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TitleInterior Design | Find Local Professionals Who Can Help With Your Interior Design Project
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Title55 Best Living Room Decorating Ideas & Designs
Urlhttps://www.housebeautiful.com/room-decorating/living-family-rooms/g715/designer-living-rooms/
DescriptionYour living room is one of the most important rooms in your home. Make it the best it can be with inspiration and ideas from these 55 living rooms we love
Date20 Aug 2021
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Body55 Living Room Decorating Ideas You'll Want to Steal ASAP Take notes from these styling, examples, and shopping tips. By Hadley Mendelsohn Aug 20, 2021 You spend a lot of time in your living room, so it not only needs to look great, but it also needs to be functional and comfortable. Mastering this trifecta can be a design challenge for sure, but we've rounded up the best living room examples to inspire your own decorating projects. From modern and formal spaces to approachable and rustic environments, there's a living room idea you'll want to take home below. Keep reading for 55 stylish designer living room tips, ideas, and shopping suggestions for spaces of any size. 🏡Love looking at designer spaces for inspo? Us too. Let's obsess over them together. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below 1 Get Weird On the Coffee Table Romanek Design Studio Instead of decorating your coffee table with the classic assortment of stacked coffee table books, opt for something subtly quirky and unique. Here, Romanek Design Studio covered the surface with a collection of classic pots and planters, which both enhance and juxtapose the formal, traditional elements throughout the space as well as the more modern ones, making for a fun and eclectic yet timeless sprawl.Check out Terrain for all your indoor and outdoor gardening needs. 2 Redefine "Neutrals" Nicole Franzen If you don't love playing with tons of patterns and bold hues but appreciate experimental pieces and tasteful pops of color, take notes on this living room. Rather than opting for all black and whites, the anchor pieces—like sofa and tables—remain neutral, while the throws, artwork and lamp offer just a splash of color (nothing too crazy: just marigold, red, navy, and green). Check out Design Within Reach for iconic design pieces. 3 Add Something Unexpected Heather Hilliard While the classic blue grasscloth wallpaper, floor lamp, and curtains set the stage for a traditional living room, designer Heather Hilliard added some unexpectedly edgy elements. The floral sofa and the green lucite coffee table are a welcome surprise that break up the classic elements without overshadowing them. Check out Kartell for cool lucite furniture. 4 Upholster the Walls Kevin Dumais Though classic and timeless, this living room by interior designer Kevin Dumais is also having tons of fun. From the red-painted ceiling to the velvet floor cushions for extra seating and the bold artwork, no detail is overlooked. To make the room feel even more soft and intimate, Dumais upholstered the walls in a leather fabric. Check out Crate & Barrel for family-friendly staples. 5 Make It Cheerful Anna Spiro Design From the playful pillows and ottoman to the elegant gilt mirror and bright blue walls, this space by Anna Spiro Design is perfect for low-key nights in, or more formal gatherings. And the pleated yellow lamp is what really makes the living room feel cheerful and cozy. Check out 45 Three Modern Vintage Home for fun, one-of-a-kind vintage lighting options. 6 Keep It Classic and Crisp Heather Hilliard Design A crisp, matte white living room is pristine, elegant, and timeless. Adding glass and metallic features sharpens up the white pieces. Sherwin-Williams Pure White is there for you when you don't just want to experiment with trends anymore. Check out Wayfair for all your home decor needs, from staples to accents. 7 Use an Off-White Heidi Caillier Design In this eclectic living room designed by Heidi Caillier, the jute rug, wood finishes, and brass accents bring plenty of warmth to ensure a cozy, inviting space. The colorful contrasting prints throughout contribute to the playful yet formal spirit of the room, too. And though it doesn't necessarily stand out, the cream paint color makes a transformative difference. White would be much starker. Check out Serena & Lily for fun yet classic throw pillows. 8 Know Your Place PHOTO: Felix Forest; DESIGN: Arent & Pyke Before you even start decorating your living room, remember where you are. (If you live in a casual beach house, your design scheme is going to look very different from that of an urban industrial loft space, for instance.) In this beach house by Arent & Pyke, the design team focused on channeling the tropical vibe of a coastal home through fun motifs and casual materials. Yet, they still maintained a look of sophistication through fresh upholstery, beautiful artwork, and a thoughtful layout. That being said, if you're a sucker for kitsch and wish you were always on island time, add a hint of it with one statement piece, like a vintage Hawaiian-print rattan chair. Check out Serena & Lily for coastal-inspired pieces. 9 Hang a Chair Romanek Design Studio Nothing ramps up the fun like a playful touch in the family room. This hanging chair in a living room designed by Romanek Design Studio proves our point—but the handsome leather upholstery also ensures a more sophisticated look. It's the perfect blend of cozy and cool. Check out Modshop for groovy retro-inspired pieces. 10 Have Fun With Throw Pillows Studio Razavi Here's a lesson in monochromatic decorating with soul. Designed by Studio Razavi, this Parisian apartment is a beautiful blend of modern and Neoclassical style. While the bones of the room evoke a grand sort of opulence, the plush Moroccan rug and spacious white sofa make the space feel more approachable. Check out Wayfair for endless options of decorative pillows. 11 Choose A Bold Wallpaper Roland Bello Wallpaper is one of those trends that just keeps on giving and giving. If you go with a classic chinoiserie wallpaper, you can do just about anything with it as your style changes over the year. This modern self portrait by Chuck Close is a bold contrast to the chinoiserie wallpaper (Iksel's Eastern Eden) behind it in this Miles Redd–designed home. The contrast doesn't stop there: Redd continued to venture beyond design convention by incorporating contrasting jewel tones and mixing modern furniture styles with antique pieces. Oh—and believe it or not, the lime green chair is from Ikea! Proof even the best designers love a good deal.Check out Anthropologie for bold wallpaper prints. 12 Bring the Fun to the Floor PHOTO: Reid Rolls; DESIGN: Leanne Ford Interiors When you have crisp white walls and neutral staples, like a sofa and coffee table, choose one statement item that brings in a surge of colorful energy. It can be anything from a vibrant piece of art on the walls to a bright carpet like this one in a living room designed by Leanne Ford Interiors. Check out Homestead Seattle for colorful, one-of-a-kind rugs. 13 Bring Some Texture to the Walls Gail Davis Design If you love the soft look and feel of upholstered walls but don't want to embark on that major of a project (you'll need to install padding, etc.), then try a fabric-effect wallpaper or a grasscloth. In this living room by Gail Davis Design, it suits the warm leather and brass pieces wonderfully, while the blue painted accents cool things off. Check out Gooddee for tons of modern and unique living room items. 14 Branch Away From Neutrals Laure Joliet Designed by Redmond Aldrich Design, this living room manages to be unique and versatile, colorful and understated, approachable and impressive, all at once. That's thanks to the quirky, eclectic mix of frames, a light wood-paneled wall, a classic carpet, and an unexpectedly colorful sofa. If you typically like to stick to more neutral tones at home but find yourself generally drawn to color, consider venturing out with a dusty rose, forest green, or navy piece—they're the new neutrals. Check out Article for sofas that feature classic silhouettes and moderately experimental colors. 15 Install Statement Lighting Overhead Jaokim Johansson for Fantastic Frank Want to go a little glam without looking too showy? Add in minimal brass accents, like a metal-frame coffee table and eye-catching metallic lighting. This living room is also a good blueprint for small space decorating. While the only three furniture items are two seats and a small coffee table, the ceiling light is all it takes to make the entire room feel special. Check out CB2 for on-trend and affordable lighting options. 16 Hang Modern Art Nicole Franzen Wall art is a great way to add a big statement in a minimalist living room. It doesn't take up any surface space, but it can really transform the aesthetic. Use an abstract photograph like this one to dictate the colors of your throw pillows for cohesion. Check out Tappan Collective for cutting-edge art. 17 Consider Your Surroundings Studio Razavi In this modern mountain home designed by architecture firm Studio Razavi, the classic cabin aesthetic gets an upgrade. The plush carpeting and sheepskin throw warm things up while the modern light fixture, streamlined furniture, and neutral colors ensure a calming, laidback, and stylish environment. Check out IKEA for plush and affordable accessories. 18 Spruce Up Your Fireplace PHOTO: Reid Rolls; DESIGN: Leanne Ford Interiors Who says backsplashes are just for your kitchen? Try tiling your fireplace. It adds an artful, customized touch to the living room without being overpowering. This is especially true if you opt for neutral or black and white geometric tiles, as in this Leanne Ford–designed space. Check out Lowes for tons of mosaic tiles. 19 Mix and Match Patterns Björn Wallander The sofa in Apartment Therapy founder Maxwell Ryan's living room is a prime example of perfectly mismatched patterns. The couch maintains a tonal blue scheme, and the blue rug beneath it ties the whole look together. It's a great way to practice your pattern mixing if you're not ready to work with the entire rainbow yet. Check out ABC Carpet & Home for beautiful textiles and throws. 20 Take Advantage of All Useable Space Werner Straube A formal living room can be full of fun and personality, too. Interior designer Corey Damen Jenkins sets the bar with a glam pendant light, marble fireplace, and plenty of luxe touches, like the emerald green velvet sofa. And it optimizes all useable space, thanks to a built-in bench between the fireplace and window niche.Check out Etsy for handmade cushions, custom throw pillows, and art supplies to rework at home. 21 Pick Comfy Seating Studio Razavi Designed by Studio Razavi, this eclectic Parisian apartment is a breath of fresh air. Not only does it prove that you can use a wallpaper mural in a minimalist environment (the grayscale color palette helps), but it's also the perfect example of how to design a living room that's both fun and relaxed, sophisticated and formal. The key? Seating needs to be comfortable, and materials need to be casual but clean. Check out RH for high-quality, comfortable, and timeless seating. 22 Display Books in Style Lisa Romerein "The room doesn't get a lot of light, so I decided to make it cozy and turned it into an English-style portrait room, which is ridiculous, but fun," says celebrity chef Alex Hitz. Taking the cozy route in a living room without a ton of natural light is a great solution. And what's cozier than a floor-to-ceiling bookshelf with seating beckoning you to curl up on it? To display your books more creatively, offset them with artwork. In this room, a Peter Rogers portrait of Alex Hitz's close friend, the late Nan Kempner, hangs over the bookshelves to create some contrast. Check out Design Within Reach for stylish and modern wall storage options. 23 Encourage Conversation PHOTO: Alexandra Ribar; DESIGN: Leanne Ford Interiors If you frequently entertain guests at your home, choose a strategic living room layout that promotes conversation and comfort. For example, this living room designed by Leanne Ford Interiors incorporates semi-circle seating that's both spacious and inviting. Sectionals are also a good option when a circular sofa isn't. And if you love the all-white aesthetic, take note: Ford brush-painted the natural Ikea rug and custom-made rope light. Check out Crate & Barrel for spacious, family-friendly sectionals. 24 Go All Out With a Gallery Wall ANNIE SCHLECHTER Aside from the adorable dogs (Jacob and Wylo) cuddled up on the armchair-meets-dog-bed, that gallery wall is the clear statement-maker in this living room designed by Philip Mitchell. Mix and match frames for a subtle nod of personality. And speaking of personal touches, consider hanging art that means something to you—whether it's your children's artwork, your own, or a portrait of your pets. Check out Framebridge for custom framing with tons of stylish options. 25 Adopt a Fig Leaf Tree Hecker Guthrie The fiddle leaf fig tree definitely wins the popularity contest as far as design favorites for indoor trees. And for good reason: It looks great with pretty much any interior design scheme, from bohemian rooms to modern spaces like this one designed by Hecker Guthrie. It really freshens up the cooler gray tones of the living room and makes that floral-printed pillow pop even more. Check out Chelsea Garden Center for beautiful indoor plants and garden essentials. 26 Double It's Function David Tsay Double your living room's function by investing in practical, multi-purpose furniture. Here, in a space by Justina Blakeney, the console table also functions as a fold-out desk. But it's not all work—there's definitely room for play, from the lush plants to the fun details, and colorful patterns throughout.Check out Jungalow for beautiful bohemian accents and essentials. 27 Choose Timeless Anchors PHOTO: Felix Forest; DESIGN: Arent & Pyke A black marble fireplace strikes the perfect balance between edgy and timeless. It anchors this living room designed by Arent & Pyke, which get a contemporary lift from the jute rug, modern and bright artwork, and shapely table lamp. And because the armchairs are a classic silhouette, they'll last forever—you can reupholster them with different colors and prints throughout the years as your taste and style change.Check out Chairish for vintage and timeless investment chairs. 28 Be Playful Christopher Delaney This hot-pink fireplace was inspired by the homeowners' grandmother's favorite shade of lipstick, interior designer Kristen McCory tells us. Have fun with little details like that and look for inspiration everywhere! If painting your entire living room a bold color sounds intimidating, opt for a statement wall or mantle. Check out Home Depot for a range of fresh color options. 29 Make Things Easy On Yourself PHOTO: Reid Rolls; DESIGN: Leanne Ford Interiors Make it easy on yourself by sticking to a very consistent, very simple color scheme. In this space by Leanne Ford Interiors, the designer worked within a strictly all-white color story. Even the firewood is painted white! We'll let that be a lesson in attention to detail. Then choose one item to really pop in a bright color. In this case, Ford went with a bright-red Pierre Paulin Ribbon chair. Check out Farrow & Ball for beautiful high-quality interior paints. 30 Use Your Favorite Color FRANCESCO LAGNESE Color stretches all the way up to the high rafters in this living room designed by Thomas Jayne and William Cullum. As you can see in the mirror, the hue of the wall changes depending on the way the light hits it, shifting between sharp mint green and soft sea-foam green. The red and blue work nicely, too, as the red is featured in the carpet, coffee table, and sofas, blending everything together beautifully. All together, the room feels traditional and formal, country chic and casual. To elongate your already tall ceilings, hang a pendant light high above the sitting area. Check out Target for tons of contemporary light fixtures. 31 Make It Gallery-Worthy Nicole Franzen Everything in this living room is playing with shape. While the marble mantle and glossy floating shelves are angular and sharp, the coffee table and ottoman are soft and rounded. The use of natural materials makes the room feel rich even though there's not much in it.Check out Amara for tons of modern and unique living room items. 32 Take Advantage of High Ceilings Romanek Design Group In this stylish, comfortable, and elevated living room by Romanek Design Studio, the off-white feels bright and airy while also warming things up and bringing it to a human scale (a cool white might be too stark, especially in a large, open room with high ceilings). Accent with soft textures and a few pops of color plus a tall plant or tree for an energizing contrast. Check out Gooddee for tons of modern and unique living room items. 33 Set Up a Library Ladder Victoria Pearson The bookshelves in photographer Victoria Pearson's own Ojai living room allow all kinds of opportunities for displaying different items, and also for storage. Adding a ladder for high shelves adds another decorative touch. Check out AllModern for leaning bookshelves and ladders. 34 Play With Shape and Color Studio DB The more distinct, the bigger the statement when it comes to wall decor and art. A good way to switch things up is by choosing artwork that doesn't live within the confines of a rectangular or square frame. We're also loving the colorful nesting coffee tables and ombre carpet, which add a little fun to this living room designed by Studio DB. Check out Minted for accessible and fun artwork. 35 Work With What You Have PHOTO: Reid Rolls; DESIGN: Leanne Ford Interiors This floor-to-ceiling fireplace in a living room designed by Leanne Ford takes style notes from the best of both worlds: a classic mountain chalet and the Malibu coast. Whether there's snow falling or waves crashing right outside that window, we want to be curled up on that linen slip-covered chair. This living room is also a testament to the perks of working with what you have. The fireplace was given a new life with a makeshift mantle comprised of reclaimed wood and a fresh coat of white paint. Check out Etsy for found objects and art supplies to rework at home. 36 Paint Your Walls a New Color 2LG Studio "Soft pink was used here as a neutral base, which connects all the other elements throughout the space," say the design duo behind 2LG Studio. "We designed bespoke plywood joinery throughout to unite the spaces and create much needed storage," they add. If you're bored of looking at stark white walls, try a soft color that can function as a neutral but exciting backdrop. Check out Portola Paints for one-of-a-kind paint colors. 37 Make It Double-Duty Studio DB If your formal living room is also your family room, you want to make sure it strikes a balance between super comfortable and presentable—a cozy family room that cleans up nicely, if you will. A super soft sectional with plenty of space to spread out on movie night is a must, but choose one that also looks elegant. Then add fun, eye-catching lighting for an extra punch of fun, like the one in this Studio DB-designed room.Check out HD Buttercup for unique and practical living room furniture. 38 Build a Home Bar PHOTO: Tessa Nuestadt; DESIGN: Emily Henderson When in doubt, add a home bar. It introduces nice depth to the room and makes entertaining guests super easy. It also makes the space feel that much more polished and thought-out. We love how the chrome framed bar stools and mushroom lamp make the bar area pop while still flowing together well in this Emily Henderson-designed space. Check out CB2 for super stylish bar stools. 39 Pair Unexpected Colors Paul Raeside Who says everything has to be matchy-matchy? Contrast your couch and chairs to make things a bit more interesting. In this refreshingly quirky living room designed by Andrew Flesher, there's a little bit of everything—from jewel tones and tropical prints to classic prep school patterns, rustic accents, and traditional touches. Check out Burke Decor for fun, on-trend patterns. 40 Shrink It Down Jaokim Johansson for Fantastic Frank Live in a super tiny space? Opt for a settee instead of a sofa or sectional and stack nesting tables instead of getting a bulky coffee table. You'll be surprised at much space this can save. And instead of spending a fortune on framing, simply pin up your favorite artwork as is. The easy elegance can be just as beautiful. Check out West Elm for great apartment-friendly furniture. 41 Make It Relaxing PHOTO: Lauren Bamford; DESIGN: Robson Rak The clean lines throughout this living room designed by Robson Rak are making a small but mighty difference. From the white paneled walls to the black-trimmed window and modern angular yet plush sofa, the linear motif is super easy on the eyes. And we love how the green nesting tables bring in some round contrast without clashing. For a similarly calming aesthetic, choose light colors and modern, low-to-the-ground furniture. Then splice in contemporary decorative objects to add personality. And bonus points if your living room has a lot of access to natural light. Check out Finnish Design Shop for contemporary and tasteful accent pieces. 42 Paint the Ceiling David A. Land Why only have fun on the walls when you can have even more fun with a statement ceiling? We're loving the romantic yet surprisingly fresh color combination of fire-engine red and violet in this space by Katie Brown. The bohemian embroidered throw pillows tie everything together nicely. That's another great way to approach the living room design process: Start with a fun pair of throw pillows, and then pull out your two favorite colors to highlight on the walls and ceiling. Check out H&M Home for fun and affordable throw pillows. 43 Take a Risk Catherine Kwong Design Rather than focusing exclusively on the walls in this grand San Francisco living room, designer Catherine Kwong brought the abstract art onto the floors. With broad white brushstrokes on the black-stained hardwood, these floors are a gorgeous juxtaposition against the Neoclassical ceiling and antique mirror above the fireplace. The key to mixing all these divergent design aesthetics is to remain in the same grayscale color scheme. Pro tip: wall sconces always add a subtle but transformative finishing touch. Check out Frances & Son for hip and classic lighting options. 44 Add a Rocking Chair Trevor Tondro Chairs that look good but are totally uncomfortable? Not worth the cute factor. Besides, here's definitive proof that rocking chairs can actually be super chic. The camel leather contrasts perfectly with the cream wall and plays up the old-time-y rustic feel of the reclaimed wood mantle. Check our Urban Outfitters for hip, fun, and affordable staples. 45 Remember That Less Is More PHOTO: Shannon McGrath; DESIGN: Robson Rak An understated palette means you can focus on incredible interior architecture and dramatic statement pieces. Who says minimalists are afraid of color? Just pick one hue and a few select essentials, like in this modern blue living room designed by Robson Rak. The soothing tones and bulbous shapes throughout, from the marble side table to the bubble pendant light and rounded sofa, make it feel like a hug in the form of a living room.Check out Moda Operandi for designer-approved accents. 46 Add Candles Francesco Lagnese Can you imagine how beautiful this room looks glowing in the candlelight? Opt for a chandelier with candles instead of lightbulbs for a rustic vibe. Or, if that's not an option, display them on your mantel and light them up when you need to strike a romantic mood. (Use flameless candles to play it safe). Check out Amazon for reliable and pretty basics. 47 Pick A Color & Run With It Manuel Rodriguez Blue, in this case. Hint: it makes it easier to decorate, since you know exactly what shade you're searching for. Check out Capsule for pared down and tasteful anchor items that don't break the bank. 48 Set Up a Few Sitting Areas Annie Schlechter This rustic great room was built to resemble a converted barn. If you're blessed with a large enough open plan living room, set up multiple sitting areas: one for hanging and snacking (a bistro table can break up the lower height of the other sitting areas), one for cuddling up with a good book, and one for formal entertaining. Check out YLighting for great staple items in a variety of styles. 49 Choose An Oversized Pendant Nicole Franzen If your room has a more minimalist vibe, try an oversized, Noguchi-inspired paper pendant. But take note: If your furniture is large and clunky, or you have a lot of busy decor, it could overwhelm it. The best part? Rice lantern pendant lights like the one in this living room designed by Space Exploration Design are super affordable. Check out Paper Lantern Store for all your rice paper lighting needs. 50 Conceal Your TV Annie Schlechter I've never understood how whenever you see a picture of a totally aspirational living room, it's completely devoid of a television. Like, doesn't that totally defeat the purpose of a living room or something?! But now you too can fake out everyone on Instagram, thanks to a bifold-panel painting that hides your television behind gorgeous art. Oh, and swivel chairs are a must. Check out Samsung for clever television designs. 51 Consider Black and Add Flowers Maura McEvoy Designer Kristin Kong hid a door to the basement behind millwork painted in Sherwin-Williams Black Fox in her home near Atlanta. The ­trick "makes the room look less choppy,” she says, since the dark color helps everything blend together. And never underestimate the power of a beautiful flower arrangement on the coffee table! Check out Cost Plus World Market for fun and affordable accessories. 52 Elongate the Ceiling Courtesy of Nicole Franzen Blend neutral gray walls with sleek, modern furniture and lighting. It'll look chic rather than dated. A velvet throw pillow will add a nice iridescent flare, too. Also, pro tip: hang your curtains at the tippy-top of your walls to make the ceilings seem higher. Check out CB2 for contemporary and versatile hardware. 53 Go Shiplap Crazy Trevor Tondro To up the farmhouse vibes, install shiplap. Joanna Gaines would totally approve. Then add something metallic, like a coffee table, for some unexpected bling. Check out Joss & Main for fun and bold pieces. 54 Keep It Simple Christopher Baker This living room is simple, clean-lined, and inviting, with a little bit of glamour and a lot of comfort. To highlight the architectural details, the moldings are painted in high-gloss white. Check out Apartment 2B for clean and classic furniture. 55 Take a Cue from the French Bjorn Wallander This living room was blessed with original Beaux-Arts plasterwork and parquet, but you can still recreate a French-inspired room at home with a linen-covered bergère and a Louis XVI side table. Vintage curtains and a crystal chandelier complete it.Check out One King's Lane for classic pieces. Hadley Mendelsohn Senior Editor Hadley Mendelsohn is House Beautiful's senior editor, and when she's not busy obsessing over all things decor-related, you can find her scouring vintage stores, reading, or stumbling about because she probably lost her glasses again. This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io Advertisement - Continue Reading Below More From What Makes the House Beautiful 60 Chic Home Bar Ideas That Call for a Nightcap 44 Scented Candles That Smell Amazing Advertisement - Continue Reading Below 74 Stunning Dining Rooms to Copy For Every Style 45 Chic Home Library Design Ideas 65 Bedroom Ideas You Haven't Seen a Million Times 82 Bathroom Ideas We're Obsessed With 58 Chic Patio Ideas to Try in Your Own Backyard Home Offices Ideas to Boost Your Creativity 50 Foyers That Create an Amazing First Impression 28 of the Most Stunning House Exteriors Ever What Makes the House Beautiful Living + Family Rooms Room Ideas 6 Living Rooms We Love 12 Luxe Living Rooms The Year's Best Living Rooms 55 Cool Kids' Rooms Even Grown-Ups Will Envy 10 Modern Living Rooms That Still Feel Fresh 26 Styling Tricks Your Small Living Room Needs
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Title31 Living Room Ideas from the Homes of Top Designers | Architectural Digest
Urlhttps://www.architecturaldigest.com/gallery/designers-living-rooms-jacques-grange-richard-shapiro-paris-malibu-slideshow
DescriptionFind inspiration in the stylish living spaces of the world’s top talents
Date2 Mar 2017
Organic Position3
H131 Living Room Ideas from the Homes of Top Designers
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Body31 Living Room Ideas from the Homes of Top DesignersFind inspiration in the stylish living spaces of the world’s top talentsBy Alyssa WolfeMarch 2, 2017FacebookTwitterPinterestThe world’s famed designers create exquisite interiors for their clients, but what about the spaces they fashion for themselves? For these sought-after professionals, their own homes are places to express their personal tastes and experiment with new trends, showcase bold patterns, and display treasured art and antiques. We’ve gathered a selection of the elegant and inspiring living rooms of decorators and architects whose residences have appeared in the pages of AD, each filled with smart and stylish ideas for your own design project. From over-the-top grandeur to sleek modernism, see the stunning spaces where the world’s top talents entertain and relax.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn1/31Architect Lee Ledbetter renovated a landmark 1963 house in New Orleans to share with his partner, Douglas Meffert. Surrounding the custom-made cocktail table in the living room are a pair of Harvey Probber brass armchairs upholstered in a KnollTextiles fabric, two Louis XVI–style fauteuils in a Holly Hunt leather, a vintage T. H. Robsjohn-Gibbings chair in a Zoffany stripe, and a vintage Florence Knoll sofa in a KnollTextiles Ultrasuede. A large mixed-media artwork by Robert Helmer hangs on the brick wall, which is painted in Benjamin Moore’s Decorator’s White.PinterestPhoto: François Dischinger2/31Designer Sara Story restored a Victorian home in Snedens Landing, New York. An artwork by Sterling Ruby and a zebrahide add pizzazz to the living room.PinterestPhoto: Douglas Friedman3/31With the help of architect Eric Ryder, designer Brigette Romanek renovated a historic Laurel Canyon home for her family. The living room is outfitted with a pair of Marco Zanuso lounge chairs from Eccola, a Blackman Cruz console (left), and a Hans Wegner chaise longue.PinterestPhoto: Ricardo Labougle4/31A large Roberto Matta canvas overlooks the living room in Linda Pinto’s Paris apartment. In the foreground at left is a bronze side table by Claude Lalanne, next to a sofa accented with 1970s fur pillows; the cocktail tables are by Ado Chale, the sculpture in the far right corner is by Philippe Hiquily, and the rug was custom made by Tai Ping.Pinterest5/31Thomas Ruff’s photograph Substrat 24 I dominates the living room of Jamie Drake’s Manhattan apartment. Arranged around a marble-and-granite table by Drake Design Assoc. are a Milo Baughman lounge chair in a Christopher Hyland mohair, a Drake-designed sofa in a Schumacher fabric, and a pair of club chairs and a Bright Group ottoman that are covered in Rubelli velvets from Donghia. The curtains are of a Clarence House fabric, and the walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Sidewalk Gray, with a Venetian-plaster finish by the Alpha Workshops. The carpet is by the Alpha Workshops for Edward Fields.PinterestPhoto: Richard Powers6/31What appears to be a gilt-framed mirror in Timothy Corrigan’s Paris apartment is actually a window aligned with two mirrors, one in the living room and one in the dining room beyond. Corrigan highlighted the ingenious hall-of-mirrors illusion by installing matching Napoléon III chandeliers in the two rooms. The armchairs and the curtain and sofa fabrics are all from Schumacher’s Timothy Corrigan Collection; the stools are vintage Jansen, and the carpet is a Corrigan design for Patterson Flynn Martin.PinterestPhoto: Miguel Flores-Vianna7/31The heart of the Allegra Hicks’s Naples, Italy, apartment is a long, high-ceilinged room divided into living and dining areas, each anchored by carpets designed by Hicks. The designer also created the Roman-shade fabric, the cut velvet on the wood-framed Jindrich Halabala armchairs, and the butterfly-specimen table at right; an 18th-century Venetian mirror surmounts the mantel.PinterestPhoto: Roger Davies8/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-27.jpg. Architect Jorge Elias filled his 17,000-square-foot home in the Jardim Europa neighborhood of São Paulo with extraordinary antiques and images. An 18th-century Russian chandelier, vintage velvet sofas, Louis XV fauteuils, a gold-leafed Hand chair by Pedro Friedeberg, and artworks by Serge Poliakoff and Fernand Léger are among the eclectic mix in the living room.Related: See More Home Remodeling & Renovation ideasPinterestPhoto: Douglas Friedman9/31The former Manhattan living room of designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent features circa-1970 Georges Pelletier ceramic lights above a vintage sofa by Afra and Tobia Scarpa for Cassina, a ’70s Jansen brass cocktail table, and a French steel low table; the vide-poche table in the foreground is a ’50s design by Jacques Adnet, and the windows are dressed with curtains and rods by RH and tassels found at a market in Thailand.PinterestPhoto: Björn Wallander10/31In Pedro Espírito Santo’s frescoed Lisbon, Portugal, salon, an 1860s Orientalist painting is flanked by foil bouquets. The gilt-wood fauteuil is antique, the cocktail table is Asian, and the needlepoint carpet was custom made.PinterestPhoto: Oberto Gili11/31Surrounding a living room doorway in the Hamptons home of David Kleinberg are two Richard Serra prints, one displayed over a mahogany cabinet by Paul László; the photograph in the hall is by Alejandra Laviada. Twin French Art Deco zebrawood side tables are joined by Art Deco armchairs covered in a Rogers & Goffigon fabric; the upholstery throughout the house was done by Anthony Lawrence-Belfair, the throw is from Homenature, and the raffia rug is by La Manufacture Cogolin.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn12/31An artwork by Terry Winters overlooks the Nashville, Tennessee, living room of interior designer Ray Booth and television executive John Shea. Roust, one of their two Siamese cats, strikes a noble pose next to a Minotti chaise longue. A Christophe Delcourt floor lamp and a Robert Lighton side table flank the sofa, also by Minotti; the carpet is by Stephanie Odegard Collection.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn13/31At the Montauk, New York, home of designers Vicente Wolf and Matthew Yee, framed photographs from Wolf’s collection—including images by Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Edward Steichen, and André Kertész—line the shelves above the living room’s sectional sofa, which is upholstered in a Janus et Cie fabric.PinterestPhoto: Scott Frances14/31In Alexa Hampton’s New York living room, a detail of the Parthenon’s frieze, painted by Hampton, hangs above the custom-made sofa, which is covered in a Kravet fabric; the klismos chair is by Alexa Hampton for Hickory Chair, Louis XVI chairs flank the mantel (designed by Hampton for Chesney’s), and the Irish matting is by Crosby Street Studios.PinterestPhoto: Ricardo Labougle15/31Lorenzo Castillo accented the drawing room of his Spanish retreat with a wallpaper from his collection for Gastón y Daniela; the vintage cabinet-on-chest is by Pierre Lottier. The Castillo-designed armchair at left is clad in a Designers Guild velvet, 1970s patchworks hang above the suede sofa, and the vintage cocktail tables were found at Paris’s Marché Paul Bert.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn16/31In Holly Hunt’s Chicago apartment, a massive Helen Frankenthaler canvas faces a Louise Nevelson sculptural work across the living room. At center, a Holly Hunt Studio cocktail table topped with a John Chamberlain sculpture joins a Holly Hunt leather sofa cushioned in a Great Plains velvet and a pair of Paul Mathieu chairs upholstered in an Edelman leather; the floor lamps are by Christian Liaigre, the Tristan Auer ottomans are in a Kyle Bunting leather, and the rug is by Christian Astuguevieille. A custom-made Vladimir Kagan sectional sofa in a Great Plains wool nestles in the bay window.PinterestPhoto: Vincent Thibert17/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-01.jpg. AD100 designer Jacques Grange’s Paris apartment—once home to the novelist Colette—overlooks the gardens of the Palais Royal. The living room is furnished with a 19th-century chaise longue, club chairs from 1925, an 18th-century desk, and a Jean-Michel Frank armchair from 1930.PinterestPhoto: Ngoc Minh Ngo18/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-02.jpg. A sculptural staircase framed in polished chrome catches the eye in late AD100 interior designer Alberto Pinto’s lively Rio de Janeiro apartment, which was renovated by architect Thiago Bernardes. Pinto designed the sofa, the painting is by Nancy Graves, and the armless chairs are by William Haines.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn19/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-03.jpg. In AD100 interior designer Muriel Brandolini’s eclectic Manhattan townhouse, Antipodal Shopperby George Condo is displayed above a midcentury Italian sofa; the cocktail table is by Mattia Bonetti, the vintage light fixture is by Gerrit Rietveld, and the oval portrait is of Muriel’s husband, Count Nuno Brandolini, as a child.PinterestPhoto: Björn Wallander20/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-05.jpg. AD100 decorator Michael S. Smith was inspired by 18th-century France when he decorated the elegant Manhattan duplex he shares with HBO executive James Costos. The walls display an Ellsworth Kelly lithograph and an antique overmantel mirror, while Louis XV–style canapés, a Jansen sofa, and Louis XVI–style gilt-wood fauteuils mingle with a Chinese low table and Japanese lacquer robe chests. The decorative woodwork is by Féau & Cie.PinterestPhoto: Tim Beddow21/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-06.jpg. Design team Paolo Moschino and Philip Vergeylen revamped a flat near London’s Victoria station, keeping only the original 19th-century cornices and the oak parquet floor. A pair of brass bookshelves inspired by a Billy Baldwin design for Cole Porter flank a work on paper by Jean Cocteau. The vintage console is by Jansen, and the sofa is by Moschino’s firm, Nicholas Haslam.PinterestPhoto: Roger Davies22/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-07.jpg. AD100 designer David Easton and artist James Steinmeyer gave the living room of their modern Tulsa, Oklahoma, getaway a warm makeover with Venetian-plaster walls painted in a Pratt & Lambert gray and Louis XVI–style slipper chairs upholstered in a crimson silk velvet. The mantel is by Easton, and the armchairs and ottoman are from his line for Lee Jofa, as are the fabrics covering them.PinterestPhoto: Miguel Flores-Vianna23/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-11.jpg. The living room walls in antiques dealer and designer Richard Shapiro’s Malibu, California, retreat are sheathed in frescoed plaster, and a 17th-century Italian mirror hangs above an antique Cypriot mantel; Shapiro designed the chairs, the Patricia Roach floor lamp is from his furnishings company, Studiolo, and the wood stools are 19th-century Ghanaian.PinterestPhoto: Thomas Loof24/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-12.jpg. Inside a glass tower overlooking the Manhattan skyline, Todd Alexander Romano created a high-impact design for his 600-square-foot studio. Inspired by the bold color choices of legendary decorator Billy Baldwin, the designer lacquered the walls and upholstered the custom-made sofa in midnight-blue. Prints by Robert Goodnough and Josef Albers add a vibrant contrast.PinterestPhoto: William Waldron25/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-13.jpg. Alex Papachristidis decorated the Bridgehampton, New York, home he shares with his extended family using luxe fabrics and eclectic finds that provide the newly built home with a sense of history. Gilded 19th-century stools and custom-made sofas upholstered in a Clarence House fabric are mixed with animal print–covered armchairs and pillows.PinterestPhoto: Roger Davies26/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-16.jpg. At his modern Los Angeles getaway, AD100 architect and designer Daniel Romualdez introduced a fur rug, a reclaimed-wood cocktail table by André Joyau, and a pair of John Dickinson lamps to help soften the sleek white space. A painting by Sarah Morris hangs on the far wall, the print above the fireplace is by Christopher Bucklow, and the acrylic armchairs are by Paul Rudolph.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn27/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-18.jpg. In Atlanta, AD100 decorator Suzanne Kasler renovated her Regency-style house with the help of architectural designers William T. Baker & Assoc. She employed a soothing palette of cream, beige, and white for the living room. “I like colors with a gray undertone,” she said. The velvet sofa is from Kasler’s line for Hickory Chair, the acrylic tables and curtain fabric are by Nancy Corzine, and the rug is by Beauvais Carpets.PinterestPhoto: Pieter Estersohn28/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-19.jpg. A stainless-steel wall sculpture by Octavio Abúndez hangs in the living room of Nate Berkus’s former duplex in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village, and the Gilbert Poillerat chairs are upholstered in a Clarence House linen. Berkus furnished the apartment in the 19th-century building with pieces he had collected over the years, including many furnishings from his previous home in Chicago.PinterestPhoto: Eric Piasecki29/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-21.jpg. When AD100 interior designer David Kleinberg moved to an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, he chose to retain the home’s original 1920s architectural details as well as the ornate millwork installed by previous owners; he updated the latter with cream and white paint. The vintage light fixture is by Swiss architect Max Ernst Haefeli, and the painting is by Garth Weiser.PinterestPhoto: Roger Davies30/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-23.jpg. Brazilian architect and designer Sig Bergamin crafted a vibrant living room in the São Paulo home he shares with architect Murilo Lomas. Murano-glass vessels are displayed on either side of a Vik Muniz painting, and the sofas are covered in a Rubelli velvet.PinterestPhoto: Tim Beddow31/31dam-images-decor-2013-03-designers-living-rooms-designers-living-rooms-25.jpg. Russian architect Dmitry Velikovsky created a refined yet exotic look for his Moscow penthouse, whose living room features an antique gilt-wood sofa, a Senegalese armchair, and an 18th-century samurai chair; a painting by Viktor Pivovarov hangs above the fireplace, and a Picasso etching leans against the bookshelf.Explore2013interiorsdecorad100April 2013Decoratingdesign ideas2016 Home Renovation Guide
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Title65 Best Living Room Ideas - Stylish Living Room Decorating Designs
Urlhttps://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/decorating-ideas/g1500/decor-ideas-living-room/
DescriptionTake hues from these beautifully decorated livinf rooms and switch up your own space. You'll be left simply inspired by these stylish living room ideas
Date14 Dec 2021
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H165 Elegant Living Room Design Schemes to Complete Your Home
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Body65 Elegant Living Room Design Schemes to Complete Your Home Budget-friendly tips to craft a chic and functional space. By Monique Valeris and Caroline Picard Dec 14, 2021 Spacecrafting Out of every room in your home, the living room deserves the most interior design attention. Just like your kitchen (or even more so), you spend hours on end there, so it needs to be outfitted for a range of activities. A comfy sofa is crucial for family movie nights, a good rug is an essential for playing with your little ones and great lighting is key for evening reading sessions. In other words, every detail counts. We've rounded up our favorite living room ideas that are full of design inspiration. These elegant living room designs — which also happen to be budget-friendly if you want to recreate — will give you pointers on refreshing your space or moving forward with a complete revamp. Whether you're working with a small living room or a large space, these design ideas will help get you on your way to creating your dream room. View Gallery 66 Photos Peter Molick 1 of 66 Cool Gray Thanks to designer Maureen Stevens, the airy living room in this 1920s Victorian home is full of style. The space features Benjamin Moore’s Gray Owl, which balances the century-old bright white trim and coffered ceiling. Beatriz da Costa 2 of 66 Versatile End Tables Searching for a way to boost your living room's functionality? Not only can end tables be easily moved around the space, but you can also use them as a work surface or spot for kids to tackle homework. When they're not in use, place books or flowers on top as you would with traditional coffee tables. SHOP END TABLES Randy O'Rourke 3 of 66 Built-in Bookshelves If your don't have a dedicated library, installing built-in bookshelves right in your living room is the next best thing. Keep a rolling ladder handy to make it easy to access the higher shelves. Michele Lee Willson 4 of 66 Multipurpose Space When it came to designing this living room, interior designer Heather Hilliard opted for a multipurpose approach. This space is suitable for tackling work, eating, lounging, you name it. SHOP OTTOMANS August Oliver 5 of 66 Classic Black-and-White Lifestyle influencer Anna Mae Groves' Cincinnati home leaned into a timeless black-and-white palette for her Cincinnati living room, complete with DIY geometric wall art. Jessica Delaney 6 of 66 Graphic Walls Speckled wallpaper, paired with an emerald velvet sofa, enliven this living room setup by New York City-based designer Megan Hopp. SHOP WALLPAPER Brie Williams 7 of 66 Cool Cyan Built-in firewood storage and deep cyan-colored walls — Sherwin-Williams' Endless Sea — add character to this living room in a 1970s Dutch Colonial-style home. Jessica Bordner 8 of 66 California Cool Create & Cultivate founder Jaclyn Johnson teamed up with interior designer Ginny Macdonald to arrange this stylish black-and-white outdoor living room. The design is an extension of her California home's interiors. Spacecrafting 9 of 66 Striking Monochrome If you love the monochrome look, you're sure to find inspiration in this living room that features Benjamin Moore's Knoxville Gray on the walls and fireplace. Lincoln Barbour 10 of 66 Rustic Flair A white living room design scheme shines thanks to wooden beams and decorative pieces that play up its rustic flair. Brent Darby 11 of 66 Shades of Mint A living room is the perfect spot to experiment with color, and this colorful space is proof. Varied shades of mint green, ranging from the sofa's cushions to the curtains, create visual interest. Layla Palmer 12 of 66 Collected Look Achieve a collected look by displaying potted greenery, decorative trays, and an assortment of vessels on your mantel.SHOP DECORATIVE TRAY Abby Murphy 13 of 66 Colorful Light Fixture Refresh an unsightly light fixture with a few simple coats of paint, round bulbs and pom-pom fringe for a whimsical touch. Bold colors overhead pull together the room's eclectic vibe. Peter Murdock 14 of 66 Streamlined Shelves Upgrade your storage by removing the jackets off old books (you can load up at yard sales) to expose the stitching or covering your collection with coordinating papers. Mike Garten 15 of 66 Tilted Mirror For a relaxed mantel look, rest a sturdy style against the wall – no hammering required. SHOP MIRROR Mary Costa 16 of 66 Lush Leaves Fill any underused nook or corner with an oversized plant to make it the focal point of the room. Tuck the pot in a woven basket for an extra punch.SHOP PLANTS . 17 of 66 Give Your Home a Refresh! Discover brilliant ways to get organized, declutter, and make over any room! These downloadable digital guides make it easier than ever to give your home a refresh. Visit our store to find dozens of ideas from Good Housekeeping and our sister brands.SHOP NOW Stacey Brandford 18 of 66 Painted Brick Update an old-school brick fireplace (or wood paneling) with a coat of cream-colored paint. Take that, '70s-era decor. Ball and Albanese 19 of 66 Soothing Palette Let the vibes flow from room-to-room with another clever paint tip. "I often paint a home one color throughout," says Susana Simonpietri, interior designer and co-founder of Chango & Co. "Or, I'll try the softest hue in the room that gets the most natural light, then work through the rest of the home with deepening shades of blue and gray." Erika LaPresto/Studio D 20 of 66 Slate and Copper Pair metallic accents (we see you, adorable end table) with traditional wood pieces to add depth and visual interest to your living room. SHOP COPPER TABLE Michael J. Lee 21 of 66 Better Flow It’s not as much about where you place your furniture as it is about the style of pieces you choose. "In each room I design, I try to include at least one round piece, such as a coffee table, that people can walk around without bumping their knees," says interior designer Katie Rosenfeld. "I also add a few armchairs and a versatile piece like a garden stool that can be used as a stool to sit on or as a table for a drink."SHOP ROUND TABLES Lisa Romerein 22 of 66 Streamlined Screen Don't let your primetime viewing habits impede your style. "Go for a slim TV (mine is a Samsung), and use a thin mount that lets it sit flat against the wall," says lifestyle blogger Carley Knobloch. "Then have the wires threaded through the wall so it looks uncluttered." Mike Garten 23 of 66 Velvet Sofa Make your living room feel much airer (and spacious) by replacing a bulky sectional with pretty seating. Besides, what feels more luxe than velvet? Emily Johnston 24 of 66 Dual-Purpose Bar Cart Setting up a booze station on your bar cart is a no brainer — but using it as an end table (especially when space is limited) to showcase blooms, art, and coffee table books is just brilliant.SHOP BAR CARTS Jason Hartog 25 of 66 Low Furniture Short pieces, like this tufted couch, give an open floor plan a cozy feel. Use area rugs to define individual "rooms" within the space. Kate Osborne 26 of 66 Navy Walls Give beige a break. Dramatic hues can drench a large living room, like this inky wallpaper. The deep blue provides a surprisingly neutral backdrop. Art Streiber 27 of 66 Comfy Seating Your style may be polished, but your furniture can still be cozy. Plush sofas and armchairs rule the roost in Ellen Pompeo's L.A. home. "It's fancy in a cool way, not in an 'I can't sit there' way," she says. Kate Osborne 28 of 66 Chic Storage Need space, stat? Swap boring shelving for more decorative options, then load up on fabric boxes or baskets to hide an overflow of knick knacks.SHOP FABRIC BOXES Jason Hartog 29 of 66 Slim Footprint Save square footage without sacrificing seating by using dining chairs in the living room. A rattan-and-cane perch takes up less real estate than a traditional recliner. Lisa Romerein 30 of 66 Family-Friendly Yep, white furniture can work in a house with kids. Just choose durable fabrics (a leather couch) and surfaces (the plastic rocker, the lacquer table) that wipe clean easily. SHOP ROCKING CHAIRS Next 75 Gorgeous Kitchen Ideas You'll Want to Steal Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Monique Valeris Senior Home Editor, Good Housekeeping Monique Valeris is the senior home editor for Good Housekeeping, where she covers decorating ideas, home tours, gift guides and more. Caroline Picard Health Editor Caroline is the Health Editor at GoodHousekeeping.com covering nutrition, fitness, wellness, and other lifestyle news. This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io More From Home Decor Gallery 26 Inviting Family Room Design Schemes 26 Bright & Cheery Sunroom Decor Ideas Advertisement - Continue Reading Below 50 Dreamy Patio Decor Ideas to Try Now 40 Standout Ways to Elevate Your Dining Room 32 Brilliant Home Office Design Ideas 55 Brilliant Bathroom Design Ideas to Love 65 Decor Tips to Make Your Bedroom a Retreat Presented by Serta Artic 25 Perfect Kitchen Paint Colors to Try Now Presented by Weiman 20+ Chic Bathroom Paint Colors 13 Stylish Modern Kitchen Ideas Presented by Ikea
