils are wired so that the current from one goes through the other. This is how humbuckers are usually wired as standard, or you can wire two single coils in series for a bigger tone. Parallel - A kind of wiring where the current divides and flows through both coils. Offers more ‘jangle’ and detail to the sound. This is how Stratocaster and Telecaster pickups are typically wired, and you can wire a humbucker in parallel mode too for a thinner, more detailed sound. Out-Of-Phase/Phase-switching - When two pickups are built or wired so that they cancel out many of each others’ frequencies, resulting in a hollow, distant, fluid kind of sound. Four-Conductor Hookup Wire - Lead wire (i.e.: from the pickup to the guitar’s electronics) which gives you direct access to each of a humbucker’s coils, so you can perform wiring options like coil split, series/parallel and phase switching. PAF - Stands for "Patent Applied For" - an early humbucker introduced by Gibson in the 50s and served as a the foundation of the iconic Les Paul sound - many modern humbuckers try to recreate this sound (PAF-style pickups) Recently Viewed Items. Recently Viewed Items Guildford Store Open. Mon-Sat 10AM-6PM Sun 11AM-5PM Contact Us On. 01483 456 777 Contact Form Sign up for our newsletter. Useful Info. Click & Collect Delivery Gift Vouchers Guitar Repairs & Servicing Loyalty Points Second Hand FAQ Competitions Customer Services. Account Contact Us Privacy Policy Returns Terms & Conditions Education & B2B Track Order About Andertons. About Us Careers Established 1964 Guildford Store Sitemap Trophy Cabinet Andertons Extra Buyer's Advice. Blog Events Customer Reviews FAQs Finance Guides Videos © Andertons Music Company, St Vincent House, 58-59 Woodbridge Road, Guildford, Surrey GU1 4RF VAT No. 211457986 Quick Info Content
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 189
  • 4
  • guitar
  • 123
  • 4
  • httpsanderton
  • 117
  • 4
  • humbucker
  • 72
  • 4
  • coil
  • 71
  • 4
  • string
  • 58
  • 4
  • black
  • 56
  • 4
  • single
  • 54
  • 4
  • guitar pickup
  • 51
  • 4
  • set
  • 48
  • 4
  • duncan
  • 47
  • 4
  • single coil
  • 43
  • 4
  • pickup u0026
  • 41
  • 4
  • u0026
  • 41
  • 4
  • guitarselectric guitar accessorieselectric
  • 40
  • 4
  • guitar accessorieselectric guitar
  • 40
  • 4
  • accessorieselectric guitar pickup
  • 40
  • 4
  • guitar pickup u0026
  • 40
  • 4
  • displayskucontextdata buyable
  • 40
  • 4
  • guitarselectric guitar
  • 40
  • 4
  • guitar accessorieselectric
  • 40
  • 4
  • accessorieselectric guitar
  • 40
  • 4
  • sound
  • 40
  • 4
  • displayskucontextdata
  • 40
  • 4
  • guitarselectric
  • 40
  • 4
  • accessorieselectric
  • 40
  • 4
  • categoryparentcategorylastitem
  • 40
  • 4
  • displayskucontextdata buyable true
  • 39
  • 4
  • buyable true attribute
  • 39
  • 4
  • true attribute itemimage
  • 39
  • 4
  • attribute itemimage httpsanderton
  • 39
  • 4
  • buyable true
  • 39
  • 4
  • true attribute
  • 39
  • 4
  • attribute itemimage
  • 39
  • 4
  • itemimage httpsanderton
  • 39
  • 4
  • itemimage467 httpsanderton
  • 39
  • 4
  • itemthumbnailimage httpsanderton
  • 39
  • 4
  • catentry_id
  • 39
  • 4
  • seo_url
  • 39
  • 4
  • buyable
  • 39
  • 4
  • true
  • 39
  • 4
  • attribute
  • 39
  • 4
  • itemimage
  • 39
  • 4
  • itemimage467
  • 39
  • 4
  • itemthumbnailimage
  • 39
  • 4
  • categoryparentcategorylastitem catentry_id
  • 34
  • 4
  • knuckle
  • 33
  • 4
  • strat
  • 29
  • 4
  • bridge
  • 27
  • 4
  • fluence
  • 25
  • 4
  • neck
  • 24
  • 4
  • seymour duncan
  • 22
  • 4
  • pickup black
  • 21
  • 4
  • seymour
  • 20
  • 4
  • bare knuckle
  • 13
  • 4
  • httpswwwandertonscoukseymour duncan
  • 13
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukseymour duncan
  • 12
  • 4
  • duncancategoryelectric guitarselectric guitar
  • 12
  • 4
  • string juggernaut
  • 12
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukseymour
  • 12
  • 4
  • duncancategoryelectric guitarselectric
  • 12
  • 4
  • knuckle string
  • 11
  • 4
  • httpswwwandertonscoukbare knuckle
  • 11
  • 4
  • strat set
  • 10
  • 4
  • duncan sh
  • 9
  • 4
  • single width
  • 9
  • 4
  • air norton
  • 9
  • 4
  • set black
  • 9
  • 4
  • fishman fluence
  • 9
  • 4
  • humbucker set
  • 9
  • 4
  • pickup u0026 electronicsvariantprf
  • 8
  • 4
  • leg 50mm
  • 8
  • 4
  • coil humbucker
  • 8
  • 4
  • hot rail
  • 8
  • 4
  • humbucker pickup
  • 8
  • 4
  • u0026 electronicsvariantprf
  • 8
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukdimarzio
  • 8
  • 4
  • neck soapbar
  • 7
  • 4
  • string bridge
  • 7
  • 4
  • acoustic guitar
  • 7
  • 4
  • httpswwwandertonscoukfishman fluence
  • 7
  • 4
  • neck pickup
  • 7
  • 4
  • modern humbucker
  • 7
  • 4
  • single coil humbucker
  • 6
  • 4
  • 1b hot rail
  • 6
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukfishman fluence
  • 6
  • 4
  • fluence multi voice
  • 6
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukbare knuckle
  • 6
  • 4
  • knucklecategoryelectric guitarselectric guitar
  • 6
  • 4
  • pole piece
  • 6
  • 4
  • coil strat
  • 6
  • 4
  • coil tap
  • 6
  • 4
  • 1b hot
  • 6
  • 4
  • conductor
  • 6
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukfishman
  • 6
  • 4
  • fluence multi
  • 6
  • 4
  • multi voice
  • 6
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukbare
  • 6
  • 4
  • black hawk
  • 6
  • 4
  • humbucker calibrated
  • 6
  • 4
  • knucklecategoryelectric guitarselectric
  • 6
  • 4
  • seo_url httpswwwandertonscoukemg
  • 6
  • 4
  • single coil pickup
  • 5
  • 4
  • single coil strat
  • 5
  • 4
  • strat pickup
  • 5
  • 4
  • coil pickup
  • 5
  • 4
  • alnico ii
  • 5
  • 4
  • coil split
  • 5
  • 4
  • pickup catentry_id
  • 5
  • 4
  • white
  • 5
  • 4
  • short leg
  • 5
  • 4
  • spaced
  • 5
  • 4
  • short leg 50mm
  • 4
  • 4
  • 50mm conductor
  • 4
  • 4
  • knuckle black hawk
  • 4
  • 4
  • black hawk humbucker
  • 4
  • 4
  • hawk humbucker calibrated
  • 4
  • 4
  • string juggernaut humbucker
  • 4
  • 4
  • neck pickup black
  • 4
  • 4
  • blacklistwidget_catalogentryrecommendation_3074457345618278705branddimarziocategoryelectric guitarselectric guitar
  • 4
  • 4
  • paf pro
  • 4
  • 4
  • gilmour set
  • 4
  • 4
  • 81 pickup
  • 4
  • 4
  • 85 pickup
  • 4
  • 4
  • type pickup
  • 4
  • 4
  • high output
  • 4
  • 4
  • passive pickup
  • 4
  • 4
  • active pickup
  • 4
  • 4
  • anderton music
  • 4
  • 4
  • greg koch
  • 4
  • 4
  • tele pickup
  • 4
  • 4
  • 50mm
  • 4
  • 4
  • knuckle black
  • 4
  • 4
  • hawk humbucker
  • 4
  • 4
  • juggernaut humbucker
  • 4
  • 4
  • blacklistwidget_catalogentryrecommendation_3074457345618278705branddimarziocategoryelectric guitarselectric
  • 4
  • 4
  • 66
  • 4
  • 4
  • steve lukather
  • 4
  • 4
  • duncan ahb 1
  • 3
  • 4
  • ahb 1 blackout
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet1454 1611106
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet1454 1611106 32b_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • classic humbucker set
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet339757 1561040312770png
  • 3
  • 4
  • multi voice single
  • 3
  • 4
  • voice single width
  • 3
  • 4
  • single width strat
  • 3
  • 4
  • width strat set
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet150758 tmp9b89jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • greg koch gristle
  • 3
  • 4
  • koch gristle tone
  • 3
  • 4
  • gristle tone signature
  • 3
  • 4
  • tone signature tele
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet150510 tmp6023jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • setlistwidget_catalogentryrecommendation_3074457345618310724brandfishmancategoryelectric guitarselectric guitar
  • 3
  • 4
  • fluence modern humbucker
  • 3
  • 4
  • modern humbucker set
  • 3
  • 4
  • humbucker set black
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet272840 1524064615936png
  • 3
  • 4
  • fluence string
  • 3
  • 4
  • string modern
  • 3
  • 4
  • string modern humbucker
  • 3
  • 4
  • modern humbucker ceramic
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet139207 tmpfb2ajpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • fluence loaded pickguard
  • 3
  • 4
  • loaded pickguard white
  • 3
  • 4
  • pickguard white
  • 3
  • 4
  • white single
  • 3
  • 4
  • single width pickup
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet272857 1524128569909png
  • 3
  • 4
  • fluence devin townsend
  • 3
  • 4
  • devin townsend humbucker
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet150744 tmpb907jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • string black
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet11744 barehawkset_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • knuckle piledriver tele
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet11715 bare147_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet69752 tmp2eb1jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet69800 tmp1b48jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet85082 tmpcc75jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • string abraxa
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet111676 tmpef7ejpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • air norton neck
  • 3
  • 4
  • norton neck pickup
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12883 dp193bk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • norton dp180
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet85576 tmp65a8jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet48718 tmpfc68jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • bridge pickup gold
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet57959 tmp2f14jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12898 dp228_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • dp415 area 58
  • 3
  • 4
  • area 58 single
  • 3
  • 4
  • 58 single coil
  • 3
  • 4
  • coil strat pickup
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12908 dp415_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12867 dp151bkbk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12877 dp158_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • 66 neck
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet55432 tmpd3fdjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • dg20 david gilmour
  • 3
  • 4
  • david gilmour set
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13487 emgdg20_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13469 emg81blk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13478 emg85blk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • slv steve lukather
  • 3
  • 4
  • steve lukather single
  • 3
  • 4
  • lukather single coil
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13510 emgslv_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet41578 tmp5e89jpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12867
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet12867 dp151bkbk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet12877
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet12877 dp158_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet55432
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet55432 tmpd3fdjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • dg20 david
  • 3
  • 4
  • david gilmour
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13487
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet13487 emgdg20_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13469
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet13469 emg81blk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13478
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet13478 emg85blk_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • slv steve
  • 3
  • 4
  • lukather single
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet13510
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet13510 emgslv_superjpg
  • 3
  • 4
  • httpsanderton productimagesimgixnet41578
  • 3
  • 4
  • productimagesimgixnet41578 tmp5e89jpg
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position5
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 6
TitleGuitar 101: What Is a Guitar Pickup? Learn About the ...
Urlhttps://www.masterclass.com/articles/guitar-101-what-is-a-guitar-pickup-learn-about-the-different-types-of-electric-guitar-pickups
DescriptionElectric guitar pickups are roughly divided into two categories: single-coil pickups and double-coil pickups (or humbuckers). Both these pickup ...
Date9 Sept 2021
Organic Position6
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 7
Title16 Different Types of Guitar Pickups Explained (Acoustic, Electric & Bass)
Urlhttps://www.guitarlobby.com/types-of-guitar-pickups/
DescriptionIn this article, we explain the different types of guitar pickups. Whether you want to know about electric guitar, acoustic guitar, or bass pickups this guide will teach you everything you want to know
Date
Organic Position7
H1The 16 Different Types of Guitar Pickups Explained (Acoustic, Electric, and Bass)
H2Here Are the Different Types of Guitar Pickups
H31. Single Coil Pickups (Electric Guitar)
2. Humbucker Pickups (Electric Guitar)
3. Mini Humbuckers (Electric Guitar)
4. Active Pickups (Electric Guitar)
5. P90 Pickups (Electric Guitar)
6. Piezo/Transducer Pickups (Acoustic Guitar)
7. Magnetic Pickups (Acoustic Guitar)
8. In-Body/Internal Microphones (Acoustic Guitar)
9. P-style (Bass Guitar)
10. J-style (Bass Guitar)
11. Noise-canceling single coils (Bass Guitar)
12. Humbuckers or Dual Coils (Bass Guitar)
13. Soapbar pickups (Bass Guitar)
14. Active pickups (Bass Guitar)
15. Bass Piezo pickups (Bass Guitar)
16. Bass Optical Pickups (Bass Guitar)
H2WithAnchorsHere Are the Different Types of Guitar Pickups
BodyThe 16 Different Types of Guitar Pickups Explained (Acoustic, Electric, and Bass) Christopher D. SchiebelDecember 19, 2021April 23, 2021 In this article, we are going to take a look at one of the most important features of a guitar – pickups. Pickups affect your tone, your guitar volume, and ultimately factors in heavily to what your guitar will sound like coming out of the guitar amplifier. Various types of magnets, winding methods, and design characteristics can drastically change the tone of the guitar. Therefore, a critical step for guitarists to nail down the tone they are looking for is to have a good grasp of how pickups function and the design characteristics of a particular pickup. We are going to take a look at everything from single coil pickups, humbuckers, P90s, and even acoustic guitar as well as bass guitar pickups. Now let’s take an in-depth look at the types of guitar pickups and how to choose the right ones for you. For those of you who are beginner guitarists, I think you’ll find the video below useful as well. Here Are the Different Types of Guitar Pickups. In this section, we’ll discuss the different types of electric guitar pickups, acoustic guitar pickups, and bass guitar pickups. 1. Single Coil Pickups (Electric Guitar). Single coil pickups are one of the most common types of pickups you can find, and it literally has single coil magnets on the pickup. Single coil pickups are also the first electric pickups to be invented, and it’s been loved and used by guitar players around the world since the 1930s. Single coil pickups are known for their sharp, biting tone that we heard on countless blues, RnB, and rock classics that we grew up with. Compared to P90s or humbuckers, single coil pickups are much clearer and more focused. Because of this, single coils are the most widely used for genres like funk, surf, soul, and country. And by combining it with a little bit of overdrive, it’s a great choice for genres like blues and rock. One downside of single coil pickups might be that it has more feedback than humbucker pickups. Especially with some gain in your guitar tone, you’re bound to run into quite a bit of feedback with a single coil pickup. So that’s one of the reasons why single coil pickups aren’t usually the first pick when it comes to hardcore genres like metal or hard rock. Single coil pickups are also very affordable to buy, so it’s really easy to try out different models and brands. Now let’s look into the history of the single coil pickups. 2. Humbucker Pickups (Electric Guitar). Humbuckers were revolutionary for pickups; they use two magnet coils wound in reverse to one another, which cancel out the hums and the noise resulting from pickup feedback signals. Humbuckers produce a thicker, warmer, and bigger output relative to single coil pickups. Because of the warmer tone, humbuckers are the staple pickup to jazz music and are also beloved by blues and rock guitarists. 3. Mini Humbuckers (Electric Guitar). A mini humbucker is a type of humbucker that was created by Epiphone. It’s basically a Gibson PAF humbucker, but the size is noticeably narrower and therefore processes a smaller amount of signal compared to humbuckers. While the PAF humbuckers produce a thick, warm, and big sound, the tone from mini humbuckers can be described as a bright and clear tone. The size is somewhere between a single coil and a humbucker, and they are often used for jazz guitars. You can find these pickups on many Gibson and Epiphone guitars like Gibson Firebird guitars. Nowadays, you can find major pickup companies like EMG, Seymour Duncan, DiMarzio producing their own line of mini humbuckers. Popular Related Article: 21 Of Our Favorite Humbucker Pickups 4. Active Pickups (Electric Guitar). Active Pickups are types of pickup that will boost the signal of the guitar using an “active” preamp circuit, an active circuit meaning it needs an exterior power source. Typically a 9V battery will be used to power active pickups. By using batteries, the overall amount of output will also be increased and you can also boost the frequencies like treble, or bass as well. This is especially good for acoustic-electric guitars and performing with acoustic guitars on stage because then you can control the possible feedback and make all the adjustments that you need to make. With electric guitars, the boosted signal and the powerful output can also be super imperative when it comes to getting that hard rock or metal tone. This is why you will usually see active pickups on most of the rock, metal, and even blues guitars. Active pickups produced by companies like Seymour Duncan or EMG will pack so much more output and boost the signal by a lot more than your passive pickups. 5. P90 Pickups (Electric Guitar). P90 pickups are essentially single coil pickups, but oftentimes they are described as pickups that are somewhere in between single coils and humbuckers. Engineering-wise, they are basically a type of single coil pickups because they also use single coil magnets. But due to things like wider bobbins and bigger pickup size makes the P90 look very different from a single coil pickup. The wider size and different parts result in a very contrasting tone from the single coil or humbuckers. The output is louder than single coils, but not as loud as humbuckers. Also, the tone from the P90 is generally thicker and has more depth than single coil pickups. P90s are also pretty versatile and cover everything from blues, rock, punk rock to jazz. But humbuckers are more suitable for hard rock and metal. You can expect to find P90 pickups on a lot of Gibson instruments like the Les Paul or SG. The placement of P90 is unique, it usually doesn’t fit in single coil pickup holes, but rather fits in humbucker pickup holes. And some P90s sometimes even look like humbuckers and are placed in humbucker casing. P90 pickups have had a lot of changes since their early designs, but they are still one of the most types of pickups after Gibson-style humbuckers and Fender single-coil pickups. Popular Related Article: Comparing Single Coil vs Humbucker vs P90 Style Pickups 6. Piezo/Transducer Pickups (Acoustic Guitar). Piezo pickups work differently from all the other magnetic pickups that we talked about. Instead of magnets picking up the electric signals that are translated and sent out to the amplifiers, the piezo pickups are located inside the bridge of the guitar and picks up the actual vibrations of the string and guitar. Therefore, it’s common to see these pickups being on acoustic instruments like nylon string guitars. Nowadays, you might also see them on electric guitars, and it’s used to create acoustic guitar sound from an electric guitar. The piezo pickup actually measures the pressure of the guitar vibrations, which creates an electrical current. Piezo pickups take the unfiltered, actual sound of the guitar whether it’s acoustic, nylon-string, or electric. The resulting tone is often on the bright side, and you get a very clear and articulate tone. Another advantage of the piezo pickup might be that there is no electrical hum because piezo-electric pickups don’t use any magnets. 7. Magnetic Pickups (Acoustic Guitar). These are essentially the same type of pickups as magnetic pickups for electric guitar. The magnetic soundhole pickup for acoustic guitar works with insulated copper wire around a magnet in the middle. The magnetic flux picks up the vibration frequency from the steel strings and transfers it to the amplifier or PA system. The sound characteristics are similar to magnetic pickups on electric guitars, and it has responsive and quite warm sound that is easy to use for playing through acoustic guitar amplifiers and recording purposes. Magnetic pickups on acoustic guitars do a great job of picking up the warm sound quality from acoustic pickups, and they are relatively easy to install, compared to other types of acoustic guitar pickups. For installing, all you need to do is just fit the magnetic pickup into the guitar soundhole and turn a couple of screws to put it in place. But what the magnetic pickups lack, are their ability to capture the depth and the resonance from the acoustic guitar body. Pickups like piezo/transducer pickups might capture more depth and resonances from inside the guitar body, and unfortunately, the magnetic pickups for acoustic guitars don’t have the ability to capture that much depth from the guitar body. Another disadvantage of magnets pickups on acoustic pickups is that they are more prone to receiving feedback from the acoustic guitar. Especially when you turn up the volume or use a lot of gain, you will need to really watch out for feedback and make sure you have it under control. Plus, these pickups won’t work at all with nylon-string guitars. 8. In-Body/Internal Microphones (Acoustic Guitar). Internal microphones work by placing a small microphone inside the soundhole, and just like a regular microphone, it picks up the vibrations from inside the guitar. Compared to magnetic pickups, these small microphones will pick up more of the natural tone and acoustic qualities of the acoustic instrument. It will pick up things like percussive playing on your acoustic guitar body, and you’ll get a more of the woody quality from the microphone out to the amps or speakers. Out of the three acoustic guitar pickup systems we looked at, the internal microphones will best represent the natural acoustic tone of your guitar. But the downside is that you might experience more feedback from the pickup and that’s why the microphone placement is extremely crucial when it comes to internal microphones. Therefore, the installation will be quite tricky, and you will either already have a working knowledge of Piezo pickup installation or use the help of a guitar technician or a repair center. Bass Guitar Pickups The magnetic pickups you’ll encounter will come in 3 flavors: “split-coil” pickups, made famous by the Fender Precision Bass, “single-coils” featured on the Fender Jazz Bass, and “humbuckers” or “dual-coils” as are found on MusicMan Basses. 9. P-style (Bass Guitar). The first magnetic pickup ever made for a production model bass was a single-coil pickup on the 1951 Precision Bass made by Fender. It had the basic single-coil design that endures to this day: four magnets ( one for each string) with exposed pole-pieces wrapped in a copper-wire coil. Fender later changed the single-coil with the now legendary “split-coil” P-bass pickup. The P-style pickup featured a few improvements over the original. They took a standard single-coil pickup and split it into two halves, basically creating two pickups that they wired together, performing as a single unit. They also added more coil wraps, increasing the size of the pickup. This resulted in a pickup with higher output and reduced noise, as single-coils were prone to pick up noise from electromagnetic sources such as amps, radios, stage lights, and so on. The P-style pickup was also the first “humbucking” pickup, although its two single-coil halves were offset: half of the pickup was used for the E and A strings, with the other half for the D and G strings. The result was a bass guitar with a buttery smooth low-end and a lot of midrange growl, which defined the early rock ‘n roll bass sound. The only drawback of the P-style pickup was its lack of high-end sparkle, which Fender addressed later on with the Jazz Bass and its classic two single-coil layout. The P-style form-factor remains mostly unchanged, but there are some variations to the classic design. In addition to the standard split-coil, you’ll also encounter fully enclosed P-style pickups. This design is less inclined to degrade over time as the coils are sealed in resin. Popular Related Article: 10 Incredible P Bass Pickups You Need To Check Out 10. J-style (Bass Guitar). In 1960 Fender released the Jazz Bass as the “premium” model in their lineup. It borrowed many design elements from the Jazzmaster guitar. The Jazz Bass featured two single-coil pickups (very similar to the original 1951 P-Bass pickup), each pickup consisting of 8 magnets (two magnets with exposed pole pieces for every string), but again enlarged for higher output, one positioned near the bridge, and the second one placed towards the neck. The neck pickup is defined by a thick and airy tone while the bridge pickup sounds tight and punchy. They still picked up a lot of hum when the volumes were not set to the same levels. Single-coils are usually long and slender, each unit covering all four strings on the bass guitar, and are often described as sounding clear and bright in comparison with split-coil pickups. As the name suggests, this pickup style is preferred by jazz bassists but is not limited to that style of music (there are a lot of metal and rock bass players using Fender Jazz Basses or J-style pickups in their instruments of choice). The J-style single-coils also come in the resin-coated, fully enclosed variety without the exposed pole pieces, eliminating the issues regarding humidity leading to the corrosion of the coils that will degrade the pickup and alter its tone. Popular Related Article: 15 Jazz Bass Pickups You Need To Know About 11. Noise-canceling single coils (Bass Guitar). Single-coil pickups will pick up hum or electromagnetic interference from your environment, be it from fluorescent lighting sources, tube amps, radios, or computer monitors. To address this issue, manufacturers created the noiseless single-coil pickup. These are not single-coils in the true sense, as they are more closely related to “humbuckers” having two coils per pickup. But while in a true humbucking pickup the coils are positioned side-by-side, with the noiseless variety the two single coils are stacked on top of each other and have different windings or copper wire gauges, separated by a metal plate. They are in essence humbuckers because they buck the hum, but from a tonal standpoint, they sit somewhere between humbuckers and single-coils. Purists and fans of the single-coils sound still prefer true single-coils as they are brighter and punchier. Their name also creates some confusion because they are single-coils only regarding their form factor. 12. Humbuckers or Dual Coils (Bass Guitar). Humbucking pickups for bass guitars were introduced to “buck the hum” of the classic single-coils of the 60’s jazz basses. They were initially designed in the Gibson guitar factory by wiring two single-coils together, side-by-side, and out of phase with each other. This cancels out the electromagnetic interference single-coil pickups are known for while producing a harmonically rich sound with lots of low end. Because they are in essence two glued-together single-coils, they have a much higher output and as a result, are louder and have more gain than any other type of magnetic pickup. When compared to the P-style pickup (with which they are more closely related to, sonically), they have a tighter low end and an even more pronounced midrange. This is why Music Man basses are so well regarded in the rock scene. As with the P-style pickup (also a humbucker), the highs are attenuated because of the basic design of the pickup. 13. Soapbar pickups (Bass Guitar). This term only describes the enclosure for the pickup (they look like black soap bars), and they are usually humbuckers although this form factor is sometimes used for “noiseless single-coils” (still technically a humbucker pickup) or single-coils. 14. Active pickups (Bass Guitar). Active pickups are a variety of magnetic pickup that features a powered preamp in its design. The preamp usually runs on a 9V battery (sometimes two) and is used to drive your signal consistently through to your amp. This is not the same as an active preamp circuit in your bass that lets you EQ your sound. Though you will find them most often paired with an active preamp. Active pickups just boost your signal for more consistency but at the cost of removing some of the dynamics in your playing. This can be useful if you play music genres where your volume stays more or less at the same level and doesn’t require as much nuance in your tone, as with metal or punk. 15. Bass Piezo pickups (Bass Guitar). In contrast to a magnetic pickup that senses the changes in the magnetic field while the strings vibrate above it, a Piezo pickup senses the vibrations of the instrument itself and converts this vibration into an electrical signal, making it the main type of pickup employed when amplifying acoustic instruments. Since piezo pickups don’t rely on magnets, they can be used with non-ferromagnetic strings, such as nylon strings. Usually, piezo pickups are either placed directly under the bridge of the instrument or, in the case of some electric bass guitars, inside of the bridge, each string having its own piezo pickup. A piezo pickup is very bright sounding and has a much faster attack when compared to magnetic pickups. Bass players have found that pairing the fast attack and brightness of a piezo with the pronounced low end and midrange of a magnetic pickup produces great-sounding tones while vastly improving the versatility of the instrument. A piezo pickup on bass needs the right kind of active preamp to avoid sounding brittle and thin and also to dial in the right mix between the magnetic and piezo pickups. 16. Bass Optical Pickups (Bass Guitar). Optical pickups have been around for almost 50 years but their use as bass pickups has not been very popular. Only in recent years have professionals started to consider them as worthwhile alternatives or complements to magnetic pickups. Optical pickups use light to detect the string vibrations. A LED is pointed at each string and a light-sensitive detector measures the refracted light as the string vibrates and converts the measured vibrations into an electrical current sending it down your signal path to be amplified. This makes them very accurate and leads to some major improvements when compared to magnetic pickups. Optical pickups are immune to outside interference and don’t produce any hum or noise. They have a broader frequency range at any volume level with a completely flat response curve as there is nothing but light being refracted off of the string. An optical pickup will also have increased sustain when directly compared to a magnetic pickup, as magnetic pickups slightly pull on the string due to their magnetic field, and as a consequence, lowering the amount of sustain. The design of the optical pickup makes it very good when a clean signal is desired but they are not as good with effects such as distortion. Many bass players still prefer the “dirtier” sound of a traditional magnetic pickup over the optical kind, due to its perceived lack of character and the slight drawback when using effects. Common Questions What Exactly is a Guitar Pickup? Before we go in-depth into the subject of pickups, let’s first establish a solid foundation on what exactly a pickup is and what it’s not. Pickups are electronic devices that are composed of magnets and wires, and the magnets essentially pick up the vibrations from the strings of electric guitar. The vibrations that are picked up through insulated copper wire coils and magnets are transferred to the amplifier, which is what you hear when you play a note on an electric guitar using a guitar amplifier. What is the Difference Between Passive Pickups and Active Pickups? Pickups in general can be classified into two types of pickups, active and passive pickups. Both are very different in their operating methods, and both have their own unique traits that all guitar players should know about. The original and the most common type of pickups are passive pickups, and you can think of everything from single coil pickups to P90 pickups. The passive pickups don’t necessarily boost or add anything to the signal, and they sort of pick up the natural tone of the instrument. The tone from passive pickups tends to be warm, but the downside is that the tone is not as powerful as active pickups when it comes to high-gain or high-distortion type situations. What’s the Difference Between Coil Split and Coil Tap? Coil split and coil tap are two common features you can find on modern guitar pickups. These two terms are often confused a lot these days, and these two terms don’t mean the same thing. Coil split specifically applies to humbuckers and humbuckers only. Humbuckers come with two coils of wire that cancels out the unwanted noise and hum, and the two coils of wire also result in larger output. When the coil split function is enabled, the connection between the two coils is broken, and only one of the two coils of wire is enabled. And that’s precisely why with coil split function, you can get a single coil pickup tone out of a humbucker. This gives guitarists a huge selection of tones to choose from, and the possibilities of different tones multiply. In most cases, coil split is enabled by clicking on the tone knob of the guitar. Coil tap function refers to single coil pickups exclusively. Just like coil splitting, coil tap function also decreases the overall output of the pickup. When coil tapping is enabled, the signal is taken from somewhere within the coil, rather than the very end of the coil. This leads to smaller signals and you get a weaker output. Coil tapping is definitely not as popular as coil splitting amongst guitar players, but they are still very useful for high-output single coil pickups. One example use would be by using coil tapping on a modern high-output single coil pickup, you can make the single coil pickup sound more like a vintage Fender single coil by lowering the output. Christopher D. SchiebelMy name is Chris and I’ve had a passion for music and guitars for as long as I can remember. I started this website with some of my friends who are musicians, music teachers, gear heads, and music enthusiasts so we could provide high-quality guitar and music-related content. I’ve been playing guitar since I was 13 years old and am an avid collector. Amps, pedals, guitars, bass, drums, microphones, studio, and recording gear, I love it all. I was born and raised in Western Pennsylvania. My background is in Electrical Engineering, earning a Bachelor’s degree from Youngstown State University. With my engineering experience, I’ve developed as a designer of guitar amplifiers and effects. A true passion of mine, I’ve designed, built, and repaired a wide range of guitar amps and electronics. Here at the Guitar Lobby, our aim is to share our passion for Music and gear with the rest of the music community.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 185
  • 7
  • coil
  • 95
  • 7
  • guitar
  • 88
  • 7
  • single
  • 62
  • 7
  • single coil
  • 61
  • 7
  • bass
  • 48
  • 7
  • humbucker
  • 39
  • 7
  • coil pickup
  • 34
  • 7
  • single coil pickup
  • 30
  • 7
  • style
  • 27
  • 7
  • magnetic
  • 27
  • 7
  • acoustic
  • 26
  • 7
  • tone
  • 26
  • 7
  • string
  • 23
  • 7
  • magnetic pickup
  • 22
  • 7
  • electric
  • 20
  • 7
  • magnet
  • 18
  • 7
  • active
  • 17
  • 7
  • type
  • 17
  • 7
  • style pickup
  • 16
  • 7
  • guitar pickup
  • 16
  • 7
  • acoustic guitar
  • 16
  • 7
  • piezo
  • 16
  • 7
  • bass guitar
  • 15
  • 7
  • electric guitar
  • 14
  • 7
  • piezo pickup
  • 14
  • 7
  • p90
  • 14
  • 7
  • sound
  • 14
  • 7
  • signal
  • 14
  • 7
  • output
  • 14
  • 7
  • rock
  • 13
  • 7
  • jazz
  • 12
  • 7
  • active pickup
  • 11
  • 7
  • split
  • 11
  • 7
  • pickup single
  • 10
  • 7
  • design
  • 10
  • 7
  • pick
  • 10
  • 7
  • music
  • 10
  • 7
  • vibration
  • 10
  • 7
  • microphone
  • 10
  • 7
  • pickup single coil
  • 9
  • 7
  • bass pickup
  • 9
  • 7
  • jazz bass
  • 9
  • 7
  • instrument
  • 9
  • 7
  • fender
  • 9
  • 7
  • pickup acoustic
  • 8
  • 7
  • pickup bass
  • 8
  • 7
  • humbucker pickup
  • 7
  • 7
  • passive pickup
  • 7
  • 7
  • split coil
  • 7
  • 7
  • pickup electric
  • 7
  • 7
  • type pickup
  • 7
  • 7
  • pickup acoustic guitar
  • 6
  • 7
  • pickup bass guitar
  • 6
  • 7
  • pickup electric guitar
  • 6
  • 7
  • p90 pickup
  • 6
  • 7
  • optical pickup
  • 6
  • 7
  • coil split
  • 6
  • 7
  • mini humbucker
  • 5
  • 7
  • single coil humbucker
  • 4
  • 7
  • popular related article
  • 4
  • 7
  • compared magnetic pickup
  • 4
  • 7
  • string guitar
  • 4
  • 7
  • pickup pickup
  • 4
  • 7
  • guitar amplifier
  • 4
  • 7
  • coil humbucker
  • 4
  • 7
  • popular related
  • 4
  • 7
  • related article
  • 4
  • 7
  • guitar active
  • 4
  • 7
  • active preamp
  • 4
  • 7
  • nylon string
  • 4
  • 7
  • copper wire
  • 4
  • 7
  • guitar body
  • 4
  • 7
  • compared magnetic
  • 4
  • 7
  • low end
  • 4
  • 7
  • side
  • 4
  • 7
  • coil tap
  • 4
  • 7
  • type guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 7
  • bass guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 7
  • acoustic guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 7
  • guitar active pickup
  • 3
  • 7
  • coil pickup single
  • 3
  • 7
  • magnetic pickup acoustic
  • 3
  • 7
  • pickup magnetic pickup
  • 3
  • 7
  • exposed pole piece
  • 3
  • 7
  • magnetic pickup optical
  • 3
  • 7
  • type guitar
  • 3
  • 7
  • tone guitar
  • 3
  • 7
  • coil magnet
  • 3
  • 7
  • guitar player
  • 3
  • 7
  • blue rock
  • 3
  • 7
  • hard rock
  • 3
  • 7
  • boost signal
  • 3
  • 7
  • rock metal
  • 3
  • 7
  • humbucker humbucker
  • 3
  • 7
  • acoustic instrument
  • 3
  • 7
  • pickup magnetic
  • 3
  • 7
  • pick vibration
  • 3
  • 7
  • capture depth
  • 3
  • 7
  • internal microphone
  • 3
  • 7
  • exposed pole
  • 3
  • 7
  • pole piece
  • 3
  • 7
  • higher output
  • 3
  • 7
  • humbucking pickup
  • 3
  • 7
  • form factor
  • 3
  • 7
  • bass player
  • 3
  • 7
  • pickup optical
  • 3
  • 7
  • coil wire
  • 3
  • 7
  • coil tapping
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
TitleHow to select guitar pickups and the key differences between them - Mixdown Magazine
Urlhttps://mixdownmag.com.au/features/sound-advice-how-to-select-guitar-pickups/
Description
Date23 Jun 2021
Organic Position8
H1How to select guitar pickups and the key differences between them
H2Demystifying one of the more ambiguous topics in guitars
H3What this article covers:
Sound is vibration
Active and passive
The history
The Sound
Examples
Let’s compare
Names you can trust
The Journey: Folamour details his process on recording and producing new album
Of Mice & Men’s Aaron Pauley on their Zoom rooms, Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their latest album
Five Sennheiser products to buy the musician in your life these holidays
The 10 most iconic StingRay bass players of all time
The Fender Bass VI's story in five iconic tracks
In focus: Pinstripe Pedals
A brief history of The Beatles on film
H2WithAnchorsDemystifying one of the more ambiguous topics in guitars
BodyHow to select guitar pickups and the key differences between them Demystifying one of the more ambiguous topics in guitars. If you’re a guitarist you will know that the choice of pickup is one of the most important designators of your sound. But how much do you really know about them? What is a single coil versus a humbucker? How are they made and what sound do they make? In this article, we’ll go in-depth with this and help you understand the difference. What this article covers:. The difference between active and passive pickups. A brief history of pickups. What different style pickups sound like with examples. Read all the latest features, columns and more here. Sound is vibration. Put simply, a pickup uses a magnet and wound coils of copper wire to create a magnetic field surrounding the guitar strings. The movement of the strings then disturbs the magnetic field, fluctuating the current that runs through the wire coils to the guitar’s output. Active and passive. Passive pickups work as described above, whereas an active pickup is powered by a battery attached to the guitar. This is designed to provide a higher output and help maintain a generally balanced frequency spectrum. For this reason active pickups are often preferred by metal guitarists who require high gain as well as a consistent tone, as you are able to really push your amp without losing clarity. However, this also means that the dynamics of your playing will be less emphasised, so many guitarists prefer the more natural sound of passive pickups. The history. The single coil pickup was first developed in the 1930s by George D. Beauchamp, one of the founders of the National Stringed Instrument Corporation. He did this using a coil of wire, two horseshoe magnets and the motor from his own washing machine. The latter component was soon swapped for one from a sewing machine. This was then placed in a new guitar he dubbed ‘The Frying Pan’, effectively becoming the first electric guitar, and tapped his friend Adolph Rickenbacker to help produce these new instruments. Single coils were widely popularised in 1950 when Fender released their Esquire guitar, which was followed by a two-pickup version called the Telecaster in ’52. Two years later saw the introduction of a three-pickup guitar named the Stratocaster One of the main problems with single coil pickups are that they can transmit a fairly audible amount of electrical hum and buzz, which lead to the creation of the humbucker pickup. Invented in 1955 by an engineer at Gibson named Seth Lover, the humbucker uses two coils that are wired out of phase with one another to ‘buck the hum’. They are still largely associated with Gibson, and are used widely in the company’s range, including the iconic Les Paul model. However Gibson also produce single coils, with the P-90 being the most ubiquitous. The P-90 was developed in 1946 but lost favour once the humbucker was released and remained relegated to their budget lines. However, several of these were later embraced for their distinctive, harsher sound, in particular by several key members of the punk movement in the late 1970s, such The New York Doll’s Johnny Thunders, The Sex Pistols’s Steve Jones and Mick Jones from The Clash. Although humbuckers and single coils are by far the two most popular types, the two are occasionally used together, such as the H-S-S configuration sometimes found in Stratocasters, which uses a humbucker in the bridge position. The Sound. Single coil pickups have a bright and cutting sound, while Telecaster style pickups are characterised by their punchy mids, the combination resulting in a ‘twangy’ sound. Consequently they are very popular for use in country and surf music. The pickups used in Stratocaster style guitars have a broader range than the Teles, resulting a comparatively warmer, more rounded tone that still maintains quite bright and punchy high to high-mid frequencies. The overall thin sound of single coil pickups mean that they are less favoured for heavy music, although the ‘bite’ that is easily achievable with these pickups has often been exploited by punk bands, and Kurt Cobain’s use of a Fender Jaguar helped to ensure that single coils were embraced by the grunge movement. The thin ‘chimey’ sound commonly associated with 60s pop music is also a result of single coil pickups. Humbuckers have generally a thicker, heavier sound and tend to accentuate both midrange and sustain. This has meant that they are popular with jazz and blues players seeking warm, round tones, as well as metal and heavy rock guitarists who prefer heft and darkness over brightness. Examples. Some notable players who use single coils are Stevie Ray Vaughan, Keith Richards, David Gilmour, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton. Some famous humbucker fans are Tony Iommi, Eddie Van Halen, Jimmy Page, Dave Mustaine, Joe Bonamassa, and Randy Rhoads. Let’s compare. Take a look at this video below to hear the difference in pickup styles. Names you can trust. Besides Fender and Gibson, the most widely used and respected producer’s of electric guitar pickups are Seymour Duncan, DiMarzio, Bill Lawrence, EMG, TV Jones and Lace Sensor.     For more on this topic, check out Yamaha’s take on it. READ NEXT The Journey: Folamour details his process on recording and producing new album. Recommended. Of Mice & Men’s Aaron Pauley on their Zoom rooms, Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their latest album. Five Sennheiser products to buy the musician in your life these holidays. The 10 most iconic StingRay bass players of all time. The Fender Bass VI's story in five iconic tracks. In focus: Pinstripe Pedals. A brief history of The Beatles on film.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 25
  • 8
  • coil
  • 16
  • 8
  • sound
  • 14
  • 8
  • guitar
  • 13
  • 8
  • single coil
  • 12
  • 8
  • single
  • 11
  • 8
  • humbucker
  • 8
  • 8
  • single coil pickup
  • 5
  • 8
  • coil pickup
  • 5
  • 8
  • fender
  • 5
  • 8
  • difference
  • 4
  • 8
  • guitarist
  • 4
  • 8
  • active
  • 4
  • 8
  • passive
  • 4
  • 8
  • style
  • 4
  • 8
  • gibson
  • 4
  • 8
  • sound single coil
  • 3
  • 8
  • sound single
  • 3
  • 8
  • passive pickup
  • 3
  • 8
  • history
  • 3
  • 8
  • wire
  • 3
  • 8
  • movement
  • 3
  • 8
  • high
  • 3
  • 8
  • tone
  • 3
  • 8
  • widely
  • 3
  • 8
  • stratocaster
  • 3
  • 8
  • iconic
  • 3
  • 8
  • jone
  • 3
  • 8
  • popular
  • 3
  • 8
  • music
  • 3
  • 8
  • player
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleGuitar Pickups 101: The Ultimate Guide
Urlhttps://ehomerecordingstudio.com/best-guitar-pickups/
DescriptionLooking to learn more about guitar pickups? Looking to improve your sound or dramatically change it? Read more and find out how in this post!
