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TitleGrowing your business - GOV.UK
Urlhttps://www.gov.uk/growing-your-business
DescriptionSteps to help grow your business - finding finance, mentors, increasing sales and developing products and services
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BodyGrowing your business Skip to contents of guide Plan for growth Once your business is established and you’re making a profit on the products and services you sell to customers, you may want to start thinking about how to grow. Many businesses think of growth in terms of increased sales, but it’s also important to focus on how to maintain or improve your profitability. Things you can do to help grow your business include: looking into ways of increasing your sales, both to existing customers and new customers improving your products and services by researching and testing changes with your customers developing new products and services, and selling them to new or existing markets taking on staff or training your current staff, including working with apprentices and mentors looking for additional sources of funding, such as bringing in new investors thinking about selling your products or services online work with a business mentor, who can help you think about how to do all of these things As your business grows. You must register for VAT if your VAT taxable turnover reaches more than £85,000. You may also find that a different legal structure is more suitable as your business grows. Contact the business support helpline in your area for help and advice on starting or growing your business. View a printable version of the whole guide Related content . COVID-19 vaccinations. Book your coronavirus vaccination and booster dose on the NHS website Is this page useful? Maybe Yes this page is useful No this page is not useful Thank you for your feedback Report a problem with this page
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TitleHow to Grow Your Business | Advice for Growing a Business | Real Business
Urlhttps://realbusiness.co.uk/grow-your-business
DescriptionIn this Real Business guide, we look at the multiple ways you can grow your small-to-medium business, including what mistakes to avoid
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How to grow your business
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How to grow your business
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BodyHow to grow your business Annie May Noonan February 25, 2020 10 mins Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on email Small businesses have to fight against the odds to survive, and that’s why it’s important that owners understand what makes a business grow. A business that doesn’t grow eventually dies and small businesses are more likely to fail with 20% of them closing in their first year. These statistics rise to 50% by their fifth year of operation. When growing a business, many different things have to be considered, from deciding upon an effective growth strategy to thinking about how your business is going to target, engage and retain a loyal customer base. During the early stages of running a business, owners tend to take on sales, marketing, financial and customer care roles as well as being a strategic leader, that’s at least until you’ve grown your business enough to afford hiring more people. How to grow your business. With so many different aspects to consider, thinking about the first step when growing a business can feel overwhelming. The best place to start is deciding upon a growth strategy. 1. Have a growth strategy With 64% of UK employees dreaming of starting their own businesses, there’s no doubt that Britain is a nation with entrepreneurial aspirations. Considering that 83% of Gen Z, (the country’s future majority workforce), also want to start their own businesses, it’s essential that everyone understands not only how to start a business, but how to grow one too; implementing a growth strategy is a good place to start. Whether you’re the owner of a startup, a small, or a small to medium business, having a growth strategy is essential to grow at scale. However, implementing an effective growth strategy takes time and they should be tailored to the individual business in question. To make a start on their growth strategy, business owners should ask themselves a series of questions, such as as the ones below: Where is my business right now? How do I get it from here to where I want it to be What makes my business different from my competitors? Why do my customers come to my business instead of them? Who is my ideal customer? Once these questions have been answered, owners can determine the central value of their business i.e, what makes the business special/stand out. Dealing with these questions can also help owners solidify the company’s mission(s), including short, and longer-term goals, ie) right now, we reach X customers, but in five years time, we aim to reach Y. These aims are all central to determining a growth strategy. Owners should then establish the “facts” of their business, such as what the revenue streams are. Following this, they can start analysing their major competitors, and evaluate what their own brand’s strengths are. While these strengths may not initially seem like advantages, for example, ?our competitor is larger than us?, unique facts about your business can give it an edge against your competition, ?but we are smaller and therefore more agile to market changes. Once you establish and analyse ?unique facts” and ‘strengths related to your business, you can use them as tools for growth. 2. Adopt new technology. Business, like the rest of the world, is going digital. This means you could be missing out on key growth opportunities if you ignore new technologies that can simplify your life or streamline processes in your business. If you’re having trouble warming to this new digital age, remember that technology is about innovation, and finding new ways to do things that drive success. A majority of the workforce will soon be Gen Zs, the oldest of which are currently 22 years old. They are entering the job market as digital natives, meaning they bring with them unique insights and are able to use new technologies immediately. As an employer, you don’t want to appear resistant to new technology, as this could put this talented new talent pool off applying to your business, potentially stalling growth via missed opportunities. While technology can be used to make existing business processes easier (such as automating laborious administrative processes), it should also be used to find new and effective ways of doing business that will drive growth. What’s more, the technology doesn’t have to be hard to use, take digital marketing technology for example. 3. Have a digital strategy in place to help grow your business. Having an online presence is a prerequisite for any successful business today. However, it’s pointless if there isn’t an effective digital marketing strategy underpinning it; as businesses will miss out on key customer engagement opportunities. Here are the points to be thinking about before deciding upon a digital marketing strategy: What are your aims? What are your tactics? How are you going to measure performance Some business owners make the mistake in thinking that a nice looking business website is all that’s needed to grow a business online. But this isn’t enough. They must make sure that business websites are search-engine optimised and user-friendly, especially for mobile device users as well as desktop-based browsers. Retail businesses, in particular, should have a fully integrated and fast response e-commerce ‘shop” on their websites too. With statistics showing that online consumers are increasingly making purchases from mobile or tablet devices, businesses must also ensure their websites cater to these preferences. How to do it. However, an effective digital strategy doesn’t stop with a pretty website, business owners must also ensure they take advantage of the various social media channels on offer to better target and engage with their customer base, (also known as social media marketing). For example, if your business offers a service, twitter is a great tool to engage with customers when dealing with complaints or promoting your level of customer care or support generally. Email marketing is also an effective way to remind your loyal customer base about your goods and services or to update them with news about the business. SME owners must never forget the ?digital” in digital marketing, as these technologies boost growth by allowing businesses to reach audiences they wouldn?t have been able to otherwise, as well as helping them build a loyal customer base. 4. Train your staff. Investing time and money into staff development can help a business grow by making employees feel like engaged, motivated and most importantly valued assets to a business. Motivated staff are more likely to go the extra mile in a business, pushing it towards growth, leading to higher productivity and output generally. At a basic level, well-trained employees have the competency, aptitude and skills to keep the business running when you’re busy or away, and will be able to service customers better. Training staff starts by setting up a staff training programme in your business. Whether you do it via a PowerPoint presentation or print out a booklet for them to keep, ensure you write down what you want your employees to learn in order to work in your business. This includes the knowledge and skillsets you believe are vital for them to do their jobs well. Start by covering the most basic skillsets you expect from staff and build from there to cover more specialised or sophisticated skills certain members of staff might need in your business. Running through these expectations with staff will help you to identify any ‘skills gaps” in your team such as lack of training in computer software. Without basic skills training, such as software training, staff may not be able to perform the more sophisticated forms of operations in a business. Ensure you upskill them from the ground up, as it’s more time-consuming to re-teach staff than to build on a strong basic foundation of knowledge and skillsets. How to train your staff. Holding regular training sessions can be useful. A popular option is holding sessions where teams can get together to learn a new skill over their lunch-break. Also known as ?lunch and learns,” you don’t always have to do the teaching. In fact, employees themselves can take turns hosting these sessions, using their specialist knowledge in a certain area of the business to upskill their peers. Bringing members of different departments together to work on collaborative projects can also help the natural exchange of skill-sets across a business. However, training and upskilling staff can be a redundant exercise if it’s not implemented regularly and if goals, objectives and performance reviews aren?t put in place to ensure they are learning and progressing. 4. Be ?modern” with taking payments. With consumers demanding increasingly flexible payment options, smaller businesses must offer them as many different payment options as possible. It might come as a surprise to some readers, but many SMEs are still not accepting card payments. Statistics from 2017 revealed that as many as 2.6m small businesses didn?t offer this payment facility. What makes this fact particularly worrying is that cash payments stopped being the main form of payment the same year. Only last year, debit card payments were the most popular payment option for consumers, accounting for three in every five transactions. Small business owners must, therefore, ensure they have card machines in their stores, including a contactless” payments option. For retail businesses, in particular, it’s vital that consumers can pay for goods easily online. Having a fully functioning e-commerce ‘shop” on their business website is vital. Businesses should also provide a variety of payment options for customers; from online to in-person and even over the phone, ensuring that all customer payment preferences are met. SME owners on how they grew their businesses 1. Ceri-Jane Hackling, managing director, Cerub PR On networking I started my business working from my spare room with my partner’s laptop and my mobile phone. The most important thing I did was to start networking. When I started the business I hadn?t even realised that networking was for small businesses but I made an effort to attend as many groups as I could so that I could decide which ones were right for me and which weren?t. Through networking, I met a lot of people but I realised quite quickly that I wasn?t necessarily going to meet clients through the people in the room, but through the people that they knew. I gradually began to grow my network which meant I met people who could introduce me to other groups and other people, potential suppliers and a support network of people who were also going through the same challenges I was. I still network and have stayed in touch with a number of people I met in the early days and many have become friends. In the early stages, I was very keen to keep costs down. I know many people who have started a business and move into offices straight away but I wanted to make sure that we had a very strong client base and money in the bank before we even considered moving into premises. Even though I had staff, we worked from my house until the end of 2007 and moved into our offices four years after I started the business. On making mistakes We ve been in business for almost 17 years but it hasn’t been plain sailing. I’ve made mistakes in employing people and have employed people because I liked them rather than because they could do the job, so if you’re in a small company it’s worth getting someone external to interview with you to give another perspective. It’s worth realising that if you have made the wrong decision, it’s better to admit it and cut your losses early otherwise you run the risk of letting clients down and upsetting the harmony in the office. I’ve also been too trusting with clients. We ve had clients who have ended up not paying invoices for several months and I’ve told the team to continue to work with them trusting that they would pay the debt. Looking back I would be much tougher and stop work much earlier. We ve had clients go into administration which means that you don’t recoup any of the outstanding money. The main thing I’ve learnt is to take a step back from the business. When you’re working with clients you can get absorbed in the work you’re doing which means that you run the risk of taking your eye off the most important thing which is growing the company and generating new work. As the boss, it’s your responsibility to look at the bottom line, focus on the business plan and plan for the future. Delegate where you can and look at the big picture. 2. Simon Crowther, founder of Flood Protection Solutions On credibility I was just 18 when I founded the company, and I knew that building credibility would need to be key for us to succeed. I believe one of the reasons the company has been a success is due to us having a distinct focus on credibility as a key differentiator. As the Managing Director I set my goals high knowing I needed to excel not only with qualifications, but also my industry profile. I built my personal profile through a strong focus on PR, including speaking at industry events and being featured on Sky News as their flood expert. Alongside this, I became Chartered, and have won multiple awards, including being featured by Forbes Magazine in their 30 Under 30 List. This was a key differentiator from others in the sector, and the additional qualifications obtained allowed me to expand the company into new areas. I have also had a strong focus on the profile of the company, working hard to win company awards, obtain case studies and testimonials, along with slick digital marketing for our company to appear as credible as possible. We have an enviable client list including Thames Water, the NHS and Environment Agency. 3. Jacqueline Barleycorn, founder, The Great British Porridge Co I put in approximately £30k of my own savings into launching my 100% natural, no added sugar instant porridge brand and I convinced my husband he didn?t need his dream car he was saving for 😉 I totally underestimated how much I would need to put in, there were so many unthought-of costs that kept cropping up. I started by setting up a Facebook page and selling through there, then approaching retailers and then having a website designed. On marketing I mainly spread the word through social media, it’s such a great tool. Then shops started stocking it and it just started snowballing. I realised quite early on that to grow the business I really didn?t have the expertise so managed to find myself two amazing business partners Hayley and Matt Hunt who have already grown their own businesses The Protein Ball Co. to over £4m in turnover to help me. Luckily they believed in the porridge from day one and loved it. They were big fans of it so I kept dropping round to see them at their office delivering bags of porridge, asking their advice and telling them how well it was doing till they took the hint 😉 One of the biggest challenges is to get things like packaging and ingredients at a low enough price to make the porridge at the right price you need to buy in massive quantities but you can’t do that until you have massive orders and you don’t get those till you get the porridge to the right price. It’s a very challenging vicious circle. It’s also important to realise that you can’t do everything yourself and finding people to help you means you can focus on what you are good at rather than spending valuable time on what you struggle with. I think it’s important to trust your gut instinct, and expect it to be a lot harder than you thought! You?ll live and breathe it and never switch off .but the highs from it are amazing and makes it all worthwhile. I get some nights where I can’t sleep simply because of the excitement of it all. Running my own business is an incredible experience! Share. Trending. January 7, 2022 How To Start A Cleaning Business. Read More January 6, 2022 What Benefits Can A Business Coach Bring? Read More January 6, 2022 Ways to Avoid Burnout as a Freelancer. Read More January 6, 2022 3 Easy Ways to Simplify Your Small Business For Streamlined Success. Read More Topic. Guides, Leadership & Productivity Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on email Related Stories. 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It is common knowledge within the world of business that only 20 per cent of startup companies survive beyond the... How to shield a growing business against Brexit uncertainties . It's a tough enough task at the best of times but the difficulty has been magnified by Brexit uncertainties and... The case for (and against) remote working . From the way we battle climate change, (starting with Jeff Bezos and his $10bn climate fund), to the way we... Expanding your brand and stepping outside of the comfort zone . With the vast majority of the population owning smartphones nowadays and the technology world constantly bringing out new bigger and... Most Read. How To Deal With Imposter Syndrome at Work . Digital marketing quiz – Test your knowledge . How to protect a new business idea: ultimate guide to safeguarding your intellectual property . How To Make A Company Dormant . Our best market stall ideas to set up in 2021 . Online business ideas UK – E-commerce opportunities for all . How To Deal With Imposter Syndrome at Work Digital marketing quiz – Test your knowledge How to protect a new business idea: ultimate guide to safeguarding your intellectual property How To Make A Company Dormant Our best market stall ideas to set up in 2021 Online business ideas UK – E-commerce opportunities for all Trending. How To Start A Cleaning Business. While a cleaning business may not sound all that glamorous, there What Benefits Can A Business Coach Bring? Hiring a business coach is becoming increasingly popular amongst business owners, Ways to Avoid Burnout as a Freelancer. With over 15 years leading workplace mental health, Chartered Psychologist, Dr 3 Easy Ways to Simplify Your Small Business For Streamlined Success. The world of entrepreneurship and operating a business is by no Elizabeth Holmes Found Guilty of Fraud in Theranos Case. Once viewed as a rising star of Silicon Valley and a How To Deal With Imposter Syndrome at Work. 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Topics
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  • Position
  • business
  • 116
  • 3
  • cooky
  • 19
  • 3
  • growth
  • 18
  • 3
  • customer
  • 18
  • 3
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  • 18
  • 3
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  • 17
  • 3
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  • 16
  • 3
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  • 16
  • 3
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  • 15
  • 3
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  • 15
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  • 11
  • 3
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  • 10
  • 3
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  • 10
  • 3
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  • 10
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  • small business
  • 9
  • 3
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  • 9
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  • online
  • 9
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  • 9
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  • way
  • 9
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  • 8
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  • ensure
  • 8
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  • 8
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  • 8
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  • business owner
  • 7
  • 3
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  • 7
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  • 7
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  • read january
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  • 3
  • easy way
  • 6
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  • 2022
  • 6
  • 3
  • grow business
  • 6
  • 3
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  • 6
  • 3
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  • 5
  • 3
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  • 5
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  • 5
  • 3
  • january 2022
  • 4
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  • 4
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  • non
  • 4
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  • business grow
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  • 4
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  • started business
  • 4
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  • january
  • 4
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  • real business
  • 4
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  • imposter syndrome
  • 4
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  • business idea
  • 4
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  • website cooky
  • 4
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  • loyal customer base
  • 3
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  • way avoid burnout
  • 3
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  • avoid burnout freelancer
  • 3
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  • easy way simplify
  • 3
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  • way simplify small
  • 3