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Title70+ Stunning Living Room Ideas - Chic Living Room Design Photos
Urlhttps://www.elledecor.com/design-decorate/room-ideas/g3490/best-living-room-ideas/
DescriptionFrom an industrial loft to a rustic space, this collection of inspiring living room ideas will make you want to refresh your own space today
Date13 Jan 2021
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H170+ Living Room Ideas That Will Leave You Wanting More
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Body70+ Living Room Ideas That Will Leave You Wanting More Warning: These living rooms will make you want to redecorate right now. By Kelsey Mulvey and ELLE DECOR Editors Jan 13, 2021 Brittany Ambridge If you want to learn about someone’s design aesthetic, look no further than their living room. As one of the most-frequented spots in the home—to be rivaled only by the kitchen—a living room sets the tone for the rest of the house. And while some might think of it as just a “cozy corner,” the living room is also a great place to experiment with bold color palettes, cool rugs, and a variety of illuminating light fixtures. (Or, for another way to shake up your space, spring for a new sofa or armchair.)The only problem? There are so many ways for you to decorate this communal space. So if you’re looking for some inspiration, we at ELLE Decor have combed through our latest home tours and are highlighting the very best living rooms for you here. From a pattern-powered pad in New York City to a globally inspired space in Colombia, this collection of living room design schemes is guaranteed to spark ideas for your own home. These luxury living room ideas also prove that careful planning and a commitment to creativity can go a long way. View Gallery 72 Photos Simon Upton 1 of 72 True Blue Living Room It’s no wonder that the living room packs the “wow” factor of this apartment on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Designer Stephen Sills paired the bright Lee Jofa wallcovering with a Louis XIV marble mantel and antique French chairs draped in a Clarence House silk. Stephan Julliard 2 of 72 Chic London Living Room Decades after its last refurbishment in 1991, a well-known Kuwaiti family enlisted designer Nebihe Cihan to spruce up their charming London flat. Cihan used sculptural details and a jewel-toned sofa from Minotti to give the space a modern edge—without stripping it of its rich history. Brittany Ambridge 3 of 72 Upper West Side Living Room Danielle Colding achieved her signature “cozy cool” look in this prewar apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The crisp white living room is anchored by a sofa from Jayson Home and a Papilio chair, creating an oasis of simplicity, ease, and eclecticism. Trevor Tondro Photography 4 of 72 Coastal California Living Room When Kim Alexandriuk was tasked with designing a family’s vacation home in Montecito, California, she sought to highlight many of the space’s European features. In the living room, she added a Paola Navone sofa and a slipper chair by Paul Marra Design to play off the extravagant fireplace. Stephen Kent Johnson 5 of 72 Cozy Upstate Living Room Three years after a fire broke out in the back of his home, designer Shawn Henderson restored his upstate New York space to be a soothing escape from the big city. This petite living room is undeniably serene, thanks to a Kaare Klint sofa, a chair by Kerstin Hörlin-Holmquist, and a versatile cocktail table courtesy of Frits Henningsen. Miguel Flores-Vianna 6 of 72 Star-Studded Living Room Designer Isabel López-Quesada refreshed this charming Madrid apartment—which the actress Ava Gardner used to call home—with soft, romantic details. Highlights include sofas reimagined in Brochier velvet, Pierre Paulin’s Mushroom chairs, and artwork by Donna Huanca. Ricardo Labougle 7 of 72 Cartagena Living Room Think of Chiqui de Echavarría’s Colombian home as a passport-free way to travel the world. With an antique bench from India, South Africa–sourced paintings, and a Spanish Colonial sofa in a Palma de Mallorca fabric, this brick-clad living room has a true global edge. Frank Frances 8 of 72 Hudson Valley Living Room Sheila Bridges took her Hudson Valley, New York, living room to new heights (literally) with a mobile she co-designed with Elizabeth Parker. Rounding out the room is a Hammertown Barn sofa, a vintage side table, and a fireplace by Ortal. Francesco Lagnese 9 of 72 Refined Upper East Side Living Room Designer Tom Scheerer added some uptown opulence to this Manhattan apartment with a 1950s Danish desk by Jacob Kjaer and textiles from Holland & Sherry, Borderline, and Kravet. With a neutral backdrop—as well as the occasional pops of green and blue—this living room is both elegant and eclectic. G L Askew II 10 of 72 Modern California Living Room Designer Ernest de la Torre updated this Tudor-style home in Bel Air—which was built by Hollywood architect Paul R. Williams in 1934—with modern panache. A vintage Jean Royère chair and a rug by Edward Fields soften the sleek space. Francesco Dolfo 11 of 72 Art Nouveau Living Room When restoring her apartment in Tbilisi, Georgia, interior designer Eka Papamichael juxtaposed the space’s rich Art Nouveau architecture with a vintage cocktail table, a Murano glass ceiling pendant, and sofas by Gervasoni. Fabien Charuau 12 of 72 Bold & Bright Living Room Srila Chatterjee and Mahesh Mathai put their bold aesthetic on full display in their Mumbai living room. The vibrant purple walls are paired with flea-market finds, a tiger sculpture from Kerala, and a custom ottoman and chairs. Roger Davies 13 of 72 Muted California Living Room Blending two distinctly different styles in one space is a tall order. When newlyweds asked Natasha Baradaran to decorate their Santa Monica, California, home, she filled the living room with various textiles in an easy, neutral color palette. The result? The perfect compromise between bohemian and Art Deco. Simon Upton 14 of 72 16th-Century Tuscan Living Room At this 16th-century retreat outside Siena, Italy, restored by Hubert Zandberg, more is more. The designer added a hefty dose of color into the living room, covering the furniture in textiles from Mulberry and de Le Cuona. Andrea Ferrari 15 of 72 Sophisticated Milan Living Room Being neck-deep in a gut renovation—in the midst of the pandemic, no less—can feel overwhelming. However, Dimorestudio’s Emiliano Salci turned his new Milan apartment into a theatrical abode. He furnished his pigmented living room with antique finds as well as pieces from his home-furnishings brand, Dimoremilano. Christopher Stark 16 of 72 Classic-Meets-Cool Living Room When designing his San Francisco home, Antonio Martins took a trip down memory lane for inspiration. From a gallery wall of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century portraits to the sleek RH, Restoration Hardware cocktail table, his living room bridges the gap between old and new. Alanna Hale 17 of 72 Hotel Lobby–Esque Living Room As the mogul behind 1 Hotels and the Baccarat Hotel, Barry Sternlicht brings a well-appointed eye to his hospitality ventures. So it’s only fitting that his personal residence follows suit. Sternlicht gives his Miami Beach living room the first-class treatment with a Jean de Merry armchair, side tables from MS Ceramic Design, and a sofa covered in Loro Piana fabric. Gianni Franchellucci 18 of 72 Fun and Feminine Living Room When Lucinda Loya was tapped to design fashion model Maya Henry’s London flat, she wanted to fill the cold space with plenty of personality. From the fringed Munna chairs to a candy-coated color palette, this living room feels feminine and edgy in equal measure. David Benjamin Sherry 19 of 72 Art-Filled Hamptons Living Room Furniture doubles as art in this Hamptons home. A white sofa matching the wall and floors sets the stage for cream vintage Joe Colombo chairs that flank a custom Marmoreal coffee table. The Egan Frantz artwork spans the length of the sofa. Chad Mellon 20 of 72 California Casual Living Room Exposed beams, a plaster fireplace, and wrought iron door frames create a Mediterranean vibe in this Newport, California home. A mix of cream upholstery with wood furniture and floors looks elegant but not fussy. Christopher Stark 21 of 72 High-Contrast Living Room An accent wall made of dark charcoal tiles boldly stands out in this elegant Mill Valley living room. Deep blacks complement warm whites with gold accents to create a glamorous scheme. James Merrell 22 of 72 Limestone Living Room Modern updates like industrial lighting and a polished cement floor create an eclectic aesthetic in this old-word living room. Cube-shaped poufs and linen-upholstered Bergère chairs add softness and texture. Tony Soluri 23 of 72 Glam Chicago Living Room A sophisticated, neutral living room in Chicago's historic Palmolive building features a clever mix of antiques and vintage finds, which create a sense of balance. Douglas Friedman 24 of 72 Palm Beach Living Room A 1920s Palm Beach home, owned by art adviser Heidi McWilliams, serves as the perfect backdrop for displaying her impressive collection. The living room is furnished with claret armchairs (right) and a hexagonal table by Rose Tarlow Melrose House, along with a neutral rug by Patterson Flynn Martin. An Anish Kapoor mirrored wall sculpture accentuates the 16th-century Italian limestone mantel, and the coffered ceiling, which is original, adds character to the room. Courtesy of Kara Mann 25 of 72 Minimalist Living Room Kara Mann's Chicago living room is a lesson in minimalist design. A pair of white chairs complement the marigold-colored rug by Miyabi Casa. The floors are large-scale limestone tiles. Alyssa Rosenheck 26 of 72 Nashville Living Room Since this Nashville home originally didn't have a living space, interior designer Jason Arnold transformed the main parlor into a beautifully layered living room with earthy tones and bold stripes. James Merrell 27 of 72 Serene Ibiza Sitting Room This Ibiza living room features local-limestone floors covered in custom Spanish esparto rugs from Antonia Molina. Walls covered in a sandy lime plaster, and a wood-beam ceiling set a rustic tone in the living room. Custom sofas are by Atelier Tapissier Seigneur and the curtains are in a quilted Braquenié fabric; the Oeil cocktail table by Pierre Chapo is vintage, the lacquered-coral sculpture is by Maurizio Epifani, and the painting over the mantel is by Alex Katz. Björn Wallander 28 of 72 Refined Buenos Aires Living Room In a Buenos Aires home, the original marble mantel in the living room was specified by Maison Jansen, who decorated the apartment in the 1930s. The circa-1940 chairs in the foreground, the console (left), and the side table (right) were designed by Jean-Michel Frank for the Argentine firm Comte. The 1930s Frits Henningsen settee is covered in a Holland & Sherry mohair, the chairs next to the fireplace are 18th-century Gustavian, the circa-1950 Sphere cocktail table and lamp are by Jean Royère, and the 1930s table (front left) and sconces are by Maison Jansen. Stephen Kent Johnson 29 of 72 Amanda Seyfried's Living Room A former barn now serves as guest quarters at actress Amanda Seyfried’s weekend retreat in the Catskills region of New York. In the living area, the sofa is by West Elm, the wool rug is by Restoration Hardware, the flooring is reclaimed oak, and the wall is painted in Benjamin Moore’s White Dove; the photograph is by Sarah Bailey. Bjorn Wallander 30 of 72 California Bungalow Lounge For designer Patrick Printy, his bungalow in Oakland, California is all about eccentric design. In this living area attached to his study, a pair of vintage sofas are upholstered in a Ralph Lauren Home stripe, the Eero Saarinen table is from Design Within Reach, barstools by CB2 are covered in a Katie Ridder fabric, the ceiling lantern is by Visual Comfort, the rug is by Ralph Lauren Home, and the busts are by Oly.The artworks include photographs by Jason Fulford, Garry Winogrand, and Richard Misrach, flanked by silhouette portraits by Julian Opie. Next 30+ Elegant, Minimalist Living Room Designs Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Kelsey Mulvey Kelsey Mulvey is a freelance lifestyle journalist, who covers shopping and deals for Marie Claire, Women's Health, and Men's Health, among others. This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io More From Inspiring Ideas for Living Rooms Dress Up Your Sofa with These Chic Throw Pillows 50+ Genius Living Room Seating Ideas Advertisement - Continue Reading Below 30 Chic Living Rooms with Creative Color Palettes The Top Home Decor Trends You’ll Be Seeing in 2021 20 Best Reading Chairs for Every Design Style 20 Living Room Wallpaper Ideas The Secrets to Maximizing a Small Living Room 24 Elegant And Cozy Fireplaces To Escape The Cold 24 White Sofa Ideas For A Stylish Living Room 15 Gorgeous Mantel Decoration Ideas Inspiring Ideas for Living Rooms Room Ideas Design + Decorate 32 Best Ways To Style A Coffee Table In Your Living Room 20 Best Gray Living Room Ideas White Living Room Furniture You'll Love The Best Mid-Century Living Rooms 20 French Country Living Room Ideas 40 Living Room Curtain Ideas
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TitleLiving room ideas, designs, trends, pictures and inspiration for 2021
Urlhttps://www.idealhome.co.uk/living-rooms
DescriptionAll the living room ideas you'll need from the expert ideal Home editorial team. Be inspired by styles, designs, trends & decorating advice
Date
Organic Position7
H1Living room ideas
H2Living room decorating ideas
Living room shopping edits
Living room colour schemes
Living room planning ideas
Living room makeovers
How to plan and decorate your living room
H3ALL Living Room Pictures
MODERN Living Room Pictures
COUNTRY Living Room Pictures
TRADITIONAL Living Room Pictures
Modern small living room ideas to make the most of your space
Living room shelving ideas – 10 creative ways to sort, store and organise
Living room wall decor ideas – 20 easy ways to add style
Living room sofa ideas - 10 ways with seating
Blue sofa living room ideas – 10 ways to style statement colour
Home decor trends to watch out for in 2022
Small living room ideas – 45 top tips and clever design tricks
The best rugs – 9 on-trend styles for your living room or bedroom
The £19.99 Amazon pampas grass our Shopping Editor loves – it's fluffy and elegant
6 stylish B&Q furniture buys we keep adding to our basket
Colour school: How to decorate with hot pink and orange
Pink living room ideas – create a stylish space filled with on-trend colour
28 White Living Room Ideas – decor in shades from brilliant white to ivory
41 grey living room ideas – decor in shades from dove to dark grey
Green living room ideas – redecorate and invigorate with the colour of the season
Living room trends 2022 - key interior decor trends and top styling tips
How to design a living room: from floors to wallcoverings, colours and layout
How to make your rooms smell good – 10 scent-sational ideas
Sofa ideas for small living rooms – 11 looks for tiny or awkwardly-shaped lounges
How to arrange living room furniture – experts reveal the 5 key steps
Walk on the wild side with tribal-inspired home accessories..
Switch on to smart TV display and storage units
Two brothers save £2,000 on parquet flooring for their mum's living room by using wooden pallets
This dark living space has been given a modern Scandi makeover with cleverly concealed TV
Before and after: A 'boring' neutral living room gets a glam and dramatic makeover
What should I put in my living room?
How do you set up living room furniture?
Living room storage ideas
What are the new colours for living rooms?
What’s the best way to light a living room?
H2WithAnchorsLiving room decorating ideas
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How to plan and decorate your living room
BodyLiving room ideas While the heart of the home is thought to be the kitchen, isn’t it fair to say the living room is where we spend the most time relaxing? It’s therefore key to create a space that’s both comforting and practical in equal measure. If you’re looking for living room ideas that will transform your front room or elevate an open-plan family space you’ve come to the right place. Our experts here at Ideal Home know exactly how to create a comfortable space where the whole household can relax, irrespective of budget we have ideas for all. Whether planning a redecorating project or undertaking a mini makeover with a furniture rethink our guides to everything from living room colour schemes to restyling small living room ideas will help inspire your home journey. From livening up the lounge to restyling a sitting room, snug or den our help is at hand. Tamara Kelly, Digital Editor 8th February 2021 ALL Living Room Pictures. MODERN Living Room Pictures. COUNTRY Living Room Pictures. TRADITIONAL Living Room Pictures. Living room decorating ideas. Modern small living room ideas to make the most of your space. Living room shelving ideas – 10 creative ways to sort, store and organise. Living room wall decor ideas – 20 easy ways to add style. Living room sofa ideas - 10 ways with seating. Blue sofa living room ideas – 10 ways to style statement colour. Home decor trends to watch out for in 2022. Small living room ideas – 45 top tips and clever design tricks. Living room shopping edits. The best rugs – 9 on-trend styles for your living room or bedroom. The £19.99 Amazon pampas grass our Shopping Editor loves – it's fluffy and elegant. 6 stylish B&Q furniture buys we keep adding to our basket. Living room colour schemes. Colour school: How to decorate with hot pink and orange. Pink living room ideas – create a stylish space filled with on-trend colour. 28 White Living Room Ideas – decor in shades from brilliant white to ivory. 41 grey living room ideas – decor in shades from dove to dark grey. Green living room ideas – redecorate and invigorate with the colour of the season. Living room trends 2022 - key interior decor trends and top styling tips. Living room planning ideas. How to design a living room: from floors to wallcoverings, colours and layout. How to make your rooms smell good – 10 scent-sational ideas. Sofa ideas for small living rooms – 11 looks for tiny or awkwardly-shaped lounges. How to arrange living room furniture – experts reveal the 5 key steps. Walk on the wild side with tribal-inspired home accessories... Switch on to smart TV display and storage units. Living room makeovers. Two brothers save £2,000 on parquet flooring for their mum's living room by using wooden pallets. This dark living space has been given a modern Scandi makeover with cleverly concealed TV. Before and after: A 'boring' neutral living room gets a glam and dramatic makeover. How to plan and decorate your living room. A good starting point is to think about how many people you need to fit in your living room on a regular basis. This will help you to choose the right living room furniture. What should I put in my living room? A large family will need a sizeable sofa and a couple of armchairs at least to make sure everyone has somewhere comfortable to sit. If space is tight, beanbags and poufs are a smart way to sneak in extra seating, and can be stowed away easily at times when there are fewer people in the house. If you like to entertain in your living room, it’s a good idea to have a few lightweight side chairs that can be moved into more sociable arrangements when people come to visit. Small side tables or nesting tables are another handy addition, giving guests a place to perch their drinks. How do you set up living room furniture? This depends on the size of your living room and what the room is most commonly used for. Small living rooms may require you to place furniture against the walls to ensure there’s enough space for people to move about without sidling around chairs or banging their shins on the coffee table. Ideally you need at least 50cm between each piece of furniture to allow for optimum traffic flow. If you have a bit more space to play with, bring the furniture away from the walls to create a cosy sitting area. This works especially well in open-plan living spaces, helping to zone the relaxation area from the thoroughfares or dining, cooking and study areas. If the back of your sofa isn’t much to look at, hide it behind a low console table topped with decorative objects. A good rug can also help to zone a living space, making it feel more intimate. Place the front legs of sofas and chairs on the rug, leaving the back legs off, to give mismatched furniture a more unified feel. If your living room is your main TV room, it goes without saying that seating needs to be positioned to give a good view of the television, and that it isn’t so far away that viewers need to squint. Living rooms without a TV give you the freedom to choose a more aesthetically pleasing focal point, whether it’s a period fireplace, an ornate mirror or a statement coffee table. If you do have a TV but don’t want it on show when you’re not watching it, you can always hide it away behind the doors of an attractive TV cabinet. Living room storage ideas. Good living room storage is almost as important as a good living room layout. Clutter can build up quickly in a space that’s used by the whole household every day, so it’s important that everything has its right place. A coffee table with drawers or a hidden shelf is perfect for keeping remote controls within reach but out of sight. Footstools that open up to reveal a secret storage compartment are another neat tidying trick, especially in small living rooms. Open shelving is great for books and ornaments, but it’s useful to have some kind of drawer or cupboard storage in your living room as well, where you can tuck away things like laptops and other items that you don’t want on display. Remember to leave plenty of room for any furniture with doors or drawers to open properly. What are the new colours for living rooms? For the biggest colours in living rooms in 2021, check out our pink living room ideas and green living room ideas. That said, you can never go wrong with a muted base, which is why our grey living room ideas and neutral living room ideas will always be relevant. What’s the best way to light a living room? Living rooms are multifunctional spaces, so they need lighting for all the different tasks they need to perform. First, you’ll need a general light source – a ceiling pendant light, for example – that will light the room at darker times of day when the household are milling about. Wall lights and table lamps will give a softer glow when it’s time to relax. An adjustable reading lamp next to a comfy chair will allow readers to focus on their book without dazzling the rest of the room. A formal, parlour-style living room demands decorative lighting to impress, whether it’s a statement standard lamp or a designer chandelier. You might also consider adding accent lighting, such as a picture light to draw attention to a favourite work of art. It’s a good idea to have at least two electrical circuits for your living room lighting – one for the main light, and one for softer lighting – as well as dimmer switches so you can control the level of light to suit the time of day, task and mood.
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TitleUK's #1 Online Interior Design Company | My Bespoke Room
Urlhttps://www.mybespokeroom.com/
DescriptionA professional, easy-to-use & totally bespoke interior design service. All online and all yours from only £250 per room
Date
Organic Position8
H1Put the me into home
H2We make it easier and more affordable than ever to design, style and furnish your home
Join the thousands of happy customers who made usthe UK's top rated Interior Design service
Our award winning, flat-fee packages
Our other design services
How does online interior design work?
Our wonderful designers
Have multiple rooms?
We work with suppliers, big and small
Our design portfolio
Why use My Bespoke Room?
A truly personal and professional experience
Frequently asked questions
H3Complete Design Experience
Complete Design Experience PLUS
Complete Design Experience MAX
Great design, conveniently delivered . .
H2WithAnchorsWe make it easier and more affordable than ever to design, style and furnish your home
Join the thousands of happy customers who made usthe UK's top rated Interior Design service
Our award winning, flat-fee packages
Our other design services
How does online interior design work?
Our wonderful designers
Have multiple rooms?
We work with suppliers, big and small
Our design portfolio
Why use My Bespoke Room?
A truly personal and professional experience
Frequently asked questions
BodyPut the me into homeCreate your own happy home effortlessly, all at a happy price.Start your briefThe UK's #1 RatedInterior Design ProfessionalAward Winning Professional Interior Designview projectsWe make it easier and more affordable than ever to design, style and furnish your home. Award-winning professional and affordable interior design and personal shopping serviceAs Seen On TVAs Seen On TVWant to discuss your project with one of our expert advisors?Join the thousands of happy customers who made usthe UK's top rated Interior Design service. The service we have received from MBR is second to none. We are very happy and pleased with the results. We just can’t wait for everything to come to life. The personal shopper service is cherry on the cake as it takes the burden off ordering and tracking items.Every step of this process has been brilliant. My designer was a real joy to work with - creative, warm & kind. One of the best parts is also the shopping service, where Laura has been really helpful in ordering all the new things I need and coordinating the deliveries!We decided we needed fresh eyes to help visualise the space of our new extension...This was the best cost: benefit investment we made throughout the whole project. I wish we had used them in our other rooms and would definitely use them again.Our designer felt like an extension of our family. We spoke almost daily via the instant message service. She listened to our ideas and then took them to that next level. The touches she added gave the professionally designed look that was respectful of our budget.99% of reviewers recommend My Bespoke RoomRead More ReviewsOur award winning, flat-fee packages. Hide detailsWhat's included?Your own professional & experienced designerUp to 3 weeks of design & communication time2 x video consultation calls with your designer, up to 40 mins eachCollaboration to agree your design styleMultiple room layouts exploredMoodboard to illustrate your final design conceptCurated product selection of all of your items (we'll source at least 4 options for each)Final annotated floor plan and 2 x 2D visualsFinal design presentation video with expert tips2 weeks post-design support with your designerYour own personal shopper to make your design a realityExclusive discounts on furniture items(when you spend over £1,500)Complete Design Experience. £395see example >For transforming single function rooms.Best for living rooms, bedrooms, offices and playrooms.£100Shopping voucher included*Hide detailsWhat's included?Your own professional & experienced designerUp to 3 weeks of design & communication time2 x video consultation calls with your designer, up to 50 mins eachCollaboration to agree your design styleMultiple room layouts exploredMoodboard to illustrate your final design conceptCurated product selection of all of your items (we'll source at least 4 options for each)Final annotated floor plan and 3 x 2D visualsFinal design presentation video with expert tips2 weeks post-design support with your designerYour own personal shopper to make your design a realityExclusive discounts on furniture items(when you spend over £1,500)Complete Design Experience PLUS. £450see example >For dual function rooms where help is required to zone areas.Best for living-dining rooms and bathrooms.£100Shopping voucher included*Hide detailsWhat's included?Your own professional & experienced designerUp to 3 weeks of design & communication time2 x video consultation calls with your designer, up to 50 mins eachCollaboration to agree your design styleMultiple room layouts exploredMoodboard to illustrate your final design conceptCurated product selection of all of your items (we'll source at least 4 options for each)Final annotated floor plan and 3 x 2D visualsFinal design presentation video with expert tips2 weeks post-design support with your designerYour own personal shopper to make your design a realityExclusive discounts on furniture items(when you spend over £1,500)Complete Design Experience MAX. £595see example >For rooms with three or more functions where more help is required.Best for kitchen finishes, living and dining rooms.£100Shopping voucher included**T&C's & minimum spend appliesCompare packagesOur other design services. Spatial Planning Consultancy£195(prices start from)Building a new home or extension? We help you create a cohesive, functional and beautiful space. £195 for four hour package then £65 per additional hour.Get a QuoteColour consultancy£195(prices start from)Your designer will give you the perfect colour scheme for your space and give you the confidence to go bold! £195 for four hour package then £65 per additional hour.Get a QuoteMini Styling Experience£250 For design inspiration and accessorising. Perfect if you've already got the layout and larger furniture items sorted but you're looking to add wow-factor.Start your briefHome visits£300(prices start from)We can arrange for a designer to visit you. They will measure up for you, take photographs and discuss your brief from the comfort of your own home.Get a QuoteSign up for fresh ideas & receive our FREE design guideHow does online interior design work?1. Complete your easy online briefThis takes less than 15 minutes! Tell us what you want to achieve from your room design, upload your room details and any inspirational images. The more the merrier!2. Connect with your designerWe'll then match you with a designer who's perfect for your look, budget and lifestyle.Your designer will kick things off with a video call to dig a little deeper into what you want to achieve.3. Collaborate onlineOur online chat makes it easy to collaborate with your designer.A second video call will be arranged to discuss and agree the design direction and layout. Your designer will then get busy sourcing all your product options!4. Your dream design deliveredTime for the big reveal! Your room design comes with a mood board, annotated floor plan, 2D visuals, and a curated shopping list with different budget options. You'll also get a virtual presentation from your designer with styling tips.5. Shop and save Effortlessly shop your design in one click then your Personal Shopper will handle the rest. With our price match guarantee and your £100 shopping voucher applied at checkout, you can rest assured that you're always paying the best price.Want to discuss your project with one of our expert advisors?"I cannot praise My Bespoke Room enough. The website is super intuitive and the instant messaging function with your designer means the entire process is convenience driven for the customer. I really could not have imagined a more fluid, hassle free process for interior designing my flat. Everything from the initial phone call to the delivery of the numerous items I have purchased via the site, have been expertly and promptly handled. Great site, great people, great work! I will be recommending their services to anyone who gawps at my flat in awe!"Kamran"Thank heavens I found My Bespoke Room! I am in the process of extending my house and re-configuring the kitchen and living room. As I am not that creative I find it hard to start with a blank canvas - and that is even worse when I cant imagine what the rooms will look like after they have been extended. Their help and advice has been invaluable and literally taken all of the stress out of deciding on furnishings for the dining/living room. The price was extremely good value and their support and availability brilliant. I cannot recommend them highly enough and I have already engaged them on my next project."Alex"You help people achieve the home of their dreams! My husband and I had to completely gut our 1930's property and start again. I found My Bespoke Room and the first time I saw my design was like a dream come true! I had been trying to make my house have this wow factor and there it was! I felt I was given enough (but lots at the same time) so I could go and do it myself. When people come round and gasp at the house I feel really proud and found the service extremely good value for money!"Sophie"Thank you My Bespoke Room! With my busy schedule the convenience of the process was perfect, with just one meeting with Lucy she got my sense of style immediately. The whole experience was enjoyable especially the excitement of receiving my designs for the first time."Jourdan Dunn"Personally, I think getting the services of a professional interior designer can be the difference between a nice finish and a stunning finish. It doesn't have to cost the Earth. Whereas some designers charge thousands of pounds to design and source all of the elements to a room, the company I use, My Bespoke Room, do it all online and they are happy to mix and match with items you already have and incorporate them into the design. This might sound like an ad but they are not paying me, I just really rate their service!"Jasmine Harman99% of reviewers recommend My Bespoke RoomRead More ReviewsOur wonderful designers. You'll be in safe hands with one of our experienced and passionate interior designers. Each are picked not only for their design prowess but also their loveliness. With over 50 designers in our team, we can match you with the perfect designer for your style and living situation.RosieInterior Designer"I'm drawn to the modern country farmhouse look. I love the use of natural materials and textures against a calming neutral backdrop."RickyInterior Designer"I love modern, contemporary design but like to be adaptable and help the client tell their own story."ClaireInterior Designer"To me, there’s no better feeling than finding the best layout to ensure your home really works for you.Pairing this with beautifully layered colours and textures is the cherry on top!"RiaInterior Designer"I love it when my designs give clients the confidence to create the room they always wanted but didn’t know how to put together themselves."MilenaInterior Designer"I love seeing a design come to life and how it can change the way people live and interact with each other."We match you with the perfect designer for you.MEET THE TEAMHave multiple rooms?We offer discountson 2 or more rooms(on any Complete Design Experience package)Receive   £40 off each additional room and benefit from the same designer working with you throughout your homeStart your briefWe work with suppliers, big and small. Our professional designers hand pick the best products from our little black book, just for you. We work with over 200 retailers, sought-after brands and trade suppliers, to ensure that we find you the best products at the best prices.Bonus! Every 'Complete' room design package comes with £100 shopping voucher applied to your basket when you spend over £2,000.Your personal shopper will then place your orders for you and help coordinate deliveries and returns saving you time and hassle.The best quality products at the best prices guaranteed with our price match promise.Our design portfolio. We've proudly worked on thousands of bespoke room designs for our lovely customers. Check out some of our favourites below and on our design portfolio page. You can even shop the products directly from many of the designs to get the look in your own home!A luxurious master bedroom, understated in soft neutralsA Fabulous Small But Mighty Brass & Dark Green Botanical CloakroomDecedent master bedroom with unique fan wall artDramatic and Elegant Deep Red Hallway An eclectic master bedroom with blush accents, which oozes characterJourdan Dunn's living room: Dark walls, deep emerald and bold patterns make a statement in this lavish loungeMore projectsThe best quality products at the best prices guaranteed with our price match promise.Why use My Bespoke Room?Great design, conveniently delivered . . .Your personal experienced interior designerYou get the undivided attention of your own professional interior designer. But the really clever bit is, it's all done online, so it's uber convenient.Budgets big and smallNo matter your budget, our designers contact books are jam-packed with the best places to get the best prices on whatever it takes to achieve the look you're after.Yours in just two to three weeksBecause everything is online, you can kick back while your designer does all the hard work, saving you bags of time and effort. In a rush? We can meet tight deadlines with our express package.Free personal shopping service Save time, hassle with our personal shopping service. Your personal shopper will order on your behalf, help coordinate deliveries, returns and always match retailer pricing & discounts. You'll even receive a £100 shopping voucher for every 'Complete' room design package which will be automatically applied at checkout when you spend over £2,000.Sign up for fresh ideas & receive our FREE design guideA truly personal and professional experience. By working online, we’re able to bring you closer than ever to a qualified and experienced interior designer, no matter where you are. We match you with one of our professional designers based on your style preferences and how you live - not just your location!Meet the TeamFrequently asked questions. What’s included in my online design package?If you've opted for the Mini Styling Experience this is what is included:Your own professional designerUp to 2 weeks of design and communication time with your designerA kick off 30 min phone or video call with your designer, so they can dig deeper into your preferencesCollaboration time via our online chat platform to agree your design style1 x mood board to illustrate your final designAn interactive shopping list with curated product suggestions. You're able to choose a maximum of 6 decorative or small item categories and we'll source 3 options for eachProfessional design advice and styling tipsFinal design presentation video from your designer with expert tips1 week post-design support with your designerAccess to our convenient personal shopping service with our price match guarantee.If you have opted for one of the Complete Design Experience Packages you will receive all of the above PLUS:£100 shopping voucher which will be automatically applied to your basket when you spend over £2,000.Up to 3 weeks of design time and communication with your designer2 x video consultation calls with your designer, up to 40 mins each (50 minutes for the PLUS package)Room layout options and final annotated floor plan2 x 2D visualisation of the room (3 x 2D visuals for the PLUS package)Curated product suggestions for ALL your key items, with at least 4 options for each2 weeks post-design supportNB. For very large or triple function spaces such as a kitchen/dining/living room, the Complete Design Experience MAX is £595 to account for the extra time needed. Our designers recommend products from a wide variety of retailers. This way, you get best possible choice and value, helping you achieve your perfect room in style and on budget.What information do I need to provide?Our goal is to create the best possible design for your space, on brief and on budget. The more information you can provide us with, the better.After you complete the brief, you’ll be able to access your Account Dashboard where you’ll find all the details that we need to get started, and they’re easy to upload. The things we need are room photos, a floor plan with key dimensions and any inspiration images that you love. If you have Pinterest boards or Houzz Ideabooks, you can share the links on your dashboard too. As soon as we have this, we can get cracking!What should I include in my budget?We always aim to work within the budget that you provide us with and source items accordingly. Trust us, we love a challenge and are experts in tracking down your desired décor at a desirable price.As a rule of thumb, your budget should cover all your key items and accessories selected in your brief. Make sure you communicate the overall budget with your designer if you are making larger changes, such as replacing your flooring and they need to allow for this when sourcing furniture.How do you match me with my designer?We know our designers inside out, so we can make the best match based on your individual needs, style, preferences and lifestyle.Let us know if you have a specific designer request or have used us before and would like the same designer. We will try and make it happen! Drop us a note at [email protected] Can a designer visit my home?Yes they can. Whilst we operate online to keep costs down, we realise some customers prefer to see a designer face-to-face. For those folk, we offer home visits that start from £300 (for the visit only). Room packages will be charged on top of the home visit fee.A designer will take the full brief in person, measure up, take photos and go through any additional details you may want to chat about, in the comfort of your own home.To find out more, please contact [email protected] for a quote based on your location and the number of rooms you would like to transform.How does the £100 Shopping Voucher work?A £100 Shopping Voucher is included with every 'Complete' room design package purchased.Once you receive your final design and curated shopping list you can add them to your basket in just one click. If your total basket spend is £2,000 or more, your £100 voucher will be added automatically.If you have multiple vouchers, for every £2,000 basket spend a new code will be automatically applied.Once you checkout, your personal shopper will place your orders and help you coordinate deliveries and returns.Our personal shopping team are on hand to help and you can reach them on your account in the chat, or by emailing [email protected] our full FAQ's here to learn more.See All FAQsStart your bespoke room transformation today!Start your briefAbout usHow it worksPricingOur servicesMeet the teamDiscoverReal projectsBlogFAQsBuying a giftNeed help?Speak to a member of our friendly team: 0203 904 3800Drop us an email: [email protected] in touchWant to join our team?Here's what makes our world go round: we care about the quality of our service. A lot. Our customers' happiness and satisfaction is always top of the agenda. We take time to truly connect with people, it keeps us humble, focused and innovative. That's why we're always looking out for talented, passionate and inventive people to help us in our mission to make homes beautiful. Simply drop us your CV at: [email protected]#1 Interior Design Professional on Houzz HouzzCopyright 2022. All rights reservedCookie & Privacy PolicyService Terms
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Result 11
TitleLiving room ideas: 55 living room designs and tips | Homes & Gardens
Urlhttps://www.homesandgardens.com/spaces/decorating/living-room-ideas-222997
DescriptionWhether you are looking for living room ideas that are classic and smart, or contemporary and laid-back, you'll find plenty of inspiration here
Date
Organic Position9
H1Living room ideas – 55 ways to decorate and furnish your space, beautifully
H2Living room ideas
1. Embrace the trend for reimagined ditsy florals
2. Layer color on color for a warm, welcoming space
3. Mix and match green and white for a fresh living room scheme
4. Choose a bold wallpaper for an impactful space
5. Choose earthy tones for an enveloping feel
6. Warm up a monotone scheme with wood
7. Plan the layout to the last inch
8. Divide a living room to suit your daily routines
9. Create a welcoming space with a ton of texture
10. Use furniture scaling to exaggerate a living room's proportions
11. Enliven a plain scheme with bold artwork
12. Rely on metallics for living room glamor
13. Mix motifs but keep the scheme simple
14. Create an accent wall with art
15. Highlight original features with paint
16. Pick a subtle mural to add definition to a plain room
17. Make a dark living room feel instantly summery
18. Layer natural tones on natural tones for a calm appeal
19. Enliven an all white scheme with clever accessorizing
20. Pick mismatched chairs for a relaxed look
21. Use checks for a smart update
22. Focus on flooring
23. Design a picture perfect living room
24. Instil purity in your space
25. Add an element of light elegance
26. Create interest through scale and texture
27. Create a wall feature
28. Make a statement
29. Invest in a rug underfoot
30. Let the light in
31. Use lighting for dramatic effect
32. Pick a stand-out piece of furniture
33. Keep it neat and tidy
34. Make a feature out of a monochrome scheme
35. Let the floor do the talking
36. Take inspiration from nature
37. Unite classic with contemporary elements
38. Pick a single stand-out accent fabric
39. Be sympathetic to the age of your property
40. Give florals a modern twist
41. Decorate with a sea of blue
42. Mix and match materials
43. Introduce wood for warmth
44. Furnish wisely around statement lighting
45. Pick a dark wall color – but add touches of light and warmth
46. Pick an eclectic combination for a welcoming living room
47. Go for a calm, pared-back look
48. Use a bay window for storage and seating
49. Go for contemporary grey
50. Embrace symmetry
51. Decorate in a neutral palette
52. Pick a palette of primary colors
53. Add an unexpected twist
54. Create a conversation area
55. Introduce an artistic touch with a painterly mural
How should I decorate my living room?
Which color is best for a living room?
Which colors make a living room look bigger?
Useful links
H3Advice
Pictures
Buying Guides
H2WithAnchorsLiving room ideas
1. Embrace the trend for reimagined ditsy florals
2. Layer color on color for a warm, welcoming space
3. Mix and match green and white for a fresh living room scheme
4. Choose a bold wallpaper for an impactful space
5. Choose earthy tones for an enveloping feel
6. Warm up a monotone scheme with wood
7. Plan the layout to the last inch
8. Divide a living room to suit your daily routines
9. Create a welcoming space with a ton of texture
10. Use furniture scaling to exaggerate a living room's proportions
11. Enliven a plain scheme with bold artwork
12. Rely on metallics for living room glamor
13. Mix motifs but keep the scheme simple
14. Create an accent wall with art
15. Highlight original features with paint
16. Pick a subtle mural to add definition to a plain room
17. Make a dark living room feel instantly summery
18. Layer natural tones on natural tones for a calm appeal
19. Enliven an all white scheme with clever accessorizing
20. Pick mismatched chairs for a relaxed look
21. Use checks for a smart update
22. Focus on flooring
23. Design a picture perfect living room
24. Instil purity in your space
25. Add an element of light elegance
26. Create interest through scale and texture
27. Create a wall feature
28. Make a statement
29. Invest in a rug underfoot
30. Let the light in
31. Use lighting for dramatic effect
32. Pick a stand-out piece of furniture
33. Keep it neat and tidy
34. Make a feature out of a monochrome scheme
35. Let the floor do the talking
36. Take inspiration from nature
37. Unite classic with contemporary elements
38. Pick a single stand-out accent fabric
39. Be sympathetic to the age of your property
40. Give florals a modern twist
41. Decorate with a sea of blue
42. Mix and match materials
43. Introduce wood for warmth
44. Furnish wisely around statement lighting
45. Pick a dark wall color – but add touches of light and warmth
46. Pick an eclectic combination for a welcoming living room
47. Go for a calm, pared-back look
48. Use a bay window for storage and seating
49. Go for contemporary grey
50. Embrace symmetry
51. Decorate in a neutral palette
52. Pick a palette of primary colors
53. Add an unexpected twist
54. Create a conversation area
55. Introduce an artistic touch with a painterly mural
How should I decorate my living room?
Which color is best for a living room?
Which colors make a living room look bigger?