Date
Organic Position9
H1The Ultimate Guide to Guitar Pickups for Under-the-Hood Musicians
H2How Pickups Generally Work
1. Coils (single vs humbucker)
2. Circuitry (active vs. passive)
3. Output (high vs. moderate)
4. Magnets
5. Potting
6. Wiring (parallel vs series)
7. Pickup Locations
Choosing the Right Pickups for YOU
Pickups I Recommend Checking Out
Changing Your Pickups
H3
H2WithAnchorsHow Pickups Generally Work
1. Coils (single vs humbucker)
2. Circuitry (active vs. passive)
3. Output (high vs. moderate)
4. Magnets
5. Potting
6. Wiring (parallel vs series)
7. Pickup Locations
Choosing the Right Pickups for YOU
Pickups I Recommend Checking Out
Changing Your Pickups
BodyThe Ultimate Guide to Guitar Pickups for Under-the-Hood Musicians As guitar players, we’re always on the never-ending quest for better tone. We try different strings, amps, pedals, etc… But one thing that most us dare not mess with is pickups. Because quite frankly, they’re intimidating. And the mere thought of tearing out the guts of your beautiful electric guitar can be sickening… Even to the “more-experienced”. However… If you’re one of the brave few who dare to explore this aspect of the instrument, you’re at a huge advantage. Because…at the front of the signal chain, pickups generate that initial “tonal foundation”…upon which everything else is built. And so…for today’s post I’ve created a detailed introduction to the world of guitar pickups to help you guys get started on this in-depth topic. Sound good?  Then let’s begin… How Pickups Generally Work. A guitar pickup is essentially a series of magnets wrapped thousands of times in insulated copper wire coils… Which generates a magnetic field around the strings… Which then generates a voltage when the strings vibrate… Which travels through your cables and gear… And eventually leaves your amp as sound. And while the tone of that sound is determined by MANY factors along your signal chain…it all begins with the pickup design. So right now, let’s look at the different design options to see how they affect both tone and performance. First up… 1. Coils (single vs humbucker). Guitar pickups come in two basic designs: Single Coil Humbuckers (double coil) While all guitar pickups were originally single coils… Everything changed in 1955… When Seth Lover at Gibson, discovered that by joining two single-coils together, wired with opposite polarities… The noise cancelled out, while the useful signal remained intact. Originally known as PAF (Patent Applied For) pickups…this new dual-coil design eventually came to be known simply as humbuckers. Over the past many decades, the Gibson Les Paul is the guitar style most closely associated with humbuckers… While Fender Stratocasters and Telecasters are most known for single-coils. In terms of performance, humbuckers have: more sustain stronger output less noise And while it may seem that humbuckers are superior to single-coils from a technical standpoint…what really matters is how they compare in tone. Single-coils are brighter and crisper, while humbuckers are warmer and darker Single-coils work better with clean sounds, while humbuckers work better with distorted sounds Single-coils have more note definition between strings, while humbuckers have less But despite all these “tendencies”…understand that almost any sound can be achieved with almost any pickup. You can still get dark heavy sounds from single coils You can still get twangy sounds from humbuckers Because the final guitar sound depends on so many other factors besides just the pickups.  And this same truth applies to everything else we’ll cover in this post. So I won’t repeat it again.  Got it? Now up next… 2. Circuitry (active vs. passive). Pickups generate a voltage using 1 of 2 methods: passive – (with magnets only) active – (with magnets, and boosted by a preamp) Originally, all pickups were passive… Until several companies began designing active pickups back in the 70’s…and the two designs have been competing ever since. Advantages to active pickups include: greater tonal clarity  more tonal consistency at different volumes better reach over long cables stronger amp overdrive Bass players especially, like them for their: cleaner signal wider frequency range sharper attack added sustain extra headroom One notable problem with passive pickups is they require stronger magnets to generate a sufficient voltage, potentially causing a condition known as “string pull“,  which negatively impacts both tone and sustain. Active pickups solve this problem using weaker magnets, and boosting the signal later with the preamp. As you can see, the benefits of active pickups go on and on.  Objectively, they win in almost every comparison. Ironically though…the majority of the guitar-playing world STILL prefers the sound of passive pickups.  And it may be for no other reason than it’s the sound we’ve become accustomed to over the years. And so again…there’s no clear-cut winner here. Up next… 3. Output (high vs. moderate). Although still not quite as “hot” as active pickups… With passive pickups…you can actually increase the output, simply by adding more winds of copper wire. At least that’s true up to a certain point… Because beyond that, more winding results in a dull, flat sound. So you basically have 3 options to choose from here: high output pickups moderate output pickups …which are the two most common. And then there’s “vintage-style” pickups which have the lowest output of all, and designed to mimic the weakened magnets found in old classic guitars. As a general rule of thumb: Higher outputs –  make it easier to drive your amp to distortion, but they give you less dynamic range. Lower outputs – give you a cleaner sound with more dynamic range, but make it harder to achieve that overdriven amp sound. Up next… 4. Magnets. ANOTHER major factor that affects a pickup’s output (and tone) is the magnets themselves. Particularly, the magnet’s layout and material. So first, let’s look at the 3 popular layouts: Individual magnetic poles – which have a thinner, brighter sound, and are commonly used on Fender guitars and other single coil pickups. Steel poles extending from a magnetic bar – which have a fatter, dark sound, and are commonly used on Gibson guitars and other humbucking pickups. Blade style – which replaces the individual pole pieces with a single metal bar, and is known to have more consistency with string bends. Next let’s look at exactly what these magnets are made of: The most common material is a metal alloy that blends aluminum, nickel, and cobalt…and is known simply as “Al-Ni-Co” for short. And one reason why this alloy so popular is its ability to maintain its magnetic properties over time. The 4 most common varieties of Alnico are: Alnico 3 – which has a soft gentle tone and the weakest magnetic pull, and is commonly seen on vintage Stratocasters. Alnico 2 – which has a similar vintage tone, but with a slightly stronger output than the Alnico 3’s. Alnico 5 – which has an even higher output and bolder sound, and is commonly used by guitarists who play in multiple genres. Alnico 8 – which has the most aggressive heavy sound of all, and the strongest magnetic pull. The only material with an even hotter output is ceramic, which has a more “trebly” sound, and is used primarily in heavy metal and hard rock genres. Up next… 5. Potting. Potting is one of those rarely discussed topics… That up until now, you may have never heard of. So here’s how it works: In order to hold every component of the pickup in place… And prevent any movement or vibration between parts…the entire pickup is dipped in wax. In terms of sound, the potting process has the effect of preventing any sort of unwanted feedback when standing in front your amp. The problem though…is that not all feedback is unwanted. Many vintage guitars with UN-potted pickups will catch random sounds in the air…which sounds bad in theory, but actually has a unique vintage charm that some players absolutely love. Unfortunately these days, almost all modern pickups are potted by default, so it’s tough to get that effect with newer guitars. Up next… 6. Wiring (parallel vs series). Humbucker pickups can be wired using either of the following 2 techniques: Parallel Series In almost all cases, parallel wiring is the standard method used with modern day pickups.  And series wiring is considered as more of a custom modification. So here’s how each one works: with parallel wiring – the signal is split in two in the beginning, then re-combined at the end.  This results in a brighter sound, with a comparatively lower output. with series wiring – the signal travels along a single path through both coils.  This results in a warmer sound, and higher output. NOTE: In order for these 2 methods to have their desired effect, BOTH pickups of the humbucker must be engaged, not just one. Up next… 7. Pickup Locations. Depending on the exact position of the pickup in relation to the strings… The resulting change in tone can be SOOO dramatic… You could easily argue that positioning is as important as anything else we’ve covered thus far. So here’s how it works: The pickup nearest the bridge sounds brightest, with the shortest sustain. The one nearest the neck sounds warm and full, with a longest sustain.   The one in the middle (if there is one) sounds somewhere in between.   Some players take advantage of this by using the exact same pickup in each location, and switching from one to another depending on the tone they want. Other players do the exact opposite, by choosing a different pickup for each position, either to accent or offset the natural tonal variations. So that wraps up all the first half of this post.  In the second half, we’ll move on to the next subject: Choosing the Right Pickups for YOU. We’ve covered a lot so far, haven’t we? But all the good information in the world isn’t worth much… If you can’t use it to solve your actual problem. So…the next obvious question is: How do you actually choose the ideal pickup for your guitar? So up next, we’ll cover some useful tips to help narrow down the options. First up… 1. Examine Your Preferences. While no pickup model is solely designed for a particular style of music…there are certain pickups that “generally” work better with certain tones. And as I’m sure you already noticed from what we covered so far, the biggest factor affecting tone is output level: Higher outputs work better for heavy distorted sounds. Lower outputs work better for cleaner, more dynamic sounds.   And it ultimately boils down to just that. So pick and choose your features based mainly on the sounds you use most often. 2. Determine external tonal influences. We all know that you guitar tone is based on numerous factors besides just the pickups, right?… Pedals and amps being the two most obvious examples. However there are also some subtle factors on the guitar itself which you may not have considered. These are the 4 big ones: Volume Knob – 250k pots are warmer, 500k pots are brighter Strings – pure nickel is darker, while steel/nickel-plated steel are brighter Woods – maple, ash, and alder are brighter, while mahogany and rosewood are darker Neck style – bolted necks are brighter with less sustain, while set-in neck are warmer with more sustain. And so…based on the existing tones of your current guitar…it makes sense to adjust your pickup selections accordingly. 3. Find What Fits. Depending on whether your guitar currently uses single-coils or humbuckers… The body will be cut to fit that specific-sized pickup inside the cavity. If you’re switching from one single-coil to another, or one humbucker to another, the change is simple. However… If you’re switching from one to the OTHER, you can see how that might present a problem. But don’t worry, because there IS a solution that doesn’t involve cutting new holes in your guitar. These days, there are plenty of single-coils shaped like humbuckers, and vice versa. And up next we will cover the options for both. Starting with… 4. Humbuckers for Single-Coil Cavities. If you wanna fit a humbucker into single-coil slot, you have 3 options: Reverse wound single-coils – which winds the middle pickup in the opposite direction, so it cancels noise when combined with either the bridge or neck pickup. Rail Humbuckers –  which are dual-coils that sit SIDE BY SIDE like normal humbuckers, but can fit into a single-coil slot because they’re half the size.  These are intended to perform like true humbuckers, both in sound and noise cancellation. Stacks – which is actually a dual-coil stacked TOP TO BOTTOM, rather than SIDE BY SIDE like normal humbuckers.  They sound similar to, though not exactly like single-coils, and have the noise cancellation as well. On occasion, you can even find pickups that combine rail and stack designs to essentially cram 4 single-coils into one extremely high output humbucker. Up next… 5. Single-Coils for Humbucker Cavities. If you wanna get single-coil tones with a humbucker slot, these are your options: single-coil in a humbucker sized casing – which sounds and behaves exactly like a normal single-coil would. Coil-Split humbuckers – (aka 4 wire humbuckers) which, when engaged, performs like a lower output vintage single-coil by essentially shutting off one of the two coils. This method does NOT cancel hum. Coil-Tapped humbuckers – which, when engaged, uses only a fraction of the winding in both coils to get a sound similar to a single coil, but with hum-cancelling as well. (this option is usually a custom modification, and not commonly seen.) With coil-splitting and coil-tapping, you have the option of BOTH single-coil and humbucker tones with the flip of a switch. Up next… Pickups I Recommend Checking Out. So now that we’ve covered virtually every nuance of guitar pickups… The only thing left to do is to use your newfound knowledge to finally choose something. And to help make this part easier, I’ve compiled the following list of the most popular and well-reviewed pickups, sorted in each of the categories covered in this post… Single Coils. Passive, High Output: Seymour Duncan SSL-5 – (Amazon/B&H/Thomann) Fender Tex Mex – (Amazon/Thomann) Fender Hot Noiseless – (Amazon/Thomann) Fender Custom Shop Texas – (Amazon/Thomann) Passive, Moderate/Vintage Output: DiMarzio Virtual Vintage Strat – (Amazon/Thomann) Fender Custom Shop 1969 – (Thomann) Active: EMG T – (Amazon) EMG SAX – (Amazon) Humbucker-Sized: Seymour Duncan SPH90 – (Amazon/Thomann) Humbuckers. Passive, High Output: Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan Hot Rodded – (Amazon/Thomann) Gibson ’57 Classic – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan SH13 – (Amazon/Thomann) Passive, Medium Output: Seymour Duncan APH 2s – (Amazon/Thomann) Active: EMG Zakk Wylde – (Amazon/Thomann) EMG 60 – (Amazon/Thomann) EMG James Hetfield – (Amazon/Thomann) EMG 81 – (Amazon/Thomann) Coil Split: DiMarzio DP100 – (Amazon/Thomann) Gibson Dirty Fingers – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan SH8 – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan SH6 – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan SH4 JB – (Amazon/Thomann) Stacks. Seymour Duncan STK T2 – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan STK T3 – (Amazon/Thomann) Rail Humbuckers. Seymour Duncan SHR-1 – (Amazon/Thomann) Seymour Duncan’s JB Jr – (Amazon/Thomann) And finally, there’s the last step of all: Changing Your Pickups. For many of us, it’s the REAL reason we’ve been hesitant to mess with pickups all these years. Not because we didn’t understand that pickups actually mattered.  But because we were scared to actually change them. So once you’ve got your new pickups, and you’re ready to switch them out, you have two options: Take them to a guitar tech – which you can do if you want to “play it safe”. Learn to do it yourself – which is what you should ideally do in the long-run. So if you’re ready to give it a shot, here’s a quick tutorial on how it’s done:
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 69
  • 9
  • coil
  • 43
  • 9
  • sound
  • 41
  • 9
  • humbucker
  • 38
  • 9
  • single
  • 33
  • 9
  • single coil
  • 29
  • 9
  • output
  • 27
  • 9
  • guitar
  • 26
  • 9
  • amazonthomann
  • 24
  • 9
  • alnico
  • 16
  • 9
  • tone
  • 16
  • 9
  • seymour duncan
  • 14
  • 9
  • duncan
  • 14
  • 9
  • option
  • 13
  • 9
  • magnet
  • 13
  • 9
  • seymour
  • 13
  • 9
  • passive
  • 10
  • 9
  • signal
  • 9
  • 9
  • vintage
  • 9
  • 9
  • string
  • 9
  • 9
  • work
  • 9
  • 9
  • active
  • 9
  • 9
  • amazonthomann seymour
  • 8
  • 9
  • design
  • 8
  • 9
  • sustain
  • 8
  • 9
  • amazonthomann seymour duncan
  • 7
  • 9
  • magnetic
  • 7
  • 9
  • emg
  • 7
  • 9
  • amp
  • 7
  • 9
  • brighter
  • 7
  • 9
  • single coil humbucker
  • 6
  • 9
  • passive pickup
  • 6
  • 9
  • higher output
  • 6
  • 9
  • guitar pickup
  • 6
  • 9
  • coil humbucker
  • 6
  • 9
  • neck
  • 6
  • 9
  • factor
  • 6
  • 9
  • fender
  • 6
  • 9
  • dual coil
  • 5
  • 9
  • common
  • 5
  • 9
  • active pickup
  • 5
  • 9
  • covered
  • 5
  • 9
  • pickup and
  • 4
  • 9
  • wiring
  • 4
  • 9
  • high output
  • 4
  • 9
  • lower output
  • 4
  • 9
  • output seymour duncan
  • 3
  • 9
  • sound commonly
  • 3
  • 9
  • output seymour
  • 3
  • 9
  • amazonthomann fender
  • 3
  • 9
  • amazonthomann emg
  • 3
  • 9
Result 10
TitleTypes of guitar pickups and their effect on tone [Guide]
Urlhttps://gearaficionado.com/blog/types-of-guitar-pickups-and-their-effect-on-tone-guide/
DescriptionAll about guitars, music gear, performance and theory. I help you get the tone that's in your head and learn every aspect about it
Date
Organic Position10
H1Types of guitar pickups and their effect on tone [Guide]
H2How do different types of pickups affect tone?
How much does pickup type affect tone?
Most common pickup types and their effect on tone
Are humbuckers louder than single coils?
What type of pickup is better?
Conclusions and recommendations
H3Single-coil
Humbucker
P90
Mini humbucker
Active pickups
Piezo pickups
Gold foil
Wide range
Jazzmaster pickups
Jaguar pickups
Triple buckers
Z coil
Filter Tron
Toaster
Lipstick
Firebird
Related posts:
H2WithAnchorsHow do different types of pickups affect tone?
How much does pickup type affect tone?
Most common pickup types and their effect on tone
Are humbuckers louder than single coils?
What type of pickup is better?
Conclusions and recommendations
BodyTypes of guitar pickups and their effect on tone [Guide]by For many people, pickups are the most important feature of a guitar.Some will even go as far as to claim that pickups are the only factor that defines an electric guitar’s tone.I would not go that far. However, I agree with the idea that they are one of the defining factors of an instrument’s sound.But how and how much do different types of pickups affect a guitar’s tone? Here is a short answer:Different types of pickups have a radical effect on an electric guitar’s tone. It is like using different EQ filters over the natural sound of the instrument. Each style of pickup will cut different frequencies from the spectrum with dissimilar intensity imprinting their own personality to the guitar.For those who want to dive deeper into this topic, in this article, I will talk about how pickup type is important, and how much does it affect the final tone.After that, I will describe the most common types of pickups briefly and give you some insights into their sound profiles.Finally, I will give you my conclusions and recommendations in regard to this topic.Are you ready to get started? Let’s go!Table of ContentsHow do different types of pickups affect tone?Pickups are not all built the same.In fact, in the early days of electric guitars, there was noticeable variability between the same model pickups made just days apart.Factors like the quality of components, or even slight changes in their construction made for great differences in tone.Going a step further, when you consider pickups constructed in a different manner and shape, it’s absolutely obvious that there will be tonal differences.It’s important, however, to have a general idea of how electric guitar pickups work to keep diving into this rabbit hole.Guitar pickups are comprised of magnets that generate a magnetic field around them. This magnetic field is sensitive to the vibration the strings produce when plucked. Those perceived vibrations are, in turn, transformed into a signal that is transmitted to the amplifier.With this in mind, you could imagine that different components and configurations will easily result in different magnetic fields and different sensitivities to their fluctuations.That is, essentially, what makes different kinds of pickups sound different.How much does pickup type affect tone?Quantifying how much a component of a guitar affects its tone is a very hard task that would require extensive scientific research.In this article, I will limit myself to give my opinion based on my experience and research. This, of course, is completely empirical and should be taken with a grain of salt.As I mentioned earlier, many people claim that pickups are the defining factor of an electric guitar’s tone and that nothing else matters.I disagree.There are many features that determine how a guitar sounds, from its shape, its construction, materials to electronics. Hey, even the amp will determine a really big portion of the final tone.Pickups account for a significant portion of what the guitar offers into the tone equation. Some will say that they dictate up to 25% of a guitar’s tone, and that could be true.We won’t arrive at any significant conclusion, however.The important thing is that you try out and experiment with what it feels to you. If you have the chance to play similar guitars with different types of pickups, pay special attention and try to isolate the sound of the guitar from the EQ filter each pickup puts it through.And yes, I like to think about pickups as filters that alter the original “true” sound of the instrument.Most common pickup types and their effect on tone. Let’s get down to business now.Every kind of pickup has its own story and sound. I will try to give you a brief idea about what you can expect from the most common ones in no particular order.Here they are:Single-coil. What can I say about the single-coil? This is where the iconic Fender sound lies. The oldest concept of them all, and a sound that survived through the ages. One of its main characteristics is the “60 cycle” hum they produce due to their susceptibility to interference.In terms of tone, single-coil pickups are balanced and versatile, they have a very clear top end and a slightly scooped midrange that gives them their unique warmth.Humbucker. Humbuckers started as an idea to eliminate the “60 cycle” hum that haunts single coils until this day. The funny thing is that, in this process, a new paradigm of tone was born. These pickups sound and look completely different than their older brother and what was sought after as an upgrade in design, really resulted in a forking path that led to many modern sounds.In terms of tone, humbuckers have a higher output, are more responsive in the low end, and sound darker.P90. P90s are pretty much Gibson’s version of a single-coil pickup. They actually have just one bobbin and, as expected, they are susceptible to the “60 cycles” hum. These ones predate the humbuckers which replaced them in the standard version of most modern Gibson guitars.In terms of tone, P90s are not as responsive in the low end but have very present mids. The top end is not a strong point, and some players might define them as muddy. That claimed muddiness should not be considered as a downside but as a feature.Mini humbucker. Mini humbuckers are just humbuckers in a smaller format. This, however, essentially changes their interaction with the strings and results in a particularly different sound than the one their normal-sized siblings offer.In terms of tone, and contrary to what many imagine, mini-humbuckers are closer to a single-coil pickup than even a P90 is. They sound slightly mid-scooped and have a really clear and bright high end.Active pickups. Active pickups are a modern version of the guitar pickup. They were popularized mostly by metal players that look for an extra boost in their tone. The active part of the system includes a preamp which in many cases will allow the player to EQ the signal before it hits the amp. These amenities, however, require a 9-volt battery inserted in the body of the instrument to function.In terms of tone, Active pickups are output monsters and are very comparable with a high output humbucker pickup. Their sound is very polarizing across the player base, and I personally think they might lack a bit in their dynamic response (variability in volume from playing with contrasting intensities).Piezo pickups. Piezo pickups are not quite what you think of when talking about electric guitar pickups, but as many guitars incorporate them I decided to add them to this list.This kind of pickup work with crystals instead of magnets to generate an amplifiable signal. I won’t go into specifics here, but you just have to know that they are used mostly in acoustic instruments.In terms of tone, Piezo pickups capture the acoustic sound of the guitar. They are great for faking an acoustic guitar sound. However, they are known from a lack in low end that tends to make them sound a little on the harsher bright side.Gold foil. Gold foil pickups are not that common and for years were very difficult to find. These types of pickups come both as single-coils and humbuckers. Their main feature is, as their name implies, a gold foil that covers the magnets. Also, the screws in these are placed right above the coils.In terms of tone, Gold foil pickups are really bright and have a rather vintage output level. This might work great for rhythm playing and will surely cut nicely in the mix.Wide range. Wide range pickups are humbuckers that were designed for the Telecaster Thinline. This is a semi-hollow variation of the Telecaster that Fender introduced as a way of making a fancier instrument from one of the simplest more classic guitars ever.In terms of tone, wide-range pickups share some features with the traditional humbucker, however, these pack a slightly carved out mid-range and an extra punch in the highs.Jazzmaster pickups. Jazzmaster pickups are another version of a single-coil pickup Fender designed for the guitar that gives them their name. Many people confuse these with P90s, however, and although many modern iterations of the Jazzmaster use P90s, these are not.The main difference between Jazzmaster pickups and Gibson P90s is that their pole pieces are actually the magnets, while P90s magnets are placed underneath the coil. Also, they are wound differently. This is a design difference that really affects their sound.In terms of tone, Jazzmaster pickups are similar to P90s, but a bit less muddy in the midrange. Their top end is also somewhat brighter, helping them sound clearer.Jaguar pickups. Jaguar pickups are pretty much normal single-coils, with the slight difference that they have metal teeth on their sides that help to reduce the dreaded “60 cycle hum”. Also, in the original Jaguar, these are mounted in the body of the instrument instead of the pickguard.Some players will argue that the mount of a pickup will also have an effective impact on the sound.In terms of tone, Jaguar pickups sound very much like a normal single-coil, perhaps with a more present top end that might sound a bit harsh to some ears.Triple buckers. Triple buckers are Fender’s approach to a high gain pickup alternative. As the name implies these are just humbucker pickups with an extra coil. However, these come packed in a humbucker size.The trick the Triple bucker has to offer is a bit like having a humbucker and a middle pickup.In the Fender Marauder guitar, position 1 of the 5-way switch activates just the 2 bobbins closer to the bridge, making it sound like a humbucker, while position 2 adds the extra “middle” coil to the mix giving it a more open sound.In terms of tone, I think the triple bucker is very similar to a humbucker but with a very scoop in the midrange. This is, however, very hard to determine since it works pretty much as having 2 pickups in different positions in one.Z coil. Z coil pickups were invented by Leo Fender in his G&L era. These are pretty much single-coils split in half, in a design that allows them to cancel the unwanted hum. So these are in fact single-coil humbucking pickups.Their looks will not be for everyone, but their clever design allows them to retain that classic Fender sound without having to deal with that awful interference noise.In terms of tone, as you would expect, Z coils sound just like any similar single-coil pickup with the same features.Filter Tron. The Filter Tron pickup was designed by the Gretsch guitar company while looking to prevent the “60 cycle” hum, just as Gibson did with their PAF humbucker (the kind of humbucker you know the most).Filter Trons have 2 coils but are packed more tightly and with larger magnets and taller bobbins. This fundamental design difference makes them sound very unique.In terms of tone, Filter Tron pickups share a lot of characteristics with “classic” humbuckers but have a lot of top-end twang to offer. This is what makes the Gretsch sound.Toaster. Toaster pickups were popularized by the Rickenbacker brand, and they come both in single-coil configurations and 2 coil ones. These ones scream England when you play them, and were heavily used by many popular British artists John Lennon.In terms of tone, Toaster pickups have a low output and a weak bass response. Their focus is on the high end and they have a particular ring on the higher frequencies that make them sound great for rhythm playing.Lipstick. Lipstick pickups are the key to the Danelectro guitar sound. They look very alien and have a vintage 50s aesthetics that many of us love. These are, in fact, single-coil pickups with a metal cover and a different design, with a larger bar magnet, that defines their sound.In terms of tone, Lipstick pickups are raw and sound not as clear as other single-coil pickups. As with many other vintage pickups, the low end is not a strong point, and their sound is defined by their screaming top end.Firebird. Firebird pickups are a particularly designed pickup Gibson chose for the emblematic guitar that gives them their name. Many confuse these with mini-humbuckers but they are conceptually different.For starters, Firebird pickups don’t have pole height adjustment screws. When you dive deeper, you get to know that the way the magnets are placed inside them is really different from the design of a classic mini-humbucker.In terms of tone, Firebird pickups are similar to mini-humbuckers, however, these have a slightly lower output and sound more balanced. Some players claim that they sound even closer to a single coil.Are humbuckers louder than single coils?Humbucker pickups are louder than single coils. In addition to the noticeable tonal difference between these 2 kinds of pickups, the output disparity is very noticeable when switching between the 2.Of course, you can control loudness with the volume knob of your amp, but if you have a guitar with both humbuckers and single coils, you will have to work on your playing or balancing their output with the volume knob to keep them at a coherent level.This is not a problem, but something to keep in mind.What type of pickup is better?No kind of pickup is better than any other. All variations of the guitar pickup have something unique to offer in terms of tone. However, most players gravitate mostly towards single-coil and humbucking pickups. P90s and mini humbuckers are the third and fourth most common alternatives.This preference among the player base is probably culturally driven since most legendary guitar idols used these types of pickups mainly. But also, back then the alternatives were fewer and many had to play with what was available.If you want to sound like your idols, probably that would mean getting a guitar with humbuckers or single-coils.On the other hand, if you are looking for a unique voice or at least a more particular one, why don’t you give a try to a less common type of pickup?Conclusions and recommendations. Whether you are looking for a new guitar or planning on building or having one built, getting to know, at least at a high level how pickups work is, in my opinion, something that will help you make a better informed final decision.However, here in GearAficionado, I always say that you should try out every instrument before buying it if you have the chance.I don’t think anyone can really understand the sound of all these different pickups without getting to hear them live. At least try the ones that you think might work out better for you.If it’s within your reach, try to get to play completely different guitars to clearly understand where the variation lies, and then start checking out ones closer to the one you preferred the most.Finally, don’t forget to have fun. Technicalities for some people get the joy out of getting a new piece of gear. You don’t have to know it all about something that makes you smile. Just go and play the instrument that feels best to you.Hello there, my name is Ramiro and I’ve played guitar for almost 20 years. I’m obsessed with everything gear-related and I thought it might be worth sharing it. From guitars, pedals, amps, and synths to studio gear and production tips,  I hope you find what I post here useful, and I’ll try my best to keep it entertaining also.Related posts:. Differences between ’57, ’58, ’59, and ’60s Les Pauls P90s vs Mini Humbuckers [Main differences] Fender Player vs Vintera vs Performer vs Professional lines Is getting your guitar PLEK’d worth it?xx
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 77
  • 10
  • guitar
  • 38
  • 10
  • coil
  • 32
  • 10
  • sound
  • 32
  • 10
  • tone
  • 31
  • 10
  • humbucker
  • 26
  • 10
  • single
  • 21
  • 10
  • single coil
  • 18
  • 10
  • term tone
  • 17
  • 10
  • term
  • 17
  • 10
  • type
  • 13
  • 10
  • end
  • 10
  • 10
  • p90
  • 10
  • 10
  • electric guitar
  • 9
  • 10
  • coil pickup
  • 9
  • 10
  • difference
  • 9
  • 10
  • fender
  • 9
  • 10
  • player
  • 9
  • 10
  • type pickup
  • 8
  • 10
  • instrument
  • 8
  • 10
  • magnet
  • 8
  • 10
  • output
  • 8
  • 10
  • single coil pickup
  • 7
  • 10
  • kind
  • 7
  • 10
  • work
  • 7
  • 10
  • design
  • 7
  • 10
  • mini
  • 7
  • 10
  • kind pickup
  • 6
  • 10
  • mini humbucker
  • 6
  • 10
  • gibson
  • 6
  • 10
  • electric
  • 6
  • 10
  • affect
  • 6
  • 10
  • common
  • 6
  • 10
  • 60
  • 6
  • 10
  • hum
  • 6
  • 10
  • top
  • 6
  • 10
  • 60 cycle hum
  • 5
  • 10
  • guitar pickup
  • 5
  • 10
  • 60 cycle
  • 5
  • 10
  • cycle hum
  • 5
  • 10
  • top end
  • 5
  • 10
  • low
  • 5
  • 10
  • high
  • 5
  • 10
  • guitar tone
  • 4
  • 10
  • soundin term tone
  • 4
  • 10
  • pickup sound
  • 4
  • 10
  • low end
  • 4
  • 10
  • soundin term
  • 4
  • 10
  • pickup type
  • 3
  • 10
  • pickup work
  • 3
  • 10
  • magnetic field
  • 3
  • 10
  • guitar sound
  • 3
  • 10
  • end sound
  • 3
  • 10
  • gold foil
  • 3
  • 10
  • jazzmaster pickup
  • 3
  • 10
  • triple bucker
  • 3
  • 10
  • firebird pickup
  • 3
  • 10
Result 11
TitleActive And Passive Pickups: What's the Difference?
Urlhttps://www.dawsons.co.uk/blog/what-is-the-difference-between-active-and-passive-pickups
DescriptionMetallers go active, blues players passive - but what is the difference between active and passive pickups? We bring you up to speed on both types..
Date
Organic Position11
H1Active And Passive Pickups: What's the Difference?
H2Both types have devoted fans, but what is the difference between active and passive pickup types?
You might be interested in..
You might be interested in..
Related Articles
H3Categories
Dawsons Online Store
Categories
Dawsons Online Store
1. Passive Pickups
2. Active Pickups
3. Advantages and disadvantages
So, which should you go for?
Get in touch
If you liked that then you might like this
Pick Up & Play!
H2WithAnchorsBoth types have devoted fans, but what is the difference between active and passive pickup types?
You might be interested in..
You might be interested in..
Related Articles
BodyActive And Passive Pickups: What's the Difference? 26th May 2020 | 11:51 | Joe Dempsey Both types have devoted fans, but what is the difference between active and passive pickup types? Remarkably, guitars have been built with pickups for well over 60 years. This neat device enabled the development of the solid bodied electric guitar and provided it with its unique voice. Over the years, the pickup has evolved and diverged into many different varieties. Most notably, the two main groups of single-coil and humbucker (twin coil) pickups have appeared. Most recently, active pickups have emerged. This raises the question, what is the difference between active and passive pickups? 1. Passive Pickups. The original magnetic guitar pickup was a passive design. Essentially, these are simple transducers, built by wrapping many coils of copper wire around a permanent magnet, usually made of Alnico or Ceramic. The location of the magnet in proximity to the strings causes the strings to magnetise, and become magnets, too. Because of this, when the strings move, they disturb the magnetic field and cause an electrical current to pass through the copper wire. You might be interested in... The vast majority of Les Pauls, SGs, Strats and Teles (in fact, the majority of all electric guitars) feature passive pickups. 2. Active Pickups. Active pickups still use coils of wire, like their passive counterparts. However, they use far fewer coils. Instead, their circuitry incorporates an active preamp (usually powered by a 9V battery) to boost the signal level, filters and EQ. 3. Advantages and disadvantages. So, why would you use a powered circuit when you could use a passive one? Well, the problem with passive pickups is that the many coils of wire involved can transmit a lot of hum and background interference (this was the main reason that humbuckers were developed). In addition, the magnets used in passive strings can pull them inwards, and occasionally cause intonation issues. Passive pickups are also pretty sensitive to feedback when pushed hard.   The lower number of coils on an active pickup means that they have a lower natural output (i.e. before the pre-amp), are less susceptible to background noise, and are naturally much quieter in this regard. However, the active pre-amp means that these pickups generally have a far higher output gain than passive models, too. Add in the ability to EQ the tone beyond a simple tone control, and you have a pretty impressive pickup. So, why aren’t all pickups active? Well, passive pickups, despite their drawbacks, have a greater dynamic range. If you’re the kind of player that likes to be able to move from whisper quiet to a screaming wail, then a passive set-up is likely to suit your playing style best. Plus, these types tend to lose high-frequency detail, and enhance lower frequencies, giving them a warmer tone. Conversely, active pickups have backs of sonic detail, but a lower dynamic range. Tonally, they’re sometimes described as ‘sterile’ or ‘cold’. This is, perhaps, a bit unfair, as active pickups can certainly be used to create sounds that pretty explosive. Their increased output before feedback has seen them become incredibly popular among guitarists in heavier, rock genres. Plus, their detailed sound lends itself to articulate passages, such as shred guitar lines, or even jazz. So, which should you go for? We wish that there was a hard and fast rule to this but as with everything guitar-related, it all comes down to personal taste and playing style. Try a few and hear the differences for yourself. Pickup Type Key Points Passive Most common design across electric guitars and basses No built-in amplification circuitry Sensitive to feedback when pushed hard Wide dynamic range Active Built-in amplification circuitry Less susceptible to electrical interference compared to passive pickups Capable of adding or removing elements such as EQ, filtering, and controlling feedback Narrower dynamic range compared to passive pickups Require additional power - generally supplied by 9-volt batteries Not exclusive to but highly favoured by metallers due to more aggressive character   Get in touch. If you need any help or advice, then our Customer Service Team are more than happy to help over the phone on 01925 582420. Our in-store specialists will guide you through the wonderful world of Guitars, just pop into your nearest Dawsons store. If you liked that then you might like this. If you've ever looked at your battle worn cables and thought, 'there has to be a better way', check out our guide on "How Not to Coil a Cable". Fancy hitting the stage but want to leave that heavy amp at home? In our "Gigging Without an Amp" article we show you the way. Who doesn't like free stuff? We give you a rundown of "6 Free Guitar VST Plugins to Conquer the World With". You're welcome! Pick Up & Play! Whether you are just starting out on your musical journey or have significant playing experience under your belt, we want to encourage and inspire everyone to take positive action with their instrument aspirations. If you have always fancied playing an instrument, getting into DJing, or advancing your knowledge on your chosen instrument, we have everything covered from instrument packs and accessories to blogs and instructional videos that provide everything needed to level up! Click Pick Up & Play to get inspired! You might be interested in... Tags:. guitar pickups knowledge Next  How To Use The Effects Loop On Your Amp Related Articles. Gibson Pickups: A Guide To These Epic Game Changers A Guide to Types of Audio Cable and Connectors Guitar Wood Types: Acoustic Knowledge Upgrade What Is An Arpeggiator? A Mini Guide to the Synth Staple Previous Page Next Page Copyright © Arranged Musical Options Ltd. All rights reserved.Xenon House, 10 School Lane, Didsbury, Manchester, United Kingdom, M20 6RD. Registered in England. Company registration number 03818887 VAT no. GB757640701 You must have JavaScript switched on in your Web browser to fully interact with our site and place an order. Simply select Preferences for your browser and select the 'enable JavaScript' checkbox. By using the Dawsons website you agree to our use of cookies to improve your experience and our services Close
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 28
  • 11
  • passive
  • 18
  • 11
  • active
  • 14
  • 11
  • passive pickup
  • 13
  • 11
  • guitar
  • 11
  • 11
  • coil
  • 8
  • 11
  • active pickup
  • 7
  • 11
  • built
  • 6
  • 11
  • type
  • 6
  • 11
  • amp
  • 5
  • 11
  • guide
  • 5
  • 11
  • active passive pickup
  • 4
  • 11
  • active passive
  • 4
  • 11
  • dynamic range
  • 4
  • 11
  • eq
  • 4
  • 11
  • difference
  • 4
  • 11
  • wire
  • 4
  • 11
  • magnet
  • 4
  • 11
  • string
  • 4
  • 11
  • feedback
  • 4
  • 11
  • lower
  • 4
  • 11
  • dynamic
  • 4
  • 11
  • range
  • 4
  • 11
  • playing
  • 4
  • 11
  • instrument
  • 4
  • 11
  • electric guitar
  • 3
  • 11
  • electric
  • 3
  • 11
  • circuitry
  • 3
  • 11
  • pretty
  • 3
  • 11
  • hard
  • 3
  • 11
  • output
  • 3
  • 11
  • tone
  • 3
  • 11
  • cable
  • 3
  • 11
  • knowledge
  • 3
  • 11
Result 12
TitleLearn About Pickups: Chapter 2. Pickup Types - Seymour ...
Urlhttps://seymourduncan.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360047564373-Learn-About-Pickups-Chapter-2-Pickup-Types
DescriptionWHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SINGLE- AND DOUBLE-COIL PICKUPS? ... All magnetic pickups house a coil of wire wrapped thousands of times around ...
Date28 Apr 2020
Organic Position12
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 13
TitleTypes of Guitar Pickups Explained - Electric, Acoustic & Bass - Zing Instruments
Urlhttps://zinginstruments.com/guitar-pickups/
DescriptionThe different types of guitar pickups explained, from the bright single-coil, the mighty humbucker to the versatile P90
Date23 Mar 2021
Organic Position13
H1Types of Guitar Pickups Explained – Electric, Acoustic & Bass
H2What is a Guitar Pickup?
Electric Guitars
Electric Bass Guitar
Acoustic Guitars
Other Stuff Worth Knowing About
Summary
H3Single Coil
Humbucker
P90
J-Bass
Soap bar
Split-coil
Dual-coil
In-Body Microphones
Transducer
Piezo
Soundhole
Active and Passive
Magnets (Alnico vs. Ceramic)
Potting
Wiring (Parallel vs. Series)
Locations (Where You Fit Them)
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Guitar Pickup?