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  • simplify small business
  • 3
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  • small business streamlined
  • 3
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  • 3
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  • deal imposter syndrome
  • 3
  • 3
  • imposter syndrome work
  • 3
  • 3
  • make business
  • 3
  • 3
  • loyal customer
  • 3
  • 3
  • business website
  • 3
  • 3
  • online business
  • 3
  • 3
  • sme owner
  • 3
  • 3
  • cleaning business
  • 3
  • 3
  • business coach
  • 3
  • 3
  • way avoid
  • 3
  • 3
  • avoid burnout
  • 3
  • 3
  • burnout freelancer
  • 3
  • 3
  • easy
  • 3
  • 3
  • way simplify
  • 3
  • 3
  • simplify small
  • 3
  • 3
  • business streamlined
  • 3
  • 3
  • streamlined success
  • 3
  • 3
  • jeff bezo
  • 3
  • 3
  • deal imposter
  • 3
  • 3
  • syndrome work
  • 3
  • 3
  • join newsletter
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
TitleHow to grow your business - Companies House
Urlhttps://companieshouse.blog.gov.uk/2018/08/03/grow-your-business/
DescriptionNews and updates from Companies House
Date3 Aug 2018
Organic Position3
H1Blog Companies House
H2Business planning
Cashflow forecasts
Review your prices
Increase sales to existing customers
Marketing
Further information
Sharing and comments
Related content and links
H3Share this page
About Companies House
Jobs at Companies House
Categories
Recent Posts
Sign up and manage updates
Follow Companies House
Comments and moderation
H2WithAnchorsBusiness planning
Cashflow forecasts
Review your prices
Increase sales to existing customers
Marketing
Further information
Sharing and comments
Related content and links
BodyBlog Companies House Organisations: Companies House https://companieshouse.blog.gov.uk/2018/08/03/grow-your-business/ How to grow your business Posted by: Brent Smithson, Posted on: 3 August 2018 - Categories: Company guidance All business types in every sector are capable of growth. Ambition and capability of the business owner can be key. Growth can be planned, but can also happen unexpectedly. Growing your business can be thought of in terms of increased sales. But, it’s also important to focus on maintaining and growing your profitability. As your business grows, you must register for VAT if your VAT taxable turnover reaches more than £85,000 in any rolling 12-month period. Growth can put a strain on cash flow, so a rigorous cash flow forecast and business plan that are monitored closely are key areas of your growth strategy. You may need to borrow money or invest savings in to the business to fund growth. So, you need to really want it, understand why you want it and fully think through the implications. The finance finder tool on GOV.UK is a useful resource. In this blog post, we'll focus on some key ways to help grow your business. Business planning. A business plan is not just required to secure funding, it's also vital for managing your business more effectively. By committing your thoughts to paper, you can better understand your business and chart specific courses of action that need to be taken to improve your business. A plan can detail alternative future scenarios and set specific objectives and goals along with the resources required to achieve these goals. By understanding your business and the market a little better and planning how best to operate within the environment, you'll be well placed to ensure long-term success. Cashflow forecasts. Cash flow management becomes important when businesses pursue growth opportunities - there may be the need for significant cash injection, in advance of any cash coming into the business. If you're a 'cash-only' business, you can bank the income immediately. However, if you sell on credit, you receive the cash in the future and hence may need to pay some of your own expenses before that income hits your account. Both the Business Plan and the Cashflow forecast are important documents when seeking finance for growth. Review your prices. Regularly reviewing your prices and checking them against your competitors can be an effective way of increasing your sales, profits or both. You should try to estimate the likely effect of different price changes on the sales, cash flow and profitability of your business before making any changes. To do this successfully, you need to understand: the ‘cost structure’ of your business (including regular ‘fixed’ costs, and ‘variable’ costs that change according to your business’ activity) the value your customers place on your products and services It's worth bearing in mind that offering a discount can sometimes reduce your overall profitability, even if your sales go up. Equally, you might be able to make more profit overall by increasing prices, even if you're selling fewer items. Increase sales to existing customers. How you go about increasing sales depends on circumstances, such as your business performance. You might choose to focus on customers who have already bought from you, or you could target new customers in your local area, nationally or overseas. The simplest way to increase your sales is to sell more of the products or services you're currently selling, to the customers who are already buying them. For most businesses this involves: persuading one-off customers to become repeat customers finding customers who’ve stopped buying from you and trying to win them back selling more of the same products or services to your regular customers Marketing . Small business marketing can be a real struggle for business owners in a competitive marketplace. Faced with the task of getting the word out on a limited budget, it can be hard to know what the best value-for-money techniques are to grow your customer base, increase your exposure and increase your profits. Marketing can be: website marketing search engine optimisation content marketing social media email marketing online advertising offline advertising With so many different forms of marketing, which one is right for your business? Digital marketing is vital to the success of many modern businesses. In addition to being a core communications channel, it is particularly beneficial to small businesses since it is largely free. An increasing number of customers also engage daily with social media channels that include Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn. As a result, smart businesses are looking for ways in which to build their brand and customer engagement online. Further information. Contact the Business Support Helpline via the following channels: Telephone: 0800 998 1098 [email protected] Webchat Twitter Facebook YouTube To keep in touch, sign up to email updates from this blog, or follow us on Twitter. Tags: Business Support Helpline, Directors, New business Sharing and comments. Share this page. Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Email Related content and links. About Companies House. Our colleagues blog about themselves and their work, our services and the information we hold on the Companies House register. We also invite guest bloggers who have an interest in UK companies and business advice. Find out more. Jobs at Companies House. We’re recruiting for roles in our Digital, Data and Technology directorate. See our list of vacancies on LinkedIn or search for Companies House on Civil Service Jobs. Categories. Recent Posts. How public support has helped small businesses throughout the pandemic 17 December 2021 Filing dormant company accounts with Companies House 15 December 2021 Podcast: New jobs at Companies House 9 December 2021 Sign up and manage updates. Email Atom Follow Companies House. Companies House on Twitter Companies House on YouTube Companies House on Facebook Companies House on Linkedin Comments and moderation. Read our guidelines.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 37
  • 4
  • customer
  • 16
  • 4
  • company
  • 16
  • 4
  • company house
  • 15
  • 4
  • house
  • 15
  • 4
  • cash
  • 9
  • 4
  • marketing
  • 8
  • 4
  • growth
  • 7
  • 4
  • sale
  • 7
  • 4
  • twitter
  • 6
  • 4
  • blog
  • 5
  • 4
  • grow
  • 5
  • 4
  • email
  • 5
  • 4
  • linkedin
  • 5
  • 4
  • service
  • 5
  • 4
  • december 2021
  • 4
  • 4
  • cash flow
  • 4
  • 4
  • business plan
  • 4
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  • december
  • 4
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  • flow
  • 4
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  • plan
  • 4
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  • price
  • 4
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  • increasing
  • 4
  • 4
  • increase
  • 4
  • 4
  • facebook
  • 4
  • 4
  • product service
  • 3
  • 4
  • small business
  • 3
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  • 3
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  • 3
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  • small
  • 3
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  • channel
  • 3
  • 4
  • support
  • 3
  • 4
  • job
  • 3
  • 4
  • 2021
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
TitleHelp to Grow – Take your business to the next level
Urlhttps://helptogrow.campaign.gov.uk/
Description
Date
Organic Position4
H1
H2Two government backed programmes
What businesses have said about Help to Grow: Management
H3Help to Grow: Management Course
Help to Grow: Digital
H2WithAnchorsTwo government backed programmes
What businesses have said about Help to Grow: Management
BodyLearn new skills, reach more customers and boost your profits with Help to Grow. Two government backed programmes. Help to Grow: Management Course . Sign up to the Help to Grow: Management Course and get 1:1 support from a business mentor and access to an alumni network. Delivered in partnership with Small Business Charter, courses are running at leading business schools across the UK. The programme is 90% funded by the government so you only pay £750. The 12-week course is designed to be taken alongside full-time work through a combination of online sessions and face-to-face learning. Find out more and register for a course on the Small Business Charter website Help to Grow: Digital . You’ll be able to access free, impartial online support about how digital technology can boost your business’s performance. If your business is eligible, you will also be able to access a discount of up to 50% towards the costs of buying approved software, worth up to £5,000. The scheme is currently in a BETA trial and all eligible businesses will be able to apply from January 2022. Register for Help to Grow: Digital What businesses have said about Help to Grow: Management. I would strongly recommend this programme to anyone who is trying to grow their business.Peter, Chief Executive of James Lister & Sons Ltd and Help to Grow: Management Course attendee This is a thought provoking and detailed course with relevant content in a fantastic mixture of online and in person teaching.Rosie, Head of Finance at Seacat Services Ltd and Help to Grow: Management Course attendee Follow on Facebook Follow on LinkedIn Follow on Twitter
Topics
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  • Tf
  • Position
  • grow
  • 10
  • 5
  • business
  • 9
  • 5
  • grow management
  • 6
  • 5
  • management
  • 5
  • 5
  • access
  • 4
  • 5
  • programme
  • 3
  • 5
  • online
  • 3
  • 5
  • digital
  • 3
  • 5
  • follow
  • 3
  • 5
Result 6
Titlegrowing-your-business-lord-young.pdf - GOV.UK
Urlhttps://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/198165/growing-your-business-lord-young.pdf
DescriptionThe second instalment published today, Growing Your Business, deals in the main with micro-businesses and small firms employing fewer than 25 people. This is an ...
Date
Organic Position5
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
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Result 7
TitleHow to grow your business | nibusinessinfo.co.uk
Urlhttps://www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/how-grow-your-business
DescriptionGuidance to help you explore the different ways of growing your business, such as franchising or buying another business, increasing your sales and market share, achieving efficiencies to boost profits or using IP to grow
Date
Organic Position6
H1How to grow your business
H2Latest advice and support straight to your inbox Sign Up
H3Strategies to improve sales and profitability
Increase your market share
Use intellectual property to grow your business
Find new business opportunities
Buy an existing business
Franchise your business
Planning for e-commerce
Increase efficiency to maximise your profit
H2WithAnchorsLatest advice and support straight to your inbox Sign Up
BodyHow to grow your business Strategies to improve sales and profitability. Increase your business' profitability by assessing your current performance, controlling costs and processes, and maximising sales Increase your market share. How to increase sales and profit from existing customers, break into new markets and increase your overall share Use intellectual property to grow your business. Different ways you can use intellectual property, including your brands, patents, copyright and designs, to support the growth of your business Find new business opportunities. How to spot new business opportunities, find ways to exploit them and successfully compete for new business Buy an existing business. Advantages and disadvantages of buying an existing business including how to assess and value it Franchise your business. Growing your business by working with independent franchisees Planning for e-commerce. What to consider when setting up e-commerce systems in your business and how to make the most of e-commerce opportunities Increase efficiency to maximise your profit. How to increase your business efficiency through lean thinking, technology use and better working practices Guides Find guides by sector Creative industries Food and drink Manufacturing Property management Retail Construction Tourism Transport Find guides by theme Starting a business Before you start your business Considering starting a business Start-up business ideas Start your business Local support for start-ups Choose your business structure Name your business Find money to start your business Business planning Choose and set up your workplace Family business Mentoring and business networks Running your start-up business Manage business finances Understand Tax and VAT when self-employed Hire staff Hire professional services Sales and marketing for start-ups IT for start-ups Protect your business ideas Grow your start-up business Trade with other countries Take steps to grow your business Finance Find local finance Northern Ireland business support finder Raising finance Choose the right finance options Borrowing finance for your business Shares and equity finance Grants and government support How to attract investment Managing finance Expert financial advice Financial planning and accounts Manage your cashflow Improve your cashflow and business performance Managing suppliers and payments Debt recovery Business banking Insurance Financial difficulty Managing financial difficulty Taxes Business tax Self Assessment VAT National Insurance Corporation Tax Construction Industry Scheme Capital Gains Tax Stamp and property taxes Tax reliefs and allowances Tax help Self-employed and tax Setting up as self-employed and tax Help and support for the self-employed PAYE and payroll PAYE and payroll for employers Keeping records for business Record-keeping Excise duties Alcohol duties Fuel Duty Tobacco Products Duty Gambling duties Industry-specific taxes Air Passenger Duty Aggregates Levy Climate Change levy Insurance Premium Tax Landfill Tax Complying with European law Contact or deal with HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) Paying HMRC HMRC complaints and appeals Dealing with HMRC Companies House returns, accounts and other responsibilities Starting a company or partnership Running a company or partnership Company registration for overseas and European companies Companies House annual returns and accounts Filing company information using Companies House WebFiling Companies House forms Find company information using Companies House WebCHeck Companies House complaints and appeals Business changes Making changes to your business Selling, closing or restarting your business Selling or closing your business Closing a company or partnership Restarting a company Accountants and tax advisers Accountants and tax advisers - HMRC services and content Tax agent authorisation Online tax services for accountants and tax advisers Help and support for accountants and tax advisers News and communications for accountants and tax advisers Compliance checks for accountants and tax advisers Appeals and penalties for accountants and tax advisers Tax agents and advisers forms, manuals and reference material Working with HMRC - joint initiatives Money Laundering Regulations Employment and skills HR documents and templates Recruitment Advertise a job Taking on staff Contract types and employer responsibilities Employment checks Employment agencies Employment documents and policies Staff documents and employment policies Pay, pensions and minimum wage Staff pay Workplace pensions National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage Manage people Working time Engaging with staff Staff health and wellbeing Staff motivation Equality and diversity Redundancy, restructures and change Trade unions Holidays, statutory leave and time off Holiday, other leave and sickness Maternity, paternity, adoption and parental leave Performance, training and development Staff performance Staff training and development Employer support programmes Resolve conflict and staff leaving Problems at work Dismissals and staff leaving Health and safety Health and safety basics Protecting your business Health and safety made simple Make your business safer Managing the welfare of people Safer ways of working Efficiency and environment Environmental action to improve your business Environmental obligations and support Environmental performance of your business Environmental business tax benefits Reduce, reuse, recycle your business waste Reducing business waste Reuse and recycle business waste Preventing pollution Hazardous substances and waste Resource efficiency Saving energy and cutting costs Saving water and cutting costs Process and resource efficiency Packaging and the environment Reducing your environmental impact Generating energy for your business Carbon emissions and climate change Business transport and the environment Environmental guidance by business sector Chemical industry Construction and building trades Electrical and electronic equipment manufacturing Engineering and metalworking Food and drink production Furniture manufacturing Metal production and processing Offices, retail and hospitality Paper and cardboard manufacturing Printing industry Waste and recycling industry Business premises and rates Choosing the right business property Choosing business property Buy business property Commercial property finder Rent business property Use your home as a workplace Rates for non-domestic properties Business rates Property management and costs Security, fire and flood protection for business property Insurance for business property Tax breaks and finance for business property Adapting and improving your property Make your property more efficient Disabled access and facilities in business premises Innovation and R&D Product and service development Developing products and services Research and development Design and business innovation Use innovation in your business Design for business success Intellectual property Intellectual property for business Patents, trade marks, copyright and design Sales and marketing Marketing your business Market strategy and planning Traditional marketing Digital marketing Social media Branding and design Know your customers Market research Understanding the local market Keeping your customers Maximise your sales Selling Selling online Selling and the law Selling overseas Pricing Tender for contracts IT IT basics Introduction to IT Choosing suppliers Software and technology solutions Software and business applications Communications Getting online Create and manage a website E-commerce Security and data protection Data protection and legal issues IT security and risks Exporting and importing Basics of importing and exporting Importing and exporting basics Tax and international trade Starting out in international trade Choosing a market Doing business in the EU Trading with countries outside the EU Procedures and licences Export Control Organisation Classifying your goods Importing controlled goods Import and export procedures Customs IT systems Sector overviews and regulations Service industries Manufactured goods Food and agriculture Natural resources and chemicals Moving your goods Transport options for moving your goods Taking lorries abroad Transporting dangerous goods Freight forwarding Customs declarations National Clearance Hub Grow your business Prepare for growth Assessing current performance Planning business growth Strategies for growth Growth through product and service development Growth through sales Growth through technology Growth through strategic sourcing Growth through strategic partnering Growth through international trade Tendering for contracts Finance and logistics How to grow your business Financing growth Managing growth Leading staff through growth Manage business risks Buy or sell a business Acquiring a business Considering buying a business Buying a business Franchising Business acquisitions and mergers Selling your business Considering selling a business Selling your business Floating on the stock market Capital Gains Tax when selling your business Exiting and transferring your business Businesses in difficulty Transferring your business Resources My New Business Northern Ireland business support finder Sample templates, forms, letters, policies and checklists Licence finder Find a case study Do it online News Events
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 89
  • 7
  • tax
  • 27
  • 7
  • property
  • 18
  • 7
  • company
  • 14
  • 7
  • growth
  • 13
  • 7
  • start
  • 12
  • 7
  • staff
  • 12
  • 7
  • support
  • 10
  • 7
  • finance
  • 10
  • 7
  • selling
  • 10
  • 7
  • find
  • 8
  • 7
  • adviser
  • 8
  • 7
  • accountant tax adviser
  • 7
  • 7
  • accountant tax
  • 7
  • 7
  • tax adviser
  • 7
  • 7
  • business property
  • 7
  • 7
  • sale
  • 7
  • 7
  • market
  • 7
  • 7
  • industry
  • 7
  • 7
  • service
  • 7
  • 7
  • trade
  • 7
  • 7
  • accountant
  • 7
  • 7
  • start business
  • 6
  • 7
  • company house
  • 6
  • 7
  • grow
  • 6
  • 7
  • increase
  • 6
  • 7
  • performance
  • 6
  • 7
  • duty
  • 6
  • 7
  • hmrc
  • 6
  • 7
  • house
  • 6
  • 7
  • environmental
  • 6
  • 7
  • good
  • 6
  • 7
  • grow business
  • 5
  • 7
  • managing
  • 5
  • 7
  • employment
  • 5
  • 7
  • development
  • 5
  • 7
  • waste
  • 5
  • 7
  • intellectual property
  • 4
  • 7
  • commerce
  • 4
  • 7
  • business selling
  • 4
  • 7
  • selling business
  • 4
  • 7
  • start up
  • 3
  • 7
  • employed
  • 3
  • 7
  • company partnership
  • 3
  • 7
  • health safety
  • 3
  • 7
  • business waste
  • 3
  • 7
  • product service
  • 3
  • 7
  • international trade
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
TitleMake the UK the best place to start and grow a business | CBI
Urlhttps://www.cbi.org.uk/our-campaigns/make-the-uk-the-best-place-to-start-and-grow-a-business/
DescriptionGrowing UK businesses don’t lack strategy, ambition or talent, but all too often, they’re not getting the finance they need to take their business to the next level. We want the UK to be the best place in the world to start and grow a business, and access to the right finance is critical to make..