Useful links
BodyLiving room ideas – 55 ways to decorate and furnish your space, beautifully Whether you are looking for living room ideas that are classic and smart, or contemporary and laid-back, you'll find plenty of inspiration here Sign up to our newsletter Newsletter (Image credit: Future) By Jennifer Ebert published 14 July 21 Our selection of the very best living room ideas includes elegant classic and contemporary schemes to suit every home's style – and we have included a ton of added-value design advice, too.So whether your living room design is expansive, open-plan, a shared home office space or on the compact side, there are looks to suit. Plus, of course, we have catered to a wide variety of styles, color preferences, and budgets, and, as ever, there are ideas you can adopt quickly – and whole-renovation inspiration.Living room ideas. These are our favorite living room ideas and we've added in-depth advice from well-known designers and our own team of experts, too, so that you know how to design a living room with aplomb.1. Embrace the trend for reimagined ditsy florals. (Image credit: Polly Wreford / Claudia Bryant)This minimal living room from one of H&G's decorating shoots is brought to life with a fabulously vibrant twist on traditional chintz – perfect country living room ideas when you want a more contemporary feel. The neutral backdrop allows for the bright, colorful textile pattern to take center-stage. The simple lines of the elegant, contemporary sofa have been covered with this glorious Spring Garden textile design for a heavenly pairing. The pink kilim, artwork and co-ordinating cushions all help to pull the scheme together for a modern twist on a classic look. 2. Layer color on color for a warm, welcoming space. (Image credit: Assignment / Polly Wreford / Claudia Bryant)A harmonious and joyful living room has been created using the colors in the rug as the center point, pulling tones out to feature within the scheme. Muted pink walls offer just the right background palette and work well set against the crisp whites, which are key in the mix to offer breathing space amid all the color. Shapely furniture in warm hues is layered alongside a classic sofa in chalky white linen, punctuated with accessories in jewel brights.3. Mix and match green and white for a fresh living room scheme. (Image credit: Future / Jan Baldwin / Katrin Cargill)Gathering a few two-tone prints in a similar palette helps to keep a scheme feeling cohesive. So even with lots of different pattern, the colors help all the diverse elements to sit together happily. The pattern mix here include the Anna French lampshade fabric, Schumacher curtains and plump Rapture & Wright seat cushions. Botanical artworks compliment the textiles and add to the country feel. Clean white walls and white pieces such as the lamp and side table ensure the space feels modern, light and airy - useful if you're looking for small living room ideas. Natural materials, as seen here with the wood console and woven rattan chair, are an essential part of any modern country look, and help to add warmth and an organic softness to the scheme. 4. Choose a bold wallpaper for an impactful space. (Image credit: John Lewis)If maximalism is your thing, bold wallpaper ideas, like the one in this living room by John Lewis, are a good way to create a space that feels eclectic, lively and fun. Choosing a pale green or blue for a maximalist design is a good choice for a living space – it will tone down the effect of the pattern to create an overall much calmer feel. 5. Choose earthy tones for an enveloping feel. (Image credit: Zinc Textile)How we love the terracotta tones of this living room, which has been created with a Zinc Textile x Martin Hulbert Design collaboration. Plaster-effect walls combine with dark wood to conjure up a desert-home feel that's really appealing. The low-slung sofa is a clever trick designers use to make rooms seem loftier. 6. Warm up a monotone scheme with wood. (Image credit: Katie Charlotte Photography/Cortney Bishop)South Carolina-based interior designer Cortney Bishop is known for her modern design vision that runs the gamut of style and structure, balancing comfort with creativity and functionality. She brings this to the living rooms she designs by combining neutrals with a ton of wood textures, which make the spaces feel easy to live with, airy and bright, but warm and welcoming, too. Here, the wooden ceiling is the star of the show, subtly echoed below by the warm tones in the furniture and soft furnishings.7. Plan the layout to the last inch. (Image credit: Mariell Lind Hansen/Studio Duggan)UK-based designer Tiffany Duggan of Studio Duggan believes careful planning is all-important when it comes to design – and since living rooms are quite literally the center of our homes, it's all the more important.'Measure and plan where you are going to put each piece of furniture and make sure you have sockets in all the right places before you get decorating or ordering,' she says.8. Divide a living room to suit your daily routines. (Image credit: Studio Peake/Alexander James)Where once living rooms were somewhere we watched TV in the evenings, they're now invariably sitting rooms, homework studies for kids, home offices for adults and, of course, movie rooms – which is why searches for broken plan living rooms are rising sharply.So how to pack this all into one space? If yours is a long living room you can divide it semi-permanently without closing off an area of the room entirely. The smartest, most permanent way to do so is with a wall of glazing, as above, which can include doors – allowing family members some time apart to pursue different activities, while keeping the room feeling spacious and open.9. Create a welcoming space with a ton of texture. (Image credit: Rikki Snyder / Becca Interiors)If you are looking for long living room ideas that make cold and disunited spaces feel more cohesive and welcoming, look to this room. ots of texture in furnishings, furniture and even wall surfaces and flooring, can make the space feel more cohesive and warmer. In the living room picture above, the rug is the dominant textural feature in the room, echoed by the material the blinds are made from and the various pieces of wooden or wicker furniture. The effect is heightened and complemented by the texture of the wall panels.10. Use furniture scaling to exaggerate a living room's proportions. (Image credit: Sarah Shields Photography / Whittney Parkinson Design)If your living room has low ceilings – or you want to make a living rooms ceilings feel taller than they are – picking a low-slung couch for a small living room is a simple way to make the room feel taller. Note, too, low furniture creates a much more relaxed living room, while taller furniture or high-backed seating creates a more formal feel.11. Enliven a plain scheme with bold artwork. (Image credit: Future / Paul Raeside)Whether you are considering a quick living room update or are looking for ideas for creating a focal point, artwork is an excellent option. 'Knowing the ambiance you are aiming to achieve in your living room helps,' advises Federica Barretta Director of Opera Gallery London. 'Consider the architectural features of the room you are buying for, from ceiling height to the color scheme and lighting, when choosing a work of art. Living rooms are where the family gets together and where guests are entertained, making them the best places to showcase the richness and eclecticism of one’s art collection.'12. Rely on metallics for living room glamor. (Image credit: Future / Paul Raeside)Metallics in a living room needn't be limited to hard surfaces such as light fittings and furniture – upholstery or curtain fabric with a shimmering finish can also bring glamor and enliven an otherwise neutral space.'Velvet is extraordinarily hard-wearing fabric,' says Homes & Gardens Editor in Chief, Lucy Searle. 'I inherited a sofa from my parents that they bought in the 1970s. It is a classic velvet piece with a strong, sculptural frame, and the fabric looks as good as it did when they bought it. If you are considering living room seating ideas, know that a well-cared for velvet sofa will still look fabulous in decades to come.'13. Mix motifs but keep the scheme simple. (Image credit: Future / Chris Everard)Monochromatic color schemes are very restful. Using a variety of motifs in one hue and keeping pattern to the upholstery, while walls and floors remain plain, brings depth to a scheme without it feeling too busy. In this room, a striking wave design on the sofa offers a contrast to the more subtle prints elsewhere.14. Create an accent wall with art. (Image credit: Future / Emma Lee)Looking for accent wall ideas to give your living room focus? If you are considering a display of artwork in a living room, one way to really make it shine is by painting the wall behind it a bold shade that's a total contrast to the colors within the pictures or paintings. This series of foliage prints set against a vibrant emerald-green wall offers a very modern take on the botanical theme. Sparse accessories and the clean lines of the furniture add to the contemporary flavor of the space.15. Highlight original features with paint. (Image credit: Future / Damian Russell)Just a few simple living room paint ideas can transform a neutral living space into one that's really quite special.Here, the black-painted window frame and original shutters provides both a contrast to the walls of the room and creates a frame for the deep emerald green sofa, drawing the eye for a dramatic focal point.  The lustre of brass elements shine brightly when set against a calm backdrop of cool greys, too. 16. Pick a subtle mural to add definition to a plain room. (Image credit: Future / Jake Curtis)Intriguing and subtle, this architectural mural adds a lighter decorative touch to this scheme in which neutral, muted furnishings allow it to take center stage. A ledge of rustic wood echoes the horizontal lines of the print and creates display space for elegant accessories. 17. Make a dark living room feel instantly summery. (Image credit: Future / Polly Wreford)If your living room is north- or east-facing, or if it lacks natural daylight, your choice of decor can change its mood dramatically. This is where green living room ideas can come in useful: it's a transformative color that can connect indoors with outdoors, and make a room feel brighter and more cheerful, even when the tones you choose are quite subtle or elegant. This trellis wallpaper speaks of blissful summer days in the garden. Working geometric motifs into the scheme gives the finished look a modern edge.18. Layer natural tones on natural tones for a calm appeal. (Image credit: Future / Davide Lovatti)Mixing elegantly crafted contemporary pieces with a serene palette of materials and hues gathered from nature will create calming interiors with a focus on the finer details. A timeless living room colour scheme offers respite from the whirlwind of modern life – and with the neutral elements in place, it is easy to play with the balance of your palette as seasons change.19. Enliven an all white scheme with clever accessorizing. (Image credit: Future / Simon Bevan)A black cane sofa arranged with palm leaf-motif cushions against plain ochre linen lends an elegant exotic feel to a classic scheme – and it's a look that you can create quickly, and update again by simply swapping out the cushions. Dark wood flooring and a table of leafy plants complete the look.20. Pick mismatched chairs for a relaxed look. (Image credit: Future / Emma Lee)Don't feel you always have to match everything – in fact, a mismatch can be charming if the colors you use complement each other. Simple utility is given a light and pretty dimension with horticulturally themed decorative flourishes and happily mismatched pattern in schemes that embody relaxed charm.21. Use checks for a smart update. (Image credit: Future / Paul Raeside)This smart living room scheme, which mixes different-sized checks on upholstery, blinds and cushions in a dashing combination of black, white and yellow, gives traditional gingham a refreshing contemporary twist.22. Focus on flooring . (Image credit: Future / Paul Raeside)Flooring sets the scene, so it is a very important starting point for a living room design. ‘Usually, I begin thinking about the hall floor,’ remarks Sean Cochran, creative director, Cochrane Design. ‘For instance, if I’ve used straight wooden boards along the length of the hall, I might use parquet in the same tone and finish in the living room.’ We have seen a resurgence of interest in wood flooring, so there are now all kinds of parquet styles, extra-wide boards and different finishes available.23. Design a picture perfect living room. (Image credit: Future / Davide Lovatti)Yellow living room ideas can be really elegant if you combine them with antique pieces and traditional furniture, arranged in considered fashion around a central coffee table to create a classic look. The grand proportions of the room are accentuated by the series of prints hung symmetrically across one entire wall, adding both personality and color to the scheme.24. Instil purity in your space. (Image credit: Future / Damian Russell)Go back to basics with neutral living room ideas. Alongside all the clamour of color, pattern and shape in current interior design, there’s a quieter story of considered, understated forms and textures at their finest. Dress your scheme with simple linen or silk, sleek metal, rich wood and polished stone to bring an elegance and timelessness to interiors, placing them above and beyond seasonal fads. Here polished concrete flooring offers a smooth, subdued contrast to organic-shaped furnishings, while a smart grasscloth wall covering lets dramatic artwork do the talking.25. Add an element of light elegance. (Image credit: Future / Jonathan Gooch)An antique Persian rug defines the seating areas in this living room. The rich colours of the rug and traditional armchairs add warmth, their formality offset by comfortable couches covered in natural linen to introduce a lighter mood. Furniture is symmetrically placed to create a balanced look, while the eye is drawn to the focal point fireplace in this cozy living room.26. Create interest through scale and texture. (Image credit: Rapture & Wright)‘Pattern is a great way to introduce character to a room,’ explains Bunny Turner, interior designer, Turner Pocock. It can be used to define a space and change the tone of different areas. ‘For example, you might want a bolder pattern on upholstery in a formal living area with a constant pattern used in an adjacent snug.’ The key is to start with a fabric that has a striking pattern featuring more than three colors. From that fabric choose the colors to be used in the scheme, then select a combination of designed in that palette, perhaps a stripe, a geometric, a floral and a textural option such as a coarse linen or herringbone.27. Create a wall feature. (Image credit: Future)The space above the couch itself can often be forgotten, but it needs just as much attention as other areas. Choose prints that coordinate with the overall scheme of the room and hang in an assortment of matchings frames. Group in odd numbers to create harmony and visual interest, or play around with a symmetrical look to create balance.28. Make a statement. (Image credit: Future / Brent Darby)Go bold and inject color with a mix of textures and prints. If you’ve got a plain backdrop, opt for a vibrant couch, such as a shade of striking blue, and dress it with a collection of contrasting cushions for a real visual feast. And don’t neglect the area under your feet – add a patterned rug to anchor the space.29. Invest in a rug underfoot. (Image credit: Future / Richard Powers)A tactile rug on top of a wood floor adds a layer of interest and comfort to a living room. Choose a large rug, so you can position all the furniture on it, rather than half-on, half-off, which is distracting. In a large open-plan room, a rug can define the seating area. If there is a signature piece of furniture, for example a blue chair, pick a rug with an accent of blue to make the chair stand out.30. Let the light in. (Image credit: Future / Adrian Briscoe)A refined palette or soft colors and pared-back style give this modern family living area its bright, uncluttered feels. Scandinavian-inspired furniture accentuates the light mood of this design. Note the color punch supplied by accessories and wall art and the way the patterned rug adds interest and warmth to the room. The main purpose of Scandinavian design is to improve daily life. Furniture is therefore not only about stylish elegance, but also about functionality – it should serve a purpose and stand the test of time.31. Use lighting for dramatic effect. (Image credit: Future / Davide Lovatti)Chandeliers and pendants are popular living room lighting ideas for dramatic effect, but they don’t need to be in the center of a room. Try hanging a pendant low over a desk or table, or perhaps three blown-glass spheres suspended at different heights in a corner. Using a pendant is an unusual way can add a fun layer to your lighting scheme.32. Pick a stand-out piece of furniture. (Image credit: Future)Just a single piece of furniture can transform a living room scheme. It needn't be as bold as the sideboard above – it may be shapely, from a contrasting period (think mid-century in an otherwise country-style space) or it may be its proportions. Or, to look at it a different way, it may be that you can add a single, boldly colored piece that's an utter contrast to your living room paint ideas. This will require some bravery, experimentation, and a willingness to admit when you have got it wrong.33. Keep it neat and tidy. (Image credit: Future / Paul Raeside)Modern life requires that the main room of the home fulfil a multitude or functions, so well-planned storage is key when designing and planning a living room. Good storage is essential in a family room, and this shelving unit provides generous space for displaying favourite objects, books and photographs, while built-in cupboards and drawers conceal DVDs, games and AV equipment.34. Make a feature out of a monochrome scheme. (Image credit: Future / Michael Sinclair)Black and white is ideal for a living space, where you can really go to town with pattern, texture and prints. If a white sofa isn’t practical, then choose a design in charcoal or pewter and layer with throws and cushions in various muted black and white. Plenty of black and white prints and an eye-catching pouffe or rug will make a statement, and you can always soften the look with pale tones of grey, beige or creamy whites.35. Let the floor do the talking. (Image credit: Future)Introduce pattern and natural character to the home with an ever-popular wood floor. Wood remains an enduring choice for interiors and is wonderfully versatile. An intricately laid parquet combining marquetry and parquetry demonstrates the highest level of craftsmanship in this living room by architectural and interior design company, Point 3 Design. Take a light-touch approach with other aspects of the decorating and keep the rest of the scheme neutral to focus the eyes.36. Take inspiration from nature. (Image credit: Studio Ashby)Interior designer Sophie Ashby reveals that nature provided the inspiration for this scheme’s welcoming, earthy palette. This is quite a grown-up room, and the seating arrangement reflects this, with a pair of bespoke, classic couches in a sage-green velvet, teamed with a tan daybed. ‘The palette was inspired by Holland Park in London and features neutral colours: greens, blues, russets, oranges and yellows,’ says Sophie. ‘We started with the rug, which we designed as an ode to the park, incorporating peacock feathers as well as leaf motifs.’37. Unite classic with contemporary elements. (Image credit: Bando / Simon Upton)Katie Harbison of property development and design studio Banda achieves an elegant mix of modern and mid-century modern living room design in this room. Allow the room’s beautiful proportions and original mouldings to shine by keeping the backdrop neutral. ‘Walls are painted in a subtle grey and the floor is a natural oak, topped with a silky grey rug,’ explains Katie. The sofa’s rounded shape almost embraces the angular coffee table by artist Thomas Markunpoika. Every piece in the room is individual, but together they create a sense of harmony, thanks to their natural colors and subtle textural interest.38. Pick a single stand-out accent fabric. (Image credit: Future / Emma Lee / Sally Denning)A plain room can look utterly different if you add in some brave upholstery – here, an otherwise neutral living space has been given a touch of classic glamor with upholstery in broad stripes. Decorating with stripes like this can also play with a room's proportions – putting them vertically on upright chairs will make the chairs look taller and narrower, creating a subtle focal point in the room.39. Be sympathetic to the age of your property. (Image credit: Cleveland)Work with the age of your home to create a sympathetic design that is both timeless and stylish. To reflect the age of the property, interior design company Sigmar used traditional grey for the walls, providing a contemporary note with pale-green doors and woodwork. A stronger color was added with green Kaare Klint Safari chairs and cushions in sea blue tones to create a calm but edgy look. ‘This space was stripped of its Victorian details in the 1960s,’ says designer Ebba Thott. ‘We reinstated cornicing and deep skirting boards, raising the door frames to celebrate the ceiling height.’40. Give florals a modern twist. (Image credit: Future / Chris Everard)Use the latest foliage and floral motifs to bring uplifting color and decorative interest to a living room. Pair botanicals with dramatically dark walls to give a surprising contemporary twist to a traditional look. Use vibrantly colored upholstery to add further layers of richness.41. Decorate with a sea of blue. (Image credit: Future / Emma Lee)Breathe new life into the classic coastal look with a breezy palette of blues, from soft shades of pale through to denim, teal and Breton navy, all complemented by pops of vibrant red. Opting for bold, block color, such as azure, denim or sapphire, on upholstery and in rugs allows depth to be added with pattern. In this blue living room, a fine ticking stripe and geometric print fabrics provide lively highlights that catch the eye.42. Mix and match materials. (Image credit: Future / Simon Bevan)Accents of chalky terracotta, brown and duck egg blue combine beautifully to bring depth to this scheme’s neutral base. Incorporate accessories in a variety of materials, including glass, metal, ceramic and wood, to create a modern look. Soften the scheme with plush upholstery fabrics, which enhance the feel of understated luxury.43. Introduce wood for warmth. (Image credit: Champalimaud)If you're looking for living room ideas for a cool space – perhaps one served by north- or east-facing windows that only deliver morning daylight, if at all – it is a wise idea to add warmth to the room with structural materials. You can do this with a wooden floor, wood-panelled walls or wooden ceilings.Or, of course you can simply add warmth with wooden furniture and complementing colors and textures in other furnishings.This gorgeous room is by Champalimaud Design in New York.44. Furnish wisely around statement lighting. (Image credit: Natalia Miyar)If you are picking out statement living room lighting for a room that doesn't have really high ceilings, ensure your furniture – particularly the coffee table and seating grouped on an area rug beneath the lighting – is low-slung. This will allow the room to breathe and for the lighting to be a focal point without the space feeling crowded.'Do not be afraid to play with scale when it comes to bespoke statement lighting,' says Natalia Miyar, an LA-based interior architect and designer, who designed the room above. 'There are some wonderful high street options available if you do not have the budget to commission something bespoke. My advice is to not play too safe and use this as an opportunity to have a little fun.'Architectural lighting is a lighting solution that designers also use to light dark areas, surfaces and to highlight a room's structure. 'Think of the angles in the room and how to light them,' continues Natalia Miyar. 'What you want to achieve is a range of light sources, light should be emitted from various points of the room and at different levels.'45. Pick a dark wall color – but add touches of light and warmth. (Image credit: Stefani Stein)Stefani Stein, who runs an interior design studio in LA, specializes in room schemes that are easy to live with but which still create impact. This dark living room above typifies her approach – drama in the contrasts, curvaceous furniture that's modern but welcoming and a really traditional feel, despite the modern approach. If, like Stefani, you wish to use a dark color on your walls to create a cozy, intimate feel, be sure to balance out the darker shades with pale colors, seen here on the sofas, the floor and at the windows – and add a touch of warmth with accent colors in furniture and accessories.46. Pick an eclectic combination for a welcoming living room. (Image credit: Kelling Designs)London-based interior design studio Kelling Designs love to design rooms that waver between elegance and practicality – and we think this living room encapsulates that perfectly. The eclectic mix of patterns are perfect for weathering busy family life, while adding color, interest and – importantly – warmth to the space. The use of contrasting patterns work because the color palette is complementary, with each subordinate to the couch. 47. Go for a calm, pared-back look. (Image credit: Future / Michael Sinclair)Featuring beautifully crafted pieces with cleaner lines than their rustic cousins, this season's take on country style shows perennial favorites in an elegant new light. For a pared-back, minimalist living room scheme, upholstered furniture should have a simple silhouette and minimal detailing. To achieve this look, opt for a neat sofa in a plain linen with no buttoning, while loose covers can be made for existing armchairs. Hints of subtle pattern and color can be introduced with soft furnishings.48. Use a bay window for storage and seating. (Image credit: Future / Jon Day)Inspired by the timber-clad summerhouses of Scandinavia and New England, this relaxed decorating scheme, which echoes the delicate shades of nature, has been designed to blur the boundary between indoors and out. Better still? The window seat provides a pretty focal point, can hide storage beneath a hidden, lift-up lid, and is a wonderful place to perch.49. Go for contemporary grey. (Image credit: Future/Polly Wreford)'Grey living room ideas' is one of the most searched for phrases online – but many grey living rooms are really just a whisper away from neutral or beige living rooms, so pale are they. If you want to create a dramatic scheme that's cozy at night, a deep, contemporary grey like the one in this room is a bold but rewarding move.Be sure to add warmth to the scheme with hotter colors, but choose them to match the depth of the grey so that the look remains modern and so that they can stand up to the grey.50. Embrace symmetry. (Image credit: De Rosee SA)Symmetry in interior design is usually introduced to create a balanced, calm space that's perfect for a living room that you want as a retreat. The simplest way to create symmetry is around a fireplace, but you can use a large piece of furniture with matching side tables and lamps for the same effect. 51. Decorate in a neutral palette . (Image credit: Future / Paul Raeside)The search for the ideal neutral is not as easy as it would initially appear. Pure whites can often be too stark, while trying to warm it up means possibly straying into magnolia territory. The color wheel is your oyster when it comes to choosing accompanying shades. For a soothing feel, sage or olive are perfect partners, soft browns and whites add elegance, while dusky pinks add subtle vibrancy. Here, a nature-inspired palette of cool neutrals provides a beautiful backdrop to a host of raw materials, delicate texture and lush greenery.52. Pick a palette of primary colors. (Image credit: Future / Emma Lee / Sally Denning)One or two primary colors against a muted palette has an artistic edge. If you are too nervous to go all-out with a primary palette – a single vase or key piece of furniture will suffice.53. Add an unexpected twist . (Image credit: Future / Chris Everard / Alyce Taylor)Inspired by carnival in Rio, we are transported to warmer climes with these bohemian living room ideas. Feel the heat with a warming palette of earthy red, spicy coral and sandy yellow mixed with a riot of pattern. A plain curtain fabric is brought to life with a vibrant pattern on the reverse. Set against a warm neutral stone backdrop, the warm tones used throughout are layered up for maximum impact, from the curtain fabrics with trim pelmet above, to the pattern-rich sofa, cushions and rug. All the colors and pattern make for a happy and uplifting combination. 54. Create a conversation area. (Image credit: Jojo Bradley Interior Design)To give your country living room an atmosphere of warmth and welcome, arrange seating to make conversation – not the TV – the focus.'In this room, the armchairs and sofas face each other across an upholstered ottoman, on which a tray of drinks or afternoon tea could be placed,' says interior designer Jojo Bradley. 'The comfortable furniture is softened further with cushions that invite you to relax and settle in for a while.'This type of furniture arrangement works really well for small or larger groups, too. The pair of armchairs with their own side table provide an area for two people to sit and talk together, while the sofas provide additional seating when crowds gather.55. Introduce an artistic touch with a painterly mural. (Image credit: Future / Chris Everard / Alyce Taylor)Meandering florals and block-printed patterns are paired with rattans and jewel-like teals for a living scene with a Far East twist – it’s like a gentle stroll through serene Japanese gardens. Warm and cool tones work well together, as here with the contrast of the cool teal blues of the coffee table and sofa, upholstered in rich velvet, set against the rich earthy reds of the wallpaper panel and painted cabinet.How should I decorate my living room? . A good starting point for decorating a living room is to think about how many people you need to fit in your space on a regular basis. This will help you to choose the right living room furniture and living room storage.Your floor plan should consider the room’s layout from a social and practical point of view. Plan seating in groups to ensure conversation flows when you have guests and consider scale and how different pieces will sit together. Seating heights vary so balance is key, but make sure guests are seated at the same level. 'Not everything has to be two-by-two when it comes to layout,' says interior designer Nina Campbell. 'By combining different styles, colors and finishes you will create an effortlessly eclectic look.''Do put together a measured plan of your living room before buying new pieces of furniture to understand the sizes you require,' explains Emma Sims Hilditch, interior designer at Sims-Hilditch. 'That way you will avoid making expensive mistakes.'In terms of color, your living room should reflect how you want to feel in that space. It is the room in which you will spend the most time in, so it is important to get it right.Which color is best for a living room?This is very subjective as it’s all about personal taste, along which item you want to build the room around. Whether that be a piece of art, a rug, or a textile. The key thing is to pick out the highlight color to enhance the best of the centerpiece.Creating color schemes is always fun and you might be surprised to know you’re not limited with colors for small rooms. 'Pale neutrals are the obvious choice to encourage the illusion of space. For a cool, stylish look, opt for light greys,' explain the experts at Dulux. 'To imbue a sense of warmth with the light and airy feel of white, try an off-white palette.' When you pair pale neutral walls with furniture in a similar color palette, you’ll create the impression of open and seamless space.Alternatively, painting a room in dark colors creates the perception of depth, therefore hiding the fact that it’s so small. Consider a feature wall in a deep grey with accent colors of purple or yellow. Rich blue tones, like sapphire and indigo provide a soothing appeal, along with depth.Which colors make a living room look bigger?'White and neutral shades are always the go-to color as they make a room look bigger, airier, and more open,' says David Harris, Design Director at Andrew Martin. 'However, for small space living, you can be more daring. Don’t be afraid of dark and rich colors, like coffee or dark grey, such as or try teal or even orange, for a braver burst of color.' These hues bring richness, intimacy and extra depth whilst allowing you to show personality and flair. Layering these deep rich colors with artwork also adds fantastic texture and interest. Jennifer Ebert Jennifer is the Digital Editor at Homes & Gardens. Having worked in the interiors industry for a number of years, spanning many publications, she now hones her digital prowess on the 'best interiors website' in the world. Multi-skilled, Jennifer has worked in PR and marketing, and the occasional dabble in the social media, commercial and e-commerce space.  Over the years, she has written about every area of the home, from compiling design houses from some of the best interior designers in the world to sourcing celebrity homes, reviewing appliances and even the odd news story or two. Latest Organizing kitchen cabinets – 10 ways to arrange essentials efficiently Adopt these tricks to organize kitchen cabinets and bring convenience to your cooking space By Sarah Warwick • Published 6 January 22 Best immersion blender 2022: hand blenders for winter soups Featuring KitchenAid, Breville, Vitamix, and Braun, here are the best immersion blenders you can buy to make tasty smoothies and delicious creamy soups By Millie Fender • Published 6 January 22 Useful links. Advice. How to design a kitchen How to design a bathroom How to design a patio Interior design: advice and tips How to clean a washing machine Pictures. Living room ideas Bedroom ideas Kitchen ideas Bathroom ideas Backyard ideas Buying Guides. Best mattress Best cordless vacuum cleaners Best pillows Best coffee makers Best blenders logo/HAG_logo Created with Sketch. about us Advertise with us Contact us Terms and conditions Privacy policy Cookies policy Homes & Gardens is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site. © Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA. All rights reserved. England and Wales company registration number 2008885.
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TitleHow to Decorate a Living Room in 7 Simple Steps
Urlhttps://www.thespruce.com/beginners-guide-decorating-living-rooms-2213483
DescriptionFollow these seven steps to create the living room of your dreams. Designers share tips to take into account when it comes to planning out this space
Date19 Oct 2021
Organic Position10
H1How to Decorate a Living Room in 7 Steps
H2Measure Your Space
Establish Your Intentions
Focus In On Your Aesthetic
Make a "Room Board"
Get Shopping
Address Your Walls
Don't Forget About Greenery
H3Meet the Expert
H2WithAnchorsMeasure Your Space
Establish Your Intentions
Focus In On Your Aesthetic
Make a "Room Board"
Get Shopping
Address Your Walls
Don't Forget About Greenery
BodyHow to Decorate a Living Room in 7 Steps By Sarah Lyon Sarah Lyon Sarah Lyon is a freelance writer and home decor enthusiast, who enjoys sharing good finds on home items. Since 2018, she has contributed to a variety of lifestyle publications, including Apartment Therapy and Architectural Digest. Learn more about The Spruce's Editorial Process Updated on 10/19/21 Pin Share Email Chris Bradley for M. Lavender Interiors While the process of decorating a space as large as your living room may feel daunting, designing a space that will appeal to you and your family both in terms of form and function is easier than you may think. We spoke with experts who outlined the seven steps one must keep in mind when planning out a living room concept. Read on for their pro tips. Meet the Expert. Rozit Arditi is a designer and the founder of Arditi Design. Mia Jung is the director of interiors at Ike Kligerman Barkley. Mark Lavender is the principal designer at M. Lavender Interiors. Kate Lester is a designer and the founder of Kate Lester Interiors. Tracy Morris is a designer and the founder of Tracy Morris Design. 01 of 07 Measure Your Space . The Spruce / Michelle Becker  Before you can make any drastic decisions about decorating your living space, you'll want to have an accurate sense of its square footage. After all, designer Kate Lester notes, "Proper measurements will ensure you select the correct size rug, furnishings, and window treatments." And keep in mind that doing your due diligence ahead of time will save you both time and money—ordering and returning furniture and accessories because they don't fit into a space as you had hoped can be a hassle! 02 of 07 Establish Your Intentions . The Spruce / Michelle Becker Determining the way in wish you wish to, well, live in your living room will significantly shape the decorating process. "It is critical to fully understand how you want to use your space before you begin the design process," designer Mark Lavender states. However, there is no one-size-fits-all use for a living area. "Personally, I knew our living room was meant for conversation and reading," designer Tracy Morris says of her own space. "So, I placed the furniture in a grouping that allowed maximum conversation and allowed me to read by the window." In other spaces, existing fixtures such as a fireplace or built-in shelving may affect the furniture arrangement from the get-go and ease the decision-making process. It's critical to be realistic about your intentions for the space, too, and not just base your design off of what you see in high-end design publications. "Make sure the room reflects you and your lifestyle—whatever your needs are at the time, make sure the room serves for that," designer Rozit Arditi states. "If you have kids, you do not need a glass coffee table or too many floor lamps that could be tripping hazards. Opt for a wood table and wall sconces instead." 03 of 07 Focus In On Your Aesthetic . The Spruce / Letícia Almeida Asks Lester, "Are you feeling modern farmhouse vibes, or more romantic and feminine?" Of course, it may be challenging to determine the direction that you wish to take with your living room design if you find yourself swooning over many types of decor styles. There's no need to commit solely to one particular look, but establishing a general scheme is important. "The space doesn’t have to be a total theme party, but determining and overall design direction will help when narrowing down selections for the space," Lester says. Upon making this decision comes the fun part—turning to favorite resources for inspiration. Lester enjoys looking through design books, magazines, or Pinterest. "I like to have at least 10 images that help inspire a room design," she offers. 04 of 07 Make a "Room Board" . Chris Bradley for M. Lavender Interiors Before grabbing your wallet, you'll want to consider how your ideal furniture pieces will function in a space. "Gather images of the pieces you intend to use and make a small 'room board,'" Lester suggests. "See how all of the pieces interact with each other and play off of one another before you get them home." You may find yourself catching key mistakes—far before they're too late to fix, fortunately. "Oftentimes, this is when we see that we have pulled too many items with the same leg style or that a rug pattern may be competing with a drapery fabric," Lester explains. "It’s a great way to make simple changes and swaps and fine-tune the look before you place the final order!" Continue to 5 of 7 below. 05 of 07 Get Shopping . Greg Powers for Tracy Morris Given that furniture can be quite pricey, you may wish to spread out your purchases over time. If you're not sure what to buy first, think big—literally. "Start with the larger pieces to ground the room, like the sofa or the area rug, and build from there," Arditi says. Arditi offers another key piece of advice, for buying sofas: "Always invest in the best sofa you can afford at the time," she comments. "We spend so much time in our living rooms and most of that time is spent on the sofa—make sure it is the most comfortable and the best one you can get. You won't regret it." 06 of 07 Address Your Walls . Michael Hunter for Kim Armstrong Design By no means should the walls be left blank, either. Wall decor is essential. "Walls are always a great opportunity to add more character to the room," Arditi comments. Adds Lavender, "Artwork, pillows, and decorative items always act as the jewelry for the room. These pieces really add that next layer of panache to the space.” Not sure what to hang? "Either a large piece of art—or a gallery wall, depending on your style—or a mirror to reflect the sunlight through the room are always great ways to decorate," Arditi adds. You can always go the secondhand route, too, to source an artifact that will make your living room truly shine, notes Mia Jung, director of interiors at Ike Kligerman Barkley. "Having a special vintage or an antique piece and art will set it apart from the family room," she states. 07 of 07 Don't Forget About Greenery . Kate Lester Interiors According to Arditi, plants make for the perfect finishing touch in any living room. "If you are tight on budget or live in a rental where you cannot invest much in your decoration, make sure to get some plants," she encourages. "The greenery adds life and freshness to any room without breaking the bank." Featured Video 10 Must-Have Apps for Serious Interior Design Read More How to Add Texture to a Room These Are the Least Popular Colors to Decorate With Right Now 8 Living Room Trends We Can’t Wait to See in 2022 Japanese Designers Share Tips For Adapting Japanese Style At Home 58 Living Room Ideas That Will Make You Want to Stay In 51 Ways To Make Your Mantel Look Stylish All Year Long Designers Explain How To Make 2021 Trends Fresh Next Year 12 Actually Tasteful Ways to Hop on the Neon Decor Trend 21 Beautiful Ways to Decorate the Living Room for Christmas Here's What You Should Know About Midcentury Modern Style Ideas for Decorating a Long and Narrow Living Room 9 Kitchen Decorating Trends We'll See Everywhere In 2022 What’s the Difference Between a Living Room and a Drawing Room? Traditional Living Rooms That Will Stand the Test of Time 35 Family Room Ideas That Are Perfect for Hanging Out How to Design a Room, in 12 Easy Steps
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TitleVirtual home makeover: testing Modsy, Havenly, Ikea on my NYC apartment - The Verge
Urlhttps://www.theverge.com/2019/8/9/20798453/modsy-havenly-ikea-roomstyler-e-interior-design-services-review-virtual-home-redecoration
DescriptionE-interior design services promise to make over your home with minimal effort, so we put Havenly, Modsy, Ikea AR, and Roomstyler to the test in a New York City apartment
Date9 Aug 2019
Organic Position11
H1I let strangers design my apartment
H2Share this story
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The QuietOn 3 earbuds use ANC to help you sleep
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BodyI let strangers design my apartment If you hate redecorating, make someone else do it for you By Natt [email protected] Aug 9, 2019, 11:02am EDT If you buy something from a Verge link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics statement. Share this story. Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share All sharing options Share All sharing options for: I let strangers design my apartment . Linkedin Reddit Pocket Flipboard Email Some people have the ability to walk into a furniture store and pick out various pieces of housewares that appear seemingly mismatched but somehow work perfectly together when placed in a room. I am not one of those people. I moved in June and decided that after years of having a sloppily put together 20-something’s apartment, I was ready for something that felt more composed and intentional. If I wanted to fake being an adult, at the very least I could try to have an adult-looking apartment, right? Faced with this task, I looked to e-interior design services for help. You may have seen ads about them in your inbox, Instagram, or on flyers at your local big brand furniture store. These services promise to make revamping your home as easy as a few clicks on a computer, so I put a few of them to the test to see if paying someone to restyle your house is worth the investment. Control. For the project, my boyfriend and I were willing to invest up to $3,000 on new furnishings and art (about a fourth of that budget I anticipate to make back in selling furniture we’re replacing). Our small (but reasonably sizable, for New York City) apartment needed the most work in the living / dining room, which is open to the kitchen. We cook at home a decent amount, but never have enough people over for a formal dining space. We do have friends over frequently to hang, drink, and play games, so we wanted the room to feel light, bright, and easy for multiple people to maneuver around. While we were flexible about furniture choices, we did have some pieces we wanted to keep, like the gray / wood armchair I dragged home through the streets of Brooklyn on my own in the middle of August. There was no way this thing’s going on Craigslist just yet. Naturally, there were some design challenges with the space itself. First, the apartment features steel floors, and we wanted a little bit of warmth to counter the industrial vibes. Second, we’re on the top floor, which has a sloped ceiling from the roof in the living room. Lastly, there is a brick feature wall that we cannot mount anything on, and it’s directly across from a west-facing window that could add glare to a TV. Keeping these factors in mind, I tried out four different services to see how our main space could be laid out. Roomstyler 3D Room Planner Trying to stretch as much of my budget as possible, I first tried a few free services for modeling my soon-to-be home. Some light Googling led me to Roomstyler, a 3D rendering tool for mocking up rooms and furnishing them with select furniture pieces from a catalog. This seemed like a good start for envisioning how we could lay out some of the items that would make the move with us. Before moving in, I took photos of the unit (old tenant’s things and all) and measured all the walls and windows. The tool lets you click and drag walls around to fit any irregularly shaped rooms, or specify wall length and height. You may not find exact matches for your home materials but you can get pretty close. There were no options for steel floors that I could find, for example, but dark grey brick replicated the feel. Choosing the wall colors and floor felt surprisingly zen until I got to the furniture layout portion. While you can choose any color under the sun to virtually paint your room, the furniture selection tool is super clunky to use. A search for sectionals offered up hundreds of results, but filtering by color suddenly slimmed the results down to one or two options, even though there were clearly pieces that fit what I wanted when I didn’t clarify color choice. Some categories would also randomly disappear. A look under home entertainment did not offer anything resembling at TV I could stick into the room for a visual, even if it wasn’t my exact model. And I couldn’t find a single art piece to place on the wall to create any kind of interest in the room. I got so tired of scrolling through options that I just plopped a couple of items in there to visualize the space. Eventually, I felt embarrassed by the duckling I’d created. The room looked as if I was trying to re-create a West Elm showroom by memory using only stuff I can get from a local Walmart. I had to move on. Use if you: Love to play The Sims. Don’t use if you: Actually want to style your real-life home and implement the design. Ikea Place Augmented reality furniture apps have become surprisingly common after Apple and Google made their mobile operating systems more AR-friendly in 2017. While there are plenty of apps on the market for placing furniture in your home, I decided to go with Ikea Place as it was one of the first furniture AR apps. Presumably, two years of existence might have given it some leverage over newer apps. Plus, there is an Ikea close to me, which would make the decoration process faster if we ended up with a layout we liked. My presumptions failed me. Ikea says it has thousands of items from its catalog on the free AR shopping app, but I could not find a single floating wall shelf to stick onto my wall for visuals, forcing me to resize a media console for effect. Like Roomstyler 3D, there was also a lack of art options as these tools mostly focused on large furniture items for rudimentary layouts. The problem with AR, too, is unless everything has been virtually placed, some items might not take foreground into effect. That left me with planters I couldn’t stick in a corner next to a media console, or chairs I couldn’t place behind a coffee table. Scale was also an issue, as each time I moved things up or down the items tended to dramatically shrink or expand, making it difficult to lay things out in a realistic way. Oh... dear. I applaud the folks working with AR to create interesting use cases, like on-location work training. But kitschy applications like this are just... not very fun to use? Holding my arm out for minutes on end gets tiring fast, especially when you have to browse through thousands of items just to find the one thing that might work in your space. Use if you: Are only trying to envision one or two items in a room at a time. Don’t use if you: Have a tendency to fling things (i.e, your smartphone) at a wall upon frustration. Havenly Fed up with free tools, I gave paid services a go. I was first introduced to e-interior design startup Havenly a few years ago at SXSW. The service promises to create a mood board, layout, and a shopping list to help make implementing the design easy — all under a flat rate instead of an hourly bill you might get with an in-person designer. (Havenly starts at $19 for a consultation, while the full experience is $169 for a bare room, with help on where to lay out each piece.) Havenly starts with a style quiz where you select photos of rooms you like and answer a few personality questions. You can select the level at which you want to be involved in the process, or say screw it and let your designer take the wheels. Then, you’re presented with a few color schemes and mood boards to rate, before you’re asked to upload photos of the room and any relevant inspiration pics. All this information allows Havenly to match you with an in-house designer that best suits your style and needs. If you’re impatient, here’s where the service might start to get annoying. Havenly has a modest group of designers it works with, which means if your aesthetic best matches someone who’s currently working on several projects, you might end up waiting a while until they can start yours (not unlike sought-after designers in real life). And once they finally get started, they’re going to start asking you more questions, with a day or two in between each response. I began my style quiz on April 19th and heard back from Cathrine, my paired designer, on April 28th. She gave me some initial mood boards on May 1st, and sent a revision on May 6th after I rated them on a four-star scale. You’re also able to rate individual pieces in the mood board so your designer knows what exactly in the room you love or hate. The first few mood boards felt like a good start, but as the process went on we continued to have the same feedback on tiny things, like coffee table and art choices. These two critiques took until May 13th to implement, with a final layout showing up on May 20th. One month is probably a reasonable timeline if you are working with a designer in real life, too. But the constant back-and-forth made things feel like they were particularly dragging, especially when we were just waiting for a new coffee table idea. Toward the end, I just accepted that this is the best we were going to do. I did like the multiple layout options our designer provided, the varying floor plans, and the unisex color scheme I hadn’t previously thought of. It also felt like everything in the design was within our budget, give or take a few key decorative pieces (the mirror and wall lamp felt less urgent than the sectional and media console, and doing without them for the time being did not lose the entire aesthetic). Use if you: Are willing to take the time to revise until you get what you want. Don’t use if you: Are impatient. Modsy Concurrent with Havenly, I also started a project on Modsy, a competing e-interior design tool. The main difference is that Modsy will also render a 3D version of your room which you can use to view multiple angles. The service also partners with several popular retailers so you can swap in a piece of furniture with something else from its catalog if you don’t like what the designer has created for you. Modsy starts similarly to Havenly, where you fill out a style quiz by picking photos of rooms you’re more drawn to, like or dislike pieces of furniture in the example designs you chose, and explain the goals of your project. Then you upload photos of your room to cover a 360-degree view. I was unable to get a good 360-degree angle of the room since the previous tenants were in the process of moving out, so using the few photos I had, I stitched them together in a super choppy way, alongside some images from the apartment’s real estate listing. Modsy somehow managed to take the mangled photo I slapped together and made a reasonably realistic render of the room, with only the floor color represented incorrectly. (This was later easily modified when we provided feedback.) I received the first batch of designs in about a week. While they were a great start, the designs felt a bit bare. It also felt like Modsy blew through my budget by suggesting not one, but two West Elm shelves in addition to a new sectional. Thankfully, it does partner with several retailers with 3D renders of their catalog available to you, so you can change out pieces you don’t love with something else. This was by far Modsy’s main advantage over other services. I could erase excess embellishments that I didn’t care for, or replace items with less expensive versions or a different color to change up the scheme. The renders also looked quite realistic, and gave me a lot of optimism for what the space could turn into. I particularly liked that Modsy imagined the second half of the room as a cafe-inspired dining area, as it could functionally turn into a workspace when I am working from home. (And maybe it’s because I am a Googleable figure, but after providing Modsy feedback that our household loves to travel, I couldn’t help but notice the JFK to Tokyo wall art in the back, clearly a nod to a previous video I did for The Verge.) Modsy also came to our rescue when we started unpacking our stuff and realized we had a lot more art than we thought, and didn’t know what to do with them. I sent the team photos of all our mismatched pieces of art and Modsy was able to render how to hang them on the wall in ways I wouldn’t have thought to do. In the end, our budget only allowed us to buy a few staple pieces that Modsy recommended. And while I loved what the designer created for the second half of our living room, currently I have repurposed this area as a review “room” for an upcoming gadget, so hopefully we’ll be able to see the dining area design through in a few months. In comparison with Havenly, Modsy starts at a higher price point at $69 for a slower turnaround time (seven to 14 days) and $149 for the base package for one room (five to 10 days). But the premium feels justifiable, giving you more flexibility to experiment on your own without necessarily waiting for the designer to send back a mockup. Still, though, it is clear that Modsy makes most of its money from referral purchases you make through its designs, and often you’ll get renders with a bunch of little pieces you might not want or need. Use if you: Are indecisive / need to see a lot of options before deciding on something. Don’t use if you: Need to stick to a strict budget. Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales While these services had their merits and disadvantages, if I had to go through the process again with another room, I would probably choose Modsy. For someone who lacks a design eye, it was helpful to see exactly how things were supposed to be placed. The catalog of items that you can swap in and out of your design also made it easy to try out a bunch of options in case the pieces Modsy picked didn’t work for you. That said, there is a personal flair to Havenly, too. You’re interacting directly with a human being, which gives you the chance to communicate exactly what you want. But if all this is too much work, then your best option is to go the old-school route of actually working with a real-life interior designer, who you can pay to do the work down to hanging up photos and laying out your rugs. Plus, it’s always nice to support local, independent artists when you can afford to. But as my former colleague Kaitlyn Tiffany says, life is expensive, and you have to pick your luxuries. If your home is your sanctuary, then do what you can to make it a place to be. Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. These do not influence editorial content, though Vox Media may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links. For more information, see our ethics policy. Reviews 8 great TikTok accounts from 2021 to follow . Reviews The QuietOn 3 earbuds use ANC to help you sleep. Gaming Here’s where you can buy a Nintendo Switch. View all stories in Reviews Share this story. Twitter Facebook