Electric Guitars
Electric Bass Guitar
Acoustic Guitars
Other Stuff Worth Knowing About
Summary
BodyTypes of Guitar Pickups Explained – Electric, Acoustic & Bass Pickups allow your electric guitar (or acoustic if you choose to amplify it) to be heard, and play an important role in shaping your tone. Depending on which you use you’ll get a different sound. In this article, you’ll learn about the different types used on the majority of guitars, and which ones are best used for different styles of music. Table of ContentsWhat is a Guitar Pickup?Electric GuitarsSingle CoilHumbuckerP90Electric Bass GuitarJ-BassSoap barSplit-coilDual-coilAcoustic GuitarsIn-Body MicrophonesTransducerPiezoSoundholeOther Stuff Worth Knowing AboutActive and PassiveMagnets (Alnico vs. Ceramic)PottingWiring (Parallel vs. Series)Locations (Where You Fit Them)Summary What is a Guitar Pickup? Pickups literally ‘pick up’ the vibrations from the strings and turn them into soundwaves. They’re essentially magnets with copper wiring wrapped around. When the strings on your guitar vibrate, the magnets are disturbed, which converts the nearby wire into a ‘signal’. The same signal then travels out the guitar, via any effects pedals you have, and finishes the journey at the guitar amp. They have their own unique tonal characteristics depending on where they’re located (neck vs bridge position) and whether they are straight or angled. Electric Guitars. We group electric guitar pickups into three categories: single-coil, humbucker, and P90. Single Coil. These use a simple magnet to transform the vibration of your strings into an electromagnetic signal –  including, at times, some unwanted hum (they are subject to a 60-cycle hum, which can produce some undesirable noise). That hasn’t stopped the worlds most famous guitar (the Fender Strat) using them to great aplomb, among many others. Despite the hum, part of their attraction is the bright, twangy tone produced. Genres such as country and surf have used them to great effect (the distinctive twang of the single-coil adding to the music) but they have been used to great effect in many other genres too (e.g. blues, folk). Typically the single-coil doesn’t take too well to lots of distortion, so you’ll find players of hard rock and metal steering clear of them. Related: Our review of the best Fender Strat pickups (single coil) Humbucker. It was frustration with the unwanted interference of the single-coil that led to the invention of the humbucker (hence the name, they ‘buck’ the hum). Instead of using just one magnet, the construction of the humbucker consists of two magnets which are wired slightly out of phase with each other (they are, in effect, two single coils together). This cancels out the hum and leads to a warmer sound in the process. Their warm tone has proved popular with the jazz crowd, as well as the metal and hard rock players as they work very well with high distortion due to their higher output. The debate about single coil vs humbuckers and which is better will never end! Related: Our review of the best humbucker pickups P90. The third type is the P90, a sort of hybrid between the two above; higher output than the single-coil with more depth, but not as high or as deep as the humbucker. The P90 is popular in blues and soft rock circles (but not hard rock). Related: Our review of the best P90 pickups Electric Bass Guitar. Electric bass pickups work the same as guitar ones, but fall into different categories. Let’s take a look: J-Bass. With a warm and clear tonality, J-Bass pickups are commonly used in jazz and were first introduced on Fender’s Jazz Bass. Soap bar. Soap bars are the same as above (J-Bass) but with wider housing that’s sealed: soap bars are also more versatile (the pins that protrude from the bottom allow you to try different wiring combinations.) Split-coil. Popular with players of punk and rock, the split-coil – as the name suggests – comprises of two halves of a single-coil pickup with one of them slightly further up the neck than the other. They give off a punchy tone. Dual-coil. Less common than the two above, the dual-coil is actually a humbucking pickup (two coils together) which produces a similar vibe (warm): as a result they work great for a vintage sound. Acoustic Guitars. Note: Amplifying an acoustic guitar is generally a trickier affair as most people want to reproduce the sound of the original instrument. As a result, it’s easier to get hung up on getting the sound as near to the real deal as possible. However, nothing will ever reproduce the tone exactly the same. For acoustic, we have four main types: In-Body Microphones. If you’re looking for the closest representation to the instrument, an in-body microphone is ideal. The one major downside is feedback. If you really want the closest thing to the sound of the instrument, you may be willing to live with it. Transducer. Next closest in terms of reproducing the genuine acoustic tone is the transducer. It sits underneath your instruments soundboard and ‘listens’, translating the sound into an electric signal. Not as accurate as an in-body microphone, but better at dealing with feedback. Piezo. The piezo is actually a type of transducer, but rather than sitting under your soundboard, it goes under your saddle where the strings pass over. It listens to the strings rather than the soundboard, and as result produces a more synthetic sound. Whereas the transducer can be overly sensitive, the piezo is better with feedback, but still prone to what’s referred to as ‘piezo quack’. Soundhole. If you want to avoid feedback entirely, a soundhole one is the way to go, as these are essentially the same as what’s used on electric guitars. The sound it produces is distinctive and can lack some of the nuances you get with the two above. Other Stuff Worth Knowing About. Active and Passive. All the above are either ‘active’ or ‘passive’ pickups, and it’s important to know the difference. Passive. Passive pickups don’t boost the signal. In other words, they have passive circuitry. This means they use simple transducers which work by many coils of wire wrapping around a magnet. The location of the magnet causes the strings to magnetize, too, so that when they vibrate, an electrical current passes through the metal wire. The passive variety doesn’t require batteries and is the type you find on Les Pauls (including most Copies), Stratocasters, and Telecasters, among many others. Active. The active type, on the other hand, does boost the signal – as such, it requires a power source for the active circuitry (usually a 9V battery). As it boosts the signal, it kicks out a high output – for this reason, the active variety is popular in genres such as metal and hard rock that requires more gain before feeding back (especially for articulate phrases that need more clarity in their delivery). Its lack of noisiness brings clarity that also provides a ‘sterilized’ feel. Magnets (Alnico vs. Ceramic). Another important factor that affects the output of a pickup is the magnets used. A material called ‘alnico’ is often used, which is a mix of aluminum, nickel, and cobalt. It was especially common in the 50s and 60s, offering a classic soft and warm tone. Ceramic pickups gained popularity in the 1970s, and often have a high output. This gives them clarity and produces a stronger sound – they’re cheaper than alnicos and offer a tight, loud growl. The layout of magnet also has a bearing on the sound, in particular whether it has individual magnetic poles (which produce a thin, bright sound), steel poles extending from an electromagnetic bar (which produce a fatter, darker sound) or the blade style, which replaces the individual pole pieces with a single bar made of metal. Potting. Potting is when pickups are sealed in wax to get rid of any air gaps in the coil or on the cover. These air gaps can create microphonic feedback, which presents itself as a loud, screeching sound when you’re playing at high volumes. The wax used is a mixture of beeswax and paraffin, which is heated to a high temperature so that it is runny enough to fill all of the gaps where air might get. If yours don’t come readily potted, you can get them done by a professional, or even pot them yourself with the right amount of care and guidance. Wiring (Parallel vs. Series). How pickups are wired makes a difference in the quality of your sound. Parallel wiring is when each pickup is wired up to the inputs and outputs together, in parallel. This means the signal reaches the guitar’s output via the fastest route possible, resulting in a clean, twangy and transparent tone. Sometimes, they’re wired in a ‘series.’ This is when they’re connected together, before reaching the output. It produces a very high output, which means that you can let out a much higher signal before running into any feedback problems. The downside to series wiring is that you often lose a lot of the higher-end frequencies. Locations (Where You Fit Them). Your guitar will have space for either two or three pickups. Each of these has a different purpose, suited to its position. Those close to the bridge will encounter a low amount of string vibration before being activated. This creates a bright sound, which is naturally quite quiet due to its positioning. The pickups designed to be fitted close to the bridge usually have a high output, to make up for the quiet location of the guitar. Pickups designed to go near the neck have a lower output, as the strings vibrate more near the neck, thus giving out a louder natural sound. The tone near the neck will also be deeper, making it well suited to chunky rhythm playing. Summary. We hope that’s given you a decent introduction. If you’re looking to purchase a set, before you dive in and buy some, consider what sound you’re going for. Do you like a heavy, precise tone with a consistent dynamic, or are you more interested in getting a vintage twang? If your heart’s set on heaviness, a set of active high output ones will do the trick, however, if you’re looking for some responsive ones then old school, passive single-coils are the only way to go. Another consideration is wood tone. What kind of wood is your guitar made from? Mahogany and rosewood have a dark tone, so hunt out pickups to complement. Maple, ash, and alder have a brighter sound, so they might be best suited to pickups that hold on to the high-end frequencies. Your volume knob affects your tone, too. 250K pots are warm, whereas 500K pots are bright. Finally, check that it’s physically possible to fit them. Many are designed for particular types, such as Strats, Teles or Les Pauls. Others are more versatile, offering compatibility with multiple models. If you have your mind on fitting some humbuckers into your single-coil guitar but don’t know how you’re going to make it fit, there are now plenty of humbuckers shaped like single-coils to ease your pain. And there are single-coils available shaped like humbuckers, so you have plenty of options. Good luck! ABOUT Privacy Disclosure Terms Zing Instruments is a participant in the Amazon Services Associates Program. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.© 2021 - Zing Instruments. All Rights Reserved.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 24
  • 13
  • guitar
  • 22
  • 13
  • coil
  • 21
  • 13
  • sound
  • 19
  • 13
  • single
  • 15
  • 13
  • single coil
  • 14
  • 13
  • output
  • 13
  • 13
  • tone
  • 13
  • 13
  • bass
  • 11
  • 13
  • magnet
  • 10
  • 13
  • humbucker
  • 10
  • 13
  • high
  • 10
  • 13
  • signal
  • 9
  • 13
  • type
  • 8
  • 13
  • electric
  • 8
  • 13
  • string
  • 8
  • 13
  • produce
  • 8
  • 13
  • instrument
  • 7
  • 13
  • active
  • 7
  • 13
  • passive
  • 7
  • 13
  • bar
  • 6
  • 13
  • acoustic
  • 6
  • 13
  • rock
  • 6
  • 13
  • feedback
  • 6
  • 13
  • body microphone
  • 5
  • 13
  • high output
  • 5
  • 13
  • wiring
  • 5
  • 13
  • neck
  • 5
  • 13
  • p90
  • 5
  • 13
  • hum
  • 5
  • 13
  • metal
  • 5
  • 13
  • warm
  • 5
  • 13
  • transducer
  • 5
  • 13
  • bass pickup
  • 4
  • 13
  • soap bar
  • 4
  • 13
  • guitar pickup
  • 4
  • 13
  • electric guitar
  • 4
  • 13
  • hard rock
  • 4
  • 13
  • single coil humbucker
  • 3
  • 13
  • coil humbucker
  • 3
  • 13
  • related review
  • 3
  • 13
  • boost signal
  • 3
  • 13
Result 14
TitleThe Structure of the Electric Guitar:What are pickups? - Musical Instrument Guide - Yamaha Corporation
Urlhttps://www.yamaha.com/en/musical_instrument_guide/electric_guitar/mechanism/mechanism002.html
DescriptionThis is the Yamaha Corporation [Musical Instrument Guide] website. This article contains information about the Electri guitar [The Structure of the Electric Guitar:What are pickups?]
Date
Organic Position14
H1The Structure of the Electric Guitar What are pickups?
H2Inside a pickup is a magnet and coil
Why use a coil?
There is a secret to how the coil is wound
Noise cancellation
Musical Instrument Guide:Electric Guitar Contents
H3How hum cancellation works
Origins
Structure
How to Play
How the Instrument is Made
Choosing an Instrument
Care and Maintenance
Trivia
H2WithAnchorsInside a pickup is a magnet and coil
Why use a coil?
There is a secret to how the coil is wound
Noise cancellation
Musical Instrument Guide:Electric Guitar Contents
BodyThe Structure of the Electric Guitar What are pickups? Inside a pickup is a magnet and coil. The pickup could be said to be the "heart" of an electric guitar. This device converts string vibrations into electricity, and is embedded in the body of the guitar right beneath the strings. Pickups use coils, which you may remember from conducting science experiments in school. An electric guitar pickup consists of a black bobbin with six magnetic bars inserted, and a material such as enameled wire wound around the magnets. Six magnets are used to better pick up the sound from the six stings. Some pickups use metal rods instead of magnets. In this case, a long and narrow magnet is laid under the bobbin. Magnets are inserted into the bobbin, then wound with enamel wire. The enamel wire has a diameter of around 0.05 mm. Why use a coil? Coils are also found in telephones and hand held microphones. Coils and magnets can be used to convert sound to electricity, even without electrical power. This works because an electric current flows through the coil when a magnetic body is moved over the magnet and coil. In an electric guitar the steel strings act as magnetic bodies. A change occurs in the electric current depending on the frequency at which the strings vibrate. The frequency wave of the strings and the wave of the electric current tend to work together, and the pickup uses this property to convert the sound into electricity. How pickups work There is a secret to how the coil is wound. Although the way the coil works is quite simple, the sound will change depending on the number of times the coil is wound, or even the way it is wound.Although winding the coil more will increase the volume of the sound, if wound too much the sound will become muffled. Even after winding the coil hundreds or thousands of times, the sound could still change if the coil is then wound even several tens of times. Meanwhile, the issue with how the coil is wound concerns the size of the gap in subsequent windings after the first time around. These gaps are incredibly small: as little as 1/100th of a millimeter. Increasing the size of the gap improves the treble. It gets even more complicated-the winding height and even the surface area of the winding (when seen from above) will affect the sound. Noise cancellation. Electric guitar pickups can include one or two coils. A pickup with one coil is called a "single coil pickup," while one with two coils is called a "humbucking pickup." Although coils are susceptible to outside noise, the two coils in a humbucking pickup cancel out each other's noise (hum cancellation), helping to reduce noise. Conversely, single coil pickups do not perform any noise cancellation, but offer a crisp and clean high-pitched tone. The silver parts are pickups. The photo depicts humbucking pickups, which feature two coils under metal covers. How hum cancellation works. Outside noise (humming) depends on how the coil is wound (and how many times the coil is wound) so coils A and B are wound in opposite directions to cancel noise, then the magnetic pole orientation is reversed and the phase of the output is aligned. Musical Instrument Guide:Electric Guitar Contents. Origins. The birth of the electric guitar  The electric guitar family  Structure. What kind of instrument is an electric guitar?  What are pickups?  [Experiment]Let's make and then test several coils  The purpose of effectors  Balancers and notch filters  How to Play. There are many ways to play the electric guitar  Controlling the sound  Pickups for different purposes  The role of effectors  There are many ways to play the electric bass  How the Instrument is Made. Even electric guitars are made from wood!  Shaping the neck and body  Coating gives the guitar a smooth finish  Assembly and adjustment  Choosing an Instrument. Choosing your first electric guitar  Types of strings and how to choose which ones to use  Must-have accessories  Useful accessories  Care and Maintenance. Basic care and maintenance  Care and maintenance techniques to keep in mind  Troubleshooting  Trivia. Slide guitar playing may have been invented in a bar  Feedback:Great for guitar playing! Not so great for karaoke...  What is the difference between an electric guitar and electric acoustic guitar?  Is there a way to eliminate the noise heard when plugged into an amplifier?  Whole note down tuning for deeper bass  Home Musical Instrument Guide Electric guitar The Structure of the Electric Guitar:What are pickups?
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • coil
  • 27
  • 14
  • electric
  • 19
  • 14
  • guitar
  • 19
  • 14
  • pickup
  • 19
  • 14
  • electric guitar
  • 13
  • 14
  • wound
  • 11
  • 14
  • sound
  • 9
  • 14
  • magnet
  • 8
  • 14
  • noise
  • 8
  • 14
  • coil wound
  • 7
  • 14
  • winding
  • 6
  • 14
  • string
  • 6
  • 14
  • work
  • 5
  • 14
  • time
  • 5
  • 14
  • instrument
  • 5
  • 14
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 4
  • 14
  • guitar pickup
  • 4
  • 14
  • coil pickup
  • 4
  • 14
  • pickup coil
  • 4
  • 14
  • body
  • 4
  • 14
  • magnetic
  • 4
  • 14
  • cancellation
  • 4
  • 14
  • electric current
  • 3
  • 14
  • humbucking pickup
  • 3
  • 14
  • care maintenance
  • 3
  • 14
  • structure
  • 3
  • 14
  • convert
  • 3
  • 14
  • electricity
  • 3
  • 14
  • bobbin
  • 3
  • 14
  • wire
  • 3
  • 14
  • current
  • 3
  • 14
  • change
  • 3
  • 14
  • gap
  • 3
  • 14
  • humbucking
  • 3
  • 14
  • play
  • 3
  • 14
  • care
  • 3
  • 14
  • maintenance
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
TitleGuitar Pickups Explained | Guitar Kit World
Urlhttps://guitarkitworld.com/blogs/resources/electric-guitar-pickups-explained
DescriptionPickups play a massive role in the tone of an electric guitar, so it makes sense to understand the basics of how they actually work and the variations of guitar pickups available. Recommended: Pickups for DIY Guitar Kits In the most basic sense, the pickups you will be dealing with when assembling an electric guitar ki
Date10 Nov 2018
Organic Position15
H1Guitar Pickups Explained
H2Magnetic Pickups Explained
The Differences between Single Coil and Humbucking Pickups
What Does This Mean To You?
Where Does Tone Come From?
Added to your cart:
H3Single Coil Pickups
Humbuckers
Resources that may be useful
H2WithAnchorsMagnetic Pickups Explained
The Differences between Single Coil and Humbucking Pickups
What Does This Mean To You?
Where Does Tone Come From?
Added to your cart:
BodyGuitar Pickups Explained Pickups play a massive role in the tone of an electric guitar, so it makes sense to understand the basics of how they actually work and the variations of guitar pickups available. Recommended: Pickups for DIY Guitar Kits In the most basic sense, the pickups you will be dealing with when assembling an electric guitar kit are magnetic. There are other types of pickups you will hear mentioned from time to time, however, for example: Contact Pickups (essentially microphones) Piezo Pickups (Which use crystals and don’t pick up outside interference as a result. They also sound fantastic) Active Pickups (Which require a source of electricity such as a battery) While the technology used to transfer sound from a guitar to an amplifier is pretty fascinating stuff especially in less common pickups such as Piezo pickups, we will focus on magnetic pickups because this is what you will be dealing with typically. Magnetic Pickups Explained. Magnetic pickups are essentially magnets (one long or 6 separate pieces generally) placed in a bobbin and then wrapped in copper wire. This, in turn, creates a magnetic field. There really isn't a lot more to a basic magnetic pickup. Recommended: Pickups for DIY Guitar Kits As guitar strings are essentially steel, when they vibrate over the magnetic field created by the pickup they create a signal (think of it like a disturbance of this magnetic field), which is passed onto your guitar amplifier via the output jack and guitar lead, in turn creating the sound you hear when playing an electric guitar. The Differences between Single Coil and Humbucking Pickups. Single Coil Electric Guitar Pickup Single Coil Pickups. If you purchase an ‘ST’ or ‘TE’ style guitar kit your guitar will have at least one single coil magnetic pickup in the bridge, middle or neck position. If you opt for an ‘LP’ style guitar kit the pickups will be what are commonly referred to as humbuckers. The very first mass-produced electric guitar was the Fender Telecaster (originally called the Broadcaster) which featured single coil pickups. These were very successful and as you will notice are still used commonly today by blues and country players for the most part. There was a bit of a problem, though. Single coil pickups tend to be fairly noisy as they can pick up on other unwanted frequencies, such as light switches, other amplifiers in the same room, basically anything that has the potential to disturb the signal. If you play with other musicians you can soon understand why this isn't always ideal. Recommended: Copper Shielding Your Guitar's Pickup Cavity Humbuckers. Humbucker Style Pickup Humbuckers as the name might suggest ‘buck’ this unwanted hum by creating two separate signals that essentially cancel each other out. Because they are less affected by unwanted frequencies by nature and use a much larger magnet they tend to be better suited to higher output. This is the reason you will see humbuckers used in metal and heavy rock. Because the output can be higher with a humbucker they tend to lend themselves to higher gain/distortion and will also be a contributing factor when it comes to sustain. Compare the tone of a Gibson Les Paul and a Fender Stratocaster and hear the difference for yourself. It's important to remember pickups aren't the only influence on tone and sustain, for instance, many people credit the set neck used on Gibson guitars such as the Les Paul for contributing to the sustain these guitars are renowned for. Need an example of great sustain? take a listen to Gary Moore's Still got the Blues. What Does This Mean To You? So essentially if you are looking for a thicker, higher output sound a humbucker will be a better fit for you. If however, you prefer a brighter, twangier tone a single coil will be best. If in doubt consider the guitar tones and styles of music you prefer e.g. Fender or Gibson and go with a similar style of guitar kit or even better grab yourself one of each. Where Does Tone Come From? While it is true that nearly all the guitar’s components will play a role in tone e.g. the bridge, saddle, and nut this is a more advanced topic that is deserving of an article in its own right at a later date. While we have touched on the characteristics of single coil and humbucking pickups, to truly cover guitar electronics check out -"Guitar Electronics for Musicians" by Donald Brosnac which details the history of guitar pickups and goes into great detail about the mechanics of guitar pickups). It's fairly heavy going for anyone new to the topic but also very interesting at the same time. Got an opinion on single coil V humbucker tone? Why not leave a comment below and share your thoughts. Resources that may be useful. SG® Guitar Kit Review An SG® style guitar kit can be a great project to work on whether you are experienced with assemb... Read now > Guitar Kit Styles For Musical Genres New to the guitar? Interested in assembling a guitar kit and learning to play but unsure which gu... Read now > Copper Shielding Kit Guitars Ever noticed a nasty hum when you plug in your new kit guitar, especially a guitar with P90 or si... Read now > Filed in: Guitar Electronics Previous article How to Wire a Stratocaster® Guitar Kit Added to your cart: . ** total_quantity ** | ** unit_price ** / ** unit_measure ** (-) Cart subtotal
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • guitar
  • 37
  • 15
  • pickup
  • 30
  • 15
  • kit
  • 13
  • 15
  • guitar kit
  • 11
  • 15
  • single coil
  • 10
  • 15
  • humbucker
  • 10
  • 15
  • coil
  • 10
  • 15
  • magnetic
  • 9
  • 15
  • single
  • 9
  • 15
  • tone
  • 8
  • 15
  • style
  • 7
  • 15
  • guitar pickup
  • 6
  • 15
  • electric guitar
  • 5
  • 15
  • magnetic pickup
  • 5
  • 15
  • electric
  • 5
  • 15
  • essentially
  • 5
  • 15
  • style guitar kit
  • 4
  • 15
  • kit guitar
  • 4
  • 15
  • style guitar
  • 4
  • 15
  • play
  • 4
  • 15
  • sound
  • 4
  • 15
  • output
  • 4
  • 15
  • higher
  • 4
  • 15
  • sustain
  • 4
  • 15
  • single coil pickup
  • 3
  • 15
  • magnetic field
  • 3
  • 15
  • coil pickup
  • 3
  • 15
  • guitar electronic
  • 3
  • 15
  • recommended
  • 3
  • 15
  • hear
  • 3
  • 15
  • time
  • 3
  • 15
  • amplifier
  • 3
  • 15
  • copper
  • 3
  • 15
  • field
  • 3
  • 15
  • signal
  • 3
  • 15
  • fender
  • 3
  • 15
  • tend
  • 3
  • 15
  • unwanted
  • 3
  • 15
  • gibson
  • 3
  • 15
  • great
  • 3
  • 15
  • electronic
  • 3
  • 15
  • read
  • 3
  • 15
Result 16
TitleTHESE 7 Different Types Of Guitar Pickups Explained Today!
Urlhttps://www.happynewguitarday.com/types-of-guitar-pickups/
DescriptionLooking to learn more about the types of guitar pickups there are available. We explain the differences between humbuckers, single-coils, P90 and more
Date9 Oct 2021
Organic Position16
H1THESE 7 Different Types Of Guitar Pickups Explained Today!
H2What is a Guitar Pickup?
Electric Guitar Pickup Types
Acoustic Guitar Pickup Types
Passive vs Active Pickups
Some Well Known Pickup Manufacturers
H3Single-Coil Pickup
Humbucker Guitar Pickups
P90 or Soap Bar Pickup
Piezo Pickups
J Style
Split Coil
Soundhole Pickups
Internal Microphones
Transducer Pickups
Passive Pickups
Active Pickups
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Guitar Pickup?
Electric Guitar Pickup Types
Acoustic Guitar Pickup Types
Passive vs Active Pickups
Some Well Known Pickup Manufacturers
BodyTHESE 7 Different Types Of Guitar Pickups Explained Today!Updated on October 9, 2021 by Dan HarperWithout the pickup, your guitar may not be audible enough. And when you’re not using the right kind of pickup, your guitar may have issues sounding like it was intended to. A guitar pickup is at the core of a guitar’s functionality and performance, along with the wood construction of the instrument, your amp, and your strings. Therefore, overlooking the pickup is not wise.  Let’s look at the pickups types.ContentsWhat is a Guitar Pickup?Electric Guitar Pickup TypesSingle-Coil PickupHumbucker Guitar PickupsP90 or Soap Bar PickupPiezo PickupsJ StyleSplit CoilAcoustic Guitar Pickup TypesSoundhole PickupsInternal MicrophonesTransducer PickupsPassive vs Active PickupsPassive PickupsActive PickupsSome Well Known Pickup ManufacturersPickups are available in different sizes and shapes. Most importantly, different pickups serve different purposes. For instance, the pickup used for playing guitar music cannot be used for metal and hard rock genres, and vice versa. The variety not just pertains to the music genre but also the kind of guitar. For instance, electric guitars and acoustic guitars have pickup classifications of their own. And they have their types of guitar pickups sub-categories as well.For the sake of brevity and some basic understanding, we’ll be focusing on pickups for electric guitars only. But before that, let’s briefly understand what a guitar pickup truly is.What is a Guitar Pickup?A pickup, technically called a transducer, is essentially a magnet wrapped in wire. The wrapping helps transform your strings’ vibration into a microelectronic signal. In layman terms, guitar pickups help amplify your guitar’s tone. The insulated copper wire coil and magnet work in tandem to create the necessary effect. They create a magnetic field surrounding the strings. This magnetic field changes when you hit a string, causing the wire coil to grab an induced voltage and current. A signal is then created, which gets transferred to the amplifier, creating the tone of your electric guitar.More reading on pickups:Why do guitars have multiple pickupsHumbucker vs Single coilhow to build a guitar pickupguitar pickups for metal toneHow guitar pickups workhow to fix microphonic pickupsbest guitar pickups for bluesElectric Guitar Pickup Types. The following are the three major best electric guitar for the money types of guitar pickups.Single-Coil Pickup. Single-coil pickups, as the name indicates, incorporate a single magnet. The regular Fender Stratocaster uses a single-coil pickup, for example. These Strat pickups are widely used, which is why their tone cannot be defined categorically. Generally, they are considered to be clearer and sharper than P90s pickup or humbuckers. They are thinner, brighter, and more focused compared to the other two pickup types.The genres that typically complement a single-coil pickup are surf and country. Most funk guitarists play single-coil Stratocasters, in fact. For rhythm guitar components on funk, disco, soul, and R&B tracks, single-coils pickups are ideal. You may use them for soloing as well. However, you must be able to control the guitar feedback loops, which are inevitable. Perhaps the only area single-coil pickups falter a bit is in their ability to handle high distortion levels, which are usually synonymous with metal and hard rock genres. They can manage marginally distorted signals, but nothing higher than that.Thanks to their great pairing of pickups with the Fender Stratocaster, they are often referred to as Strat or Fender style pickups. The Telecaster popularized its very own variant of single-coil pickups with some minor modifications added, like changes to the base plates. A widely known drawback to the pickup is its vulnerability to electrical interference, which results in a buzz or “hum” noise at higher volumes. This hum type is referred to as the “60 cycle” hum.Humbucker Guitar Pickups. A humbucker is basically a couple of single-coil pickups functioning as a team. Unlike a single-coil pickup, humbuckers “buck” hums – therefore, the name. The bucking is thanks to the two coils canceling out the extraneous noise of each other using reversed polarity. The by-product of this being the two coils producing a warm, big sound which has become synonymous with Gibson guitars’ fat, buttery sounds.Compared to single-coils, a humbucker has a fairly warm tone, making it quite suitable for the jazz genre. It’s believed that the humbucker pickups came to be due to the need for more output and volume from pickups while also eliminating the loud hum single-coil pickups generated. Thanks to this increased output, humbucker pickups do significantly better than single-coil pickups when it comes to genres that require high distortion levels. Country and surf are the only two genres that humbuckers are not cut out for. Otherwise, they shine in pretty much all scenarios. A lot of all this has also got a fair bit to do with the build and physics of a humbucker.A fairly recent addition to humbucker pickups is “coil-tapping”, which has only heightened the pickups’ popularity. The coil tapping ensures only one coil of the two engage when you pull a knob. This means you get a significantly cleaner and brighter single-coil pickups sound. Also, this addition offers players using humbuckers a lot more tonal choices right at their fingertips.P90 or Soap Bar Pickup. The P90s are somewhere in between a single-coil pickups and a humbucker pickup. It’s basically a hybrid of the two, but more of a single-coil pickup variant. Since P90s are technically single-coil pickups, their sensitivity is pretty much the same as a single-coil, 60/50 cycle. However, instead of magnets wrapped in a coil, like they do in single-coils, P90s come with magnets featured beneath the coil. And due to this arrangement, a P90’s single-coils look bigger than traditional single-coils. Its bobbins are wider and shorter. Another major difference is that P90 pickups incorporate bar magnets beneath their pole pieces. Regular single-coil pickups employ rod magnets instead.A P90’s output is higher compared to single-coil pickups, but they lack the output that humbuckers are known for. A P90 usually has slightly more depth compared to regular single coils, but again not as intense as humbuckers. P90s are ideal for rock and blues genres – not hard rock, however. Despite having its strongholds, a P90 is usually considered to be versatile.P90s pickups were seen on several Gibson guitars of yore, such as the Gibson Les Paul. Also, unlike humbuckers and single-coils, a P90 comes in different forms and shapes so that it could be compatible with different guitar builds when making an electric guitar. For instance, the soap bar shape was made to work with SG and Les Paul guitar body types alone.Piezo Pickups. Piezo pickups are an alternative to magnetic pickups that we find on a large majority of electric guitars and the technology behind it actually predates that of the magnetic pickups. Unlike magnetic pickups which translate string vibrations into electric signals using the magnetic field created by the magnet(s) and wrapped copper wires, a piezo pickup actually picks up the actual vibrations made by the guitar strings. This is the reason why this kind of pickups are most commonly used to magnify the sound of acoustic instruments, such as a nylon string guitar.Now, as for piezo pickups on electric guitars, the pickups there commonly use a kind of compressed crystal which receives and measures the pressure of the string vibrations in order to translate it to electrical current. With piezo pickups, the electric signal is preamplified before it reaches the guitar’s output.Tone-wise, electric guitars with piezo pickups produce a less warm but brighter tone compared to magnetic pickups and this allows for a high degree of tone clarity and string articulation. Therefore, we can probably say that piezo pickups really replicate the actual acoustic energy tone-wise. One particular advantage with piezo pickups (that many guitarists will appreciate) is that since there is no magnetic field involved here, you will pick up very little hum while playing an electric guitar fitted with a piezo pickup.J Style. J style guitar pickups are a Joe Barden product. This incredible piece provides the same great JBE power, tone, and response for their bass guitar for six strings for the last 25 years. These pickups were designed to maintain the J-Bass tone and character but with advanced features.J style pickups are readily available for both 4, and 5 string J-bass styled bass guitars. They are widely loved as they exhibit quiet performance for live performance or recording. What’s more, bass players can tailor their sound accurately without fear of noise.Features include a dual blade design, extended frequency response, fits standard J-Bass pickup routs. The neck and bridge position pickups are different in size to fit into the cavities of traditional J-Bass, as well as guitars styled the same way without any modification to the instrument. These are among the many reasons that make these pickups a favorite to many.Split Coil. If you are looking to upgrade the sound of your guitar, a set of pickups can do the trick. Since guitars are more or less the same, a pickup can make a significant change to how your instrument sounds. The way these pickups perform largely determines the tone of your instrument. But how do you choose the perfect pickups for your bass guitar? Below, we will let you know about split coil pickups.Split coil pickups are two halves of one single coil pickup, with each half placed underneath two of the strings of the bass. This particular pickup was popularised by Leo Fender’s “P-Bass” in the 1950s. Also, they are common on a Precision bass. They are made in a way that the signal they pick up is out of phase, hence their nickname “the humbucker” as they buck the hum.Overall, this pickup’s sound is more profound in the middle and bottom to make it more distinct. On jazz, they have a slight hum from the open circuit. Split coil pickups are very popular with punk rock stars because of the distinctive clear and big sound they produce. They can also be paired with J bass pickup at the edge to get a variety of tones from each.Acoustic Guitar Pickup Types. No matter how loud your acoustic guitar is, you’re gonna need to amplify it when playing in front of any sizable crowd. And while a standard mic might get the job done, a pickup will be much more effective — and convenient too. Now, it goes without saying that you want to choose a pickup system that matches your style and tonal needs. On that note, it’s time to look at the 3 main types of acoustic guitar pickups.Soundhole Pickups. These are very similar to electric guitar pickups, employing a magnetic field to pick up the vibrations of the strings. A typical soundhole pickup is comprised of a magnet upon which an insulated copper wire is wrapped; this combination is what creates the magnetic field. And like the name suggests, the unit can be mounted besides the soundhole or on top of it as bridging.Soundhole pickups tend to have a warm tone with lots of string detail. They’re also user-friendly, and easier to install than other systems. The only problem is that they don’t work with nylon-strung axes.Internal Microphones. Your pickup system could also be in the form of a tiny mic that’s mounted right inside your guitar’s body. Internal mics pick up sound the same way that standard microphones do, but they’re much more sensitive in design. This means they’ll pick up more of the instrument’s character and resonance, subsequently yielding a more natural tone than other units. Still, internal mics are highly-susceptible to feedback, and dependent on proper placement to produce the desired results.Transducer Pickups. Transducer pickups are known for their lifelike representation of your acoustic tone and work by converting physical vibrations into electrical signals that can be amplified. These pickups don’t pick up any ambient sound, hence produce more direct sound with a solid and distinctive tone. An example of transducer pickup is the piezo system.The advantage of transducer pickups is they are more reliable than most pickups as their tone is easier to control. Further, they are not inclined to feedback. Hence, this pickup is your go-to option if you want to amplify a nylon acoustic guitar.Transducer pickups are relatively easy to install. Nevertheless, you can still have a professional pre-fit one for you. Further, they are suitable for multiple styles to cater to a broad audience of guitar lovers. What’s more, they are pretty flexible and can be mounted under the bridge or anywhere you like.Passive vs Active Pickups. Pickups are an important part of any electric guitar because they act as microphone during sound production. They are usually made of a magnetic material and covered in wire. Pickups mainly alter your guitar’s string vibrations into an electrical signal that is transferred to your amplifier to ultimately produce sound.Pickups come in two types which include passive and active pickups.Passive Pickups. They don’t require an external source of power for them to function because they have a copper wire and a magnet that usually senses string vibration. These vibrations are transformed into a current that is fed out of your amplifier.When using passive pickup around electronics, you are likely to hear noise from the pickup that might interfere with your playing. This is mainly caused by static accumulation because of the multiple wires used in construction. A humbucker can be used to reduce this problem; although it might not be of much help when used at a high volume.Active Pickups. This requires an external source of power supply, which in turn necessitates fitting a battery onto your guitar rig. If the external source of power does not fit, you may be forced to modify your guitar. The external source of power will make the tone more consistent, and the sound a little more powerful.Most musicians use passive pickups because of their ability to switch volume and tones across a song. Active pickups, with the ability to reproduce sound with clarity, are suitable for genres that need lots of power. One should consider what they want to attain musically when selecting between passive and active pickups.Some Well Known Pickup Manufacturers. LR BaggsDiMarzioSeymour DuncanSitemap - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policyxx
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 114
  • 16
  • guitar
  • 62
  • 16
  • coil
  • 40
  • 16
  • single
  • 28
  • 16
  • single coil
  • 26
  • 16
  • string
  • 21
  • 16
  • coil pickup
  • 20
  • 16
  • bass
  • 19
  • 16
  • tone
  • 19
  • 16
  • guitar pickup
  • 18
  • 16
  • single coil pickup
  • 17
  • 16
  • humbucker
  • 16
  • 16
  • sound
  • 15
  • 16
  • p90
  • 13
  • 16
  • electric
  • 13
  • 16
  • magnetic
  • 11
  • 16
  • electric guitar
  • 10
  • 16
  • type
  • 10
  • 16
  • magnet
  • 10
  • 16
  • genre
  • 9
  • 16
  • vibration
  • 9
  • 16
  • piezo
  • 9
  • 16
  • style
  • 8
  • 16
  • wire
  • 8
  • 16
  • signal
  • 8
  • 16
  • piezo pickup
  • 7
  • 16
  • instrument
  • 7
  • 16
  • acoustic
  • 7
  • 16
  • pick
  • 7
  • 16
  • string vibration
  • 6
  • 16
  • magnetic field
  • 6
  • 16
  • field
  • 6
  • 16
  • hum
  • 6
  • 16
  • power
  • 6
  • 16
  • bass pickup
  • 5
  • 16
  • bass guitar
  • 5
  • 16
  • active
  • 5
  • 16
  • rock
  • 5
  • 16
  • produce
  • 5
  • 16
  • external source power
  • 4
  • 16
  • type guitar
  • 4
  • 16
  • copper wire
  • 4
  • 16
  • pickup humbucker
  • 4
  • 16
  • humbucker pickup
  • 4
  • 16
  • magnetic pickup
  • 4
  • 16
  • external source
  • 4
  • 16
  • source power
  • 4
  • 16
  • source
  • 4
  • 16
  • soap bar
  • 3
  • 16
  • hard rock
  • 3
  • 16
  • acoustic guitar
  • 3
  • 16
  • pickup electric
  • 3
  • 16
  • magnet wrapped
  • 3
  • 16
  • transducer pickup
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
TitleDo Electric Guitar Pickups Really Make A Difference? – Rock Guitar Universe
Urlhttps://rockguitaruniverse.com/guitar-pickups-make-a-difference/
DescriptionGuitar pickups are among the most important parts of the guitar. Without pickups, no one would be able to hear what you play. The pickup…
Date
Organic Position17
H1Do Electric Guitar Pickups Really Make A Difference?
H2Guitar Pickup Types
Guitar Pickups Configurations And Their Effect On The Tone
Cheap vs Expensive Guitar Pickups
Can I Put Any Pickups On My Guitar?
Summary
H3S-S-S Configuration
HH Configuration
H-S-S Configuration
S-S Configuration
HSH Configuration
Cheap Pickups
Expensive Pickups
Recent Posts
H2WithAnchorsGuitar Pickup Types
Guitar Pickups Configurations And Their Effect On The Tone
Cheap vs Expensive Guitar Pickups
Can I Put Any Pickups On My Guitar?