Date
Organic Position7
H1Make the UK the best place to start and grow a business
H2Access to the right funding will supercharge the UK’s growing businesses
Why it’s needed
Support the change
Are you a business leader?
Are you a CBI member?
Are you a policymaker?
H3The change we're calling for
Launching from a strong start
Our progress and impact
H2WithAnchorsAccess to the right funding will supercharge the UK’s growing businesses
Why it’s needed
Support the change
Are you a business leader?
Are you a CBI member?
Are you a policymaker?
BodyMake the UK the best place to start and grow a business Access to the right funding will supercharge the UK’s growing businesses . Growing UK businesses don’t lack strategy, ambition or talent, but all too often, they’re not getting the finance they need to take their business to the next level. We want the UK to be the best place in the world to start and grow a business, and access to the right finance is critical to make that happen. Building back from the coronavirus pandemic and forging a new global future, now more than ever, is the time to go for growth. The change we're calling for. To make great decisions and get access to the funds needed to supercharge growth, businesses need the right information at their fingertips. That’s why we’re calling on the government to improve financial literacy amongst SME business leaders to unlock their full potential, through a financial skills strategy. Launch a new finance skills strategy with tangible activities to drive financial literacy Create a network of growth ambassadors, made up of entrepreneurs and business leaders that have been on the journey already The British Business bank should step up its efforts to make businesses aware of the funding available to them through webinars, teach ins and regular communication Quote — “Small and medium sized businesses form the lifeblood of the UK economy but continue to face challenges in realising their growth ambitions. The CBI’s SME Council is there to represent and champion the interests of all SMEs and ensure their voice is heard as the UK strives to become the best place to start and grow a business.” Joanne Smith, Chair, CBI SME Council, CEO, TCC Why it’s needed . Misinformation, poor communication and a lack of awareness of the finance options available are preventing firms across the UK from scaling up, which isn’t just bad for business, it’s bad for people. Medium sized businesses have a crucial role to play in boosting productivity given their importance to the UK economy. Punching far above their weight, firms with 50-499 employees are responsible for one in six jobs and generate nearly a quarter of private sector revenue. Scale up businesses are the entrepreneurial heroes of the UK economy, and critical to solving the UK productivity puzzle. Smaller firms are agile, they innovate, they disrupt, they challenge the status quo ensure there’s healthy competition – which is great for customers as well as the wider economy. Launching from a strong start. When scale ups are scaling up, everyone stands to benefit The UK is already a great place to start and grow a small business. We have the talent, the technology and the entrepreneurial culture that enables small businesses to succeed. But access to finance will help these young businesses to level up. could be added to the economy by 2034 if the scale-gap is closed jobs can be added to the UK economy by 2034 by closing the scale-up gap The UK is third in the world for start-ups and thirteenth for successful scale-ups Our progress and impact. The CBI campaigns tirelessly on behalf of our members so that business creates prosperity for all. Learn more about the work we do and the impact we are making on this issue. access_time Jump to Jump to a section Jump to — sort Filter Show all Engagement Impact Progress Resource search Search Sep 2017 Resource — What the Patient Capital Review means for growing businesses Nov 2017 Engagement — Autumn Budget 2017 in review May 2018 Resource — Entrepreneur’s Relief could supercharge expanding businesses Jun 2018 Resource — British Business Bank Finance Hub Jan 2019 Resource — Rollout of the British Business Bank UK network May 2019 Resource — SME banking disputes must be resolved to make way for growth Sep 2019 Impact — CBI influence secures grace period before HMRC penalties Apr 2020 Impact — Launch and improvements to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) Apr 2020 Impact — Secured financial support for the ‘stranded middle’ May 2020 Impact — Launch of Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) Jul 2020 Impact — Changes to EU State Aid Framework help more businesses benefit from coronavirus loan schemes Nov 2020 Impact — Launch of UK Listings Review Feb 2021 Progress — Launch of Pay As You Grow Apr 2021 Progress — Launch of Recovery Loan Scheme May 2021 Impact — Launch of CBI Strategic Dialogue for growth and investment Sep 2021 Engagement — Productive Finance Working Group recommendations Oct 2021 Impact — Extension of Recovery Loan Scheme Oct 2021 Impact — Expansion of funds for British Business Bank (BBB) Back Forward No results found Close Loading ... Loading ... Loading ... Read more Support the change. Are you a business leader? . Join the CBI Our members are our mandate, and the reason we're the most influential business organisation in the UK. Join the voice of business, and help us campaign to ensure the UK is the best place to start and grow a business. Become a member Are you a CBI member? . Have your say Struggling to access the finance you need to grow? Share your views and ideas on how finance for growth can improve to ensure that businesses can thrive. Get involved Are you a policymaker? . Make a difference This campaign is led by the CBI's Financial Services team. Contact Chris Wilford, Director of Financial Services Policy to find out about the change UK business urgently needs and how you can support it. Contact us
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Result 9
TitleTips on how to grow your small business - Small Business UK
Urlhttps://smallbusiness.co.uk/tips-on-how-to-grow-your-small-business-2504996/
Description
Date4 Feb 2016
Organic Position8
H1Tips on how to grow your small business
H2
H3Here are five pointers to set you on the way to successfully developing your small company.
Further reading on growing a business
Related Topics
Related Stories
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BodyTips on how to grow your small business Employ our tips and watch your business flourish by Ben Lobel4 February 2016 Here are five pointers to set you on the way to successfully developing your small company. . Here are five pointers to set you on the way to successfully developing your small company. Transitioning from a lesser experienced start-up to a budding, small-to-medium-sized business can be an exciting yet confusing process, particularly if you’re investing a lot of time scoping out the best tools and strategies to help your business flourish. You’d be right to take the time to plan and strategise, though, as many small businesses may find themselves overwhelmed by the sheer volume of resources so freely available. To save you a little time, below are five steps which we believe will be beneficial to your growing start-up or small business. 1. There are many different ways you can capture emails, whether it be done offline (eg at a conference/networking event) or online, via incentivised subscription methods. Discovering the ‘best’ way will depend on your industry and business model, or whichever way works most efficiently in accordance with your budget. It’s all about trial and error! 2. Create a distinct brand personality, and ensure that all employees at every level of your organisation are adopting this to reinforce your brand image. You can do this by communicating your brand guidelines to all relevant parties. Don’t know where to start with your branding? Look around online for brands that you love and then dissect why. For example, Dove is a brand valuing ethics, simplicity and pureness. It has achieved this by adopting a simplistic blue and white colour scheme throughout all their TV ads, digital campaigns and product packaging. 3. In all aspects of your small business or start-up, don’t cut corners when it comes to the quality of work you’re producing for your customer. If customers feel like you aren’t going above and beyond what they expect of you, then there’ll start to look elsewhere and this will have a big impact on both your short-term and long-term ability to grow. 4. Everyone loves a teeny price tag or a freebie! It’s the best way to reward new and returning customers, and will most likely keep them coming back for your business/services. Make sure you’re promoting your discounts and deals across all social media platforms and any onsite blogs to attract as many pairs of eyes to your business, as possible. Running a contest is also a great way to grow your email subscription list (see point 1). An example of this tip in action: Aspinall Foundation has recently been running a campaign, reaching out to a number of authoritative journalists and online publications, inviting them to stay at Aspinall’s new Treehouse Hotel, in return for a written, published review and rating of their short stay. 5. Competitors are your best, worst enemy. Without a little competition, you’re none the wiser to things like, how much you should charge for your product or service, or what you could do better (because their customers are expressing frustration with certain elements of their business). Don’t spend too much time or energy focusing on your sideway competition, but use it wisely in order to make decisions on the direction of your own growing company. Laying the foundations for a successful business doesn’t have to be a stressful, rushed, or an ordeal. It does, of course, require perseverance and a lot of determination, and these things don’t just happen overnight. If you’re currently operating a small, or start-up business, which tip do you think could help you reach the next growth milestone? Let us know in the comments below! Further reading on growing a business. What to know when growing your business for acquisition Related Topics. Entrepreneurs Related Stories. [https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Decision-making-1568x1075.jpeg.optimal.jpeg] Advice Should you register as a sole trader or a limited company? Mart Abramov, CEO of TaxScouts, shares the positives and negatives of being a sole trader or a limited company, so you can make the best choice for your growing business. [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/success-1568x1057.jpeg.optimal.jpeg] Advice Overcoming obstacles to start-up success How can you avoid your new business being one of the 60% that fail within three years? Mark Wright, winner of The Apprentice, shares his experience [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Currency-stock-image.png] Advice Starting your own currency brokerage firm is a horrible idea [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Coffee-shop-owner-scaled-1.jpg.optimal.jpg] Advice How to start your own coffee shop Fancy opening your own coffee shop? We explain what you need to know about cash flow, hiring staff and of course, finding the right coffee. Related Stories. [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Decision-making-1568x1075.jpeg.optimal.jpeg] Advice Should you register as a sole trader or a limited company? Mart Abramov, CEO of TaxScouts, shares the positives and negatives of being a sole trader or a limited company, so you can make the best choice for your growing business. [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/success-1568x1057.jpeg.optimal.jpeg] Advice Overcoming obstacles to start-up success How can you avoid your new business being one of the 60% that fail within three years? Mark Wright, winner of The Apprentice, shares his experience [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Currency-stock-image.png] Advice Starting your own currency brokerage firm is a horrible idea [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==][https://s37564.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Coffee-shop-owner-scaled-1.jpg.optimal.jpg] Advice How to start your own coffee shop Fancy opening your own coffee shop? We explain what you need to know about cash flow, hiring staff and of course, finding the right coffee.
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Result 10
Titlehow to grow your business post-pandemic
Urlhttps://www.managementtoday.co.uk/start-small-think-big-grow-business-post-pandemic/innovation/article/1720072
Descriptionuncertainty, customer-centric, innovation
Date28 Jun 2021
Organic Position9
H1Start small, think big: how to grow your business post-pandemic
H2Information Links
ManagementToday
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In an uncertain marketplace, it’s vital to innovate and make customer-centric decisions says Seona Tully, HubSpot UK country manager, SB & MM
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5 bizarre business lessons to take from The Apprentice
Chris Hirst: My 5 leadership resolutions for 2022
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The Theranos trial: why the biggest risk to your business may be you ..
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BodyStart small, think big: how to grow your business post-pandemic In an uncertain marketplace, it’s vital to innovate and make customer-centric decisions says Seona Tully, HubSpot UK country manager, SB & MM . Sponsored by HubSpot Published: 28 Jun 2021 Last Updated: 30 Jun 2021 The events of the past year have transformed entire industries, upended the way people work, and re-shaped our behaviours. During this time, many companies in the UK have had to pivot client engagement strategies to meet customers, through innovation and adaptation. HubSpot has grown rapidly over a relatively short space of time. We have gone from helping small startups accelerate their growth through our software and educational resources, to supporting iconic UK brands like Revolut and Skyscanner. We now have over 4,000 employees worldwide and recently hit two significant milestones: surpassing 100,000 paying customers and hitting $1 billion in annual recurring revenue (ARR).  So what did it take to get to this level of success and what can other businesses learn from the decisions we made to help them grow, compete and win?Don’t be afraid to go against the grain. Businesses have always struggled to find ways to acquire new customers while minimising costs. Customers have become savvier and are increasingly sceptical of traditional marketing tactics, making this an even greater challenge. Consumers like to understand what value they’re getting before making a purchase, and many different factors can influence the outcomes of this, such as education, trust and relationship building. This is where the freemium model can benefit organisations. It’s one we started using around five years ago, as it aligns well with the concept of inbound marketing – and this is when you have to add value before you extract value.The main benefit of freemium for the user is that it’s a natural process that allows them to discover the company’s product or service on their own. For a business, leveraging the freemium concept helps growth, as they acquire free users then optimise the upgrade paths to turn them into paying customers. The likes of Spotify, Atlassian and Zoom are great examples of companies that have succeeded in scaling their businesses this way. The general perception of freemium, however, is that the model isn’t suited to B2B companies targeting long-term, large-scale growth. This is because it’s specifically designed to target consumers, since you need to have a lot of people signing up for your free products to make any freemium funnel work. In fact, the majority of freemium funnels convert free users to paying customers at less than 4%.  But this shouldn’t be an impediment to companies in the B2B space. As we’ve seen at HubSpot, a freemium model is, in some ways, better suited to the changing way decisions are made in businesses. Rather than a top-down approach to technology decision-making, there is increasingly a bottom-up approach, with companies looking at which products are being used and lobbied for by junior team members. A freemium model ties neatly into this paradigm. And this has proved successful for us, with nearly 60% of our current customers starting out with our free offerings upgrading to access our more powerful, paid-for tools. Companies of all sizes shouldn’t be afraid to go against the grain – a lot of the time, the advice to not try something comes either from fear or a lack of experience. Taking risks in business brought the world the modern smartphone with the iPhone, the first truly attractive electric car with Tesla, and digital assistants with Alexa. Who knows what the next great innovation will be?Put customers first. Customers will always be at the heart of any organisation. Forming strong, long-term relationships with them should be the top priority for businesses, but even more so in a time of global uncertainty.The pandemic has triggered huge changes in consumer behaviour. It has brought about a decrease in spending, coupled with a move to online shopping, as stores closed around the country. As a result, customers now expect a seamless digital experience across all channels, which cater to their specific needs. This is where marketing, sales and customer service teams come into play, to deliver everything that customers demand.But it’s no longer a case of just having a database that logs customer details and interactions. A well-integrated, fully utilised and successful CRM platform needs to focus on delivering on the needs of the customer, not just the narrow needs of sales or marketing.At HubSpot, it became clear to us that existing CRM systems weren’t up to scratch. For well over a decade we’ve been customer-first. With this underpinning ethos, we realised all of our teams needed to work more closely together, but existing CRM systems wouldn’t let them do this.So what did we do? We built our own CRM platform to fulfil the needs of modern businesses. Our platform allows businesses to keep track of their customers' journey, store personalised customer information in their database, track leads, and build reports to analyse overall company performance. Importantly it keeps it all in one place, so regardless of whether a marketer, sales rep or customer service rep is dealing with the customer, they are all drawing from the same single source. In 2021, this kind of experience is no longer a nice-to-have. Use your own innovation to grow . Agility was important to most companies pre-pandemic, but the past year has turbo-charged the need for companies to be able to react quickly to seismic shifts in the market landscape.Many businesses that provide services will be looking at offering new features to ensure they grow in 2021. The traditional way to add these offerings is through acquisition, so that capabilities can be brought online quickly, but this does have its negatives. The biggest issue is that it takes a lot of time and effort to entirely remove barriers for data to flow freely from acquired capabilities to the core proposition.  Organisations can avoid this problem by innovating within the business. We chose this path at HubSpot, and we are extremely proud that we have created the majority of our platform tools in-house. Today we have teams in Dublin and the US that develop all of our tools, and while it may take longer initially, it means we can create capabilities that are integrated from the start and which are based on customer feedback, to totally solve pain points. In the past year, we’ve launched our refreshed Sales Hub, CMS Hub and Ops Hub to create a fully fledged integrated suite. And these suites are becoming increasingly attractive to clients, becoming the preference among marketing technology leaders, with demand doubling in 2020 alone. By carefully crafting in-house, customers can benefit from a product that’s cohesive, customisable and empowering. The great thing is, because we started building our own in-house development capabilities early on, it has been a positive reinforcement cycle. As our team has built more of our platform, it has become more capable, with better tools.Business can see the light at the end of the tunnel in terms of the pandemic, but the customer landscape we emerge into is not the same one we left behind in 2020. With so much uncharted territory, businesses should be looking at how they can steal a march on the competition and try a new approach to grow, always with the customer front of mind. With so much change comes the opportunity for rapid growth, and we look forward to supporting as many businesses as possible to help them achieve their dreams.Image credit: Micheile Henderson via Unsplash Tags: Partner content More on this Topic. Fast forward: why you can't afford to delay tech adoption post-COVID Marketers need to lead with insight to help drive growth How payroll can drive growth post-Covid Find this article useful? Get more great articles like this in your inbox every lunchtime Subscribe Find out more about our weekly bulletins Food for thought Why it’s time to take a sabbatical in 2022 . Here’s what you should know about hitting pause on your career, from a seasoned sabbatical... 45 hours ago Leadership Lessons 5 bizarre business lessons to take from The Apprentice . As the new series of The Apprentice - the first in 2 years - kicks... 06 Jan 2022 Leadership Lessons Chris Hirst: My 5 leadership resolutions for 2022 . Forgot to make any resolutions? Here's five that will make you a better leader in... 06 Jan 2022 Read the latest issue here…. . Down to business How SMEs can avoid financial pain from the supply chain crisis . The supply chain crisis is threatening to strangle small businesses. 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Result 11