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Result 14
Title50 Modern Living Rooms That Act As Your Home's Centrepiece
Urlhttp://www.home-designing.com/modern-living-room-interior-design-ideas-inspiration-pictures
DescriptionThe living room is your home's centre. Get creative with these minimalist, industrial, pastel-coloured, contemporary, Scandinavian and farmhouse lounge designs
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H150 Modern Living Rooms That Act As Your Home’s Centrepiece
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Body50 Modern Living Rooms That Act As Your Home’s Centrepiece Tumblr living roommodern Like Architecture & Interior Design? Follow Us... Thank you. You have been subscribed. Youtube Pinterest Follow Instagram RSS The place where we all gather, laugh and play is undoubtedly the living room. The focal point of a home, its place between kitchen and bedroom acts as a natural centre, drawing guests from morning wake-ups to after-work nights in. These fifty modern living rooms show stretch in a variety of substrates and styles. Centre modern furniture around a cubic rug. Forge a concrete paradise with living walls astride couches. Go futuristic, with colourful clocks that shine metallic. Design your lounge creatively, using these fifty modern living rooms as examples. 1 | Visualizer: Roman KolyadaUsing pops of red and blue upon black and grey, this modern eclectic living room is coloured under baubles. Eastern pieces in a Turkish rug and wooden table cube give it character.2 | Visualizer: Svyatyuk StanislavSettle into an oasis in orange and grey. This modern lounge keeps it interesting using different shades of grey, a metal coffee table and figure canvas. Advertisement 3 | Visualizer: Anjey BabychScandinavian style can be ultra-minimalist. Block couches in grey play with light wooden stools, a swing chair and brighter lemon light in this relaxed scene.4 | Visualizer: TeroCentre your living room with a unique rug. This 3D-illustrated piece, Visioni A, by Patricia Urquiola is met by other squares in three lounge sets and a fireplace. A wooden-panel partition and glass-barrier staircase frame the space.5 | Visualizer: Arturo HermenegildoMake a splash in your lounge with a multi-colour rug. Paired with teal cushions and floor lamps, this retro-inspired look uses wood, cream furniture and an elephant drawing to evoke modern India. 6 | Visualizer: DelightfulGo pastel in your next lounge design. Upon a floor in lino and wall in light wood, pops of pastel green, pink, light terracotta and blue mingle amongst a swing arm wall lamp and laddered bookcase. 7 | Visualizer: Erriadbey KerimovLooking for living rooms for book-lovers? This relaxed grey design features a cosy marble fireplace, brown leather feature chair and most unusual bookcase, which writes ‘Read your bookcase’ using each cubby hole’s spaces.8 | Visualizer: Hatice UnsalMake concrete living rooms greener. This fusion of industry and nature is created with two living walls, grey linen furniture and a scattering of pot plants to tie it all together. Advertisement 9 | Visualizer: Roman PravnikDon’t want a stark look? Make it cosier with white and wooden walls, a fluffy rug and monochrome abstract – and token living wall, naturally. A whiskey decanter or two invites us further in.10 | Visualizer: Yo DezeenMake your living room breathe the industrial look. Replete with factory-inspired extractor fans, a one-wheeled coffee table, metal staircase and leather sofa, this lounge just screams bachelor pad. Check out our modern industrial-style living rooms post for more inspiration in this style.11 | Visualizer: Javier WainsteinA stunning artwork can be your lounge’s focal piece. Framed by large Japanese windows, an exposed brick wall and Scandinavian school chairs, this funky living room exemplifies great loft-style design. 12 | Visualizer: Kò NgMake your lounge sophisticated. Lit by a cacophony of circular hanging pendants and designer table lamps, such as the Flos IC T2 here, this living room uses white, brown and denim blue to make relaxing look easy. 13 | Visualizer: Alena BulatayaMonochrome living rooms are timeless. This modern design joins black and white together in a row of low bookcases, a wood stack, exposed brick and L-sofa. Check out our post for more black and white living rooms.14 | Visualizer: Dzhemesyuk DesignHave a heritage wall you’d like to use as a feature? Black living rooms can give old walls new life, as with this lounge seating a grey modern sofa, black and white sketch and round nesting coffee tables. 15 | Visualizer: Maks MarukhinA brick wall living room is the envy of many. Pair yours with sleek, smooth materials, like this lounge’s black wall, no-fuss rug and mushroom leather couch. Inset shelving and a framed abstract add interest. 16 | Visualizer: Maksim MT3DvisDon’t like the look of a plain black facade? Insert LEDs throughout its lifting edges, like this living room peopled with zig-zag cushions, a geometric rug and floral door art to the side.17 | Visualizer: Natalia VergunovaIn love with a large wall clock, but not sure where to put it? Make it your lounge’s central feature. This room’s space-age vinyl couch, silver cushions and stunning acrylic centrepiece is accessorized with a mirrored door and semi-industrial metal fixtures. 18 | Visualizer: Andrew SokrutaSculpt your lounge. A cracked feature wall and sculptural chairs, here the Q1 lounge chairs, are provided space by high, grey-curtained windows and a bronzed floor and panel. 19 | Visualizer: Alessandro ZeccaRather be up high? This living room’s ornamental ceiling feature and geometric staircase panel have set our dreams on fire. Check out our wall texture ideas for living room post for more inspiration. 20 | Visualizer: GauravThink of shape and form when designing your living room. Peopled by a spot mural, patterned wallpaper and a range of rugs, cushions and vases, this eclectic living room uses muted colours to make the mis-matched work together.21 | Visualizer: Oporski ArchitekturaLove the minimalist look? This black and white lounge couldn’t be more simple, with its contoured stairway, walls and suite straight out of a magazine. Check out our 40 Gorgeously Minimalist Living Rooms post for more ideas in this style.22 | Source: Ligne RosetWant something with a bit more colour? This gorgeous living room uses Japanese influences to create a low-down look with futon couches. A row of white French windows and pops of mustard and light pink accent the style.23 | Designer: Lotta AgatonPhotographer: Pia UlinMissing that little bit of green outside? This Scandinavian living room livens up its interior with small trees peppering its black, white and wooden space. Check out these indoor plants for some low-maintenance choices. 24 | Designer: NordicoPhotographer: Hey!CheeseWant a lounge and office all in one? A partition doubling as a TV-holder keeps this living room light and bright, with wood and grey furniture bordering an office on lino. A modern accent chair in navy looks out to the view outside. 25 | Visualizer: Catherine ManokhinaLet marble form the backdrop. Lit by a bauble chandelier and floor reading lamp to one side, the greys in the wall, curtain and seating colour this lounge in shades of grey.26 | Visualizer: Naira OmarBuild the living room of your dreams. This marble plinth bordering an indoor pool is the latest in stylish conversation pits. Cut in quilted seating, a central fireplace and a tree or two for a perfect place to socialise.27 | Visualizer: Yaroslav SerdyukLooking for the latest in double-height living rooms? Bright, open and spacious, this white living room is afforded a fireplace by a middling copper plinth. Store ornaments in its inlets to showcase world treasures. 28 | Visualizer: Cosmocube StudioLove the look of wood panelling? This living room takes its ceiling to its architectural limit, with an array of dangling bubble lights over a suite in grey.29 | Visualizer: Home DDraw an animal stencil in your lounge. Black, white and divided almost in two, its large-shaped elements are strung by two rows of camera lights.30 | Visualizer: wottanA splash of colour can make your living room come alive. Looking out to a flowering tree, two sunshine-coloured seats add pizzazz beside an abstract in grey.31 | Visualizer: Kaer ArchitectsThose lucky enough to own a window corner lounge should add block sofas. This grey version cuts its seats into checkers, whilst a marbled kitchen bench offers similar patterning.32 | Visualizer: Vizline StudioNot brave enough to own an indoor living wall? Provide a view to one outside, like this grey-hued lounge bordering foliage and a bookcase.33 | Visualizer: 365 DesignOutdoor living walls can come from top and bottom. A row of bridal creepers covers the roof, a hedge the lawn in this sophisticated living room lit by hollow circular pendants. A marble floor and taupe couch introduce more cool.34 | Visualizer: Nikita BorisenkoWhy not look to a tree instead? Set beside a marble fireplace, the large glass pane of this living room’s window has us thinking of Christmas.35 | Visualizer: Olga Podgornaja A yellow accent living room doesn’t have to be bold. The subtle lemons of this cosy space lie in a scattering of cushions, painting strokes and jars in the background kitchen. 36 | Visualizer: Federico CedroneBuild yourself a mid-century modern living room. White walls, a pale blue rug and classic brown leather seating offer a look the discerning designer will admire.37 | Visualizer: Third AestheticDifferentiate your pieces by a shift in texture. This living room offers a rug in suede, a couch in linen and an accent chair in quilted grey.38 | Visualizer: Ekaterina DomrachevaLet your living room own a colour. This pea green set is complemented by a twig-and-berry chandelier, LED-lit wooden panelling and a stencilled glass table.39 | Visualizer: PolyvizA room segue could be your lounge’s feature. This lit hallway provides a warm background to this laid-back lounge in grey. A glowing wooden feature and origami art piece help tie the look in.40 | Visualizer: Mario MimosoLove rectangles? Design in them, using this lounge’s framed prints, fireplace cavity, marble tables and upholstered sofa.41 | Visualizer: Rina LovkoA dash of pink can really pretty up the place. This lounge pairs it with soft grey, an indoor tree and a bevy of black magnetic lights. 42 | Visualizer: Evgenia AborinaLooking for more variation? This pastel pink sofa is met with chairs in berry, ottomans in blue and a series of art pieces in complementary shades.43 | Visualizer: Imade PastelPastel room decor need not be childish. The Scandinavian themes in this compact space show in a wooden crockery stand, patterned couch cushions and geometric rug. A vintage photograph tells a story. 44 | Visualizer: Darina IvanovaLooking for living rooms with large wall art? Look no further, with this grey and wooden room made tropical by its canvas. 45 | Visualizer: Ace of SpaceHave only a small space to play with? Make like this living room, and frame your pastel art with grey couches, light wood and white-wall bookcases.46 | Visualizer: Ekaterina DochevaHipsters can’t go past this living room. Decorated with cushions in pastel, a white brick wall and beautiful plant stand, the hanging bike on its wall is its central feature.47 | Visualizer: Bui NiLooking for more natural art? Try wooden wall decor for size, like this grey and white living room with coloured wood at its centre. A pipe-inspired light and potted orchid finish the look.48 | Visualizer: Jenya LykasovaGet a taste for travel with this modern rustic living room. With its rattan chandeliers, driftwood framing and large potted ferns, how could you not feel away on vacation?49 | Designer: Giannetti HomeLovers of the countryside will favour this modern farmhouse living room. A caged chandelier, French windows, faded Turkish rug and traditional marble fireplace all add to the feel.50 | Visualizer: Maria FadeevaThe modernist has a place for this colourful living room. A series of oscillating bulbs, pop pastel hues and circular artwork offer signature elements. Recommended Reading: 50 Modern Coffee Tables To Add Zing To Your Living Detailed Guide & Inspiration For Designing A Mid-Century Modern Living Room Modern Asian Luxury Interior Design Did you like this article? Share it on any of the following social media channels below to give us your vote. Your feedback helps us improve. Whatsapp From HD & Partners Book Of Beautiful Homes - $19.99 3D Home Design App - Free (In-app purchases) Ultimate Modern House Plans Pack - $99 Other related interior design ideas you might enjoy Modern Classic Chairs30 Large Wall Clocks That Don't Compromise On Style50 Cool And Unique Wall Clocks You Can Buy Right NowClocks with a difference Comments? Let us know What we are about. Our mission is to help people visualize, create & maintain beautiful homes. We bring to you inspiring visuals of cool homes, specific spaces, architectural marvels and new design trends. Follow us for a daily dose of outstanding homes, intelligent architecture & beautiful design. 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Result 15
Title900+ Living Room ideas in 2022 | living room style, living room, living room designs
Urlhttps://www.pinterest.com/thehavenly/living-room/
DescriptionJan 7, 2022 - Beautiful looks to inspire your living room style!. See more ideas about living room style, living room, living room designs
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BodyLiving RoomBeautiful looks to inspire your living room style!·3,122 Pins 1dCollection by The HavenlySimilar ideas popular now. DesignHome DecorLiving RoomInterior DesignLiving Room StyleEclectic, Glam Bedroom Design by Havenly Designer PradnyaBrowse interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomContemporary Living Room Design by Havenly Designer YoseikaView interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomContemporary Living Room Design by Havenly Designer YoseikaSee more interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern, Minimal, Scandinavian Design by Havenly Designer CaitlinExplore interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern, Minimal, Scandinavian Living Room Design by Havenly Designer ShelbySee more interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern, Glam, Minimal, Scandinavian Living Room Design by Havenly CarlaSee more interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern, Glam, Minimal, Scandinavian Living Room Design by Havenly CarlaExplore interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomBohemian, Midcentury Modern Living Room Design by Havenly Designer AndreaBrowse interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern Living Room Design by Havenly Designer JillView interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern Living Room Design by Havenly Designer JillSee more interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomBohemian, Midcentury Modern Living Room Design by Havenly Designer AnnaView interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomBohemian, Midcentury Modern Living Room Design by Havenly Designer AnnaExplore interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern, Eclectic, Bohemian, Midcentury Modern Design by Havenly Designer MichelleSee more interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomModern, Eclectic, Bohemian, Midcentury Modern Design by Havenly Designer MichelleSee more interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomEclectic, Bohemian, Midcentury Modern Living Room Design by Havenly Designer ChristinaView interior decorating ideas on Havenly. 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Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomBeautiful Interior DesignBeautiful InteriorsGlam Living RoomLiving Room DesignsInterior DecoratingModernInspirationBiblical InspirationTrendy TreeModern, Glam Living Room Design by Havenly Designer MariaView interior decorating ideas on Havenly. Find inspiration and discover beautiful interiors designed by Havenly's talented online interior designers.The HavenlyLiving RoomBeautiful Interior DesignBeautiful InteriorsTransitional Living RoomsLiving Room DesignsInterior DecoratingModernTrendy TreeDecorating Living RoomsDecorModern, Glam, Transitional Living Room Design by Havenly Designer KylieView interior decorating ideas on Havenly. 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Result 16
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Result 17
Title20 Living Room Design Mistakes Everyone Makes
Urlhttps://www.mydomaine.com/living-room-decorating-mistakes-4767833
DescriptionInterior designers share the most common living room design mistakes to avoid. Read on to learn from the experts
Date7 May 2021
Organic Position15
H120 Living Room Design Mistakes Everyone Makes
H2Selecting the Wrong Sofa
Falling Into the Showroom Look
Buying a Rug That's Too Small
Poorly Planning Your Layout
Hanging Art Incorrectly
Making It Too Precious to Live In
Not Mixing Periods and Styles
Forgetting Furniture Heights
Sticking With Obvious Fabrics
Not Testing Your Furniture Layout
Overlooking Smaller Items
Overthinking the Sofa
Choosing a Disproportionate Coffee Table
Selecting Cheap Art
Hanging Curtains Wrong
Choosing Harsh Lighting
Ignoring Clutter
Forgetting Prime Wall Space
Lining Your Walls with Furniture
Neglecting Investment Pieces
Related Stories
H3
H2WithAnchorsSelecting the Wrong Sofa
Falling Into the Showroom Look
Buying a Rug That's Too Small
Poorly Planning Your Layout
Hanging Art Incorrectly
Making It Too Precious to Live In
Not Mixing Periods and Styles
Forgetting Furniture Heights
Sticking With Obvious Fabrics
Not Testing Your Furniture Layout
Overlooking Smaller Items
Overthinking the Sofa
Choosing a Disproportionate Coffee Table
Selecting Cheap Art
Hanging Curtains Wrong
Choosing Harsh Lighting
Ignoring Clutter
Forgetting Prime Wall Space
Lining Your Walls with Furniture
Neglecting Investment Pieces
Related Stories
Body20 Living Room Design Mistakes Everyone Makes By Gabrielle Savoie Gabrielle Savoie Gabrielle Savoie is the founder of décor site Savvy Home, a finalist for prestigious style and design awards. She is an expert in interior design and home décor and has been a writer and editor for various high-profile publications in the industry for almost 10 years. MyDomaine's Editorial Guidelines Updated on May 07, 2021 FACEBOOK PINTEREST EMAILSHARE DISC Interiors Interior designers spend their lives studying the little details that make a room just perfect. Similar to a beautifully directed movie, a well-decorated living room is instantly engaging and impressive while also being functionally designed for comfort and ease of use. And, sometimes, what is slightly off in our own living rooms can be difficult to pinpoint. But you know it's there. To shed some light on the most common living room design mistakes that may be plaguing our spaces, we talked with interior designers and a residential architect. As it turns out, there might be one little thing that makes all the difference. Or, perhaps, the issue could be quite large. From everything like choosing the wrong rug size to adding a bit more warm light, your dream living room is just an article's read away. This article, to be exact. The space of your dreams may not be so out of reach if you consider the most common living room decorating mistakes. Ahead, find the 20 most common mistakes people make when designing their living room and how best to avoid—or fix—them. 01 of 20 Selecting the Wrong Sofa . Design: Workshop APD; Photo: Donna Dotan Designers agree: A great living room starts with a great sofa. "So often, I come into a house, and the owners have good taste, but they already have a sofa that they want to work with," explains stylist and TV host Emily Henderson. "They don't want to replace it because it's not that old and they don't mind it. I've had to break the news over and over that, with a sofa like that, they would never get the room they want." 02 of 20 Falling Into the Showroom Look . DISC Interiors Another mistake that plagues living rooms everywhere, according to New York architect Elizabeth Roberts, is going for the "showroom feel." In other words, a room that looks like it's all been purchased from the same store. "It's important to us to mix new and vintage elements in order to create an interesting, eclectic, and individualized room," she says. 03 of 20 Buying a Rug That's Too Small . Emily Henderson For Henderson, one of the main offenders in living room decorating is the poorly sized rug. "America has been suffering for too long from 'small rug' syndrome," she says. "I see it virtually every day, and it pains me—especially when it can be so easily avoided." Huge rugs can be expensive and feel like such a scary commitment, but, according to the stylist, it's one of the most important aspects of a room. 04 of 20 Poorly Planning Your Layout . Design: Vanessa Alexander; Photo: Tessa Neustadt While it may be tempting to push a sofa against a wall facing the TV and call it a day, Roberts reminds us that there is much more involved in planning a great living room layout. "It's important to consider and create conversation groupings, especially if the room is long and narrow like many townhouses and lofts," she says. The First 5 Things You Should Buy When Decorating Your Living Room 05 of 20 Hanging Art Incorrectly . Studio Ashby "Art hung the wrong way on a wall is like a character in a movie wearing a really bad wig," Henderson says. "It's just kinda hard not to see it, and you wish so bad you could just rip it off, knowing that everything would be so much better without it. It doesn't ruin your experience, but it's just terribly distracting." She adds, "If the wall were cut up vertically into four sections (going from bottom to top), think of the art being in the third quadrant (counting from the floor)," says Henderson. Wall App is a great way to visualize art on your existing walls. The free website allows for you to upload a photo of your actual room and place potential art in a variety of sizes within it. 06 of 20 Making It Too Precious to Live In . Elizabeth Roberts While the days of unused "sitting rooms" and plastic-wrapped furniture are long gone, Roberts still insists on paying attention to making your living room fit the conveniences of daily life. "Select textiles and rugs that can take the wear and tear of everyday living," she recommends. 07 of 20 Not Mixing Periods and Styles . Ben Pentreath Sometimes, people feel limited by the architecture of their home and select furniture based on it. Try not to feel stuck. In one Georgia home, the design firm merged contemporary furniture with traditional crown molding, Moroccan antique rugs, African beaded benches, and contemporary art. 08 of 20 Forgetting Furniture Heights . Design: Emily Henderson Design; Photo: Tessa Neustadt Roberts has one indispensable trick for combining periods and styles: "When mixing new and vintage elements, pay attention to furniture heights, as traditional furniture is typically higher than modern pieces." 09 of 20 Sticking With Obvious Fabrics . Design: Emily Henderson Design; Photo: Sara Ligorria-Tramp According to Roberts, "there are some great outdoor fabrics that we're using indoors that dogs and kids cannot destroy. It's important to select rugs that will wear well. Beware of the seductive silk rug." Instead, consider a wool rug. 10 of 20 Not Testing Your Furniture Layout . Design: Arlyn Henandez; Photo: Sara Ligorria-Tramp It's very important to consider views from major seating elements. "In a large open room, it's nice to be able to sit on a favorite piece while addressing the rest of the room," Roberts says. "In a small room, it's important to consider the necessary window views." She adds: "In a room with a fireplace, it's often difficult to know where to put the TV—large TV cabinets are cumbersome and don't fool many. My favorite solution is a projector that projects onto the white wall above the mantel." 11 of 20 Overlooking Smaller Items . Design: Mandy Cheng Design; Photo: Madeline Tolle To avoid feeling like you're in a store, Roberts also recommends leaving adequate room in the budget for lighting, textiles, and accessories after large items are selected. "The small pieces are what add personality," says Roberts. "We also prefer to light the living room with low lighting instead of overhead light. Floor lamps and table lamps are best for living rooms." 12 of 20 Overthinking the Sofa . Mandy Cheng Design "No one loves a simple sofa more than me because they are so easy to style," says Henderson. She recommends staying away from overly ornate details like curved legs, winged arms, tufts, and nailheads. 13 of 20 Choosing a Disproportionate Coffee Table . Mandy Cheng Design There's more to choosing a coffee table than swinging over to your favorite home goods store and selecting one on a whim. Let your lifestyle and functionality (kid-friendly, storage for remotes?) guide the materials, height, length, and clearance space needed to ensure your coffee table sings in harmony with your living room. 14 of 20 Selecting Cheap Art . Design: Mandy Cheng Design; Photo: Madeline Tolle Designers like Bobby Berk say cheap art can really drag down a room's aesthetic. Instead of going generic, opt for a custom art service, where you can commission affordable, original art. "There are lots of cool custom art services available now, such as Minted and Leftbank Art," Berk says. 15 of 20 Hanging Curtains Wrong . Design: Mandy Cheng Design; Photo: Madeline Tolle for Home Polish Hanging curtain rods just above the window can close in a space. Instead, hang the rod half a foot above the window frame. This will give the room a feeling of added height and openness. 16 of 20 Choosing Harsh Lighting . Brad Knipstein "Updating lighting fixtures can be an inexpensive way to really help improve the overall aesthetic of any space as well as give a sense of sophisticated elegance and comfort," says Suzanne Donegan, a designer and creative director. It's also one of the most often-overlooked design features yet most versatile—light fixtures can move with you. 17 of 20 Ignoring Clutter . Fantastic Frank Too many accessories, no matter how expensive, are considered décor overkill. For a less-is-more vibe, "accessories should be grouped together to create a pleasing vignette, whether it's on the cocktail table, buffet, or bookcase," says interior designer Marlaina Teich. 18 of 20 Forgetting Prime Wall Space . Design: Mandy Cheng Designs; Photo: Madeline Tolle When designing your living room, the floor isn't the only option to place furniture and décor—think vertically. Mandy Cheng, a Los Angeles interior designer, said to consider using floating shelves and hanging plants. "We're so used to furniture that sits on the floor that, once things stop fitting on the floor, we give up." 19 of 20 Lining Your Walls with Furniture . Sarah Jaye Weiss “A common layout mistake I see people making with their living room is having all the furniture pushed up against the walls,” Elite Decorist designer Mikayla Keating says. Try floating your sofa or accent chairs closer to the center of the room to balance out the layout. 20 of 20 Neglecting Investment Pieces . Katherine Carter  Though counterintuitive at first, investing in one statement accent is a financially better move than spending on multiple inexpensive pieces. Homepolish designer Ashlie Mastony says: "In the end, the little things cost just as much, and the space feels cluttered rather than cohesive.” Sorry, These 5 Design Mistakes Are Making Your Living Room Look Cheap Related Stories. 10 Decorating Mistakes That Instantly Cheapen Your Home 11 Common Décor Mistakes Interior Designers Want You to Avoid 52 Decorating Tips Every Design Enthusiast Should Know 40 Simple Living Room Design Ideas To Instantly Transform Your Space 10 Design Mistakes That Designers Always Notice in a Living Room How to Craft a Truly Perfect Home Office, According to Designers The 50 Best Living Rooms We've Seen on Instagram These 20 Layout Mistakes Are Making Your Room Look Cheaper The Design Ground Rules You Need to Know Before Breaking Them 40 Gray Living Rooms That Are Far From Boring 34 Small Apartment Ideas That Make the Most of Your Square Footage The Worst Decorating Mistakes You Can Make, According to Pros 42 Foolproof Ways to Make Your Living Room Extra Cozy 13 Open-Plan Living Spaces That Will Make You Want to Move 30 Popular Living Room Paint Colors Designers Can't Get Enough Of These 6 Layout Mistakes Instantly Cheapen Your Home
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Result 18
TitleHow to Decorate Your Home - Real Estate Guides - The New York Times
Urlhttps://www.nytimes.com/guides/realestate/home-decor-ideas
DescriptionMoving into a new home can be one of life’s great joys, but it can also be a time of uncertainty, especially when it comes to decorating. But by following the steps used by professional interior designers, you’ll have a much greater chance of success
Date
Organic Position16
H1How to Decorate Your Home
H2Interior Decoration: Laying the Groundwork
Entryway Ideas
Dining and Living Room Decor Ideas
Sign Up for the Real Estate Newsletter
Bedroom Decor Ideas
L.L.Bean 280-Thread-Count Pima Cotton Percale Sheet Set
Xtreme Comforts Shredded Memory Foam Pillow
L.L.Bean Baffle-Box Stitch Down Comforter, Warm
Kitchens and Bathrooms
Frontgate Resort Cotton Bath Towel
About the Author
H3Don't Start in the Furniture Store
Know Your Measurements
Create a Floorplan
Decide How You Want to Live
Copy the Pros
Tape It Out
Develop a Budget
Plan the Phases
Read More About Planning Your Decor
Make a Statement
Design to Your Routine
Plan for the Weather
Create the Palette
Treat the Walls
Choose the Furniture
Related Guide
How Things Flow
Add Rugs
Related Guide
Finish With Art and Accessories
Plan the Furniture
Make It Soft
Make the Bed
Control the Light
Related Guide
Evaluate Cabinets and Counters
Focus on Things You Touch
Refresh With Textiles
Don't Forget the Powder Room
H2WithAnchorsInterior Decoration: Laying the Groundwork
Entryway Ideas
Dining and Living Room Decor Ideas
Sign Up for the Real Estate Newsletter
Bedroom Decor Ideas
L.L.Bean 280-Thread-Count Pima Cotton Percale Sheet Set
Xtreme Comforts Shredded Memory Foam Pillow
L.L.Bean Baffle-Box Stitch Down Comforter, Warm
Kitchens and Bathrooms
Frontgate Resort Cotton Bath Towel
About the Author
BodyHow to Decorate Your HomeBy Tim McKeoughHeader photography by Yasu + Junko; styled by Elizabeth PressShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare in an emailBookmark the pageMoving into a new home can be one of life’s great joys, but it can also be a time of uncertainty, especially when it comes to decorating. How do you make your space look its best while reflecting your personal sense of style? Do it well and you’ll end up with a comfortable, happy home. Do it poorly and you’ll end up with a hodge-podge of furniture, fabrics and paint colors that never congeal into a pleasing whole. With a little planning, and by following the same steps used by professional interior designers, you’ll have a much greater chance of success.  Interior Decoration: Laying the Groundwork. To reach the finish line, you first have to know where you’re going. Don't Start in the Furniture Store. Many have heard the advice to avoid grocery shopping when you’re hungry, because it leads to poor choices. The same holds true for furniture stores – don’t go shopping in a panic, just because you have an empty home. Yes, you need a sofa. But if you pick the pink-striped sectional just because you like it in the store, without taking measurements or thinking about the rest of the room, you’re stuck with it. The rest of the room will have to be built around that sofa, and if it’s too large for the space it will look forever awkward.  Start in the room you’re looking to furnish, armed with a measuring tape and a notepad. Know Your Measurements. Matching the scale of furniture to the scale of a room is critical. A deep sectional sofa can easily overpower a small room and svelte chairs can get lost in a wide-open loft. Before you start designing, measure the length and width of each room you intend to decorate, along with the ceiling height and elements that could get in the way – stairs, columns, radiators and other obstructions. It’s also a good idea to measure window openings, along with the wall space below, above and to the sides of each one, to get ready for window coverings.  “The first mistake most people make is that they buy things that are the wrong size – sofas that don't fit in the room, sofas that don't fit through doorways, tables that are too small, desks that are too big, nightstands that hang into the doorway,” said David Kleinberg, founder of the New York interior design firm David Kleinberg Design Associates. Carefully measuring your space can help avoid such problems.  Create a Floorplan. Once you have the measurements of your room, it’s time to put them to use with a floor plan that gives you a bird’s eye view of the entire home. “Every job should start with a floor plan,” said Alexa Hampton, the president of Mark Hampton, the New York interior design firm founded by her father. “You need to know the space.”  One option is to draw a floor plan the old-fashioned way, with paper, a pencil and a ruler. However, most professional designers use drafting software like AutoCAD. In between those two extremes are apps that aim to make it easy for homeowners to create simple floor plans (some even automate measurements with your smartphone’s camera, but double-check those numbers), including Magicplan, Floor Plan Creator and RoomScan Pro. Once you have the outline of the space, start experimenting with the placement of furniture, making sure that the footprint of each piece is scaled to match the size of the drawing. Decide How You Want to Live. This is the tricky part, and there are no right or wrong answers. Rooms can be traditional or modern, formal or relaxed, and visually warm or cool. “To the best of your ability, you have to try to discern how you would like to live in a given space,” said Ms. Hampton. “What will you be doing? How many people live there? Are there children? What are your ambitions for how you would like to live?”  The decoration of a home for someone who regularly hosts large dinner parties, for instance, should be different from a home for someone who eats out at restaurants every night. The person who plans to host lavish fundraisers should have a different living room than the person who dreams only of crashing in front of the TV. Copy the Pros. Look in design books and magazines, as well as at online resources like Houzz, Pinterest and Instagram to sharpen your personal style. “Figure out the style that you respond to most,” said Brad Ford, an interior designer in New York City, and develop a dossier of favorite images.  Once you have images you like, study the details, advised Mr. Kleinberg. “See where pattern is used versus where solids are used, and where color can be used successfully or not,” he said. It will also help inform everything from the type of furniture you might like to a potential strategy for window coverings.  Tape It Out. To take ideas on a floor plan one step farther, use painter’s tape in the real space to outline where furniture will be placed on floors and against walls.  “We use blue tape on the floor to box out different elements,” said Anne Maxwell Foster, an owner of the New York interior design firm Tilton Fenwick. “Where will the rug be? Does it need to be cut? How far is the coffee table coming out? Even though we have everything down to a sixteenth of an inch on a furniture plan, there's something helpful about visualizing it in the space, and being able to walk around.”Develop a Budget. There’s no getting around the math: If you splurge on an unexpectedly expensive chair, you’ll have less money available for the rest of the home. “You want to make sure you're being strategic about how you spend your money,” said Mr. Ford. “A budget gives you a roadmap for how to divide the costs of things between rooms.” You can still make an exception if you find a one-of-a-kind dining table, he noted, but in order to pay for it you have be thoughtful about where else you can cut back. Plan the Phases. Finishing drywall, refinishing hardwood floors and painting ceilings is all messy work. If at all possible, it’s better to have this type of work completed before moving any furniture or accessories into the space.  If it can’t be avoided, seal large furniture under plastic drop cloths and accessories in boxes with tape to protect them. Read More About Planning Your Decor. The Art of the Floor Plan: Capturing a Home, Line by Line. May 30, 2011From Floor Plans to Décor, a Focus on Design. May 5, 2011Design Books to Kick-Start Your Decorating Projects. March 6, 2018When Decorating Styles Clash. March 17, 2017Entryway Ideas. The foyer or entrance hall creates the first impression, so make it count. Make a Statement. Don’t hold back. “That room is the power moment when somebody walks into your home,” said Suysel dePedro Cunningham, an owner of the interior design firm Tilton Fenwick. “It can say so much about your personality and design taste.”  For that reason, a wall finish that might seem like too much for a living room or bedroom may be ideal in a foyer. “It’s a place where you can do a bold color, a lacquer or a wallpaper for a ‘Wow’ moment that you might be scared of in a large living room,” she said. An added benefit? Statement-making wall coverings and finishes tend to be expensive, but because foyers are usually small, these products can often be installed without breaking the bank. Design to Your Routine. With a few key furniture pieces and accessories, you can make your daily arrival and departure sequence a breeze. “Typically, it's not a huge space, so you're working with a limited number of pieces,” said Mr. Ford. If you’re the kind of person who likes to drop everything when you walk in the door, “a console with drawers is great, because it’s a nice place to hide your keys and mail,” Mr. Ford said. Or, in the absence of drawers, a bowl, tray or other sculptural container can serve as a catchall to help keep things organized.  A bench or a stool or two that slide under the console can provide a place to sit while lacing up shoes while taking up minimal floor space.  Another helpful element is a wall-mounted mirror, said Mr. Ford. “It gives you one last chance to check yourself before you walk out the door.” Plan for the Weather. As the first space people enter when coming from outside, the foyer has to deal with a lot – ice, snow, rainwater, mud and whatever else Mother Nature decides to deliver. To avoid having these things creep into the rest of the home, you need to deal with them at the front door.  The effort begins even before you cross the threshold. “I like to have a mat outside the door, so people can wipe off their feet before even stepping inside,” said Mr. Ford.  Inside, you can follow up with an indoor-outdoor rug. An umbrella stand not only keeps umbrellas handy, but also prevents wet ones from draining on the floor. Storage bins or baskets, which can be stowed under a console (if the space isn’t taken by stools), can contain soggy hats and mitts. If your foyer doesn’t have a closet, buy coat hooks or a rack. These are all functional pieces that can serve double-duty as decorative elements as well. Dining and Living Room Decor Ideas. The main living areas, whether they are separate rooms or combined in an open-concept space, set the stage for life with family and friends. Create the Palette. You can see colors, patterns and metal finishes online, but digital images are mere approximations of what the real things look like. Wherever possible, order color chips, fabric swatches and material samples to be sure finished products will meet your expectations. “You can order samples from most vendors, and it’s always best,” said Mr. Kleinberg. “Some colors blend together,” when viewed on a screen, he added, and it can be difficult to differentiate cool and warm tones.  Don’t just look at the samples in isolation. Pin them to a board or put them in a tray to see how well they work together. “All greens play nicely together,” said Mr. Kleinberg. “All blues fight.” Putting samples side by side is the way to see if different colors and patterns will live in harmony or tension.  Ms. Hampton sometimes goes one step farther. “When we’re working on a fabric scheme, we’ll put the fabric on the copier, reduce it, cut it into the right shape for the floor plan and paste it down,” she said, “so we can see how the various fabrics spread through the room.”Treat the Walls. Paint colors are notorious for appearing different hues in different light conditions (and seeming to change between the paint store to home). This effect is only amplified once you slather it on four walls. For that reason, it’s never a good idea to commit to a paint color when you first see the chip in a store. Look at the largest chip you can get in the room you plan to paint, at a minimum. Better yet, paint large sample patches on walls or on boards that can be moved around and view them at different times of day.  Note: As long as you test the color before painting the entire room, there’s no reason to be scared of bold, saturated colors.  Once you have a color selected, choose the sheen. Matte or flat paints offer a pleasant gauzy appearance that also hides wall imperfections, but can be difficult to maintain, clean and touch up. “I tend not to do matte walls, in general,” said Ms. Hampton, who prefers paint with an eggshell or satin finish that is just slightly glossier and easier to scrub.  Baseboards, moldings, doors and other trim can be painted the same color as the room to make them visually recede, or a contrasting color — usually an off-white in a room with colored walls — to make them more of a feature. Trim can also be painted with a different sheen than the walls. A semi-gloss sheen will bring more attention to moldings while adding durability.  You should also decide how you want to treat the ceiling. You can paint it white for a crisp feel, or the same color as the walls for a cocooning feel. It’s safe to use a matte or flat sheen because the ceiling is rarely touched by dirty fingers or smudge-creating objects. If the surface is perfectly smooth, it can also be painted with a glossy finish as a design feature that reflects light down into the living space. (If your ceilings aren’t smooth, don’t do it — the glossy sheen will only highlight imperfections.)  For something unexpected, consider looking beyond paint. Manufacturers offer a multitude of alternatives, including patterned wallpaper, grass cloth, upholstery fabrics, wood paneling and even stone and brick veneer. Choose the Furniture. Working from your floor plan and inspiration images, choose the specific pieces of furniture — the sofas, chairs and tables — that will make the space livable. Depending on the desired vibe, you can go in wildly different directions.  For a traditional room, focusing on a symmetrical layout often helps — for instance, installing a sofa and coffee table centered on a fireplace, with matching armchairs on either side. “A very symmetrical space can be beautiful and formal,” said Ms. Hampton. On the other hand, “if you choose a sectional sofa, it’s probably going to be a less formal space,” she said, with an asymmetrical layout.  Seat height is also important. Sofas and lounge chairs in the same room should have seats that are at similar heights to avoid some people sitting much higher than others. In general, lower seats offer a casual, laidback feel, and higher seats come off as more formal.  Whether the space is casual or formal, there is a rule of thumb to keep in mind: The number of dining chairs should roughly match the number of spaces for lounging. “That’s an old truth my father shared with me,” said Ms. Hampton. “If you’re planning to have 12 people at a dining room table, you should have 12 seats in the living room,” for entertaining before and after the meal. Related Guide. How to Buy a Couch. This guide from Wirecutter will walk you through everything you need to know to bring home a durable, comfortable and aesthetically pleasing piece of furniture.How Things Flow. No living room sofa or chair should be an island of its own. When people sit down, they almost always need a place to put a drink or book, as well as light to read by. Place a coffee table or end table within easy reach of each seat, along with a table or floor lamp.  No one wants to stub a toe on a chair leg, so you’ll also want to ensure there are clear walking paths through the living room, and that no furniture blocks part of a doorway or makes it necessary to squeeze by.  Will your living room have a TV? If so, plan for a wall mount or a media unit to hold it, as well as a path for cables that won’t be unsightly.  Do you plan to host buffet-style dinners? If so, a credenza or sideboard near the dining table will allow you to serve in one space rather than having guests traipse through the kitchen. Add Rugs. A living room with hardwood floors but no rug looks naked. For visual and literal comfort, add a rug.   There are three common strategies for doing so: A room-filling rug. Install a rug that covers almost the entire floor of the room, leaving a border or just a foot or two at the edges. This usually works best in smaller rooms.  Seating area rugs. Break a larger room down into multiple seating areas by using rugs to visually hold each group of furniture together. Or, in an open-concept space, use a rug to hold the living area together, while allowing the dining area to sit directly on the wood floor.  Layered rugs. Pile smaller rugs on top of a larger one to create extra visual interest while reinforcing the layout of the room.  Be generous when selecting sizes. A small rug under the coffee table that doesn’t reach the legs of sofas and chairs will look like a raft lost at sea. The rug should extend about halfway, or fully, under the furniture at its edges. Related Guide. The Best Affordable Area Rugs. Wirecutter researched hundreds of budget area rugs, interviewed experts, and tested rugs with panelists, then put their feet on our favorites at home to find the best. Finish With Art and Accessories. The last step to finishing any room is to add art and accessories, but there is no one-size-fits-all approach. In a minimalist space, it might be just a few objects; in a maximalist space, it could involve displaying entire collections and layers of objets d’art.  Go back to your original inspirational images and study the way those rooms are accessorized. Do they mix candles, boxes, bowls and books together, or is there just one vase on a table? Is there a single artwork above the sofa, or a freeform gallery wall?  Be sure to consider your functional needs. A tray on an ottoman can contain remote controls. Throw pillows provide extra back support for deep sofas and chairs. A magazine rack can keep reading materials out of the way. Attractive baskets are ideal for tidying up children’s toys in a hurry. Sign Up for the Real Estate Newsletter. Every week, get updates on residential real estate news, covering the five boroughs and beyond.Your email addressSign Up NowSee sample | Privacy Policy | Opt out or contact us anytimeBedroom Decor Ideas. Designed correctly, a bedroom can serve as your nightly sanctuary. Plan the Furniture. It’s called a bedroom for a reason: the bed is the key piece of furniture. As such, it should be given pride of place in the room, most likely with the headboard positioned against one wall and paths for walking on both sides.   “Don’t shove a bed in the corner,” if at all possible, said Nick Olsen, a New York City interior designer. “They’re impossible to make, and uncomfortable for two people to use.”  One exception: children’s bunk beds. Because they already have safety rails that usually only allow access from one side, there’s no reason not to have one in a corner.  If there’s space, install nightstands on both sides of an adult bed for convenience. They could be simple small tabletops, tables with a single drawer for storing essentials, or something larger. “Consider whether you need extra storage space,” said Mr. Olsen. “You can use two dressers for nightstands,” to provide space for folded clothing.  Do you like to watch TV in bed? If so, you’ll want a dresser, cabinet or console table near the foot of the bed that can hold the TV while providing additional storage (unless you plan to mount it on the wall or spring for a motorized stand).  Many designers also like to put a single chair in the corner of a bedroom, not only as a place to rest but also as a landing pad for tossed clothing and personal accessories when you’re in a hurry. Make It Soft. Because the goal is to create a space that feels calm and inviting, a bedroom is probably not the place to use bold colors or graphic wallpaper. “I would avoid anything that feels aggressive,” Mr. Olsen said. “Even though I like bold colors in my decorating, I like paler tones in the bedrooms: gentle blues, greens and yellows.”  Some designers even upholster bedrooms walls for a literal soft touch. Underfoot, Mr. Olsen advocates adding some kind of textile to warm up cold, hard floors – either wall-to-wall carpeting, a large rug that extends underneath the bed or smaller rugs on either side of the bed, and perhaps at the foot of the bed. Make the Bed. There are many different ways to make a bed, and the subject of whether or not you should use a top sheet has been the subject of fierce debate in recent years. Much comes down to personal preference and whether you desire a bedroom that feels casual or formal.  It’s possible to make a bed with nothing more than a fitted sheet over the mattress, a nice duvet and a couple of pillows. But for something a little more formal, you need more layers.  Mr. Olsen has a very specific way of making a bed, which he says was passed down to him from the designer Miles Redd, who learned it from the doyenne of decorating, Bunny Williams. “I do a fitted sheet, a top sheet, and some kind of blanket, which varies in weight based on the season – a cotton blanket for summer or a wool blanket for winter,” said Mr. Olsen. “Then, four standard-sized pillows, usually down, which I stack. Then a decorative pillow stacked against the standard ones. Then, I do a down duvet with a cover folded at the foot of the bed.” Mr. Olsen recommended keeping the sheets simple – perhaps hotel-style white linens with a subtle embroidery detail at the edge – and bringing in color and pattern with the top two pillow shams and decorative pillow. Wirecutter productThe Best Sheets. L.L.Bean 280-Thread-Count Pima Cotton Percale Sheet Set. If you like a cool, crisp feel to your sheets, these are comfortable, very breathable, and reasonably priced. More Wirecutter sheet picksRight Arrow IconRight Arrow IconWirecutter productThe Best Bed Pillows. Xtreme Comforts Shredded Memory Foam Pillow. Moldable and adjustable, with excellent support for back-, side-, and some stomach-sleepers, this is also one of the most affordable pillows we tested.More Wirecutter pillow picksRight Arrow IconRight Arrow IconWirecutter productThe Best Comforter. L.L.Bean Baffle-Box Stitch Down Comforter, Warm. Sleeping under this comforter was a delight: It felt lofty and warm, but breathable and includes L.L.Bean’s excellent satisfaction guarantee.More Wirecutter comforter picksRight Arrow IconRight Arrow IconControl the Light. The ability to control light – both natural and artificial – is important.  If you’re sensitive to sunlight when sleeping, you want to have the ability to eliminate it completely. The best way to do so is with a blackout roller shade or a Roman shade with a blackout lining. However, sunlight will still usually leak into the room at the edges of the shade. To block it, add curtains with a blackout lining.  At night, it’s helpful to have layers of lighting. An overhead light allows you to illuminate the whole room quickly, but may not do much to set the right mood.  A pair of lamps on bedside tables usually offers a more appealing glow. Many designers use table lamps as well as wall-mounted lamps, either hardwired or plugged into an outlet, on either side of the bed. The table lamps provide an ambient glow, and the wall-mounted lamps provide directional light for reading. “It’s nice to have both, but they shouldn’t compete for attention,” said Mr. Ford. “You want a super simple table lamp and a really decorative sconce, or vice versa.”  In terms of control, “Every light should be on a dimmer,” said Mr. Olsen – good advice for every room of the home.  Related Guide. How to Get a Better Night's Sleep. Sleep is essential to better health. So how do you become a more successful sleeper? Grab a pillow and find out.Kitchens and Bathrooms. Customizing these spaces can add personality without requiring a gut renovation. Evaluate Cabinets and Counters. Changing kitchen counters is no small undertaking, but switching from an inexpensive material, like laminate, to a luxurious one, like marble, granite or quartzite, can significantly change the overall appearance of a kitchen or bathroom. The kitchen backsplash is another area ripe with opportunity. Even if you leave the existing counters in place, you can add or replace an existing backsplash using a favorite tile made from ceramic, glass, metal or cement.  If kitchen cabinets and the bathroom vanity cabinet are simple and in good shape, it’s often possible to paint them a new color for a different look. If the cabinet doors have a design that looks dated, you can sometimes keep the existing cabinets carcasses, and replace the doors only.  In the case of a cheap bathroom vanity, it’s often economical to replace the whole thing. Many companies offer prefabricated vanities, complete with matching tops and sinks. Focus on Things You Touch. Simply replacing cabinet pulls with new hardware can significantly change the look of a kitchen or bathroom. The kitchen and bathroom faucets are also no place to skimp – you touch them every day, so choose models that not only look good, but also have handles that feel reassuring when you turn them, and heads that offer the functionality you desire.  In a bathroom, this line of thinking extends to accessories as well – quality towel bars, robe hooks and toilet roll holders can all give the room an upgraded appearance at minimal cost. Refresh With Textiles. There’s no point in having nice towel bars if they’re holding frayed or mismatched towels. Recycle your old ones and buy new towels and washcloths in a single solid color (you deserve it). For a decorative accent, add patterned hand towels.  If there’s a mildewed shower curtain around the tub, replace it with one made from a pleasing material like linen, or a glass panel.  If the bathroom or kitchen floor leaves something to be desired, but you don’t want to go to the trouble or expense of tearing it out, you can cover it with a large woven vinyl rug or mat from a company like Chilewich or Bolon. Wirecutter productThe Best Bath Towel. Frontgate Resort Cotton Bath Towel. This is the softest towel we tested—it feels like a plush towel from a luxury hotel and comes in a wider variety of sumptuous colors than any other we found.More Wirecutter towel picksRight Arrow IconRight Arrow IconDon't Forget the Powder Room. Because it’s so small and used infrequently, a powder room is the perfect place to let your inner decorator run wild with bold colors and wall coverings.   “If you entertain, it’s so much fun to make it an unexpected, cool element,” that will surprise guests, said Mr. Olsen, who has designed powder rooms with wild wallpaper and mirrored wall panels.  That sentiment was echoed by Ms. Maxwell Foster: “Find a wall treatment you love, and just go for it.”  Finally, remember that decorating should be fun. By starting out with a plan, and following the same steps used by the pros, you’ll make the experience significantly less stressful that going at it in a haphazard fashion. And, hopefully, you’ll end up with the ultimate prize: the home of your dreams. About the Author. Tim McKeough writes about architecture and design, including the On Location and Shopping Guide columns, for The New York Times. 