Summary
BodyDo Electric Guitar Pickups Really Make A Difference? Written by Jacob in Guitar Gear Guitar pickups are among the most important parts of the guitar. Without pickups, no one would be able to hear what you play. The pickup will register disturbance in the magnetic field and create a small current that will further get amplified until we can hear it from the speaker. But do electric guitar pickups really make a difference? Pickups are responsible for the sound of the guitar, and by picking the right type and combination, you can significantly change how your guitar sounds. However, you should also consider an amplifier as well. Expensive pickups will not sound as great on a cheap amp, while cheap pickups will sound quite good on a pro amp. Depending on the types of pickups your guitar has, and the combination of those pickups, you’ll be able to create a variety of tones. For example, SSS combination with three single-coil pickups is popular in blues music, while HH with two humbuckers is used in heavier genres like metal. Contents show 1 Guitar Pickup Types 2 Guitar Pickups Configurations And Their Effect On The Tone 2.1 S-S-S Configuration 2.2 HH Configuration 2.3 H-S-S Configuration 2.4 S-S Configuration 2.5 HSH Configuration 3 Cheap vs Expensive Guitar Pickups 3.1 Cheap Pickups 3.2 Expensive Pickups 4 Can I Put Any Pickups On My Guitar? 5 Summary Guitar Pickup Types. There are two main differences and categories when it comes to types of pickups single-coils and humbuckers, and both can be either active or passive. The first important thing is the number of coils that pickups have. Single-coil pickups will have a single winding around the permanent magnet, and in it, the electromotive force will generate a small current. The second type is humbucker which is, basically, two single coils put together. So the first category is based on the number of coils that pickup has. If the magnet has a single winding around it, that type of pickup is called single-coils. The main problem with single-coil pickups is that they create a hum or noise when they are used individually. To avoid this problem, guitars with two coils that are wound in the opposite direction are made. They have a similar effect as if you took two single-coil pickups and place them side by side.  Since there are two coils in humbuckers, the output of these pickups will be higher. Single-coils are mostly used for blues and rock, while humbuckers are for genres like heavy metal. Naturally, it is not impossible to see someone playing blues with humbuckers and another way around.  Both types of pickup as explained here are passive. This means that they require no additional power source. The current that is generated in the coils is high enough to travel through the cable to the amplifier that will enhance the signal until it can be reproduced and heard through the speakers.  However, there is another guitar pickup type where the player will need an additional power source. These pickups are also known as active. The player will usually need a 9V battery to power the electronic board. The pickup will besides everything mentioned use a circuit board to enhance the characteristics of the pickup. Both single-coils and humbuckers come in active and passive versions.  Related Post if you are interested to know whatever guitar pickups wear out, then check out my post Do Guitar Pickups Wear Out? Guitar Pickups Configurations And Their Effect On The Tone. Based on the types of pickup in the guitar, the player can have different tones at their disposal.  Pickup Type Pickups TypeTone Single CoilBright, CrispHumbuckerThicker, Warm Configurations Pickups ConfigurationsTone PossibleS – S – SClassic Strat tone with bluesy sound with a brighter toneH – HHeavier sound with a warm tone, usually for heavy metal and hard rockH – S – SThe punchy, thicker, warmer tone in the bridge positionS – SUsually associated with Tele for a country with a brighter toneH – S – HHeavier, thicker, warmer sound in both  neck and bridge positionH – H – HHigher output in each position with a heavy tone that will sound quite warm Check the following video to hear all the different configurations S-S-S Configuration. credit: David Monniaux SSS is where the guitar will have three single-coil pickups. The perfect example of the SSS configuration is a Fender Stratocaster. Strat guitar also has a switch that allows players to change the pickups that are used. Modern Fenders have a five-way switch, where there are five different positions. The first one is for the neck pickup, the second one is for the neck and middle. Similarly, the third one is for the middle, and the fourth one is for the middle and bridge. Finally, the fifth position will activate only the bridge pickup. This way, the player will have five different tones that they can use along with potentiometers to further shape the tone. The potentiometers can regulate, or more accurately, remove a part of the frequency. These knobs will remove higher frequencies or restore them, depending on the way you turn the knob. This way, the player can roll off the treble, and they can make their guitar sound brighter or warmer.  HH Configuration. The HH combination is as popular as SSS. This combination is used on almost every Gibson model, and many companies after kept the design. Naturally, you can find a Strat with this configuration as well. Double hum combo is used for every genre that requires higher output like hard rock, heavy metal, and even blues.  H-S-S Configuration. In this configuration, we will have a humbucker in the bridge position, while the other two pickups are single-coils. Usually, players will use the bridge pickup for playing rhythm, and by placing a humbucker in that position, the player can have a pickup with higher output for rhythm. This configuration found its place in genres like heavy metal and hard rock. The player can play riffs on the humbucker while keeping that well-known single-coil sound for solo.  S-S Configuration. credit: CasinoKat A perfect example of this combination is a Fender Telecaster. Since there are only two pickups that are both single-coils, the player will have a three-way switch that they can use to change between these pickups. As you can imagine, there are fewer options for creating sound. HSH Configuration. credit: Freetoast Here the neck and bridge are humbuckers. The perfect example of HSH guitar is Steve Vai’s Ibanez. Many years ago, Steve Vai worked with Ibanez to create a perfect guitar for his needs, and the result is a guitar that became among the most popular instruments in the world.  Of course, you can find guitars with all three humbuckers. While they are not as common and not as popular, there are still a few examples out there. Ace Frehley from Kiss used to play Les Paul with three humbuckers. There aren’t many guitars with this configuration, and it never became as popular as other types.  Cheap vs Expensive Guitar Pickups. So, what’s the main difference between cheap and expensive guitar pickups? Both do the same job, and while ones can cost tens of dollars others can go up to several hundred. Of course, everyone would love to know if there is a significant difference that can justify the price of each. The difference between these two is incredible. Since pickups are the very thing that creates the tone of the guitar, investing in good ones will let you have a perfect and clear tone. On the other hand, cheap pickups are lower quality and the tone will never be nearly as good. Naturally, this can be even more noticeable if you compare cheap ones with active pickups. Expensive pickup will offer a clearer and more defined tone.  Cheap Pickups. There are several factors when it comes to cheap pickups. Firstly, the company that created them won’t be a well-known brand. Now I do not say this because of the brand name, but because of the style. If you get a Fender pickup, you can be sure that your guitar will sound like Fender. While no name pickups will often sound bland and without that special something. The company that created them will use cheaper materials, weaker magnets, copper winding won’t be as pure, and everything will be a tiny bit worse.  As a result, the sound will never be as the one you imagined or heard. And the only way to achieve that is with expensive equipment. Naturally, not everyone can afford an expensive amplifier, and if your goal is to create something unique and experiment, cheap pickups can actually do the work. Since each pickup will offer something unique, there is a chance that you’ll find the one that works for you. The best part is that you won’t have to spend a fortune, and you can experiment until you find something that you like.  Expensive Pickups. That brand name I mentioned works almost as a certificate. If you get EMG pickups, your guitar will have a higher output, you’ll be able to play anything from Pink Floyd to Iron Maiden. Naturally, the price is a bit higher. Expensive pickups can be several hundred for a set. The guitar equipped with a high-end pickup will sound like a high-end guitar. However, if you spend a fortune on the guitar and buy the cheapest amplifier, you might not notice the difference.  Amplifiers play a major role in the sound of the guitar. The only downside of these pickups is the price. And if you combine it with the price of an amp, you should prepare yourself to spend maybe over a thousand on equipment.  Of course, the main question is what you want as a player. If you dream of having a perfect sound, then you should prepare yourself for a high price for the quality. There is no doubt that expensive pickups are better, but the sound of cheap ones can be pleasant too.  Can I Put Any Pickups On My Guitar? Changing pickups is quite easy. Especially if you are not planning on changing the configuration of the pickups. However, there are several things that you should consider. If you own a Stratocaster with an SSS combination, you can put any single-coil pickup in it. You can buy a set of Fender pickups and install them in the guitar without any problems. However, if you want to change the configuration, there might be extra work. For example, the HSS combination is still doable. But if you want a real humbucker in the bridge position, there is no other way but to expand the hole in the wood. Original humbucker won’t fit in the single-coil hole, and you will need to widen it before the pickup can fit. However, there is a way around this as well. Some companies like DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan create humbuckers in a single-coil size. This way, you’ll be able to get a humbucker sound without a need to drill anything.  Similarly, if you have humbuckers but want to switch to single-coils, you will need to cover the extra space. Unfortunately, you won’t find single-coils that are as big as humbuckers, and you will have to practice your woodworking skills if you want everything to look neat.  The other problem you might encounter is if you want to switch to active pickups. Whether you are switching to active singles or hums, you will need to find a place to store a 9V battery. While some guitars can offer extra space under the pickguard or under the potentiometers, it is not always an option. Furthermore, you will need your battery to be easily accessible if you don’t want to remove the entire pickguard every time your battery dies.  Guitars that have active stock pickups, usually have an additional compartment for the battery that is easily accessible.  Summary. Besides the amplifier, investing in pickups is always a great idea. This way, you can upgrade the sound of your guitar and create something unique and beautiful without buying a new instrument. If you are satisfied with the wood, design, and look of your guitar, upgrading pickups is something you can always try.  So the answer is yes. Pickups can make all the difference in the world. They are the reason why you can hear the guitar at all. If you found this article useful you may want to save this pin below to your Guitar board Tweet Jacob I have been playing guitar since 2004. As long as I can remember I always had a huge passion for rock music and I extremely enjoy playing it. Helping people on their rock journey is what drives me to keep on playing. Read More About Me Recent Posts. link to Top 30 Famous&Easy Arctic Monkeys Guitar Songs - Tabs Included Top 30 Famous&Easy Arctic Monkeys Guitar Songs - Tabs Included An English rock band, Arctic Monkeys, was formed in mid-2002 in Sheffield, after friends’ meeting at Stocksbridge High School. The band’s popularity started in 2004 when CDs with their demo songs...Continue Reading link to Top 30 Famous & Easy Nirvana Guitar Songs - Tabs Included Top 30 Famous & Easy Nirvana Guitar Songs - Tabs Included Founded by lead singer and guitarist Kurt Cobain and bassist Krist Novoselic in 1987 in Aberdeen, Washington, Nirvana, one of the most notorious American rock bands of all times as their music...Continue Reading
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 78
  • 17
  • guitar
  • 52
  • 17
  • configuration
  • 36
  • 17
  • single
  • 24
  • 17
  • coil
  • 23
  • 17
  • sound
  • 21
  • 17
  • humbucker
  • 20
  • 17
  • single coil
  • 19
  • 17
  • guitar pickup
  • 16
  • 17
  • type
  • 14
  • 17
  • tone
  • 14
  • 17
  • player
  • 13
  • 17
  • cheap
  • 13
  • 17
  • expensive
  • 12
  • 17
  • switch
  • 9
  • 17
  • expensive pickup
  • 8
  • 17
  • coil pickup
  • 8
  • 17
  • fender
  • 8
  • 17
  • difference
  • 8
  • 17
  • create
  • 8
  • 17
  • combination
  • 8
  • 17
  • bridge
  • 8
  • 17
  • type pickup
  • 7
  • 17
  • pickup guitar
  • 7
  • 17
  • find
  • 7
  • 17
  • active
  • 7
  • 17
  • rock
  • 7
  • 17
  • position
  • 7
  • 17
  • single coil pickup
  • 6
  • 17
  • cheap pickup
  • 6
  • 17
  • pickup single
  • 6
  • 17
  • amplifier
  • 6
  • 17
  • example
  • 6
  • 17
  • higher
  • 6
  • 17
  • perfect
  • 6
  • 17
  • pickup single coil
  • 5
  • 17
  • configuration credit
  • 5
  • 17
  • pickup type
  • 5
  • 17
  • pickup sound
  • 5
  • 17
  • playing
  • 5
  • 17
  • high
  • 5
  • 17
  • battery
  • 5
  • 17
  • price
  • 5
  • 17
  • guitar song tab
  • 4
  • 17
  • song tab included
  • 4
  • 17
  • cheap expensive
  • 4
  • 17
  • heavy metal
  • 4
  • 17
  • top 30
  • 4
  • 17
  • guitar song
  • 4
  • 17
  • song tab
  • 4
  • 17
  • tab included
  • 4
  • 17
  • guitar pickup type
  • 3
  • 17
  • cheap expensive guitar
  • 3
  • 17
  • expensive guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 17
  • pickup difference
  • 3
  • 17
  • sound guitar
  • 3
  • 17
  • guitar sound
  • 3
  • 17
  • sss combination
  • 3
  • 17
  • expensive guitar
  • 3
  • 17
  • coil humbucker
  • 3
  • 17
  • bridge position
  • 3
  • 17
  • perfect example
  • 3
  • 17
  • higher output
  • 3
  • 17
  • fender pickup
  • 3
  • 17
  • arctic monkey
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleA Comprehensive Guide to the Dizzying World of Electric Guitar Pickups | Guitar World
Urlhttps://www.guitarworld.com/gear/comprehensive-guide-dizzying-world-electric-guitar-pickups
DescriptionIt’s a no-brainer that the two most important elements of an electric guitar rig are the guitar and amp. But what is the third most important element? The pickups
Date
Organic Position18
H1A Comprehensive Guide to the Dizzying World of Electric Guitar Pickups
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyA Comprehensive Guide to the Dizzying World of Electric Guitar Pickups By Chris Gill published 6 October 17 (Image credit: DiMarzio)It’s a no-brainer that the two most important elements of an electric guitar rig are the guitar and amp. But what is the third most important element?The pickups. Why? Because they are the critical, essential link between the guitar and amp, transmitting the guitar’s signal to the amp while also acting as sort of a gatekeeper by boosting and/or cutting certain frequencies coming from the guitar.While a guitar’s tone woods and construction account for much of its overall tonal characteristics, the pickups are the source of a guitar’s primary tone, shaping its personality by sculpting the guitar’s inherent acoustic tone into something that’s (hopefully) more refined, sonically attractive, articulate and dynamically responsive before it reaches the amp and speakers for further tone shaping.One of the easiest, fastest and sometimes even cheapest ways to significantly improve a guitar’s tone is by upgrading its pickups. Simply put, a poor set of pickups can make a great guitar sound lousy, but a great set of pickups can make a cheap guitar actually sound pretty good.Don’t believe it? Consider the example of many low-budget Teisco and Harmony/Silvertone guitars from the Sixties built out of cheesy plywood and inferior mystery materials but equipped with “gold foil” pickups, which on their own fetch almost as much on the used market as the entire guitar they were installed into because those pickups make pretty much any guitar sound divine.While changing pickups can provide a guitar with a significant tonal makeover, a good set of pickups basically enhances what is already there instead of completely transforming a guitar into something else. One way to think of the process is like swapping engines in a car.For example, one could install a Corvette 327 engine in a 1940 Ford Tudor sedan (and lots of hot rodding enthusiasts have done so), but while the swap will increase the Ford’s top speed and improve performance, the new engine won’t turn the Ford into a Corvette.Similarly, one can’t turn a Strat into a Les Paul just by installing full-size humbuckers; there’s much more that influences a guitar’s tone, such as body and neck woods, scale length, neck and headstock angles, bridge construction and so on—but a pickup swap will certainly change the guitar’s performance and personality. Illustration Courtesy of FenderProbably the most difficult part of the pickup-swapping process is deciding which pickups to choose in the first place. Back in the Seventies when replacement pickups first hit the market in significant numbers, the choices were basically split between vintage-style or high-output models made by a handful of pickup specialists.Today there are hundreds of choices, which include low-cost “generic” models, numerous variations of vintage classics, super high-output versions, an ever-growing selection of artist signature models, accurate reproductions of obscure cult pickups, revolutionary modern designs and much more, offered by a growing variety of guitar companies, pickup specialists and small boutique makers. Then there are various specs that confuse neophytes and old farts alike and can be as difficult to decode as a Japanese book from a native English speaker’s perspective.The good thing is that if you have a particular, reasonable tone goal in mind, there’s a very strong likelihood that there’s a pickup out there that will deliver the goods. Of course, you don’t want to go through a dozen or so pickups before you find the right one, which is why we’re here to help you navigate through the vast and often confusing world of today’s replacement pickup market. From the terms and technologies behind pickup design to the tools you need to install pickups yourself, the following information is essential knowledge that should put you on a faster track to tonal nirvana.WHAT IS A PICKUP? For this article we’ll be focusing exclusively on standard magnetic electric guitar pickups and not on other varieties such as piezo or other contact transducers, microphone-based pickups or optical technology.The modern electric guitar pickup that we all know and love was initially conceived in the early Thirties by George Beauchamp for the first commercially successful electric guitar—the Ro-Pat-In/Rickenbacker A-25/A-22 “Frying Pan” lap steel. Whereas previous electric guitar pickup designs focused on capturing the vibrations of a guitar’s top or body, Beauchamp’s design focused on the vibrating strings instead. His design incorporated two large horseshoe-shaped magnets that surrounded the strings near the bridge and a wire coil wrapped around a bobbin that surrounded individual magnetic pole pieces for each string.A standard electric guitar pickup creates a magnetic flux field, which in turn magnetizes a string made of ferromagnetic material like steel or nickel. When the string is plucked, the vibrations of the magnetically charged string disturb the flux field. As the magnetic field fluctuates, the disturbances are transmitted through the wire coil as electrical current.The overall design of a magnetic electric guitar pickup is very simple, but numerous variables such as the type and strength of the magnet(s), size of the coil(s), size of the wire, wire material, wire insulation, number of windings, winding pattern, pole piece design and so on affect a pickup’s performance, output and tonal characteristics. While it’s important to be aware of these variables and how they can affect sound, don’t worry too much about the finer details unless you plan on designing your own pickups.PICKUP TYPES In the grand scheme of things, there are only two basic types of electric guitar pickups: single-coil and humbucking. A single-coil pickup generally consists of a coil of wire wrapped around a bobbin surrounding either individual pole pieces for each string or a single, continuous blade that extends across all of the strings. A humbucking pickup involves two wire coils placed either side by side or in a top and bottom stack configuration, also with the coils surrounding the pole pieces or blade(s).Usually a humbucking pickup has a single flat, bar-shaped magnet placed below a side-by-side configuration of coils and centered lengthwise between each coil and its set of polepieces, which are made of ferrous material such as steel to conduct magnetism from the bar magnet and generate the magnetic field.On a single-coil pickup and some stacked humbuckers, the pole pieces are usually made of permanently magnetized material, although many exceptions exist, like the P-90 pickup design, which features two bar magnets underneath the coil with ferrous pole piece screws placed in between the magnets.Lollar Pickups' TraditionalIn general terms, single-coil pickups tend to be smaller in size, have lower output and produce brighter tones with emphasized treble, but they also tend to pick up unwanted interference like 60-cycle hum. Humbucking pickups are generally larger, deliver higher output levels and offer warmer tones with pronounced midrange, while also eliminating most extraneous noise due to the noise-canceling properties resulting from using two coils with reversed polarity and the current flowing in opposing directions.However, over time these distinctions have become blurred, and it’s now common to find humbucking pickups in smaller, Strat- and Tele-sized configurations, single-coil pickups with noise-canceling technology and many other variations.SINGLE-COIL PICKUP TYPES By far the most popular and common single-coil pickup types are Strat- and Tele-style pickups. However, there are a multitude of other varieties worth consideration that each offer their own distinct tonal personalities and performance characteristics. The Gibson P-90 (in soapbar and dog-ear housings) is a very popular choice, but Gibson’s similar and earlier design known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup featuring a single blade pole piece is also a cool alternative with cult appeal, especially among jazz, country and blues players.The Fender Jazzmaster and Franz pickups (the latter commonly found in Guild electrics from the Fifties) look similar to P-90 pickups, but each has its own distinct voice, as do Fender Jaguar pickups, which have similar dimensions to Strat pickups but are surrounded by metal claws to focus a parallel magnetic field along each string.A set of Fender Custom Shop Texas Special Strat pickupsOther interesting classic, original single-coil pickup designs include the “lipstick tube” pickups found on many Danelectro and Silvertone guitars, Gretsch Hilo’Tron pickups, DeArmond/Dynasonic pickups commonly used by Gretsch, Burns Tri-Sonic (a key component of Brian May’s tone), Rickenbacker “toaster top” and variations of the Sixties “gold foil” design found in Teisco and Harmony guitars.HUMBUCKING PICKUP TYPES Seth lover’s original humbucking pickup design, introduced on Gibson guitars in 1957 and nicknamed the “PAF” for the “patent applied for” decal affixed to the base plate through the early Sixties, remains the basic template for the majority of humbucking pickup designs produced today. However, there are several other popular classic variations, including Gibson’s smaller mini-humbucker and Firebird pickups, the Gretsch Filter’Tron and Fender Wide-Range (also designed by Seth Lover).PASSIVE VS. ACTIVE The most common distinction after single-coil/ humbucking is whether a pickup is passive or active. Passive pickups are the traditional wire coil/magnet/pole piece design, and they remain the most popular style of pickup on the market today. Passive pickups have a high-impedance design (low current, potentially high voltage), and output is usually increased by wrapping the bobbins with additional turns of wire and/or using more powerful magnets.However, increasing the output of a passive pickup also can affect the tone in undesirable ways such as making the treble response too dark or shrill, and the pickups can become more susceptible to undesirable external noise. If the magnets are too powerful, a strong magnetic field can actually suppress string vibration, decreasing sustain and dynamic response—the reverse of the desired outcome.Active pickups have similar basic construction to passive pickups, but the circuitry uses an active preamp (usually powered by a 9-volt battery) to boost the signal, allowing low-impedance designs (high current, potentially low voltage) incorporating fewer wraps of coil wire and less powerful magnets.There are several benefits to this type of design: reduced noise (particularly with single-coil designs), higher overall output, consistent tone when turning down the volume control, no high-frequency loss when using long cables, consistent clarity and note-to-note definition whether using clean or high-gain distortion amp settings, and the ability to use active tone controls to boost or cut frequencies (whereas passive tone controls are really just low-pass filters that can only roll off treble frequencies to make the tone darker). The downside of active pickups is that the tone can cover a wider and flatter frequency range than many players are accustomed to, which some players find too cold or sterile, and the output is generally more consistent, which some players consider less dynamically responsive.As always (at least when it comes to pickups), there are plenty of exceptions to these general descriptions. Some new active pickup models are designed to provide warm tones similar to vintage passive pickups, and some modern passive pickup designs have expanded treble and bass to provide a wider frequency range without sacrificing dynamic response.OUTPUT Now that we’ve discussed most of the popular different types of electric guitar pickups, let’s get into the basic details of pickup construction and specs that guitarists should know. In discussions, reviews, recommendations and sales literature for pickups, the topic of output seems to dominate. Pickups are often categorized as low-, medium- or high-output, and the term “vintage output” gets thrown around a lot, usually for low- or sometimes medium-output pickups.This all seems relatively self-explanatory, but confusion often arises when getting into specific ways of measuring output, particularly since the biggest pickup companies use different means for listing these specs. Seymour Duncan uses DC resistance, which is measured in ohms, while DiMarzio measures output in millivolts. Some companies prefer to specify inductance (measured in henries) or even a combination of two to all three of the previous.DC resistance is the easiest spec to measure as it involves little more than using a multimeter set to measure 20k ohms (. ) and connecting the meter’s red probe to the pickup’s hot wire (usually white or red) and the meter’s black probe to ground (either the base plate, braided shielding or ground wire, which is usually black). Actually it doesn’t really matter if you swap the multimeter’s red and black probes as the reading will be the same, but I think it’s good to maintain a consistent approach as a matter of habit.General DC resistance ranges for Strat and Tele pickups are typically between 6k and 8k ohms, while some lipstick tube single coils have DC resistance around 3-4k ohms and vintage PAF-style humbuckers measure between 8–10k ohms. Modern high-output pickups often measure at least 12k ohms to values above 20k. But while DC resistance provides a good “ballpark” estimate of a pickup’s output, it doesn’t tell the whole story as resistance is influenced by several factors like the total amount of windings, the gauge of the coil wire and magnet strength. One effective description I’ve read compares DC resistance output specs to determining a person’s size only by measuring their height. That may give you a general impression of their size, but is a 120-pound person who is six feet tall really bigger than a 250-pound person who is only five feet tall?So why don’t most other companies use millivolts like DiMarzio does? The problem there lies with the numerous variables involved in measuring output this way. Essentially, one needs a very controlled environment where, at the very least, the same type of string at the same tension placed the same distance from the pickup is playing the same note struck at the same strength, and so on. Millivolt specs are good for comparing different models offered by the same company, but comparing pickups between different companies is not useful as the standards are not consistent. Like DC resistance, output millivolts are really only helpful for a ballpark estimate.I could confuse you even further by discussing inductance (which is measured in henries), but since so few companies list this spec, I’ll just skip it for this article. Long story short: don’t worry too much about pickup output descriptions and specs. Depending on the tone you desire, a low-output pickup can be as good of a choice as a high-output pickup. High-output pickups became popular in the Seventies as a quick and dirty means to push an amp into more saturated distortion, but now that most amps have high-gain preamps and any number of overdrive and distortion devices are readily available, the distinction has become less important.EQ This Spec is much more helpful in the grand scheme of things than output. Do you want a warmer sound from your guitar? Then you’ll probably want to consider a pickup that emphasizes midrange and bass. How about more clarity, presence and cut? A pickup with boosted treble frequenices may be an ideal choice. Most manufacturers’ EQ descriptions are pretty accurate and many of their websites include recorded examples that provide excellent reference standards, but keep in mind that the new pickups installed in your personal guitar may not match the tone of the guitar in a soundbite due to different tone woods, scale lengths and other construction details, as well as the variations that exist even in two different guitars of the same model.As a rule of thumb, I find it’s best to try to achieve some sort of balance between the guitar and pickup’s tonal character. If you think that your guitar with its current pickup configuration sounds too dark, look for brighter-sounding pickups and perhaps even consider low- or medium-output models. If it’s too trebly, weak and thin-sounding, go for high-output pickups with boosted midrange and bass.MAGNETS While several details of a pickup’s construction affect its tonal character and output, the type of magnet(s) that it uses can tell you a lot about its character right off the bat. The most common types of magnets used for pickup construction are alnico and ceramic. Alnico is short for aluminum, nickel and cobalt, and alnico magnets are usually an alloy of iron, aluminum, nickel, cobalt and copper, and sometimes titanium as well.Alnico magnets can be made in a variety of different compositions with each element in different percentages, which are graded as alnico 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and so on (an alnico 3 magnet actually has no cobalt, while alnico 8 and above magnets have a small percentage of titanium). With the exception of alnico 3, a higher number corresponds with a stronger magnet. The most common magnets for guitar pickups are alnico 2 and 5. Ceramic magnets are made from barium, strontium and lead-iron oxides, which results in a stronger magnet that also is cheaper to produce.While a pickup’s overall tonal character is influenced by many different factors, in general terms, weaker magnets like alnico 2 tend to emphasize midrange while stronger magnets like alnico 5 have more of a “scooped mid” personality with extended bass and treble response. Ceramic magnets usually produce brilliant treble and crisp, articulate attack.Other magnets used less often for pickup construction include samarium cobalt (featured in Fender’s discontinued Samarium Cobalt Noiseless pickups) and neodymium (featured in Q-Tuner pickups). Both are “rare earth” magnets that are generally stronger than alnico and ceramic magnets but also more expensive to produce due to the higher cost of the raw materials. Another uncommon magnet is rubber ferrite (similar to the magnets most of us use to affix our kids’ artwork to the refrigerator), which is used in most “gold foil” pickup designs.WINDINGS Most pick up manufacturers will not reveal the specifics of how their various pickup models are wound because this is where the true art of pickup design comes into play. Dozens of variables are involved here including the gauge/thickness of the copper wire used, the thickness of the wire insulation (which affects how close the metal of the wound wires are to each other), how tight or loose the coils are wound, how many total windings are used, the pattern of the windings, the width and depth of the windings and much more. However, you don’t need to be concerned about these details unless you plan on winding your own pickups one day. Again, a pickup maker’s EQ charts are more helpful in the long run.Seymour Duncan Dave Mustane pickupsOne detail to consider, however, is whether a pickup is potted (the windings coated in wax, epoxy or other material) or not. Coil windings, particularly if the wind is loose, can vibrate against each other when a guitar is played at loud volumes, which can result in a piercing, nasty feedback squeal.However, at lower volumes loose windings can produce “microphonic” tones that, simply put, deliver a natural, acoustic-like sound similar to using a microphone. Light potting is an ideal compromise, providing some acoustic-like resonance while resisting squeal. Heavy potting is best for guitarists who play at excessively loud volume levels, but some players think the overall tone of heavily potted pickups is too tight and focused.Fishman Fluence Humbuckers for seven- and eight-string guitarsThen there is the entirely new design of the Fishman Fluence pickups, which replaces copper wire coils with an innovation called the Fluence Core, consisting of two multi-interconnected- layer boards. This design provides two entirely different tones (such as active/passive) at the flick of a switch. Another relatively new innovation is Lace’s Alumitone pickups, which feature “current driven” passive technology that enables a design with minimal coil windings and low DC resistance to produce increased output levels with the expanded frequency response and low noise of active designs.COVERS Pickup covers protect the fragile wire coils from damage, but depending upon the material they’re made out of, they also can affect the pickup’s magnetic field and resonant peak. A cover that is made of ferrous material and/or plated with ferrous material (like nickel) will affect the pickup’s magnetic flux, but a plastic pickup cover won’t (which is why Strat players don’t remove the pickup covers).When Seth Lover designed the original Gibson PAF humbucker, he experimented with a variety of different materials for pickup covers before making his final choice based on how it affected the guitar’s tone (part of the reason later Gibson humbuckers with chrome plating on the covers—instead of nickel—sound different). Removing the covers results in a different magnetic field that boosts output and treble frequencies slightly.POLE PIECES The size and shape of the pole pieces are critical features of pickup design that affect the size and shape of the pickup’s magnetic flux field. Generally speaking, wider pole pieces will produce a wider magnetic field that picks up a larger portion of the vibrating string, producing a more sonically complex tone, whereas the narrower focus of a narrower pole piece produces a more focused tone.A focused magnetic field can be a good thing if you prefer bright, percussive twang, while a wider field generally delivers richer, full-bodied tone. Some single-coil pickups have staggered pole piece heights to compensate for the varying output of different strings, while others have the pole pieces all the same height (like Mitt Romney’s trees in Michigan). Height-adjustable pole pieces with screw or Allen heads allow players to customize the compensation, while blade-style pole pieces are a good choice for guitarists who struggle with decreased signal strength when they bend strings (as bending a string can move it out of a magnetic flux “peak” and into a weaker “valley”).TWO-CONDUCTOR VS. FOUR-CONDUCTOR HUMBUCKER WIRING If you’ve already shopped for humbucking pickups, you may have noticed options for two- and four-conductor wiring. Two-conductor wiring means the pickup has only separate wires for the hot output and ground. Four-conductor wiring provides two separate wires for each of the pickup’s coils, identified as north start, north finish, south start and south finish, with north and south referring to the polarity of the separate coils.Four-conductor wiring offers a multitude of output circuit configurations, including coil split/tapping (for single-coil tones), series, parallel and out-of-phase. The advantages of different wiring configurations are worthy of an entire article unto itself, but my quick recommendation is to choose four-conductor wiring if available as it can be wired like a two-conductor pickup but it also offers other options should you choose to explore those later.MAKING THE FINAL CHOICE The number of companies making replacement pickups today is truly staggering and impressive. Most of the major guitar companies like Dean, EVH, Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, PRS and more sell pickups individually, and the big specialists like DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan offer an incredible variety of choices as well as designs beyond traditional Gibson-style humbuckers and Strat/Tele single-coils.Even most smaller boutique companies like Barden, Bare Knuckle, Curtis Novak, Kent Armstrong, Bill Lawrence, Lindy Fralin, Lollar, Mojotone, RailHammer, Rio Grande, Suhr, TV Jones, Van Zandt and Wilkinson offer an impressive variety of models to choose from, as do bigger parts-oriented companies like Allparts and WD. Active pickup specialists include Bartolini, Bill Lawrence, Duncan and EMG, while modern, revolutionary designs are available from Fishman, Lace and Q-Tuner.Bare Knuckle Cobra pickupJust like guitar models, an abundance of signature model pickups is available, and these pickups are a good place to start if your goal is to sound similar to your favorite guitar hero. Even if your favorite players don’t have signature models, it can be worth the effort to find out what pickups they play as that can eliminate some of the guesswork about a pickup’s overall tonal personality. If you choose to go on your own path, don’t be afraid to experiment and make a few changes as you go along.Pickups are a relatively inexpensive investment and as long as the pickups you are swapping are the same size as the ones already in your guitar the modification is easily reversible.Choosing the right pickups for your guitar often can be better than getting an entirely new guitar, especially if you’re already comfortable with the playability of your ax. If you’ve struggled with less than stellar tone for years, and no new amp or pedal has been able to fix it, changing pickups is the best solution, and more often than not the results exceed a player’s expectations. So get out there and melt some solder, burn some fingertips and find the tone you’ve always dreamed of.TOOL TIME: ESSENTIAL ITEMS FOR DIY PICKUP REPLACEMENTI don’t mean to put your local guitar repair tech out of work, but the skills required for replacing pickups are so simple that there is no reason you shouldn’t consider doing this job yourself. For the labor cost of one pickup replacement job, you could buy all the tools you’ll ever need to replace pickups for a lifetime, and for a few bucks more you can do the job with ease and speed.The most important tool for pickup installation is a good soldering iron or station. The main consideration here is that the iron has ample power to melt solder quickly both on potentiometer lugs and bigger surfaces like the back of a pot, tremolo claw or other surfaces used for grounding. A 40-watt soldering iron is sufficient for most jobs (and inexpensive), but even better is an iron or soldering station with variable power or temperature.The Weller WES51 is an inexpensive 50-watt soldering station that is variable from 350 to 850 degrees F and costs less than $100. Higher wattage produces higher temperatures that can quickly heat up braided shielding and the back of a potentiometer enough to ensure a solid solder joint without damaging the pot’s internal resistive strip. Another reason to use a high-power soldering iron or station is that many new guitars use lead-free solder, which can only be removed at temperatures higher than 425 degrees.You’ll also need two tips for the iron—a pencil-style tip with a sharp point for precision work at lower wattage (such as soldering a wire to a pot lug) and a chisel tip with a wide, flat edge to distribute heat quickly across larger surfaces (such as the back of a pot). If you opt for just a soldering iron, you’ll also need a stand (soldering stations usually have built-in stands).Other essential items include 60/40 (tin/lead) solder with rosin-core flux (do NOT use acid-core flux) or lead-free rosin-core solder (only if your soldering iron is powerful enough) and a good set of wire cutter/strippers that can remove insulation on wire between 10 to 20AWG. Solder wick or a solder sucker is helpful for removing old solder (and keeping it from damaging your guitar’s finish). A curved-jaw locking hemostat or a device called a “third hand” can be very helpful for holding wire and components securely while freeing your hands for the soldering iron and solder. Chris Gill Chris is the co-author of Eruption - Conversations with Eddie Van Halen. He is a 40-year music industry veteran who started at Boardwalk Entertainment (Joan Jett, Night Ranger) and Roland US before becoming a guitar journalist in 1991. He has interviewed more than 600 artists, written more than 1,400 product reviews and contributed to Jeff Beck’s Beck 01: Hot Rods and Rock & Roll and Eric Clapton’s Six String Stories.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 149
  • 18
  • guitar
  • 60
  • 18
  • tone
  • 34
  • 18
  • output
  • 34
  • 18
  • coil
  • 33
  • 18
  • magnet
  • 27
  • 18
  • design
  • 27
  • 18
  • wire
  • 24
  • 18
  • alnico
  • 23
  • 18
  • magnetic
  • 18
  • 18
  • string
  • 18
  • 18
  • piece
  • 16
  • 18
  • single
  • 16
  • 18
  • pole piece
  • 14
  • 18
  • high
  • 14
  • 18
  • pole
  • 14
  • 18
  • guitar pickup
  • 12
  • 18
  • single coil
  • 12
  • 18
  • iron
  • 12
  • 18
  • low
  • 12
  • 18
  • good
  • 12
  • 18
  • electric guitar
  • 11
  • 18
  • electric
  • 11
  • 18
  • material
  • 11
  • 18
  • model
  • 11
  • 18
  • company
  • 11
  • 18
  • field
  • 11
  • 18
  • type
  • 11
  • 18
  • winding
  • 11
  • 18
  • resistance
  • 10
  • 18
  • solder
  • 10
  • 18
  • soldering
  • 10
  • 18
  • pickup design
  • 9
  • 18
  • humbucking
  • 9
  • 18
  • passive
  • 9
  • 18
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 8
  • 18
  • magnetic field
  • 8
  • 18
  • dc resistance
  • 8
  • 18
  • coil pickup
  • 8
  • 18
  • humbucking pickup
  • 8
  • 18
  • single coil pickup
  • 7
  • 18
  • conductor wiring
  • 7
  • 18
  • high output
  • 7
  • 18
  • affect pickup
  • 6
  • 18
  • magnetic flux
  • 6
  • 18
  • passive pickup
  • 6
  • 18
  • soldering iron
  • 6
  • 18
  • tonal character
  • 5
  • 18
  • wire coil
  • 5
  • 18
  • output pickup
  • 5
  • 18
  • guitar tone
  • 4
  • 18
  • high output pickup
  • 4
  • 18
  • replacement pickup
  • 4
  • 18
  • detail pickup
  • 4
  • 18
  • pickup construction
  • 4
  • 18
  • ceramic magnet
  • 4
  • 18
  • conductor
  • 4
  • 18
  • pickup tonal
  • 3
  • 18
  • pickup magnetic
  • 3
  • 18
  • set pickup
  • 3
  • 18
  • guitar sound
  • 3
  • 18
  • gold foil
  • 3
  • 18
  • signature model
  • 3
  • 18
  • flux field
  • 3
  • 18
  • coil wire
  • 3
  • 18
  • ferrou material
  • 3
  • 18
  • 90
  • 3
  • 18
  • strat tele
  • 3
  • 18
  • pickup type
  • 3
  • 18
  • gibson
  • 3
  • 18
  • active pickup
  • 3
  • 18
  • low medium
  • 3
  • 18
  • tonal
  • 3
  • 18
  • stronger magnet
  • 3
  • 18
  • pickup cover
  • 3
  • 18
  • soldering station
  • 3
  • 18
Result 19
TitleAcoustic Guitar Pickup Types? THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE - Guitar Skills Planet
Urlhttps://guitarskillsplanet.com/acoustic-guitar-pickup-types/
DescriptionDid you know you can get Pickups for the Acoustic Guitar? This is important to know if you gig regularly because it can save you mountains of hassle!
Date
Organic Position19
H1Acoustic Guitar Pickup Types? THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE
H2WHAT ARE ACOUSTIC GUITAR PICKUPS?
1. UNDERSADDLE PICKUPS (PIEZO PICKUPS)
2. SOUNDHOLE PICKUPS (MAGNETIC PICKUPS)
3. SOUNDBOARD TRANSDUCER PICKUPS (CONTACT PICKUPS)
4. MICROPHONE PICKUPS
5. BLENDED SYSTEMS (HYBRID PICKUP SYSTEMS)
ACOUSTIC GUITAR PICKUPS VS. ELECTRIC GUITAR PICKUPS
CONCLUSION
Delay Pedal Types? Where to Position In Your Signal Chain!
Compressor Pedal Dials? EVERYTHING you need to know!
Types of Guitar Strings By Brand [COMPLETE LIST!]
H3*Advantages:
*Disadvantages:
*Advantages:
*Disadvantages:
*Advantages:
*Disadvantages:
*Advantages:
*Disadvantages:
*Advantages:
*Disadvantages:
Leave a Reply Cancel Reply
H2WithAnchorsWHAT ARE ACOUSTIC GUITAR PICKUPS?
1. UNDERSADDLE PICKUPS (PIEZO PICKUPS)
2. SOUNDHOLE PICKUPS (MAGNETIC PICKUPS)
3. SOUNDBOARD TRANSDUCER PICKUPS (CONTACT PICKUPS)
4. MICROPHONE PICKUPS
5. BLENDED SYSTEMS (HYBRID PICKUP SYSTEMS)
ACOUSTIC GUITAR PICKUPS VS. ELECTRIC GUITAR PICKUPS
CONCLUSION
Delay Pedal Types? Where to Position In Your Signal Chain!
Compressor Pedal Dials? EVERYTHING you need to know!
Types of Guitar Strings By Brand [COMPLETE LIST!]
BodyAcoustic Guitar Pickup Types? THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE Richard Wilde November 12, 2020 Guitar Gear No Comments Tweet Pin It Did you know you can get Pickups for the Acoustic Guitar? This is important to know if you gig regularly because it can save you mountains of hassle! Acoustic Guitar Pickup Types? There are THREE main types of Pickup types for the acoustic guitar. These include: Undersaddle pickups (Piezo pickups)Soundhole pickups (Magnetic pickups)Soundboard transducer pickups (Contact Pickups)Microphone pickupsBlended systems (Hybrid pickup systems)Below I will give you a summary of 5 different types of pickups that are commonly used in the acoustic guitar… Let us get started! Table of Contents WHAT ARE ACOUSTIC GUITAR PICKUPS?There are a lot of different pickup types for the acoustic guitar, but in general, the usage of them is relatively similar, and each pickup is suitable for the unique requirement of different guitar artists.The Guitar pickup is a type of transducer that senses the audio signal or vibrations from the guitar, then converts them into electrical signals and transmits them to the external audio system. The pickup allows you to connect the guitar to an amplifier and make it louder to reach the furthest audiences in a large hall or venue.Generally, the guitar is classified into 2 main groups: Acoustic and Electric Guitar. And the pickups are both used on all of them. As a result, depending on the type of your guitar, the pickup going with them will have correlative features.1. UNDERSADDLE PICKUPS (PIEZO PICKUPS). Undersaddle pickups are the most popular choice of pickups for acoustic guitars. As the name suggests, the undersaddle pickup is a thin strip of six piezoelectric crystals located below the guitar’s bridge. This thin strip captures the tone from the vibrating strings and converts these vibrations into an electrical signal.Sound from the undersaddle pickups are close to the natural sound you would ordinarily hear in a live setting making it perfect for gigs. However, i would not recommend using these for recording purposes.Sale Guitar Pickup, 5-Band Preamp EQ LC-5 Equalizer Tuner Piezo Pickup for Acoustic Guitars APPLICATION: This pick-up equalizer system with 5 bands can be easily fitted into your acoustic guitar and it is essential to electrify and amplify their sound.LOUDNESS CONTROL: It features an actual loudness control so that you can precisely determine the site and get the right sound.EASY TO USE: Come with pre-wired for easy assembly. It features shape control and volume control, convenient to use. And the connecting wire with 2.5mm plug included.NICE ACCESSORY:This is essential for your guitar performance. Really change the mood and feel of a song or chord.FINE WORKMANSHIP: It gives you a comfortable touch through their unique design. Advanced manufacturing process, durable for long time use. $23.99 Buy on AmazonWhen you put the undersaddle pickups at the end of the strings, the sound generated will be brighter and thinner. However, the sound volume is relatively low, hence they require the installation of an additional preamp to boost the original signal. Even so, the undersaddle pickups are extremely popular because they perform brilliantly on stage. They allow the guitar artists to play at a much louder volume without any annoying feedback, and the treble and midrange even sound clearer.Undersaddle pickups also run on piezo-electric technology like pickup soundboard, but instead of being placed on the guitar’s body, the undersaddle pickups are entirely located inside the guitar’s body, under the bridge saddle, using Piezo strings to directly record the vibration frequency of the string right underneath the bridge. Because the undersaddle pickups do not appear on the outside of the body, they do not detract from the aesthetic of your guitar.*Advantages:. Their aesthetic position protects the visual appearance of your guitarCompared with other kinds of guitar pickups, they are the most resistant to the feedback of all types, allowing you to make a loud performanceThey are wonderful for amplifying a nylon string acoustic guitar because they work on the basis of detecting physical vibrations rather than generating a magnetic field*Disadvantages:. They require difficult and fiddly installation. You may need a small hole that is drilled into the bridge of the guitar and you must be very careful to make sure that the pickups are well fitted between the bridge and the saddleThey have excessively huge dynamic range, so they do not have the ability to respond well to a weighty attack. To overcome this issue, you may need a preamp with a compressor to spread the levels equallyIn some low-cost models, the output created sounds a bit brittle as they are badly affected by the piezo quack effect.2. SOUNDHOLE PICKUPS (MAGNETIC PICKUPS). The operating principle of soundhole pickups bases on electromagnetic induction. In simple terms, the magnetic field inside the pickups will sense vibrations of steel guitar string and then convert those vibrations into a voltage, which is similar to the way the electric guitar pickups work. Unsurprisingly, the sound created by them is quite similar to the one in the electric guitar pickups. Donner Acoustic Guitar Pickup, DSS-6A Guitar Pickups Active Mahogany Soundhole Pickup with Mic Adjustable Heads Humbucker for Acoustic Guitar Sweet and Clear Sound - DSS-6A pickups is an active guitar pickup and needs a 9v battery (INCLUDED). And it adopts double coil technology to reduce noise and feedbackMIC Pickup - being able to pick up the authentic acoustic tone and every detailed sound like the overtone,Please work with AMP to receive sound6 Adjustable Heads - by adjusting the heads, you can change the distance between strings and poles, so that you can get the tone you want.Solid Mahogany Housing - Solid Mahogany Housing can transmit acoustic vibrations stably, providing a balanced and clear tone.Soundhole diameter range: 3.8”/96.6mm ~ 3.94”/102mm. Note: Suitable for 6-string acoustic guitar but does not work with 3/4 size acoustic guitars like Taylor baby series, little martin series $49.99 Buy on AmazonMost soundhole pickups are easily installed and uninstalled without the risk of damaging your beloved guitar. Soundhole pickups are usually mounted above the soundhole of the guitar, taking the sound directly from string vibrations. Obviously, to a great expectation, the sound of the notes is separated and balanced from the magnetic soundhole pickups.When installing the soundhole pickups, sometimes there may be a cable hanging on the outside of the guitar. Even so, you do not need to be so worried about this issue since you can easily overcome it by hiding that string inside the soundhole and making some more mods for a more aesthetically pleasing look. About their varieties, there are 2 types of soundhole pickups: single-coil and double-coil (often referred to as humbucker) and they can be used in both single or pair status.*Advantages:. They are really easy to assemble and there is no need for complicated or fiddly installing steps. You just fit them across the soundhole and then turn some screws to tighten it.They own the great capability of being resistant to unwanted feedback because they sense the string vibrations without the direct recording. Therefore, this upside makes them especially perfect for your live-performances.The tone generated by them sounds warmer than the output from the undersaddle pickups*Disadvantages:. Like the undersaddle pickups, they do not capture the warm rustic sound from the acoustic guitar. That means even though your guitar will still sound like an acoustic, it will not get the resonance of its unplugged toneThey are only appropriate for steel string guitars, hence you can not use it with nylon string acoustic guitarsAs they span the soundhole of your guitar, the undersaddle pickups are a little bit unaesthetic.3. SOUNDBOARD TRANSDUCER PICKUPS (CONTACT PICKUPS). Soundboard transducer pickups implement a technology which is similar to the undersaddle pickup, using the piezo effect to sense the vibrations of the guitar body and the bridge, then converting them to the electronic signal and transmitting them to the amplifier.Sale Donner Acoustic Guitar Pickup, DSS-3 Guitar Pickups Sound Seeker Pure Sound Transducer for Cello Banjo Ukulele Mandolin Guitar Microphone Pickup 【Widely Used】Donner 3 transducer pickup system is widely used on various instruments, like acoustic guitar, classical guitar, resonator guitar, ukulele, banjo, mandolin, wood bass, cello, violin, fiddle, Dobro, Cajon, dulcimer, steel drums, etc. Suitable for western music and folk instruments.【Pure & Original Sound】Fixing a rubber to adjust the tone and make your guitar more perfect. Donner DSS-3 pickup system collects clear and true sound and reproduces all strings nicely balanced. Let you enjoy high sound reproduction.【User-friendly Set】Package includes 1 passive guitar pickup, 1 set of glue, 4 3M stickers, 3 cable holders, 1x fixture leather pad, 1 ABS fixed clip. No battery and soldering is required. Pre-wired piezo mic saves time for you. Easy to install, convenient to use.【Easy External & Internal Installation】 Simply take seconds to use the provided green glue or 3M stickers to affix 3 piezos to the instrument's surface, external installation is finished. Or follow our easy internal instructions to install the pickup inside. You can “DIY” your favorite sound with a free combination of the installation position.【High Quality】Never worry that your audio cable interface gets loose suddenly when you have a performance. Smooth contact surface at the bottom picks up the sound characteristics of wood top. Soft & high quality cable guarantees high-quality sound $39.99 Buy on AmazonHowever, unlike the undersaddle pickup which is just put under the bridge inside the body, soundboard pickups can be flexibly placed in many positions of the guitar.*Advantages:. – Regardless of their random position, soundboard pickups can sense the vibrations of the soundboard or the bridge itself as opposed to the strings. Therefore, they produce a natural sound, creating a rich and warm tone on the acoustic guitar – They are among the easiest pickups to be installed because you can almost set them up anywhere you like: under the bridge, inside or outside the body is possible*Disadvantages:. – Because these pickups take the sound directly from the vibrations of both the strings and the body, they are easy to meet the problem of the feedback at high volume affecting multiples instruments when we are playing all of them together on stage.– The top of the guitar will have hotspots and deadspots which can produce a great number of vibrations. Therefore, if you locate them on the underside of the guitar’s body, you will encounter lots of difficulties in determining the best place to stick the contacts. 4. MICROPHONE PICKUPS. Microphone pickups have both internal and external models but the internal microphone is more common and popular than the other. The internal microphone is a minor condenser microphone that is positioned on a flexible arm within the internal cavity of the guitar, permitting the guitar players to easily adjust the location of the microphone. IK Multimedia iRig Acoustic Stage Digital Microphone System for Acoustic Guitars and Instruments Patented system works with any acoustic or acoustic-electric guitar providing an exceptionally true acoustic toneHigh performance clip-on microphone, digital preamp and processor far outperforms ordinary piezo and magnetic pickupsOnboard DSP provides personalized tone calibration with four selectable variationsAUX connects an existing acoustic-electric guitar pickup output and blends it with the rig Acoustic Stage signal using the mix knobIncludes powerful feedback elimination technology that works instantly at the touch of a button $99.99 Buy on AmazonCondenser microphones are what you will find in the studio when you want to record the sound of your acoustic guitar. To accommodate a similar setup for the live stage, a small condenser microphone placed inside the body captures all the nuances of the string and the body.Besides, external microphones are often put on a goose neck adjustable arm, which allows the guitar players to set up the microphone in a suitable place that they do not hinder the picking hand. In terms of sound, microphone systems are considered as the top layer which creates natural and realistic tones.*Advantages:. Among the acoustic guitar pickups, their range of frequency is the widest one, hence, microphone pickups are ideal to preserve the natural and realistic tone of your guitar.Due to their size and location, they are visually unobtrusive, which protects your guitar appearance.*Disadvantages:. Because these pickups are more sensitive than the other types, they tend to be susceptible to unwanted feedback, which creates a very bad effect when you play with the band or perform in a noise venue.To own these pickups, you must be ready to pay at a higher cost for them because they are one of the most expensive pickup types on the market.5. BLENDED SYSTEMS (HYBRID PICKUP SYSTEMS). As its name suggests, the blended system is a “blend” of two (or more) separated pickup types in a bid on making use of the specific strengths of each to deliver the highest quality of tone. There are a lot of options for the combination, but in general, a good microphone often goes with one of the other 4 options to create a blended system. To explain the reason for this method, we will need to understand the particular operation as well as the audio output that each pickup can generate. L.R. Baggs Anthem Acoustic Guitar Pickup and Microphone Patented TRUMIC carries the majority of the guitars’ frequency range while the Element Pickup carries the lowest frequenciesMix control blends between the TRU MIC augmented with low frequency support from the Element Pickup and full-range Element PickupNoise cancelling microphone technology eliminates any annoying honky or boxy qualities from the inside of the guitarSoundhole preamp includes volume, mix, phase inversion, battery check, and mic trim controlsAll discrete pre-contoured soundhole preamp with preset crossover $299.00Buy on AmazonThe blended pickup systems will incorporate the authentic natural tone of a microphone pickup with the clear output of the soundboard transducer pickups or undersaddle pickups, providing you with a great representation of your guitar’s attack. Moreover, this combination will help guitar players to catch the resonance of the guitar’s body from a condenser microphone and the attack and detail from a piezo system. Since both undersaddle pickups and soundhole pickups are driven by the strings themselves, nearly all guitarists do not combine them in order to avoid the problem of clashing frequencies and all sorts of sonic abnormality.*Advantages:. Through the combination of multiple pickups, blended systems can capitalize on the benefits of each type. As a result, they can help to control the tonal quality and offer better soundTheir versatile feature can support you to avoid irritating feedback in your guitar performance*Disadvantages:. These pickups are significantly more pricey than any of the other pickup typesBecause they are a combination of various pickup types, they require difficult and professional installation. Unless you really have a deep understanding of them before starting setting them up, you may get into trouble with themACOUSTIC GUITAR PICKUPS VS. ELECTRIC GUITAR PICKUPS. Acoustic Guitar Pickup: You can attach the pickups in both acoustic or classic guitars. Based on the brand of product and the product line, the pickups will be pre-installed in your guitar or you can upgrade them. In the acoustic guitar, the pickup is shaped like a small horizontal bar located under the guitar’s bridge. Usually, an acoustic guitar only has one pickup. The categories of pickups basically do not differ much. And if there are any differences between them, it is only the difference in size to suit many types of instruments. Acoustic guitar pickups will allow you to turn any typical acoustic into an acoustic-electric instrument, adding more amazing effects to your songs.Electric Guitar Pickup: For an electric guitar, the pickup is considered to be the soul of it because the electric guitar can not work without the appearance of the pickup. Pickup works accordingly to the principle that sound is created by the phenomenon of magnetic induction. When the guitar string vibrates, it becomes a source of magnetic flux. The frequency of the electric current generated relies entirely on the frequency of the oscillation, producing signals of various frequencies. Then the signal will go through the amplifiers and the sound which comes out of the speakers will have a wide range of tone and pitch. An electric guitar often has more than 1 pickup (can be 2 or 3 pickups). Based on the kind of electric guitar, we can choose a pickup for the most appropriate use.On the whole, pickups are more commonly used in the electric guitar than with the acoustic one. While the acoustic guitar has a thicker neck and larger body to bear the pressure of weighty strings, the electric guitar owns lighter strings that only require the combination with a thinner neck and smaller body. In respect of sound, the pickups in the electric guitar enhance the process of learning since they project the sound, and a lighter touch along with the lighter strings will make the electric guitar easier to play. Because the vast majority of musical instrument pickups are found in electric guitars, there are many articles focusing on the pickups of the electric guitar. In this guide today, we will learn more about the pickups in their counterpart-acoustic guitar, especially the 5 different types of them in the next section.CONCLUSION. When mentioning guitar pickups generally, most of us just think of electric guitar pickups due to their popularity. However, there is another type of guitar pickup that needs mentioning. That is the acoustic guitar pickup. The acoustic guitar is considered to be one of the most widely-used and recognised instruments in the world. Therefore, a wide variety of components have been designed for supporting it in handling many different music styles and performances. Acoustic guitar pickups should be compulsory for those who want to take their instrument further and add more amazing effects to their playing. In this article, we will take a closer look into acoustic guitar pickups as well as investigate the five different types available on the market.The purpose of this guide is to provide you with an ultimate overview of different types of acoustic guitar pickups. Generally speaking, there are 4 different categories of pickups in addition to a blended system combining multiple ones. In the article we have looked at the differences between the different pickup types including the created output, placement, aesthetics, complexity and price. Gaining deep insight into these types (including their pros and cons) will allow you to decipher the most suitable guitar pickups to meet your needs. Thanks for reading. Related Posts. Delay Pedal Types? Where to Position In Your Signal Chain! Compressor Pedal Dials? EVERYTHING you need to know! Types of Guitar Strings By Brand [COMPLETE LIST!]. About The Author. Richard WildeI have been playing guitar for over 15 years and have come to learn the "tips" and "tricks" of how to overcome some of the most difficult barriers when it comes to your guitar playing; some of which most people never overcome. Im confident that with my help coupled with your inspiration and passion for music you can overcome these too!Leave a Reply Cancel Reply.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 129
  • 19
  • guitar
  • 115
  • 19
  • acoustic
  • 49
  • 19
  • guitar pickup
  • 38
  • 19
  • acoustic guitar
  • 35
  • 19
  • sound
  • 29
  • 19
  • type
  • 27
  • 19
  • string
  • 24
  • 19
  • microphone
  • 23
  • 19
  • electric
  • 20
  • 19
  • electric guitar
  • 18
  • 19
  • system
  • 17
  • 19
  • body
  • 16
  • 19
  • undersaddle
  • 16
  • 19
  • undersaddle pickup
  • 15
  • 19
  • acoustic guitar pickup
  • 14
  • 19
  • soundhole
  • 14
  • 19
  • vibration
  • 13
  • 19
  • bridge
  • 12
  • 19
  • piezo
  • 12
  • 19
  • tone
  • 11
  • 19
  • instrument
  • 10
  • 19
  • pickup type
  • 9
  • 19
  • soundhole pickup
  • 8
  • 19
  • transducer
  • 8
  • 19
  • magnetic
  • 8
  • 19
  • signal
  • 8
  • 19
  • inside
  • 8
  • 19
  • frequency
  • 8
  • 19
  • work
  • 8
  • 19
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 7
  • 19
  • feedback
  • 7
  • 19
  • soundboard
  • 7
  • 19
  • transducer pickup
  • 6
  • 19
  • microphone pickup
  • 6
  • 19
  • pickup acoustic
  • 6
  • 19
  • output
  • 6
  • 19
  • internal
  • 6
  • 19
  • combination
  • 6
  • 19
  • quality
  • 6
  • 19
  • blended
  • 6
  • 19
  • pickup acoustic guitar
  • 5
  • 19
  • pickup system
  • 5
  • 19
  • blended system
  • 5
  • 19
  • guitar body
  • 4
  • 19
  • string acoustic
  • 4
  • 19
  • acoustic electric
  • 4
  • 19
  • guitar pickup type
  • 3
  • 19
  • type acoustic guitar
  • 3
  • 19
  • undersaddle pickup piezo
  • 3
  • 19
  • acoustic electric guitar
  • 3
  • 19
  • soundboard transducer pickup
  • 3
  • 19
  • pickup electric guitar
  • 3
  • 19
  • type acoustic
  • 3
  • 19
  • pickup piezo
  • 3
  • 19
  • type guitar
  • 3
  • 19
  • guitar work
  • 3
  • 19
  • sense vibration
  • 3
  • 19
  • guitar string
  • 3
  • 19
  • sound acoustic
  • 3
  • 19
  • soundboard transducer
  • 3
  • 19
  • high quality
  • 3
  • 19
  • inside body
  • 3
  • 19
  • condenser microphone
  • 3
  • 19
  • guitar player
  • 3
  • 19
  • acoustic acoustic
  • 3
  • 19
  • pickup electric
  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
Title13 Awesome Things You Need to Know on Guitar Pickups
Urlhttps://www.strumavenue.com/types-of-guitar-pickups-explained/
DescriptionWithout any pickups, electric guitar would be lifeless. But, how much do you know about types of guitar pickups? Do you know how they work?