TitleTop 21 Business Strategies To Grow Your Business In The UK | UK Business Blog
Urlhttps://business.clickdo.co.uk/top-21-business-strategies-to-grow-business-profitable/
DescriptionAre you planning to start a business in the UK? Here are 21 smart business strategies for you to turn your business profitable in the UK
Date1 Jun 2019
Organic Position10
H1Top 21 Business Strategies To Grow Your Business In The UK To Become Profitable
H2
H3Business Strategies
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Home Business Ideas
Learn at SeekaHost™
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BodyTop 21 Business Strategies To Grow Your Business In The UK To Become Profitable By Dinesh Kumar VM | June 1, 2019 The UK offers a thriving environment for investors and business people to set camp. You can open a small business which you operate from home or an office block. It really doesn’t matter; whichever option you pick, the aim of every business is to make a profit. Here are some tried and tested business strategies one can employ; 1. Be unrealistic; the first thing you’ll need to do is to be unrealistic with your business objectives and goals. Being unrealistic helps you set huge goals that are achievable targets and work towards achieving some of the goals. Never be afraid of starting with big thinking and grow. Know your target market and direct all your efforts towards making the most out of it. Your success as a business won’t be defined by the size of your office or the furniture therein, but by the returns, you’re getting back. Know what strengths your business has and what areas need to be improved on. 2. Rolling out your infrastructure; some businesses rush to open their doors and embark on aggressive online marketing. Only to realize afterward, that having the proper infrastructure matters a lot. We live in a digital age and your business will need to have a robust online presence. It’s very important that your office or home work station has superfast broadband internet. Having fast internet in your workplace is not a luxury; it is a requirement for success. Superfast internet enables you to respond to emails promptly, incorporate e-commerce to your business, and create social media pages, and so on so forth. 3. Create measurable KPI’s; Outline your business in a very effective manner and prioritize them from the; Outline your business in a very effective manner and prioritize them from the beginning so that the strategies and tactics can be identified to achieve each one in the most reliable way possible. These tactics should be defined in the form o KPI’s (key performance indicators) which will identify the key indicators that affect the growth of your business and then dedicate the most time and money to those areas. The list of business KPI’s and objectives is never definitive and will need to be reviewed regularly to ensure it remains on course. It should be aligned to the dynamic digital environment that is present. KPI’s are measurable because they help in evaluating the success of reaching business goals and objectives. 4. Shared office space; you must have heard of the new trend where businesses are opting to share office space. Doing so helps cut down on office rent costs. Plus some of these shared working spaces have invested in high-quality furniture, meeting and video conference rooms, fast internet, and so on. Have a look at the top co-working spaces available in London today. 5. Learn from competitors; whether it is in the leading TV Stations or Newspapers, you’ll notice that they keep poaching employees and CEOs from each other. Even top tech companies like Google, Yahoo, Facebook, and YouTube all compete fiercely to attract the best talent. As a business owner, you too have to learn from what your competitors. See what they are doing right or differently. Attend seminars and conferences for events related to your business; here’s where you gain all the inspiration and insight you need about growing your business. 6. Gifts; unlike discounts and bonuses, gifts are a different story all the same. Supermarkets will give you sweets or candy instead of the loose change they’d have given after shopping. Major brands launch their products by giving out free gifts in the name of samples. If your business is relatively new, consider giving out gift hampers on the day you’re launching. Everyone likes freebies and there’s no better to make your brand get noticed than by gifting shoppers. If you operate a restaurant, for instance, you could give every diner a free, ice cold glass of fresh fruit juice. If you just opened a new bar in town, you could offer free tots or a glass of wine to the first 50 revelers. Trust you me, everyone loves free things and if you can match that initial hype with good customer services, your customers will remain loyal. 7. Branding; Branding is a unique way of defining your business to yourself, your team and external audiences. It could also be called a business identity. It basically embodies the core of the business and its values. Most customers are now savvy and they see through most attempts by companies to charm or spin their way to sales. A strong brand will encourage loyalty, advocacy. It can even protect your price in times when competitors rely on promotional discounts to drive sales. The brand will also give the right platform to extend your various offerings. 8. Facebook advertising; Two million small to medium-sized enterprises advertise on Facebook; it is an inexpensive and effective way to market to virtually any audience. Facebook ads excel at advanced targeting. They allow you to target a specific audience based on location, interests, age, sex, online behavior and many others. Creating Facebook ads is a very easy task. You just need a solid image, a bit of descriptive copy, one image, and a link. Promote your app icon here as well. The Facebook Ads Manager also makes it fairly simple to run tests and multiple ad sets, allowing you to reach profitability without needing technical expertise. That said, many users have a lot of difficulties succeeding with their initial campaigns. It will take some persistence, but on the positive side, Facebook’s popularity has produced numerous 3rd party tools that can help you succeed. If you approve that Facebook is the right channel for you, then you will use a tool like AdEspresso to run your campaigns and speed your journey to positive ROI. If you run a business that has a strong visual component, it might be worth trying out Instagram Ads. As a subsidiary of Facebook, Instagram Ads benefit from the same database and targeting options, while allowing you to connect with an audience that is better primed for visual sales. 9. Google My Business; Ranking your Google My Business (GMB) listing is one of the most essential things s you can do for your business. If you run a local business targeting local clients, I would say that it is THE most powerful strategy available to you. Google My Business combines all your different Google platforms into one central place, which includes your Google+ profile, your Google reviews, access to data on Google Analytics and Google Insights, and more. If you have a unique brand then you have a large display. GMB immediately gives your business a lot of credibility and visibility, and as I said before, if you run a local business it should be your #1 priority list. Ranking your GMB listing is not a mundane task. It simply requires you to optimize your profile and then collect reviews and citations. 10. Google Adwords; There are more than 40000 search queries on Google every second. No other advertising method has the potential to get your business before that many pairs of eyes. Google Adwords is like a godfather of online marketing channels. It has been around for a long time since it has a competitive edge and it is also expensive. If you know what you are doing then it will work very well with you. Despite being a paid channel, Adwords’ goal is to deliver relevant search that is up to date to users, and as a result, it will be less expensive for you when you are utilizing proper on- page SEO. Google will assign a quality score to your ad, which is dependent on CTR( Click Through Rate), relevance and the landing page your ad sends traffic to. This quality score factors into the bid rate you will need to get an ad displayed, with higher scores lowering the bid cost. Unlike many of the channels, Adwords is remarkably a symbiotic channel that can be paired to many other strategies to maximize output. As a paid marketing channel, it allows you yo obtain results which are immediate and can scale as far as your budget allows. 11. Content Marketing; 18% of marketers say that content marketing has the greatest commercial impact on their business of any channel in 2016. Content marketing is the process of creating and distributing reliable, valuable, consistent and relevant content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience and drive profitable customer action. Unlike paid advertising, content marketing focuses on long term results. The initial payoffs tend to be low, but the long term, sustainable growth in visitors, leads, and customers can single-handedly carry a business. Content marketing is not easy, however, and requires every element to be done right: Quality contents Relevant topics Optimized for readers Optimized for SEO Consistent content creation and promotion Content is not limited to blog posts. It includes podcasts, videos, online courses and a host of other mediums in which people consume information. If you are strategizing for your own business, make sure you have time and capital needed to get going with no initial ROI, and then DO YOUR HOMEWORK. Too many businesses these days are just wasting a lot of resources. 12. Organic Social Media 67% of consumers use social media for customer support, and 33% prefer using social media instead of the telephone. If people cannot find your business using social media, they will look for your competitors who are present on preferred social channels. One should have active social media accounts and invest in growing your social audiences. For some businesses, it makes sense to invest heavily in organic social media growth. For example, Instagram users that follow fashion influencers are actively looking to purchase new styles. By building an active, fashion-savvy audience, a clothing retailer can build a direct sales channel. The key is identifying where your customers are and how they like to be approached. If social media is the answer to both those questions, it is the perfect channel for your business 13. Coupon Deal Sites; Whether you sell a product or offer a service, you can use coupon deal sites like Groupon to quickly promote your business. Coupon deal sites have a large audience, grouped by location, and then allow local, regional or even multinational businesses to offer limited-time discounts to their members. Benefits include mass exposure, targeted local advertising, increased brand awareness, and an influx of new customers. The cost comes in the form of low revenues per sales. In the case of Groupon, you are required to discount your product by at least 50% and at least half the revenue goes to Groupon. If you are running a 300% markup, you will lose money on your Groupon site. 14. Online marketing; more and more businesses are learning about the importance of online marketing. Online marketing is a deliberate form of marketing that has specific targets, directed towards a specific demographic segment. All the major brands in the UK have a robust online presence; they understand that the battle for consumers is now being fought on the internet. It’s important that you get a professional, online marketing agency to help your brand get an online foothold. 15. Corporate social responsibility; corporate social activities are a great way to connect with consumers on a personal level. Your business achieves a positive impact with society and brings together employees, shareholders, customers, and owners of the business. The employees in particular also get a change of environment away from their busy office desks and work stations. The recently concluded London Marathon would have been a great place to start, you could register your employees and have them compete in the shorter races; all the proceeds from this Marathon go to charity. 16. Team building; millions of UK workers are not contented with their current jobs. Not so much because of the pay, but because of the pressure and lack of family-work balance. Team building retreats are a great way of growing your business. Team building helps you retain your employees; it also helps build unit cohesion among different team players. 17. Professional customer care; it is very wise to invest in professional customer care for your business. Some investors look at this as an extra cost, but it isn’t.  Business is all about perceptions and if your customers feel that you’re neglecting their concerns, they could easily walk away. Check out this post on the importance of customer care for your business. All successful businesses treat their customers with respect and courtesy, thanks to the customer care systems put in place. 18. Compliance with the law; remember the old adage that honesty is the best policy in business? One business strategy you should employ is to ensure that your business is licensed, registered, and legit. Tax evasion will get you in hot soup when HMRC comes calling. Not ensuring your business or employees (for risky jobs) will also get you in trouble. Be sure to acquaint yourself sufficiently with all the legal aspects of operating a business in the UK. 19. Emergency services; some businesses are still in their comfort zones, operating from 9-5 and expecting to grow. Well, be that business that goes an extra mile to serve your customers. If you offer crucial services like plumbing, water leak detection, electrical repairs, waste removal, dental services; try and offer emergency services in case they’re needed. You can’t tell a patient with a severe toothache to come on Monday morning simply because you’ve closed for the weekend. A leaking LPS gas container can’t wait for long. Offering round the clock services helps build loyalty among your customers. 20. Patience is a virtue; each year, hundreds of new startups are closed down because their owners weren’t patient enough. There’s no shortcut, no legit business will make you a millionaire overnight! Be patient and give your business time to grow and expand. The story of Hargreaves Lansdown is an inspiring story that every small business owner should read. 21. Taking calculated risks; businesses are all about taking risks. There are times you’ll have to make the bold decision of moving to a larger office, hiring more employees, and so on. This is perfectly in order; as we mentioned, never sit in your comfort zone. This guide will come in handy on educating you on the benefits of taking calculated business risks. Bio Twitter Facebook Google+ LinkedIn Latest Posts Dinesh Kumar VM. SEO Consultant | Guest Posting & Blogger Outreach at ClickDo LtdI'm an SEO Analyst and blogger outreach expert at ClickDo Ltd. & Expert at Building High Authority Local Citations, Also, I help Business Owners in the UK by flooding more Leads to their Business by ranking their website on top of Google for potential Keywords. I'm an author and enjoys writing UK business blogs to help promote UK businesses online. You can also contact me for guest posting services as I manage over 100 top UK business websites. Check out my personal blog - Dinesh Kumar VM @dineshkumarvm2. Dinesh Kumar VM. +Dinesh Kumar VM. Latest posts by Dinesh Kumar VM (see all). How to start a business in NSW (New South Wales)? - February 20, 2021 0330 Numbers: Are They Cost Free? (Top 10 Providers List) - May 1, 2020 Quick Cleaning Services – Cleaning Company in London - February 28, 2020 Sharing is caring Related Itemsbusinessbusiness strategiesbusiness tipssmall business ← Previous Story Why you need to become the face of your brand Next Story → Why you need a video on your homepage? You may also like... Three Ways To Improve Your Business-To-Business Relationships Why do you need to have a Digital Mailroom for different businesses? Step-by-Step SEO Guide for Small Business Owners Facebook. Home Business Ideas. Learn at SeekaHost™. 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Result 12
TitleGrow your business successfully in just three strategical phases
Urlhttps://chacc.co.uk/growth-blog/guide-to-growing-your-business/
DescriptionBusiness growth struggle is nothing new to UK businesses but we have simplified it in three simple phases so that you can grow your business successfully
Date
Organic Position11
H1A Comprehensive Guide To Growing Your Business
H2How to Grow your Business?
H3How can this article help you grow your business?
1. What are the stages of Business Growth
Video: Tips and Tactics To Propel Your Business Growth
2. How do you plan for Growth?
4. How do you manage Growth?
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H2WithAnchorsHow to Grow your Business?