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Title10 of the best British interior designers to know right now
Urlhttps://elledecoration.co.uk/decorating/g30043896/best-british-interior-designers-to-know/
DescriptionWe celebrate the hottest names in interior design, from Nune to Run for the Hills and Campbell-Rey, in our definitive list of interior designers to know now
Date28 Nov 2019
Organic Position17
H110 British interior designers to know right now
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body10 British interior designers to know right now From Campbell Rey to These White Walls, we profile the hottest names in interiors right now By Kiera Buckley-Jones 28/11/2019 Covet & Noir Considering the calibre of projects that find their way to us at ELLE Decoration, picking Britain's very best interior designers can feel a near-impossible feat. Rather than an inexhaustible A-Z, we've chosen ten to have on your radar now. Here we celebrate the most in-demand names in interior design, many of whom are blurring the lines between commercial, residential and furniture design with their inspiring and stylishly curated spaces. We can't wait to see what they do next... Advertisement - Continue Reading Below 1 Ben Thompson Ben Thompson A former director of Ilse Crawford’s StudioIlse, architect Ben Thompson initially worked at a small firm specialising in the restoration of historic country properties. ‘I became fascinated by the value of sensitive design on top of the architectural layer,’ he explains. This appreciation of period properties is evident in his biggest project to date, Heckfield Place in Hampshire. ‘The gut reaction was to go five star,’ says Thompson of the country house hotel. ‘We wanted to deliver that level of quality, being brave enough to offer less and give the experience a special, yet more domestic feel. And to engage with the landscape.’ The greatest reward, he says, was uniting like-minded individuals and craftspeople to bring the vision to life. bwtlondon.com 2 Campbell-Rey Campbell-Rey Duncan Campbell met Charlotte Rey in 2007 when the pair were teenagers, both working as editors on Acne Studio’s biannual magazine Acne Paper. Although Campbell studied law and Rey fashion history and theory, their creative partnership grew organically over time until they officially launched Campbell Rey in 2014. ‘We slowly built a design practice that now incorporates residential and commercial interior design, creative direction, and furniture and product design.’ Today, their projects span from branding and styling a hotel to designing a range of marble occasional tables and Murano glassware, reimagining Kartell’s ‘Componibili’ storage units, producing furniture for Punch Room Bar at The London Edition hotel, and even creating the trophy for the Elton John AIDS Foundation in 2017. Not to mention their art direction of books, plus styling and rebranding of a hotel. Increasingly, the core of the practice is interior design, with current projects including two restaurants, a penthouse in Mayfair and a house in Kent. Campbell’s north London home is pictured here. The duo work closely together but regularly collaborate with small teams depending on the creative endeavour – which, judging by their past record, could be just about anything. campbell-rey.com 3 Charles Mellersh Paul Raeside After studying architecture, Mellersh began his design career as a stylist and journalist, before setting up his studio in 2006. He describes his approach as ‘modern and warm’, often extensively quizzing clients to make sure they wholly understand how they intend to use their space. To inject personality, he searches the world for unique, often collectable pieces – such as in this west London property – including one-of-a-kind commissions from rising designers like Marcin Rusak. He is currently working on a restaurant and retail space in Notting Hill and a large New York apartment with Central Park views. charlesmellersh.com 4 Run for the Hills Tivoli Formed by husband-and-wife team interior designer Anna Burles and graphic artist Christopher Trotman in 2011, Run for the Hills is a multidisciplinary powerhouse, whose projects encompass homes, restaurants, bars, hotels and a cinema (the Tivoli in Bath; above). Their playful designs mix contemporary elements with a vintage industrial edge, think daring prints with raw surfaces. At this year’s Decorex, the duo has created a bedroom in the Design Encounter pop-up house. Next on the agenda is the transformation of an apartment in the south of France and a listed barn in the Cotswolds. runforthehills.com 5 Nune Nune Transatlantic practice Nune is run by interior design duo Sheena Murphy and Tor Sauder, British and Canadian, respectively. The pair met in New York where they have an office, although Murphy is now chiefly based in the UK. Together they have applied their clean and contemporary yet eclectic style to New Yorkers’ homes (above) as well as hospitality projects, including 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge – think pale woods, textured greys and cosy whites with fine black accents. With a philosophy that thoughtful design can enhance wellbeing, Nune incorporates locally sourced natural materials, the work of independent makers, and flea market finds in its schemes. The pair credit the work of Louis Khan, Carlo Scarpa and Axel Vervoordt as inspiration. nunenune.com 6 These White Walls These White Walls The opening of restaurant Hide on London’s Piccadilly last year caused a stir not just for the food (the head chef is Ollie Dabbous) but for the interiors. Designer Rose Murray, founder of These White Walls, had worked closely with plaster artist Rachel Dein – who produced the hand-cast botanical wall panels (above) – organic-matter artist Jeanette Ramirez and paper artist Su Blackwell. Murray knew the restaurant would provide ‘an amazing 3D canvas to showcase their work’. Hide has proved to be quite the international calling card – other projects in progress include private residences in Dubai and Hong Kong, as well as a boutique hotel and spa in northern Italy. thesewhitewalls.com 7 Sarah Delaney Design Sarah Delaney Design Sarah Delaney’s practice has been running for over 20 years, but her background is in TV and film production. Her designs have a quiet poise with a restrained colour palette, and carefully considered furniture pieces, many of them antique. Her work is ‘based on creating interiors which reflect our clients’ individual style and interests’, so it’s no wonder she has a lot of repeat commissions for their homes across the world, as well as this west London house. Working closely with top architects gives her an acute awareness of the building process, as well as ‘a rigorous attention to detail’. sarahdelaneydesign.co.uk 8 Fred Rigby Fred Rigby As well as designing furniture, Fred Rigby has created several shop interiors and the Villa Lena hotel-cum-art foundation in Italy, pictured here. He also recently collaborated with Rosa Park, editor-in-chief of Cereal magazine, on the interior of her latest project, the Francis Gallery in Bath, and conceived the newly launched ‘Pebble’ sofa for design agency House of Grey. Next up? A bar and restaurant in Shoreditch, a jewellery showroom and his own range of furniture based on the theme of contemporary classicism, which is how he would describe his style: ‘modern with a leaning towards the past, drawing inspiration from nature and our surroundings’. fredrigby.com 9 Covet & Noir Covet & Noir Having worked together for years as commercial and residential interior designers on projects in London and New York City, Adele Lonergan and Maria Lindgren set up their joint venture, Covet & Noir, last year. They've already completed several London-based residences, including a Notting Hill villa (above) and a mews house in the redevelopment of an iconic recording studio near Portobello Road. A Flemish Renaissance-style townhouse in London’s Marylebone and a villa in Ibiza are next on the cards. Lonergan and Lindgren describe their style as ‘timeless and considered’, want their ‘designs to last rather than be slaves to trends’ and ‘love mixing modern pieces with antiques and pairing more refined details with organic touches'. covetnoir.com 10 Studio Duggan Studio Duggan Director of her eponymous studio, Tiffany Duggan says that her first flavour of interior design came when she interned at ELLE Decoration some ten years ago. Her theatrical flair is evident – she studied Scenic Art at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama – and she likes to inject a ‘touch of the unexpected’ with clever colour layering, furniture upholstered in strong hues and prints juxtaposed against walls in sophisticated shades, as in this north London house. Her practice designs residential projects across Europe, and recently launched the ‘Trove’ line of bedroom products. studioduggan.com This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io Advertisement - Continue Reading Below More From British Design Richard Brendon on his new collection with the V&A ELLE Decoration British Design Award winners 2021 Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Introducing L.Ercolani, Ercol’s new sister brand Name to know: British designer Fred Rigby Henry Holland on his new ceramics collection Why is stylish stationery such an enduring joy? Behind the design: the ‘Balzac’ armchair by SCP Mother of Pearl’s first sustainable homeware range The best bespoke furniture makers in the UK Urban Splash: property developer with a difference British Design Decorating Name to know: British designer Fred Rigby The new interiors showroom to know about The hot new names in design to have on your radar BRITISH DESIGN AWARDS 2016 British Design Awards 2015 British Design Awards 2019 Winners
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Title75 Beautiful Living Room Ideas and Designs - January 2022 | Houzz UK
Urlhttps://www.houzz.co.uk/photos/living-room-ideas-and-designs-phbr0-bp~t_10272
DescriptionBrowse these beautiful Living Room ideas and designs. Get inspiration for living room layouts, colours and more lounge ideas
Date
Organic Position18
H1Living Room Ideas and Designs
H2Living room wallpaper ideas
Small living room ideas
Living room layouts and choosing the right living room furniture
Living room design ideas
Living room storage ideas
H3
H2WithAnchorsLiving room wallpaper ideas
Small living room ideas
Living room layouts and choosing the right living room furniture
Living room design ideas
Living room storage ideas
BodyLiving Room Ideas and DesignsAll Filters (2)StyleContemporary Modern Traditional Eclectic Rustic Country Mediterranean Coastal Scandinavian Midcentury Industrial Victorian Shabby-Chic Style World SizeCompact (37900)Medium (206243)Large (142612)Expansive (18739)ColourRed(10,849)Orange(13,364)Wood Tones(14,553)Yellow(9,189)Green(16,262)Turquoise(8,009)Blue(11,684)Violet(1,656)Pink(1,404)Black(58,846)Grey(103,999)White(200,967)Beige(92,058)Brown(330,677)TypeEnclosed (93646)Mezzanine (19175)Open (289003)SpecialityFormal (147728)Home Bar (8594)Music Room (7160)Reading Nook (24428)TVAll TVs (172404)Built-in Media Unit (26891)Concealed (8987)Corner (464)Freestanding (37804)None (106689)Wall-mounted (98157)Wall ColourBeige (113499)Black (3100)Blue (18280)Brown (12483)Green (10381)Grey (79767)Multi-coloured (7611)Orange (1638)Pink (1439)Purple (1231)Red (2470)White (175547)Yellow (10566)Floor MaterialMedium Hardwood (128936)Light Hardwood (95025)Dark Hardwood (82460)Carpet (34318)Porcelain Tile (16998)Ceramic Tile (14421)Concrete (13881)Laminate (9264)Marble (6053)Vinyl (5667)Travertine (4018)Painted Wood (3355)Limestone (2643)Plywood (2329)Bamboo (2134)Terracotta Tile (1757)Slate (1539)Lino (654)Tatami (582)Cork (519)Brick (397)FireplaceAll Fireplaces (223821)Standard (165437)None (78625)Ribbon (19460)Wood Burning Stove (12124)Two-sided (11389)Corner (10795)Hanging (4222)Fireplace SurroundAll Fireplace Surrounds (201903)Brick (20085)Concrete (8104)Metal (12341)Plaster (16644)Stacked Stone (1124)Stone (91117)Tile (32786)Timber Clad Chimney Breast (310)Wood (19318)Floor ColourBeige (47483)Black (3009)Blue (735)Brown (109262)Green (394)Grey (25450)Multi-coloured (3414)Orange (707)Pink (158)Purple (43)Red (724)Turquoise (53)White (8621)Yellow (845)Ceiling DesignAll Ceiling Designs (18801)Coffered (1832)Drop (2490)Exposed Beam (4707)Timber Cladding (855)Vaulted (4427)Wallpaper (1994)Wood (2211)Wall TreatmentAll Wall Treatments (13248)Brick (1185)Panelling (1738)Tongue and Groove (1151)Wainscoting (1276)Wallpaper (5148)Wood (1611)FeaturesChimney Breast (235)Curtains (1774)Dado Rail (102)Feature Wall (1242)Lighting (5954)Popular Colour CombinationsCream and Black (47)Grey and Black (119)Grey and Brown (122)Grey and Cream (219)Grey and Pink (33)Grey and Purple (39)Grey and Teal (2796)Grey and White (857)Grey and Yellow (175)Refine by:Budget£ (17499)££ (92015)£££ (116893)££££ (36899)Sort by:Popular TodayPopular TodayLatest ActivityAll Time PopularNewly Featured1 - 20 of 1,661,631 photosModernVictorianContemporaryWood Burning StoveScandinavianTraditionalCompactOpenCountryNonePreviousNextItem 1 of 12Save PhotoRitson RoadGresford Architects LtdThis is an example of a bohemian living room in London.Save PhotoCanadacraig Enterprise LtdZAC and ZAC - PhotographyⒸ ZAC+ZACThis is an example of a traditional formal enclosed living room in Other with brown walls, carpet, a standard fireplace, beige floors, panelled walls and wood walls.Save PhotoVintage in the countrysideOla Jachymiak StudioThis holistic project involved the design of a completely new space layout, as well as searching for perfect materials, furniture, decorations and tableware to match the already existing elements of the house. The key challenge concerning this project was to improve the layout, which was not functional and proportional. Balance on the interior between contemporary and retro was the key to achieve the effect of a coherent and welcoming space. Passionate about vintage, the client possessed a vast selection of old trinkets and furniture. The main focus of the project was how to include the sideboard,(from the 1850’s) which belonged to the client’s grandmother, and how to place harmoniously within the aerial space. To create this harmony, the tones represented on the sideboard’s vitrine were used as the colour mood for the house. The sideboard was placed in the central part of the space in order to be visible from the hall, kitchen, dining room and living room. The kitchen fittings are aligned with the worktop and top part of the chest of drawers. Green-grey glazing colour is a common element of all of the living spaces. In the the living room, the stage feeling is given by it’s main actor, the grand piano and the cabinets of curiosities, which were rearranged around it to create that effect. A neutral background consisting of the combination of soft walls and minimalist furniture in order to exhibit retro elements of the interior. Long live the vintage!Save PhotoContemporary Living RoomThis is an example of a contemporary living room in London.Save PhotoLizzie GreenBen Sage PhotographyClassic living room in London with white walls, a built-in media unit and grey floors.Save PhotoBeautiful home in SW3Domus NovaInspiration for a scandi living room in London.Save PhotoFilly IslandUnique HomestaysInspiration for a medium sized farmhouse living room in Gloucestershire with white walls, a corner fireplace, a wall mounted tv and beige floors.Save PhotoNew homes at Dean's Mews LondonADAM ArchitectureInspiration for a classic formal and cream and black living room in Hampshire with beige walls, light hardwood flooring, a standard fireplace and no tv.Save PhotoBattersea TownhouseBroseleyWe carried out a demolition and rebuild of this beautiful terrace house, located just off Battersea park. Design and build in partnership with LPE Designs. Interior Designer: LPE Designs Photographer: Nick SmithSave PhotoEuropean Inspiration in CultraAdornas Kitchens & InteriorsThis is an example of a contemporary living room in Other with beige walls, medium hardwood flooring, a standard fireplace and brown floors.Save PhotoMilngavie extensionBreagh ArchitectsDesign ideas for a classic enclosed living room in Glasgow with grey walls, medium hardwood flooring, a wood burning stove and brown floors.Save PhotoMayfair ProjectMays PhotographyThis is an example of an expansive contemporary enclosed living room in London with a music area.Save PhotoKensington RowVeronica Rodriguez Interior PhotographyPhoto of a contemporary living room in London.Save PhotoYellow HouseC O A LBohemian open plan living room in Cornwall with white walls, light hardwood flooring and beige floors.Save PhotoSugdenMalondaphotosClassic living room in London.Save PhotoBarratt London - Eastman Village - Show Home 1Casa e ProgettiDesign ideas for a contemporary living room in London.Save PhotoDalston Victorian HouseEmilie Fournet InteriorsThe blue walls of the living room add a relaxed feel to this room. The many features such as original floor boards, the victorian fireplace, the working shutters and the ornate cornicing and ceiling rose were all restored to their former glory.Save PhotoLiving RoomRukmini Patel Interior DesignDesign ideas for a classic living room in Other with white walls and a standard fireplace.Save PhotoGlycena Road SW11.Cannon Photos LtdThis is an example of a traditional living room in London.Save PhotoNorthumberland Stone CottageStudio DeanThis rural cottage in Northumberland was in need of a total overhaul, and thats exactly what it got! Ceilings removed, beams brought to life, stone exposed, log burner added, feature walls made, floors replaced, extensions built......you name it, we did it! What a result! This is a modern contemporary space with all the rustic charm you'd expect from a rural holiday let in the beautiful Northumberland countryside. Book In now here: https://www.bridgecottagenorthumberland.co.uk/?fbclid=IwAR1tpc6VorzrLsGJtAV8fEjlh58UcsMXMGVIy1WcwFUtT0MYNJLPnzTMq0w123456789Next PageLooking for living room ideas? Whether your living room is lacklustre, your lounge is limited in space, your sitting room is suffering from outdated decor or your front room is full of clutter, there are living room ideas and designs that will inspire you to breathe life into your living space. Discover small living room ideas to help maximise tiny spaces or layout ideas that will work with awkward shaped living rooms. Perhaps you’re struggling to decide on living room colours? Read on for help with colours, layout and design ideas, or find inspiration from the millions of living room photos on Houzz. Living room wallpaper ideas. A good place to start when it comes to redesigning your living room is with the walls. While paint may seem the simplest choice, and easy to change, don’t discredit the design opportunities of wallpaper in living rooms. There are tons of great living room wallpaper ideas, from modern geometric patterns to traditional florals, and loads of ways to use them – you don’t have to cover the whole room or go for the ubiquitous feature wall. You could wallpaper only above the dado rail (if you have one), either side of a chimney breast, or behind a shelving unit to give your displayed items a stylish backdrop.Discover more living room wallpaper ideas or if paint is more your style, there’s plenty of living room designs to discover when it comes to paint ideas; just browse through the huge selection of living photos and search for the specific paint you’re after if you really want to narrow it down.Small living room ideas. When it comes to our living room design, we want it to feel as welcoming and personality-filled as possible, but that can be a struggle when we’re working with a small space. But not to fear, there are small living room ideas to help you make most out of what you’re working with.A couple of small living room ideas can include: working with the height you have – installing floor-to-ceiling bookshelves or drawing the eye to the top of the walls with wallpaper; choosing space-saving or storage-incorporating (or both!) furniture, such as corner sofas with storage space under the chaise longue section; and keeping things symmetrical – a central fireplace with seating opposite, or seats facing each other, can give the illusion of a larger, more grand room. When it comes to the best decor for small living rooms, you can either choose to keep things light and airy to open up the space, or embrace the cosiness of the smaller area you have by going for warm colours and filling the room with your favourite accessories.Living room layouts and choosing the right living room furniture. When it comes to the layout of your living room, it will depend on what pieces of furniture you have – but how do you choose what living room furniture to add, whether you’re refreshing your living room design or starting from scratch?The best place to start is with the seating – one corner sofa will usually seat three to four people, and if that’s all you think you’ll need, then you can leave it at that. Placing your sofa along the longest wall helps to make the most of the space, but think about where you want the focus of the room to be, too. If you need more seating, look at armchairs that offer comfort but don’t take up too much space – cramming a room with too many large armchairs is something to avoid. But armchairs and sofas don’t have to be your only options – go for bean bags and floor cushions for an eclectic feel, pouffes and ottomans if you’re more traditional, and smart design chairs for contemporary living room ideas.Coffee tables are always handy, but you can always add a couple of side tables if you don’t want to clutter the central space in front of seating with anything. If you centre your living room design around a fireplace or TV, then you might want storage and shelving to feature around the focus of your room. There are plenty of style options when it comes to TV units, and you can even go for bespoke living room storage units to make the most of the space if you want a sleek, built-in look. Keep reading below for more living room storage ideas.Discover a huge range of living room furniture, as well as living room accessories, to help you finish your room design.Living room design ideas. Struggling with what living room colours to choose, or what style to go with? While a grey living room design is popular at the moment, you might not want to go with the ubiquitous colour. Although, if neutral and contemporary are the living room ideas you’re after, a grey sofa or grey walls will give you a good base to work on. If you want to stay neutral, beige is not your only other option, either. Light yellows, taupes and soft greys will work. Why not try adding simple but plush cushions to your sofa and a rug in these colours to achieve a modern-traditional look? For contemporary living room ideas, dark blues and greens are on trend, but if you don’t want to dive straight into the dark wall trend, you could opt for a couple of pieces of furniture, or go for dark-hued living room accessories instead. Whites, woods and pastels could work well for Scandinavian living room designs. If an eclectic living room is what you’re after, you could go for large print wallpaper, a statement lighting piece, vibrant rug and lots of colourful book or ornament displays. For a country feel, rustic carpet, stone hearths, comfy armchairs and traditional patterns in creams, greens and browns will give you that cosy cottage feel.Living room storage ideas. It’s natural that our living rooms tend to attract lots of items and belongings seeing as they act as multipurpose living spaces. Whether you love to read a book; watch a film; let your children play with their toys; practise a craft like knitting or drawing; play a musical instrument or play video games in your sitting room, there will always be a need for a few extra living room ideas that can help you with storage.Apart from the standard bookcases, side tables and TV units, there are a few other handy living room storage ideas you can invest in. As mentioned before, if you have the room and budget for it, a built-in storage unit could be the way forward. With a well-built unit you could hide your TV, DVDs, players, books, video consoles and all sorts away in one place. If you don’t quite have a large enough area for one, you could look at shelving – either side of the chimney breast is a great place to install shelving if you have one in your living room. And don’t forget living room furniture such as sofas, benches and ottomans that lift up to reveal hidden storage; providing seating and storing space at the same time. With the right storage solutions your living room design could open up and feel so much more spacious and stylish.Discover more living room storage ideas by browsing these photos.Once you have your living room storage, colours, design, layout and furniture sorted, all that’s left is to browse the millions of living room ideas on Houzz and save your favourites to an ideabook. If you’re still searching for specific living room ideas, check out the popular pages below:Living room lighting ideasCosy living roomsGrey sofa living roomsWhether you want inspiration for planning a living room renovation or are building a designer living room from scratch, Houzz has 1,661,623 images from the best designers, decorators, and architects in the country, including Emilie Fournet Interiors and Veronica Rodriguez Interior Photography. Look through living room photos in different colours and styles and when you find a living room design that inspires you, save it to an Ideabook or contact the Pro who made it happen to see what kind of design ideas they have for your home. Explore the beautiful living room ideas photo gallery and find out exactly why Houzz is the best experience for home renovation and design.Read MoreUnited KingdomSelect countryUnited StatesUnited KingdomAustraliaDeutschlandFranceРоссия日本ItaliaEspañaDanmarkSverigeIrelandSingaporeNew ZealandIndiaABOUTCAREERSMOBILE APPSPROFESSIONALSBUTTONSADVERTISETerms & Privacy© 2022 Houzz Inc. 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Title49 stylish living room ideas to copy now | House & Garden
Urlhttps://www.houseandgarden.co.uk/gallery/living-room-ideas-and-designs
DescriptionLiving room ideas and lounge ideas from some of the world's best interior designers. Whether you're decorating a modern flat or an old cottage, we've got furniture, lighting and colour inspiration
Date6 Oct 2021
Organic Position19
H149 stylish living room ideas to copy now
H2How to choose your living room furniture
How to accessorise a living room
The art of the living room
Grey Plaster Walls | Modern Country Living Room Ideas
Concealed Television | Living Room Design Ideas
H3
H2WithAnchorsHow to choose your living room furniture
How to accessorise a living room
The art of the living room
Grey Plaster Walls | Modern Country Living Room Ideas
Concealed Television | Living Room Design Ideas
Body49 stylish living room ideas to copy nowStylish living room ideas from some of the world’s best interior designers. Whether you're decorating a modern flat or an old cottage, we've got furniture, lighting and colour inspiration.By Emily Senior6 October 2021FacebookTwitterEmailPinterestMaree HomerThere are so many elements involved in decorating a living room. Starting with the bones of the room, there are paint colours and flooring to decide on, which will set the tone of the space. We love the distinguished feel of timber flooring, preferably with some rugs layered on top for softness. It's essential to make the most of any architectural features within your lounge ideas. Consider putting in some joinery and bookcases that can help you make the most of the room's height and provide valuable storage. If you're lucky enough to have a fireplace, make it a focal point, arranging your sofas and chairs to face it, and decorating the mantelpiece with pictures and ornaments.MAY WE SUGGEST: Christmas decoration ideasHow to choose your living room furniture. At that point, it's time to consider how to choose your living room furniture, taking into account how you use the space, what kind of sofa you prefer, how many armchairs you can fit in, whether you need a sofa bed, and the importance of a coffee table or ottoman, and of course side tables to put a drink on. The right furniture can make a huge difference to the feeling of a room. Consider the scale of it - you don't want tiny furniture drowning in a huge room, although small living rooms can often benefit from some oversized furniture. In an open plan living room-cum-kitchen, furniture can be essential for breaking up the space; a sofa with its back turned to the dining table is a handy way of differentiating between the living space and the dining space. And consider how you use your furniture before you make the final decision - do you prefer to lounge on a squashy sofa or is this a more formal room where you'd prefer to sit upright?How to accessorise a living room. Finally you can get to the really fun bits, the textiles and accessories. The size and shape of your window might dictate your choices when it comes to curtains and blinds, but there's a huge variety out there to choose from. Perhaps you like simple, elegant curtains in heavy linen or wool, or something brighter and chintzier for a more eye-catching feel. In a small room, you may well prefer to stick to blinds, but think about getting them in a fun pattern so that they become a decorative feature. Almost every living room will be in need of a good rug, whether you opt for rustic sisal, a modern Berber rug or a traditional Turkish carpet. And then what’s a sofa without some beautiful cushions? They’re essential for adding colour and pattern to a room.The art of the living room. Turning our attention back to the walls, the final thing you'll need is some art, so don't miss our shopping guide to affordable art, as well as our advice on how to start a collection. And once you've assembled it all, find out the best ways to hang your pictures on the walls, with helpful tips for gallery walls, statement art and everything in between.If you're in need of inspiration, we've gathered the best living room designs and lounge ideas from the House & Garden archive here to help with your decoration, from country houses to studio flats and London townhouses.Paul Massey1/49Native ShareThe living room of textiles dealer Susan Deliss' French country home is painted a soft blue, this perfectly counter balances her electic mix of patterned fabrics. The red sofa, from George Smith, looks fabulous covered in a vibrant collection of cushions.Martin Morrell2/49Native ShareFor their latest house, a 19th-century barn with outbuildings in Oxfordshire, Mark and Georgie Rowse have drawn on their extensive renovation experience – and their address book of specialist artisans – to create a characterful and welcoming home for themselves, their family and a host of visiting friends. A velvet-covered antique sofa and a specially commissioned ottoman upholstered in an old rug make this sitting room an appealing spot to relax.Paul Massey3/49Native ShareAfter having to leave her house in Chelsea, Alexandra Tolstoy has established a new base in London for her family and a workspace, which she has filled with furniture, textiles and folk-art pieces. Walls painted in ‘Pimlico Green’ by Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler for Fenwick & Tilbrook contrast with woodwork in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Black Blue’. The armchair, from Love Your Home, is covered in ‘Sirin’ linen in terracotta from Volga Linen. The sheep is an antique sourced by Daniel Slowik of Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. Luke Irwin designed the Persian-inspired ‘Blue Popper’ rug.Paul Massey4/49Native ShareInterior designer Octavia Dickinson has put together an appealing blend of antique finds, favourite fabrics and bespoke pieces to create a comfortable, colourful home for her family in south London. The walls are painted in coral ‘1-023’ from Papers and Paints. Two paintings by Caroline Popham hang above a sofa upholstered in ‘Anura’ linen by Robert Kime. In front of the window are two armchairs from The French House. Octavia designed the ottoman, upholstered in ‘Pienza’ by Clarence House’, and the stools, covered in Pierre Frey’s ‘Romi’ and Linwood’s ‘Omega Velvet’.Simon Brown5/49Native ShareThe sitting room in Emma Burns' London flat is painted in Papers & Paints' HC 9-094, a gentle background for Emma's extensive collection of 20th century art. Green accents run through the space, which is grounded by the rich brown upholstery of the sofa. Emma had the shelving unit custom made, with a small desk that pulls out on one side.Simon Upton6/49Native ShareNicky Haslam teamed up with his former protegées, Jena Quinn and Lucy Derbyshire of Studio QD, to renovate this London house previously split into two flats to create an exuberantly elegant single home. Walls, curtains and chairs in Rose Tarlow’s ‘Bloomsbury’ chintz provide a floral backdrop for antique pieces including family portraits, a Chinese lacquered table, an Indian carpet and an Italian neoclassical 18th-century mirror. A table lamp from Christopher Butterworth – its base a Sixties Vallauris ceramic vase – stands on a console table covered in the same fabric as the sofa beside it – ‘Orizzonti’ in dusty lilac from Opuzen. Above the English 19th-century wooden chimneypiece in the Rococo style, from Westland London, is a series of gold uplighters, one of them an antique design, which Nicky reproduced to create a set of six.Mark Anthony Fox7/49Native ShareInterior designer Kathryn Tyler has renovated this Cornish cottage in a relaxed and contemporary style, opening up the layout and installing vast windows that frame the extraordinary sea views. An ash-framed picture window provides uninterrupted views of Perprean Cove. Cushions in vintage French linen line the windowsill. The perforated brass pendants are from Vilhelm Lauritzen and the West African Senufo coffee table was picked up by Kathryn on one of her sourcing trips.Alexander James8/49Native ShareThis Victorian villa was given a meticulous rethink by architectural design studio De Rosee Sa, resulting in the exciting reinvention of a south London family home. Walls in ‘Morph’ by Colour Makes People Happy set off ochre sofas by Søren Lund from Another Country. The painting above the original chimneypiece is by Tessa Schneideman. The blown-glass pieces are by glass artist Peter Layton at London Glassblowing. The marble ‘Cluster Coffee Table’ is by De Rosee Sa.Rachel Whiting9/49Native ShareIn Gabby Deeming's Bloomsbury flat, a ‘Poirot’ armchair, designed by Gabby for Arlo & Jacob’s House & Garden range, is between Jali shelving and a Sika trolley. The choice of 'Caddie' from Paint & Paper Library for the walls pulls the whole room together.Paul Massey10/49Native ShareThis vibrant living room belongs to none other than Rita Konig, in her County Durham farmhouse. Walls in 'Invisible Green' by Edward Bulmer Natural Paints set off a sofa from David Bedale Antiques in a vintage fabric and a yellow-upholstered Gillows armchair. The coffee tables, possibly from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler, stand on a rug from Robert Kime.Simon Brown11/49Native ShareThe dynamics of a family business can be complicated, especially when the time comes to hand it on, but interior decorator Chester Jones and his son Toby have managed a seamless transition as evidenced by their collaboration on this 19th-century house in Oxfordshire. The double drawing room is vast, but is so cleverly arranged into seating areas that its atmosphere is one of calm and comfort.Rugs can be a helpful way to divide the space and define different areas in a large room. Here, two rugs from Afridi Gallery serve this purpose. On one side, a Bijar kilim is teamed with a kilim-covered 17th-century chair and paintings by Ivon Hitchens and Patrick Heron, among others.Simon Brown12/49Native ShareEach area of the open-plan main room in this small west London flat has its own distinct atmosphere, thanks to the inventive details introduced by interior designer Beata Heuman, who relished the creative challenge of making every inch count. Though the room is small, it has high ceilings, which she has taken full advantage of with customised joinery. ‘With all that vertical volume, extending details like the artwork and bookshelves draws the eye upwards,’ says Beata.The sofas are in tonal shades of blue and green. One bespoke sofa is covered in Designs of the Time’s ‘Halian’ (YP15033) linen from John Boyd Textiles with a cushion in Beata Heuman’s ‘Marbleized Velvet’. The other sofa is in Lelièvre’s ‘Cosmos’ velvet in conifere with cushions in Nicky Haslam Design’s ‘Shutter Stripe’. Above it hangs a Surface View map, next to a ‘Belles Rives Bar Table’ by Rita Konig for The Lacquer Company.Maree Homer13/49Native ShareA small space is a great opportunity to go bold with colour, as this living room in a Sydney cottage by Lisa Burdus attests. On the ground floor, walls papered in Osborne & Little’s ‘Chroma’ in the apple colourway match woodwork painted in ‘Purslane’ from Dulux. Peter Meyer’s ‘Urban Weave’ blinds tone with ‘Tuscan Casina’ sisal matting from International Floorcoverings. Two French armchairs from Palace Trader Antiques have been re-covered in ‘Mini Weave’ by Susan Deliss. The two cane chairs by the window were sourced in Morocco and painted red.Paul Massey14/49Native ShareThe zinc-topped coffee table in the drawing room is from The Conran Shop; Marion Lichtig designed the sofa beyond it, in a simple style to contrast with the antique furniture.Paul Massey15/49Native ShareIn the open-plan living room of a Berkshire house by Nicola Harding, the seating area has a sofa from Sofa.com and vintage armchairs reupholstered in a striped fabric from Tissus d’Hélène. The walls are painted in ‘Tracery’ and the woodwork in ‘Normandy Grey’, both by Little Greene. The furniture here is deeply comfortable; for advice on choosing sofas, armchairs, tables and much more, see our guide to how to choose living room furniture.Michael Sinclair16/49Native ShareThe sofas in Guy Tobin's south London house were made for the space; a sensible investment in a small living room. They have been covered in cotton velvets – the yellow one is in Lelièvre’s ‘Cosmos’. The coffee table is topped with Lumachella antica; this stone also features on the fireplace, combined with a mid-eighteenth-century carved pine surround. To the right of this is a Lucian Freud etching.Alexander James17/49Native ShareThe eighteenth-century painting above the Victorian chimneypiece provides a focal point in the living room of Colefax designer Wendy Nicholl's London flat, with its grisaille walls painted by Jessica Fletcher at Colefax and Fowler. The pale walls, depicting natural forms and classical columns, are offset by a bright and glossy red coffee table. Although the pattern is hand-painted, this room is a great source of inspiration for living room wallpaper.Elsa Young18/49Native ShareHenrietta Courtauld, one half of The Land Gardeners, and the owner of this 1850s London terrace house commissioned architect and designer Maria Speake of Retrouvius to decorate this duck egg blue living room.'Both Henrietta and I love a bit of twinkle in a room,' says Maria. Here this comes from a Seventies mirror that hangs above the marble chimneypiece, and from the two eye-level cupboards in the recesses, with removable glass fronts that open to reveal pictures pinned to the fabric behind.'Henrietta has a terrific eye for objects and colour,' says Maria, 'and all the furniture was hers, so I just suggested we upholster it in antique grain sacks and French linen sheets to tie the room together.' The pristine appearance of this white upholstery speaks volumes about the forbearance of Arthur, the family's long-haired Jack Russell. Colour in the room comes from the hand-dyed velvet cushions by Kirsten Hecktermann.Paul Massey19/49Native ShareIn this minimal Manhattan home designed by Rita Konig, Fortuny 'Persiano' cotton (now discontinued) was used to make the blinds for the three large windows in the living room. Having discovered Jacques Adnet through Rita, the owner now has a piece by the French designer in almost every room - here it is a pair of round tables. The Clifford Ross picture above the chimneypiece was bought at New York gallery Sonnabend.Davide Lovatti20/49Native ShareWalls in ‘Nabis’ by Adam Bray for Papers and Paints set off a mix of Ensemblier furniture in Tara Craig's tiny London flat. A ‘Hanmer’ sofa in a Jasper fabric by Michael S Smith and a George Spencer velvet is paired with ‘Montgomery’ chairs in Howe’s ‘Knurl’ linen, a ‘Trafalgar’ armchair in Howe leather and a ‘Lissadell’ ottoman in ‘Nathalie’ cotton by Claremont. The curtains are in Marialida’s ‘Louvres’ in mocha/antique white from Tissus d’Hélène. With its ceiling light, sconces, and table lamps, this is an exemplary arrangement of living room lighting.Paul Massey21/49Native ShareThe drawing room in a Padstow house by Marion Lichtig encapsulates the 'seaside-meets country' look of the interior, with its nineteenth century scallop-backed chair and rustic fireplace.Paul Massey22/49Native ShareArtist and maker Bridie Hall has made her mark on her Victorian house in north London with eclectic collections of antique finds and her own eye-catching works set against bold blocks of colour. At the far end of the living room, an Eero Saarinen dining table with Hans Wegner ‘Wishbone’ chairs overlooks the garden. Bridie’s collection of antique volcano paintings, acquired over the years, frames the large window.Sharyn Cairns23/49Native ShareSimple pieces of Georgian furniture, including a glazed bureau bookcase, have been used in the sitting room of Ben Pentreath's Georgian parsonage. The effect is eclectic and welcoming.'The sitting room seemed to need pink... After splashing splodges of various pinks about, I called Patrick Baty at Papers and Paints and he mixed exactly the right shade that warmed and softened the room.' The colour is now in one of Patrick's paint ranges - naturally called 'Parsonage Pink'. The furniture is simple - no flounces, ormolu or unwanted frilly bits; nothing that is not appropriate. But more than that, nothing that is not pretty. It is quiet, peaceful and comfortable.Having taken on the lease of a Georgian parsonage situated in a Dorset village, Ben Pentreath set about furnishing and gently restoring it, making an impact with small, considered changes.Jake Curtis24/49Native ShareIn the living room of designer Ben Pentreath's flat, the walls of the sitting room are hung with a pale grey grasscloth, which provides a neutral background for the brightly coloured upholstery, including the flame-coloured ottoman, trimmed with 'Grand Galon Athenee' from Clarence House at Turnell & Gigon, and the mint-green armchair from Pentreath & Hall.It makes a subtle background for the furniture too, which is a clever mix of periods, such as a Regency sideboard and mid-twentieth-century pieces including a Hans J Wegner chair and a favourite Fornasetti 'Palladiana' chest, bought from Themes & Variations gallery. The fireplace overmantle is from the Aesthetic Movement. On the right, a Gesso lamp base from Pentreath & Hall is topped by a Green 'Turquoise Flower' Ikat Lampshade by Melodi Horne.Lucas Allen25/49Native ShareWhen two architects bought one of the smallest houses in New York, they transformed the interior, creating a bijou interior with a sense of spaciousness that belies its exterior appearance.The pink velvet sofa in the sitting room was purchased at auction.Michael Sinclair26/49Native ShareDesigner Patrick Williams has carefully transformed an eighteenth-century house in Bath into a welcoming home. In the library on the first floor, the family's Penguin and Pelican books are housed in bookcases made by Patrick, who combined new shelves with Georgian architraves. The rug belonged to his grandparents and survived a Second World War bomb blast.Simon Upton27/49Native ShareThe scheme for the drawing room in this restored farmhouse was designed around a set of seventeenth-century Soho tapestries, which hang on each side of the chimneypiece. Various shades of green, notably the British racing green velvet armchairs and the white and lime green chairs, bring the room together.28/49Native Share'It's a touch of Duchess of Windsor,' comments designer Douglas Mackie of the Maison Jansen Louis XV-style writing table in the right hand corner of his Marylebone living room - the French firm of decorators numbered Wallis Simpson among its prestigious clients in the middle decades of the twentieth century, and were known for creating reproduction pieces like this, that are now highly sought after in their own right.Mixing decorative eras with finesse, a Sandra Blow painting is flanked by a pair of twentieth-century, tortoiseshell chairs, bought from Michael Pruskin of the Pruskin Gallery and covered in a custom-made silk by Toyine Sellers. The tables and rug are of Douglas' own design.Michael Sinclair29/49Native ShareIn the London home of Lady Wakefield and her late husband Peter decided to move their drawing room up to the first floor. Here, they created a comfortable space with panelled walls and purposely unmatched upholstery that mix well with paintings and objects acquired over the past three decades. Two rugs from Turkey demarcate separate sitting areas, while bookshelves on either side of the original marble chimneypiece display ceramics from Iran.Mel Yates30/49Native ShareThe sofa in the drawing room of this Hampshire vicarage designed by Max Rollitt dates from the Regency period. The walls are lined with prints and Adam Calkin's 'Chateau' wallpaper from Lewis & Wood.Click to see Max Rollitt's style file.Simon Brown31/49Native ShareWhen Emma Burns inherited the former stables that her parents had progressively converted as a weekend retreat, she put into practice the principles that guide her professional work as a designer. The oak corner cupboard is eighteenth century and came from Cowbridge in Wales.Michael Sinclair32/49Native ShareThe owners of this London house have called upon the expertise of Maddux Creative's design duo to maximise space and light, and play up the distinctive period details. On the first floor, this modern living room is a glamorous space, where curved furniture and voluminous curtains in a Bruno Triplet taffeta reflect the curved shape of the window and ornate architraves.Simon Upton33/49Native ShareThe small but perfectly formed sitting room in the designer Nicky Haslam's country house is the ideal cosy space. The low Victorian bench, upholstered in petit point, takes the place of a coffee table. 'An informal sitting room should be a place where guests feel like they can put their feet on the furniture, with everything at hand," says Nicky. "Next to sofas should be a place to rest things at arm's length. This may seem like a silly detail, but it is an important one in practice.''The irregularly plastered walls were originally covered in a time-remembered recipe of bull's blood and distemper. This soft colour gives a complexion-flattering glow, especially if the buff card-shaded lamps are lit. Use subdued light upwards, but bright pools below for reading. A dirt-colour hair-cord carpet covers the floor, over which I have layered a white flokati rug from Greece. They are cheap as chips, and you can bin them when they're past it. The sofas are slip-covered in 'Jaisalmer' by John Stefanidis, a hard-wearing off­-white cotton. The covers are the same ones I had when I first moved in 40 years ago and they still don't need to be replaced.'For more advice and images of this house, see 'Nicky Haslam's Folly de Grandeur: Romance and Revival in an English Country House' (Jacqui Small, £40)Ngoc Minh Ngo34/49Native ShareUmberto Pasti’s sitting room in Tangier has many treasures on display, including Moroccan tiles, a Flemish tapestry and a Turkish kilim.Sharyn Cairns35/49Native SharePlenty of seating is arranged around an ottoman in the sitting room of designer Ben Pentreath's Georgian parsonage, including a sofa from Max Rollitt, an original Howard & Sons armchair bought at a local auction, and a Regency cane bergère chair. The black linen-covered fireside chair is the 'Chauffeuse' from Pentreath & Hall.Paul Massey36/49Native ShareThe sitting area in Rita Konig's London flat is a masterclass in layering, with textiles in different patterns and textures covering the sofas and cushions; Etro's red cotton velvet 'Palinuro' from Pierre Frey is used on one sofa and China Seas' 'Ziggurat' from Tissus d'Hélène on the other. The open fireplace surrounded by a chimneypiece found at Petworth Antique Centre, and walls covered with a mix of framed prints, photographs, drawings and paintings, add to the relaxed look.Owen Gale37/49Native ShareIn the library room of the Suffolk house, Susan used a fabric she found in a shop on Paris' left bank and upholstered the sofas in a hard-wearing fabric that wouldn't be ruined by the dogs of the house.Paul Massey38/49Native ShareIn the drawing room of Clare Mosley's Georgian house, the atmosphere is warm and cosy, especially with the fireplace lit. Chimneypieces were truffle-hunted from the backyards of various dealers in north London, since the owners were very particular that these should be of the same period as the house. The light in front of the right window was once an aspidistra stand, which Mark converted. The sofa is from George Sherlock.Michael Sinclair39/49Native ShareGrey Plaster Walls | Modern Country Living Room Ideas. Jo Vestey and her husband filled their farmhouse with a mix of old and new furniture and accessories. In this sitting room, the top of an old French wine table hangs above the chimneypiece between two dark scaffolding poles, echoing the wooden beams above. Neutral limed-plaster walls and oak flooring provide a blank canvas, allowing interesting pieces to stand out such as vintage and contemporary photographs.The linen curtains are in the same sandy colour as the walls, set into the window recesses. 'You don't notice the curtains,' says Jo. 'I think that's how it should be, rather than having big, pouffey ones.'The armchairs towards the back of the room are 'Mark' club chairs from am designs, upholstered in their Belgian linen.Rachel Whiting40/49Native ShareConcealed Television | Living Room Design Ideas. The artist owners of this London house called on interior designer Beata Heuman to create a family home full of fun, distinctive design and punchy colours. A highly original space, unapologetically theatrical and oozing energy. 'The owners are both artists. They have quite wild tastes and they love strong colours,' says Beata.Beata has concealed the television in a red-lacquer cabinet with glazed doors framing maps. The ottoman serves as a coffee table, so the top is upholstered in 'Asphalte' by Métaphores, a double-sided linen/cotton cloth with a rubber coating that makes it wipeable. It also provides storage. 'This style of decoration can look cluttered, so I have put storage everywhere to streamline it,' says Beata. The armchairs are from the owners' old at, reupholstered in cotton denim from I Want Fabric.Paul Massey41/49Native ShareThis scheme created by Ilse Crawford in Stockholm's Ett Hem hotel combines some serious pieces of modern design with a lightness of touch that means the room still feels welcoming and comfortable. The green armchairs are by Cassina, combined with delicate wall lights by Michael Anastassiades and the Eames 'Stool C', available at The Conran Shop. Try Eleanor Pritchard for a similar graphic print blanket.Simon Brown42/49Native ShareCharged with adding character to a London flat modernized by a property developer, Max Rollitt has used his characteristic combination of unusual antiques and luscious colours.An early English vernacular flavor has been employed in the sitting room, with sixteenth-century-style panelling, dark painted floorboards and a big square of rush matting that marks out the seating area.Three singular pieces of furniture - a handsome, mid-eighteenth century Irish bureau bookcase, a Queen Anne oyster chest on a stand, and a carved reproduction side table from Max Rollitt, with a breche violette marble top that matches the corner chimneypiece - add elegance and gravitas.Patina is a Rollitt specialty and the room is painted in a soft shade of grey using a 'secret recipe' to achieve the slightly chalky, almost grained look, similar to that of early lead paint.Ruched mustard-yellow blinds are in a crunchy Claremont silk, while the sofa is covered in 'V W Hopper' from Opuzen.Jake Curtis43/49Native ShareSymmetry characterises this sitting room, where the owner's nineteenth-century wooden armchairs covered in a woollen fabric and a pair of custom console tables from Soane are centred around a Fifties Italian mirror from Tarquin Bilgen and a recently added marble chimneypiece.Ngoc Minh Mgo44/49Native ShareThe cosy white scheme in the living room of Harriet Anstruther's restored Sussex farmhouse features a distinctive cowskin ottoman from George Smith that adds punch to the house's original features.45/49Native ShareThe grey living room in the home antiques dealer and designer Max Rollitt is a canny blend of traditional and eclectic design. The sofa is upholstered in clashing fabrics, colours and prints.Lucas Allen46/49Native ShareOpen-plan living is made cosy with warm touches to this mews house in London owned by designer Caroline Riddell.A wood-burning stove provides a focal point in the living area, which also features a George Smith sofa with cushions in a Robert Kime weave. A Fifties Hungarian rocker is covered in 'Aralia' designed by Josef Frank for Svenskt Tenn in the Twenties. Mustard blinds from Susan Deliss add a splash of colour to the tongue-and-groove panelling.Rachel Whiting47/49Native ShareThe living room design of this Chelsea home illustrates designer Stephen Eicker's 'layered' style, with a varied mix of colour, pattern and texture, backed by a hand-painted chinoiserie wallpaper by de Gournay. The lampshades are from Robert Kime; the mirrors are from Hilary Batstone.Rachel Whiting48/49Native ShareThe bookshelves were already in place, but have been repainted by Maria Speake for the owners of this Barbican flat, high up in one of the towers of the Grade II-listed 70s brutalist landmark. Maria created a sliding door so that the living room can be shut off from the hall for extra warmth - the door is clad with reclaimed parquet, each piece of which has been individually sanded to create a sculptural effect. Maria runs Retrouvius - the reclamation company - with her husband Adam Hills. If you want to make a bold statement with stripes, the cotton fabric on the sofa is 'Twelve Bar Stripe', £95 per metre at Mulberry Home.Simon Brown49/49Native ShareThis graceful drawing room in the Cotswolds is blessed with light thanks to a large bay window overlooking the garden. Architect Robert Hardwick designed the panelling, which is painted in Farrow & Ball's 'Old White'. Antique textiles and paintings enhance the airy feel. The house in its present form is only 20 years old, the result of hard work and imagination on the part of the owners and Robert, who is an expert in Cotswolds vernacular.TopicsLiving RoomDecorationDecorating By Room
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TitleHow to Decorate a Living Room: 11 Designer Tips | Houzz
Urlhttps://www.houzz.com/magazine/how-to-decorate-a-living-room-stsetivw-vs~105196187
DescriptionTry a few of these living room design tips and ideas, and you’ll be on your way to creating a comfy space that reflects your style
Date
Organic Position20
H1How to Decorate a Living Room
H2A designer offers tips for creating a comfortable space that reflects your style
H3
H2WithAnchorsA designer offers tips for creating a comfortable space that reflects your style
BodyHow to Decorate a Living RoomA designer offers tips for creating a comfortable space that reflects your style. Yanic SimardFebruary 18, 2021Toronto Interior Design Group is a trusted one stop shop residential interior design boutique-style firm crafting timeless interiors.MoreSaveComment222Like720PrintEmbedShareFacebookTwitterEmailWhether your style is traditional or modern, relaxed or formal, bold or subdued, your living room should be a place where you can feel comfortable, let down your guard and spend quality time with friends, family or just yourself. There’s an art to decorating a room that looks great and works well for you. So before you dive into a living room redesign with your pro, arm yourself with a few designer tips and tricks. Here are some of my favorites. Urbanology DesignsSave Photo1. Mix Light and DarkWhen a living room is all white and bright, it can feel too “clean” and unapproachable. When it’s all dark, it can feel like a cave. But mixing dark and light colors creates a dynamic look that has depth and balance. The design of any space benefits from the inclusion of at least a little white and a little black.Osborne ConstructionSave Photo2. Contrast Your NeutralsBeyond including some white and some black, decorating a living room with a variety of contrasting neutrals goes a long way toward making it feel rich and welcoming. In this example, the white walls, caramel leather, brass hardware, gray sofa and blue-gray cabinets all contrast with one another, which highlights their different finishes and undertones. This makes the palette feel rich even before other key elements, such as color, pattern and texture, are added.Shop for sofas on HouzzTamara Rene DesignsSave Photo3. Play With TextureTexture is easy to overlook when decorating a living room, especially since we don’t see it so much as touch it. But it’s important for making a living room feel cozy, and that goes for plush textures that appeal to the touch and harder textures that add contrast. Include leather, cotton, wool, metal, stone, glass, plant life and as many other textures as you can.Find an interior designer to help you decorate your living roomCohesively CuratedSave PhotoPillows are a great place to start, especially if you’re decorating a living room on a budget. Look to other accessories and furnishings to add new materials to the palette, even in small doses.Shop for decorative pillowsJohnson Squared Architecture + PlanningSave Photo4. Work in Some WoodWe can’t talk about texture without talking about wood, one of the top materials for bringing a sense of warmth to a living room.There are so many ways to add wood, any of which will make a space feel a bit more inviting. Consider wall paneling, side tables, movable stools, picture frames, sofa legs and carved pieces of art as just a few of the many options.Mark D. Williams Custom Homes, Inc.Save Photo5. Mix Up Your UpholsterySure, most furniture stores give you the option of purchasing an entire living room set in matching upholstery, but that doesn’t mean you should do it. In a formal seating area, matching upholstery can give a sense of maturity and order, but if you want a living room to feel cozy and welcoming, mix and match your upholstered pieces to give the design a bit more personality.Lawless DesignSave PhotoOne of the safest ways to do this is to mix leather chairs with a fabric sofa or vice versa, so the materials contrast in an obviously intentional way. It gives the living room design some diversity, which can also give members of the family different options to suit their seating preferences.Croma Design Inc.Save Photo6. Choose Practical FabricsSpeaking of upholstery, it’s especially important for living room seating to be not only comfortable but durable. What this means will depend on your family. You may have babies or small children, pets or not, and they may be messy or tidy. In general, mid-tone fabrics are the safest bet, as very light or dark shades will readily show soil and wear.KELLY + CO DESIGNSave PhotoLeather is a great material for avoiding stains because it can be easily wiped clean when a spill occurs. However, it’s usually more easily scratched than most fabrics, so it may not endure animals as well. A leather that already has a broken-in look or a pattern can age especially well.See how to clean leather furnitureVAS Construction Inc.Save PhotoDenim and corduroy are two other materials that can be inviting yet durable. Plus, they add an unexpected twist compared with the typical plain cotton or wool upholstery you often see in stores. When choosing fabric for your living room furniture, look for a material with a blend of natural and synthetic fabrics to get the practical features of both, and if possible do a bend test of a fabric swatch to make sure the weave appears tight and doesn’t reveal the backing material. A tight weave will be more durable than a loose one (which leaves lots of space for dirt to hide), no matter the material.LDa Architecture & InteriorsSave Photo7. Add a Dash of ColorWhile you can create a beautiful space without any vivid hues, adding even a little bit of color to a living room can go a long way toward creating a relaxed and inviting atmosphere.LDa Architecture & InteriorsSave PhotoWhen in doubt, look to a cheerful blue — it’s a hue that usually everyone can agree on. It perfectly contrasts warm elements such as leather and wood, and it feels just neutral enough to work with basically any other future accent colors.Shop for blue sofas on HouzzStudio K InredningSave Photo8. Add a Patterned RugPattern is a powerful design tool, infusing a living room with energy and minimizing the appearance of stains or wear. A patterned rug brings these benefits to the “fifth wall” — the floor — simultaneously anchoring a seating area and giving the whole room a sense of life. Even if you already have carpeting, consider adding a rug to your seating area. The first time you roll it up to go to the cleaners after a big spill, you’ll be glad you had it there.See 11 area rug rules and how to break themML Interiors GroupSave Photo9. Choose Movable Tables and StoolsLightweight tables, stools, ottomans and even side chairs that can be moved around easily make a living room much more comfortable, giving you and your family lots of options on a daily basis for putting your feet up, setting a drink down or seating an extra guest. Use a few smaller pieces, such as the upholstered footstools seen here, to allow for movement of pieces closer to and farther from the main seating as needed.Katie Monkhouse Interior DesignSave Photo10. Consider Conversational DistancesNo matter how big your living room, there’s a limit to how large a seating group can be and still make sense for intimate conversation and cozy gatherings. A good distance between seats to facilitate conversation is about 8 feet, meaning if you have several sofas or a sofa and side chairs, the seating area should have a diameter of 8 feet, or 4 feet out from the center. A huge, 12-seat sectional sofa may look great and be perfect for a party, but if you’re looking to create a cozy living room, it’s usually best to use fewer, smaller seating pieces and push them a little closer together.Imbuia Construction Inc.Save Photo11. Don’t Take It Too SeriouslyA living room is a great space to embrace thoughtful disorder, such as through an artistic gallery wall, mix-and-match throw pillows, open storage baskets and fun furniture like this tepee-inspired tent.Trying for perfect order will mean that anything out of place will stick out like a sore thumb, whereas accepting a bit of controlled chaos will mean the occasional dropped toy or draped blanket will look right at home.Your turn: Have you decorated a small living room to make it feel more welcoming spacious? Or have you made changes to a big living room to make it more cozy? Please show us your makeover in the Comments!More on HouzzKey Measurements for Designing the Perfect Living RoomLay Out Your Living Room: Floor Plan Ideas for Rooms Small to LargeGet more living room ideasFind an interior designerShop for living room furniture and accessoriesFeeling Inspired? Shop for Similar ProductsDiscover More ProductsPreviousNextItem 1 of 7SaveComment222Like720PrintEmbedShareFacebookTwitterEmailSee 222 commentsExplore Related TopicsDecorating GuidesMost PopularLiving RoomsRead Related Stories7 Major Decorating Mistakes and How to Avoid ThemBy Yanic Simard·120Most Popular15 Ways to Create Separation in an Open Floor PlanBy Yanic Simard·29Remodeling GuidesNew This Week: 7 Stylish and Welcoming Family RoomsBy Mitchell Parker·25Living Rooms8 Pieces of Furniture You’ll Keep ForeverBy Yanic Simard·96Your First House8 Ways to Make Your Living Room More LuxeBy Neila Deen·13Living Rooms13 Ways to Upsize a Small Living Room Without Moving a WallBy Yanic Simard·78Living RoomsKey Measurements for Your Living RoomBy Steven Randel·144Living Rooms9 Living Room Decor Decisions Likely to Divide OpinionBy Amanda Pollard·15Living RoomsNew This Week: 5 Relaxing Living RoomsBy Mitchell Parker·22Living RoomsTour a Designer’s Bold and Colorful Living Room and Guest BathBy Mitchell Parker·5Houzz TV LiveThe Most Popular Living Rooms So Far in 2020By Mitchell Parker·56Trending NowDesign Ideas From Spring 2020’s Top Living RoomsBy Erin Carlyle·20Trending NowThe 10 Most Popular Living Rooms of Spring 2021By Becky Harris·9Trending NowHouzz Tour: Period Home Blends Classic and Contemporary StyleBy Emma Hedges·21Transitional Homes12 Living and Family Rooms With Beautiful Built-InsBy Becky Harris·25Living RoomsShop Related CategoriesSofasPicture FramesDecorative PillowsThrowsVasesArtworkLearn MorePeople who liked this story also liked7 Major Decorating Mistakes and How to Avoid ThemFull Story15 Ways to Create Separation in an Open Floor PlanFull StoryNew This Week: 7 Stylish and Welcoming Family RoomsFull Story8 Pieces of Furniture You’ll Keep ForeverFull Story8 Ways to Make Your Living Room More LuxeFull Story13 Ways to Upsize a Small Living Room Without Moving a WallFull StoryKey Measurements for Your Living RoomFull Story9 Living Room Decor Decisions Likely to Divide OpinionFull StoryNew This Week: 5 Relaxing Living RoomsFull StoryTour a Designer’s Bold and Colorful Living Room and Guest BathFull StoryLearn MoreUnited StatesSelect countryUnited StatesUnited KingdomAustraliaDeutschlandFranceРоссия日本ItaliaEspañaDanmarkSverigeIrelandSingaporeNew ZealandIndiaABOUTCAREERSMOBILE APPSPROFESSIONALSBUTTONSFOR BRANDSSELLPrivacy & NoticeTerms© 2022 Houzz Inc.