Date
Organic Position20
H113 Awesome Things You Need to Know on Guitar Pickups
H21 – Guitar Pickups Kick-Started Electric Guitars and the Rock Genre
2 – Guitar Pickups Explained [Simplified]
3 – Types Of Guitar Pickups
4 – How Do Electric Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work?
5 – Magneto: The power of magnets
6 – Coiled Wires Have a Roaring Effect on the Overall Quality of the Pickup
7 – Why Are There Many Pickups on an Electric Guitar?
8 – The Position(s) of Your Guitar Pickup Contributes to the Overall Sound Quality
9 – 3 Types of Electric Guitar Pickups
10 – How Do Acoustic Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work?
11 – 4 Types of Acoustic Guitar Pickups
12 – 5 Types of Bass Guitar Pickups
13 – Passive vs. Active Pickups
[BONUS] A new Prototype of Pickup: Optical Pickup
Final Words of Advice
H3OR
Guitar Pickups Explained [In-depth]​
Single-Coil Pickup
Humbucker Pickup
P90
But what is piezoelectric, and how does it work?
Undersaddle Pickup (Piezoelectric)
Bridgeplate Pickup (Transducer)
Soundhole Pickup (Magnet)
Internal Microphone
Mic Blend Pickup System
J-pickups (Jazz)
P-pickups (Precision)
About The Author
H2WithAnchors1 – Guitar Pickups Kick-Started Electric Guitars and the Rock Genre
2 – Guitar Pickups Explained [Simplified]
3 – Types Of Guitar Pickups
4 – How Do Electric Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work?
5 – Magneto: The power of magnets
6 – Coiled Wires Have a Roaring Effect on the Overall Quality of the Pickup
7 – Why Are There Many Pickups on an Electric Guitar?
8 – The Position(s) of Your Guitar Pickup Contributes to the Overall Sound Quality
9 – 3 Types of Electric Guitar Pickups
10 – How Do Acoustic Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work?
11 – 4 Types of Acoustic Guitar Pickups
12 – 5 Types of Bass Guitar Pickups
13 – Passive vs. Active Pickups
[BONUS] A new Prototype of Pickup: Optical Pickup
Final Words of Advice
Body13 Awesome Things You Need to Know on Guitar PickupsBy Hannah Rivers / October 20, 2021 “How do guitar pickups work?” Do you know the answer to that? Here’s the deal: This isn’t news, but what you know about guitar pickups MAY be wrong. So, by the end of this article: You’ll learn the different types of guitar pickup and how they ACTUALLY work. Spoiler alert: There will be a lot of “FUN” stuff.  Let’s start! You’ll Learn 1 – Guitar Pickups Kick-Started Electric Guitars and the Rock Genre2 – Guitar Pickups Explained [Simplified]3 – Types Of Guitar Pickups4 – How Do Electric Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work?5 – Magneto: The power of magnets6 – Coiled Wires Have a Roaring Effect on the Overall Quality of the Pickup7 – Why Are There Many Pickups on an Electric Guitar?8 – The Position(s) of Your Guitar Pickup Contributes to the Overall Sound Quality9 – 3 Types of Electric Guitar Pickups10 – How Do Acoustic Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work?11 – 4 Types of Acoustic Guitar Pickups12 – 5 Types of Bass Guitar Pickups13 – Passive vs. Active Pickups[BONUS] A new Prototype of Pickup: Optical PickupFinal Words of Advice 1 – Guitar Pickups Kick-Started Electric Guitars and the Rock Genre. Let’s do some problem solving first, shall we? In a band (pre-rock-and-roll), there are a lot of loud instruments. So, what happens to the sound of a guitar? No one can hear it anymore. So, how do we solve that problem? With a microphone, of course. Though another problem with mics: They hear the sound of other instruments. (This is before the computers are invented, so noise cancellation was nowhere to be found.) Related Guides: Best Acoustic-Electric GuitarsBest Acoustic Guitars with Low ActionBest Acoustic Guitar for Kids So, what should be our solution? Well, George Beauchamp and John Dopyera came up with an innovative solution. Guitar Pickups! With the birth of guitar pickups, the electric guitars began their era. 2 – Guitar Pickups Explained [Simplified]. Here’s the simple explanation on how do guitar pickups work: Think of it as a mic. Instead of a voice, it’s for the guitar and guitar only. The pickup senses the movement of the guitar strings or vibration of the body (acoustic), turns it into signals. Then it’s sent to an amplifier, which strengthens the signal given to it. Lastly, the amplifier sends it to the speaker for us to hear the sound of music. Note: It’s not exactly like a microphone, just a similar concept. Now, for the FUN part: Let’s get technical! How does guitar pickup work? Wait, actually, I have to talk about the types of guitar pickups first. This way, I’ll be able to explain individually on how they work. 3 – Types Of Guitar Pickups. There are a lot of kinds of pickups for guitar. To this day, someone out there is creating something new. Hear’s the deal: There are two different types of pickups for guitar, generally speaking. You might be saying, “you’re contradicting yourself!” Hear me out: Based on how guitar pickups work, there are basically two types.  The first one uses a magnetic field; and The other uses vibration. The magnet pickup is more commonly used in the electric guitar world, including bass. While piezo is more prominent on acoustic guitars. So, to be more exact: “There are different kinds of guitar pickups based on these two concepts.” Fun Fact: In the science field, pickups are transducers or at least a type of transducers. Transducers are devices that convert energy from one form to another. In our case, the physical motion (string movement, aka vibration) is converted to electric signals. . . . If you want to skip to “how do acoustic guitar pickups work,” click here. Let’s do this chronologically, starting with electric guitars with their magnet pickups. 4 – How Do Electric Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work? Based on your knowledge, how do you think the pickups work? The strings cut the magnetic field of a pickup, which is translated to signals?  OR. The pickup senses the movement of the strings by the strings’ magnetic field? Note: These two options are based on the explanations I saw around the net. Before answering the question, let’s explain it first and perhaps do some experiments. Now: Let’s dig deep into the explanations and physics behind the guitar pickup design theory. Guitar Pickups Explained [In-depth] . So, how does the guitar pickup, “pick up” or sense the string motion or vibration? I mean, it doesn’t use a camera as a motion sensor, right? Even that kind of technology won’t be practical. Here’s the deal: It has something to do with Faraday’s law. By definition, Faraday’s law of induction states that the rate of change of flux causes the production of an electromotive force (EMF) or a voltage(-ish). Watch this video, particularly from 00:28 to 00:51. You can watch the whole video if you want to understand Faraday’s law better. As you can see, when he inserted the magnet into the coil, the galvanometer reacted. The meter moved (or a voltage was produced) depending on how he influenced the magnet (rate of change of flux). Here’s the kicker: The pickup works the exact same way. The strings as the magnet, and the coil and ammeter as the pickup. source: National Mag Lab Note: This representation of string vibration is made simple for easy visual understanding. Because in the real world, the string will vibrate up and down, sideways, or diagonal. Sometimes it even vibrates in a circular motion. . . . In fact, that demonstration of Faraday’s law can already be referenced to answer our question. But, the concept alone is no fun, right? We need something like a real demonstration. So, let’s continue! 5 – Magneto: The power of magnets. image via: Seymour Duncan The main component of an electric guitar pickup is the magnet and coiled copper wires. Seth E. Lover, the inventor of humbucking pickups, said, “even without the magnet, the pickup can still work.” What do you think? Here’s the kicker: It’s because the materials of the strings are ferromagnetic (permanent magnet), IT CAN WORK. So, even without the magnet in the pickup, the strings already have their own weak magnetic field. But, there’s a catch… If you remove the magnets from the pickup, the resulting sound might be too quiet but not zero. Here’s a comparison of with and without magnet: Video by Zexcoil Are you surprised? So was I! To tell you the truth, the reason this worked is that the magnets from the guitar pickup still strengthens the magnetic field of the string. So to answer the question earlier: How do guitar pickups work? Both options were only half correct, mostly because of how it’s phrased. Here’s why: The string doesn’t cut the magnetic field albeit, we can use the phrase “disrupting” or “disturbing” of the magnetic field. But the way it’s been explained in a few articles is misleading. Plus, the pickup does sense the magnetic field of the string but that’s not all there is. Here’s the kicker: The string and the pickup magnet’s attract each other and their magnetic fields combine. Look at this experiment for visualization: If you’ve noticed, the iron filings are connected when there’s an attraction. That’s the same with the pickup and string relationship. Also, the magnetic field of the string becomes stronger (or bigger). So, when you pluck or strum the strings, the combined magnetic fields and/or the string’s BIGGER magnetic field also move. (This is how the no magnet demo worked.) And by definition of Faraday’s law, this change in position or flux results in an EMF (in our case, the signal). Are you still with me? It’s quite confusing, eh? So, for the short answer: The guitar pickup enhances and combines with the magnetic field of the string. So when, the string moves, the magnetic field moves along with it (in a way, the combined magnetic field is disturbed). This vibration (change of flux) induces the signal (EMF) for the pickup to “pick up”. . . . Anyway, we’re not done yet. There’s more to talk about coiled wires. 6 – Coiled Wires Have a Roaring Effect on the Overall Quality of the Pickup. Coiled wires affect the quality of sound altogether: If the coils are wound multiple times, the volume will be louder. If you wound it too much, the sound may be stifled. Even if the difference is just ten windings, you might just notice the difference. When you increase the gaps (as little as 0.1 millimeters), the treble also improves. In fact, even the height and the surface area of the winding can significantly affect the sound. 7 – Why Are There Many Pickups on an Electric Guitar? In a nutshell: We’ll also be talking about guitar string vibration. For a more visual presentation, here’s how guitar strings vibrate: Basically, the string vibrates on different frequencies and volumes based on the 1st harmonic (or fundamental wave). Now, let’s say the pickup is on this line. On the 3rd harmonic and 6th harmonic, the string doesn’t vibrate. In other words, the pickup will not pick up any magnetic flux; hence no signal or sound produced for the specific harmonics. That’s why there is more than one pickup in an electric guitar. More pickups mean a broader range of tonal quality. For instance: Let’s assume you’re using 2 pickups. Essentially, the resulting sound will be a combination of two. If the first pickup doesn’t pick up any string vibration, the second may. Furthermore, the distance between pickups affects the final sound quality. 8 – The Position(s) of Your Guitar Pickup Contributes to the Overall Sound Quality. That’s also why pickups are strategically placed. Please note that not all electric guitars use multiple pickups. With that said, it’s still common to have more than one pickup. Let’s use a Fender Stratocaster as an example, also known as Strat. Strat is one of the most popular electric guitar types out there. (And my favorite as well.) Stratocaster usually has three pickups (by the neck, by the bridge, and in-between those two) Neck pickup will be dark kinda’ sound and excellent for strumming. The bridge pickup has the brightest quality and excellent treble. Middle pickup gives it a literal in-between quality of neck and bridge pickup. It has more treble but less bass than the neck pickup. It’s hard to explain by words so listen to this: Simply put: Multiple pickups will give you different tonal ranges, and undoubtedly one of those will fit your bill. 9 – 3 Types of Electric Guitar Pickups. You may encounter something like HSS or SSS. These are pickup arrangements. The letter S is single-coil, and H is a humbucker. Let’s use HSS as an example: HSS stands for humbucker at the bridge, single-coil for the middle, and another single-coil at the neck. Before anything else: All of the types of pickups for electric guitar are practically single-coil pickups with a little alteration.  So, I’d say their main difference is tonal quality. Now: Let’s talk about these different types of pickups for an electric guitar. Single-Coil Pickup. This pickup is the first one that came out back in the mid-1920s. A century later, it’s still popular! Here’s the thing: They are brighter in terms of sound compared to other pickup types. At the same time, it sounds clean and clear even when there’s a little bit of noise. Single-coil pickups are excellent for pop, funk, reggae, country, and with some effects, rock. Unfortunately, high levels of distortion aren’t handled well by this type of pickup. Humbucker Pickup. Single-coil pickups have noises, which the humbucker solves. Humbucker pickups literally buck the hums, hence the name. Basically, these are two single-coil pickups in the opposite direction, working together to remove the hum. It has a thick overall tonal quality, especially the bass. For genres with a lot of overdrive and distortions, this is the perfect fit. P90. P-90 is the less popular of the group, but it’s not the least per se. Here’s the kicker: This pickup is like a medium place (between single-coil pickup and humbucker). It has a darker sound and has noise (in a good way). For rockers, punk, or blues players, this type of pickup works well. So, here’s my question: For you, what do you think is the best? 10 – How Do Acoustic Guitar Pickups ACTUALLY Work? Let’s do another science: The acoustic guitar pickups use the concept of piezoelectric effect. Here’s the basic analogy of piezoelectric effect: Think of a lemon; when you squeeze it, the juice comes out, right? For piezoelectric, when you press or squeeze a piezoelectric material, electricity comes out. It’s not the closest analogy, but don’t worry, I will still explain it. Let’s start with the materials: Some crystals are considered piezoelectric. Here are some examples: Quartz Crystal;Sugar;Rochelle Salts;Topaz;Tourmaline; andEven our bones But what is piezoelectric, and how does it work? Let’s look at this silicon dioxide or quartz’s molecular arrangement. Please note that this is simplified so that it’s easier to understand. Silicon is partially positive, while oxygen is partly negative. They have equal dipoles on each bond, which initially cancels each other out. In other words, no electric charge direction. If we apply pressure… The atoms shift. Stretched cells end up with a net negative charge, while the other has net positive. This creates an electrical field or a small potential difference, which allows the current to flow. But if we stretch it out the opposite way… The bottom end becomes a more negative charge, while the upper side becomes a positive charge. Also, the current flows the other way. For the acoustic guitar: When we pluck a string, we basically vibrate the string and the parts connecting it, such as, (and especially) the saddle. The piezoelectric crystal below senses that vibration. With this simultaneous application of alternating pressure (vibration), we create an alternating electric field. Or in simpler terms, alternating current. source: Haze Guitars The alternating current produced by the crystal will serve as our signal. That signal can be sent to an amplifier and to a speaker for everyone to hear your music. Two more examples using the piezoelectric effect are quartz watch and lighter. In fact, you can create your own mic with a lighter. 11 – 4 Types of Acoustic Guitar Pickups. There are many different types of acoustic guitar pickups. For now, we’re going to talk about 4 basic categories. Piezoelectric, transducer, magnet, and mic pickup. Undersaddle Pickup (Piezoelectric). source: Haze Guitars This pickup is the most common in acoustic-electric guitars. It’s literally a pickup under the saddle. Undersaddle pickup uses a thin piezo crystal element, as shown in the image above. There are 6 piezo crystals, one for each string. With this, the pickup can directly sense the vibration from specific strings. Then, the metal strips collect the electric charges from the crystals. Here’s the thing: Because the crystals detect the vibrations directly (from saddle), the pickup sounds clear and natural. This pickup isn’t visible from the outside, which gives it an edge against some acoustic guitar pickups. (You’ll see what I mean later.) Furthermore: You can control its volume and tone control, which will be excellent when you’re playing live! One disadvantage of this is the installation. You can install it yourself, but you’ll be basically drilling into the guitar. Hence, you should get a professional to do the installation. Unless, of course, you’re a luthier or experienced with this kinda’ stuff. Bridgeplate Pickup (Transducer). Basically, this type of pickup still works under the piezoelectric effect.  Now: This category is the easiest to install. It can be attached on top or under the bridge since it utilizes an adhesive. It has more acoustic sound and lush tones than other acoustic pickups. Unfortunately, it is sensitive to body noises and has lousy feedback. Soundhole Pickup (Magnet). Soundhole pickups work just like electric guitar pickups. Wait, correction: It literally is an electric guitar pickup. Since it is based on string vibration, this is the most feedback resistant pickup for the acoustic guitar. If you like to use effects, this works like magic too! The sound, on the other hand, is closer to that of electric guitar than an acoustic. But hey, if that’s what you’re looking for, this will be perfect for your acoustic guitar! Internal Microphone. Literally, a microphone inside the acoustic guitar. Funnily enough, microphones use the piezoelectric effect. This will be great for percussion playing on the guitar. Unfortunately, just like most microphones, it is very prone to feedback. It is also not strong enough to augment the sound of the strings. Here’s the kicker: There’s one type, nay, a combination that I really like. They call this mic blend system. Mic Blend Pickup System. Mainly, you can install both an internal microphone and a piezoelectric pickup. You can use just one, or you can use both at the same time! Amazing right? Here’s how it sounds compared to other pickups: If you ask me, this mic blend pickup system is the closest to an acoustic guitar sound. 12 – 5 Types of Bass Guitar Pickups. Bass Guitar pickups are quite similar to electric guitar pickups. For instance, bass guitars use: Single-coil pickups and humbucker pickups. Here are some three other notable bass guitar pickups: J-pickups (Jazz). The jazz pickups are certainly more familiar with jazz bassists (as the name suggests). It has warm yet bright sound.  J-pickups are two single-coil pickups placed near the bridge and neck. This will give you more tonal range to fit the sound of your liking. P-pickups (Precision). Sometimes, precision pickups are also called split-coil pickups. This is basically two halves of a single pickup. The 2 halves are placed under the top 2 strings and under the bottom 2 strings. They have aggressive timbre, so they are commonly used for funk and rock. You may have encountered a, “soap bar pickup“.  This is just j-pickups sealed in a housing in the shape of a soap bar. This is to prevent the pickups from degrading. You may also find piezoelectric pickups on bass guitars, albeit rare. 13 – Passive vs. Active Pickups. Out of all the types and categories, pickups still has something up its sleeve. Pickups can be classified as passive or active pickups.  They have differences in their construction and their overall tonal capabilities. Passive Pickups have more coils than active. That also means it has more noise and is prone to feedback. Here’s the good thing: They are sensitive to vibrations, so even the most subtle tone will be picked up. With that said, these pickups are more expressive. If you like playing from soft to loud, then soft (or whatever the dynamic is), this will be perfect for you. For the cherry on top: It is also more affordable than active pickups. Active Pickups have fewer coils, so initially, they have lower output. That’s why they require a battery for the preamp. This will give the pickup a higher output and more sound power. Active pickups also have a cleaner tone as opposed to passive. If you like distortions, this is probably the pickup you’ll choose. It’s perfect for metal and hard rock. For the (slightly) bad thing: It is a little more expensive, and there’s little to no dynamics. [BONUS] A new Prototype of Pickup: Optical Pickup. This pickup is not popular and is still an incomplete technology, yet it still works! Basically, it uses light to sense the vibration of the strings. So, even if you use nylon strings on an electric guitar, it will sound like the original. To be honest, I haven’t tried it yet.  If you tried this type, please let me know what you think about them in the comments below. Final Words of Advice. Learning how guitar pickup works and learning the different types of pickups for guitar is just as important as deciding what guitar to buy. I mean, pickups are literally the most essential part of an electric guitar! Now: For the different types, there is no such thing as best. It’s more like one is better than the other in a particular genre. Then again, there are numerous genres out there. Each type or kind has different applications. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Finally: If you’re choosing a pickup, follow your heart. Choose the one that sounds perfect for you. Keep on strumming! Enjoy? Share with your friends! About The Author. Hannah Rivers. Hannah Rivers is a music enthusiast, founder and chief editor of Strum Avenue. She hopes that by sharing her journey through this blog, she'll be able to inspire future musicians. Strum Avenue uses cookies to improve your experience and show you personalized ads. By clicking “Accept”, you consent to the use of ALL the cookies. However you may visit Settings to provide a controlled consent. Cookie Policy. Settings AcceptManage consent Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may affect your browsing experience. Necessary Necessary Always Enabled Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. These cookies ensure basic functionalities and security features of the website, anonymously. CookieDurationDescriptioncookielawinfo-checkbox-advertisement1 yearSet by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin, this cookie is used to record the user consent for the cookies in the "Advertisement" category .cookielawinfo-checkbox-analytics1 yearSet by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin, this cookie is used to record the user consent for the cookies in the "Analytics" category .cookielawinfo-checkbox-functional1 yearThe cookie is set by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin to record the user consent for the cookies in the category "Functional".cookielawinfo-checkbox-necessary1 yearSet by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin, this cookie is used to record the user consent for the cookies in the "Necessary" category .cookielawinfo-checkbox-others1 yearSet by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin, this cookie is used to store the user consent for cookies in the category "Others".cookielawinfo-checkbox-performance1 yearSet by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin, this cookie is used to store the user consent for cookies in the category "Performance". Functional functional Functional cookies help to perform certain functionalities like sharing the content of the website on social media platforms, collect feedbacks, and other third-party features. CookieDurationDescriptionna_id1 year 1 monthThe na_id is set by AddThis to enable sharing of links on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter.na_rn1 monthThe na_rn cookie is used to recognize the visitor upon re-entry. It allows to record details on user behaviour and facilitate the social sharing function provided by Addthis.com.na_sc_e1 monthThe na_sc_e cookie is used to recognize the visitor upon re-entry. It allows to record details on user behaviour and facilitate the social sharing function provided by Addthis.com.na_sr1 monthThe na_sr cookie is used to recognize the visitor upon re-entry. It allows to record details on user behaviour and facilitate the social sharing function provided by Addthis.com.na_srp1 minuteThe na_srp cookie is used to recognize the visitor upon re-entry. It allows to record details on user behaviour and facilitate the social sharing function provided by Addthis.com.na_tc1 year 1 monthThe na_tc cookie is used to recognize the visitor upon re-entry. It allows to record details on user behaviour and facilitate the social sharing function provided by Addthis.com.ouid1 year 1 monthAssociated with the AddThis widget, this cookie helps users to share content across various networking and sharing forums. Performance performance Performance cookies are used to understand and analyze the key performance indexes of the website which helps in delivering a better user experience for the visitors. CookieDurationDescriptiond3 monthsQuantserve sets this cookie to anonymously track information on how visitors use the website. Analytics analytics Analytical cookies are used to understand how visitors interact with the website. These cookies help provide information on metrics the number of visitors, bounce rate, traffic source, etc. CookieDurationDescription__gads1 year 24 daysThe __gads cookie, set by Google, is stored under DoubleClick domain and tracks the number of times users see an advert, measures the success of the campaign and calculates its revenue. This cookie can only be read from the domain they are set on and will not track any data while browsing through other sites.CONSENT2 yearsYouTube sets this cookie via embedded youtube-videos and registers anonymous statistical data.u1 yearThis cookie is used by Bombora to collect information that is used either in aggregate form, to help understand how websites are being used or how effective marketing campaigns are, or to help customize the websites for visitors.uid1 year 1 monthThis is a Google UserID cookie that tracks users across various website segments. Advertisement advertisement Advertisement cookies are used to provide visitors with relevant ads and marketing campaigns. These cookies track visitors across websites and collect information to provide customized ads. CookieDurationDescriptionab1 yearOwned by agkn, this cookie is used for targeting and advertising purposes.anj3 monthsAppNexus sets the anj cookie that contains data stating whether a cookie ID is synced with partners.CMID1 yearCasale Media sets this cookie to collect information on user behavior, for targeted advertising.CMPRO3 monthsCMPRO cookie is set by CasaleMedia for anonymous user tracking, and for targeted advertising.CMPS3 monthsCMPS cookie is set by CasaleMedia for anonymous user tracking based on user's website visits, for displaying targeted ads.CMRUM31 yearCMRUM3 cookie is set by CasaleMedia for anonymous user tracking based on user's website visits, for displaying targeted ads.CMST1 dayCasale Media sets this cookie to collect information on user behavior, for targeted advertising.DSID1 hourThis cookie is set by DoubleClick to note the user's specific user identity. It contains a hashed/encrypted unique ID.id1 year 1 monthSet by Google DoubleClick, this cookie is used to create user profiles to display relevant ads.IDE1 year 24 daysGoogle DoubleClick IDE cookies are used to store information about how the user uses the website to present them with relevant ads and according to the user profile.KADUSERCOOKIE3 monthsThe cookie, set by PubMatic, registers a unique ID that identifies a returning user's device across websites that use the same ad network. The ID is used for targeted ads.KTPCACOOKIE1 dayThe cookie, set by PubMatic, registers a unique ID that identifies a returning user's device across websites that use the same ad network. The ID is used for targeted ads.mc1 year 1 monthQuantserve sets the mc cookie to anonymously track user behaviour on the website.mdata1 year 1 monthThis cookie is used by Media Innovation group and registers a unique ID to identify a visitor on their revisit, in order to show them relevant ads.ov1 year 1 monthThis cookie is set by the provider mookie1.com. This cookie is used for serving the user with relevant content and advertisement.pxrc2 monthsThis cookie is set by pippio to provide users with relevant advertisements and limit the number of ads displayed.rlas31 yearRLCDN sets this cookie to provide users with relevant advertisements and limit the number of ads displayed.test_cookie15 minutesThe test_cookie is set by doubleclick.net and is used to determine if the user's browser supports cookies.uuid3 monthsMediaMath sets this cookie to avoid the same ads from being shown repeatedly and for relevant advertising.uuid23 monthsThe uuid2 cookie is set by AppNexus and records information that helps in differentiating between devices and browsers. This information is used to pick out ads delivered by the platform and assess the ad performance and its attribute payment.VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE5 months 27 daysA cookie set by YouTube to measure bandwidth that determines whether the user gets the new or old player interface.YSCsessionYSC cookie is set by Youtube and is used to track the views of embedded videos on Youtube pages.yt-remote-connected-devicesneverYouTube sets this cookie to store the video preferences of the user using embedded YouTube video.yt-remote-device-idneverYouTube sets this cookie to store the video preferences of the user using embedded YouTube video.yt.innertube::nextIdneverThis cookie, set by YouTube, registers a unique ID to store data on what videos from YouTube the user has seen.yt.innertube::requestsneverThis cookie, set by YouTube, registers a unique ID to store data on what videos from YouTube the user has seen. Others others Other uncategorized cookies are those that are being analyzed and have not been classified into a category as yet. CookieDurationDescriptionGoogleAdServingTestsessionNo description Save & Accept
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 157
  • 20
  • guitar
  • 88
  • 20
  • cookie
  • 51
  • 20
  • guitar pickup
  • 48
  • 20
  • string
  • 39
  • 20
  • user
  • 39
  • 20
  • type
  • 38
  • 20
  • electric
  • 30
  • 20
  • sound
  • 29
  • 20
  • set
  • 28
  • 20
  • cooky
  • 25
  • 20
  • electric guitar
  • 24
  • 20
  • acoustic
  • 24
  • 20
  • work
  • 22
  • 20
  • website
  • 20
  • 20
  • magnet
  • 19
  • 20
  • year
  • 18
  • 20
  • coil
  • 18
  • 20
  • field
  • 18
  • 20
  • acoustic guitar
  • 17
  • 20
  • visitor
  • 17
  • 20
  • pickup work
  • 16
  • 20
  • magnetic
  • 16
  • 20
  • consent
  • 16
  • 20
  • magnetic field
  • 15
  • 20
  • cookie set
  • 15
  • 20
  • vibration
  • 15
  • 20
  • piezoelectric
  • 14
  • 20
  • single coil
  • 13
  • 20
  • quality
  • 13
  • 20
  • single
  • 13
  • 20
  • ad
  • 11
  • 20
  • guitar pickup work
  • 10
  • 20
  • recognize visitor
  • 10
  • 20
  • entry record
  • 10
  • 20
  • category
  • 10
  • 20
  • record
  • 10
  • 20
  • youtube
  • 10
  • 20
  • coil pickup
  • 9
  • 20
  • sharing
  • 9
  • 20
  • information
  • 9
  • 20
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 8
  • 20
  • single coil pickup
  • 8
  • 20
  • pickup electric
  • 8
  • 20
  • type pickup
  • 8
  • 20
  • set cookie
  • 8
  • 20
  • acoustic guitar pickup
  • 7
  • 20
  • magnet pickup
  • 7
  • 20
  • consent cooky
  • 7
  • 20
  • gdpr cookie consent
  • 6
  • 20
  • cookie consent plugin
  • 6
  • 20
  • user consent cooky
  • 6
  • 20
  • coiled wire
  • 6
  • 20
  • pickup pick
  • 6
  • 20
  • bass guitar
  • 6
  • 20
  • gdpr cookie
  • 6
  • 20
  • cookie consent
  • 6
  • 20
  • consent plugin
  • 6
  • 20
  • user consent
  • 6
  • 20
  • user behaviour
  • 6
  • 20
  • pickup electric guitar
  • 5
  • 20
  • faraday law
  • 5
  • 20
  • yearset gdpr cookie
  • 5
  • 20
  • consent plugin cookie
  • 5
  • 20
  • cookie recognize visitor
  • 5
  • 20
  • visitor entry
  • 5
  • 20
  • entry record detail
  • 5
  • 20
  • record detail user
  • 5
  • 20
  • detail user behaviour
  • 5
  • 20
  • user behaviour facilitate
  • 5
  • 20
  • behaviour facilitate social
  • 5
  • 20
  • facilitate social sharing
  • 5
  • 20
  • social sharing function
  • 5
  • 20
  • sharing function provided
  • 5
  • 20
  • register unique id
  • 5
  • 20
  • type acoustic
  • 5
  • 20
  • pickup magnet
  • 5
  • 20
  • type guitar
  • 5
  • 20
  • string vibration
  • 5
  • 20
  • faraday
  • 5
  • 20
  • law
  • 5
  • 20
  • piezoelectric effect
  • 5
  • 20
  • active pickup
  • 5
  • 20
  • yearset gdpr
  • 5
  • 20
  • plugin cookie
  • 5
  • 20
  • cookie recognize
  • 5
  • 20
  • entry
  • 5
  • 20
  • record detail
  • 5
  • 20
  • detail user
  • 5
  • 20
  • behaviour facilitate
  • 5
  • 20
  • facilitate social
  • 5
  • 20
  • social sharing
  • 5
  • 20
  • sharing function
  • 5
  • 20
  • function provided
  • 5
  • 20
  • register unique
  • 5
  • 20
  • unique id
  • 5
  • 20
  • magnetic field string
  • 4
  • 20
  • record user consent
  • 4
  • 20
  • consent cooky category
  • 4
  • 20
  • cookie set youtube
  • 4
  • 20
  • talk
  • 4
  • 20
  • string vibrate
  • 4
  • 20
  • field string
  • 4
  • 20
  • website cooky
  • 4
  • 20
  • record user
  • 4
  • 20
  • cooky category
  • 4
  • 20
  • cookie store
  • 4
  • 20
  • collect information
  • 4
  • 20
  • user website
  • 4
  • 20
  • set youtube
  • 4
  • 20
  • type guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 20
  • guitar pickup explained
  • 3
  • 20
  • type acoustic guitar
  • 3
  • 20
  • bass guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 20
  • plugin cookie record
  • 3
  • 20
  • cookie record user
  • 3
  • 20
  • category cookielawinfo checkbox
  • 3
  • 20
  • year monththi
  • 3
  • 20
  • cookie set casalemedia
  • 3
  • 20
  • set casalemedia anonymou
  • 3
  • 20
  • casalemedia anonymou user
  • 3
  • 20
  • anonymou user tracking
  • 3
  • 20
  • unique id identify
  • 3
  • 20
  • hannah river
  • 3
  • 20
  • pickup explained
  • 3
  • 20
  • passive active
  • 3
  • 20
  • pickup sense
  • 3
  • 20
  • guitar string
  • 3
  • 20
  • concept fun
  • 3
  • 20
  • pickup guitar
  • 3
  • 20
  • change flux
  • 3
  • 20
  • tonal quality
  • 3
  • 20
  • pickup type
  • 3
  • 20
  • pickup humbucker
  • 3
  • 20
  • humbucker pickup
  • 3
  • 20
  • sense vibration
  • 3
  • 20
  • mic blend
  • 3
  • 20
  • cookie record
  • 3
  • 20
  • category cookielawinfo
  • 3
  • 20
  • cookielawinfo checkbox
  • 3
  • 20
  • embedded youtube
  • 3
  • 20
  • monththi
  • 3
  • 20
  • information user
  • 3
  • 20
  • set casalemedia
  • 3
  • 20
  • casalemedia anonymou
  • 3
  • 20
  • anonymou user
  • 3
  • 20
  • user tracking
  • 3
  • 20
  • id identify
  • 3
  • 20
  • user relevant
  • 3
  • 20
  • video youtube
  • 3
  • 20
Result 21
TitleWhat's the Difference Between Passive and Active Pickups? | Bananas at Large — Bananas at Large®
Urlhttps://www.bananas.com/blogs/news/whats-the-difference-between-passive-and-active-pickups
DescriptionThe pickup on your electric guitar or bass affects the tone. Whether you have a passive or active pickup, each type will give a different sound to your music. Learn what exactly the pickup is, the difference between passive & active pickups, & which type you should use
Date
Organic Position21
H1What's the Difference Between Passive and Active Pickups?
H2What Is a Pickup?
Passive vs. Active Pickups
Which Pickup Is Better?
Join our mailing list
Quick Links
More Services
Customer Service
Follow us
Added to your cart:
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is a Pickup?
Passive vs. Active Pickups
Which Pickup Is Better?