BodyA Comprehensive Guide To Growing Your Business By:   Anam Rehman Growth Blog Comments:   1 Comment How to Grow your Business? Starting a new business can seem very daunting. However, with consistent effort, effective management, intuitive thinking, and a determined startup accountant, you can successfully set up your new business. When you are starting out, it is also very important to set up a strong foundation for your business to help you stay organized and focused on growth.  Remember: Growing your business is like taking care of your child; you must have a suitable environment for the child to grow in and to nurture in, and you must ensure that your child gets the right nutrients for them to thrive. How can this article help you grow your business? This article will outline quick strategies that will help you grow your business, our main focus is to educate you about:  The Stages of Business GrowthPlanning for Growth Managing Growth 1. What are the stages of Business Growth. Your business will go through several stages of growth during its life, each stage comes with its own unique challenges. Our team of skilled Business Advisors, at Clear House Accountants, have not only identified the common issues that you might face but also their potential solutions.  A. First phase: The Startup . The startup phase of a business is a very exciting time for a business, as business ideas are initiated and put into action.  Challenges: During the startup phase, the most common problems businesses face are: Finance- businesses struggle with their finances as they have to incur expenses to set up the business without any major sources of revenue or funding.Brand awareness- businesses struggle to establish their brand name as they do not have a business history or any reputation.Businesses can engage in unnecessary activities that deviate from their business plan and spread their resources too thin, due to lack of experience and resources. Related: Minimise business risk with an effective Business Continuity Plan. Solutions: This initial phase is the hardest stage for a business, not only will you be short on finance, but the lack of brand visibility, resources and customers magnify the problems. However, there are several solutions you can implement to mitigate these. Plan and manage your cash flow better.Gain insight from customers, family, or friends and make improvements accordingly.Start focusing on short term and achievable targets while keeping the long term goals in mind.Prepare an in-depth budget to plan for financing activities and investing activities.Hire a marketing agency or use marketing freelancers to attract better higher-value clients. It’s prudent for startup businesses to utilise the services of an accounting firm from the start to set up a strong foundation that will be key to their success. A competitive startup accounting firm will guide you in improving control over your cash flow, strategise for unforeseen scenarios, improve profitability through performance monitoring all the while helping you identify potential tax reliefs and savings. Related: Read our tips to boost your startup!  B. Second Phase: Business Growth. Once a business has successfully passed through the startup stage, it needs to start preparing for growth. At this stage, a business will see growth through increased revenue, more customers, higher profit margins, a round of funding, higher brand visibility etc. Growth has to be managed, if you fail to manage growth it becomes extremely costly to generate again. Challenges: The growth phase comes with its own unique challenges for business owners:   Lack of resources – A business can be growing but still struggle to match resources with its growth, this can be due to a lack of funds, time constraints or a lack of planning.Increased workload – As the resources of a business get stretched out so does the workload per employee.Inconsistent growth – Growth if not managed properly can become unstable and volatile, this can result in huge issues such as excessive resources, poor customer service etc.A decline in performance – Factors such as an increased demand coupled with reduced resources and more workload can create a higher number of errors resulting in lost performance. Solutions: Here are some solutions you can apply during your growth phase to mitigate some of the problems: Hire a passionate accountant who is equally interested in your business as you are. Your accountant will help you manage your finances and resources efficiently. They will also set up KPI’s to determine if your growth is sustainable and what key metrics are the most valuable to measure your business growth. Evaluate your company’s processes on a regular basis to make improvements to them and make them more efficient to reduce the need for manpower.Your accountant will recommend that you use a cloud accounting software along with a reporting and management system which will enable you to predict sales, control inventory and manage resources. You should use this recommendation.Monitor your business to make sure your activities are in line with company goals and objectives by working on your business growth plans and designing an effective strategy for its implementation.Perform regular business health checks in order to constantly monitor business performance to make sure that your growth is not toxic and is sustainable. A business health check is a key to making sure that the business has no serious issues that can hinder positive business growth. Our in-house accounting experts have curated an in-depth guide to explain the effective strategies that can be used to help maintain the health of your business.  Related: Learn how UK businesses are optimizing tax incentives for the growth of their business. Video: Tips and Tactics To Propel Your Business Growth. We have prepared an in-depth video with Small Business Growth Tips for Different Business Stages. Watch the Video to Learn More About the Different methods to achieve Small Business Growth. C. Third Phase: Business Expansion. In order to avoid stagnation of growth, businesses look to expansion as a solution. This can also help in increasing global brand visibility and improve market presence. In this phase, your focus should be on sustaining business performance while increasing global or local diversification and expansion into new markets, territories or products. Challenges: The third stage of business growth is all about business expansion and the most common challenges you will encounter in this phase are:  A struggle to manage business performance as the expansion process can impact it negativelyObstacles which will prevent a business from reaching into new markets due to geographical, demographic or communication challenges.Difficulties in introducing new products or managing quality while expanding. Related: Economic uncertainty can hinder business growth, here are 4 ways your business can stay ahead of the competition during the worst economic conditions.  Solutions: Solutions you can implement to mitigate the problems: Devise new expansion strategies as the business hits its maturity phase, plan and prepare before implementing.Target the markets that are suitable for your products and avoid targeting any markets that are high risk.Set realistic goals according to the number of resources you have. Manage expectations, plan for the expansion process and stress test it before launching. Businesses need to develop a business development strategy for each phase to ensure that challenges can be mitigated and solutions can be arranged.  2. How do you plan for Growth? If a business tries to achieve unplanned growth, it might struggle to maintain it, replicate it or benefit from it. There are a number of methods to plan for growth, such as by using budgets and forecasts, business plans and scenario planning. One tried and tested method which covers a few of these options is a Business Development plan. A. Business Development Plan. A business development plan is quite similar to the initial business plan, however, it has a higher emphasis on business growth, strategic planning, and designing smart solutions for complicated problems for each business stage. When designing your business development plan, you need to make sure you are on the right path. Business owners need to conduct a SWOT analysis for the business development plan, early on to determine the businesses current position. Business owners should speak to a business accountant to gain relevant insight and expertise into developing a practical analysis of their business development strategy.  a. Key points to consider when creating a business development plan. Discover new opportunities: Practical business growth planning requires you to research your competitors, target market, your products and your financial standing in the market, thoroughly.  Create a financial plan: The business development plan should consist of a concrete financing plan. It should include the amount of capital you possess and the additional funding you will require, it should also address how the funding will be acquired and the cost to acquire the funding. Set realistic goals: You need to have realistic goals for your business, to make sure you achieve them. You will need to set goals and strategize to achieve these goals using systems and processes to monitor your progress. Hire a high performing team: A good team can be the key to success, you need to ensure that you hire a good team, introduce new employee training programs to increase their productivity and incentivise them properly. In the highly competitive business world, you should be able to retain your most valuable assets, your employees. Using different schemes such as The Enterprise Management Incentive (EMI scheme), The Salary Sacrifice Scheme, Cycle to Work Scheme etc. you should be able to improve employee retention while boosting employee morale. Set marketing and sales goals: Your sales and marketing strategy is going to help you set yourself apart from your competitors, it is, therefore, essential to identify the marketing and sales channels your business will target, how and when. You should also decide how to measure the results of your marketing efforts such as through KPI’s, financial measures or feedback surveys. A good example of a KPI metric can be the marketing ROI, it can be used before a decision needs to be made, and also after the decision is made, to measure the actual result. b. Tips to create an effective business development plan. There are some considerations to keep in mind while writing your business development plan: Make sure you don’t underestimate the amount of money and capital required to grow your business.You will come across countless growth opportunities, but ensure that you select the best ones that are suitable for your business.Keep an eye on your budget to ensure that you don’t fall short of cash. It is easy to keep track of your cash flow through accurate forecasting methods. A cash flow forecast is an important tool used to design financial strategies. It also provides an estimate of a company’s financial standing in the future. Develop an understanding of cash flow through our comprehensive guide.Set both long term and short term goals, but make sure that your short term goals should align with your long term goals. Once a plan is in place, you will need to focus on the practicalities of rising demand, expanding the customer base and the diversification of your products and services.  Planning for growth can get really complicated unless you can project the demand for your business, service or product. This is where demand forecasting can add immense value, and will also be used to complete the business development plan. c. Demand Forecasting. Demand forecasting is the process of determining the quantity or amount of goods and services that your customers will be purchasing from you in the future. You forecast the future demand of your customers by examining the past data that may include your sales from the previous years.  How can demand forecasting help your business? If you are successful in conducting an accurate and reliable demand forecast, you will be able to: Predict the correct amount of resources that will be required to meet the demands of the customer in the future.Make informed and effective decisions.Gain valuable insight into potential growth opportunities in the target markets.Deal with any cash and product shortages or surpluses in the future effectively. You should talk to an accountant to help you prepare a demand forecast. If you are based in London, you should look online for an Accountant in London. 3. What are the different types of Demand Forecasts? There are three main types to demand forecasts: qualitative,  quantitative and casual.  Qualitative: The Qualitative method is used where you don’t have sufficient data to work on and are usually estimating the demand for future products and services. There are various ways to conduct a qualitative forecast. Forecasting by sales team: The sales team is assigned the duty to forecast demand by using their knowledge, expertise, experience, and past sales data.Forecasting by a panel of experts: A panel of experts that may include accountants, advisers, investors, etc., conduct their forecasting individually and finalize a single forecast after careful mutual consensus.Forecasting by research: A survey is designed to investigate the customer’s preferences, market data, product demand which can also be used to hook customers’ interest. Quantitative:  The Quantitative method is ideal for businesses that have been in the market for a considerable number of years. The companies utilizing quantitative practices have the benefit of creating an accurate and reliable demand forecast for their future products and services based on past sales and other data that has been collected for several years by the company. Quantitative forecasting is possible by: Averaging: By averaging, you add up the actual demand from customers for the past three months and divide it by three to get forecasted demand for the next three months.Sales against time graph: This method involves plotting a trend line across sales and time axis, a single point on the graph denotes the number of sales during a specific point in time. Casual:  The causal method takes several factors such as inflation, spending behaviour, changing economy and behaviour of competitors to predict demand for new products in the future. A causal method can be conducted by: Product lifecycle: You analyze the different stages of a product’s lifecycle to determine which stage of the lifecycle attracts the most customers.Studying seasonal trends: You determine the reasons behind the upward and downward sales drive both during the period of a year. When planning for growth you need to be able to plan on how to increase growth, some of the methods which work have been explained below: A. How to improve Sales in the startup phase? Sales are one of the primary determinants of business growth. Business owners should know how to retain their existing customers and how to approach new ones. Here are some tips to consider as you are trying to drive up sales: Research early on: You need to understand your current and potential customer base to drive up sales. Conduct thorough research on the target and potential markets before releasing your product.  Make good use of social media: Many businesses now prefer to set up a business page on Facebook or Instagram, as it is free of additional costs such as rent, electricity, and other utility charges. If one is successful in figuring out which social media the target market uses the most, and market their products or services on the respective platform, then there is a very high chance that your sales can boost dramaticallyOffer exclusive discounts and packages: By offering reasonable discounts and special packages on your product line, you can keep your loyal customers satisfied and you will also be able to attract new customers for your products.Pay special attention to existing customers: Ensure that you are keeping your current customers happy and satisfied. Your existing customer base can be crucial to driving up your sales, through referrals or word of mouth sales. You can make these steps possible by designing and conducting a survey or hiring someone to lead the market data gathering for you. A business plan consultant can help your business get past the most difficult business phases effortlessly. B. What other methods can you use to improve sales?  Digital is the future. Every business needs to have an online presence, which can be through a website, social media pages or online video channels. However, maintaining an online presence is not enough, businesses need to ensure they take the right steps to guarantee their website generates maximum traffic.  You have to optimize your website for search engines and for that you need to ensure that your SEO game is solid. Learn different tricks and tips which can be used to increase your SEO or hire a competitive marketing agency.The primary purpose of digital marketing is to enhance the presence of a business online, which makes it easy for customers to find your business using the internet.You should have a responsive website that is both user-friendly and simple to use.Post your products with exciting content and pictures on Facebook, Instagram or any other online shopping platforms.Make sure you build an email list to inform your new and existing customers about new products and discounts you are offering.Work hard on your content, engage influencers on social media, and make the best use of Google tools like Google Analytics to ensure your website stays at the top in the relevant searches. Related: In order to stay ahead of the competition, businesses need to step up their accounting, marketing and operations department simultaneously. There are several tools that can help pace up the process. C. Growth through effective decision making:. Smart decisions such as when to hire more employees, grow your product line, invest in new machinery can be crucial not only to the success of a business but also how quickly it can grow. Making these decisions requires sharp business acumen, accurate data and a set of good tools and frameworks. Our guide to making better business decisions can help business owners learn the skill of making effective business decisions accurately. With effective business decisions, businesses can save time, money and lost effort. Swift decision making can help businesses mitigate risk, reduce wastage and maintain efficiency within the organisation. Strategy can be quite useful to make effective business decisions, there are many strategic tools available for strategic planning, among which scenario planning has gained much ground due to its ability to analyse a wider range of scenarios with a longer range, this helps businesses avoid becoming short-sighted and having tunnel vision when strategizing. D. Growth through growing your product line:. To expand your business, you can try and focus on expanding your product line. It’s always better to improve your product line than just adding new products.  This section tends to provide you tips through which you can successfully expand your product line. Improve Product Line: You should work on carrying our surveys, feedbacks and research on finding out what improvements the market wants in your products, once you are able to identify these improvements, you should try and implement as many as possible to improve the product line. This is a recommended strategy before any new products are introduced in the market. Understand the External markets Your business expansion into new markets will require you to understand its dynamics and customer preferences very carefully. You need to have sufficient knowledge about the competitors in the market, market growth rate, potential barriers to entry and the level of demand for your product. It would be best if you also had guidance on how to enter the market successfully. External markets can be compared using the benchmarking process. The process basically compares the company’s performance against that of competitors or with their own performance over the past years. You can read more about the Steps to Benchmarking your business in our guide. E. Growth through new markets. If you are planning to introduce your products and services into a new market, there are various ways through which you can enter and leave your footprint in the market. Acquisition or franchising: Buying a franchise or acquiring another business is an excellent option. This is the quickest way to enter the market and to learn its dynamics, but the risk level associated is somewhat high, and you might have to spend a hefty amount of money to acquire a franchise or another business. Introduction of a new product: You can make your way into the market by introducing an entirely new product or set of products into the market. This approach tends to be risky as you will have no exposure to the dynamics of the market, and you’ll have to learn most of the things by yourself. As compared to other approaches, you’ll have full control over your business. Partnership: Taking partners on board is an excellent option, partners who are living near your target location will understand the market and its preferences better. You can also partner with other existing businesses in the market, or you may hire distributors to ensure your products are flowing into the market as you wish. This approach is less risky as compared to the others, however, you need to ensure that you develop friendly relations with your partners and keep their interests along with yours in mind. Related: If you are confused about which partnership structure to adopt, read our guide to learn more. 4. How do you manage Growth? Once you have understood the various growth stages, planned for growth and achieved it, you need to manage it. Managing your growth properly will guarantee the longevity of your business. You can manage growth as follows: Reporting Once you have achieved growth, in order to sustain it you require effective reporting which includes but is not limited to metrics and measurements, these confirm how the growth is being achieved? If this growth is sustainable and what actions need to be taken to sustain it. Reporting will also help assess the existing growth strategy in place and if any amendments or modifications are required. Customer Relationship Another important element of managing growth is to maintain or improve customer service, this can be done through effective customer service processes, regular feedback, and training & development. Growing, Expanding and Sustaining a business is hard work, but with effort comes the fruit of return such as money, jobs for your local market and a contribution to your country’s economy. Clear House Accountants are specialist Accountants in London who are experts in working with various businesses at each of their business stages. We have worked hard to train our accountants to be able to help develop smart solutions, practical strategies, and effective processes to help your business grow and develop at whatever business stage it is in. Anam Rehman. Director Operations & Finance. +44 (0)207 117 2639 [email protected] chacc.co.uk Author Bio. Anam has a degree in accounting from the Prestigious St John’s University, and works as a senior director in Clear House. Before working in Clear House, Anam worked in various commercial roles, the last one being the VP Operations for a prestigious business organisation,working on improving the organisation’s operational efficiency, growth and high level client management. Anam manages clients ranging from software companies to large property developers and managers. Notably, she recently worked with a large property development company building large scale developments in London and the surrounding area. You Might Also Want to Read:. Top 7 Tools for Business Growth How UK Businesses Should Optimize Tax Incentives for Sustainable Growth 9 Ways to Grow Surplus Business Cash 1 Comment. jennifer77 . Amazing Bundle of thanks for sharing such an informative content March 9, 2021 Reply Leave a Comment Cancel reply. This website uses cookies to improve your experience. 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These cookies do not store any personal information. SAVE & ACCEPT
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 125
  • 12
  • growth
  • 64
  • 12
  • product
  • 35
  • 12
  • market
  • 33
  • 12
  • plan
  • 28
  • 12
  • customer
  • 25
  • 12
  • demand
  • 22
  • 12
  • sale
  • 20
  • 12
  • business growth
  • 18
  • 12
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  • 17
  • 12
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  • 17
  • 12
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  • 15
  • 12
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  • 13
  • 12
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  • 13
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  • 13
  • 12
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  • 12
  • 12
  • manage
  • 12
  • 12
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  • 12
  • 12
  • solution
  • 12
  • 12
  • method
  • 12
  • 12
  • accountant
  • 12
  • 12
  • set
  • 12
  • 12
  • ensure
  • 12
  • 12
  • strategy
  • 12
  • 12
  • development plan
  • 11
  • 12
  • goal
  • 11
  • 12
  • service
  • 11
  • 12
  • improve
  • 11
  • 12
  • forecast
  • 11
  • 12
  • business development plan
  • 10
  • 12
  • marketing
  • 10
  • 12
  • line
  • 10
  • 12
  • decision
  • 10
  • 12
  • product line
  • 8
  • 12
  • stage business
  • 7
  • 12
  • growth business
  • 7
  • 12
  • phase business
  • 5
  • 12
  • demand forecasting
  • 5
  • 12
  • business stage
  • 5
  • 12
  • effective business
  • 5
  • 12
  • cash flow
  • 5
  • 12
  • business owner
  • 5
  • 12
  • product service
  • 5
  • 12
  • demand forecast
  • 5
  • 12
  • website cooky
  • 5
  • 12
  • business growth business
  • 4
  • 12