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TitleLearn How To Decorate A Living Room In 6 Easy Steps | Spacejoy
Urlhttps://www.spacejoy.com/interior-designs-blog/how-to-decorate-your-living-room
DescriptionIn this blog post, our expert designers have listed 5 essential living room decor ideas you should follow. Find best living room interior design ideas only on Spacejoy
Date
Organic Position21
H1Our Complete Guide On How To Decorate Your Dream Living Room
H2Step 1: Know Your Measurements
Step 2: Picture the Layout
Step 3: Choose Your Style
Step 4: Find the Sofa First
Step 3: Pick the Area Rug
Step 4: Get the Right Lighting
Step 5: Decide on Your Color Palette
Step 6: Add Wall Art & Accessories
More Tips on How to Decorate a Living Room
Frequently Asked Questions
Let's Design Your Perfect Living Room
Editors Pick
Customer Stories
Similar Picks
Categories
H3Living Room Design Ideas
1. Mix Light and Dark Paint Colors
2. Contrast Neutral Colors
3. Play With Texture
4. Mix Your Upholstery
5. Choose Movable Furniture
Printed Affair: A Mid-Century Scandinavian Bedroom
Blush Over This Mid-Century-Inspired Living Room
Game Room: Transitional Coastal Study Room
A Mid-Century Living-Dining Room In Perfect Hues
Striped Rugs: A Transitional Modern Bedroom
A high-on-style living room that doubles up as the perfect set for shoots!
An urban farmhouse style living room with an industrial twist
Triple duty - living room, dining room and a small work space, all in one
A unicorn wonderland for a 7-year-old girl
This Minimalist Industrial living room that proves less is more!
H2WithAnchorsStep 1: Know Your Measurements
Step 2: Picture the Layout
Step 3: Choose Your Style
Step 4: Find the Sofa First
Step 3: Pick the Area Rug
Step 4: Get the Right Lighting
Step 5: Decide on Your Color Palette
Step 6: Add Wall Art & Accessories
More Tips on How to Decorate a Living Room
Frequently Asked Questions
Let's Design Your Perfect Living Room
Editors Pick
Customer Stories
Similar Picks
Categories
BodyOur Complete Guide On How To Decorate Your Dream Living RoomOf all of the rooms in your house, the living room is by far one of the most important ones. After all, your living room is your entertainment center, the place for cozy movie nights with the family, and where your guests mingle when they visit. So, it's not surprising to feel a bit intimidated about decorating this important room. Not to worry, we're sharing our step-by-step guide on how to decorate a living room to make it look like it came straight out of a magazine.  Step 1: Know Your Measurements. Even before you have all your living room design ideas on paper, you need to do one thing -- measure. Your entire living room design could be inaccurate or not work in the space from window treatments, furniture, and rugs if you do not measure each nook and cranny. You'll want to pay special attention to walls with windows, doors, or inset, as these areas will limit the room’s layout. Make sure to take this sketch with you while shopping. It’ll help prevent accidents or order incorrect size furniture. No one wants to PIVOT their new leather sofa into their new dream living room.  Step 2: Picture the Layout. You don’t have to be an interior designer or an architect to think about how you want your living room’s layout to be. When you take the time to draw a layout of your room, you can get a better idea of the furniture you need to buy. It can help you figure out if you’ll have enough space for your new bar cabinet or your long sectional sofa. At the same time, it can also help you realize that maybe you won’t have room to add that additional cabinet to showcase your family’s serveware collection.  Think about your layout or floor plan as the first step into dreaming about what your living space will look like. Next, make a list of the important items for you to have in the room and prioritize the positioning of these items. Are you having trouble creating a layout? There is a plethora of floor planner software available, or our team of expert designers can create the perfect living room layout for you.  Step 3: Choose Your Style. This is the trickiest part of creating your living room space. But, deciding how you want to live will set the baseline for where and how you’ll shop for furniture. Think about the style you wish to showcase: modern, contemporary, relaxed, formal, warm, farmhouse, or inviting. Choosing a style can help you figure out what you need.  Ask yourself: What will I be doing in my living room? How many people will usually be spending their time there? Am I planning on hosting parties? Do I enjoy watching TV in the living room? While it might seem like unrelated questions, these can help you understand the type of furniture you’ll need. For example, if you know that you’ll spend time watching TV in the living room, maybe investing in a comfortable sectional sofa is more important than adding accent chairs. On the contrary, if you’re planning to host parties, a loveseat paired with accent chairs and ottomans might give you more flexibility to create an inviting seating area that sparks conversations.  Step 4: Find the Sofa First. Whenever you're looking up living room ideas, the first results typically revolve around the sofa. It makes perfect sense; the couch is perhaps the largest piece of furniture in your living room and will dictate how you arrange the rest of the parts. Find a sofa that will become your focal point. Remember to keep in mind the functionality of your living room. If you know you'll spend a lot of time here watching TV, then a sectional is a better option than a loveseat. Additionally, lifestyle considerations like pets and children will make the material of the sofa more important.  Whether you’re choosing an accent, large sofa, or playing with various seating options, make sure you don’t over-saturate the space. While you want your seating area to be comfortable, you also want to leave enough room to walk around the area without continually tripping over the edges of the sofa or the coffee table.  Step 3: Pick the Area Rug. Area rugs can be tricky to buy if you don't know what you need. For a living room, you should find a big enough rug to fit all your furniture. Ideally, keep about 10-to-20 inches of bare floor between the edges of the carpet and the room walls. Keep in mind, when area rugs are too small, the living room will look disjointed.  Nowadays, you can even layer different area rugs to create more depth and add more texture. If you’re looking for an exciting look, consider mixing and matching different shapes and textures to create an intricate design that will make the living room look more grounded.  Step 4: Get the Right Lighting. For your living room to look put together, you need three lighting types: ambient, task, and accent. To make this happen, you might consider a mix of overhead chandeliers, table and floor lamps next to the main sofa for accent, and wall sconces for ambient lighting. Lighting can be quite tricky, so make sure to have an overall idea of how your living room will be arranged before you buy lighting.  When it comes to lighting, you can have some fun. We always get questions like, “Should I use two matching lamps?” The answer is: you don't have to! Depending on your living room’s style, you can play around with the pieces you add. For example, you can use a statement lamp on one side that goes with your side table, but on the other side, choose a floor lamp that provides different lighting. Not only are you choosing the right light style for each portion of your living room, but you’re also adding more pieces to make the space look more intriguing.  Here are some lighting ideas for your home to give you some inspiration.  Step 5: Decide on Your Color Palette. When it comes to living room ideas, choosing the right paint color is crucial. Pick a color palette that compliments your furniture choices, your home’s overall aesthetic, and the style you want to achieve in this room. Remember, lighting will also play a critical role in choosing the right paint colors, so don't forget to look at steps four and five together.  Remember that you can mix decor trends and different colors. Don’t be afraid to mix colors, patterns, and styles throughout your living room. However, make sure that there’s a common theme, whether it’s the color, the style, or the subject matter, to ensure you don’t make the space look overwhelming. Step 6: Add Wall Art & Accessories. No living room decor ideas would be complete without wall art and accessories. Don't go crazy, thinking that every inch of the room needs to be filled. Empty space is vital in designing comfortable spaces as it provides a place for your eyes to rest. Including wall art and accessories like pillows, blankets, mirrors, decorative items will pull the space together and complete the look.  It can be challenging to choose artwork to match your space. However, think about the overall theme when selecting your wall art. Remember that when you’re adding wall accessories, these are often pieces that are deeply personal choices and speak about your personality. Other components can be more strategic, like an oversized floor mirror over a small wall to make the room seem more spacious.  More Tips on How to Decorate a Living Room. Regardless of your style, there’s an art to decorating a room that fits your aesthetic. Now that you have the basics, here are some tips on how to decorate a living room like a professional.  1. Mix Light and Dark Paint Colors. We’re used to seeing rooms in one color only. But, when you combine dark and light living room paint colors, you create a dynamic look that adds depth and balance to your space. Check out some of the most popular living room paint colors to get you started.  2. Contrast Neutral Colors. On that same note, remember that you can contrast neutral colors as well. For example, white walls can create a crisp contrast to caramel leather accents and brass hardware. Using contrasting tones makes the palette feel richer, and it will give you a striking look as you start adding more color and texture.  3. Play With Texture. If you don’t feel confident using color to create a unique look, incorporate different textures instead. You can include texture by adding leather, cotton, wool, stone, glass, and many other textures as you wish.  4. Mix Your Upholstery. As you start to be more creative and playful with your furniture choices, try to mix up your upholstery. Mix and match pieces to give your decor more personality and break up the style. One of the safest ways to do this is to mix leather chairs with a fabric sofa or vice versa.  5. Choose Movable Furniture. When choosing your tables, stools, and ottomans, make sure they’re easy to move. This will give you many options to choose from, and it creates a more dynamic living room space that can adapt to your needs.  Frequently Asked Questions. How do I start decorating my living room? Hopefully, the tips above will help you get started on planning your living room space and decor. Try to start small. Otherwise, a whole redesigning project can be too overwhelming. Usually, most people begin with picking the rug, sofa, and accent art wall. Work your way around your TV and media console and start creating a conversational and enjoyable space in this space.  How can I beautify my living room? Beautifying your living room can be easily achieved with a few steps. Try to incorporate more color using pillows, throws, and decorative elements to break with the monochromatic look of the space. Use furniture to decorate as well by choosing tables and chairs with ornate legs. Make your lighting part of your decor by choosing statement light fixtures that blend with the design. Try to work all of these tips by following a theme, so it’s easier to stay focused.  How can I decorate my living room on a low budget? You don’t have to redesign your entire living room to make an impact. Start by rearranging the furniture to play with your living room’s layout and change the way it looks. Get a few frames and upgrade your art wall decor using family photos, prints, and easy-to-find posters. Add greenery with house plants to elevate the space, and think about painting a wall or two to create more depth. These small steps can make a huge difference in how your living room space looks without having to spend a fortune to make it happen.   Let's Design Your Perfect Living Room. When in doubt, you should always turn to the experts. Look for inspiration on Pinterest, Houzz, Instagram, and other interior design outlets to get an idea of what a professionally designed living room should look like. It can also help you get an idea of the different layouts, styles, and furniture pieces you can add to your living room to make it stand out from the crowd.  There are millions of living room design ideas you can source for inspiration. But, the vast number of living room trends out there can make the design process a bit less fun and more overwhelming. Luckily, that's why you can start a project today and work with a talented Spacejoy interior designer to make your living room a dream come true.Editors Pick. Explore editors designPrinted Affair: A Mid-Century Scandinavian Bedroom . Blush Over This Mid-Century-Inspired Living Room. Game Room: Transitional Coastal Study Room. A Mid-Century Living-Dining Room In Perfect Hues . Striped Rugs: A Transitional Modern Bedroom . Customer Stories. Explore editors designA high-on-style living room that doubles up as the perfect set for shoots!Living Room Designed For Amber EsperazaRead Full Story arrow-right | SpacejoyAn urban farmhouse style living room with an industrial twist. Living Room Designed For Stephanie MilesRead Full Story arrow-right | SpacejoyTriple duty - living room, dining room and a small work space, all in one. Living Room Designed For Rachel MichelleRead Full Story arrow-right | SpacejoyA unicorn wonderland for a 7-year-old girl. Kid's Bedroom Designed For Beltus IkechiRead Full Story arrow-right | SpacejoyThis Minimalist Industrial living room that proves less is more!Living Room Designed For Christov AlexioRead Full Story arrow-right | SpacejoySimilar Picks. Related designs for youCategories. Explore other categoriesspinner | Spacejoy
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Result 24
Title78 Best Living Room Ideas 2021 - Stylish Living Room Decor Ideas
Urlhttps://www.veranda.com/decorating-ideas/g1638/living-room-ideas/
DescriptionLet these living room ideas from the world’s top interior designers inspire your next decorating project, from a color change to a seating arrangement swap
Date7 Jul 2021
Organic Position22
H1The 78 Best Living Room Ideas for Beautiful Home Design
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
BodyThe 78 Best Living Room Ideas for Beautiful Home Design Get one-of-a-kind inspiration from these fashionable rooms around the world. By Rose Barraza and Sarah DiMarco Jul 7, 2021 As the place where friends and family gather the most in a home, it’s important for a living room to be not only inviting but also well decorated. Every detail matters, from the decorative pillows and cozy throws topping your expertly upholstered sofa to the eye-catching color combinations that enliven your space. And no primary living area is complete without a beautiful, soft living room rug underfoot to pull the whole look together.Whether your living room is an open plan space in need of parlor-style seating zones or a smaller, cozier spot, these living room ideas from the world’s top interior designers are sure to inspire your next decorating project. With everything from fearless splashes of color to richly patterned wallpaper, these masterful displays will guide you in creating chic, statement-making living rooms that burst with their own senses of character. View Gallery 78 Photos Mark Roskams 1 of 78 Americana Drama “I like to utilize the entire volume of a room,” says designer Anthony Baratta, pointing to an American painting by Tomory Dodge and oversize custom floor lamp, both of which take advantage of the capacious height of this New York City apartment. Equally ample upholstered furnishings are clad in arresting colors and patterns, including cherry-red velvet (Pierre Frey) and the sofa’s block-printed linen (Christopher Moore). Plaster and marble objects, including an over-the-top amphora lamp, echo the color and classical tone of the original ceiling moldings. The medallion border on the drapes was inspired by one in a Christian Lacroix showroom. 2 of 78 Old-World Grandeur In the large living room of this Alabama home designed by architect Paul Bates and interior designed Melanie Pounds, a landscape diptych by Michael Dines hangs over a carved European mantel (Chateau Domingue). Sofas, Verellen (at left) and Dmitriy & Co. (at right). Douglas Friedman 3 of 78 Anything But Mellow Yellow Designer Todd Romano's San Antonio living room might as well be a virtuoso’s guide to owning the color wheel: Taxicab yellow, pure red, and cobalt are a mighty foundation for soft pastels and nuanced naturals. A pair of Chinese baluster vases fitted as lamps bookends a custom button-tufted sofa. Central artwork, C-Ring 1, Todd & Fitch. William Abranowicz 4 of 78 Midcentury Cool In the living room of architect Ken Pursley's Charlotte, North Carolina, home, a Calacatta marble partition separates the seating area from an open kitchen, shielding countertop clutter while inviting conversation between cook and guest. The custom sofa was a wedding gift from fellow architect Bobby McAlpine. Thomas Loof 5 of 78 Sea of Greens In the living room of designer Cece Barfield Thompson's New York City home, an oil painting by London artist Daisy Cook hangs over a nine-foot Schneller sofa upholstered in stain-resistant fabric (Perennials). The coffee table is crafted from a 19th-century Chinese screen. Joshua McHugh 6 of 78 European Simplicity The inviting, casual living room of this colonial Connecticut home designed by Philip Gorrivan is furnished with antique French leather armchairs and a sprawling sectional sofa covered in a vintage ticking stripe. Several of the pillows were crafted with fabrics the owners picked up on their travels. Brie Williams 7 of 78 Royal Hues In the living room of designer Ceara Donnelley's Charleston home, a custom mohair sectional (Dmitriy & Co.) wraps a R&Y Augousti table. Paneling color, Pelt by Farrow & Ball Eric Piasecki 8 of 78 Scale and Age In the living room of this waterfront Maine home designed by architect Gil Schafer, troweled plaster walls and immense, dual, custom-carved Dorset stone fireplaces give a sense of European heft and age. An antique needlepoint sofa is slipcovered in a cool ocean-blue linen. Mark Roskams 9 of 78 Mad for Plaid This radiant New York City study designed by Anthony Baratta is dressed in a Lee Jofa tartan pattern recolored specifically for this room (Anthony Baratta credits the “perfect pitch” of his team, Erick Espinoza and Jamie Nagoon, for refining such hues). The armchair upholstery is inspired by an early American weaving; the leather chair is antique English. Nickolas Sargent 10 of 78 Primitive Modern That's how designer Mikel Welch would describe his personal design aesthetic, and he channeled himself as a client for this comforting living room at the 2021 Kips Bay Decorator Show House Palm Beach. Welch says he loves to blend old, rustic pieces and vintage finds with his affinity for modern homes to create a unique space—and that is certainly on display here. The designer used pieces from his own furniture collection to anchor the space, while filling in with furnishings from Jayson Home. The oversized abstract art above the console table is from Briggs & Co. The room is painted an airy Swiss Coffee in matte from Benjamin Moore's Aura line and the breezy window treatments were fabricated by The Shade Store. Nickolas Sargent 11 of 78 Nautical and Nice For Lexington, Kentucky–based Benjamin Deaton, transforming the 2021 Kips Bay Decorator Show House Palm Beach living room was all about blending the Palm Beach lifestyle with his personal aesthetic and experiences. The designer envisioned the conceptual homeowner as being a well-traveled, renowned host with an endearing quirkiness that makes this traditional space have a fresh and relaxed feel. Douglas Friedman 12 of 78 Inside Out At this Dallas home designed by architect Ryan Street and interior designer Meredith McBrearty, a contemporary abstract by Louisiana painter José-María Cundin ignites a textural symphony of natural neutrals. The living room sofa is by Joseph Jeup, and the pair of armchairs are by B&B Italia. Thomas Loof 13 of 78 Sunshine State of Mind In this light-filled retreat in Naples, Florida, designed by Summer Thornton, gauzy block-printed drapery (Muriel Brandolini) filters sunlight into the great room. Sofas, Montauk Sofa Annie Schlechter 14 of 78 House of Tudor At this Bronxville, New York, historic Tudor home designed by Carrier and Company, the living room’s colorful and printed upholstery enliven oak paneling that is original to the home. Walnut veneer drawings, Neal Perbix. Mohair sofa fabric, Maharam. Coffee table, Julian Chichester. Stephen Karlisch 15 of 78 La Fiorentina Lives On At the 2020 Kips Bay Decorator Show House Dallas, the living room evoked so much Mediterranean charm, you could almost feel the warm ocean breeze right in the middle of Texas. Inspired by the iconic La Fiorentina, designer Mark D. Sikes utilized his signature blue-and-white color palette to reinterpret the historic, elegant space into one fit for a North Dallas manse.The star of this room is the magnificent wallcovering by Iksel Decorative Arts that envelopes the space in European seaside glamour. Elegant tailored-pleat drapery fabricated by The Shade Store gave the room a romantic, dreamy feel. The history of La Fiorentina was beautifully continued through this inviting, serene living space that evoked the same casual elegance and grace. Laurey Glenn 16 of 78 A Gracious Gathering Space Designed by Brockschmidt and Coleman, the Nashville, Tennessee, home of Keith and Jon Meacham features a convivial living room with the perfect mix of cool and warm hues that's often filled with lively guests gathering for cocktails before dinner. Curtains, Claremont. Douglas Friedman 17 of 78 Wonderful Wanderlust At this Connecticut home designed by Miles Redd, a pair of commissioned Tim Kent paintings portraying Babylonian scenes adds a sense of wanderlust and fantasy to the family room. Faux shagreen desk, Made Goods JD Powers 18 of 78 Elemental Beauty In the living room of this Sea Island, Georgia, home designed by Anne Spilman, a Holland and Sherry rug brings a lively pattern to the floor while Brunschwig & Fils chair fabric, Holland and Sherry curtain fabric, and a seafoam green couch welcome in color. Mali Azima 19 of 78 Deco Neutrals In the spirit of French Deco, architect Yong Pak and designer Melanie Turner worked together to create this light-filled salon, complete with two cozy seating areas and a dining table for 12, this 100-year-old Atlanta home. In the main seating section, a conical Murano glass chandelier glimmers over pair of Louis XVI–style commodes and retro-inspired sofa (Björk Studio). The artwork above the mantel is by the late artist Todd Murphy. Francesco Lagnese 20 of 78 Soaring Chintz The entire scheme of this charming living room in a Big Sky, Montana condo stemmed from the owner's love of Pierre Frey's floral linen, Mortefontaine. Designer Palmer Weiss covered two swivel chairs and several pillows in it, then carried the aubergine, soft brown, and olive tones throughout the rest of the room. The 19th-century portrait of Pocahontas is by Victor Nehlig. Julia Lynn 21 of 78 Gutsy and Vibrant Decorator Angie Hranowsky gave each room of this late-20th-century Tudor it's own personality. In the yellow living room, golden walls (Golden Straw, Pratt & Lambert), a peach velvet sofa (Pierre Frey), and pillows in purple and pale seafoam green assert youthfulness and vibrancy. Douglas Friedman 22 of 78 '80s Glamour With a shared love for 1980s design and glamour, designer Miles Redd and his client, Sam Milner, played with bold color and lively pattern in the jewel-toned living room of her Greenwich home. Rich sapphire, emerald, and ruby tones seen in the chintz-covered furniture and Persian carpet inspired the room's taffeta curtains, silk walls (Kravet), and velvet pillows. DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN 23 of 78 Hollywood Influences A soulful mix of natural materials, soft suedes, Belgian linens, and luxe velvet brings a sense of Old California back into this 52-acre vineyard estate by Ken Fulk. At the center of the living room, a linen sofa (Gregorius|Pineo) and a leather armchair (McGuire) offer ideal spots to perch beside the peninsular fireplace. Emily J Followill 24 of 78 Anglo and Low Country Blend Architect Peter Block constructed this Arts and Crafts–inspired cottage on Brays Island to offer prime flexibility in a small footprint. Designer Beth Webb filled the living room with a plush sofa (Mrs. Howard) upholstered in soft wool (Holland & Sherry) to provide the resting spot after dinner in the adjoining dining room. Annie Schlechter 25 of 78 A Jubilant Occasion Lacquered green walls and vivid dragon-print draperies (Jim Thompson) usher guests in to converse and relax in this jubilant New York living room by Chiqui Woolworth. The artwork over the mantel, Contemplation, is by Anne Rose, the owner’s mother. Brie Williams 26 of 78 Island Vibes When renovating his 70-year-old midcentury cottage on Harbour Island, designer Matthew Carter used a color palette of deep greens, dark browns, and a blend of whites to make each room feel more organic. For the living room, the Kentucky-based decorator paired a classic sofa (George Smith) paired with armchairs in a blue-check fabric (Alan Campbell). At the center is a 1970s coconut shell table. Max Kim-Bee 27 of 78 Artful Restraint Los Angeles–based designer Richard Hallberg used a cloud-like palette and a symphony of objéts to tie together each room of this historic Nashville mansion. Chess by John Cage (1968) hangs over a custom sofa within the living room. Soft linen upholstery fabric is by Formations. DYLAN THOMAS 28 of 78 Patterned Connections To unify the two halves of the large drawing room in his English countryside cottage, textile designer Richard Smith covered the walls of each section in the same shell-pink wallcovering (Madeaux). The flame stitch fabric covering the settee can also be seen on pillows in the other side of the parlor. HELENIO BARBETTA 29 of 78 The Mediterranean Edit Handmade terra-cotta floors, a brass hearth surround, and tiles crafted in Tangier, Morocco, bring elemental beauty and warmth into the living room of landscape architect Marco Bay's Portofino escape. The blue and green glassware on the mantel echoes the sparkling Mediterranean outside. Courtesy of Mikel Welch 30 of 78 Innovative Thinking Designer and TV host Mikel Welch proves neutrals and wooden accents are far from boring in this New York City apartment. Welch repurposed barn doors as an innovative wall decor piece that warms up the entire space. Next 30 Luxurious Apartments from Around the World Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Sarah DiMarco Sarah DiMarco is the Assistant Editor at VERANDA, covering all things decor, design, and travel, and she also manages social media for the brand. This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io More From The Ultimate Living Room Decorating Ideas 65 Fabulous Fireplace Ideas for Cozy Retreats 52 Stunning Staircases to Make a Grand Entrance Advertisement - Continue Reading Below 50 Eye-Catching Living Room Color Combinations 13 Best Hanging Egg Chairs For Any Decor Style Flatweave Rugs Window Ideas from Kips Bay Showcase The 16 Best Handwoven Rugs & Textiles 10 Best Fire Screens For Warming Up In Style You Won't Want To Miss Lilly Pulitzer's New Collab 13 Fierce Animal-Print Rugs The Ultimate Living Room Decorating Ideas Beautiful Homes and Design Inspiration Homes & Rooms Living Room Inspiration 26 Designer Dining Room Ideas to Get You Motivated Beautiful Bedroom Decor to Reinvent Your Space 35+ Bathroom Design Ideas, From Modern to Traditional The Best White Paint Shades for Any Room 42 Kitchen Ideas For A Beautiful Space To Cook
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Title10 interior designers share their secrets for decorating small living rooms | Livingetc
Urlhttps://www.livingetc.com/advice/small-living-rooms-interior-designers-share-their-secrets
DescriptionGet the inside scoop on how to maximize space with expert advice and small living room decorating ideas from our favorite designers
Date
Organic Position23
H110 interior designers share their top small living room decorating ideas
H21. Streamline with built-in solutions
2. Place open storage above or below the eye line
3. Commission custom furniture
4. Add character with salvage and vintage pieces
5. Create a sofa nook within a wall of storage
6. Embrace spatial constrictions
7. Allow the light to flow
8. Be brave with colour
9. Create a convivial layout
10. Make use of every inch
What’s the best storage solution for a small living room?
How to use colour in a small living room
How to get the layout right for a small living room
Useful links
H3Buying Guides
How To
Inspiration
H2WithAnchors1. Streamline with built-in solutions
2. Place open storage above or below the eye line
3. Commission custom furniture
4. Add character with salvage and vintage pieces
5. Create a sofa nook within a wall of storage
6. Embrace spatial constrictions
7. Allow the light to flow
8. Be brave with colour
9. Create a convivial layout
10. Make use of every inch
What’s the best storage solution for a small living room?
How to use colour in a small living room
How to get the layout right for a small living room
Useful links
Body10 interior designers share their top small living room decorating ideas Get the inside scoop on how to maximize space with expert advice and small living room decorating ideas from our favorite designers Sign up to our newsletter Newsletter (Image credit: John Marshall) By Tessa Pearson published 15 June 21 Looking for small living room decorating ideas? We've got you covered and asked our favorite interior designers for their top tips on how to make the most of even the tiniest of spaces. Small living rooms can often feel like an endless source of frustration, particularly if key spaces and high-traffic areas are cramped and awkward to move around in. Your living area should be a place of rest and relaxation, so it’s even more important to make it somewhere you look forward to spending time in. It might be tempting to adopt a spartan approach to decorating, but small living rooms can still be cozy and welcoming - it’s all about balance and making your space work harder. We asked 10 interior designers to share their secrets for small living rooms; their tried and tested tips for creating a small living room that’s inviting, functional, and free from clutter - all without compromising on character. 1. Streamline with built-in solutions. (Image credit: Megan Taylor)'Built-in storage can change the function of the space from day to night, depending on how your life works and what you choose to store inside. In this home, we used a wall of cabinetry to create a hidden office space that’s easy to close off at the end of the day.''The key is plenty of drawers, shelves and movable living room storage inside - whether that’s a filing cabinet or a drinks trolley for cocktail hour. Enhance the effect with color too: here, we used a strong, energizing blue inside the office and a calming pale pink for the outer doors.'Russell Whitehead and Jordan Cluroe / 2LG Studio2. Place open storage above or below the eye line. Nune / Photography: Brooke Holme(Image credit: Nune)'This compact TV room needed to serve as an office and a place for guests to stay, which meant squeezing a desk and an L-shaped sleeper sofa into a small space. To create more room for books, we installed a high bookshelf around the perimeter of the room, which provides 17 linear feet of open storage, and is positioned above the eye line.''If you’re going to try something similar, we advise painting it the same color as the wall to create the illusion of a floating shelf and contribute to an uncluttered feel.'Sheena Murphy & Tor Sauda / Nune3. Commission custom furniture. (Image credit: Simone Hag / Photography: Dylan James)'Choosing small living room furniture of the right scale and proportions are the key to designing small spaces, which is where customization comes in. For this open-plan live/dine space, we commissioned a curved sofa in a deep green velvet, which helps define the living area and makes the most of every inch.''It also converts into a guest bed and comprises hidden storage. If you don’t have the budget for a custom piece, you could achieve a similar visual effect by hunting for a petite, low-slung, L-shaped sofa in a striking colour and/or textured fabric.'Simone HaagFor non-custom seating to suit a wide range of interiors, we recommend checking out the best sofas and best sofa beds on the Livingetc team's radar4. Add character with salvage and vintage pieces. (Image credit: Retrouvious / Photography: Micheal Sinclair)'A small sitting room can still be warm and personal. Inject character with reclaimed materials and vintage pieces, such a salvaged parquet floor, which is is both resilient and glamorous. (Pre-loved parquet is readily available and cheap, but watch out for extra costs such as cleaning and installation.)''Lustrous textiles lift a scheme and work beautifully as wall hangings — they can also be both a fabulous and affordable alternative to buying original art. This silk piece is French, from the 1920s, and is woven with metal thread that shimmers wonderfully. Finally, an antique wall sconce is also a great option for a small spaces, offering a hint of vintage without overpowering the room.'Adam Hills and Maria Speake / Retrouvius5. Create a sofa nook within a wall of storage. (Image credit: Turner Pocock / Photography: Alex James)'As a studio, we like to ‘ground’ furniture particularly when it’s is sitting around the perimeter of a room. Encasing it in joinery is often the answer, as this makes a sofa, chair or daybed feel inviting and cozy to sit in as well as providing additional storage, which is always useful in a small space.''In this project, we wallpapered to back of the joinery to bring in another pattern and provide a playful backdrop to the items on the shelves. We then used the space above the sofa to create a gallery wall of artwork.'Emma Pocock and Bunny Turner / Turner Pocock6. Embrace spatial constrictions. (Image credit: Marta Perez)'When I moved into this house, I could have removed the wall between this tiny anteroom and the living room beyond, but instead, I welcomed the idea of having a place to land when I arrived home. I commissioned a daybed inspired by a classic Donald Judd design to slot into one side, which serves as a handy spot to remove shoes, a cozy reading area and a spare bed for extra guests.''The room has windows on three sides which allows for cool ocean breezes in the summer months. I made use of one of these windows for hanging a piece of art, which accentuates the seating area beautifully.'Glenn Ban / Glenn Ban Interiors7. Allow the light to flow. (Image credit: Martin Hulbert Design)'When installing structures in a small space, try to capitalize on natural light wherever possible. In this apartment, we decided to add the glass partition wall to make both the combined living area and the kitchen feel bigger and brighter, while still allowing the cooking area to be slightly segregated.''This can be particularly useful in the winter months when the light levels are lower. We also installed a new staircase with an open structure, which again aids the flow of light and creates an interesting focal point in the room. Finally, the hits of muted citrus colors add a little vibrancy and also help to define the separate spaces.'Martin Hulbert / Martin Hulbert Design8. Be brave with colour. (Image credit: Micheal Sinclair)'People often shy away from using bold shades in small spaces, but I think color makes a home more inviting. Plus, giving each room its own personality can actually make a place feel bigger.''As a designer and stylist, I’m always decorating walls and sets, so I know how easy it is to rectify a paint job if you aren’t happy with the color. I tried a lot of different green paints before I found the perfect chalky, mossy hue for the living room color in this small East London flat, settling on ‘Crocodile’ from the Colours by B&Q range. It’s the perfect foil for marble and brass and looks beautiful throughout the day as the light changes.'Laura Fulmine9. Create a convivial layout. (Image credit: Studio Kaya / Photography: Christopher Horwood)'I always advise my clients to adopt a small living room layout that encourages conversations. By this, I mean a furniture arrangement which allows for maximum face-to-face time. This is especially practical if you love to entertain.''In my own home, I have created this setup around a vintage travertine table and the fireplace. This layout is particularly great for small spaces as the armchairs give you the flexibility to move them around and the daybed serves the purpose of a conventional sofa while not cluttering the room as much. The added bonus? A cozy corner for power naps.'Denis Bayern / Studio Kaya10. Make use of every inch. (Image credit: Studio Fortnum / Photography: Anna Stathaki)'In a small living room, it's crucial to utilize every nook and recess, which is why alcove storage can be invaluable. By adding cupboards to the lower half you can hide toys, paperwork, yoga mats, weights, home office equipment and more, leaving the upper shelves free for displays of books, objet d’art and plants to personalize your space.''In my traditional Victorian terrace, we created the built-in joinery and storage in the middle room, and in the front room we used the alcove for an ottoman to provide additional seating. Finding an ottoman with under-seat storage is a great option if you need extra space to hide things away.'Rebecca Wakefield / Studio FortnumWhat’s the best storage solution for a small living room?In any compact space, storage should work hard and be as unobtrusive as possible: think concealed compartments, multi-function designs and wall-hung solutions. For the ultimate streamlined space, consider a wall of built-in cabinetry to keep clutter out of site. Alternatively position shelving above the eye line and cupboards below it to maintain a sense of space. Look to footstools and occasional tables with storage built in, and stackable boxes with lids to keep kids’ toys contained. How to use colour in a small living room. There’s no reason why a small space can’t be colorful. However, if you’re going for a bold scheme, you may want to stick to a limited palette. Spend some time working out how the light changes in the space and reacts with your chosen hue, as the effect will be intensified in a smaller room. A fresh, invigorating shade could look great in the morning, but if you want to create a relaxing atmosphere for cozy evenings, a deeper, warmer color might be more appropriate.How to get the layout right for a small living room. When space is at a premium, it has to be functionality first. There’s nothing more frustrating than a small room that looks good but doesn’t work for your lifestyle. Position furniture so that you can move as freely as possible, and ensure nothing restricts the flow of natural light. Be ruthless too: if you don’t entertain often, then there’s no need for superfluous chairs or occasional tables. Swap in a sumptuous footstool instead.  Latest How to style winter decor after Christmas in your home with these expert floristry tips Winter decor after Christmas is an essential way to keep the home feeling cozy and inviting, and these expert tips will make your house feel alive By Pip Rich • Published 4 January 22 Masonite's M-Pwr explained - the first big tech launch of the year, and it's about to make life so much easier The M-Pwr smart door from Masonite brings together smart security, convenience and more, all in one design By Caroline Preece • Published 4 January 22 You might also like Small living room ideas – 20 design tricks and styles to make a tiny room feel bigger Maximize your space with these small living room ideas – from easy layout switches to make a small living room feel bigger to clever furniture picks to make the most of space By staceysheppard • Published 30 November 21 29 living room ideas, designs, and trends to inspire Let our stylish living room ideas inspire you to switch up your color scheme, try a new layout or totally redecorate By Amy Moorea Wong • Published 22 November 21 23 home library ideas – striking bookcase displays worth stealing Show off your book collections with these beautiful home library ideas By Lotte Brouwer • Published 23 August 21 22 home office ideas to create an inspiring space for working from home With these home office ideas, WFH just got a whole lot more stylish... By Lotte Brouwer • Published 19 August 21 Living room lighting ideas – experts explain how to create the perfect mood The right living room lighting ideas can truly elevate change a space, so get it spot it on with our expert guide By Amy Moorea Wong • Published 15 July 21 17 elegant living room ideas to add grandeur to any size space Our elegant living room ideas are sure to inspire a chic, classic update whether you are working with a spacious period property or a small contemporary apartment By Lotte Brouwer • Published 14 July 21 14 cozy living room ideas – how to create a stylish den-like space in your home These cozy living room ideas are sure to make you want to curl up, surrounded with throws and cushions, no matter what the time of year By Hebe Hatton • Published 13 July 21 15 living room window treatments – stylish curtains, blinds and shutters to update your space Let these lovely living room window treatments inspire you to have a quick and easy refresh By Jacky Parker • Published 12 July 21 View More ▸ Useful links. Buying Guides. The best wall mirrors The best blenders Gorgeous children's desks The cosiest blankets for autumn How To. How to hang wallpaper Create the perfect gallery wall Tips on painting a room Hiring an interior designer Inspiration. Grey living room ideas Ideas for boy's bedrooms Small living room ideas Ideas for grey kitchens Livingetc Simba Art File about us Terms and conditions Privacy policy Cookies policy Livingetc is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site. © Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA. All rights reserved. England and Wales company registration number 2008885.