Join our mailing list
Quick Links
More Services
Customer Service
Follow us
Added to your cart:
BodyWhat's the Difference Between Passive and Active Pickups? The pickup on your electric guitar or bass affects the tone. Whether you have a passive or active pickup, each type will give a different sound to your music. Below, we'll explain what exactly the pickup is, the difference between passive and active pickups, and which type you should use. What Is a Pickup? The pickup is the piece of metal or plastic that sits below the strings on the body of your guitar or bass. It "picks up" the vibrations coming from the strings and translates those vibrations to the sound you hear coming out of your amp. The pickup is made of a magnet and wound copper wire. When you strum the strings of the guitar or bass, it disrupts the magnet and alters the current that is running through the copper wire. That current then moves through the amplifier, giving you your sound. Passive vs. Active Pickups. There are several differences between the two types of pickups. Passive pickups are how we described them above. They have two basic components — the magnet and would copper wire — which pick up the vibrations of the strings. The vibrations are read as a current, which then travels through your cable and then out of your amplifier. Passive pickups create a weaker electric signal than active pickups, making your amplifier more important. The amp is where your sound is boosted, giving it much better projection. Active pickups have a higher output than passive pickups because they rely on a power source, like a battery. Basically, active pickups will give your sound more power and give you a more consistent tone than a passive pickup. Which Pickup Is Better? Objectively, neither type of pickup is better than the other. Each type of pickup comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. The advantages of a passive pickup include: Making your tone more expressive because the pickup is more sensitive to the vibrations of the strings Ability to pick up more subtle tones, giving your music a greater range More affordable than guitars and basses with active pickups Some disadvantages of passive pickups are: They have a more limited output If you have a slightly lower-quality guitar, it could have more of an effect on your sound than an active pickup Produce a lot more feedback out of the amplifier, which can interfere with the sound and tone of your guitar or bass If you're a beginner, you may not want to spend the extra money needed to get an active pickup. However, you can upgrade your passive pickup to an active pickup. If you like playing around with the subtleties of your music, the passive pickup would also be the better choice. The quality of your amp is also important in getting the most out of your passive pickup, since this type relies more heavily on this piece of equipment. The advantages of an active pickup include: Have less feedback than passive pickups, giving your music a cleaner sound Easier to handle with high-gain distortions Better tone than passive pickups with a lower-quality guitar or bass Some of the disadvantages of the active pickup are: Guitars with active pickups are more expensive than guitars with passive pickups If your battery runs out, the instrument is basically useless until you replace the battery Active pickups are more popular with bass players and guitarists who mainly play metal. For bassists, the active pickup gives the instrument a brighter tone that fits better with the style of their playing. The power you get with an active pickup is better suited to the energy of the metal genre of music. With their cleaner tones, active pickups are also better suited for studio recording. If you used a passive pickup instead, you'd have a lot more excess noise to work through while mixing the track. The type of pickup you choose will come down to the genre of music you typically play in, your playing style and your own preference. Test out both types of pickups, decide on the type you think sounds best, and then just go with that one. At Bananas at Large®, our team can help you find the guitar or bass with the right pickup for your needs. With great deals and a dedicated and helpful team, we can help you find exactly what you want and need. Filed in: All Previous article Best Year for the Fender Stratocaster Join our mailing list . Subscribe to be the first to hear about our exclusive offers, new arrivals, what's on sale and upcoming events! Quick Links . Contact Us Store Hours About Us Return Policy FAQ Shipping & In-Store Pick Up Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Sitemap Gift Cards Bananas T-Shirts More Services . Financing Rewards Program Rentals Music Lessons Installations Repairs Blog Events Protection Plans Sell Your Gear COVID-19 Customer Service . Call Us(888) 900-1959Visit our San Rafael store1654 2nd StreetSan Rafael, CA 94901Call or Text: (415) 457-7600Visit our Santa Rosa store531 College AvenueSanta Rosa, CA 95404Call: (707) 542-5588We're always looking to improveTell us what you love or what we need to fix. Leave Feedback Follow us . Find us on Facebook Find us on Twitter Find us on Pinterest Find us on Instagram Find us on Youtube Find us on E-mail Copyright © 2022 Bananas at Large® Amazon American Express Apple Pay Discover Elo Facebook Pay Google Pay Mastercard PayPal Shop Pay Venmo Visa Added to your cart: . Subtotal
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 44
  • 21
  • active pickup
  • 18
  • 21
  • active
  • 18
  • 21
  • passive
  • 17
  • 21
  • passive pickup
  • 13
  • 21
  • guitar
  • 10
  • 21
  • find
  • 9
  • 21
  • type
  • 9
  • 21
  • sound
  • 9
  • 21
  • bass
  • 8
  • 21
  • tone
  • 8
  • 21
  • guitar bass
  • 7
  • 21
  • music
  • 7
  • 21
  • type pickup
  • 6
  • 21
  • string
  • 5
  • 21
  • vibration
  • 5
  • 21
  • passive active pickup
  • 4
  • 21
  • passive active
  • 4
  • 21
  • pickup type
  • 4
  • 21
  • banana
  • 4
  • 21
  • pick
  • 4
  • 21
  • amplifier
  • 4
  • 21
  • giving
  • 4
  • 21
  • pay
  • 4
  • 21
  • pickup pickup
  • 3
  • 21
  • tone passive
  • 3
  • 21
  • copper wire
  • 3
  • 21
  • metal
  • 3
  • 21
  • amp
  • 3
  • 21
  • magnet
  • 3
  • 21
  • copper
  • 3
  • 21
  • wire
  • 3
  • 21
  • current
  • 3
  • 21
  • power
  • 3
  • 21
  • battery
  • 3
  • 21
  • advantage
  • 3
  • 21
  • disadvantage
  • 3
  • 21
  • quality
  • 3
  • 21
  • feedback
  • 3
  • 21
  • playing
  • 3
  • 21
Result 22
TitleBridge and Neck Pickup Differences Explained! – Tone Topics
Urlhttps://tonetopics.com/bridge-and-neck-pickup-differences/
DescriptionThe '50s and the '60s were of great importance to the development of the electric guitar, with some basic standards being set and still used…
Date
Organic Position22
H1Bridge and Neck Pickup Differences Explained!
H2The Bridge Pickup Sound
The Neck Pickup Sound
Difference Between a 3-Way and a 5-Way Selector Switch
Before You Go
H3My Short Answer…
This Video Explains all (Watch Below)
Cutting Through
The Guitar Riff
Famous Neck Pickup Intro
Experiment With Both Pickups
Read My Related Post
Recent Posts
H2WithAnchorsThe Bridge Pickup Sound
The Neck Pickup Sound
Difference Between a 3-Way and a 5-Way Selector Switch
Before You Go
BodyBridge and Neck Pickup Differences Explained! Written by Adam in Guitar Gear The ‘50s and the ‘60s were of great importance to the development of the electric guitar, with some basic standards being set and still used to this very day. Most of the guitars you stumble upon have multiple pickups to choose from, giving players a great variety of tones. usually, adopting two or three humbuckers or single-coils. Each of the pickups has its position – bridge, middle, or neck. Here, I will be taking a closer look at the issue and finding the main differences between a bridge and neck pickup. So let’s get into it with my short answer… My Short Answer…. The main difference between neck and bridge pickup is the bridge sounds brighter, sharper and more piercing used for riffs, lead lines, rhythm, and solos. In Contrast, the neck pickup sounds warmer, thicker and darker usually used for lead solos and melodies. This Video Explains all (Watch Below). Of course, there are different variations involved here, depending on whether the guitar has single coils or humbuckers or a combination of these two. Either way, I’ll shed some light on this topic and, hopefully, you’ll be familiar with some basic differences by the end of this article. The Bridge Pickup Sound. The first and the most obvious difference, aside from their position, is in the tone. The bridge pickup has a sharper tone – more defined and with a bit more high-end frequencies in it. A vast majority of those distorted heavy riffs you’ve heard are played through a bridge pickup, most likely a humbucker. The bridge pickups pick up the signal from the string vibration closer to the bridge, making the tone “tighter” and “punchier.” The bridge position produces that “spanky” tone when played with no distortion, kind of what you would get if you played very close to the bridge on an acoustic guitar. It usually allows you to cut through the mix when playing with a band, giving you a tighter and more defined tone. The differences are pretty obvious and can be heard right away, giving you more options to play around with and have more tones. Now, as stated above, both bridge pickup and neck pickup have their own roles in songs. Cutting Through. While we’re at it, the tone of the bridge pickup really cuts through the mix on distortion or overdrive. A vast majority of those chunky heavy riffs that you hear in most of the hard rock and heavy metal songs is played using a bridge pickup, usually a humbucker. As opposed to the neck tone, the bridge pickup is a bit heavier on the treble side. In addition, the bridge pickups are usually played with the tone kob all the way up, using their maximum potential. In some cases, you’ll have to turn the tone knob just a little bit down if you want to lose some of the excessive trebles in clean tones. The Guitar Riff. The bridge pickup is often used for distorted riffs or rhythm parts, whereas the neck is used for some lead parts. The funny part is that the labels at the switch usually say “rhythm” for the neck pickup, and “treble” for the bridge. This is an older concept, and with the development of rock music, the roles of pickups on different positions have changed. But with this in mind, you are free to use them as you wish and whatever suits the music that you’re making or reinterpreting. At the end of the day, there are no strict rules to stick by when it comes to making your own music. The Neck Pickup Sound. When it comes to the neck pickup, this one picks up the signal closer to the neck. The tension there is not as strong, the string vibrates with a bigger amplitude, and the tone coming from the pickup is more mellow, thicker, and rounder, sometimes even a bit “muddy.” It is often used for some fingerpicking or clean rhythms, for solos on distortion or overdrive, or you can even hear it in some clean or slightly overdriven jazz or blues solos. The neck pickup, as stated above, gives out the more “mellow” and “round” tone. The strings above the neck pickup are a bit looser and, as a result, the tone will have less attack to it. However, despite being more mellow, it does sound “bigger” compared to the bridge pickup. There are more lower-end frequencies in there, making it sound muffled, yet somehow really warm and appealing. Another word that could be used here is “tender,” especially if we’re talking about some clean tones on the neck pickup with the tone pot rolled down just a bit. This is how you get that classic warm, mellow, and “round” jazz tone. If we’re talking about distorted guitar, then think about classic hard rock lead guitar parts. In a lot of cases, you can hear the famous rock guitar legends playing lead parts through the neck pickup. Famous Neck Pickup Intro. One of the good examples that can be used here is “Sweet Child O’ Mine” intro and the first half of the song’s solo. In the second half of the solo, you can clearly hear that sharper tone of a bridge pickup that’s further enhanced by a wah pedal. Another example is “Still Got The Blues” by Gary Moore. If you listen, the tone is a thick and creamy sounding Les Paul on the neck pickup. Used for that recognizable bluesy melody. The list could go on…. Using the neck pickup has its purpose in rock music. However, you won’t often hear it used for those chunky riffs. Playing power chords on the A and E strings through the neck pickup might make your tone too blurry. Experiment With Both Pickups. Of course, this is sometimes the desired effect and you’re always free to experiment. But in most cases, it will be expected of you to not play the riffs using the neck pickup. It’s better left for some clean parts, more mellow melodies on overdrive or softer distortion, or for high gain lead parts where you will mostly be playing single notes on the higher strings. An important thing to mention here is that pickups are specially designed for both bridge and neck positions. The pickups for the bridge position usually have more output to compensate for the smaller string amplitude near the bridge. And the opposite, the neck pickups usually have less output, thus giving a more even and balanced volume for both positions. Read My Related Post . Speaking of pickups, want to know the difference between covered and uncovered (open-coil) humbucker pickups? You check out our post (Here) explaining the tonal differences between both types of pickups. Difference Between a 3-Way and a 5-Way Selector Switch. You’ve definitely seen pickup selectors on electric guitars. This is one of the most important components, letting you choose between the pickups and different combinations of pickups. The two main types of these switches are a 3-way selector and a 5-way selector. Now, the most standard two humbucker guitars will have a 3-way selector switch. Position 1 selects the bridge pickup, the middle position selects both humbuckers, giving you that “nasally” tone that’s not used that often, and the third position selects the neck pickup. These are found on guitars like Les Pauls, SGs, or any others that feature the two humbuckers or two single-coils. As for the 5-way switch, these are usually found on Fender Stratocasters or any guitars that have three pickups. They select five different combinations: bridge, bridge and middle, middle, middle and neck, and neck positions. These additional two combinations of two pickups on Strats give that sparkling clean bluesy tone or the twangy country tone. In some cases, you’ll stumble upon guitars with two humbuckers that have a 5-way switch. These are pretty interesting as they “split” the humbuckers and use different combinations of the pickups’ individual coils. This way, you can also get some of those sparkling single-coil combinations even though you don’t have single-coil pickups on your guitar. Before You Go . Ever wondered why some pickups appear slightly angled in some guitars? Then you should read my next post “Why Are Some Guitar Pickups Angled?” The reason and history of this modification will surprise you! Adam Adam is the founder and author of Tone Topics and dedicated to providing the best guitar content for like-minded gear nerds. Please enjoy all the content on the site and support us by sharing these posts with other people. It would really help us out! Recent Posts. link to The Best Genres For Semi-Hollow Guitars The Best Genres For Semi-Hollow Guitars Choosing the right guitar for your ideal tone, playing style, and typical genre is difficult. Not so with semi-hollow body guitars. These hollowed versions are super versatile, but how...Continue Reading link to Guitar Multi-Effects vs. Single Pedals (Pros & Cons) Guitar Multi-Effects vs. Single Pedals (Pros & Cons) As the modern digital age continues to make enormous strides within the guitar gear industry. Players ponder whether multi-effects are better than a traditional pedalboard full of pretty analog...Continue Reading
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 51
  • 22
  • guitar
  • 27
  • 22
  • neck
  • 27
  • 22
  • bridge
  • 27
  • 22
  • tone
  • 26
  • 22
  • neck pickup
  • 19
  • 22
  • bridge pickup
  • 14
  • 22
  • selector
  • 14
  • 22
  • switch
  • 12
  • 22
  • humbucker
  • 12
  • 22
  • position
  • 12
  • 22
  • difference
  • 10
  • 22
  • coil
  • 9
  • 22
  • single
  • 8
  • 22
  • solo
  • 7
  • 22
  • string
  • 7
  • 22
  • riff
  • 7
  • 22
  • part
  • 7
  • 22
  • single coil
  • 6
  • 22
  • sound
  • 6
  • 22
  • lead
  • 6
  • 22
  • combination
  • 6
  • 22
  • bit
  • 6
  • 22
  • clean
  • 6
  • 22
  • select
  • 5
  • 22
  • giving
  • 5
  • 22
  • middle
  • 5
  • 22
  • played
  • 5
  • 22
  • playing
  • 5
  • 22
  • hear
  • 5
  • 22
  • rock
  • 5
  • 22
  • mellow
  • 5
  • 22
  • post
  • 5
  • 22
  • tone bridge pickup
  • 4
  • 22
  • pickup difference
  • 4
  • 22
  • way
  • 4
  • 22
  • tone bridge
  • 4
  • 22
  • bridge neck
  • 3
  • 22
  • pickup sound
  • 3
  • 22
  • lead part
  • 3
  • 22
  • combination pickup
  • 3
  • 22
  • semi hollow
  • 3
  • 22
  • multi effect
  • 3
  • 22
Result 23
TitleUpgrading Your Electric Guitar Pickups: Pros and Cons
Urlhttps://www.learntoplaymusic.com/blog/upgrading-electric-guitar-pickups-pros-cons/
DescriptionThe pros & cons of upgrading your electric guitar pickups. Including info on how guitar pickups work, how they are configured & why you should upgrade them
Date7 Oct 2014
Organic Position23
H1Upgrading Your Electric Guitar Pickups: Pros and Cons
H2Why Change or Upgrade Your Guitar Pickups?
What are Guitar Pickups?
Types of Guitar Pickups
Guitar Pickup Configurations
In Conclusion
H3HomeGuitar
Who is LearnToPlayMusic.com
Leave A Comment. Cancel reply
Continue Learning
Visit our store
Connect with us
Recent Posts
Categories
Past Posts
H2WithAnchorsWhy Change or Upgrade Your Guitar Pickups?
What are Guitar Pickups?
Types of Guitar Pickups
Guitar Pickup Configurations
In Conclusion
BodyUpgrading Your Electric Guitar Pickups: Pros and Cons HomeGuitar HomeGuitar . Upgrading Your Electric Guitar Pickups: Pros and Cons By LTP Editor|October 7th, 2014|Guitar|5 Comments Upgrading Your Electric Guitar Pickups: Pros and Cons Why Change or Upgrade Your Guitar Pickups? Most guitar players will probably never feel the need to change pickups, and this is fine. However an experienced player who is looking for specific tones will certainly find it worthwhile. A guitarist’s tone is largely the result of what their fingers are doing and how they physically play their instrument. However, pickup choices do have some bearing, as do the amplifier and the guitar itself. Pickup manufacturers normally provide a description of each pickup in their catalog, and most now have recorded samples online. What are Guitar Pickups? Guitar pickups are essentially a microphone which responds to the vibration of strings by converting the acoustic energy they create into an electrical signal, which is then sent to an amplifier. On any electric guitar the pickup is mounted under the strings, between the bridge and the start of the fretboard. Types of Guitar Pickups. The two main kinds of electric guitar pickup you’ll encounter are the single coil and the humbucker. There are numerous guitar pickup manufacturers out there and literally hundreds of pickups on the market – all of which are based upon these two designs. Much could be said about the differences between them, such as the magnetic materials used, the wiring, number of windings and spacing, but for simplicity we’ll focus on the practical differences to be aware of. One major difference is that single coil pickups create electrical noise, because they act like a small antenna and are susceptible to mains interference and radio. A humbucking design avoids this problem, hence the term hum-bucker. The main defining features of each guitar pickup are listed in the table below: Guitar Pickup Configurations. Electric guitars can come with a mix of humbuckers and single coils or simply one type. This is called the pickup configuration. Famous guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster (shown below) come with 3 single coil pickups as standard (S-S-S). The Gibson Les Paul comes with two humbuckers (H-H). Dozens of modern guitars are based upon a ‘Superstrat’ design, which often uses an S-S-H configuration. This means a single coil for the neck and middle, and a humbucker in the bridge. The Blade RH-4 by Gary Levinson uses ‘stacked coil’ pickups for the neck and middle (these are humbucking designs but look and sound more like a single coil), and a humbucker for the bridge. An S-S-H configuration allows for a combination of traditional stratocaster sounds and modern distorted tones on the same guitar. The Ibanez RG and JEM series (as shown below) mostly use a H-S-H configuration, giving two fat humbucker tones for the neck and bridge sound, while also allowing for a single coil middle-pickup tone, ideal for rhythm playing. In Conclusion. So why would someone want to upgrade a pickup? One reason is that cheaper pickups (e.g., stock pickups in cheaper instruments) can lack clarity, particularly with distorted tones. Even if your technique is good, the resulting sound may have a certain muddiness to it. Cheaper pickups also sometimes have a “woolly,” or hollow bass response, while better ones tend to be focused and retain clarity. Better pickups will often emphasize harmonics more, and give a pleasant, even sound to chords and lead playing. Many pickups are popular because of the qualities they possess, including the Seymour Duncan Alnico II Pro, EMG-81, and DiMarzio PAF-Pro. You may already have a great guitar with humbuckers but would prefer a single coil tone, or perhaps want to upgrade a humbucker to one that has a brighter tone. Or maybe the style of music you play could benefit from higher-output pickups? You could also be searching for a “sound” or trying to emulate the tone of your favorite artist. Finding out what pickups they use and switching over is one step you can take. The possibilites are endless. Popular pickup manufacturers include Seymour Duncan, EMG, DiMarzio, Lace, Bill Lawrence, Lindy Fralin, Bartolini, Kinman, Joe Barden, Bareknuckle, Lollar, Fender and Gibson. Check them out if you have opportunity – a world of tone awaits you! A stock Fender Telecaster guitar (left) and the same instrument with modified pickups added (right). Who is LearnToPlayMusic.com. LearnToPlayMusic.com is the world’s leading music education innovator and publisher of print, eBooks, apps and online lessons. – Continue learning with Learn To Play Music at LearnToPlayMusic.com Share this page with your friends... Pinterest Leave A Comment. Cancel reply. Continue Learning . Get the eBook Get the print book Visit our store. Check out our huge range of music lesson books and eBooks Connect with us. Recent Posts. How To Play Guitar Techniques: Vibrato and Bending Apollo-M Delivers Unlimited Music Lessons To Musicians for $4.95 Per Month How to Read Music and Scores Slap Bass Technique – How to Play Bass Shred Guitar: The Art of Blazing Fretboards Categories. News Promotions Products Tips & Tricks Guitar Bass Guitar Piano & Keyboard Singing Drums & Percussion Music Theory Music Space Past Posts. Past Posts Select Month November 2014  (2) October 2014  (9) September 2014  (7) August 2014  (11) July 2014  (10) June 2014  (10) May 2014  (6) December 2013  (1) March 2013  (3) February 2013  (2) January 2013  (32) December 2012  (26) August 2012  (4)
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 34
  • 23
  • guitar
  • 29
  • 23
  • tone
  • 15
  • 23
  • guitar pickup
  • 14
  • 23
  • 2014
  • 12
  • 23
  • humbucker
  • 12
  • 23
  • configuration
  • 11
  • 23
  • coil
  • 11
  • 23
  • single coil
  • 10
  • 23
  • single
  • 10
  • 23
  • music
  • 8
  • 23
  • electric guitar
  • 7
  • 23
  • 2013
  • 7
  • 23
  • instrument
  • 6
  • 23
  • bridge
  • 6
  • 23
  • design
  • 6
  • 23
  • electric
  • 6
  • 23
  • sound
  • 6
  • 23
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 5
  • 23
  • pro
  • 5
  • 23
  • play
  • 5
  • 23
  • coil pickup
  • 4
  • 23
  • neck
  • 4
  • 23
  • bass
  • 4
  • 23
  • upgrading electric guitar
  • 3
  • 23
  • guitar pickup pro
  • 3
  • 23
  • pickup pro con
  • 3
  • 23
  • upgrading electric
  • 3
  • 23
  • pickup pro
  • 3
  • 23
  • pro con
  • 3
  • 23
  • pickup manufacturer
  • 3
  • 23
  • manufacturer
  • 3
  • 23
  • main
  • 3
  • 23
  • difference
  • 3
  • 23
  • fender
  • 3
  • 23
  • middle
  • 3
  • 23
  • cheaper
  • 3
  • 23
  • technique
  • 3
  • 23
  • learntoplaymusiccom
  • 3
  • 23
  • ebook
  • 3
  • 23
  • lesson
  • 3
  • 23
  • post
  • 3
  • 23
Result 24
TitleHow to Tell What Pickups Are in Your Guitar - Pro Sound HQ
Urlhttps://prosoundhq.com/how-to-tell-what-pickups-are-in-your-guitar/
DescriptionWondering what pickups are in your electric guitar? Here's exactly how to tell what pickups your guitar has and how it affects your tone
Date
Organic Position24
H1How to Tell What Pickups Are in Your Guitar
H2The Quick Answer
Identifying Pickup Type
Identifying Passive and Active Pickups
Identifying Pickup Make and Model
H3Identifying Pickups Visually
Identifying Pickups by the Guitar
Identifying Pickups by Sound
Recent Posts
H2WithAnchorsThe Quick Answer
Identifying Pickup Type
Identifying Passive and Active Pickups
Identifying Pickup Make and Model
BodyHow to Tell What Pickups Are in Your Guitar Written by Heather in Electric Guitar,Electric Guitars Wondering what pickups your electric guitar has? Here’s a quick guide to identifying the type, make and model of your pickup.I’ll be running through how to determine what pickup type you’re using, whether they’re active or passive, and the make and model. So let’s get started! The Quick Answer . You can identify pickup type by looks. There are three main types: single coils (very thin), P90’s (a widened version of single coils) and humbuckers (twice the width of single coils).  If you want to identify what make and model your pickups are, then you’ll usually need to remove them by unscrewing them, and check the back to see the make and model.  Identifying Pickup Type . It’s usually pretty easy to spot what pickup type you’re using. There are three main pickup types:Single coilsP90’s HumbuckersThere are three ways you can try to identify what pickups you’re using: by looks, by sound, and by the guitar.  Identifying Pickups Visually. All three pickups look pretty different from one another, so it’s usually quite easy to spot which you’re using. Single coil pickups are small and thin. Sometimes they have visible magnet poles, but some just look like a thin bar of metal or plastic, usually less than a couple of centimetres or half an inch thick.They’ll usually be held down by two screws (one either side of the pickup). P90 pickups look like single coils except they are a bit wider. They’re usually around an inch thick or 2.5 centimetres. They’ll usually be held down by two screws (one either side of the pickup). Humbucker pickups are much wider, usually twice the size of a single coil. There will usually be 3 screws either side of the pickup, holding them down. Here’s a quick photo to show the different types of pickups.  There can be a little bit of confusion when identifying humbucker pickups, as they come in a few different forms. Sometimes they look like two single coils sandwiched together, and other types they just look like a wide pickup encased in metal or plastic. Here’s a photo showing the main forms that humbuckers exist in.  These are all humbucker pickups. Identifying Pickups by the Guitar . This is another pretty easy way to tell what pickups you’re using, because unless your guitar has been modified or you’re using a custom version, most guitars use the same pickup type. Here’s a list of the most popular electric guitars, and which pickups they use, in each position (bridge, middle and neck).  Electric Guitar Bridge Pickup Middle Pickup Neck Pickup Stratocaster Single coil Single coil Single coil Telecaster Single coil N/A Single coil Les Paul Standard Humbucker N/A Humbucker ES-335 Standard Humbucker N/A Humbucker SG Standard Humbucker N/A Humbucker Les Paul Special P90 N/A P90 Ibanez RG450 Humbucker Single Coil Humbucker PRS Custom 24 Humbucker N/A Humbucker Identifying Pickups by Sound . If you’re struggling to decide what pickup type a guitar has, you can also try listening to it. This isn’t a very easy method though, because you almost always need to compare it to other pickups to decide what type it is. But it can be fun to try and figure out what pickups you’re using by listening to the tone, if you’re looking for a challenge!Here’s what each type sounds like:Single coils sound bright, twangy and thin.Humbuckers sound warmer, fuller and more mellow.P90 pickups sound somewhere in between the two. They have a very balanced tone. Check out this video to test how good your ears are at identifying pickup types! Identifying Passive and Active Pickups . Some pickups are active and some as passive. The majority of electric guitars have passive pickups. However, electric guitars geared towards metal players, often have active pickups. Active pickups contain a battery, which increases the power of the pickup, but without damaging the clarity of the tone. Take a look at this ultimate guide to guitar pickups to learn more about this topic. You can identify active and passive pickups by looks most of the time.  Active pickups usually have a plastic covering, rather than metal.Active pickups do not usually have the magnetic poles showing.Most active pickups are humbucker types, rarely single coil or P90.Here’s a quick photo to show a comparison between active and passive pickups.  You can also tell whether pickups are active or passive by listening to them.Active pickups will sound much louder, fuller and more powerful than passive pickups. Check out this blindfold challenge to compare the tone of active and passive pickups.  Identifying Pickup Make and Model . Okay so if you already know what pickup type you’re using, and whether they’re active or passive, the last thing you’ll want to know, is the make and model.This can be a little more difficult.The easiest way to tell what pickups are in your guitar, is by removing the pickup, and looking on the back for a make or model number, or a serial number. Here’s how to remove your pickups:Make sure your guitar isn’t plugged into anything. Remove the strings on your guitar. On some guitars you may be able to avoid this step, depending on how high your strings are set (action height), but it does make it more fiddly. Remove the pickup screws. Your pickup should pop out of place enough for you to be able to flip it over and check what it says on the back (be very careful not to pull any wires). When you’re done, just flip the pickup back over and screw it into place again.  Pickup screws If the pickup has the make and model on the back, then you’re sorted! But if it’s just the serial number, then you can try popping it into Google and sometimes it’ll show up.  If you don’t want to remove your pickups, then you can try searching the model of your guitar, and finding out what stock pickups are used in this line. Of course, this only works with guitars that are using their original pickups.  So there you go! That’s how why tube amps are so expensive! I hope you’ve found this article helpful, thanks for reading. Here are some other posts you might find useful:The Reason Why Some Pickups are AngledBridge vs Neck Pickups  Heather Hey, I'm Heather. I started playing an electric guitar when I was given a Squier Strat for my birthday around 15 years ago. I now own an acoustic guitar and several electric guitars including my personal favourite, a PRS SE Custom 24. Recent Posts. link to Which Guitar Amp Should You Buy? Complete Buyer's Guide Which Guitar Amp Should You Buy? Complete Buyer's Guide Whether you're a complete beginner or experienced player, choosing which guitar amplifier to buy can be tricky. In this article, I'll take you through a complete buyer's guide with all the...Continue Reading link to Combo vs Stack (Head and Cab) Amp: Which is Best? Combo vs Stack (Head and Cab) Amp: Which is Best? If you're looking to buy a new guitar or bass amplifier, then one of the first decisions you'll need to make is whether you want a combo amp, or a stack amp. In this article, I'll explain the pros...Continue Reading
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 66
  • 24
  • guitar
  • 26
  • 24
  • humbucker
  • 17
  • 24
  • single coil
  • 16
  • 24
  • type
  • 16
  • 24
  • coil
  • 16
  • 24
  • single
  • 15
  • 24
  • active
  • 12
  • 24
  • here
  • 10
  • 24
  • passive
  • 10
  • 24
  • identifying
  • 9
  • 24
  • pickup type
  • 8
  • 24
  • remove
  • 8
  • 24
  • electric
  • 8
  • 24
  • model
  • 8
  • 24
  • electric guitar
  • 7
  • 24
  • active passive
  • 7
  • 24
  • screw
  • 7
  • 24
  • sound
  • 7
  • 24
  • amp
  • 7
  • 24
  • identifying pickup
  • 6
  • 24
  • quick
  • 6
  • 24
  • na
  • 6
  • 24
  • active pickup
  • 5
  • 24
  • passive pickup
  • 5
  • 24
  • p90
  • 5
  • 24
  • tone
  • 5
  • 24
  • guide
  • 5
  • 24
  • back
  • 5
  • 24
  • humbucker na humbucker
  • 4
  • 24
  • screw side
  • 4
  • 24
  • humbucker pickup
  • 4
  • 24
  • guitar pickup
  • 4
  • 24
  • pickup guitar
  • 4
  • 24
  • pickup sound
  • 4
  • 24
  • humbucker na
  • 4
  • 24
  • na humbucker
  • 4
  • 24
  • identify
  • 4
  • 24
  • check
  • 4
  • 24
  • easy
  • 4
  • 24
  • buy
  • 4
  • 24
  • complete
  • 4
  • 24
  • screw side pickup
  • 3
  • 24
  • standard humbucker na
  • 3
  • 24
  • active passive pickup
  • 3
  • 24
  • complete buyer guide
  • 3
  • 24
  • pretty easy
  • 3
  • 24
  • side pickup
  • 3
  • 24
  • standard humbucker
  • 3
  • 24
  • pickup active
  • 3
  • 24
  • complete buyer
  • 3
  • 24
  • buyer guide
  • 3
  • 24
  • buyer
  • 3
  • 24
  • combo
  • 3
  • 24
  • stack
  • 3
  • 24
Result 25
TitleAlnico vs Ceramic Magnets For Guitar Pickups - The Guitar Gear Guru
Urlhttps://theguitargearguru.com/alnico-vs-ceramic-magnets-for-guitar-pickups/
DescriptionLearn the difference between alnico vs ceramic magnets for electric guitar pickups! Choose the right pickup for your guitar!
Date24 Mar 2021
Organic Position25
H1Alnico vs Ceramic Magnets For Guitar Pickups
H2Differences Between Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets
The tone of Alnico vs. Ceramic Guitar Pickups
How Much Does It Really Matter?
Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets Conclusion
H3Alnico Magnets
Ceramic Magnets
Alnico Magnets
Ceramic Magnets
H2WithAnchorsDifferences Between Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets
The tone of Alnico vs. Ceramic Guitar Pickups
How Much Does It Really Matter?
Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets Conclusion
BodyAlnico vs Ceramic Magnets For Guitar Pickups by Justin Mann | Mar 24, 2021 | Guitar Electronics | 0 comments FacebookTweetPin Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets For Guitar Pickups   This post contains affiliate links.  When you purchase a product through one of our affiliate links, we get paid a referral at no extra cost to you.  Please see our disclaimer and terms and conditions for more info.   We guitarists love to argue about gear, don’t we?  There are many different opinions out there, and everyone is talking about how to get the best sound from our beloved instruments.  If anyone mentions guitar pickups, the debate of alnico vs ceramic magnets is sure to follow. Alnico and ceramic magnets are the two main types of magnets you’ll find in electric guitar pickups.  Each has its own pros and cons, and the debate of which one is better has been raging for decades now.  So what are the differences between the two??  What does it mean to you as a player when you’re shopping for gear?? In this post, we’ll go over the main differences between alnico vs. ceramic pickup magnets.  By the end of this post, you’ll have a better idea of what you’re looking at when shopping for your next guitar or replacement guitar pickup!     Differences Between Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets.   Before we discuss any pros or cons, we’ll first go over the main differences between alnico and ceramic magnets. Both alnico and ceramic magnets are types of permanent magnets.  They’ve both been used in a wide range of applications over the years, other than just guitar pickups.  Even though many of their applications are the same, the materials used in their construction are very different.    Alnico Magnets. T. Mishima of Japan first developed alnico magnets in 1931.  Alnico is an iron alloy containing Aluminum, Nickle, and Cobalt.  Hence the name, Al-Ni-Co. Alnico magnets were a vast improvement over the other types of magnets available at the time.  They were the strongest type of permanent magnet until the development of rare-earth magnets in the 1970s.   Alnico magnets are available in several different grades and strengths, ranging from alnico 2 through 5.  Most suppliers write these numbers as roman numerals II-IV.  The higher the number, the stronger the magnet.  Alnico II and IV are the most common grades used for electric guitar pickups.   Alnico magnets were used in some of the earliest guitar pickups and are still being used by pickup makers today.  These magnets are the choice of many players looking for that “vintage tone,” but more on that later…….    Ceramic Magnets. Ceramic magnets (aka ferrite magnets) were developed in the 1950-the 60s as a cheaper alternative to other types of magnet materials.  These magnets are composed primarily of iron oxide (aka rust) and strontium carbonate.  Ceramic magnets can also contain small amounts of barium, manganese, nickel, and zinc. The applications for ceramic magnets are a little limited because of how brittle they are.  Nevertheless, ceramic magnets are still by far the most common type of magnet produced to this day.  Most of the magnets in your home right now are probably ceramic! In addition to their lower cost, ceramic magnets are also much harder to demagnetize than other magnet materials.  Manufacturers have used ceramic magnets in guitar pickups since the 1960s.  With their lower cost, they are often found on lower-priced instruments.  Because of their use in many cheap and nasty guitars, ceramic pickups have gotten a bad rap over the years.  However, in a quality pickup, ceramic magnets can be great!  But more on that later…….   Affiliate Link     The tone of Alnico vs. Ceramic Guitar Pickups.   So now that we’ve got all the nerdy stuff out of the way, let’s talk about how the different types of magnets affect the sound of guitar pickups!  Different types of magnets create slightly different magnetic fields around a guitar’s pickups.  This can affect how the pickup senses the vibrations of the guitar’s strings and the pickup’s tone.   For more info on how guitar pickups actually work, check out my other post linked below!! ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓ How Electric Guitar Pickups Work How Do Electric Guitar Pickups Work? Alnico Magnets. Generally, alnico magnets have a reputation for sounding rounder, warmer, and smoother/sweeter.  They can be more dynamic, responding better to the subtle nuances of your playing.  Alnico pickups tend to be lower output than most ceramic pickups.  Because of this, they generally won’t push an amp as hard and they’ll clean up better than ceramics pickups.  This all depends on what grade of alnico is used in the pickup, alnico II vs. IV, for example.    Ceramic Magnets. On the other hand, Ceramic magnets have a reputation for sounding brighter, sharper, and more cutting with some mid-range scoop.  All things being equal, ceramic pickups tend to be higher output than many alnico pickups.  Because of their higher output and brighter/clearer sound, ceramic pickups usually hold up very well under a lot of heavy distortion.  These pickups’ extra bite and clarity help a heavily distorted tone from getting too muddy and murky.   The downside of ceramic magnets is that they can bright to the point of sounding harsh and tinny in some guitars.  Some cheaper ceramic pickups can also have a slightly fuzzy, almost brittle tone.  Now bear in mind that these downsides have a lot more to do with the overall build quality of the pickup, not the type of magnet used.  Because of their low cost, ceramic pickups are used in many really cheap and nasty electric guitars.  Face it, many of these instruments are by-all-means playable, but you can’t expect perfect tone out of them either.   Remember that all this is very subjective, and many other variables affect the sound of a set of pickups.  This brings me to my next point………    How Much Does It Really Matter?   So, we know the type of magnet in your guitar’s pickups can affect its tone.  But how big of a difference does this really make?? Well, there are two schools of thought here……….. The first is that the type of magnet used is vital, and the tone of one vs. the other is instantly recognizable.  The second is that the magnet type does not affect the tone of the pickup whatsoever.  The only thing that matters is the strength of the magnet, not the material it is made of.  So who do you believe??  Well, here’s my take on it; I think that the type of magnet used can affect the tone of a pickup, but not to the extent that many would have you believe.  In other words, the magnet material alone isn’t going to make or break a pickup or the rest of your rig.  The magnet material plays its part, but plenty of other variables also affect the sound of a guitar’s pickups.  Such as……. The number of windings in the coil of the pickup. The gauge of wire used in the coil. The shape of the coil. The size/strength of the magnet in relation to the coil. Are the pole pieces adjustable or plain slugs? Are the pole pieces straight or staggered?   As you can see, there are many other factors at play here.  Think of the magnet material as an ingredient in the recipe instead of a deciding factor in the sound of your pickups.   Case-in-point.  When I was researching this post, I started looking at some of my own guitars as examples.  My #1 is a custom build I did a while back that’s got a Seymour Duncan JB in the bridge.  Now, I couldn’t remember the specs on that pickup and what kind of magnets it had in it (my memory sucks, I’d forget my butt if it wasn’t attached).  I was thinking that it had ceramic magnets because of how bright and cutting it is.  Nevertheless, I doubled checked Seymour Duncan’s website just to be safe.  Well, guess what…..The JBs actually have alnico IV magnets in them, not ceramic.  Go figure, right? P.S.  For my review of the Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, check out my other post linked below!! ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓  Seymour Duncan JB, Sh-4 Pickup Review Seymour Duncan JB, Sh-4 Pickup Review     The magnet material plays a pretty small part in the overall sound of your pickups.  Personally, I have a hard time telling the difference just listening to a guitar.   But don’t take my word for it!  Check out Darrell Braun’s video here, where he does a shoot-out of different types of pickup magnets in the same guitar! After watching the video, you’ll probably notice a small difference between the different magnets.  But it wasn’t anything earth-shattering, was it?   Alnico vs. Ceramic Magnets Conclusion. So is there a difference between the tone of alnico vs. ceramic magnets in your guitar’s pickups?  Yes, there is a difference, but not much of one.    Even though alnico and ceramic magnets contain completely different materials, they both perform well in many different types of guitar pickups.  When shopping for a new guitar or set of replacement pickups, pay attention to the actual sound of the pickups, not the type of magnet listed on the spec sheet! For tips on choosing the right guitar pickup for you, check out my other post linked below!! ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓  ↓ Electric Guitar Pickups: How To Choose Electric Guitar Pickups: How To Choose     Do you like pickups with alnico or ceramic magnets??  Let me know in the comments!!     That’s a wrap! So that’s it for now folks.  I hope you found the post interesting, and be sure to let me know in the comments if you have any suggestions for future posts. Be sure to check me out on Pinterest, Facebook, and Twitter!  Any likes, shares or follows really help out the site and are greatly appreciated! Stay safe, and thanks for reading!  I’ll see you at the next one!   P.S.  Don’t forget to grab the FREE Electric Guitar Setup Guide below!! ↓   ↓   ↓   ↓   ↓               FacebookTweetPin Categories. Bass Guitar Gift ideas Guitar Building Guitar Electronics Guitar Repair Guitar Setup Guitar Tech Instruments Other Pickups Acoustic Guitar Bass Electric Guitar Fingerboard Fretboard Guitar Guitar Building Guitar Buying Guitar Electronics Guitar Gear Guitar Neck Guitar Parts Guitar Pickups Guitar Setup Guitar Strings Guitar Tech How To Humbucker Repair Short Scale Bass wpDiscuz00Would love your thoughts, please comment.x()x| ReplyInsert
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • magnet
  • 65
  • 25
  • pickup
  • 64
  • 25
  • guitar
  • 57
  • 25
  • ceramic
  • 36
  • 25
  • alnico
  • 31
  • 25
  • ceramic magnet
  • 25
  • 25
  • guitar pickup
  • 23
  • 25
  • type
  • 20
  • 25
  • type magnet
  • 14
  • 25
  • alnico ceramic
  • 13
  • 25
  • tone
  • 13
  • 25
  • difference
  • 12
  • 25
  • alnico ceramic magnet
  • 11
  • 25
  • alnico magnet
  • 9
  • 25
  • electric guitar
  • 9
  • 25
  • post
  • 9
  • 25
  • electric
  • 9
  • 25
  • material
  • 9
  • 25
  • magnet guitar
  • 8
  • 25
  • magnet material
  • 8
  • 25
  • ceramic pickup
  • 8
  • 25
  • sound
  • 8
  • 25
  • affect
  • 7
  • 25
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 6
  • 25
  • seymour duncan
  • 6
  • 25
  • instrument
  • 6
  • 25
  • check
  • 6
  • 25
  • duncan
  • 6
  • 25
  • cost
  • 5
  • 25
  • seymour
  • 5
  • 25
  • jb
  • 5
  • 25
  • ceramic magnet guitar
  • 4
  • 25
  • difference alnico ceramic
  • 4
  • 25
  • seymour duncan jb
  • 4
  • 25
  • guitar electronic
  • 4
  • 25
  • affiliate link
  • 4
  • 25
  • difference alnico
  • 4
  • 25
  • duncan jb
  • 4
  • 25
  • point
  • 4
  • 25
  • play
  • 4
  • 25
  • iv
  • 4
  • 25
  • lower
  • 4
  • 25
  • coil
  • 4
  • 25
  • magnet guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 25
  • pickup type magnet
  • 3
  • 25
  • guitar pickup work
  • 3
  • 25
  • check post linked
  • 3
  • 25
  • ii iv
  • 3
  • 25
  • pickup alnico
  • 3
  • 25
  • affect sound
  • 3
  • 25
  • pickup type
  • 3
  • 25
  • pickup work
  • 3
  • 25
  • check post
  • 3
  • 25
  • post linked
  • 3
  • 25
  • alnico pickup
  • 3
  • 25
  • affect tone
  • 3
  • 25
  • sound pickup
  • 3
  • 25
  • guitar setup
  • 3
  • 25
  • sounding
  • 3
  • 25
  • output
  • 3
  • 25
  • part
  • 3
  • 25
  • review
  • 3
  • 25
  • setup
  • 3
  • 25
  • bass
  • 3
  • 25
Result 26
TitleBest electric guitar pickups 2022: single-coil, humbucker, P-90 and active pickups for all styles | MusicRadar
Urlhttps://www.musicradar.com/news/best-electric-guitar-pickups
DescriptionUpgrade your electric guitar tone now with the best pickups from Seymour Duncan, EMG, Bare Knuckle and more
Date
Organic Position26
H1Best electric guitar pickups 2022: single-coil, humbucker, P-90 and active pickups for all styles
H2Why buy new electric guitar pickups?
What are electric guitar pickups made of?
What are active pickups?
Related buyer's guides
H3Best electric guitar pickups: Music Radar's choice
Best electric guitar pickups: Product guide
1. Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates SH-PG1B
2. Lindy Fralin Vintage Hot
3. EMG James Hetfield Het Set
4. Fender Tex-Mex
5. Mojo Pickups Mojo’Tron
6. Fender Pure Vintage ‘65 Jazzmaster Pickups
7. Mojotone 56 Quiet Coil P-90 Soapbar
8. Fishman Fluence Classic Humbuckers
9. Bare Knuckle Juggernaut
10. DiMarzio Super Distortion S
11. Bare Knuckle Boot Camp True Grit Set
12. Seymour Duncan ‘59 Neck
13. EMG SA
Best electric guitar pickups: Buying advice
H2WithAnchorsWhy buy new electric guitar pickups?
What are electric guitar pickups made of?
What are active pickups?