  • managing growth
  • 4
  • 12
  • startup phase
  • 4
  • 12
  • manage growth
  • 4
  • 12
  • clear house
  • 4
  • 12
  • business plan
  • 4
  • 12
  • term goal
  • 4
  • 12
  • business expansion
  • 4
  • 12
  • existing customer
  • 4
  • 12
  • social media
  • 4
  • 12
  • business decision
  • 4
  • 12
  • stage business growth
  • 3
  • 12
  • plan business development
  • 3
  • 12
  • effective business decision
  • 3
  • 12
  • improve product line
  • 3
  • 12
  • comment
  • 3
  • 12
  • grow business
  • 3
  • 12
  • set business
  • 3
  • 12
  • brand visibility
  • 3
  • 12
  • short term
  • 3
  • 12
  • long term
  • 3
  • 12
  • depth
  • 3
  • 12
  • customer service
  • 3
  • 12
  • company
  • 3
  • 12
  • business performance
  • 3
  • 12
  • making business
  • 3
  • 12
  • realistic goal
  • 3
  • 12
  • plan business
  • 3
  • 12
  • market product
  • 3
  • 12
  • customer base
  • 3
  • 12
  • demand customer
  • 3
  • 12
  • improve product
  • 3
  • 12
Result 13
TitleJamesons Limited - Chartered Accountants & Business Advisers in Witney, Oxfordshire
Urlhttps://www.jamesons.co.uk/resources/4-ways-to-grow-your-business
Description
Date
Organic Position12
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
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  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 14
TitleGrow your business
Urlhttps://www.westsuffolk.gov.uk/Business/start-and-grow-your-business/growyourbusiness.cfm
Description
Date
Organic Position13
H1Grow your business
H2Brexit - Advice for your business
Boost your sales and marketing
Improve and develop your product
Grow your workforce
Find new funding
Find new premises
In this section
Contact details
H3Economic Development and Growth
H2WithAnchorsBrexit - Advice for your business
Boost your sales and marketing
Improve and develop your product
Grow your workforce
Find new funding
Find new premises
In this section
Contact details
BodyGrow your businessThe continuing growth and development of your business is as important to us as it is to you. We can provide free and impartial advice, support and direction for any business related enquiry. You can contact us in person, by telephone or email for personal, one to one service - we're here to help. We have brought together information and links to websites that will help you grow and transform your business. Find out more from the topics below. Brexit - Advice for your business. The New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership for Norfolk and Suffolk provides advice and resources to businesses following the UK’s decision to leave the UK. This valuable resource can be found on the New Anglia LEP's website. Boost your sales and marketing. Effective sales and marketing are at the heart of any successful business. Marketing strategies often need to be refreshed and refocused in order to boost sales to existing customers or attract new ones. Similarly, a revitalised sales strategy may open up new markets or sales channels such as exporting Follow the links below for more help, advice and guidance. Marketing Donut: Use the tools on offer to review your marketing and sales strategies. For instance, is your pricing still relevant? Could you make use of a website? Should you explore a new distribution strategy or hire a sales agent? Gov.UK, growing your business: Find out more about attracting new customers or increasing sales to existing ones Make sure you watch their video on the different ways to sell to customers Department for International Trade: Exporting can open up whole new markets and opportunities. Contact the Department for International Trade for free and specialist advice on how to market and sell your product overseas. Business is Great Britain: Has a wealth of information on growing your business. Be sure to check out their section on how getting online can revolutionise your sales and marketing. New Anglia Growth Hub: The Growth Hub provides assistance and direction for growing local businesses. It can help you with a variety of topics, such as finding new contract opportunities. Contracts Finder: Find out more about supplying goods or services to the government and its agencies. Improve and develop your product. Consider improving your original product, process or service or developing and introducing new ones. Continued market research is crucial to finding out how you can improve or develop your product. It's also a great way of keeping track of your competitors. Follow the links below for more information. Marketing Donut: Advice on product research and product development Plus find out how to correctly market your new product to raise consumer awareness. Be the Business: aims to inform, educate and collaborate with the businesses of Britain to boost business productivity and restore us to the forefront of business performance worldwide. Innovate UK: Find out about the advice, support and funding on offer for business innovation and product development. Catapult: Support, equipment and facilities to research and test new ideas and products. Enterprise Europe Network: A source of information and advice about the support and funding opportunities on offer for product research and development. Menta, growing business: Menta have 30 years experience in helping local companies carry out research and development for new ideas and products. New Anglia Growth Hub: Get free support and assistance from their specialist advisors on developing new ideas, marketing and funding support. Intellectual Property Office: Protect your new product and check that it isn't contravening intellectual property laws. Grow your workforce. Hiring new staff or training your existing workforce in new skills is the first real step towards growing your business. Something simple such as improving customer service can have a huge impact on your business. Retraining staff and hiring new employees isn't always costly and there is plenty of help and practical, financial support available, find out more from the links below. Gov.UK, hire and train staff: Gives a brief overview of employment opportunities and training schemes on offer. You can also check current employment regulations and what your responsibilities are as an employer. Apprenticeships: Hiring an apprentice is a great way to expand, enrich and diversify your workforce. West Suffolk College offer a wide range of employee training, recruitment (including apprentices) and potential funding towards this. ACAS: Find a wealth of information on employment and management, there is also a step by step guide to recruiting Job Centre Plus, help for recruiters: Find a range of recruitment services, including the small business recruitment service National Careers Service: Find local training courses specific to your business. HM Revenue and Customs: HMRC provides comprehensive and essential information on employing people and paying business tax, such as PAYE. Make sure you take advantage of their free elearning tool and webinars Find new funding. There are a number of funding opportunities on offer for growing businesses. This is part of the government's commitment to help growing and forward thinking firms reach their potential. Visit our Find funding page for more information, or contact us for bespoke advice. Find new premises. The need to increase production, store more products or having the facility to display stock might mean you need bigger premises. We can help you do that - visit our Find land and property page or contact us for one to one advice. In this section. How we can help your business Locate your business here Start your business Grow your business Find funding Find commercial land and premises Contact details. Economic Development and Growth. 01284 757114 [email protected] westsuffolk.gov.uk Follow us on Twitter
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 26
  • 14
  • find
  • 15
  • 14
  • product
  • 13
  • 14
  • advice
  • 10
  • 14
  • sale
  • 9
  • 14
  • marketing
  • 8
  • 14
  • funding
  • 8
  • 14
  • support
  • 7
  • 14
  • service
  • 7
  • 14
  • information
  • 7
  • 14
  • growing
  • 7
  • 14
  • development
  • 6
  • 14
  • offer
  • 6
  • 14
  • growing business
  • 5
  • 14
  • growth
  • 5
  • 14
  • contact
  • 5
  • 14
  • market
  • 5
  • 14
  • opportunity
  • 5
  • 14
  • research
  • 5
  • 14
  • grow
  • 4
  • 14
  • free
  • 4
  • 14
  • link
  • 4
  • 14
  • anglia
  • 4
  • 14
  • local
  • 4
  • 14
  • strategy
  • 4
  • 14
  • customer
  • 4
  • 14
  • training
  • 4
  • 14
  • advice support
  • 3
  • 14
  • business find
  • 3
  • 14
  • sale marketing
  • 3
  • 14
  • growth hub
  • 3
  • 14
  • find funding
  • 3
  • 14
  • step
  • 3
  • 14
  • employment
  • 3
  • 14
  • recruitment
  • 3
  • 14
  • premis
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
TitleRussell and Russell | Do not ignore the importance of having a great accountant
Urlhttps://www.growyourbusiness.co.uk/
DescriptionA great accountant should have your interests at heart and provide you with the advice you need to get the business working like a well-oiled machine. Take a minute to consider the questions below
Date
Organic Position14
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
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Result 16
Title15 Steps to start a business from scratch with (almost) no money
Urlhttps://entrepreneurhandbook.co.uk/starting-a-business/
DescriptionLearn how to start a business with our step-by-step guide covering every aspect of business setup from ideation to company setup, creating a brand and more
Date
Organic Position15
H115 Steps to start a business from scratch with (almost) no money
H2A step-by-step guide to starting a business, covering everything from coming up with business ideas to business planning, fundraising and more
1. Know yourself as an entrepreneur before you start
2. Coming up with great business ideas
3. Research your business ideas
4. Test your business premise
5. Create a business plan
6. Registering a business
7. Setting up finances, accounting and tax
8. Protect your business
9. Create a brand and identity for your business
10. Buying the business essentials
11. Find funding for your new business
12. Creating a sales and marketing strategy
13. Building a team for your new business
14. Starting a business in your spare time
15. A little bit of entrepreneurial inspiration
H3Discover your motivation for starting a business
Understand your entrepreneurial passions
Are you the right age to start a business?
Start generating business ideas
Define & analyse your target market
See if there’s a demand for your product or service
Understand your potential customers
Have a marketing & sales plan that makes sense
Make sure your business model will work
Find funding for your business
Be precise when measuring performance
Different testing methods
Key elements of a business plan
How to write a business plan
How to format and present your business plan
Keep your business plan updated
Tools for business planning
Different types of business structure
Selecting a structure for your business
Register a limited company
Register as a sole trader
Registering a limited liability partnership
Opening a business bank account
Understanding your accounting, tax and filing responsibilities
Hire an accountant
Choosing small business accounting software
Find a solicitor or law firm
Getting intellectual property protection in place
Make sure you have small business insurance
Choosing the right business insurance
Create a professional brand for your business
You need to create a website for your business
How to create a website for your business
Create an e-mail address for your business
Setting up business broadband
Getting a business phone line
Finding office space
Selecting business stationary and signage
Your savings
Friends & family
Business grants
Business competitions
Angel investors
Venture capital
Crowdfunding
Business Loans
Business credit cards
Business overdrafts
Getting a product or service ready for sale
Positioning your offering
Understanding your USP (Unique selling point)
Setting price at the right level
Choosing a route to market
Selecting marketing channels
Build a sales process
Building sales assets
Building a sales pipeline
Create a customer service team
Brilliant recruitment practices are linked to business success
Creating a management ethos and system
Making sure you are compliant with employment law and taxes
Managing yourself
Perfect businesses to start in your spare time
Hide your entrepreneurial intentions
Only work on your business in your spare time
Social life on hold
Maximise the number of hours
Work on your business every hour
Make sure to get some rest
Advice from owners of successful spare time entrepreneurs
Related topics
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About
Topics
H2WithAnchorsA step-by-step guide to starting a business, covering everything from coming up with business ideas to business planning, fundraising and more
1. Know yourself as an entrepreneur before you start
2. Coming up with great business ideas
3. Research your business ideas
4. Test your business premise
5. Create a business plan
6. Registering a business
7. Setting up finances, accounting and tax
8. Protect your business
9. Create a brand and identity for your business
10. Buying the business essentials
11. Find funding for your new business
12. Creating a sales and marketing strategy
13. Building a team for your new business
14. Starting a business in your spare time
15. A little bit of entrepreneurial inspiration
Body15 Steps to start a business from scratch with (almost) no money A step-by-step guide to starting a business, covering everything from coming up with business ideas to business planning, fundraising and more. Editorial team | October 2, 2017 Coming up with a business idea and starting a business can seem overwhelming and complicated. There are so many things you have to consider from coming up with an excellent idea to registering a company, all the way to business planning, fundraising and much more. That is why we have put together this in-depth guide to take you by step by step through how you can start a business. It covers every conceivable thing you could want to know when setting up a business, including: Know yourself as an entrepreneur before you start Generating new business ideas Researching the validity of your ideas Testing your business premise in the real world Creating an initial business plan Setting up the right legal structure for your business Understanding your financial, accounting and tax obligations Protecting your business from a legal and disaster perspective (insurance) Creating an identity for your business including building a brand and website Get your business essentials sorted including setting up internet and stationary Funding options for starting your business including investment, grants, loans and more Devising initial marketing and sales strategies Building your initial team including recruitment, management and company culture Starting your business whilst keeping a full-time job I highly recommend that if you are new to starting a new business you should read this guide from beginning to end, but if you want to skip ahead, there’s a table of contents below with quick links to sections and subsections. This guide is designed for UK entrepreneurs but most of it relates to entrepreneurs starting a business anywhere, only the financial and legal sections will differ significantly. 1. Know yourself as an entrepreneur before you start. Starting a business is a process that requires an enormous amount of thought and careful examination. First, you need to take a good look at your strengths, weaknesses and skills. This will allow you to start thinking about what you can do and what you cannot do. It is important to start here even if you already have world’s best business idea, because you might not have the skills or personality traits to enable you to make it into a successful business. You want to come up with business ideas where you are naturally best suited to be successful, for example: A person with a decent level of programming skill is well adapted to starting a web development agency. A person that has a short attention span might not want to consider accountancy related businesses. An person that doesn’t enjoy speaking to new people wouldn’t consider a heavily client facing business. These are just three general examples, but it gives you an idea of the thought process. The crucial point is to understand yourself and your team, and if you are well suited to any business ideas, areas of business or specific types of business. It allows you to start coming up with ideas and narrowing down what businesses you could start. Discover your motivation for starting a business. Before you start a business, you should be absolutely clear about why you are doing it. That may sound obvious, but there are actually many reasons why someone should choose to turn their back on the security of a job and career for the uncertainty of starting a business. So the clearer you are about what exactly you are trying to achieve, the better chance you have of achieving it. Wealth, power, fame, saving the world? Most entrepreneurs are motivated by a mix of the above although most wouldn’t like to admit it. Understanding what is driving you to start a business is a major factor in determining what type of business you should start. Why? Because when a business you start isn’t aligned with personal ambition, it is much more likely you will fail. You should make sure from the beginning that your personal goals and drive are compatible with your business, for example: Someone who seeks wealth might want to look at companies in the financial services industry, where Fintech valuations and revenues are typically much higher than other start-up businesses. Someone who seeks power and influence could achieve this through any form of media business. Someone who seeks out fame might be best suited to an entertainment related business. Someone who wants to save the world might start a business tackling climate change through renewable energy. It is important to understand why you are starting a business so you can focus on business ideas that will help you get to where you want to go. Make sure it’s a good reason to start. In reality, you are unlikely to have just one reason for starting a business; it is likely to be a combination of several of them. So be aware that the aims may conflict with each other. Creating a long-term family business to pass down the generations, for example, may well be incompatible with making a serious fortune, because you may find you need to sell the business in order to realise its full worth. While it is possible to create a successful business solely to make a lot of money, in reality, it will be hard work if there isn’t at least one other factor acting as a motivator. This is because it can take many years between starting a business and receiving any money from it – if ever – and along the way the hard work required is immense, and the possibility of failure is very real. Simply pinning your hopes on a future possible pot of gold is unlikely to be enough to sustain you through the difficult times. So make sure you have a good reason, work hard and enjoy the ride! Understand your entrepreneurial passions. When it comes to starting a business, if you are passionate about it, you will be more likely to be successful. The main reason for this is simple: you will work harder and persevere more on a business you are passionate about, thus be more likely to succeed at it. Often the only difference between an entrepreneur who starts a successful business and an entrepreneur who fails is passion. Logic dictates that if you want a successful business then you should begin in an area that you already have a passion for. To start figuring out what businesses or areas of business you are or could be passionate about start by thinking about the areas, activities, and things you are passionate about, that is, that interest you and you have strong opinions on, for example: Someone who loves to hike might consider setting up a travel business. Someone who loves Lego might think about a toy or construction business. Someone who spent their whole life with a passion for music might start a company related to sound When thinking of offline or online business ideas keep in mind that starting any business is hard enough, if you make sure it is one you are passionate about you are much more likely to succeed. Are you the right age to start a business? Questions such as what is the average age of a startup founder, what is the optimal age to be a founder and is it possible to be too old/ too young to start a startup, are all often asked. The graph from HBR shows the distribution of ages of the founders of billion dollars, venture capital-backed private companies. It’s an interesting distribution that undeniably favours those between the age of 20-35.  Of course, these $1bn companies are huge outliers and represent a very small dataset of total startups.  Having said that, it’s an interesting graph to note as after all, for those of us that start startups, isn’t this the ultimate dream that we’re all swinging for in the long run?  For those that fall into this age bracket, the signs are good. Even Fred Wilson, prolific New York based Venture Capitalist was quoted as saying that “tech is biased toward the younger generation” as the article notes. In contrast to the graph above, the Kauffman Foundation conducted a study and released a report entitled “The Anatomy of an Entrepreneur“. They found the average age of a founder to be 40 years old. Of course, I can think of a number of benefits of waiting until this age to start a company; the most obvious being years of experience under your belt. Ultimately, age should not be a limiting factor in success. There are pros and cons about certain ages, and some people might have biases one way or the other.  Regarding starting a startup often it is down to the circumstances and thought process of the individual. There will always be reasons to not take the plunge but in reality are these reasons even valid? Your age should be way down the list of factors that you consider if you’re thinking of starting a startup.  With startups being the roller coaster that they are, the range of emotions from almighty highs to deep lows experienced by any founder on a day to day basis will dwarf the benefits or negatives caused by the founder’s age. There are many metrics that startup founders can pay attention to at any one point in time.  In my opinion, age should not be one of them.  What’s your opinion? 2. Coming up with great business ideas. Coming up with a business idea is relatively easy, coming up with a great business idea is hard. It is critical to your success that when starting out you explore as many ideas as possible before deciding on the final one you will take forward. In this section, we will guide you through the process of finding a great business idea that you can turn into a successful, profitable and valuable business. Start generating business ideas. It is now time to start coming up with ideas, this is often a long and time-consuming process but have some patience and you will bring to life some fantastic ones. Below you will find advice on how to get started in the ideation process and come up with great business ideas! Solve a problem that prospective customers care about. Start by thinking about what significant problems you could solve and how. Many successful companies started out on a mission to solve real problems that affect millions of people and provide a solution through their products and services. For example, Tesla started with the objective of making the world’s cars purely electric and they are well on the way having built a hugely successfully multi-billion-dollar business in the process. Identify where you provide a better solution. Look for areas where solutions are already available but you can do better than existing companies either regarding efficiency, innovation or cost. For example, Apple entered the mobile phone market more than a decade ago as an underdog with a new innovative product and are now a market leader. Despite the fact the technology had been available for years no one had brought the level of innovation the iPhone did to the market. Be cheaper than other businesses. You should look for areas where you can provide significant savings to the customer vs competitors. These types of businesses grow incredibly fast, particularly during recessions. For example, Poundland is a great example of this kind of business, since its inception its used price as the primary differentiator to its competitors. Through offering the lowest price possible on a big range of consumer products the business has grown to a highly successful high street chain. Innovate in a traditional slow changing market. Is there a field of business or industry that hasn’t seen much innovation in the last 10-100 years? This is often the case in non-tech industries that are slow to push forward change while the status quo remains profitable. These industries often have tremendous opportunities to disrupt them with new technologies, innovations, systems and methods. For example, only recently has the taxi industry rapidly changed with the introduction of Uber innovating how we find and hire taxis. Build a business for a future need or market. Try to think into the future, what will the world look like in 5 or 10 years? Thinking about the future will allow you to think about new markets and niches that may open due to innovations and new technologies. For example, cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin in the last few years have grown to be significant markets by themselves with a whole eco-system of technology and infrastructure providers developing around it. Copy other businesses and be better. It is unlikely, unless you are on the forefront of technology, that your business ideas are unique. Plenty of the world’s biggest companies were not revolutionary, yet they came into markets with developed players and just outperformed everyone else. You do not have to have the most original idea to create a brilliant business, you just have to do it better than anyone else! For example, Microsoft came out of nowhere and beat every other competitor to become the dominant operating system provider in the early 1990’s. Turn your hobby into a business. A logical jump is to take a hobby and turn it into a real business. Why? A hobby is something you already know a lot about, clearly have a passion for and you will know where to start. For example, it is logical to go from collecting models to selling models. Think about a global business. The world is now a very global place, you can have a business in China and operate it from New Zealand if that is what you want. Globalization and technology offer immense possibilities to run businesses in new and emerging markets around the world. If the conditions are not right for your business model in your home country market look for a country where they are. For example, Rocket Internet built their multi-billion-dollar business by copying innovative business models from developed markets and taking them to less developed markets where they were the only company. Don’t limit yourself to one business idea. It is easy to settle on one idea but to give yourself the best chance of coming up with a great idea it’s best to pick a few to explore and compare. If you’re stuck, stop thinking. You can overthink it when it comes to ideation, so if you are stuck stop thinking about it. Many times, when you stop actively thinking about something the solution or idea will come to you later. 