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Result 26
TitleHow to design the perfect living room - Curbed
Urlhttps://archive.curbed.com/2016/9/2/12755518/living-room-design-basics
DescriptionDon’t even think about starting with throw pillows
Date2 Sept 2016
Organic Position24
H1How to design the perfect living room
H2Site search
In This Stream
Next Up In Interior Design
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H31. Start with a plan, not pillows
2. Invest in the couch
3. Punctuate with lighting
4. Define the room with rugs
5. Accent with tables
6. Layer different textures
8. Have fun with pillows
7. Add personality
9. Select with purpose
Interior Design 101: Tips for designing and decorating your interior space
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BodyHow to design the perfect living room New, 3 comments Don’t even think about starting with throw pillows By Melissa Dalton Sep 2, 2016, 11:30am EDT Illustrations by Sunny Eckerle Rafael Soldi Gone are the stuffy parlors from the past—living rooms are just that: The rooms where we live. "That’s the beauty of the living room," says Portland, Oregon, designer Lynne Parker of Lynne Parker Designs. "It’s where we now do everything." Here are her nine tips and tricks for making the living room the ultimate destination. 1. Start with a plan, not pillows. The first step? Steer clear of purchasing pillows. "I meet a lot of clients who come to me and say, ‘I started buying throw pillows and now I have no rhyme or reason to this space,’" says Parker. "The foundation [of the design] is a vision and a plan." Since your living room might host all sorts of activities, whether that’s a cocktail party or family movie night – Parker recommends planning for real life. "I try to understand what ‘living’ means to each of these clients," says Parker. "Does it mean that you have media? Is it a place where you’re only on your laptops? How many places do you need to seat people?" She develops a layout and furniture plan that takes the homeowners’ lifestyle into account. This includes having a T.V., if that’s the client’s preference. "Go for it! It’s a reality of life," Parker says. From flat screens to projectors, television design has come a long way. "They’re beautiful now," says Parker. 2. Invest in the couch. Once functionality is figured out, the first piece of furniture that Parker buys is the sofa. "It’s important to find a piece that’s going to stand the test of time and be a quality piece," she says. She encourages clients to take their time with the purchase and think through a number of factors. The most important criteria will be their budget, with an entry-level range starting from $1,500 to $2,500. Lifestyle is also a consideration, as it will determine how much use the piece will receive, and in turn, the best color family and fabric. For instance, something like white mohair wouldn’t work well with sticky children’s hands and muddy paws from pets. When choosing the fabric, Parker reviews the "rub" number, which provides a clue to durability. Finally, she wants to know clients’ aesthetic preference, such as classic or modern, and has them do "sit tests" to gauge comfort. Sofas available to the trade will be the highest quality, especially those made by longtime furniture manufacturers like Lee Industries, Kravet, and Schumacher. Mainstream retailers offer a range of great styles but the product may not last longer than a decade. In order to illustrate the price variations in a similar style, Parker compared the West Elm Monroe in Celestial $1,300, to the Malibu from Jonathan Adler $3,200, to the Kravet Villanova $5,200. 3. Punctuate with lighting. When planning the room’s furniture layout and window treatments, Parker prioritizes natural light. "Then I make sure we have high and low lighting," Parker says. "Do we have great lamps? Do we have good overhead lighting?" For this part of the design, she prefers to choose lamps that support the overall aesthetic and act as sculptural notes. "Invest in some beautiful lamps and you’re going to have those forever in your collection," she says. Parker favors YLighting, Robert Abbey, and Moooi, a Scandinavian lighting company. "I also think Lindsey Adelman’s work is exquisite," she says, citing the branching chandelier. "It’s like a work of art." She also finds unique vintage models and has them rewired. "Lamps just punctuate the space," she says. 4. Define the room with rugs . "I like the rugs to claim the territory," Parker says. "I make sure that the rug is much larger than the seating space." Sizing larger with the rug will ultimately make the room look bigger. "Go more oversized than you would think," she says, just making sure not to bisect major circulation paths and keeping all the front legs of a seating group on the rug area. The rug needn’t always make a bold statement. "There’s going to be a lot of other elements that come into play," says Parker, so she makes sure the rug’s color, texture, and pattern balance with the whole scheme. 5. Accent with tables. Coffee tables can become a focal point, since the eye is drawn to their shape as it contrasts with the larger mass of the sofa. As such, Parker often likes to choose pieces that have strong lines and are timeless. "This is a piece that I like to choose something iconic, like a beautiful Noguchi," she says. Accent tables are also functional necessities, as every seat needs a place to put their coffee cup or cocktail glass. Parker likes to pick these pieces up at vintage shops or estate sales, or search 1st Dibs under "Coffee and Cocktail Tables." 6. Layer different textures. To make the room inviting, juxtapose the textures of different materials, such as wood, metal, wool, silk, and glass. "Texture is super important," says Parker. She advises that the materials you use should feel good to the touch. "Does something feel soft when it’s supposed to feel soft? Is it strong when it’s meant to be durable? Does your carpet feel good under your feet?" An easy way to incorporate texture is via throw blankets and accessories. Parker likes the Three Panel Throw from House of Castellon, for its modern update of a classic as well as these colorful felt coasters from Canoe. 8. Have fun with pillows . Pillows are another great way to bring in color, pattern, and texture, so Parker suggests having fun when picking them out. "It depends on the mood and style of the client, but I always go pretty bold with pillows," she says. Parker buys pillows from all sorts of outlets, everywhere from Urban Outfitters to Trina Turk to CB2 and Leif, and she also has them custom made. "I always tell clients, you’re not going to keep a throw pillow for twenty years," she says. "So have some fun with it." 7. Add personality. Accessories are more than just trinkets or clutter. They are an opportunity to tell a story about the personality and life of the homeowner. By weaving these pieces into the overall design, the space will truly feel like your home. In her own house, Parker prefers books and likes the selection at Better Living Through Design. "They inspire me, so my books are everywhere," she says. Whether your pieces are gifts from loved ones or reminders of the places that you’ve been, "They’re really an expression of us. That’s what your home should be: is all these expressions of you and who you love." 9. Select with purpose. "I’m a big believer that clutter stresses us out," says Parker. "While I have a lot of layers to my designs, it should have some tidiness to it." She suggests taking time with the process and selecting items thoughtfully, so that every piece has a purpose and a place. "Technology has taught us that speed is so important, but art takes time," she says. "Really consider what you want this space to say about you and how you want it to make you feel…You’re curating your life. Everything that you look at should make you happy." In This Stream . Interior Design 101: Tips for designing and decorating your interior space. How to up your candle game this holiday season How to design the perfect living room DIY interior design: Is it a good idea? View all 18 stories Next Up In Interior Design . The Mystifying World of TikTok Home Tours The appeal of the TikTok everyhouse from Curbed SF Now Is the Perfect Time to Redo Your Bay Windows from Curbed SF Where to find the best pottery and ceramics in the Bay Area A bright attic renovation full of curves and yellow Minimalist lofts built atop converted button factory Share this story.
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Title6 Decorating Tips From a Top Interior Designer | Time
Urlhttps://time.com/5360413/decorate-remodel-home-tips/
DescriptionTop interior designer Grant K. Gibson shares his best tips to easily decorate or remodel your house in his new book, The Curated Home
Date7 Aug 2018
Organic Position25
H16 Decorating and Remodeling Tips From a Top Interior Designer
H21. Determine Your Style
2. Figure Out What You Don’t Like
3. Build Around Your Space
4. Sample Your Paint
5. Mix High and Low Price Points
6. Start From the Ground Up
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H2WithAnchors1. Determine Your Style
2. Figure Out What You Don’t Like
3. Build Around Your Space
4. Sample Your Paint
5. Mix High and Low Price Points
6. Start From the Ground Up
Body6 Decorating and Remodeling Tips From a Top Interior Designer A dining room designed by interior designer Grant K. Gibson. Kathryn MacDonald Courtesy of Grant K. Gibson By Grant K. Gibson August 7, 2018 4:57 PM EDT Grant K. Gibson has been designing homes for more than 15 years. Originally from Los Angeles, the 39-year-old designer, who’s now based in San Francisco, takes pride in creating living spaces that speak to the personality, preferences and experiences of his clients. Now, he’s releasing his first book, The Curated Home, which takes readers inside his design process and educates them on how to develop a timeless and curated interior that’ll fulfill their aesthetic tastes for years to come. “It’s not only about practical tips — how to display objects from travels, what to look for when making furniture purchases and the type of paints that work best in a particular room — but also how to think like an interior designer,” Gibson writes in the book’s introduction. Below, Gibson shares some advice on where to start when tackling design projects. So whether you’re furnishing a new home, updating your kitchen or just want some inspiration to refresh your rental, here are his six top tips for “tweaking your décor.” A living room designed by interior designer, Grant K. Gibson. Kathryn MacDonald Courtesy of Grant K. Gibson 1. Determine Your Style. How do you want a space to feel? Here’s a trick to help you hone in on your style: take a look at your closet. Do you prefer tailored pieces or do you prefer looser and more comfortable items? Do you gravitate toward certain colors or patterns? Another way to help you determine your style is to think of key words that define how you want a space to feel. Traditional, formal, elegant? Playful, humorous, inviting? Monochromatic, streamlined, modern? Take note of design inspirations in every facet of life. I often use these as a starting point to discuss with clients when I’m hired to help them design the interiors of their homes. Recall a hotel in which you’ve stayed or restaurant in which you’ve dined that particularly struck your fancy. Perhaps it was a minimal interior from your trip to Japan or a clubby bar in New York furnished with worn leather chairs. 2. Figure Out What You Don’t Like. It is a lot easier for people to express what they do not like. By putting dislikes into the equation, we can eliminate some things and narrow in on others. For example, a bold large-scale print might remind you of something in your childhood that you do not want to see in your own space. Or a wingback chair might bring back memories of being sent to time-outs for pulling your sister’s hair. Likewise, a certain color might evoke feelings of a past design trend that you aren’t eager to repeat. These memories and reactions are very personal and individual, but also define our tastes. 3. Build Around Your Space. The Curated Home by Grant K. Gibson. Kathryn MacDonald Courtesy of Grant K. Gibson Space planning, which impacts scale, is essential. People often use furniture that is too large or too small for a space. I like to blame a certain retail company for the large-scale furnishings that saturate interiors today. Build around the furniture that you actually have space for. Think about the balance of a space. For larger rooms, consider establishing zones for different activities: a seating area that is conducive to conversation; another area for television viewing; a work area with a desk or table for projects or games. Even though I love symmetry, you can make things feel too contrived when you make everything symmetrical. Think about the visual weight and distribution to balance out a space. Proportion and scale are key to any design. 4. Sample Your Paint. Paint selection is one of the most important and cost-effective decisions you can make. Proper paint choices harmoniously connect spaces. Consider the house as a whole. You risk creating disjointed rooms if you paint one room at time. Take into account how colors affect our mood. Some colors make people feel happy, calm or even agitated. I have been known to paint interior doors a bold black for a contrast against crisp white walls. Sample actual paint colors on your walls when looking at options. Observe them in natural light, morning light and at night. Often a go-to color that worked well for one project will not work for another. What might work at your friend’s home might not work at your home. The chips at the paint store are a helpful starting point, but what looks good on paper might not translate into your interior. With white paints, try a handful of different hues on the wall and pay special attention to the undertones. They can have touches of pinks, blues or yellows. The outside surroundings strongly affect the temperature of the light. The vegetation and the sky can create reflections of greens and blues on your interior walls. 5. Mix High and Low Price Points. Pedigree doesn’t necessarily mean better (whether it be art, furniture or dogs). Consider an “unknown” artist or designer and buy based on shape, comfort and how the art or furniture works for you and your needs. The most humble objects can have the most soul and be the most beautiful thing in a room. Do not be afraid to mix high and low price points. Not everything must be precious to be important. The opposite can be said with splurging on something that you really love. A kitchen with a custom metallic hood designed by interior designer Grant K. Gibson. Kathryn MacDonald Courtesy of Grant K. Gibson 6. Start From the Ground Up. Design can be overwhelming. People often want to know where exactly to start. For any room, I usually suggest that you begin from the ground up: Decide on the floor covering. It doesn’t matter if you want or have hardwood floors, area rugs, tile, stone or wall-to-wall carpeting. Thinking about your floor first will dictate how other pieces are layered in the space. If you select a neutral tone or natural fiber without a lot of pattern or color, you have more options with colors or upholstery. If you start with an antique rug, you can draw colors from the rug to formulate a color palette. It is important to plan these things in tandem, otherwise you end up with the circus effect: too many things going on without the space as a whole functioning in unison. Starting with a sofa or upholstered chairs limits your style immediately. There is more flexibility with something like an area rug with dozens or even hundreds of possibilities. This is where you have options and can then start to layer pieces. It is a much easier approach to make your final floor covering decision first, and then layer. Last, but not least, Gibson advises that people take their time when designing their homes. “When taken care of, these items [and decisions] can last for years,” Gibson advises. Excerpted from The Curated Home (Gibbs Smith 2018). More Must-Read Stories From TIME Shonda Rhimes Already Knows What You're Going to Watch Next How Donald Trump Turned Jan. 6 into a Windfall Why 2022 Is the Year We Learn to Live With COVID-19 Public Schools Are Struggling to Retain Black Teachers. These Ex-Teachers Explain Why CDC Director Rochelle Walensky Faces a Surging Virus—And a Crisis of Trust How Addictive Social Media Algorithms Could Finally Face a Reckoning in 2022 The Supreme Court Could Let Religious Schools Take Taxpayer Money. Former Students Say That's a Mistake Contact us at [email protected] SHARE THIS STORY Read More From TIME You May Also Like Read Next The Bloody Brilliance of Megan Abbott Next Up: Editor's Pick How Black Filmmakers Are Reclaiming Their History Onscreen EDIT POST You have reached your limit of 4 free articles. Paywall-Icons-Devices Unlimited access to TIME.com Paywall-Icons-Newsletter Inside TIME newsletter, twice weekly Paywall-Icons-DigitalMagazine Access to the TIME Digital Magazine Subscribe Now Already a print subscriber? Go here to link your subscription. Need help? Visit our Help Center. Purchased TIMEPieces? Go here to connect your wallet. Subscribe Now
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TitleInterior Design Studio London | The Living Room
Urlhttps://thelivingroomlondon.com/
DescriptionThe living room - An interior design studio in London will help you to elevate your home, restaurant, workspace, etc from ordinary to something magnificent
Date
Organic Position26
H1
H2INSTAGRAM
PLEASE CALL US ON 0800 690 6000 TO DISCUSS YOUR PROJECT REQUIREMENTS.
H3ABOUT US
ONLINE RETAIL SHOP
CONTACT
H2WithAnchorsINSTAGRAM
PLEASE CALL US ON 0800 690 6000 TO DISCUSS YOUR PROJECT REQUIREMENTS.
Body="https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-PWXKSR2" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> INSTAGRAM. Please enter an Access Token on the Instagram Feed plugin Settings page. PLEASE CALL US ON 0800 690 6000 TO DISCUSS YOUR PROJECT REQUIREMENTS. . ABOUT US. The Living Room was established in 2010 by Ali Sayed as a specialist in the provision of luxury furniture and lighting from the world’s leading designers and manufacturers Read more ONLINE RETAIL SHOP. My Living Room is the sister brand of The Living Room, and is an online shop for interior designers and property developers seeking to add that pizzazz to projects with elegantly curated home accessories from Italian vases and ceramics to chairs, sofas, beds and art. Please Click here to have a browse. CONTACT. THE LIVING ROOM 16 Curzon Street, Mayfair, London W1J 5HP 0800 690 6000 [email protected] © 2021 The Living Room. All Rights Reserved. Designed by
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TitleHow To Design A Room Like An Interior Designer [Step By Step] — Greenhouse Studio
Urlhttps://www.greenhousestudio.co/home-garden/how-to-design-room
DescriptionThis is my design process written down for decorating a space. The whole point though is to make it adaptable so it serves YOU, your home, and your loved ones. If you follow these guidelines, you will create a room that is comfortable, cohesive, functional for you and yours, and reflects your own personal style. It also doesn’t need to cost a fortune
Date
Organic Position27
H1How To Design A Room Like An Interior Designer [Step By Step]
H2Budget for your design project
Create a mood board
Choose a "springboard" (inspiration) object
Create a scaled plan (ie - make sure your furniture fits)
Start with foundation furniture
Picking a paint palette
Scale up
Avoid over-usuing any single source or style
Inject your own personal style and individuality
Other posts you’ll love:
H31. Make A Budget2. Create A Mood board3. Choose Your “Springboard" (Inspiration) Object 4. Make A Room Layout Plan5. Choose Foundation Furniture 6. Pick Paint Colors 7. Scale Up8. Don’t Over-Source Any Single Source 9. Inject Your Own Style And Individuality
Mood Board, Round 1 - Pinterest
Mood Board, Round 2 - refine your ideas
Potential foundation furniture options:
Some tips to guide your paint selection process
How to choose paint color (while staying sane)
Home Office Reveal - Plants, Light, & Nature-Inspired Workspace
How to create a mood board to design your space (2 easy options)
H2WithAnchorsBudget for your design project
Create a mood board
Choose a "springboard" (inspiration) object
Create a scaled plan (ie - make sure your furniture fits)
Start with foundation furniture
Picking a paint palette
Scale up
Avoid over-usuing any single source or style
Inject your own personal style and individuality
Other posts you’ll love:
BodyHow To Design A Room Like An Interior Designer [Step By Step]  Does overwhelm and paralysis set in at the thought of how to even start decorating your space? A living room, bedroom, let alone your entire home? It can be (almost) enough to make you dive back under the covers and just say “forget it - I’ll live with it the way it is!” I feel you and I’m here to help with a methodical, step by step process that will break down how to design your room into doable parts. Even though it’s my design process, the whole point is to make it adaptable so it serves YOU, your home, and your loved ones. If you follow these guidelines, you will create a room that is comfortable, cohesive, functional for you and yours, and reflects your own personal style. It also doesn’t need to cost a fortune. I firmly believe that design constraints, whether budgetary or otherwise, often result in a more interesting project, and not the other way around. With some clever ingenuity and a little extra legwork, you can save money and your end result will be a richer and more compelling reflection of your personal style. I really do believe this. Ready? Let’s get to it!This post contains affiliate links. Click here to read my full disclosure. Interior design by Fletcher Rhodes, Sonoma CA. Photo: Thomas KuohReady? Here goes:1. Make A Budget2. Create A Mood board3. Choose Your “Springboard" (Inspiration) Object 4. Make A Room Layout Plan5. Choose Foundation Furniture 6. Pick Paint Colors 7. Scale Up8. Don’t Over-Source Any Single Source 9. Inject Your Own Style And Individuality. Budget for your design project. A budget is a must if you want to keep your remodel/redesign under control. Decide up front what you can spend on your project. Prioritize your expenditures into “must haves,” “nice to haves,” and “not a priority.” Then pencil out approximately how much those items will cost. (More on this below.)I start off by creating a spreadsheet where I input line items for each and every element of a project. Any fixed costs go in along with cost estimates that are replaced by hard numbers once I have them.  If you’re planning on sourcing any of the materials yourself, you’ll need to calculate square footages to estimate your materials costs. Keep your spreadsheet updated so you know where you are budget and cash-flow wise. Always add in an additional 10% for cost overruns. Some would say 20% is more appropriate. For a landscape overhaul, 10% should be sufficient. For a gut kitchen remodel in an old house - better to go with 20%. The point is, you don’t want to be on such a tight shoe-string budget that when your contractor opens up a wall and you find dry rot or corroded plumbing, (surprise!) you don’t have a cushion. Once you’ve set your budget, stick to it. Don’t be tempted to deviate from your budget mid-project with “Iit sure would be nice if (insert expensive upgrade). This is how budgets get blown. Unless you can really and truly afford it, don’t do it. Here’s a full post on funding a home remodel or design project. Pro Tip: Get 3 bids for any work that needs to be done. You’d be surprised at the variation in cost sometimes, but of course, this also needs to be closely compared to your assessment of the contractor’s quality of the work being done and project management skills. If your contractor is only going to show up every 3 days or so to work while squeezing you in between other jobs, that’s going to delay your overall project timeline which may have cost or scheduling consequences elsewhere. Be sure to discuss project management expectations up front.Read the full post on how to budget and fund your design or renovation project. Kitchen design and source: deVOL KitchensCreate a mood board. Before you spend any of your hard-earned money, the first step in the design process is to create a mood board, and then take a step back to see what the common threads are.Having a plan ahead of time before you jump in is always smart. A mood board and subsequent plan of attack can help you avoid ending up with a piecemeal look and making costly mistakes. Some questions to ponder:What’s the purpose of the space you’re working on? Does it need to be practical for families and groups or is it more of a private space where you want to relax?What do you want the overall feel or mood of the room to be about? Come up with a few descriptor words if that helps. What styles, themes, colors are you drawn to? It’s worth noting that sometimes we think we know what we like, but then we find out otherwise. More on that shortly. [Want more design inspo and helpful plant tips? Let's hang out on Instagram!] Mood-project board image by The Home Index, Napa CA. Mood Board, Round 1 - Pinterest. Click here for a complete post on easy ways to create your own mood board. My favorite quick and dirty way is to make a Pinterest board. Start pinning rooms, color schemes, furniture and accessories that you like. If you don’t already have a definite style preference or even if you do, try to avoid having preconceived ideas. Just start pinning what appeals to you. Tip: When pinning furniture, look for the individual shots with only the plain white background so you can see the furniture piece alone in conjunction with your other items without the “visual noise” of a staged room scene. Usually the Pinterest “pin” icon comes up on company websites if what you want isn’t not already on Pinterest with a plain backgroundOnce you have about 50 pins, take a step back and look at the board overall. What styles/colors/forms/textures keep popping up in your selections? What styles/colors/forms/textures are standing out to you in way that makes you feel good? For example, are you finding you’re consistently drawn to soft, off-white walls or do you crave the vitality of stronger color? Are your pins fitting what you originally thought you were after? If so, great! If not, don’t be afraid to consider these new ideas that are emerging from your pinning. Do a gut check! Up above where I asked if you really know your style? At times I’ve discovered that just because I thought I knew what I wanted ahead of time, my pins don’t lie. I recently realized that I’m more of a soothing neutrals and contemporary design person than I used to be, and don’t laugh - Pinterest helped me figure this out! After pinning many rooms that individually resonated with me, I looked back over them all collectively and realized “Hey - I seem to be drawn to a lot of light-neutral walls and clean-lined decor (with black windows) and lots of plants!” OK the plant part wasn’t exactly a shocker, but I had always thought I was more into color than I actually am.Just as the camera doesn’t lie, neither do your pins when taken in as a whole. It’s possible that Pinterest can facilitate your style gut check for you. A collection of imagery inspiration as well as specific objects, furniture, and paint for my home office remodel project. Mood Board, Round 2 - refine your ideas. If you want, after doing a Pinterest mood board, (quick and easy requiring no graphics skills) you can drill down a bit further and create a board like I did below. It’s not absolutely necessary but it does provide a clearer picture of what you’re considering. Again, here’s a link for easy mood board options. You could also create a second Pinterest Mood Board with your refined ideas. Be sure to keep the first one though where you save all your original ideas and save source information from a pin representing anything screen shot and brought into Pinterest by you. Be sure to pin items similar to what you already have. Several of the objects pinned in my board represent things I already own, and I want to see how they gel with the new ideas. So the key here is to place your items alongside new ideas and see how they fit together. Make sense? Be sure to try out different options for each of your pieces - more than one sofa, pillows, rugs, coffee tables, lamps etc. See how they work together comparatively. Too much contrast or too little? Too much pattern? Too much blue? Practical enough to stand up to your family? Take a good hard look and evaluate. Greenhouse Studio home office mood board. Photo credits - upper left inspirationsdeco.blogspot.com, bottom left, @melissamlo via Instagram, bottom right, Margo Hupert - margohupert.pl.  Choose a "springboard" (inspiration) object. A “springboard object” is a term I came up with that evolved from my own design process. (I picture the vault springboard from gymnastics days.) In addition to your unifying elements discussed above, you can select an object, artwork or decor piece that you use to help organize and propel the direction of your design project. A painting or a rug for example, might inform the color scheme you work with. Or if you fall in love with a quirky thrift store find or antique, it could set the tone, style, or mood for your entire room if you want. As always though, do a gut check. Just because you have a cool vintage painting with some purple in it doesn’t mean you need to dogmatically take up that color and incorporate it elsewhere if it doesn’t feel good or “right” to you to do so. It wouldn’t surprise me if the quirky painting were the springboard object in this beautifully moody deVOL Kitchen design. It also doesn’t have to be an object but could instead be a particular image that inspires you. For example, for my home office redesign, my “springboard” was images of the fabulous studio of Polish artist Margo Hupert. The wonderful imagery of her eclectic nature-inspired studio in greens, whites, and gray-browns had me swooning and became my main source of inspiration. My “springboard” image for the Greenhouse Studio home office redesign. Source & Photography: Margot Hupert Create a scaled plan (ie - make sure your furniture fits). This is a bit of a chicken or egg scenario and can be done either before or after the next section on picking foundation furniture. Which ever order, you MUST take measurements and make a simple drawing of your space and layout your proposed furniture and any other room elements before purchasing. To get to the point where you’re motivated to make a plan, you probably have your eye on a few furniture pieces you’re excited about. To know if they realistically fit or not, you need to lay them out on paper (virtual or not) and see. You can get out the graph paper, pencil, and eraser and lay out your scaled plan if you like, using 1 square = 1 foot and interior design furniture placement cut-outs (this can be a lot of fun and works fine - don’t get me wrong!). Or you can use a free floor planner app to lay out your furniture and see how everything works in your space. I have a post reviewing free floor planner apps including video demos. AutoCAD and SketchUP are my go-to software for 2D and 3D respectively, but roomstyler.com was the first simple, user-friendly free option I found. To get started: In Roomstyler, navigate to “Tools - 3D Roomstyler” and you can easily draw your room in plan view (overhead view looking straight down) and then automatically generate a 3D image. Plan view will let you see how well your furniture fits. Start drawing your walls to their correct dimensions. Then you can add in scaled furniture or you can just draw out your furniture to the correct dimensions instead. After making a plan view, another important step is to take some blue painter’s tape (or I lay out a few intersecting tape measures in a pinch) on the floor (or wall) and see how different objects fit irl. Again, laying it out on paper is important, but so is a second check of how it might feel in your actual space. Research interior design dimension standards on how much space is needed between dining room chairs and walls for comfortable passage or a sofa and coffee table for example. After all, laying out your furniture possibilities is important, but if you unknowingly only leave 12” to walk between your virtual sofa and a wall, you’ll find it’s a tight squeeze IRL! Take this time to consider outlet locations and wall elements like mounting a TV, wall sconces, and ceiling lights with associated wiring needs.Seeing your ideas laid out to scale provides an important reality check to the ideas and inspiration of the mood board. The last thing you want is spend a lot of money on something that doesn’t fit well in your space, no matter how much you like it.  Start with foundation furniture. Again, which comes first, picking some furniture possibilities and measuring them in our space, or measuring our space to determine rough sizes for furniture. Realistically, I know which I would do - I’d find things I love first and then determine if they fit, and if not, find something similar that does. Either way, we can now move onto the furnishing basics. If we’re talking about a living room, this might be a sofa and coffee table for starters, or a sofa and a couple armchairs. To get going here, I’d recommend selecting a neutral couch and a simple cocktail table, or the neutral couch and a couple of leather armchairs - whether midcentury, club chairs, or whatever, so long as they’re streamlined and classic overall. The point is to choose foundation pieces that are versatile and can work with a variety of styles, color schemes, and accessories. 7 years from now, you may be over modern farmhouse, or at least over it in the way you love to style it now. Before you get out the torches and pitchforks for that comment though, let me just say I’m speaking from personal experience here. It’s amazing how much my tastes have evolved over the last 10 years. It’s not that I now dislike what I loved back then, it’s just that it’s not what I would choose to go with now. That’s all. Just sayin’ The neutral sofa, chair, and coffee table would allow the client to dramatically change out the rest of this interior if they wanted. Interior design by Fletcher Rhodes, Sonoma CA. Photo: Thomas Kuoh. So I would encourage you to consider giving yourself the gift of future flexibility. If you have simple foundation pieces that can go with a variety of decor styles, these big ticket items can continue to work for you if your style changes over time. This allows you to go nuts and have lots of fun expressing your style preferences du jour with the smaller things like occasional tables, lamps, accessories etc, without breaking the bank. On the other hand….there’s the very real possibility that your kids and menagerie will trash whatever sofa or soft furnishings you purchase regardless.I can certainly relate. After having twin toddler boys and a couple cats contained in a yard-less condo, by the time I finally jettisoned that olive-colored wannabe Pottery Barn couch back in the day, the thought of what running a black light over it would reveal was truly horrifying. So at risk of completely contradicting myself above, this could also be license to throw caution to the wind and go for that tangerine sofa. It might not last much beyond the babyhood-thru-elementary years anyway. The struggle is real. Kids, pets, and whatever else can wreak havoc on your soft furnishings. Source: Crypton Pro tip: With this in mind, don’t blow your budget on super expensive soft-furnishings or think of them as “investment pieces.” I’ve learned to buy relatively inexpensive sofas and upholstered furniture, and I’ve been more than happy with that strategy. Regardless, they still cost a lot, because they’re sofas and chairs, right?First of all, they’re rarely statement pieces anyway. (Unless you do go for that tangerine sofa.) A neutral sofa often doesn’t look or feel all that different from a less expensive model, especially considering the sometimes jaw-dropping price differentials. That being said though, frame construction, fabric quality, down vrs synthetic cushions etc certainly makes a difference. FYI just in case you entertain fantasies of reupholstering that investment sofa when needed, or like me, you found a “fabulous bargain” mid-century Asian style sofa at Goodwill and drug it home thinking “I’m gonna reupholster this sucker and surpass it’s original glory!” Let me share some truth - reupholstery almost always costs more than buying new. Yes, sadly that mid-century sofa eventually made it’s way to the curb with a big '“FREE” sign on it.So between kids, pets, and your clumsy uncle clutching a big glass of red, you don’t want to completely freak out when (not if) your couch suffers damage. These mental images are what pushed me to go with my Bomar sofa from Joss and Main versus the pricey one that was on sale for 4.5 times the price at a local boutique in town. (Those down cushions were dreamy though!) I’m very happy I did. I don’t want to be the mom or hostess who breaks out in a sweat every time food/drink/small and-or furry creatures get near my stuff. I also believe that an upholstery/carpet spot cleaning vacuum with a wet-vac brush can be an excellent investment and sanity saver. I might not have survived toddler twins without mine. Potential foundation furniture options: . 1) Leather is great for kids - if they or the cats throw up on it, you can simply wipe it down, unlike upholstery. Do be sure it’s a durable finish though, specifically, aniline dyed leather which combines a protective treatment with a durable part of animal hide. My TV room with a 12’ long leather sofa where my boys can eat greasy snacks without worry. It’s actually two pieces of a Thomasville sectional sourced through Ebay. I placed them end to end to create a “custom” sofa to fit this narrow room. Photo | TDW Media In contrast is top-grain leather. Ever sat on one of those lovely, supple sofas or chairs that feel more like soft kid gloves or an expensive handbag than a piece of furniture? Most likely it’s top grain leather. The top layer is removed by sanding to get rid of surface imperfections. Because of that, the leather is very soft but isn’t durable and will stain easily. This is the kind of leather most handbags, wallets, and other expensive leather goods are made from as well. Run your fingernail over leather furniture you’re considering. If it leaves a mark, run away. It won’t hold up to whatever your kids, pets, and red-wine slinging family and friends dish out. 2) Spill and stain resistant fabrics like Crypton or Sunbrella. They are sometimes indoor/outdoor as well, and they’ve come a long way in terms of how they feel, look, and perform since first hitting the home decor scene in the 90s. Arhaus sectional sofa upholstered in Crypton stain resistant performance fabric. Source: Crypton 3) Slipcovers. Although I’ve never tried them, slipcovers also work so long as they come out of the wash in the same shape and size as they went in and don’t require 3 hours of ironing. (Not gonna happen.) Many who prefer light colored upholstered furniture swear by them. 4) Another stain defense strategy I deployed back in the day on my old Pottery Barn wannabe sofa was to put a large piece of fabric across the main seating area for a casual, boho vibe. Ideas: a throw blanket, tailored bedspread, (I used a basic white cotton duck IKEA bedspread), a simple cotton tab-less drapery panel or 60” wide (upholstery width) fabric can all work. Drapery tabs can be cut off fabric and fabric hemmed without sewing using Stitch Witchery fabric adhesive) . You can even tuck the cloth behind any loose-back cushions for a tidy look and that helps keep it in place. When liquid lands, hopefully the covered seat part bears the brunt of it and can be quickly thrown in the wash. This slipcovered sofa from Serena & Lily comes in dozens of stain resistant fabrics.  Picking a paint palette. So after you’ve settled on the overall mood and style and thought about colors based on your mood board, and chosen any inspiration objects, it’s time for wall paint. I’m the first to admit that choosing paint can drive me and everyone around me batty. (Read about my latest paint selection side-show here.) I really recommend reading the post and the other posts linked from it. Paint is important and an expensive process and needs to be chosen carefully to avoid costly mistakes. Here’s the abbreviated version:Going back to that Pinterest board, decide on what generally works for you; neutral or color. If it’s neutral shades you’re drawn to, what kind? White? Gray? Taupe? Greige? (greige is a warm gray-beige combo) Then, consider the undertones: do you want a cool white/gray/taupe vrs warm white/gray/taupe, etc. Photo: ShutterstockImportant note: neutral and color aren’t mutually exclusive. My living room is painted Benjamin Moore’s Richmond Gray, which is much more of a neutral green than a gray. Same in my bedroom - it’s painted Benjamin Moore’s Sea Haze, which is a neutral blue. Perhaps you want a mostly pale neutral with a subtle undertone of a color such as a white with a touch of green or a gray with just a hint of lavender. The same principals apply here as with stronger color. You don’t have to choose between neutral and color if you don’t want to!I’m not going to lie to you though, this can get tricky (and expensive) fast. What appears on a color chip to be the most subtle warm gray can be not so subtle lavender gray once it’s up all over the walls, especially where the corners intersect or where light hits it directly causing underlying tones to “glow” (not necessarily in a a good way). My bedroom is painted in Benjamin Moore’s Sea Haze, which is a neutral blue on the walls but on the chip looks gray. Photo: Greenhouse Studio Some tips to guide your paint selection process. Do some research on paint color palettes - once again, Pinterest is your friend. Lots of blog posts with titles like “10 best whites for interiors” for example, recommending paint schemes. Then go down the paint store and choose some chips. Bring them home and stare hard at them during different times of the day and determine which ones might be contenders. Then go back to paint store and buy samples of ones you like plus some white primer. I always just paint directly on the wall, but you could also go to a craft store and buy some poster board. Either way, paint the white primer so it creates a border around your sample and then paint large samples and observe in different light at different times of the day. Pro tip: Paint color will look more color-saturated on an entire wall than on the chip. Much more saturated. In other words, if you desire a hint of lavender to warm up your mostly gray paint choice, your paint chip that looks like a nice subtle French lavender gray might look a lot more like a purple Barney nightmare when covering an entire wall. ALWAYS paint a large sized sample including intersecting corners where color undertones reflect on each other. Trust me. Pro tip: The color of your existing walls can really, really affect how the potential new color looks. (Really!!) I said this above but it’s so important I’m saying it again: After my last round of painting, my solution is to put up primer so I can paint samples on a white wall. At the very least, go with large white poster board and leave a border around the sample.Pro tip: Interior designer or paint-expert vetted paint palettes exist for a reason! The shades they recommend generally work for most spaces, or at the very least, stand a greater chance of working than a random shade that looks pretty on a chip and then produces a hideous undertone once you get it on the walls.  Honestly, choosing paint can be so fraught with potential disaster, that perhaps the best piece of advice I can give you is to pick a designer recommended color (look for cross-references between recommendations) and thoroughly test it rather than “going rogue” with one of the bazillion other options out there. I hate to sound so conventional about this, but it really can be just that difficult choose a color you not only can live with, but actually love. Again, I recommend reading the full post on paint color selection with the expert color recommendation links, and then doing additional research and sample testing on your own.Scale up. I debated including this because I don’t want this taken as a blanket recommendation. However, in general, choose larger and fewer over smaller and numerous. Too small and numerous = too fussy oftentimes. (Remember your elderly neighbor’s collection of ceramic miniatures?) More often, “too small” results in not making much of an impact and may create a feeling of clutter. I would also say, “scaling up” applies more to accessory type objects rather than say, a sofa. The last thing you want to do is decide carte blanche to “go big or go home” and purchase a ginormous reclining sectional complete with drink holders only to have to shoehorn it into your space. If this is your temptation, please re-read the Scaled Plan section above. In the garden, it’s better to have 2 or 3 statement containers (depending if you’re going for symmetry vs. asymmetry) with large plants or small trees rather than 6 small containers huddled together. This may seem more expensive initially, but often I find that I end up spending more on numerous small things over time than on a thoughtful, larger up-front investment. Instead of many small objects, the bedside table has a large lamp and a few carefully chosen accessories. Interior Design - Fletcher Rhodes, Sonoma CA. Photo - Rebecca Gosselin. Just like clothes, it’s often better and ultimately more economical (and environmental) to buy a few quality pieces rather than numerous mediocre items that are hardly worn and get quickly donated/discarded. (Guilty as charged on that one, but mucho better than I used to be at re-calibrating my notion of what is or is not a “deal!”)Speaking of containers though, if you do have a group of smaller objects like a collection, decorative trays and platters can be used to corral and make visual sense of them. Example - decorative trays that house a collection of succulents in small pots. A wood tray corrals decorative accessories. Source: The Home Index This can also apply to wall art. If you have numerous smaller framed pictures, group them into a gallery. When done correctly, the overall effect is that it looks like one large cohesive installation. (This concept reminds me of big schools of silvery sardines. They move in a giant group together because it fools predators into thinking they’re one big fish, but I digress..) For tips on how to hang a gallery, refer to your interior design dimension standards mentioned in the “Create A Plan” section above and check out this gallery wall post by Pottery Barn. A beautiful green, white, and black gallery wall in an artist’s studio. Interior design + artwork: Margo Hubert  Avoid over-usuing any single source or style. This is a pretty simple concept. What I’m getting at here is you don’t want your house to look like a Pottery Barn catalog for example. Using some items from Pottery Barn is great, but if the entire space is overly sourced from any one style or brand, it can create a flat, homogeneous look.A good example of not overusing a single source or style is Magnolia Home - mecca for modern farmhouse, right? However, if you look closely at many Magnolia style shots, they often incorporate items that would be classified as something other than modern farmhouse. Magnolia library & conference room renovation. Interior Design: Joanna Gains, Source: MagnoliaNote how Joanna Gaines has skillfully incorporated mid-century-style into the Magnolia Home corporate library and conference room through the mid-century classic Tulip table and Cherner side chairs. (LOVE Cherner chairs! Check out how to get your own Cherner side chairs for less.)Mix it up: Back to modern farmhouse - if that’s your style through and though, that’s great, but within that, there are still style subsets you may want to play with and bring together. If you love the shabby chic, chippy furniture pieces that look rescued from the back of a barn, create a more layered look by incorporating more streamlined elements of French, Scandinavian, or coastal farmhouse style. I would still encourage you to consider bringing in a few pieces from a different style or period altogether that compliments your design for a richer look. So how in the heck do I “mix it up” you say? Go back to your Pinterest mood boards and look for unifying features like color, texture, and form like we talked about in the beginning. Then find pieces from a complimentary yet different style which at first pass may seem too different, but actually add harmony and depth to your overall design. For example, say you have a mid-century room but you found this industrial side table you love with a black wrought-iron base. Use the black color in the base to tie the two styles together by incorporating midcentury pieces that have a bit of black in them as well. You’ve instantly created more depth and interest in the look of your space over a “one liner” type of design scheme. Your rooms will love you for it, and you will love them back. Pro-tip: Speaking of black, a common interior designer truism is that every room needs a touch of black. I know there are spaces that look amazing without any black, but 85% of the time, I agree. I think it adds drama while providing a grounding effect. I would modify though by saying a brush stroke of charcoal, deep navy, or blackish-green will do just as well. Hey, if you don’t believe me, just look again at Joanna’s dramatic, moody conference room all done in that deep peacock blue-green. The black in this living room provides a grounding effect in an otherwise light atmosphere. Pamela Hope Design, Houston, TX.  Inject your own personal style and individuality. Now we get to the really fun part! You’ve done the heavy lifting of choosing foundation furniture and paint. With the smaller and usually less expensive pieces like accessories, accent tables, lamps, pillows, plants etc, you have all the freedom to express yourself about what ever makes your heart sing or speaks to your soul. This is your reward for suffering through the trials of paint selection!Quirky, thrifted, found, natural, metallic, rustic, old, new. A bowl that held a dessert bought at a school fundraiser is repurposed to hold a Moroccan astrolabe and brass beads lined with fabric samples. A thrifted brass snail sits on an Ebay limestone cocktail table. This is your chance to experiment! Do it without fear, have fun with it, and I guarantee you’ll learn something in the process. Try mixing old with new, high end with low end, rustic with streamlined, large with small, and just see what happens. Read here for tips on how to decorate with natural and found materials and objects. See what interesting and eye-catching combinations and arrangements you come up with. Best of all, they will be a unique reflection of you and your personal style. House of Harvest antiques does a brilliant job of incorporating eclectic objects together for a one-of-a-kind-curated look. Source : House of Harvest  So that’s my “manifesto” on how to design a space. I hope you got some helpful tips that you’ll be encouraged to try out in your own home. It’s a lot of work to design a space but it’s also a lot of fun, and the end result is worth it. There’s nothing better than coming home to a place you love. [Want more design inspo and helpful plant tips? Let's hang out on Instagram!]Be sure to sign up below so we can stay in touch! Enjoy the post? Pin it for later!   Other posts you’ll love:. How to choose paint color (while staying sane). Home Office Reveal - Plants, Light, & Nature-Inspired Workspace. How to create a mood board to design your space (2 easy options).   DIY, Home DecorTina HuffmanApril 12, 202012 Comments Facebook0 LinkedIn0 Reddit Pinterest0 //SQUAREWEBSITES SUMMARY BLOCK PLUG-IN CODE// !--Tradedoubler site verification 1264796 --> Publisher Website!