Related buyer's guides
BodyBest electric guitar pickups 2022: single-coil, humbucker, P-90 and active pickups for all styles By Rob Laing , James Farmer published 7 January 22 Upgrade your electric guitar tone now with the best pickups from Seymour Duncan, EMG, Bare Knuckle and more Included in this guide:. 1Seymour. Duncan Pearly Gates SH-PG1B2Lindy. Fralin Vintage Hot3EMG. James Hetfield Het Set4Fender. Tex-Mex5Mojo. Pickups Mojo’Tron6Fender. Pure Vintage ‘65 Jazzmaster Pickups7Mojotone. 56 Quiet Coil P-90 Soapbar8Fishman. Fluence Classic Humbuckers9Bare. Knuckle Juggernaut10DiMarzio. Super Distortion S11Bare. Knuckle Boot Camp True Grit Set12Seymour. Duncan ‘59 Neck13EMG. SA (Image credit: Future) Upgrading to one of (or a set of) the best electric guitar pickups is one of the most effective ways to dramatically improve your tone - besides buying a new guitar. Luckily for those in the market for a set of new pickups, there’s never been a better time to buy pickups. The market is huge and varied, meaning that finding the right pickups for your guitar and your sound is super easy. In this guide, we’ll answer some common questions, and help you make the right choice.A pickup is essentially a metal coil wrapped around magnetic pole pieces. This creates a magnetic field to reproduce frequencies, which are detected by the pickup when your electric guitar strings vibrate. These vibrations are then transferred into a signal as you’re playing and are sent to your amplifier via your instrument cable. A number of factors can affect what frequencies a pickup listens to – including the type of magnet and number of coil windings – and this determines its character and the kind of strengths and weaknesses it may have for different musical styles.We’ve included some expert buying advice at the end of this guide, so if you’d like to read more about the best electric guitar pickups, hit the ‘buying advice’ tab above. If you’d rather get straight to the products, then keep scrolling.Best electric guitar pickups: Music Radar's choice. Our top pick for the best electric guitar pickups has to be the Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates. The Pearly Gates draws on the influence of the past to create an unbeatable combination – especially if you have a Les Paul to upgrade.The original influence for its character and name is the bridge humbucker from ZZ Top legend Billy Gibbons’ 1959 Pearly Gates Les Paul. Those legendary early Gibson LPs featured PAF humbuckers that are regarded by tonehounds to be the cream of pickups, but the Seymour Duncan spin on the design offers more output to boost your overdrive. The midrange growl seals the deal.For us, the best all-round single-coil pickup is the Fralin Vintage Hots. Now celebrating its 30th birthday, the enduring popularity of Lindy Fralin’s design isn’t a mystery when you hear it in action. The clarity and balance with classic Strat high end sparkle can really revamp your tone and make your guitar feel new, with added articulation and sensitivity that makes all pickup positions addictive.Best electric guitar pickups: Product guide. (Image credit: Seymour Duncan)1. Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates SH-PG1B. The best all-round humbucker pickup. SpecificationsLaunch price: £109/$105Magnet: Alnico 2DC resistance: 8.1k (bridge), 7.3k (neck)Reasons to buy+Great for blues sustain+Well balanced for rock styles +Pinched harmonics singReasons to avoid-Metal players may want a hotter 'buckerThe legendary tone of the Gibson ‘59 Burst Les Pauls is coveted by players for good reason – and Billy Gibbons’ Pearly Gates is an iconic example. So when one of the greatest pickup manufacturers sought to recreate its humbuckers, the results were always going to be special, and that’s why this is number one on our best electric guitar pickups rundown.Whether you’re a Les Paul owner looking to supercharge your bridge position tone, or want some golden era vintage blues mojo for your humbucker upgrade – these won’t disappoint. A relatively bright high-end offers sustain with rich harmonics, while midrange raunch can be found too. The Pearly Gates comes with a four-conductor hookup cable to allow for a variety of pickup-switching options.(Image credit: Fralin)2. Lindy Fralin Vintage Hot. The best all-round single-coil pickup . SpecificationsLaunch price: £77.99 - £279/$95-$250Magnet: Alnico 5DC Resistance: (estimated) 6k (neck), 6k (middle), 6.6k (bridge)Reasons to buy+A great upgrade for Strat players+Balanced and open sound+Great for leadsReasons to avoid-Best bought as a set A best-selling design by Lindy Fralin, the Vintage Hot has been a go-to pickup for Strat players looking to upgrade for three decades now and its name is pretty suggestive as to what you can expect – an open sound but with sizzle in the higher end that’s ideal for lead players wanting to shine. The Vintage Hot is pitched between Fralin’s other two popular single-coils – fatter than it’s most vintage Read ‘54 but brighter than its Blues Special. It’s all about balance and clarity that many players regard as the ultimate Strat pickup.(Image credit: EMG)3. EMG James Hetfield Het Set. The best active guitar pickup for metal with versatility. SpecificationsLaunch price: £200/$249Magnet: C (neck) & C/S (bridge)DC resistance: 2.11k (neck), 1.61k (bridge)Reasons to buy+Great for metal rhythms+Neck pickup offers impressive clean tones+Attack and low endReasons to avoid-Needs guitar space for 9V batteryAs they were first to the table, EMG once had a monopoly in the active pickup field, and although competition is fiercer, its established models still prove to be popular with players - including metal’s greatest rhythm player. A longtime EMG user in his ESP models, it wasn’t until 2009 that Hetfield asked the company to combine its active tone with some of the character of a single-coil. This set was its response and an evolution of the popular EMG-81 bridge and 60 neck the guitarist used for 30 years. The JH-N’s larger core offers more attack and low end than the 60. The JH-B offers a clearer low end to combine with the 81’s attack.(Image credit: Fender)4. Fender Tex-Mex. The best value Fender pickup set. SpecificationsLaunch price: £119/$99 Strat (set of three), £85/$99 Tele (set of two)Magnet: Alnico VDC Resistance: 6.5k (neck), 6.4k (middle), 7.4k (bridge)Reasons to buy+Great value for entry-level Fenders+Boosted output for rockReasons to avoid-Not for fans of clean country twangIf your entry level Squier or Fender Strat or Tele needs upscaling in the tone department, Fender have the answer here with one of the best electric guitar pickup options when it comes to value. Available in Strat or Tele sets, the Tex Mex bridge pickup is overwound and proves its beefier worth with overdrive – cutting through with grit and balance. Blues fans can also be comforted to learn these are the same pickups found on the signature Jimmie Vaughan Tex-Mex Strat.(Image credit: Mojo Pickups)5. Mojo Pickups Mojo’Tron. The best boutique humbucker for classic Gretsch tone. SpecificationsLaunch price: £100/$121Magnet: Alnico 5DC Resistance: 5k (bridge) 4.2K (neck)Reasons to buy+For vintage Gretsch tone lovers+Single-coil spank +Great hum cancellation Reasons to avoid-Not enough chunk for heavy rockersWhether you’re looking for vintage country and rockabilly tones from the schools of Chet Atkins and Eddie Cochran, or something a little different for a humbucker upgrade, the Mojo’Tron is a great choice. The original Gretsch Filter’Tron is an early humbucker design that has more spank and punch than your usual ‘bucker, and is thinner with lower output and a more open sound.The British-made Mojo’Tron is a boutique take on the design; ‘bright and twangy’ for that rockabilly bite. They’re even available in P-90 models, as well as the standard Filter’Tron size. Be patient though as Marc Ransley’s pickups are handmade to order with no shortage of customers, so you may have to wait a little while. But it’s worth it!  (Image credit: Fender)6. Fender Pure Vintage ‘65 Jazzmaster Pickups. Two tonal time capsules, please. SpecificationsLaunch price: From £169/$129Magnet: Alnico VDC Resistance: 6.8kReasons to buy+True vintage tone for your JM+Faithful recreation of the ‘65 pickup+Comes with everything you need for installation Reasons to avoid-A bit too bright? Fender’s pickups are rarely criticised. It seems that nearly every guitar that comes out of Fender’s factories sounds just as it should - but if you’re a Jazzmaster player in disagreement, then these Pure Vintage ‘65s could be just the thing you need.Crafted to as close to 1965 spec as possible, the Pure Vintage Jazzmaster set is built to capture the sound of the mid-’60s in a guitar tone. The Alnico V magnets do this well, capturing the bright, clean and clear tonality of the original Jazzmasters. Period correct bobbin construction, flush mounted polepieces and classy aged-white pickup covers round off these ultra-tasteful pickups - and the relatively low price point is the icing on the cake.(Image credit: Mojotone)7. Mojotone 56 Quiet Coil P-90 Soapbar. The best vintage P-90 pickup without the unwanted hum. SpecificationsLaunch price: $130/£98 (each), $255/£189 (set)Magnet: Alnico 5 barDC resistance: 8.6k (bridge), 8k (neck)Reasons to buy+P-90 goodness without the excessive hum+Available as a set+Vintage styleReasons to avoid-More expensive than some rivalsThere’s a lot to love about the vintage P-90s of the 50s – clarity and highs that cut with fat mids. Less appealing is the 60-cycle hum that can prove maddening in certain situations. Mojotone deliver the old school vintage spec 42 gauge coil wire, lower Gauss Alnico magnets and scatterwound coils for handwound character... but without the hum.Mojotone don’t use stacked coils or active circuitry to get these results but their design works. And if you’ve been wary of single-coils before because you want more beef or gain and without the unwanted noise, these are an investment worth making.(Image credit: Fishman)8. Fishman Fluence Classic Humbuckers. The most cutting-edge electric guitar pickup available right now . SpecificationsLaunch price: £139/$176 (each), £235/$337 (pair)Magnet: Alnico 5DC Resistance: N/AReasons to buy+More versatile than most humbuckers+Kills unwanted hum+Revolutionary designReasons to avoid-This technology costs It’s not often that a guitar pickup can be called revolutionary in that last fifty years but the Fluence range is. An active pickup range available in single-coil and humbucker designs, but they offer a unique blend of classic and modern by offering distinct ‘voices’ the player can choose between.Launched in 2014, Fluence pickups use a solid core instead of the traditional wire coil and the magnets used on these Classic Humbuckers (Modern and Signature sets for artists including Deftones’ Stephen Carpenter, Greg Koch and Tosin Abasi also available) feature blade magnets that create an even magnetic field to enhance definition. There’s also a preamp onboard each pickup that can be charged via USB.The neck Classic offers two ‘voices’; vintage or clear chime and the bridge has a classic ‘vintage PAF’ and over-wound-style ‘Classic Hotrod’. The third voice for each is a single coil tone. You’re covering a lot of tonal ground here.(Image credit: Bare Knuckle)9. Bare Knuckle Juggernaut . The best humbucker pickup for modern metal tones and seven-string guitars. SpecificationsLaunch price: from £139/$168Magnet: Alnico and ceramic mix (Bridge), Alnico 5 (neck)DC resistance: 13.3k (bridge), 8.9k (neck)Reasons to buy+Great for metal +Neck position tones are dynamic+Mansoor-approved!Reasons to avoid-Not for vintage tonehounds. Obviously.The Aftermath humbucker proved very popular for Bare Knuckle, with an incredibly tight response for fast metal rhythm work. The Juggernaut was developed with one of its high profile fans, tonehound Misha Mansoor of progressive metallers Periphery and the results are more versatile than the Aftermath while living up to the Juggernaut name.The attack of a ceramic pickup when picking hard with the harmonic response of an Alnico any time you need it? Yes indeed! It delivers in the low end and mids for huge rhythm sounds, while reflecting the detail of the sophisticated chord voicings often found in progressive metal. It’s even available for eight-string as well as six and seven-string guitars.(Image credit: DiMarzio)10. DiMarzio Super Distortion S. The best single coil-sized humbucker pickup . SpecificationsLaunch price: £75/$79.99Magnet: CeramicDC Resistance: 13.18kReasons to buy+Superb all-rounder for rock+Single-coil and humbucker available+A guitar legendReasons to avoid-Not available as a matching set As well as being a great humbucker, the Super Distortion is historically important. The whole concept of buying a replacement electric guitar pickup didn’t really exist before the Super Distortion became a benchmark by which other high output pickups were measured.Designed to give your tube amp a push into glorious overdrive, it still stands up today and has been used by the likes of Paul Gilbert, Kurt Cobain, Def Leppard’s Phil Collen and Kiss’s Paul Stanley. But why should only humbucker guitar players get all the fun?The Super Distortion S offers the famed thrills of its older brother, but is designed to fit in the Strat’s slanted bridge position. It’s a great all-rounder – you’ll have a super Strat in no time!(Image credit: Bare Knuckle Pickups )11. Bare Knuckle Boot Camp True Grit Set. Affordable pickup sets from BKP - rejoice!SpecificationsLaunch price: From £124/$151 (Tele set, pictured)Magnet: Alnico VOutput: MediumReasons to buy+Medium output provides loads of tonal options+Humbuckers, Strat, Tele and P90s all catered for+More affordable than some other big brands Reasons to avoid-Can't tweak the Boot Camp range Bare Knuckle Pickups have taken the world of pickups by storm in recent years. Their approach has always been super simple - make the best pickups, by hand - and make your guitar sound awesome. The Boot Camp series of pickups removes some of Bare Knuckle’s more time-consuming core options, and sticks a solid, workhorse set of pickups in your hand, ready to don any guitar you like. The True Grit set sits in the middle of the Boot Camp series, with the Alnico V magnets offering a ‘medium’ output to these pickups. They’re ideal for anyone who wants to conjure an epic hard rock, grunge or old-school metal tone from a set of Strat or Tele single coils, Humbuckers or P90s. They’ll do some pretty stunning cleans, too.(Image credit: Seymour Duncan)12. Seymour Duncan ‘59 Neck. The best neck pickup for blues . SpecificationsLaunch price: £77/$79Magnet: Alnico 5DC Resistance: 7.6kReasons to buy+A classic humbucker +For versatile blues playing+A classy Gibson linkReasons to avoid-Medium output not hot enough for someThe sound of a solo on the neck pickup can be a gloriously warm and fat tone, but many of us find our stock neck pickups too dark and muddy. The ‘59’s popularity is huge for a reason; versatile and clear, adding sustain and some bright attack from a slightly boosted high end for leads where you need it. That’s alongside a full low end with subtly scooped mids that make it a go-to for smooth clean work.It’s got serious provenance behind the name too; the ‘59 is wound on Seymour Duncan’s Leesona 102 machine that was originally used in Gibson’s Kalamazoo factory in the fifties.(Image credit: EMG)13. EMG SA. The best hum-cancelling single coil pickup. SpecificationsLaunch Price: £229/$265Magnet: Alnico 5DC Resistance: Not availableReasons to buy+No more unwanted hum!+Good enough for Gilmour… Reasons to avoid-Lacks the vintage character of some passive single coilsThe main downside of single-coil pickups is the unwanted sound they produce by their very nature – hum. It’s especially frustrating when recording, so the chance to get the bright and open Strat sound with its plummy bottom end, but without unwanted noise, is the SA’s trump card. It was enough to convince David Gilmour – needless to say it’s great for driving effects chains and expressive, versatile blues work.The SA is a medium output active pickup available in black, white, ivory or even red to match your scratchplate.Best electric guitar pickups: Buying advice. (Image credit: Seymour Duncan, Fralin)Why buy new electric guitar pickups? . If you find a guitar that you love the feel of but feel it's lacking once plugged in to a guitar amp, new pickups can be the most effective way of trading up your tone for a fraction of the price of a new guitar. But knowing what you want and what’s on offer from various pickup types is a vital first step. Different electric guitars need different types of pickups, and each different pickup will sound different, too. It’s for this reason that there’s almost endless choice. That’s where this best electric guitar pickups guide can help.  What are electric guitar pickups made of? . A pickup can contain one magnet – or even several magnets – that can vary in shape. Think of these magnets as a pickup’s engine. Like we mentioned before, these magnets are wrapped with wire, which creates a magnetic field. Your string vibrations, when they interrupt the pickup's magnetic field, create a signal that is sent to your amplifier through your guitar cable.Traditional single-coil pickups found in guitars like Strats and Teles have rods made of magnetic material rising up through the pickup. These rods are called pole pieces, and they direct a magnetic field to each of the strings.Humbucking pickups usually have an additional bar magnet under the pole pieces. Single coil pickups are more susceptible to noise from hum and interference due to having one wire coil, while the two coils in a humbucker create a reverse polarity that reduces or ‘bucks’ the hum. In humbuckers, both coils create a magnetic field, which increases the signal strength they produce and adds more sustain to your tone.You might also want to consider a P-90 pickup. Think of them as a hot-rodded single coil with a wide coil that accentuates the mids; good if your tone is getting lost in your band’s mix. Gibson designed it in 1946 and it’s often referred to as a soapbar because of the rectangular shape. Billie Joe Armstrong, Pete Townshend, Neil Young and Tony Iommi have all harnessed P-90 power.  What are active pickups? . Active pickups use additional circuitry in a preamp built into the pickup that usually requires a 9-volt battery to provide power. They have been adopted by players ranging from Metallica’s James Hetfield to David Gilmour. If you’re a humbucking metaller, or you’re looking for less hum and more compression to your single-coil tone, active pickups are well worth a look. Related buyer's guides. These are the best acoustic guitar pickups you should tryCheck out our guide to the best cheap electric guitarsThe best budget electric guitars under £/$500The best electric guitars under $/£1000Check out these gifts for guitaristsTake a look at the best pedalboards for guitarists Rob Laing I'm the Guitars Editor for MusicRadar, handling news, reviews, features, tuition, advice for the strings side of the site and everything in between. Before MusicRadar I worked on guitar magazines for 15 years, including Editor of Total Guitar. I've currently set aside any pipe dreams of getting anywhere with my own songs and I am enjoying playing covers in function bands. 
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 89
  • 26
  • guitar
  • 43
  • 26
  • coil
  • 32
  • 26
  • vintage
  • 23
  • 26
  • humbucker
  • 23
  • 26
  • set
  • 21
  • 26
  • tone
  • 21
  • 26
  • alnico
  • 20
  • 26
  • electric
  • 20
  • 26
  • electric guitar
  • 19
  • 26
  • guitar pickup
  • 18
  • 26
  • single
  • 18
  • 26
  • single coil
  • 17
  • 26
  • 90
  • 17
  • 26
  • credit
  • 15
  • 26
  • price
  • 15
  • 26
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 14
  • 26
  • strat
  • 14
  • 26
  • avoid
  • 14
  • 26
  • magnet
  • 13
  • 26
  • specificationslaunch price
  • 12
  • 26
  • metal
  • 12
  • 26
  • player
  • 12
  • 26
  • neck
  • 12
  • 26
  • specificationslaunch
  • 12
  • 26
  • resistance
  • 12
  • 26
  • offer
  • 11
  • 26
  • bridge
  • 11
  • 26
  • duncan
  • 10
  • 26
  • knuckle
  • 10
  • 26
  • active
  • 10
  • 26
  • classic
  • 10
  • 26
  • sound
  • 10
  • 26
  • end
  • 10
  • 26
  • seymour
  • 9
  • 26
  • seymour duncan
  • 8
  • 26
  • bare knuckle
  • 8
  • 26
  • pearly gate
  • 8
  • 26
  • super distortion
  • 7
  • 26
  • active pickup
  • 7
  • 26
  • single coil pickup
  • 6
  • 26
  • vintage hot
  • 6
  • 26
  • coil humbucker
  • 6
  • 26
  • magnetic field
  • 6
  • 26
  • coil pickup
  • 6
  • 26
  • pickup specificationslaunch price
  • 5
  • 26
  • alnico 5dc resistance
  • 5
  • 26
  • reason avoid
  • 5
  • 26
  • string
  • 5
  • 26
  • boot camp
  • 5
  • 26
  • pickup specificationslaunch
  • 5
  • 26
  • alnico 5dc
  • 5
  • 26
  • 5dc resistance
  • 5
  • 26
  • strat tele
  • 5
  • 26
  • create magnetic field
  • 4
  • 26
  • jame hetfield
  • 4
  • 26
  • lindy fralin
  • 4
  • 26
  • fralin vintage
  • 4
  • 26
  • pure vintage
  • 4
  • 26
  • image credit
  • 4
  • 26
  • create magnetic
  • 4
  • 26
  • le paul
  • 4
  • 26
  • low end
  • 4
  • 26
  • avoid not
  • 4
  • 26
  • single coil humbucker
  • 3
  • 26
  • pickup seymour duncan
  • 3
  • 26
  • duncan pearly gate
  • 3
  • 26
  • pure vintage 65
  • 3
  • 26
  • fralin vintage hot
  • 3
  • 26
  • pickup seymour
  • 3
  • 26
  • duncan pearly
  • 3
  • 26
  • vintage 65
  • 3
  • 26
  • true grit
  • 3
  • 26
  • pole piece
  • 3
  • 26
  • buying advice
  • 3
  • 26
  • round
  • 3
  • 26
  • high end
  • 3
  • 26
  • credit seymour
  • 3
  • 26
  • humbucker pickup
  • 3
  • 26
  • tex mex
  • 3
  • 26
  • tele set
  • 3
  • 26
  • mojo tron
  • 3
  • 26
  • classic humbucker
  • 3
  • 26
  • medium output
  • 3
  • 26
  • neck pickup
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
TitleUnderstanding the purpose of electric guitar pickups
Urlhttps://ruokangas.com/specifications/pickups/
DescriptionAt Ruokangas Guitars, we are not taking part to the ongoing industrial race for cheaper labour and bigger profits. Our ambition is simply to live our lives making guitars, cherishing the tradition of handcraft. Why? Because we love it. It's a good life
Date
Organic Position27
H1Understanding the electric guitar pickup
H2It's alive!
Will changing the pickups help?
The secret of great tone revealed
Working with Harry Häussel
Do you need more oomph?
A toast for us tone freaks!
What are the best pickups for me?
H3Amplified, naturally
Sculpting the voice of your guitar
Too muddy waters?
How to cut through in the mix?
The acoustic feedback
I sound different from you
Stand out from the crowd
Precision engineering from Germany
My first own pickup comes alive
What the hell is he talking about..?
Singlecoil dynamics
Sound matters
Staggered polepieces or not?
It’s the little tweaks
Gimme Steam
Use Guitar Creator to learn
Let’s figure it out together
The future of the electric guitar pickup?
H2WithAnchorsIt's alive!
Will changing the pickups help?
The secret of great tone revealed
Working with Harry Häussel
Do you need more oomph?
A toast for us tone freaks!
What are the best pickups for me?
BodyUnderstanding the electric guitar pickup Tweet It's alive! Amplified, naturally. An electric guitar is a living being. It behaves differently when taken into different spaces, when held by different people, or taken into different climates. It’s alive. The electric guitar pickup can be in some ways compared to a vocal microphone. No matter how expensive and state-of-the-art microphone you put in front of me, I won’t sound like Frank Sinatra, unfortunately. I will sound like me. The microphone can sculpt my voice by filtering or boosting frequencies, but the purpose of the microphone is not to colour my voice. The purpose of a pickup is to listen to and pick up my voice, so that it can be amplified in the most natural way possible. Sculpting the voice of your guitar. I look at a guitar pickup in this exact same way. One can claim that the magnetic pickup only picks up the vibration of the strings – not the sound of the guitar. Yes, that is true. However, the way the strings sound – the way the harmonics of strings are enhanced or cancelled, is strongly affected by the object the strings are attached to. In other words, the guitar itself makes a huge difference. Will changing the pickups help? Too muddy waters? A typical scenario is that a guitar sounds dark and muddy. The player wants to improve it by changing the pickups. To some extent this may work ok – but only if the reason for the muddiness tracks down to the original pickups. Often, however, it is the acoustic properties of the guitar dictating what the amplified sound is like. No matter what pickups you put into an acoustically dark sounding electric guitar, the muddiness will come through into the amplified tone. You can finetune the sound and alter the way the guitar drives your amp by changing pickups, but the foundation (the guitar itself) needs to be right. The acoustic sound of your guitar needs to be healthy. How to cut through in the mix? Another example – a great sounding electric guitar typically needs to have a good dose of certain mid frequencies and sparkling highs to cut through in the mix. If your guitar doesn’t provide those frequencies acoustically, you’re screwed. Changing pickups won’t help – if the frequencies are not there, they’re just not there. A pickup can’t put back something that doesn’t exist. The secret of great tone revealed. The acoustic feedback. To add some more elements to the already a complex phenomenon, we also have to deal with the “acoustic feedback”. By this term I mean the sound waves created by the space (room, hall or whatever) in which we’re playing the guitar. The louder the amp, the more it will feed back into the parts of the guitar and the strings, making them vibrate differently – cancelling or coupling frequencies – further sculpting the sound. I describe this phenomenon in more detail in another article, called the Tone Talk. I sound different from you. And let’s not forget the player! The same guitar can sound completely different in the hands of someone else than you. Stand out from the crowd. I often refer to great tone with attributes like ‘transparent’, ‘dynamic’ or ‘healthy’. When the acoustic sound of an electric guitar is healthy to start with, it is a rewarding situation to choose pickups to that guitar. Why? Because now the function of the pickup is not to do all the work, but to amplify the healthy sound of the guitar in the most natural way. If desired, we might want to tweak a bit of this and that with the characteristics of the pickup. In an extreme musical genre, such as metal music, the tone of the guitar is typically processed to a dramatic extent. Now we might want to push the envelope a bit further with the choice of pickups. Still, no matter what the music style – it is so much easier to make the amplified sound to stand out from the crowd in an exceptional way, when the guitar itself sounds healthy to begin with. Working with Harry Häussel. Precision engineering from Germany. I realised very early on my career, that I couldn’t do everything by myself. I just didn’t have the time. And, I’m not really a solo act by my heart and soul. I enjoy better working in a team. One of the first people I ever teamed up with was Harry Häussel from southern Germany. I got to know Harry towards the end of 1990’s as we met at the Frankfurt Musikmesse. I had some ideas regarding pickups for my guitars, and I felt from the beginning that we were very much on the same wavelength. My first own pickup comes alive. Our first project together was the design of my first “own” pickup. I had worked out some parameters for these humbuckers already with a Finnish guitarist Peter Lerche. Harry made me prototypes with different magnets and coils, until we settled on to what was then named the Dukebucker. The Dukebucker is a low output pickup. Especially the neck unit is unique with significantly less winding than neck humbuckers would traditionally have. Our idea was to make these pickups clear and wide spectrum. So even if they’re in the same ballpark with classic PAF style pickups output-wise, they do have a distinct character of their own, that functions very nicely together with my guitars. Do you need more oomph? What the hell is he talking about..? We use also many of the Häussel standard pickups such as Broad or BigMag for our Mojo, or Tozz for the Hellcat, but over the years we’ve come up with quite a few tweaks of our own, and Harry has had never ending forbearance to continue working with me, pushing the envelope further. Typically our phone calls regarding a new pickup could be something like me explaining in a very obscure way: “This guy wants more “oomph” to his bridge pickup – can you do that?”. Harry would patiently ask me a few more questions to understand what the hell am I talking about. Sometimes he might just simply respond: “Yeah, I think so – I’ll send you something to try out”. And most of the times he nails it on the spot! Singlecoil dynamics. Another example of our own pickups are the SingleSonics, that we launched in 2001. I’ve always loved P90 pickups, and I asked Harry if we could make me something that looks like the Dukebucker but has the characteristic P90 sound. The pickup is almost like a P90, but not quite, cause the magnets are different size. Nowadays we use the SingleSonic in many different guitars. In VSOPs it would be often in calibrated sets of three, whereas in a Mojo the SingleSonic would be in the neck position. This pickup is one of my all-time favorites. It mixes extremely well also with the Dukebuckers. A toast for us tone freaks! Sound matters. I admit it. I’m a tone freak. But I resign from “buying” the preconceived opinions of how to get the best sound. Even if hearing sound is an emotional experience for me, I approach the sound matters from the same pragmatic angle as I approach every aspect in making the actual guitar. I study carefully what exists already. I experiment, and eventually make up my own mind based on a vast array of criteria. Some examples follow. Staggered polepieces or not? We have singlecoil pickups called the VS Classic and VS Blues. They’re not too far from Harry’s own ST Classic and Blues – which are really great pickups as they are. It’s just that we wanted a couple of tweaks, such as radiused polepieces rather than staggered. We also wanted screened cables than cloth-covered vintage type. It’s the little tweaks. We wanted these little changes, cause I’m not so much into the “tradition for the sake of tradition” thinking. The staggered polepieces, for example – they made perfect sense back in the 1950’s when the only type of strings available were heavy gauge, with wound G string. The materials used in strings were different, too. The staggered polepieces were introduced at the time to compensate the uneven response of those old timer strings. Today, as the strings available are better made and more balanced, radiused polepieces make more sense to me. But hey, no reason to be offended. Certainly there is no right or wrong in these matters. If you feel that staggered poles are the secret to the greatest tone, then that’s the way for you to go. Gimme Steam. There is one quite unusual story related to our pickup developments elsewhere on this website. The spotlight article I’m referring to is called Gimme Steam, and it tells how the pickups for our Steam bass were born. Sound matters One example of how versatile a guitar with two humbuckers and a P90 can be. This guitar was custom made for Antti Paranko. The pickups are the Unibuckers with the added HB sized P90 in the middle. The pickups are operated via a Freeway 6-position toggle switch. Controls: Master Volume, Master Tone, HB shared Vol, P90 Vol. Doesn't the magnetic pickup only pick up the vibration of the strings – not the sound of the guitar? True. However, the way the strings sound – the way the harmonics of strings are enhanced or cancelled, is sculpted by the object the strings are attached to. In other words, the guitar itself makes a huge difference.– Juha Ruokangas What are the best pickups for me? Use Guitar Creator to learn. The purpose of this article is to help you understand why our choice of pickups is what it is. It is not a tech spec article that would provide you full information about our pickup options. For that information, you’ll get the best overview of our current choice of pickups from the Guitar Creator. Let’s figure it out together. If you have any questions about our pickups after educating yourself with the help of the Guitar Creator, just send us email and we’ll figure it out together. Our common choice of pickups is not carved in stone, either. In other words – we’re happy to listen to your special wishes. Sometimes we install Kloppmann, Lollar, Fralin, Bare Knuckles, etc. There are so many great pickups in the world! The future of the electric guitar pickup? Just when you thought this long and winding article finally came to an end… Check this one out. A pickup literally out-of-this-world… Alder Arctic Birch Bridge talk Custom inlay Ebony Fretwork Guitar finish Hardware Nut Pickups Playability Rock maple Rosewood Spanish Cedar Thermal Ageing Tone talk Valvebucker®
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 49
  • 27
  • guitar
  • 36
  • 27
  • sound
  • 24
  • 27
  • string
  • 15
  • 27
  • harry
  • 13
  • 27
  • tone
  • 10
  • 27
  • electric guitar
  • 7
  • 27
  • time
  • 7
  • 27
  • electric
  • 7
  • 27
  • matter
  • 7
  • 27
  • great
  • 6
  • 27
  • p90
  • 6
  • 27
  • amplified
  • 5
  • 27
  • frequency
  • 5
  • 27
  • acoustic
  • 5
  • 27
  • healthy
  • 5
  • 27
  • example
  • 5
  • 27
  • article
  • 5
  • 27
  • staggered
  • 5
  • 27
  • polepiece
  • 5
  • 27
  • guitar pickup
  • 4
  • 27
  • string sound
  • 4
  • 27
  • sound guitar
  • 4
  • 27
  • changing pickup
  • 4
  • 27
  • sound matter
  • 4
  • 27
  • pickup guitar
  • 4
  • 27
  • choice pickup
  • 4
  • 27
  • microphone
  • 4
  • 27
  • voice
  • 4
  • 27
  • changing
  • 4
  • 27
  • tweak
  • 4
  • 27
  • choice
  • 4
  • 27
  • made
  • 4
  • 27
  • dukebucker
  • 4
  • 27
  • electric guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 27
  • guitar sound
  • 3
  • 27
  • staggered polepiece
  • 3
  • 27
  • guitar creator
  • 3
  • 27
  • singlesonic
  • 3
  • 27
  • wanted
  • 3
  • 27
  • steam
  • 3
  • 27
  • creator
  • 3
  • 27
Result 28
TitleCould anyone explain the difference between pickup types? : Guitar
Urlhttps://www.reddit.com/r/Guitar/comments/11uep3/could_anyone_explain_the_difference_between/
Description26 votes, 47 comments. I'm looking to get an electric guitar (I have an acoustic and I can play basic things and just want an electric to play …
Date
Organic Position28
H1Could anyone explain the difference between pickup types?
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyCould anyone explain the difference between pickup types? Close26Posted byMartin9 years agoCould anyone explain the difference between pickup types? I'm looking to get an electric guitar (I have an acoustic and I can play basic things and just want an electric to play around on) and I've noticed each type has different pickups like Humbuckers with Zebra Coils or 'Classic Humbuckers', Soapbar pickups, P-90 Pickups, P-94 etc. etc..And then the varience with position of the pickups. I understand that the sound changes the closer to the bride you play, I'm assuming that's the only reason for the different location of the pickups, correct me if I'm wrong though.My main question is what kind of different sounds do each of the pickups make or how are they different etc.47 commentssharesavehidereport80% UpvotedLog in or sign up to leave a commentLog InSign UpSort by: best level 1 · 9 yr. ago · edited 9 yr. agoTo add to the variation, plenty of pickup types sound different: e.g., a Duncan humbucker will not sound quite like a Gibson humbucker. There are plenty of articles people have written to explain the differences at different levels of detail, but very generally:Single coils (iconically, on Fenders like stratocasters or telecasters) sound very open, and tend to have more high end to them. Additionally, you get a bit of '60 cycle hum,' to them, which means at high volumes you do get background noise with this type of pickup. They tend to have very pristine clean tones (think Albert Hammond Jr. from The Strokes), and when distorted they have a lot of 'bite' to them (think Hendrix). Using the tone controls, you can make a strat or tele sound pretty smooth (think John Mayer), but not as smooth or compressed as...Humbuckers (most Gibson, PRS, etc.). These are basically two single coil pickups wound together such that the 60 cycle hum is...well...bucked. But this also results in a very smooth, compressed, mid-heavy sort of tone. The cleans are less pristine and much smoother, and the distortion tends to have less 'bite' and more 'crunch' (e.g., Santana). It's easier to get the tone louder and dirtier without feedback with humbuckers than with single coils, which is one reason metal players tend to prefer these. In general, these are all around heavier-sounding.P90's (including Soapbars, for the most part) are kind of in between single coils and humbuckers. They aren't as clean/bitey as singles, but they aren't quite as smooth/crunchy as humbuckers. They've got their own sound, though, and I honestly don't know how best to describe it except the way I just did. P94's are actually not P90 variants, but are humbuckers designed to eliminate 60 cycle hum and sound more P90-ish (P90's are actually a type of single coil, and are thus subject to that hum).As you mentioned, there's a ton of variation even within the same pickups depending on how you set the tone switches and knobs. Playing towards the bridge pickup with the tone knob rolled all the way open will give you a very high-range, bright sound, whereas the neck pickup with the tone knob down will sound dark and smoother in comparison. However, in general, what I've said above holds: there's only so thick you can make single coils sound, and there's only so squeaky clean you can get humbuckers to go.To further muddy the waters, there's pickup aggressiveness: some are designed to break up and distort earlier than others (e.g., zebras), and some are designed to stay clean at very high volumes (e.g., more 'classic' humbuckers). Whether the pickup is covered or not honestly makes very little difference. It's all ultimately up to what you think sounds (and looks) good, and what you're wanting to play.43ReplyShareReportSaveFollowlevel 2Op · 9 yr. agoMartinThank you a lot for this!This is just what I needed4ReplyShareReportSaveFollowContinue this thread level 2 · 9 yr. ago · edited 9 yr. agoThis is pretty perfect. I'd like to add to the single/double list of players. Cause its really all about what kind of music you play:Single coil: blues- Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert Collins, funk- the Meters, David Gilmour, Various RHCP guitarists, Bruce Springsteen and the e street players, various talking heads, rock/blues- Jimi, early Bob Weir, ClaptonHumbuckers: Jam guys - Jerry, Trey, Santana, Alman's. Heavy guys - Slash, Metallica, Megadeath, Rush, Jimmy Page, Angus Young, virtually all jazzers- Joe Pass, Tal Farlow, Grant green, Wes Montgomery Jimmy Bruno, Jim Hall, Charlie Hunter, etc...Edit: wrong name1ReplyShareReportSaveFollowContinue this thread level 2 · 9 yr. agoBrian May doesn't play a humbucking guitar. It's more chimey than crunchy.1ReplyShareReportSaveFollowContinue this thread level 2 · 9 yr. agoExcellent. Can you give a similar breakdown on those lipstick pickups like on a telecaster or how mini humbuckers compare in sound to their regular sized counterparts (if any)? Lastly, what about "toaster" pickups?1ReplyShareReportSaveFollowContinue this thread level 2 · 9 yr. agoJazzmasterWhoa, hold up! You mean to say zebra pickups are different internally? I always figured it was just an aesthetic thing, but as I have zebras on my LP I'd be very keen to know the real differences.1ReplyShareReportSaveFollowContinue this thread level 2 · 9 yr. agoThis is so helpful1ReplyShareReportSaveFollowlevel 1 · 9 yr. agoDitto on reading info at SeymourDuncan.comTo get you started:Passive pickups are not magic.They are wire, wound around a magnetic rod. As the string moves around above the pole, the magnetic field is altered and the wires output a small voltage signal.The tone comes from the wire (diameter, type), the number or wraps around the pole (more, less), and the magnetic rod (type, shape).e.g. more wire loops in the coil = a bit 'hotter' pickupThere are different techniques to lower the noise:dip the pickup wires in wax or something to reduce their movement/jiggling;wiring two coils of wire in opposite to cancel out any signal noise (from fluorescent lights, RF interference, etc.)So, humbuckers are that dual-coil/opposed wiring config (see: Hum buckers!). Compare a humbucker sound to a single coil strat pickup, under a flourescent light, and you'll see.Zebra is just the coloring (1 black, 1 white) of the plastic spacer at the ends of the coil.Active pickups help boost the signal coming out of the pickups. So, you need to inject energy ... which is why these need batteries or some power source.Where you place the pickup along the string changes its sound, also. Think of the string as oscillating - wider swings in exactly the center (12th fret) and tighter swings/loops post-pluck near the anchor points (1st fret/nut and bridge).If you put a pickup close to the neck, it sounds less "trebly/tinny" than near the bridge.So - lots of combinations of placement, materials, wiring, etc. to affect the tone.Google around for folks that make their own pickups. You'll see a lot of chat about these variables.9ReplyShareReportSaveFollowlevel 1 · 9 yr. agohttp://www.seymourduncan.com/support/find-your-tone/8ReplyShareReportSaveFollowlevel 1 · 9 yr. agolevel 2 · 9 yr. agoBeerecaster, LPHow helpful.2ReplyShareReportSaveFollowr/GuitarWelcome to r/guitar, a community devoted to the exchange of guitar related information and entertainment. This is a forum where guitarists, from novice to experienced, can explore the world of guitar through a variety of media and discussion. If you have guitar related questions, use the "Search" field or ask the community. The best place to start if you're new is right below in our "Rules" section. Thanks for visiting.1.1mGuitarists982Not practicing as they shouldCreated May 28, 2008JoinTop posts october 21st 2012Top posts of october, 2012Top posts 2012helpReddit coinsReddit premiumReddit giftsaboutcareerspressadvertiseblogTermsContent policyPrivacy policyMod policyReddit Inc © 2022 . All rights reservedBack to Top
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • yr
  • 36
  • 28
  • pickup
  • 28
  • 28
  • level
  • 19
  • 28
  • sound
  • 16
  • 28
  • humbucker
  • 13
  • 28
  • coil
  • 11
  • 28
  • thread level
  • 10
  • 28
  • type
  • 8
  • 28
  • tone
  • 8
  • 28
  • single
  • 7
  • 28
  • single coil
  • 6
  • 28
  • wire
  • 6
  • 28
  • guitar
  • 5
  • 28
  • thread
  • 5
  • 28
  • difference
  • 4
  • 28
  • play
  • 4
  • 28
  • zebra
  • 4
  • 28
  • high
  • 4
  • 28
  • hum
  • 4
  • 28
  • clean
  • 4
  • 28
  • lot
  • 4
  • 28
  • post
  • 4
  • 28
  • 60 cycle hum
  • 3
  • 28
  • explain difference
  • 3
  • 28
  • pickup type
  • 3
  • 28
  • 60 cycle
  • 3
  • 28
  • cycle hum
  • 3
  • 28
  • tend
  • 3
  • 28
  • 60
  • 3
  • 28
  • cycle
  • 3
  • 28
  • smooth
  • 3
  • 28
  • player
  • 3
  • 28
  • p90
  • 3
  • 28
  • designed
  • 3
  • 28
  • knob
  • 3
  • 28
  • magnetic
  • 3
  • 28
  • string
  • 3
  • 28
Result 29
TitleStratocaster Pickups : Guide to Understanding Single-Coil Pickups | Fender Guitars
Urlhttps://www.fender.com/articles/gear/a-guide-to-fender-single-coil-stratocaster-pickups
DescriptionTake your Strat tone to the next level with brand new PUPs
Date
Organic Position29
H1A Guide to Fender Single-Coil Stratocaster Pickups
H2
H3How Do Pickups Work?
What Does It Mean When a Pickup Is "Hot"?
Single-Coil Sounds
How Much Are Pickups?