3. Research your business ideas. This stage is all about researching your business idea as much as possible to decide if your idea or ideas could turn into a great business. To assess and compare each, you want to have a clear understanding of the points below. Define & analyse your target market. Is there a market for the business, product or service and is it big enough to support your goals? You should also consider the competitive landscape and know who your main competitors are. Analyse what their and your weaknesses and strengths are, as well as market opportunities and threats. You want a clear idea of the overall market and how your business would fit into it. See if there’s a demand for your product or service. Is there a direct demand for your goods or will you have to educate customers about the need for your product or service? Understand your potential customers. You should have a clear idea of who your potential customers are, including demographic data and business details if you are selling B2B. Have a marketing & sales plan that makes sense. Having a good understanding of how you would reach your potential clients and grow your market share is critical to success. Specifically, understanding what marketing and sales activities and channels will you need to pursue and how. Make sure your business model will work. Can your business model work given the current market and potential customers? This is often an overlooked point, but many start-ups fail because their business model does not operate. Find funding for your business. Is it going to cost a significant amount to set up your business? This is a key factor on whether your business could work as it depends on your resources and your ability to raise finance if needed, i.e. Small business grants, business angels, venture capital, invoice finance or bank business loans. 4. Test your business premise. Once you have a few thoroughly researched business ideas it’s time to test quickly and validate if the premise of your proposed business works in the real world. Many entrepreneurs who skip this stage, end up wasting much time chasing ventures that would never work. So now that we have established it is a good move to test your ideas and research, this section explores the different routes to market for testing different ideas. Be precise when measuring performance. When testing a proposed business, you can assess the performance of any venture in different ways, so it is important to initially work out what you want to measure to gauge success or failure. Here are some suggested measures to get you started: How much revenue could you generate/ How many products can you sell? How much customer interest can you generate? How much press/notoriety can you generate? Different testing methods. As per the title of this section, you should find and deploy the fastest, cheapest, and most robust way possible of testing your business premises. How you choose to do this largely depends on your business idea, below are some of the most popular methods that fit the above criteria. Create a landing page and carry out e-mail marketing. If you have services or a specific solution based business and your primary sales channel will be online, this is often the quickest way to test: Set up a quick one-page website (for non-technical people Wix is a good solution). Make it seem and feel professional (you can get a 5 dollar logo/brand off Fiverr). List your services/solutions. Add a contact email. Find the e-mails of ideal potential buyers and contact them about your service. Then manage communications and see if anyone is interested, if not ask why and be persistent. Build an online store and buy adverts. If your idea involves selling products online: Create a quick online store (WordPress, Shopify or BigCommerce are good options). Add a brand and make everything look professional. Add mocked up graphics of your products. Add contact details and sort an email. Spend £25 on Facebook ads and see how many clicks, sales and how much revenue you can drive. Set up a market stall and sell. If you are starting a product based business and your primary sales method will be face-to-face, a cost-effective way to test your business is to build initial versions of your product and book a table at your local market or festival. You can gauge via sales and customer feedback if the premise is a success and gain valuable feedback as to how you could pivot the premise to success if it fails. Innocent Smoothies started by testing their products at a festival before becoming a business (and later being acquired by Coke for hundreds of millions). Sell over the phone (Telesales). One of the best ways to get meaningful qualitative feedback is to find the ideal buyer of your product on LinkedIn for example, track down their phone number and call/pitch as much as possible to gather as much feedback and as many pre-orders as you can. 5. Create a business plan. At this point you have chosen the business idea you are going to turn into a business and tested it, now it is time to put together a business plan to outline in detail the objectives of your business and how you are planning to achieve them. A business plan is a great exercise for sorting out your thoughts and it allows you to plan your business in a structured way, for yourself and so outside parties such as investors or partners can understand what you are trying to achieve and how. Great planning from the start can be the difference between a business that is successful and well executed and a business that fails. In this section, you will find guidance on how to create a great business plan. Key elements of a business plan. Your business plan should include many key elements and follow a simple and clear structure. Always aim to create a business plan that anyone could pick up and understand what your business is, what its objectives are and how you are planning to get there; this means breaking it up into clear sections. Executive summary. An executive summary is an introduction to your plan, its content, and an overview of everything in your business plan. It should provide the reader with a short, concise and clear overview of what your business is and what you are trying to do in no more than two paragraphs. Contents page. The readers of your plan will often want to skip to specific parts that interest them; a contents page allows them to navigate quickly to the appropriate section. Business model and products/services. Here you need to outline your business model and what are the products, services and solutions you provide. Customer, market and competition. In this section, you need to show a clear understanding of your ideal client, the market for your product, service or solution (also have your market clearly segmented) and an understanding of the competitive landscape, including who your competitors are and where you are in the market in comparison to them. Marketing and sales. This section is about demonstrating a clear plan from a marketing and sales perspective as to how you intend to achieve your objectives, whether that is scale, revenue generation or some other tactic. Finances and projections. You want to show your current finances and any projections you have for the business moving forward. Always make sure to be realistic with financial projections, you will have to back them up at some point! Team. Include a short section about your current team, who they are and their qualifications/experiences. If you have expansion plans for human resources, you should also include them here. Business plan summary. This section should should showcase the entirety of your business and your business plans, through key points in bullet point format and provide contact details so a reader can easily get in touch with you. How to write a business plan. Writing a business plan when you are starting out is often a new, complicated and sometimes overwhelming task. There are however some golden rules you should take into consideration when writing that will make your life a lot easier! Keep your writing short. Make sure to summarise and keep your writing as short as possible as this will help your plan be very clear. It helps you organise your ideas but most importantly, it makes it much easier for external parties to understand. Make sure everything is relevant. It is very easy and tempting to include irrelevant information in your business plan. This extra information usually makes your communication less efficient and makes the idea harder to understand. To get rid of any irrelevant material, once you have finished a section do a quick review and get rid of anything that doesn’t support or add to the main point you are trying to make in that section. Check grammar and spelling thoroughly. If there’s even a chance external parties will at some point read your business plan, then make your spelling and grammar excellent. As with any document, you lose much credibility and sometimes meaning if there are spelling and grammar errors. Create a simple mission statement. A mission statement should concisely explain what the overall purpose of your business is, for example, the mission could be: to reduce the impact of plastic waste on the environment. Set clear objectives. Set SMART objectives by being very specific on what you are trying to achieve across the business and in individual areas. State how you are going to get there. It sounds simple but many entrepreneurs are not very clear about how they are going to achieve their business objectives, make sure you thoroughly think and create a way for your business to get from point A to B. Use a realistic timeline. Setting a realistic timeline alongside your activities and objectives is a critical factor when composing any business plan. How to format and present your business plan. Making sure you have created your plan in the appropriate format can be very important to how it is perceived or used. Here are a few tips on how you can achieve the best format. Business plan formats. Create your initial document in Word, Google docs or Open Office, these tools are easy to use and you’ll end up with an easily editable file. You can also use Excel to create and update a clear structure, this helps to give you a good overview of the plan. Make sure to use a theme that is consistent throughout the document regarding fonts, colours and design features. If you must give a copy to an external party, always export the file to PDF, and make sure to have professional graphics in place if desired (if you want to design something graphically complex, Adobe InDesign is perfect for this). How to present your plan. If you are going to make a presentation of your plan, you need to create a PowerPoint/Keynote version. The presentation format will differ from your business plan in that each page should make one key point with a maximum of other three supporting ones. Make sure to use simple graphics and focus on what you are trying to communicate (remember you can always provide a full business plan at the end of a presentation to any parties). Keep your business plan updated. Your business plan should be updated as circumstances and objectives change. If your business is now running, it’s impractical to continually update this document but it should be reviewed and kept up to date over time. Apart from anything else it is a good reflection on where you started and where you are now. If you are looking for a way to track your progress against objectives, it is best to build a tracker/planner on Excel or use tools like Asana or Trello. Tools for business planning. Usually, Excel, Word or even a whiteboard is sufficient, but if your business is a little more complex or you struggle with organisation, then using a business planning software makes sense. The best and most popular solutions out there are Asana, Trello and LivePlan. 6. Registering a business. The structure you select for your business depends on your specific needs. In this section, we will take you through the various business structures, their advantages, disadvantages and how you can set them up. Different types of business structure. There are several types of legal structures you can choose from when setting up a business, we have detailed them further below. Sole trader. A sole trader is a business-type where one person owns and runs the entire business. It is the simplest business structure you could adopt. It is very suitable for any one-person businesses; this includes independent accountants, web developers and gardeners among others. Being a sole trader means the individual is entitled to all/any profits of the business but is also liable for any debt/damages incurred. In the UK, there are currently over 3 million registered sole traders, and the number is growing with a massive influx of skilled freelancers. Limited company                                               . A limited company is a structure that means a business is a separate entity from its owners. This means the owners are only liable for any business debts to the extent of the amount of money they have put into the business, thus limiting any exposure for business owners beyond their total investment. There are two types of limited companies you can incorporate in the UK. Private limited company (LTD or Ltd) In a private limited company, the owners privately hold shares. This is the most common and preferred incorporation structure for most small businesses in the UK. Over 5.2 million limited companies are operating in the UK now. Public limited company (PLC) In a public limited company, shares are available to the public for ownership and purchase. A public limited company must have a value of at least 50,000 pounds before it can trade as a PLC. PLC is commonly used as a structure for major companies after they make an initial public offering (selling a large portion of their shares in the capital markets). Limited liability partnership (LLP). An LLP is a partnership structure used by many businesses including vets, dentists, law firms or accountancy firms. An LLP is made up of at least one limited partner and one general partner (there can also be more than one of each), and these partners have different responsibilities and exposure regarding the business. Limited partners On formation provide property or money to a Are liable for all debts up to the amount they have They have no operation control and can’t actively manage the business. They cannot remove the initial investment (property or money) they put into the partnership. General partners Are liable to pay any debts the partnership cannot pay off. Actively manage and control the operation of the business. Can make binding (irreversible) decisions on business matters and for the business. General partners can apply for ACS; this is where assets and money are put together and managed on behalf of the partners. The partners end up co-owning the assets but only must pay tax on their share of any profits. Guarantee Company (LBG). LBG is a structure used by not-for-profit businesses such as social enterprises that seek a legal structure to operate. This structure is somewhere between a charitable status and a limited company. In an LBG no share capital is issued, instead, the members act as guarantors for the company. It’s commonly used by trade associations, schools, and other businesses. Selecting a structure for your business. There is no simple answer to which structure is best for your business, it depends on your business operation and needs. For example, if you: Plan to grow your small business beyond yourself (one person) and then sell it, then a Private Limited Company would likely be the most suitable structure. Plan to only operate as a one-person business for the near future, then a Sole Tradership would probably be the best structure. Plan to start a business that has a significant amount of senior management, capital and that deals in services, then a Limited Liability partnership would be the best choice. Setting up a structure for your business is not something you do every day, do some more in-depth research and decide what legal structure is best for your business. Register a limited company. Forming a limited company can be a simple process, but it is also something that should be done very carefully (if you are unsure about something, seek legal advice). Below you will find an overview of what you will need to register a company, where you can register and other useful details on company formation. Where can I register my company? You can register your new company at Companies House on GOV.UK, this process will take you about 30 minutes if you have all the required details ready. How much does it cost to register a company? It costs £12 to register a company online (you can pay this fee via PayPal, debit card or credit card). It takes on average 24hrs for your company to be registered. Details needed for registering a company. To register a company, you will need to have the details below ready: A company name (You can find more information on naming your company below). Address for the company. One or more directors’ names and details (if it is just you that is fine). Details of the company shares, shareholding, and shareholders (with at least one shareholder). A Memorandum and articles of association. This is a standard document that shareholders create and agree to that outlines the company’s written rules, it’s usually very standardised unless you have specific needs. Detailed information on anyone who owns a significant interest or control in the company (this means anyone who owns 25% or more shares or voting rights in the company). Choosing a company name. When choosing a company name you need to consider legal requirements but also apply common sense: Make sure the name you have chosen isn’t trademarked by another company, you can check this via the Intellectual Property Office search on GOV.UK. Your name cannot have any profanity in it (that is, rude language). Your company name does not have to be the same as your trading name, for instance: your company name could be “Generic media group Ltd” and you might trade under different names for various products the company owns such as “Business magazine, Agriculture magazine…” It depends on your plans, but it can be useful to have a name different from your product or service if you intend to launch other areas of the business, products or services. Your name cannot be to the same or too similar to another company that’s registered at Companies House. Your business name should be something that’s simple to say, spell and remember. Be creative and try brainstorming as many options as you can. Test your name and get feedback from your social group. Ultimately, you should take some time before you decide on a business name. Setting up a company address. To start a limited company, you need to have a registered business address. A registered address will appear on your Companies House listing and it is where the official post is sent including corporation tax and annual return requests. You can use your home address, office address or even a PO box. A PO box can be bought from a virtual office provider and is usually a good option if you want a more formal business address from the start (virtual address providers will forward any post onto your home or selected address for a fee). Creating a memorandum and articles of association. The standard articles of a memorandum document are usually sufficient for most new companies, all you need to do is have all the shareholders read, sign the document and submit it. If you have more complex needs regarding your company’s rules, you should consult a lawyer. Understanding directors & secretaries. Every company needs at least one director to start, this director or directors form the initial management team of a company. If you are starting a company by yourself, you would need to be listed as a director. You will also need to nominate a company secretary, which would also be yourself if you are the only founder. Getting shareholding & shareholders right. You want to get shareholding and shareholders details right from the let-go, it can cause a painful situation later if you submit this poorly or even incorrectly, particularly if you take on investment. A new company with only one director and one shareholder (who are the same person), and a shareholding of 100 ordinary shares owned by this director/shareholder would work well initially. Register as a sole trader. Registering as a sole trader is a simple process, it just requires you to fill out and submit several forms to the HMRC registering yourself as self-employed. What details do I need to register as a sole trader? You only need your national insurance number, a home address and a business name. Where can I register as a sole trader? You will need to register as self-employed with the HMRC by filling in the appropriate SA form and submitting it. Choosing a sole trader name. Being a sole trader, you can trade under your name or a business name of your choosing. If you want a separate business name, it cannot conflict with any existing trademarks, and you will also need to use your name and the business name on any official paperwork. Deciding on an address for a sole trader. Usually, a home address is fine as this is not made publicly available and many self-employed people operate from home. If you are going to list your business address on a website or anywhere else though, you could consider getting a virtual office or PO Box if you do not have a fixed office address. Registering a limited liability partnership. Registering a limited liability partnership (LLP) is more complex than most registrations. The details below provide a helpful outline of how you can go about registering an LLP with practical advice. How can I register a LLP? You will need to download the LP5 application form from GOV.UK and send it by post to Companies House. All partners in the company must sign this form and it typically takes five days for your limited partnership to be set up. You will also need to send in a fee of £20 via cheque or postal order at the same time (payable to “Companies House”). As an alternative, you can incorporate the company online through a third-party software. Choosing a partnership name. The same rules apply to selecting a partnership name as with a company name, see advice in the above, limited company registration section. Choosing an address for your LLP. The same address rules as for a limited company apply only that your registered business address, for official mail and public listing, must be in the territory where you incorporate initially. For instance, if you incorporate in Wales your registered partnership address must be in Wales. You are free to change this after registration though. You need a general partner and a limited partner. You must have a general partner and a limited partner to start a limited liability partnership. This cannot be the same person, so the minimum founding team is of two people by default. 