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TitleAffordable Interior design - MADE.com
Urlhttps://www.made.com/interior-design
DescriptionUpgrade your home \using our free bespoke virtual interior design service. Or get tips and advice from the experts. Give your home the TLC it deserves.
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Title12 simple Dos and Don’ts for interior design beginners | homify
Urlhttps://www.homify.co.uk/ideabooks/731416/12-simple-dos-and-don-ts-for-interior-design-beginners
DescriptionNot sure about your choice in décor and colours? Let homify take control and teach you how to easily craft a professional and simple interior design
Date23 Nov 2020
Organic Position29
H112 simple Dos and Don’ts for interior design beginners
H21. Don’t push all the furniture against the walls
2. Don’t pick your paint colour first
3. Don’t mix up your colours too much
4. Do use dramatic colour in a small space
5. Do make the most of your lighting
6. Don’t be selfish with seating
7. Do use different textures
8. Don’t tease your walls
9. Do pay attention to your hallway
10. Don’t use tiny potted plants
11. Do use accent pieces
12. Don’t let everything match
Interior design tips: Colour theory and meanings
The most important thing to remember when interior designing? Style is everything.
Discover home inspiration!
homify - modify your home
H3Houses
Living room
Kitchen
Bedroom
Garden
Bathroom
Dining room
Pool
H2WithAnchors1. Don’t push all the furniture against the walls
2. Don’t pick your paint colour first
3. Don’t mix up your colours too much
4. Do use dramatic colour in a small space
5. Do make the most of your lighting
6. Don’t be selfish with seating
7. Do use different textures
8. Don’t tease your walls
9. Do pay attention to your hallway
10. Don’t use tiny potted plants
11. Do use accent pieces
12. Don’t let everything match
Interior design tips: Colour theory and meanings
The most important thing to remember when interior designing? Style is everything.
Discover home inspiration!
homify - modify your home
Body12 simple Dos and Don’ts for interior design beginners Johannes van Graan 23 November, 2020 10:00 Created: 29 April, 2016 Loading admin actions … Whether you live in a city flat or farm cottage, you want to make your living space as comfy and appealing as possible. But achieving that drop dead gorgeous look that appears on design shows isn't always easy – and yet they make it look so effortless.Here’s a secret: those show hosts are professional decorators or they get their ideas from expert Interior Designers/Decorators. And we are just regulars who are prone to designing mistakes. But that is no reason to give up and be contempt with your mismatched settings and not-too-snug environment. Designing or decorating a space without a strategy is pretty much the same as cooking or baking without a plan: it could end in disaster. So, to save you some time and money, we’ve compiled some easy interior design for beginners, including well-known dos and don’ts. You’re welcome! 1. Don’t push all the furniture against the walls . Save Wohnen Skandinavian . 99chairs 99chairs Furniture placement is not a Tetris game. Your furniture needs breathing space to make your room seem like a much more interesting zone. Even if it’s only a few centimetres away from the walls, allowing the furniture to “float” can help to create a conversation grouping, for example, in your living room. 2. Don’t pick your paint colour first . Save . ROSA PURA HOME STORE ROSA PURA HOME STORE Sometimes interior design tips are downright strange, like this one telling us that deciding which tones to splash on your walls should be one of your last decisions. You have an entire rainbow of colours to choose from, and seeing what furniture pieces and decorative items are placed in a room can help you pick out the perfect colour.Besides, in terms of simple room design, it is much harder to find upholstery or accessories that perfectly fit with your wall colours than vice versa. 3. Don’t mix up your colours too much . Save International Prop Award Winner-Best Interior Design Singapore 2013 . Design Intervention Design Intervention You want your home to have a cohesive feel, and therefore you do not need to paint every room in a different colour. Choose three main colours to use throughout your house to make it much easier on yourself. Then opt for different hues of those main colours for a fresh look that is still consistent (for example, Arctic blue differs considerably from cobalt blue). 4. Do use dramatic colour in a small space . Save . Prego Sem Estopa by Ana Cordeiro Prego Sem Estopa by Ana Cordeiro Small spaces that you pass through can show off a colour in a striking way. While it’s true that dramatic colours can make a room feel heavy or dark, painting your pantry or hallway in a dark tone is a different matter. Opting for dramatic hues in small spaces makes the entire house feel colourful and bigger, because it turns a tiny area you might not notice into a striking spot that grabs your attention. 5. Do make the most of your lighting . Save . SPACEPLUS SPACEPLUS You should know by now that, when it comes to interior design ideas for small houses, lighting will be mentioned. In fact, lighting should always be planned into your budget – never as an afterthought. A well-chosen light fitting can transform the look and feel of a room considerably.  Don’t be afraid to show off your personality with a statement piece. And remember: a dimmer switch gives you the ability to create the perfect mood whenever you please.  6. Don’t be selfish with seating . Save . Coffee Meuble Coffee Meuble There’s truth in the “less is more” saying, but don’t expect your guests to keep standing while you entertain. For the living room, you will need the sort of chairs that people can pull up and space together to allow for a flowing conversation.And if space is an issue, make sure you have a couple of sexy dining chairs that can be pulled into the living area. Need help with your home project? Get in touch! Let's get started 7. Do use different textures . Save . Groothandel in decoratie en lifestyle artikelen Groothandel in decoratie en lifestyle artikelen Texture adds dimension and interest to a room. It appeals to our visual and tactile senses when we perceive a space that makes use of smooths, roughs, shines, and dulls – just not in an overkill fashion. Add some texture with a rug, a piece of wall art, a scatter cushion on the couch, or an interesting coffee table. 8. Don’t tease your walls . Save . alba najera alba najera What we mean by that is don’t opt for small pieces of art or mirrors on large, bare walls. That big empty space will swallow them whole. Either go big, or go another route. Modular shelves add charming character to a wall, and so does busy wallpaper. Or share in the hot trend of wall decal words to spice up that big wall. 9. Do pay attention to your hallway . Save SS16 Style Guide—Refined Monochrome Collection—Hallway . LuxDeco LuxDeco Your hallway is a fantastic opportunity for you to make a statement about your style. And yet it doesn't have to be anything grand – any statement is better than none at all. Use paint or patterned wallpaper to add colour and personality, and perhaps hang a beautiful mirror or painting. A mirror is especially clever, as it reflects light and creates the illusion of more space. Use a table to place mail, keys, and other small items when you enter your house. 10. Don’t use tiny potted plants . Save . Hobby Flower Hobby Flower Like everything in your home, the plants should make a statement – or else leave them outside. And although small planters were fabulous in the 1970s, modern interior style has moved on. Rather opt for one large tree or plant in a pot. A series of itty-bitty indoor plants will just make your space seem cluttered. 11. Do use accent pieces . Save . homify homify Trust a few accent items to incorporate the look you want without being overwhelming. If you have a love for beach houses, for example, display a stylish collection of seashells or coral on a side table or on your bookshelf. This is going to look far more sophisticated than designing an entire beach-style room. 12. Don’t let everything match . Save . malee malee Interior catalogues are designed to sell furniture, not to show you how you should be living. Nobody lives that way, so don’t try so hard to match that look.Rather create a lived-in look by making your room’s design eclectic, not a showroom. Use different pieces and accents that catch the eye and add interest to your space. Interior design tips: Colour theory and meanings . Save Living Room . Balance Property Ltd Balance Property Ltd Even when it comes to a simple interior design, your choice in colours should never be an afterthought. That’s because colour therapy tells us that different colours have different meanings (and, thus, affect us differently).• Red: Bold, powerful, passionate• Orange: Optimistic, charismatic• Yellow: Energetic, friendly, fun• Green: Growth, prosperous, generous• Blue: Content, intelligent, authoritative • Purple: Creative, compassionate, devoted (can also be seen as a royal colour)• Black: Elegant, mysterious, confident• White: Wise, pure, innocent. Keep in mind that if you want to enhance or lift these characteristics even more, you need to influence the value, lightness, or darkness of the specific colour. Next up for your inspiration: How to build a house for under £50k (ideas and plans).   The most important thing to remember when interior designing? Style is everything. . Save . Amy Peltier Interior Design & Home Amy Peltier Interior Design & Home Finding a signature style can seem easy. We do this for ourselves with clothing. However, with interior decorating, this task is much more daunting. Whether you're trying to start with a simple interior design or working with a client, our best interior design tips can certainly help you. But knowing what you like and don't like should be the priority. In order to figure out your personal style, find inspiration. Look through ideabooks and note down which pieces you like and which you don't. Notice the colors that appeal, the textures you're drawn to, and the materials you want in your home. Once you have a list of your own personal 'Dos and Don'ts,' you'll be prepared to pick out pieces you'll truly love. And the easiest simple house design tip? Find a piece or two that you can't live without and find complementary decor. Centering a room around a couple of pieces will be pleasing to the eye and help you to focus more easily on colors, textures, and materials that go together.Ready to start? Start with an easy or small room like your bathroom and get in touch with a professional to work with on a design. And if you've already started with a new design and it's looking grim, consult our guide on the biggest decorating mistakes (and don't worry, we have solutions for you)! Open in a new tab Embed this photo on my site 10 modern conservatory furniture ideas Need help with your home project? Get in touch! Let's get started Discover home inspiration! . Houses . Living room . Kitchen . Bedroom . Garden . Bathroom . Dining room . Pool . Edit SEO element homify - modify your home . 4.5 Browse through millions of photos with the homify app! DOWNLOAD THE APP FOR FREE No, Thanks
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Title65 secret interior design tips from the experts | loveproperty.com
Urlhttps://www.loveproperty.com/gallerylist/71465/65-secret-interior-design-tips-from-the-experts
DescriptionFrom balancing colour schemes to hanging artwork, planning lighting and even positioning curtains, we've rounded up the best secret interior design secret tips to take your own decor to the next level. Shh – just keep it quiet..
Date3 Aug 2021
Organic Position30
H1
H2Foolproof interior design ideas for a fabulous home
Always order samples
Go back to basics
Forget symmetry
Add a pop of bright red
Use curves and arches
Introduce crown mouldings
Paint the shutters
Plan thoroughfares
Nail the floor plan
The power of three
The 70-30 split
Make flooring cohesive
Balance your colour scheme
Upcycle drab furniture
Colour block walls
Highlight a fireplace
Create cosy nooks
Add seasonal updates
Style bookshelves right
Design around your line of sight
Add panelling to walls
Let in natural light
Wallpaper the bathroom
Accent with black
Dress the bed
Layer tonal shades
Invest in designer pieces
Fall in love with stools
Play around with scale
Warm with wood
Swatch your paint
Measure dining room dimensions
Let floors do the talking
Call on complementary colours
Obey the golden ratio
Repeat home accessories
Orchestrate indoor lighting
Embrace dark colours
Take design tips from nature
Create an outdoor room
Be punchy with pattern
Take floor tiles onto walls
Use your whole room
Don’t be scared of negative space
Go large with oversized wall art
Create standout details
Create a home bespoke to you
Map out a gallery wall
Get your rug right
Run riot with a stair runner
Opt for non-toxic paint
Layer soft textures
Celebrate the ceiling
Start with a sofa
Add atmosphere with mood lighting
Double-up with two-tone walls
Frame off-cuts for a quirky touch
Hang curtains high
Balance bathroom lighting
Repurpose wallpaper in unexpected ways
Upcycle kitchen cabinets
Play with pendant lighting
Take the long view
Never stop editing
Tape it out
H365 secret interior design tips from the experts
Comments
H2WithAnchorsFoolproof interior design ideas for a fabulous home
Always order samples
Go back to basics
Forget symmetry
Add a pop of bright red
Use curves and arches
Introduce crown mouldings
Paint the shutters
Plan thoroughfares
Nail the floor plan
The power of three
The 70-30 split
Make flooring cohesive
Balance your colour scheme
Upcycle drab furniture
Colour block walls
Highlight a fireplace
Create cosy nooks
Add seasonal updates
Style bookshelves right
Design around your line of sight
Add panelling to walls
Let in natural light
Wallpaper the bathroom
Accent with black
Dress the bed
Layer tonal shades
Invest in designer pieces
Fall in love with stools
Play around with scale
Warm with wood
Swatch your paint
Measure dining room dimensions
Let floors do the talking
Call on complementary colours
Obey the golden ratio
Repeat home accessories
Orchestrate indoor lighting
Embrace dark colours
Take design tips from nature
Create an outdoor room
Be punchy with pattern
Take floor tiles onto walls
Use your whole room
Don’t be scared of negative space
Go large with oversized wall art
Create standout details
Create a home bespoke to you
Map out a gallery wall
Get your rug right
Run riot with a stair runner
Opt for non-toxic paint
Layer soft textures
Celebrate the ceiling
Start with a sofa
Add atmosphere with mood lighting
Double-up with two-tone walls
Frame off-cuts for a quirky touch
Hang curtains high
Balance bathroom lighting
Repurpose wallpaper in unexpected ways
Upcycle kitchen cabinets
Play with pendant lighting
Take the long view
Never stop editing
Tape it out
Bodysrc='//trc.taboola.com/1186225/log/3/unip?en=page_view' width='0' height='0' style='display:none'/> 65 secret interior design tips from the experts. Gallery View| Expand View Foolproof interior design ideas for a fabulous home. Carpetright It's said there's a world of difference between a room designed by a professional interior designer and one done by a home decorator. From balancing colour schemes to hanging artwork, planning lighting and even positioning curtains, designers have a box of tricks that can turn an average scheme into a fabulous space. We've rounded up some of the trade's best-kept secrets to take your own décor to the next level. Shh – just keep it quiet... Always order samples . Dunelm It might sound obvious, but many home decorators overlook samples when overcome with excitement about transforming their interiors. From wallpaper and paint, to flooring and fabrics, you should always order a selection of samples before committing to any specific material. Place the samples together, look at their quality and visualise how all the elements will work together in the room. You could even get crafty and create a moodboard, full of all your favourite swatches. Go back to basics. HGTV Fixer Upper Interior design guru, Joanna Gaines, knows a thing or two about creating a gorgeous home. In her book Homebody: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave, she suggests starting with crisp white walls, since they "can actually provide a neutral and clean foundation to design around that other colors can’t, giving you more freedom to get creative with decor.” There are hundreds of whites, creams and greys to choose from, so all you need to do is decide which is right for you. Forget symmetry. Matalan Many homeowners believe that creating a perfectly symmetrical space will result in a flawless interior design scheme, but this isn't always the case. In fact, by sticking with a symmetrical design you could actually end up with a flat space that lacks warmth and personality. Instead, aim for balance. Hang your wall art off-centre, add texture to create cohesiveness and group mismatched pieces of furniture together for a playful twist. Asymmetrical elements will draw the eye and provide plenty of intrigue. Add a pop of bright red. Pooky Interior designer Beata Heuman, author of Every Room Should Sing, revealed a simple trick she uses to add that extra something to her projects. Beata says that adding a pop of cherry red can finish a scheme even if it seems like it won’t fit with the rest of the décor. For a low-risk option, try adding a bright red lampshade, scatter cushion or picture frame and see if it brings the room to life. It’s a tip she has learnt from her mentor Nicky Haslam, the British designer whose clients have included Mick Jagger, Ringo Starr and Charles Saatchi. Use curves and arches. Covet House Curves, circles and arches are having their moment, adding a softness to interiors that looks both modern and classic. We love how this clever bedroom design turns a useful storage solution into a cool feature, with added tiny downlighters that make your display glow after dark. It also cleverly echoes the asymmetric curve of the headboard. Brilliant! Introduce crown mouldings. Farrow & Ball Crown mouldings, or cornicing, is a piece of decorative plaster that runs between the wall and the ceiling. Coming in all sorts of shapes and sizes, it is a common period feature of older houses but adding it into a bedroom or living room is a shortcut to achieving a refined, traditional style. Paint the shutters. Dulux A well-dressed window can take a room from drab to fab in one fell swoop. The latest trend is to use colour to incorporate them fully into your decorating scheme. This design uses a two-tone effect, which makes even budget shutters look like they were made for this stylish bedroom. Plan thoroughfares. Abode One of the most common design mistakes that non-designers make – especially in open-plan spaces – is cramming too much furniture into an area without leaving enough room for people to walk around comfortably. The most frequently-used thoroughfares in your home should be at least 90cm wide – just enough for two people to pass each other.  Nail the floor plan. Pexels Speaking of leaving enough space, it’s also important to make sure there is room to move around in less busy areas of your home. For example, you should ideally leave about 45cm between sofas, chairs and coffee tables in your living room. This gives you plenty of space for sitting and moving around without having to stretch too far for your cup of coffee or shout across the room to have a conversation. The power of three. Lights4Fun Three is most definitely a magic number when it comes to design – as are odd numbers in general. Grouping odd numbers of items – be it cushions, vases, pictures or candles – forces the eye to move around the display, creating a level of visual interest that symmetrical, even-numbered arrangements simply can’t compete with. The 70-30 split. Graham & Green Here’s another handy trick for getting your proportions right and balancing different styles within the same space. A guaranteed way to give a room character is to decorate about 70% of it in a particular style then complete the remaining 30% in a completely different style. So you can spice up a largely traditional scheme with a smattering of contemporary items, or vice versa. Make flooring cohesive. Pexels Using the same flooring throughout different rooms or areas in your home is an easy way to make the space feel much bigger than it is. If you have large, open-plan rooms, use rugs to break up the continuity and divide the space according to use. This will create the impression of distinct sitting and dining areas that still pull together as part of the same, larger whole. Balance your colour scheme. Loaf Want a failsafe way to proportion a three-colour scheme? Stick to 60% for your dominant colour, 30% for your secondary colour and 10% for your accent colour and you’ll find it hard to go wrong. To add a fourth colour into the mix, split the secondary colour or, at a push, the dominant colour, but never the accent.  Upcycle drab furniture. Rust-Oleum / Make it Yours Being able to transform old furniture is an interior decorator's secret weapon. Whether turning mass-produced flat-pack designs into one-off pieces or sprucing up junk-shop bargains into shabby-chic heirlooms, repainting furniture is a simple way to add colour and character in your home at rock bottom prices. Go for an all-in-one paint that doesn't need primer to cut down on prep time. Colour block walls. Dulux Block painting walls with harmonious or contrasting colours can alter a room's sense of space and also give your scheme a fun twist. To get a crisp finish, always use masking or decorator's tape. Get an instant style fix wby marking out geometric shapes and fill in the blanks with a variety of colours that reflect your personality.  Highlight a fireplace. The Otto House Brightly painted fireplace surrounds have become an on-trend feature – we especially love this geometric design by The Otto House. What's more, you don't necessarily need a period property to achieve the look. A colourful fireplace surround can become a feature on its own as an original storage solution. Fill the centre with books or candles and use the top shelf to lean art and display houseplants.  Create cosy nooks. Annie Sloan Fabrics / PullCast Turning awkward or unused space into a beautiful nook is a well-worn trick of many interior designers. Whether it’s a window seat or a reading nook, bespoke carpentry creates a stylish solution that fits the space like a glove. Make it comfortable with cushions and side tables and extra marks if you can add in some secret storage space! Add seasonal updates. Lights4fun Paying attention to detail adds a professional finishing touch that creates interest and character. An effective way to achieve this is by accessorising with endearing objects that echo the current season. This autumnal display with pumpkins and lanterns will make a warm welcome for guests entering an entryway and can be easily updated for the holidays. Style bookshelves right. H&M Home Learning the art of display makes the difference between practical storage and a beautiful feature. Here's how to make your bookshelves Instagram-worthy. Do not overcrowd the space, choose accessories in the same colour and group items together in odd numbers. Use books as objects and exhibit them both horizontally and vertically for interest. Aim for two-thirds books, one-third accessories and make sure to include either plants, foliage or flowers too. Design around your line of sight. Photographee.eu/Shutterstock The best height to hang or stand a TV is at eye level in the position you’ll be watching it from. So in your living room, you’ll want it at the same height as your head when you’re sitting down. In a kitchen, you might want to hang it at your eye line when you’re standing or sitting at a breakfast bar. The ideal TV viewing distance is about 1.5 times the diagonal span of your TV screen. Add panelling to walls. Dulux Wooden wall panels aren't just for period properties. This decorative feature adds character and texture to contemporary homes too and is a growing trend. What's more, it may look expensive but budget versions made from wood alternatives like fibreboard and OSB are super cheap and, once mounted, can hide wall surfaces that have seen better days. Tongue and groove panels make rustic schemes warm and cosy while framed and mid-height styles suit traditional looks and create a refined finish. Paint the panels in bold or muted tones for up-to-date appeal.  Let in natural light. Crate and Barrel There is no substitute for natural light. It not only benefits our health and wellbeing but it also affects how colours appear. Always look at the light in your room before you decorate it. South-facing rooms benefit from the maximum amount of light whereas north-facing will be darker, therefore, paint colours can seem a completely different hue in one room to another. Wallpaper the bathroom. Woodchip and magnolia You don't necessarily need to stick to tiles in the bathroom. Wallpapering bathroom walls can make a beautiful style statement and it's a great place to use bold pattern and colour you might not use elsewhere. Large prints look especially striking in small spaces so feature wallpaper can transform cloakrooms and downstairs toilets, too. Look for specialist bathroom wallpaper that is wash and splash-resistant. Accent with black. John Lewis There is a misconception that black makes things look closed in and dreary but this isn't the whole story. Interior designers use it as an accent because it can actually enlarge the feeling of space by placing the darkest tone on an area you want to 'push back'. The key is to use the bold shade sparingly to ground a room and tie the scheme together. Against a pale backdrop and used in repetition, the overall contrast adds a striking punch and looks undoubtedly chic. Dress the bed. George Home A bedroom should reflect your personality and as the bed takes up so much physical and visual space it certainly needs attention. So, what better way to make an impact than with versatile bed linen that can easily be changed whenever the mood takes your fancy. Look for good quality bed linen in colours and patterns that complement the surroundings and then layer like a pro with propped pillows, a throw blanket and decorative cushions for a hotel-chic vibe. Layer tonal shades. Norsu Interiors Using multiple shades of the same colour immediately makes a room look polished and pulled together, and it's a trick that you can't get wrong. Layer the same colour or vary hues, adding texture and pattern into the mix. Start with a failsafe array of sofa cushions and then move onto larger items and structural parts of a room, for instance, painting a piece of furniture the same colour as the wall behind. Invest in designer pieces. Chaplins Furniture Designer furniture only gets better with age, so it's well worth investing. Iconic pieces with dramatic shapes make a great focal point in any room. A Fritz Hansen chair, Ercol sideboard or Arco Flos floor lamp will always attract attention and will never go out of fashion.  Fall in love with stools. Loaf Versatile stools are an interior decorator's secret weapon. This little piece of furniture can be slotted into any design to add functionality. Tuck or stack them at the side of a room when not in use and then bring them out for extra seating when needed. Give them multifunctional purpose, for instance, a lidded stool makes an excellent side table and storage piece in one. Play around with scale. HK Living Going supersized gives you instant interior design brownie points. Not only does upscaling a key accessory or piece of furniture make a striking style statement but it also creates a comfortable, cosy atmosphere in a room. Lamps and pendant lights offer the perfect way to play with scale, as they can create a big impact without taking up too much space. Warm with wood. Argos If a room lacks warmth and character, there's no better antidote than wood. While timber accessories and furniture are an easy way to lift a scheme and add texture, a 3D wall can really work wonders in a space without a focal point. It doesn't have to cost the earth either – this chic beach house-inspired design can be achieved with narrow strips of reclaimed wood. For something more rustic, sand down the surface before installing. Swatch your paint. Air Images/Shutterstock Before you commit to a wall colour, it's important to paint a swatch and observe how the shade looks in different light conditions. For a mess-free method, paint swatches on A3 pieces of paper and move them around the room throughout the day, observing how they look in different corners of the space. Measure dining room dimensions. Loaf Dining tables often get squeezed in as an afterthought, but it’s worth thinking carefully about how much space you need to avoid bumping elbows while you eat. The ideal dining table height is 74cm, with 45cm of legroom and 75cm of space between the table and the wall so you can get up and sit down comfortably. Each place setting should be about 65cm wide. Let floors do the talking. Carpetright Just like ceilings, floors are often left as an afterthought in decorating schemes but a statement floor can create striking results that will add wow-factor to the room. The key is to incorporate balance, for instance,  if the floor is busy pattern make sure the rest of the room is pared back and neutral. Look for furniture pieces with a small footprint and lift what you can off the floor.  Call on complementary colours. M&S The colour wheel is an interior design essential. It can help you to plan your colour pairings or guide you out of a design rut when you’re struggling for inspiration. Use it to help you come up with complementary schemes (using colours from opposite sides of the wheel), analogous schemes (using colours next to each other on the wheel) or bolder schemes such as split complementary or triadic, which use three colours. Obey the golden ratio. Sara Tramp via Emily Henderson Design The golden ratio is a proportion often seen in nature and has served artists well for centuries. Interior designers can put it to good use too and create schemes that feel effortlessly harmonious. It works by dividing spaces into approximately two-thirds for one section and one third for the remainder. In this scheme by Sara Tramp featured on designer Emily Henderson's website, the bed and bedside table take up roughly two-thirds of the arrangement, while the shelving unit takes up around a third, creating a sense of balance without feeling too formal. Repeat home accessories. Pexels Repeating shapes throughout a scheme is a subtle way to help the human brain read a space as a harmonious whole. Here, for example, a selection of rectangles – in the pictures, sofa and scatter cushions – echo one another, as do the pair of round mirrors, round coffee table and vase. The central ampersand purposefully disrupts the repetition so the scheme doesn’t become too predictable.  Orchestrate indoor lighting. IKEA Good lighting is often the last thing most people think about when coming up with a new design scheme, but it really should be the first. You need to carefully plan where every single light, switch and socket will go before turning to decorating, making sure you include a good mix of overhead lighting, task lighting, mood lighting and accent lighting. Using the right colour and brightness of light bulb for the right tasks will also help your room look and perform its best. Embrace dark colours. Crown Paints What’s the best way to make the most of a dark room? The instinctive answer might be to paint it bright white to reflect as much light as possible. But this can give a dingy room an off-putting, grey-ish tone that feels needlessly gloomy. Instead, embrace the dark side and paint your walls in deep, rich hues to create an irresistibly cosy scheme that draws you in. Lighten the mood with a few bright accents and make sure you include plenty of layered lighting.  Take design tips from nature. DFS You don’t have to spend hours scouring through pretty pictures of interiors to find your dream scheme. Look around and you’ll start to see inspiration everywhere – from the soothing texture of pebbles on a beach to petrol shimmering in a forecourt puddle. Take photos and use them to help you create a concept board to inform your design. This coastal-themed room draws on the beach, from the lobster-pot light fitting to the whitewashed wood walls. Create an outdoor room. M&S Planning an alfresco dining room for outdoor entertaining? Treat your exterior space as you would a living room scheme and factor in rugs, lighting, comfortable seating and areas to pop drinks. Paint fences in sunny colours, display artwork (you can buy prints specifically for outdoors, to survive the elements) and hanging plants. Lastly, use an outdoor rug to ground the scheme. Be punchy with pattern. Prestigious Combining different patterns in the same room can be tricky, but a good tip is to use varying patterns in similar colours, or the same pattern but in varying scales. For example, try small florals mixed with big blowsy blooms, or go for bold geo shapes in different colourways as shown here. Take floor tiles onto walls. The Baked Tile Company Who says you can't use the same patterned tiles on both walls and floors? Carry them up from the floor to the ceiling for a standout design with maximum impact. Use your whole room. IKEA Don't feel you have to line your furniture up along the walls... If you have a big living room, bringing sofas and armchairs into the centre of the space will create a cosy and much more sociable seating space. This works particularly well in open-plan spaces and you can always place a console at the back of your seating so you're not looking at a big expanse of sofa. If your room is too small for a central sofa, keep it against the wall and arrange a few armchairs at angles (facing towards the sofa) to get the designer look. Don’t be scared of negative space . Carpetright As tempting as it is, fight the urge to fill every wall and shelf, otherwise you’re in danger of your room scheme feeling cluttered. Instead, leave a few areas free to gain some much-needed breathing room and a better sense of space. Painting a door and its frame the same colour as your walls is a good trick, as it helps the woodwork to blend in, giving the illusion of a larger blank area. Go large with oversized wall art. Rob Mills Architects / Architizer When it comes to art, it’s very much a case of the bigger the better. You can fake it to some extent by clustering smaller pictures into a gallery wall, but nothing compares to an oversized artwork that grabs your attention the moment you step into a room, as this scheme by Rob Mills Architects shows. Double up and place two complementary pieces next to (instead of over) a fireplace for maximum impact. If oversized art is outside of your budget, trying offsetting a smaller piece above a sideboard or sofa – hanging it centrally will make it look lost.  Create standout details. Crown Paints Whether it’s painting squares (or circles) on a wall, as shown here, creating a detailed mural or going for a freestyle pattern of monochrome dashes, there are so many ways to use paint to create an innovative look on a budget. Think outside the box and carry your painted effect around corners and onto door frames for added interest.  Create a home bespoke to you. Audenza The pioneering Victorian interior designer William Morris once said, “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful”. It’s a maxim that all designers – amateur and professional – can still benefit from today. If there's something you love, whether it's a piece of furniture, an artwork or collection, think about how best to work your scheme around it. It's pieces like these that create an individual and cherished interior. Map out a gallery wall. Norsu Interiors A staple in the interior design repertoire, the gallery wall is an exercise in creativity and balance – but not even the experts get it right the first time. To achieve that Instagram-worthy display, map out your design beforehand. Cut out cardboard templates of each frame you want to hang and arrange them across the wall with Blu Tac until you find a combination that works, then simply swap for the real thing! Get your rug right . Rug Society Rugs are the ultimate way to draw an interior design scheme together, but go too small and the rug will look lost and your scheme will fall flat. Ideally, a rug should be big enough that some or all of your furniture’s feet can sit on it – using a tiny rug under a coffee table will only make a room feel poky. In a dining area, you should be able to sit at the dining table with all four of your chair’s feet on the rug. Consider using them in different ways, too – whether it's a few rugs overlapping each other or even hung in place of wallhangings. Run riot with a stair runner. Dash & Albert Europe Entrance looking a little lacklustre? Interior designers know that even the most hardworking hallway decor needn't scrimp on style. Want to make a narrow hallway or staircase look wider? Rather than covering it all in carpet, fit a runner leaving about 8cm of bare floor on either side. The runner divides up the space, drawing the eye into the distance and tricking it into thinking the area is wider than it is. Opt for non-toxic paint. Earthborn When choosing paint, it’s easy to put colour first and forget other factors, such as how the paint might affect the environment or your health. Consider buying paints made from natural materials that contain no (or very low quantities of) harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs). They may be a bit pricier, but they’re a worthwhile investment, especially for a children’s room or when decorating a nursery. Layer soft textures. The French Bedroom Company Texture is key to creating a successful design scheme, especially if you’re working with a neutral colour palette. To keep a room interesting, incorporate different tactile materials throughout the space, from soft woollen throws to silky cushions, rough brick walls to glossy mirrored finishes. Celebrate the ceiling. Claire Esparros for Homepolish Design Crystal Sinclair Ceilings don’t tend to get a lot of love on the whole. Boring old white with perhaps a bit of colour on the cornicing is usually about as exciting as it gets. But creating a statement ceiling by painting, papering or even adding a mural as designer Crystal Sinclair has done here can give a room an instant lift. Painting a ceiling in a dark colour can make a space feel warm and cosy, while metallic paints or faux tin tiles give it a more Art Deco look.  Start with a sofa. Sofology Trying to design a successful open-plan living space? When you're working with a blank canvas, it can be difficult to decide where to start. Rather than getting bogged down with accessories in your living room, start with the sofa. Usually the largest piece of furniture in the room, it's easiest to plan your layout around this key feature. When it comes to positioning, consider the light, thoroughfares and any views you might want to utilise. This also works for other rooms, whether it's the bed in a bedroom or a dining table in an entertaining area. Add atmosphere with mood lighting. Delightfull Mood lighting can instantly create the right atmosphere. Dimmer switches give you the power to use the same bulb as either general lighting or mood lighting, so installing them in every room will instantly boost the versatility of your lighting scheme. If you’re using LED lighting, make sure you choose dimmer switches that are LED-compatible so the bulbs glow brightly enough and don’t flicker. Lamps are ideal for creating a cosy glow at night, and candles, lanterns and wall lights will all help add to your room's overall ambience. Also, try using LED-strip lights to highlight an alcove or under shelving to highlight your favourite features.  Double-up with two-tone walls. Crown Paints If you live in a new-build, chances are your home may be short on architectural features. Why not try painting some in? You could go for a two-tone wall that changes colour at dado rail height, as shown here, or have a different colour starting at picture rail height and continue onto the ceiling to add height. It’s an affordable way to add interest to your home and very easy to update, too. Frame off-cuts for a quirky touch. Bronwyn Poole by Touch Interiors An affordable way to create a piece of oversized art like this colourful number by Touch Interiors is to frame a striking wallpaper or piece of fabric. You can save even more money by searching for off-cuts online, or combining different samples to give a patchwork effect. Hang curtains high. Hillarys Curtains can make or break a room. Opt for a luxurious fabric, such as velvet, to create an opulent frame for your windows. One of the most common curtain mistakes is to hang them just above the top of the window frame, making the window – and the room – feel squat. Hang them high to create a grand impression and make the room feel taller. Balance bathroom lighting. Dusk Lighting Not many of us would claim to look our best in the morning, but you can give yourself a head start by getting your bathroom lighting right. Never hang a bathroom sconce above the mirror – it will only make you look washed out. Instead, install sconces on either side of the mirror as they'll light your face evenly and frame you in your most flattering light. Placing downlighters around the sides of the room, rather than the middle, will also help to avoid shadows. Repurpose wallpaper in unexpected ways. @liznylon / Instagram Looking for wallpaper ideas to give instant wow-factor? Try using it in unexpected places to line cupboards, drawers and shelving as Liz Engelsen has done here. This is a subtler, cheaper way to introduce a statement pattern into your scheme than papering a whole wall. Again, keep an eye out for money-saving off-cuts if you don't need to use a whole roll.  Upcycle kitchen cabinets. Superfront A good interior designer knows when it’s time to replace an item and when a perfectly good piece can be repurposed to create something fabulous. Kitchens are an excellent case in point. For example, if you have basic IKEA kitchen units that are in a good condition, you can give them a fresh look by fitting them with new doors and hardware from kitchen upgrade companies such as Superfront, Reform and Plykea at considerably less cost than buying new units.  Play with pendant lighting. Pooky One of the most common questions interior designers are asked is how high to hang pendant lighting. The answer depends, to some extent, on the size and style of your light, the height of your ceilings and the height of the people living in your home, but here are some useful guidelines: in a living room or hallway, hang your light about 2.4m from the floor, above a dining table, leave about 75cm between the tabletop and your pendant. If you're hanging them above an island for statement kitchen lighting, leave about 80cm between the countertop and the bottom of the light shade.  Take the long view. Habitat Look at the flow of your home and take into account the room that’s beyond the one you’re painting. The door frame in this picture has been painted in the same pale pink as the wall in the room beyond, tying the two spaces together. It doesn’t have to be a door frame, either – look at highlighting other areas of woodwork, from picture rails and skirting to window frames and banisters. Never stop editing. Carpetright When it comes to interior design perfection, your work is never done. While your wall colours, furniture and floor coverings might remain the same for years, there are plenty of ways to give your interior spaces a freshen up, without having to redecorate. Update your door handles, upcycle a piece of furniture, change up rugs and cushions, alternate the images in your gallery wall or try out some new lighting to enhance your favourite spaces with minimal effort. Tape it out. Carpetright When you're planning the furniture for a room, it can be easy to over order or underestimate the space you actually have to hand. Yet space planning is key to good interior design. In order to avoid overcrowding and creating an in-cohesive design, grab some masking tape and plan out your furnishings, based on the measurements of the items you're keen to buy. This will give you an idea of layout, floor space and if anything just doesn't quite fit. Loved this? Like and follow us on Facebook to see more inspiring interior design ideas Share the love 03 August 2021 Interiors See more on this topic Comments. Be the first to comment View All ( {{ vm.comments.length }} ) Do you want to comment on this article? You need to be signed in for this feature Share the love + Add Comment Copyright © loveproperty.com All rights reserved.
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TitleInterior Designers Reveal the Mistakes You're Making in a Living Room
Urlhttps://www.insider.com/mistakes-youre-making-when-decorating-a-living-room-2019-11
DescriptionFrom incorrect couch placement to rugs that aren't the right size, here are some common design mishaps you could be making in your home
Date20 Nov 2019
Organic Position31
H1Interior designers reveal the 10 biggest mistakes people make when decorating a living room
H2Buying a rug that is too big or too small for your living room will mess up the entire space
Placing your couch up against a wall could make the room look smaller
Using pieces of furniture that are too "matchy-matchy" might make your home look like a showroom
Your television should be hung in a practical spot, not somewhere high up
If you don't prioritize comfort, your living room could end up feeling bleak
You might want to have multiple light sources in your living room to create ambiance
Choosing furniture that's too big or too small for your space can make the room feel off
Incorporating furniture that doesn't match the rest of your home might throw off the space
You should use shelving space, but avoid packing it with large items
Not having enough tables and other surfaces to set your things on can be impractical
H3FOLLOW US: Insider is on Facebook
H2WithAnchorsBuying a rug that is too big or too small for your living room will mess up the entire space
Placing your couch up against a wall could make the room look smaller
Using pieces of furniture that are too "matchy-matchy" might make your home look like a showroom
Your television should be hung in a practical spot, not somewhere high up
If you don't prioritize comfort, your living room could end up feeling bleak
You might want to have multiple light sources in your living room to create ambiance
Choosing furniture that's too big or too small for your space can make the room feel off
Incorporating furniture that doesn't match the rest of your home might throw off the space
You should use shelving space, but avoid packing it with large items
Not having enough tables and other surfaces to set your things on can be impractical
BodyInterior designers reveal the 10 biggest mistakes people make when decorating a living room Rachel Murphy 2019-11-20T15:36:02Z Facebook Icon The letter F. Email icon An envelope. It indicates the ability to send an email. Twitter icon A stylized bird with an open mouth, tweeting. Twitter Snapchat icon A ghost. Snapchat Fliboard icon A stylized letter F. Flipboard Pinterest icon The letter "P" styled to look like a thumbtack pin. Pinterest Link icon An image of a chain link. It symobilizes a website link url. Copy Link Even if your living room looks pretty great, a few common mistakes could be preventing it from being perfect. Shutterstock Insider spoke with four designers to find out the top 10 mistakes people make when decorating a living room.One major mistake is not having enough lights in the space.Another common design mistake is not incorporating multiple surfaces, like coffee tables and end tables, into the room.Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Your living room is probably one of the first spaces someone sees when they enter your home, meaning there's a lot of pressure to make it look perfect.To help you do just that, Insider spoke with four interior designers to find out some common decorating blunders and furniture faux pas.Here are some of the biggest mistakes people make when decorating a living room. Buying a rug that is too big or too small for your living room will mess up the entire space. A small rug can make your space look unfinished. Shutterstock Gena Kirk, the vice president of design at KB Home, told Insider that it's important to ensure that a rug does more than just work within the design scheme of your home — it needs to fit the room you intend to use it in."A rug that is too large will look overwhelming in the space and can make the room appear smaller," she said. "A rug that is too small forces your furniture to be closer together, leaving the room feeling unbalanced and [creating] the feeling of wasted empty space."Kirk recommended using painter's tape and exact measurements to create mock outlines on your floor so you can envision how the rug might look in your space. Placing your couch up against a wall could make the room look smaller. You might want to move your couch closer to the center of your room. Shutterstock Lauren White, the owner and principal designer of Ellen W. Interior Concepts, told Insider that instead of placing your sofa up against the wall, you should consider "floating" it."Floating furniture means that you place pieces off the wall, sometimes in the middle of the room," she said. "When you do this in your living room, it makes the room feel and look larger because you will be able to walk around it." Using pieces of furniture that are too "matchy-matchy" might make your home look like a showroom. Furniture that matches might make your room feel like no one actually lives in it. Shutterstock Walk into a furniture showroom, and you're likely to find that almost everything is sold in sets — including living-room furniture."The easiest thing would be to purchase an entire set, but don't do it," White said. "A space that looks too 'matchy-matchy' isn't a good thing. Furniture sets are visually boring, but ending different pieces demonstrates that you took time to curate your space, which, in turn, elevates the style in your home." Your television should be hung in a practical spot, not somewhere high up. Your TV should be at eye level with the sofa. Shutterstock Design is more than having a home that looks pretty — you should also take ergonomics into account."I know that placing your TV over the fireplace is the 'it' thing to do, but it does a huge disservice to your neck," White said."Your TV should be eye-level to where you are sitting," she told Insider. "You should not have to look up." If you don't prioritize comfort, your living room could end up feeling bleak. A couch might look cool, but it should be comfy too. Shutterstock People often think you have to sacrifice comfort for style, and it reflects in their living space, Sonja Rasula, a former interior designer on HGTV's "Home to Go" and TLC's "Trading Spaces" who founded Unique Markets in Los Angeles, told Insider."Comfortability is one of the biggest factors that make a living room," Rasula said. "Even if you are balling on a budget, adding a cozy blanket or a few plush pillows will make all the difference." You might want to have multiple light sources in your living room to create ambiance. One light source often isn't enough. Shutterstock Living rooms are multifunctional, and your lighting choices should reflect that, Sara Ray, an interior designer based in Nashville, told Insider."There should be overhead lighting on a dimmer that can be used to move throughout the space or dimmed to provide the right ambiance for a party," she said. "You want to have plenty of secondary lighting so that tasks like reading can be done while sitting in the space."She suggested placing accent lighting on bookshelves, on a fireplace mantel, or above artwork to create layers of lighting in your living room. Choosing furniture that's too big or too small for your space can make the room feel off. Your couches and table shouldn't make it difficult to move around the space. Shutterstock Picking out the right furniture is important, but where you put it is equally essential to designing a living room."Large pieces in a small space can make the room look even smaller, where small pieces in a large space can leave too much empty space," Rasula told Insider.For larger living rooms, she recommended leaving 30 to 36 inches between furniture pieces. Smaller spaces, like apartments, can get away with 18 to 24 inches between pieces."This amount of distance will ensure you're not overcrowding your living room while at the same time will help maximize space for a smaller living room," she said. Incorporating furniture that doesn't match the rest of your home might throw off the space. Some pieces just don't belong together. Shutterstock Kirk said her clients often want to incorporate a piece of furniture in their living room that doesn't really mesh well with the overall style of their home.She said that while this should be avoided, there's an exception to the rule."If it is because they love it, I say buy it," she said. "I believe that if you love something you can make almost anything work, and that's part of what makes a person's home uniquely theirs — a home filled with furniture they love." You should use shelving space, but avoid packing it with large items. Sometimes less is more. Shutterstock When it comes to shelving in your living room, there's a right way and a wrong way to go about decorating it, according to Rasula."You should utilize shelving space as much as possible, but try and avoid overhang, which could cause the space to look overcrowded," she told Insider.She explained that overhang is when items that are too large for the shelf or bookcase they're on stick out over the ledge. Not having enough tables and other surfaces to set your things on can be impractical. One table probably isn't enough. Shutterstock Since a living room is often well trafficked, you should probably have ample places to set down your drinks, books, and other items, Ray told Insider."To create a functional living room, you should have a surface that you can easily reach from wherever you're sitting," she said. "It's so nice to have a side table close by when you're ready to set a drink down."Read more:Interior designers reveal the 10 decorating rules you should never breakInterior designers reveal the 12 biggest mistakes people make when decorating a bedroomWe had interior designers critique 10 famous apartments from shows like 'Friends' and 'Gossip Girl'8 things an interior designer would buy from Target right nowThe worst interior design trends everyone was obsessed with the decade you were born, according to experts Newsletter Get a daily selection of our top stories based on your reading preferences. Loading Something is loading. FOLLOW US: Insider is on Facebook . More: Features Freelancer Evergreen story interior design Interior Designer living room Decor Home Decor Design Home Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. Close icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. 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