Fender Custom Shop Custom '69 Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Custom Shop Custom '54 Stratocaster Pickups
Eric Johnson Signature Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Custom Shop Fat '50s Stratocaster Pickups
Pure Vintage '59 Strat Pickups
PUure Vintage '65 Strat Pickups
Gen 4 Noiseless Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Tex-Mex Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Vintage Noiseless Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Custom Shop Texas Special Strat Pickups
Fender Deluxe Drive Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Original '57/'62 Stratocaster Pickups
Fender Hot Noiseless Strat Pickups
H2WithAnchors
BodyA Guide to Fender Single-Coil Stratocaster PickupsTake your Strat tone to the next level with brand new PUPs.By Mike DuffySince Leo Fender initially introduced it in 1954, the traditional Fender Stratocaster has been known to have three single-coil pickups, and in the six-plus decades since that historic day, that design hasn’t changed much. That being said, single-coil pickups have certainly evolved over the years, allowing players to get different tones while staying within the parameters of a Strat outfitted with a trio of single-coils. After all, an electric guitar pickup plays a huge part in your guitar’s sound, but just how they do that can be quite confusing to the beginner. This is primarily a guide for those looking to dial in their tone with a pickup mod, so while we won’t be getting into the minutiae of how a pickup operates it can serve as a guide for those looking to learn more about what could be considered a guitar’s “engine.” Looking for a beginner guitar? Our interactive gear guide, FindYour.Fender.com, matches you with the perfect model by learning about your sound & style. You’ll be well on your way to finding the right guitar for you. READ MORE: Consider the Pickup: How to Amplify Your Acoustic READ MORE: Decoding Standard Pickup Arrangements How Do Pickups Work? While they come in a variety of shapes and sizes, all pickups essentially operate the same. Pickups translate a string’s vibration into an electric signal that flows through an amp or a mixer and then through a speaker to make a sound. To pick up that vibration, a magnetic field is projected from a magnet that is wrapped in several thousand turns of copper wire. When a string vibrates, it disturbs the field, thus creating the electrical current to amplify. READ MORE: What Are Alnico Pickups? READ MORE: What Are Pickup Poles? And Why Are They So Important? What Does It Mean When a Pickup Is "Hot"? The stronger the signal sent to the amp, the higher output a pickup has, meaning the sound through the speaker will distort more easily. The more readily the pickup distorts, the “hotter” it is. All things being equal, a pickup that has considerably more windings of wire will have a higher output. The increased voltage generally means more mid-range frequencies and less high frequencies. Hot pickups gained popularity in the 1970s, when amps with lots of gain and overdrive pedals were just coming along and hard rock was on the rise. Single-Coil Sounds. There are many different kinds of pickups, but here we'll be honing in on Fender's available single-coil Stratocaster pickups in the classic three-pickup Strat series — neck, middle and bridge. In general you'll get a brighter, snappier sound from the neck position pickup, and bridge pickups are considered "hotter" or more powerful. But that singular Strat sound has more to do with the overlooked middle pickup than the other two. Engage the the middle pickup along with either the neck or bridge to get that signature snap. (And get to know the Strat's five-way selector switch.) READ MORE: The Difference Between Strat and Tele Bridge Pickups READ MORE: What Is a Humbucker and How Does It "Buck" the Hum? READ MORE: The Difference Between Active and Passive Pickups How Much Are Pickups? That depends. Fender recently released a limited run of 300 Ancho Poblano Strat pickups hand wound by Master Pickup Winder Josefina Campos. Those will run you a cool $500, while the most affordable upgrade on this list can be found in the Fender Tex-Mex Strat pickups, which come in at $99.99. At the end of the day though, there's no better way to improve your tone than to upgrade your PUPs. Fender Custom Shop Custom '69 Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/s1MGlPaq3vw Fender Custom Shop Custom '69 Strat single-coil pickups produce the full, punchy tone that defined rock in the late '60s and is especially effective with pedals. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 5/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 5/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 5/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 1/5 Fender Custom Shop Custom '54 Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/LtlOr7FVQXw Our Fender Custom Shop Custom '54 Strat pickups authentically recreate the clear tones and heightened sustain that made the Stratocaster the most revered guitar in rock history. These single-coil pickups are crafted to faithfully replicate the cutting tones reminiscent of 1954 Stratocaster guitars. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 3/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5 Eric Johnson Signature Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/j6PaK5q0Xyk Fender's R&D engineers worked closely with world renowned guitarist and tone connoisseur Eric Johnson to craft the Eric Johnson Signature Stratocaster pickups for his uniquely articulate sound. Carefully blending Leo's legacy with EJ's modern discerning sonic tastes, these Strat pickups are a key element of EJ's unmistakably pure tone. Each pickup is unique in structure and performance. The neck pickup is based on a '54 Strat pickup with oversized alnico 3 magnets. The middle pickup, based on a '63 Strat pickup, uses specially treated alnico magnets and is reverse wound to cancel hum when used with the neck or bridge pickup. The bridge pickup uses alnico 5 magnets and is specially voiced to be hotter without sacrificing that sweet top end sparkle. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 8/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 7/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 8/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 7/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 6/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5 Fender Custom Shop Fat '50s Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/2vfwSZEO-Do Fender Custom Shop Fat '50s Strat pickups deliver the single-coil 1950s Stratocaster sound you know and love. Hot-rodded wiring design delivers enhanced bass response and an extra shot of 21st-century attitude. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5 Pure Vintage '59 Strat Pickups. From vintage bobbin construction to genuine original-era cloth wiring, all Fender Pure Vintage pickups are wound to precise specifications for authentic, traditional Fender tone and performance. Built to evoke the original era of the Fender Stratocaster, these single-coil '59 Strat pickups produce round, warm tone with a sweet edge. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5 PUure Vintage '65 Strat Pickups. No other pickups give you the powerful, clean and clear surf rock tones of mid-'60s Stratocaster guitars like dutifully constructed, meaty-sounding Pure Vintage '65 Strat pickups. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5 Gen 4 Noiseless Stratocaster Pickups. With the all-new Gen 4 Noiseless Stratocaster pickups we've achieved the sonic equivalent of cold fusion—authentic vintage-style Fender tone combined with noise-free performance. A quantum leap in pickup technology, these are the pinnacle of our pickup designs, offering crisp, clear cleans as well as gigantic overdriven tones that are bursting with pure rock power. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 6/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 6/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 3/5 Fender Tex-Mex Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/lB8mPNqdilc Fender Tex-Mex Strat single-coil pickups offer increased output, sparkling highs and attention-grabbing warm tone that keeps all the characteristics of your favorite vintage-style Stratocaster. From Texas grit to soaring clean tone, they're the pickups of choice for versatile players and can be found on the Jimmie Vaughan Tex-Mex Stratocaster. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 3/5 Fender Vintage Noiseless Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/xmcqVXRI8S0 Vintage Noiseless Strat pickups produce all the brilliant clarity, definition and harmonic attributes of vintage single-coil Strat tone without the hum. Get the prized early Stratocaster tone with modern circuitry and craftsmanship. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 3/10 | BASS — 5/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 3/10 | BASS — 5/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 3/10 | BASS — 4/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 3/5 Fender Custom Shop Texas Special Strat Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/cf-pZt_OBys Found in Fender American Special Stratocaster guitars and characterized by their midrange chirp, crystalline highs and tight bass, Fender Texas Special Strat pickups feature an overwound single-coil construction that produces big Texas-blues tone. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 8/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 4/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 4/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 8/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 4/5 Fender Deluxe Drive Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/J9alBirNikE Fender Deluxe Drive Stratocaster pickups are supercharged with the highest output of all our single-coil pickups. The pickups' overwound design makes them ideal for high-gain amp settings, but they also sparkle brilliantly when clean. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 6/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 4/5 Fender Original '57/'62 Stratocaster Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/pzWDtTMaeQw Fender Original '57/'62 Strat single-coil pickups are reverse-engineered from a 1963 Stratocaster guitar. These pickups deliver vintage-Strat sound, feel and vibe, with glistening highs and warm lows. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 4/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 4/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 4/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 5/5 Fender Hot Noiseless Strat Pickups. Embedded content: https://youtu.be/Ttm0ERWw9-M Fender Hot Noiseless Strat pickups can be found in the Jeff Beck Signature Stratocaster guitars exude tone that combines warmth and punch with cutting bluesy articulation, with a screaming high-gain bridge pickup. And thanks to Fender's state-of-the-art Noiseless design, the clean, full sound is free of hum. NECK PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10 MIDDLE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10 BRIDGE PICKUP TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10 TOTAL POWER RATING: 5/5#electric#pickups#stratocasterFender uses cookies (and other similar technologies) to collect data to improve your experience on our site By using our website, you’re agreeing to the collection of data as described in our Website Data Collection Policy and Privacy Policy.You can change your preferences at any time.✕
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 118
  • 29
  • mid
  • 41
  • 29
  • bass
  • 41
  • 29
  • pickup treble
  • 39
  • 29
  • treble
  • 39
  • 29
  • 510
  • 39
  • 29
  • fender
  • 31
  • 29
  • 610
  • 31
  • 29
  • strat
  • 29
  • 29
  • 410
  • 27
  • 29
  • stratocaster
  • 26
  • 29
  • tone
  • 20
  • 29
  • bridge
  • 20
  • 29
  • bridge pickup
  • 18
  • 29
  • neck
  • 18
  • 29
  • mid 410 bass
  • 17
  • 29
  • mid 410
  • 17
  • 29
  • 410 bass
  • 17
  • 29
  • middle
  • 17
  • 29
  • pickup treble 510
  • 16
  • 29
  • treble 510 mid
  • 16
  • 29
  • middle pickup
  • 16
  • 29
  • strat pickup
  • 16
  • 29
  • treble 510
  • 16
  • 29
  • 510 mid
  • 16
  • 29
  • single coil
  • 15
  • 29
  • bass 510
  • 15
  • 29
  • single
  • 15
  • 29
  • coil
  • 15
  • 29
  • stratocaster pickup
  • 14
  • 29
  • neck pickup
  • 14
  • 29
  • bass 610
  • 14
  • 29
  • power
  • 14
  • 29
  • neck pickup treble
  • 13
  • 29
  • middle pickup treble
  • 13
  • 29
  • bridge pickup treble
  • 13
  • 29
  • total power rating
  • 13
  • 29
  • total power
  • 13
  • 29
  • power rating
  • 13
  • 29
  • guitar
  • 13
  • 29
  • total
  • 13
  • 29
  • rating
  • 13
  • 29
  • sound
  • 12
  • 29
  • mid 610 bass
  • 11
  • 29
  • mid 610
  • 11
  • 29
  • 610 bass
  • 11
  • 29
  • custom
  • 11
  • 29
  • vintage
  • 11
  • 29
  • pickup embedded content
  • 10
  • 29
  • 410 bass 610
  • 10
  • 29
  • pickup embedded
  • 10
  • 29
  • embedded content
  • 10
  • 29
  • embedded
  • 10
  • 29
  • content
  • 10
  • 29
  • 310
  • 10
  • 29
  • 510 mid 410
  • 9
  • 29
  • noiseless
  • 9
  • 29
  • stratocaster pickup embedded
  • 8
  • 29
  • mid 510 bass
  • 8
  • 29
  • coil pickup
  • 8
  • 29
  • mid 510
  • 8
  • 29
  • 510 bass
  • 8
  • 29
  • single coil pickup
  • 7
  • 29
  • fender custom shop
  • 7
  • 29
  • fender custom
  • 7
  • 29
  • custom shop
  • 7
  • 29
  • read
  • 7
  • 29
  • shop
  • 7
  • 29
  • pickup treble 310
  • 6
  • 29
  • treble 310 mid
  • 6
  • 29
  • 310 mid 410
  • 6
  • 29
  • pickup treble 610
  • 6
  • 29
  • treble 610 mid
  • 6
  • 29
  • 510 bass 510
  • 6
  • 29
  • treble 310
  • 6
  • 29
  • 310 mid
  • 6
  • 29
  • treble 610
  • 6
  • 29
  • 610 mid
  • 6
  • 29
  • bass 410
  • 6
  • 29
  • 710
  • 6
  • 29
  • bass 510 middle
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 middle pickup
  • 5
  • 29
  • bass 510 bridge
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 bridge pickup
  • 5
  • 29
  • bass 510 total
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 total power
  • 5
  • 29
  • bass 610 middle
  • 5
  • 29
  • 610 middle pickup
  • 5
  • 29
  • bass 610 bridge
  • 5
  • 29
  • 610 bridge pickup
  • 5
  • 29
  • power rating 25
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 mid 610
  • 5
  • 29
  • gen
  • 5
  • 29
  • noiseless stratocaster
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 middle
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 bridge
  • 5
  • 29
  • 510 total
  • 5
  • 29
  • stratocaster guitar
  • 5
  • 29
  • 610 middle
  • 5
  • 29
  • 610 bridge
  • 5
  • 29
  • rating 25
  • 5
  • 29
  • custom shop custom
  • 4
  • 29
  • pickup treble 710
  • 4
  • 29
  • treble 710 mid
  • 4
  • 29
  • bass 610 total
  • 4
  • 29
  • 610 total power
  • 4
  • 29
  • 610 bass 510
  • 4
  • 29
  • pickup treble 410
  • 4
  • 29
  • treble 410 mid
  • 4
  • 29
  • tex mex
  • 4
  • 29
  • shop custom
  • 4
  • 29
  • treble 710
  • 4
  • 29
  • 710 mid
  • 4
  • 29
  • 610 total
  • 4
  • 29
  • treble 410
  • 4
  • 29
  • 410 mid
  • 4
  • 29
  • fender tex mex
  • 3
  • 29
  • strat single coil
  • 3
  • 29
  • 410 bass 510
  • 3
  • 29
  • pickup treble 810
  • 3
  • 29
  • treble 810 mid
  • 3
  • 29
  • 810 mid 610
  • 3
  • 29
  • 710 mid 610
  • 3
  • 29
  • 610 mid 510
  • 3
  • 29
  • noiseless stratocaster pickup
  • 3
  • 29
  • power rating 35
  • 3
  • 29
  • rating 35 fender
  • 3
  • 29
  • 410 mid 510
  • 3
  • 29
  • noiseless strat pickup
  • 3
  • 29
  • mid 310 bass
  • 3
  • 29
  • 410 bass 410
  • 3
  • 29
  • pickup pickup
  • 3
  • 29
  • fender tex
  • 3
  • 29
  • strat single
  • 3
  • 29
  • pickup produce
  • 3
  • 29
  • eric johnson
  • 3
  • 29
  • signature stratocaster
  • 3
  • 29
  • treble 810
  • 3
  • 29
  • 810 mid
  • 3
  • 29
  • pure vintage
  • 3
  • 29
  • rating 35
  • 3
  • 29
  • 35 fender
  • 3
  • 29
  • noiseless strat
  • 3
  • 29
  • mid 310
  • 3
  • 29
  • 310 bass
  • 3
  • 29
Result 30
TitleGuitar Pickups 101 - Premier Guitar
Urlhttps://www.premierguitar.com/gear/guitar-pickups-101
DescriptionConfused by terms like alnico, Formvar, and pole pieces? Dive into our primer to discover the history and technology behind the electric guitar’s most essential component
Date
Organic Position30
H1Guitar Pickups 101
H2Steve Cropper on Running Over His Favorite Guitar
Will the Electric Bass Continue to Evolve?
Mastodon: Brent Hinds’ and Bill Kelliher’s Catharsis and Redemption
Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review
Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022]
Gibson’s ’Birds of a Feather, Flocked Together
TC Electronic Launches the INFINITE Sample Sustainer
Hooked: Dave Hause on Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love"
A Tribute to the Cars
MXR Introduces the Poly Blue Octave Pedal
Will the Electric Bass Continue to Evolve?
Carlos Santana: “Feedback Is Good for You”
Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022]
Top 10 Rig Rundowns of 2021
Rig Rundown: Circles Around the Sun
Rig Rundown: All Them Witches [2021]
Rig Rundown: The Hives [2021]
Why New Caps Can Bring Old Pedals to Life
Quick Resolutions To Improve Your Musical Life
Mod Garage: How to Triple Shot Your Humbuckers
The Stompbox-Builder’s Secret Weapon
Last Call: Practice Makes Permanent
How to Map Triads
Top 10 Lessons of 2021
Can “Speed Bursts” Actually Help Your Chops?
Shred Like Satriani: A Crash Course in Modern Legato
The Basics of Britpop
Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review
Dunlop Pivot Capo Review
Top 10 Gear Reviews of 2021
Blackstar Dept. 10 Dual Drive Review
Best Albums of 2021
Steve Cropper on Running Over His Favorite Guitar
Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review
Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022]
Hooked: Dave Hause on Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love"
First Look: MXR Poly Blue Octave
Walrus Audio Julianna Giveaway
Greenhouse Effects Deity Giveaway
Help PG and You Could WIN a Gibson G-45!
Walrus Audio Reverb Giveaway!
Stompboxtober Day 31: Supro Flanger
H3Confused by terms like alnico, Formvar, and pole pieces? Dive into our primer to discover the history and technology behind the electric guitar’s most essential component
In his final Bass Bench, our columnist ponders what innovations will come next
The legend says the world needs to be “far out,” and he’s cut a new album, Blessings and Miracles, to take it there. He talks about his fabled tone, advice from Miles Davis, his search for universal melodies, and stepping outside the cage
H2WithAnchorsSteve Cropper on Running Over His Favorite Guitar
Will the Electric Bass Continue to Evolve?
Mastodon: Brent Hinds’ and Bill Kelliher’s Catharsis and Redemption
Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review
Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022]
Gibson’s ’Birds of a Feather, Flocked Together
TC Electronic Launches the INFINITE Sample Sustainer
Hooked: Dave Hause on Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love"
A Tribute to the Cars
MXR Introduces the Poly Blue Octave Pedal
Will the Electric Bass Continue to Evolve?
Carlos Santana: “Feedback Is Good for You”
Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022]
Top 10 Rig Rundowns of 2021
Rig Rundown: Circles Around the Sun
Rig Rundown: All Them Witches [2021]
Rig Rundown: The Hives [2021]
Why New Caps Can Bring Old Pedals to Life
Quick Resolutions To Improve Your Musical Life
Mod Garage: How to Triple Shot Your Humbuckers
The Stompbox-Builder’s Secret Weapon
Last Call: Practice Makes Permanent
How to Map Triads
Top 10 Lessons of 2021
Can “Speed Bursts” Actually Help Your Chops?
Shred Like Satriani: A Crash Course in Modern Legato
The Basics of Britpop
Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review
Dunlop Pivot Capo Review
Top 10 Gear Reviews of 2021
Blackstar Dept. 10 Dual Drive Review
Best Albums of 2021
Steve Cropper on Running Over His Favorite Guitar
Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review
Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022]
Hooked: Dave Hause on Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love"
First Look: MXR Poly Blue Octave
Walrus Audio Julianna Giveaway
Greenhouse Effects Deity Giveaway
Help PG and You Could WIN a Gibson G-45!
Walrus Audio Reverb Giveaway!
Stompboxtober Day 31: Supro Flanger
BodyGuitar Pickups 101 Dan Formosa August 7, 2017 Fig. 1 — Photo by Dan Formosa Confused by terms like alnico, Formvar, and pole pieces? Dive into our primer to discover the history and technology behind the electric guitar’s most essential component. You learned everything you need to know about guitar pickups in your 5th grade science class. Or at least 90 percent of what you need to know. Reflecting knowledge dating back a hundred years, a pickup’s electromagnetic principles are rudimentary and covered in every grade-school science book. However, the other 10 percent—how to implement those principles and apply them to an electric guitar to make you sound like the musical god or goddess you are—is what legends are made of. Let’s review the first 90 percent; we’ll stick close to the basics and explain how electromagnetic pickups work, in case you were absent from class that day. To start, pickups are based on two separate but related principles: If you place a coil of wire near a magnet and induce a change in the magnetic field, electricity will be generated in the coil’s windings. Also, if you place a piece of non-magnetized ferrous metal near a magnet—a screw, nail, a paper clip, whatever—it too will become magnetic. There’s a chronological sequence of where your guitar sound starts and finishes. The energy from your fingers and pick is transmitted to your guitar strings, which disturb the pickup’s magnetic field, thus affecting a coil of copper wire within the pickup and generating an AC signal that trails out from the two ends of the coil to connect to any tone and volume controls your guitar may have. From there the signal heads to your guitar’s output jack and instrument cable, through any pedals, and finally to your amp and speaker. Every one of those stages will have a significant effect on the resulting tone. There is enough to discuss about this topic to fill a book—and in fact it has, many times. To begin to understand pickups, let’s look at those first few stages. It All Starts With Strings The first step in getting a pickup to generate any signal at all is to disturb the pickup’s magnetic field. Though electric guitar strings come in many varieties, they all share a common trait—the ability to affect a magnetic field as the string vibrates. Naturally, this means the strings need to be vibrating somewhere within that field. Depending on a pickup’s design, its magnetic field may span a small or wide area, and that’s good to keep in mind. Because strings are responsible for a significant portion of an electric guitar’s sound, it makes little sense to compare the performance of different pickups until you’ve done your homework with strings. You’ll want to be familiar with the basics, which includes exploring the differences between lighter and heavier gauges, nickel-coated steel or pure nickel windings, roundwound or flatwound construction, and round or hex cores. Consider buying a handful of different types of strings made by different manufacturers and spending quality time with each set. There’s a reason manufacturers offer so many string choices, and a little experimentation can yield big dividends. Why bother staggering the pole heights? It’s simple: Different string types and gauges will perform differently. Tom Klukosky, whose “factory manager” title downplays his multi-functional role at DR Strings, points to three string-related variables that affect your sound: the string material, the winding technique used for the wound strings, and the string’s ability to vibrate. He points out that strings are the “singers,” the originators of your tone. If you don’t like the singer’s voice, changing the microphone isn’t going to help. Strings disrupt the magnetic field by vibrating within it, and a string’s material affects the strength of this disruption. And with wound strings, this becomes a key consideration. Unlike nickel-plated steel, pure nickel doesn’t affect the magnetic field. Neither does stainless steel—the core is doing the work. In choosing strings, don’t simply go by what you might hear others say. For instance, strings wound with pure nickel have a reputation for “warming up” your sound. However, Klukosky prefers them because the plain (unwound) strings sound brighter in comparison to those wound with pure nickel, and this shifts the overall tonal balance toward the treble strings. Location, Location, Location String vibration is greater in the area of the neck pickup and less towards the bridge. The difference in vibration along its length means that different pickup positions result in readily noticeable variations in tone. If you ever get a chance to tinker with an archtop equipped with a floating pickup that can be readily repositioned between the bridge and the neck—such as the classic DeArmond Rhythm Chief—you’ll see how sensitive the positioning can be. If your guitar has multiple pickups, their positions (neck, middle, or bridge) will be taken into account by their maker. While two or more pickups might seem ideal in terms of tonal variety, these extra colors come at a cost. One advantage of a bridge-pickup-only guitar is the absence of magnetic pull on the strings that a neck pickup would exert. This pull can impede string vibration. It’s one reason why the single-pickup Fender Esquire, for example, has its fans. Mod Garage author Dirk Wacker put it nicely in PG’s April 2012 issue: “The Esquire is not a Telecaster with a missing neck pickup, but rather a distinct model with its own sound.” You can also do very well with just a neck pickup. Equipped with only a neck pickup, my 1955 Gretsch Streamliner archtop gets a lot of use. The absence of a bridge pickup, which would otherwise add mass near the bridge, allows the top to react more freely around this critical area, and this gives the guitar a nice woody tone. In evaluating pickups and related technology, just remember that a pickup is a sensor, and that the sound starts a few millimeters above it. Reinforcing that view, in the 1960s Gretsch referred to their pickups as “Electronic Guitar Heads,” borrowing the term “head” from tape recorders, which also rely on magnetic technology (Fig. 1). Fig. 2 — Photo by Dan Formosa Pickup Pole Pieces A typical pickup may contain six individual magnet poles (often referred to as pole pieces). Or it may contain six steel poles that have become magnetized as a result of their proximity to a magnet lying within the pickup. Dissect some pickups and you will encounter variations on these basic themes, such as a steel blade that runs across the pickup beneath the strings. Using magnets for poles and wrapping a coil around them is the most straightforward method of making a pickup, but this concept has a few limitations. If a magnet could be easily machined, pickup manufacturers would just turn them into screws to allow easy height adjustment. But they can’t. Or, more accurately, it has been tried, but abandoned. If you’re thinking about swapping pickups in your guitar, it’s more useful to discuss the sound you’re looking for with a pickup maker, as opposed to requesting a certain resistance orother technical specification. Therefore on a typical Stratocaster or Telecaster pickup, the individual magnet poles are not adjustable. The pickup may come from the factory with all poles set at an even height, or the heights may be staggered to anticipate the preferred string balance, as shown in Fig. 2. But the only way to adjust a pole on a traditional Fender pickup is to raise all of them at once by raising the pickup itself. Harry DeArmond solved this problem with the DeArmond 2000 (aka Dynasonic), a pickup that employed a rather complex mechanism. Six small slotted screws, visible from the top, connect to adjoining magnetic poles, secured from within by teardrop-shaped brass rings (Fig. 3). Each pole has a spring that allows it to move up and down, so you can turn the screw to adjusts the pole height. Gibson’s “staple” pickup, developed circa 1954, follows a similar model. Fig. 3 — Photo by Dan Formosa Why bother staggering the pole heights? It’s simple: Different string types and gauges will perform differently. Your 2nd string will have approximately 50 percent more metal reacting with the pickup than your 1st string. An unwound 3rd string will have approximately three times as much. And although the amount of steel will be a contributing factor, it’s not the whole story. A .016 plain 3rd string isn’t going to vibrate the same way a .009 1st string vibrates. To ensure good string-to-string balance, it’s helpful to have height-adjustable poles. Fig. 4 — Photo by Dan Formosa DeArmond’s adjustable mechanism is beautifully intricate, but there’s an alternative solution: use steel screws. Designing a pickup so that portions of the steel screws are near a magnet allows the screws to act as magnets that can easily be individually adjusted. Problem solved. Fig. 4 shows a single-coil P-90 pickup with two bar magnets and adjustable steel screws for poles. This design was patented by Charles F. Shultz in 1959. In the early days of electric guitar, adjustable poles were more of a necessity than they are now. As pickup maker Curtis Novak points out, strings made today are much better balanced than strings were in the past, so worry not—you and your pickups with non-adjustable-poles should get along just fine. When tinkering with adjustable poles, don’t simply set them to be as high as possible. Raising a pole means you are placing its magnetic field up closer to a string. Any perceived improvement obtained by bringing a pole closer to a string may be offset by a decrease in sustain as the magnetic pull dampens the string’s vibration. It’s well worth spending time to experiment with different pickup and pole heights. Many guitar manufacturers and pickup makers offer charts showing optimal spacing between pickup pole pieces and their corresponding strings. This information is based on a lot of testing and research, so it’s a good idea to at least start with the recommended settings. Fig. 5 — Photo courtesy of Seymour Duncan The Coil A coil, which typically surrounds the poles or the magnet, usually comprises 5,000 to 9,000 turns of super-fine copper wire. Fig. 5 shows the coil on a modern Strat-style pickup made by Seymour Duncan. Current manufacturing techniques automate the winding process, ensuring that the wraps are laid down evenly, and that the pickups coming out of the factory will sound identical. Pickups made in past decades were wound by hand, which meant less consistency in the number of windings and the evenness by which they were coiled. (Pickups made by hand today are similarly more variable, at least in some respects.) Does this inconsistency contribute to a more classic sound? It’s likely, since it’s more true to the winding techniques of the past. Is that sound any better or worse? It’s a lot like drinking wine: The best wine is the wine you like the best. Like windings in a speaker or an electric motor, the coil wire is covered with a clear coat of insulation—otherwise it would just short out. That coating can be enamel, Polysol, or Formvar. The coatings themselves have no direct effect on a pickup’s sound, but the coating’s thickness can. Fender used Formvar back in the day, although its formulation has changed over the years, and some folks love to debate whether these changes produce sonic differences. When you see a measure of a pickup’s resistance, it’s a measure of the coil. It’s a factor that may receive a bit too much importance—there’s a lot more to consider. To be accurate, we should technically be discussing impedance, which refers to the ability of an AC signal (your guitar sound) to get through, as opposed to resistance, which is the measurement for DC. The important difference is that the coil’s impedance will vary with the signal’s frequency. Because resistance is much easier to measure using a simple multimeter, that’s what you commonly see in pickup specs. In pickups, copper wire gauges—running thinner to thicker—are typically 44, 43, or 42. Thinner wire means increased resistance. To use a water pipe analogy, a thinner pipe requires more water pressure. With the same number of windings, thinner wire will result in a smaller coil. The smaller diameter of 44-gauge wire translates to 36 percent less copper per inch than 42 gauge. Tone-wise, thinner wire is generally more mid-centric, and high and low frequencies are not as prominent. Alnico 5 is stronger than alnico 2—as the numbers increase, so does magnetic strength. Increasing the number of windings results in a hotter (i.e., louder) pickup. Therefore guitarists often request overwound pickups, which have a higher resistance measurement. But it’s a misconception that hotter pickups, or pickups with higher resistance, are necessarily more desirable than those with a lower resistance. Curtis Novak is among those pickup makers who play down the importance of resistance as a meaningful measure of performance. “Younger musicians will typically look for the hottest, loudest pickup,” he says. “As players get older, they get more into the nuances. You’d think older guitarists’ hearing would be degraded by many years of playing, but it’s the opposite—they’re more concerned with fidelity and intonation.” But be prepared, increased fidelity will also result in a pickup that’s less forgiving—you have to play more carefully. String-to-string separation will be clearer, but mistakes will also be more readily revealed. After trying what Novak considers to be his best-sounding pickup model, guitarists often tell him, “I feel like I have to work harder on my technique.” The bottom line: If you’re thinking about swapping pickups in your guitar, it’s more useful to discuss the sound you’re looking for with a pickup maker, as opposed to requesting a certain resistance or other technical specification. The Bobbin On some pickup designs, the coil is created by wrapping the wire around a bobbin—a separate oblong part that is then positioned to place the magnetic poles in the coil’s center. Pickups with adjustable steel screw poles typically use this configuration. Other pickups forgo the bobbin—the wire on Stratocaster and Telecaster pickups is coiled directly onto the magnetic poles. Without a bobbin, the pickup can be smaller. Sound is also influenced because lack of a bobbin brings the coil wire as close as possible to the magnet, strengthening the signal that the coil picks up. There are other non-bobbin designs. For example, a Danelectro “lipstick” pickup wraps the coil directly around a bar magnet, allowing both to fit within a small, cylindrical metal cover while keeping the number of parts to a bare minimum. Fig. 6 — Photo by Dan Formosa Magnet Position and the Magnetic Field Looking at the pickup poles, one might easily assume where the magnetic field is located—directly above each pole. But it’s not that simple. Other metal in the pickup, and the location of the magnet itself, influences the size, shape, and position of the magnetic field. A pickup’s design that places the magnet within a metal C-channel extends the magnetic field to the edges of the channel. As described in a 1966 patent, one of Leo Fender’s pickup designs goes further by calling for metal “teeth”—formed by notches in the channel—on either side of each of the six poles to further control the area of magnetic force (Fig. 6). Other pickups using adjustable steel poles locate their bar magnets directly beneath the poles. Simple; it just adds height. As an alternative, Ralph Keller’s 1954 design for Valco pickups places the magnet to the side of the coil and steel poles (Fig. 7). Fig. 7 — Photo by Dan Formosa A similar configuration is used in the Hilo’Tron pickup from Gretsch. While the original Hilo’Tron included adjustable poles, it unfortunately didn’t provide for an easy way to raise the pickup body. Which is too bad, because bringing the magnet itself closer to the strings makes a world of difference. Proper adjustment on that pickup requires shimming the entire assembly to raise the pickup in a trial-and-error manner—difficult but worth it. Fig. 8 — Photo by Dan Formosa Alnico 2, Alnico 5, and Ceramic Magnets Alnico 2 and 5 are the most common forms of the aluminum/nickel/cobalt alloy magnet. Alnico 5 is stronger than alnico 2—as the numbers increase, so does magnetic strength. There are stronger versions, such as alnico 6 and 7, but they aren’t as useful because stronger magnets can create a harsh tone. To that point, ceramic magnets, which are less expensive to produce and easier to shape, were commonly used in inexpensive guitars arriving in the U.S. from overseas. There was an additional price advantage: The stronger pull of ceramic magnets meant manufacturers could use less copper wire in the coil. This was truly a cost-cutting measure with little attention paid to sound quality. As a result, ceramic magnets developed a bad reputation, but this may be somewhat unfair. In fact, ceramic magnets can be effective, if used with care. Seymour Duncan, among others, has developed pickups that employ ceramic magnets wisely, and they appear in several of his models. Curtis Novak has changed his opinion over time. “I used to turn up my nose at ceramic magnets, but I have found some really good uses for them. They can deliver a tone that is not shrill, spiky, and harsh. Using steel poles and a ceramic magnet won’t sound like a Strat, but you can make some really fine pickups by working with the coil and using different grades of ceramic.” The first step in getting a pickup to generate any signal at all is to disturb the pickup’s magnetic field. That said, the properties of alnico 5 seem to hit a sweet spot. Too much pull in a magnet requires a weaker coil, too little pull requires a coil with additional windings. Novak’s observation: “When guitar manufacturers embraced alnico 2, it’s because they hadn’t come up with alnico 5 yet!” Single-coil and Humbucking Pickups Hum in a pickup results from stray electric signals reaching the coil. To counteract this annoying sound, humbucking pickups employ equal-but-opposite coil windings that cancel the hum, or at least greatly reduce it to an acceptable level. Their invention is usually associated with Seth Lover’s design for Gibson (Fig. 8) and Ray Butts’ design of the Filter’Tron for Gretsch, which were both developed in the mid 1950s. However, origins of a hum-reducing pickup date to the mid 1930s. The pickup being developed then, patented by Armand Knoblaugh and assigned to the Baldwin Company, was intended to amplify pianos. Going even further back, in 1912 Western Electric created hum-cancelling technology for use in telephone amplification. (See Wallace Marx Jr.’s article, “The Pickup Story, Part III: The Road to the Humbucker” in the December 2009 issue of Premier Guitar.) The 1950s hum-cancelling designs placed equal-but-opposite coils side-by-side, essentially combining two mirror-image single-coil pickups. For a long time, you could easily identify hum-cancelling pickups by their larger size. But noise-cancelling, single-coil-size pickups were eventually developed to fit into Fender-style pickup cavities. Fig. 9 — Photo by Dan Formosa Their coils were either stacked one on top of the other or positioned in line (with one coil wrapping around the poles for the three high strings, the other around poles for the three low strings). DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan have each been offering hum-cancelling single-coil replacements since the mid 1980s. Fig. 9 shows DiMarzio’s 1984 stacked-coil patent. Check—One, Two Our final topic concerns pickups that have become microphonic. In addition to the strings interrupting the magnetic field, voltages can be induced simply by vibrating the coil or the magnet. If loose pickup parts begin vibrating with resonant notes or the vibrations in the body of your guitar, the pickup will act like a microphone, ringing unwantedly. In some cases, even yelling loudly into the pickup will transmit your voice through the amp. The solution is to “pot” the pickup by dipping it in melted wax, securing the parts to prevent them from vibrating. Many pickups have already been potted by the manufacturer. For other pickups that need potting, it’s a quick, simple procedure: Let the pickup soak briefly in a medium-hot wax bath, remove it, let it cool, and then reinstall it. As with so many guitar-related subjects, there’s plenty of debate about how potting can affect a pickup’s tone. Some guitarists prefer the liveliness of pickups that aren’t potted, but if you play really loud, potted pickups reduce the likelihood of screeching feedback. It’s a WrapThis is an introductory article, so there are plenty of topics we didn’t get to cover. For example, the rubbery refrigerator-type magnets and low winding count used in Teisco’s “gold foil” pickups, or the inner workings of DeArmond’s relatively flat archtop-mounted Rhythm Chief, which we mentioned earlier. But all electromagnetic pickups follow the same science-class principles, and once you understand the basics, it’s easy to dissect any pickup and figure out how it works … more or less. I suspect most pickup designers would agree that pickups, like many other topics, follow a general rule: The more you learn about them, you realize the less you actually know. With that thought in mind, class dismissed.From Your Site Articles Does String Gauge Really Matter? Of Course, But... - Premier Guitar › Hot-Rod Your Electric: Tiny Tone Tweaks, Done Dirt Cheap - Premier Guitar › gear-history guitars featured-stories special-featured-stories september-2017 how-tos pickups-accessories paf humbucker guitar-bass-mods gear singlecoil p-90 whats-new Steve Cropper on Running Over His Favorite Guitar . Will the Electric Bass Continue to Evolve? . Mastodon: Brent Hinds’ and Bill Kelliher’s Catharsis and Redemption . Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review . Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022] . Gibson’s ’Birds of a Feather, Flocked Together . TC Electronic Launches the INFINITE Sample Sustainer . Hooked: Dave Hause on Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love" . A Tribute to the Cars . MXR Introduces the Poly Blue Octave Pedal . Will the Electric Bass Continue to Evolve? . Heiko Hoepfinger January 7, 2022 This not-so-special-looking Mustang bass sold for $384,000. Introduced in 1966 at just $189.50 (about $1,600 today), that’s a big markup for the historic and collector’s value it accrued on tour with the Rolling Stones. Photo by Julien’s Auctions In his final Bass Bench, our columnist ponders what innovations will come next. Roughly 70 years into the history of the electric bass, I find myself wondering: Is there a target in the evolution of our instrument? Are we aiming for superb playability, the highest tuning stability, tonal superiority and versatility, ergonomics and comfort, or even all of these things? Read More Show less bass bench bass pro advice vintage bass jens ritter hofner paul mccartney bill wyman the beatles the rolling stones fender mustang bass guitar bass player famous bass players fender precision bass p bass j bass jazz bass fender jazz bass bass bench Carlos Santana: “Feedback Is Good for You” . Ted Drozdowski January 3, 2022 Carlos Santana aims for “the same place Charlie Parker, Beethoven, or Stravinsky would go to” as he solos on one of his gold-leaf-finished Paul Reed Smith custom Singlecuts. Photo by Marylene Eytier The legend says the world needs to be “far out,” and he’s cut a new album, Blessings and Miracles, to take it there. He talks about his fabled tone, advice from Miles Davis, his search for universal melodies, and stepping outside the cage. Carlos Santana plays like a superhighway. His notes—always exquisite and succulent—are founded on terra firma yet travel to many places. The 74-year-old 6-string guru often uses the word multidimensional to describe his technicolor sonic thumbprint. And, through more than a half-century of recordings and concerts, that multidimensionality speaks as articulately as the beautiful unison-string bends in his band’s classic “Samba Pa Ti,” projecting his devotion to melody, intention, the echoes of his influences, imagination, inspiration, awareness, fidelity to his art, and a desire to communicate. Read More Show less carlos santana guitarists interviews prs mesa boogie guitar player guitar player interview santana smooth rob thomas sonny sharrock prs guitars prs se prs doublecut paul reed smith dumble dumble amps howard dumble blessings and miracles carlos santana READ LATEST ISSUE NOW! STAY PLUGGED INGet our email newsletter!Enter Email AddressSubscribeLATESTRIG RUNDOWNS Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022] . Top 10 Rig Rundowns of 2021 . Rig Rundown: Circles Around the Sun . Rig Rundown: All Them Witches [2021] . Rig Rundown: The Hives [2021] . LATESTDIY Why New Caps Can Bring Old Pedals to Life . Quick Resolutions To Improve Your Musical Life . Mod Garage: How to Triple Shot Your Humbuckers . The Stompbox-Builder’s Secret Weapon . Last Call: Practice Makes Permanent . LATESTLESSONS How to Map Triads . Top 10 Lessons of 2021 . Can “Speed Bursts” Actually Help Your Chops? . Shred Like Satriani: A Crash Course in Modern Legato . The Basics of Britpop . LATESTREVIEWS Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review . Dunlop Pivot Capo Review . Top 10 Gear Reviews of 2021 . Blackstar Dept. 10 Dual Drive Review . Best Albums of 2021 . LATESTVIDEOS Steve Cropper on Running Over His Favorite Guitar . Electro-Harmonix Nano Deluxe Memory Man Review . Rig Rundown: Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis [2022] . Hooked: Dave Hause on Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love" . First Look: MXR Poly Blue Octave . LATESTGIVEAWAYS Walrus Audio Julianna Giveaway . Greenhouse Effects Deity Giveaway . Help PG and You Could WIN a Gibson G-45! . Walrus Audio Reverb Giveaway! . Stompboxtober Day 31: Supro Flanger . x
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • pickup
  • 131
  • 30
  • string
  • 60
  • 30
  • fig
  • 40
  • 30
  • guitar
  • 38
  • 30
  • coil
  • 38
  • 30
  • pole
  • 38
  • 30
  • magnet
  • 33
  • 30
  • alnico
  • 32
  • 30
  • magnetic
  • 29
  • 30
  • bass
  • 23
  • 30
  • sound
  • 22
  • 30
  • photo
  • 20
  • 30
  • magnetic field
  • 17
  • 30
  • photo dan
  • 16
  • 30
  • field
  • 15
  • 30
  • wire
  • 14
  • 30
  • steel
  • 14
  • 30
  • design
  • 13
  • 30
  • winding
  • 13
  • 30
  • adjustable
  • 12
  • 30
  • tone
  • 12
  • 30
  • electric
  • 12
  • 30
  • resistance
  • 11
  • 30
  • screw
  • 10
  • 30
  • ceramic
  • 10
  • 30
  • fig photo
  • 9
  • 30
  • ceramic magnet
  • 9
  • 30
  • dan formosa
  • 9
  • 30
  • signal
  • 9
  • 30
  • fender
  • 9
  • 30
  • dan
  • 9
  • 30
  • formosa
  • 9
  • 30
  • height
  • 9
  • 30
  • photo dan formosa
  • 8
  • 30
  • rundown
  • 8
  • 30
  • electric guitar
  • 7
  • 30
  • single coil
  • 7
  • 30
  • rig rundown
  • 7
  • 30
  • rig
  • 7
  • 30
  • disturb pickup
  • 6
  • 30
  • dinosaur jr
  • 6
  • 30
  • masci 2022
  • 6
  • 30
  • adjustable pole
  • 6
  • 30
  • 2022
  • 5
  • 30
  • neck pickup
  • 5
  • 30
  • pickup maker
  • 5
  • 30
  • carlo santana
  • 5
  • 30
  • stronger alnico
  • 4
  • 30
  • guitar sound
  • 4
  • 30
  • stronger
  • 4
  • 30
  • opposite
  • 4
  • 30
  • pole piece
  • 4
  • 30
  • copper wire
  • 4
  • 30
  • pure nickel
  • 4
  • 30
  • pole height
  • 4
  • 30
  • pickup pole
  • 4
  • 30
  • steel pole
  • 4
  • 30
  • steel screw
  • 4
  • 30
  • seymour duncan
  • 4
  • 30
  • hum cancelling
  • 4
  • 30
  • jr
  • 4
  • 30
  • pickup magnetic
  • 3
  • 30
  • pickup design
  • 3
  • 30
  • string string
  • 3
  • 30
  • fig show
  • 3
  • 30
  • electro harmonix nano
  • 3
  • 30
  • harmonix nano deluxe
  • 3
  • 30
  • nano deluxe memory
  • 3
  • 30
  • deluxe memory man
  • 3
  • 30
  • memory man review
  • 3
  • 30
  • rig rundown dinosaur
  • 3
  • 30
  • rundown dinosaur jr
  • 3
  • 30
  • jr masci
  • 3
  • 30
  • guitar pickup
  • 3
  • 30
  • coil wire
  • 3
  • 30
  • string vibrate
  • 3
  • 30
  • point string
  • 3
  • 30
  • magnet pole
  • 3
  • 30
  • magnetic pole
  • 3
  • 30
  • gibson
  • 3
  • 30
  • show
  • 3
  • 30
  • bar magnet
  • 3
  • 30
  • adjustable steel
  • 3
  • 30
  • curti novak
  • 3
  • 30
  • closer string
  • 3
  • 30
  • pickup made
  • 3
  • 30
  • number winding
  • 3
  • 30
  • thinner wire
  • 3
  • 30
  • bobbin
  • 3
  • 30
  • side
  • 3
  • 30
  • premier guitar
  • 3
  • 30
  • electric bass
  • 3
  • 30
  • electro harmonix
  • 3
  • 30
  • harmonix nano
  • 3
  • 30
  • nano deluxe
  • 3
  • 30
  • deluxe memory
  • 3
  • 30
  • memory man
  • 3
  • 30
  • man review
  • 3
  • 30
  • rundown dinosaur
  • 3
  • 30
  • masci
  • 3
  • 30
  • bass bench
  • 3
  • 30
  • top 10
  • 3
  • 30
Result 31
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position31
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position