7. Setting up finances, accounting and tax. Once you have set up the legal structure of your business, there are several important financial and tax responsibilities you need to figure out. Opening a business bank account. Before you can start generating any revenue or making purchases, you are going to need to open a business bank account to send, receive and securely store your businesses capital (money). It is essential to select a bank and business account carefully as it is very likely you will be with the chosen banking provider for the life of the business. Choose a bank for your business. There’s no simple answer for this, it is best to gather some information on each bank and their offerings and compare to see who’s the best fit. You should look for details such as: What’s their track-record in working with small businesses? Do they have a range of products and information specifically for small businesses? What do other small business customers think of the bank? Is the bank respectable, have they engaged in any illegal activity recently? Once you collect all this information, which you can find online; you should have a good idea of which bank is best for your business. Select a winning bank account. You also must decide what type of business account or accounts your set up. If you have the wrong type of account, it can significantly affect the cost of business banking. Here are a few things to consider when selecting a business account: Do they charge fees based on different transactions, is it a flat monthly fee or is it even free? If transaction fees are applied, what charges are applied to each type of transaction? Do they provide transaction fee free accounts for certain types of transactions such as online or retail? Does the bank offer any complimentary benefits such as insurance, software, or other benefits if you open a certain account with them? Do they offer free business banking and accounts for a period? For new ventures, banks tend to offer from 6-24 months free banking. It will take you a bit of time to gather information on bank accounts and compare it, but it is worth doing as it can save a lot of money, time and headaches in the future. It can be difficult to change banks. Once you are a few months or years into trading, it can be challenging to change banks and even to change your accounts, as you will likely be processing many payments and purchases through your bank and accounts at any one time. If you change banks or accounts you will need to update individual partners, suppliers and customers, which is a very time-consuming task. It usually ends up being severe enough that many businesses do not switch banks even if they have an unpleasant experience. Understanding your accounting, tax and filing responsibilities. As a shareholder, owner or director you will likely be responsible for filing some form of accounts, filing paperwork and paying various business taxes to the HMRC on an annual or more regular basis. Understanding your basic accounting, tax and financial responsibilities from the start is essential to running your business properly, being legally compliant and avoiding hefty fines from the HMRC. Record your financial transactions. Most businesses are legally required to keep an accurate and up to date record of their finances, this means recording expenditure, income and any other financial transactions of the business. Having up to date records helps to make financial plans and enables you to file your accounts relatively quickly as you have all the relevant data ready for your accountant. Prepare & file annual accounts. Limited companies and limited liability partnerships are required to submit accounts annually. These accounts are a record of your businesses expenses, revenue and financial transactions across the accounting year. Your corporation tax bill will also be worked out based on these accounts. It’s typical for an accountant to prepare these accounts based on your accounting records from the year, depending on how organised and up to date these records are this can be a simple or complicated process. Filing a confirmation statement. Limited companies and limited liability partnerships need to submit an annual confirmation statement. This statement is simply to check that the information that Companies House has about your business is correct and if any is incorrect or out of date, you will need to update these details. Register for self assessment. Self-assessment involves the annual filing of a set of simple accounts covering your income during the year. The HMRC uses this to assess the tax you need to pay personally. Sole traders, company directors and limited liability partners will need to register for self-assessment (company directors will also need to know about PAYE and dividends). Sole traders can also use any business-related costs to reduce their income and overall tax bill. One final exception is that if your limited company is not-for-profit, then you do not need to file self-assessment. Register for VAT (Value Added Tax). If your business is likely to have more than the VAT threshold in annual sales, you will need to register for VAT. This is a flat rate tax you must charge on top of any goods or services you sell. On the positive side, once you’re VAT registered and have your VAT number you can purchase products from other businesses VAT free. Register for corporation tax. If you have a limited company and it is trading (this means making any financial transaction), you will need to register for corporation tax within three months of starting your business or beginning to trade. You will be assessed for corporation tax through your annual accounts and will need to pay a flat rate tax based on the profits generated by your business. You can find more details on paying corporation tax here and further details on registering for CT here. Understanding business rates. Business rates are a tax levied on business premises by the UK government and delivered by local authorities. They are charged annually on business properties including shops, factories, offices, warehouses, bars and more. If you own or rent commercial premises, it is likely you will need to register for and pay business rates. However, if you are running your business from home it is unlikely you will need to pay business rates. Tell Companies House and HMRC of any changes. If your business details significantly change you will need to inform the relevant authorities, for instance, for instance; if your registered address changes you will need to tell Companies House/HMRC straight away. Hire an accountant. When it comes to starting any small business, it is advisable to have an accountant. A good accountant will save your business substantially more money than they cost to hire. Specifically, an accountant will ensure: You pay the right amount of tax. Ensure you meet, file and pay any major tax deadlines,e. annual statements, accounts, corporation tax… Have expert financial advice and information at your service. Ensure your annual accounts are correctly compiled and submitted to the HMRC. In summary, a good accountant will make the financial aspects of your business much easier to handle and save you much money in the process. Choosing an accountant. The ideal accountant for a small business that’s just starting up is a local independent accountant who will give your business finances the time and attention it needs and probably be less costly than a major firm. How much does an accountant cost? Accountants will either ask you to pay a lump sum annually or more commonly a monthly fee that will cover the ongoing work. The amount typically depends on how well you can negotiate, but it will likely be between £30-150 a month depending on the complexity of your business financial matters and filing needs. Sole traders however, probably only need an accountant once a year for self-assessment and this should cost between £80 -200. Choosing small business accounting software. Unless you are a sole trader with a few transactions going through your business each year, yes, you need small business accounting software, and there are two primary reasons: If you are a limited company or partnership, your annual accounts, which you must legally submit to the government yearly, require all your records from the annual accounting period. So you can accurately track all your financial transactions and the financial health and future of your business (including costs, revenue, and profit). It cannot be stressed enough how important it is to keep up to date and accurate financial records from the start. Failure to do this can result in losing a lot of time, money and in some cases criminal prosecution. 8. Protect your business. Once you have taken care of all financial matters, it is necessary to protect your business from the unpredictable by taking care of certain legal and insurance issues. Find a solicitor or law firm. Most companies will not need to hire a legal advisor initially, except if they want advice on company set up or have some specific legal matters that need attending. However, at some point in your businesses life-cycle, you will need some form of legal support, whether that is drawing up contracts or protecting your business interests in court. Make sure that if you hire a legal advisor at some point, you always agree on an hourly rate and on the amount of time required in advance for any work. Getting intellectual property protection in place. Intellectual property (IP) is intangible property that is the result of creativity. Protecting your IP as a business can be critical to protecting your business, brand and products from damages that come from people using your intellectual property without your permission. This section explores intellectual property rights and protections you can put in place to protect your business’ intellectual property. Trademarking a name and brand. A trademark is a legally registered symbol, word or words representing a business that legally owns it, protecting the business from anyone else using this name or symbol. For new ventures, you will want to trademark your company name and brand, this makes sure you legally own your brand and company name, and prevents anyone from misusing it. Patenting an idea, technology or process. A patent is an exclusive right granted for a product, invention or process that provides a new way of doing something or provides a new technical solution to a problem. Applying for a patent is only relevant for new businesses that have invented innovative technology or product that could be copied by others. A patent grants your legal ownership of this invention and the exclusive right to it, thus providing your business with protection. The relevance of copyright law. Copyrighted work means that other businesses cannot use your written or creative work without permission. Copyright is primarily employed by book publishers, theatre companies and other types of entertainment/information based companies who need to ensure works are not reproduced without authorisation. Make sure you have small business insurance. Business insurance for a new business can be an absolute lifeline that provides much-needed financial and legal support when the unexpected happens. Whether you must recall a dangerous product or have an employee endure an accident at work, having the right insurance can be the difference between a business being able to cope with a disaster or having to close. With that in mind, this section gives a quick overview of the major types of insurance you might consider for a new business. Public liability insurance (PLI). PLI protects businesses against losses suffered by people or customers injuring themselves or sustaining property damage due to the activity of business, it is one of the most common types of small business insurance. It is of particular importance if you operate physical premises and regularly interact with customers in a third party or business owned premise. Professional indemnity insurance (PII). PII is for businesses and professionals that provide advice or services to customers. It protects your business against any claims for damages or legal costs which arise due to act omission or breach of professional duty in the daily course of operations. It actively protects your business if advice or a service provided negatively affects a customer. Employers liability insurance (ELI). ELI protects a business that employs staff from financial losses incurred when a staff member experiences a job-related illness or injury. Workplace injuries can be extremely costly for an employer if they are liable. ELI offers protections against this and it’s particularly relevant for business who have many staff involved in physical work on their behalf, i.e. manufacturing, event running… Product liability insurance (PLI). Product liability insurance protects your business from damage to property or personal injury caused by products your business/company has supplied or sold. Key man insurance (KMI). Key man insurance protects businesses from the loss of a key employee such as a CEO by paying out a large sum on the event of their death or incapacitation. It is effectively life insurance against anything critical happening to a key employee. If your business is entirely reliant on one employee or a small group, this insurance can often help save the business from bankruptcy in a disaster situation. Landlord insurance (LI). Landlord insurance protects business owners who own property from losses sustained as the result of renting that property. If a business owns its office and rents it out to other companies, this type of insurance will protect you from damages caused by a tenant. Trade credit insurance (TCI). Trade credit insurance is insurance that protects private companies from their customers being unable to pay back a debt due to bankruptcy, default or insolvency. It’s most relevant for companies that operate under a B2B model and have a range of key customers who use offered credit facilities. Director’s and officers liability insurance. D&O insurance policies can protect management from personal liability in the event a claim is made against them for wrongdoing. For example; if a director knowingly or unknowingly communicates incorrect financial information that leads an investor to lose money or make a poor decision, resulting in a claim against the director. Business contents insurance. Business contents insurances provides coverage for your equipment, tools and even stock on your business premises (you can also get specialist stock insurance if you carry high volumes of goods), to cover the cost of replacement or repair commonly in the event of fire, flood or theft. Choosing the right business insurance. As with buying any product or service make sure to shop around and compare prices and clauses. With insurance, you will want to read the small print very carefully and clarify the conditions around your insurance policy (to make sure you a policy covers losses or damages thoroughly). Regarding selecting an insurer, look for firms who have an excellent reputation and long record of accomplishment in insuring small businesses. 9. Create a brand and identity for your business. Now that you have protected your business adequately, it is time to create a public facing identity. This is how you present your company to the world including branding, setting up a basic website and creating a business e-mail address. Create a professional brand for your business. Having a professional brand is critical to any business that wants to stand out in today’s competitive environment. That does not mean the branding process needs to be costly or time-consuming, there are just a few key things you should consider for creating a professional brand: Create a logo (Keep it simple and hire a designer on Fiverr, online logo maker, or a cost-effective design agency). Create a colour scheme for your business that will be used across all promotional and company assets (you can use a colour selector to find a palette and it’s also a good idea to look into basic colour psychology before you choose). Come up with a slogan for your company if you think it is useful. You can also create a symbol that can be used as a recognising mark of your company when you do not want to put your full dress logo, such as on a product (it is typically included in your logo). It is important to take your time though and explore a few different branding options before settling on an initial brand. You need to create a website for your business. Whether you are a retail store, a chemicals company or a modelling company having at least a basic website is a requirement for business in the 21st century, customers expect you to have a website and expect to be able to find it easily. Your website should: Include and show your company/business details including address, phone number, name, and logo (if you have a limited company number it is also a legal requirement to list it here). Provide a clear description of what your business is/does. Provide details of your products, services, and Provide a business e-mail or contact form that enables prospective customers/outside parties to reach you easily. You can add many more things to your website, this is just the basic information you need to include. Now, how do you create a website? How to create a website for your business. Creating a website is not nearly as complicated as you might think it is. There are many different types of software, website builders and helpful information that allow you to build a simple website for your business. Easily build your own website. If you do not want to take on this task or are unclear on how to do it, you can always outsource it to a freelancer, but there is a far better and cheaper option available. Website builders have come to the stage where you can build your entire website quite simply through one provider with no prior experience. Companies like Wix, Squarespace, Weebly, Wix, Shopify or BigCommerce offer very simple to use tools so that you can often have a simple website up and running in under an hour. However, if you decided to explore the possibility or even build your own website, we have outlined the main steps you will need to accomplish this with helpful tips. 1. Purchase a domain. A domain name is your public address on the internet, it is the URL that appears at the top of your browser on any website, for example: www.cocacola.com. The first thing you need to do is purchase a domain for your business. Typically this domain would be your business name, if this taken, try different variations. You can buy a domain name from popular domain registers such as GoDaddy or Name Cheap (try to make sure you purchase a .co.uk or .com domain, these are important trust indicators for anyone visiting your website). 2. Purchase website hosting. Web hosting involves renting all or part of a server (online computer) where your website will be stored, think of it as renting virtual land for your office. When looking for a reliable website host, you will want to review a few things before choosing a hosting provider: What’s the reputation of the hosting company? What’s the cost of hosting compared to other providers? What’s the host’s uptime compared to other vendors? (% of time their servers are live.) Do they provide one-click installs of LAMP/LEMP and CPANEL/WHM and WordPress (Read further on for descriptions.) If you are in a hurry, popular and cost-effective web hosting companies include Bluehost, GoDaddy and 1&1. 3. Point your domain name to your server IP address via DNS. The Domain Name System (DNS) is the internet’s mail routing system in a way. When someone types the domain genericmedia.co.uk, your hosting company’s server will respond by telling the computer that genericmedia.co.uk website is stored on a particular server with the IP address of xxx.xxx.xxx. Many hosting providers will automatically generate the correct DNS record, pointing your web address to the server IP address when you install your website, but a number do not. If you need to set this, you will need at an elementary level to add an A record pointing your domain name to your correct server address (you can typically find your DNS panel in your hosting provider’s portal). 4. Point your domain to your web hosting company. Now that you have set up your domain, hosting and correct DNS records it is time to point your domain at your web hosting company. This is done by changing your domain’s nameservers. Start by looking for the nameservers/DNS in the domain company’s portal. Once you have found it, you will want to swap out the current nameservers for the ones your web host has given you and click update (if you do not know what these are, do a Google search on “nameservers” and your web host’s name, they usually pop up!).You now need to wait 5 – 48 hours for the nameserver change to propagate across the internet. 5. Install LAMP & WHM/CPANEL. Depending on your hosting company this may already be set up, if you see anything that says ‘enter cPanel’ or ‘cPanel’, it likely already is and you do not have to do anything! For other hosts, you will need to install a LAMP stack (the underlying technology used by the server) and WHM/CPANEL, the web hosting software that allows you to set up your website. There are many steps by step guides providing information on how to do all this for different hosts across the web. 6. Install WordPress. WordPress is often the go-to choice for flexible content management systems that allow you to build and manage websites with little technical skills. Installing WordPress usually requires a one-click install from cPanel under Softaculous or another auto-installer (if you do not have an auto-installer you will need to download and transfer WordPress via FTP, this gets a bit more technical). Make sure to note down your login details as well! 7. Purchase & install a website theme. Login to WordPress at yourwebsite.co.uk/wp-admin. You should have a new up and running website, now you need a design in the form of a WordPress theme. These themes (designs) give different aesthetics, structures and control options depending on which one you get. You can find a free theme or purchase a theme to suit your needs. There are particularly good paid options built for many types of small businesses including blogs, restaurants, builders, and many more. You can find themes to download via WordPress or go to paid providers like Themeforest. Once you have one, you will need to upload and activate your theme via the appearance-themes panel in WordPress. 8. Add all your information. Now it is time to create pages and add all your business information. Create your pages (Home, about, contact us). Add your logo. Add your product, service, or solution listings/details. Add a menu. Congratulations you have built a basic website, now it’s time to get a professional e-mail address. Bonus step for eCommerce entrepreneurs: Choosing your eCommerce platform. If like many new entrepreneurs your wading into the eCommerce waters, then choosing a platform is potentially the most important facet to get right before you start a site build. There are many eCommerce platforms available out there that promise to provide the best online experience. To keep you guided on what eCommerce platform to choose, it pays off knowing their different categories. Web-based eCommerce platforms: Web-based platforms provide eCommerce software or shopping cart service directly to the end users. Some examples of these platforms include Commerce Server, Drupal, and Joomla. Web-based platforms offer the user a fully-functional online store while others give limited functionality. On-premise eCommerce platform: A lot of businesses prefer to use an on-premise eCommerce platform for their eCommerce needs. These platforms have been designed for small businesses and are highly customizable. They also provide a hosted service that includes full-customization options for customers. Off-premise eCommerce platform: An off-premise eCommerce platform is designed for larger businesses or companies. They also offer the user greater customization and features that come with the hosted services. The main benefit of using off-premise platforms is that they are able to offer the full features and security level offered by the hosted services without the additional cost. The downside of using this platform is that it does not provide any of the same options that the hosted solutions do. Hybrid or multifunctional eCommerce platform: This platform allows you to choose from many different ways to manage your business. The main advantage of using this type of platform is that it helps reduce operational costs and improve the overall operational and business performance. Some of the features of this platform include automatic submission of orders, automatic replenishment of stock, automatic inventory management, and customer management. They also offer customization for custom logos, themes, and colour schemes. As you can see there are many factors to consider when choosing a platform for your eCommerce website. If you want a platform that will help you make better use of your resources and get the maximum return out of your investment, you should opt for an eCommerce hosting provider that has all the features that you need. The right platform will help you increase your profits as well as the profitability of your business. Create an e-mail address for your business. Once you have a website, you are going to need a professional e-mail address where prospective customers and external parties can reach you, this means that instead of using: [email protected]/outlook.co.uk or [email protected] you will be using [email protected] or [email protected] Having a business branded e-mail address is critical to engendering trust and is a general standard for most businesses in the UK. Fist set up an email address using G Suite or another third party email service. Then you’ll need to make sure your email is routed correctly which is done by updating your MX records. To change your MX records you will need to look for your hosting company’s DNS panel. Once your MX records are updated any email received by your server for your domain will be sent to Gmail (or the email service provider you’ve chosen) i.e. any mail received by genericmedia.com would be forwarded to your email. This is easier to do than it sounds! Initially, unless you have more team members, you will want one generic email address: [email protected], [email protected] and one personal address such as [email protected] or [email protected] 10. Buying the business essentials. Getting the basic essential setup for any new business is not glamorous, but it is very necessary. Whether that is sorting the internet, phone, utilities or purchasing technology among many other things, here’s a quick guide to getting the essentials right. Setting up business broadband. Fast and reliable internet is a necessity. Whether you need to sell online or communicate with customers, the internet is a vital component for most new businesses. Here are some guidelines for choosing a secure, reliable and fast internet provider and package: Make sure your connection will have a minimum of 20mbs download speed and 6mbs upload speed (Broadband or Fibreoptic). Check reviews online of each company and the different tiers/types of internet packages they offer. Make sure the contract length is no longer than 18 months (you usually negotiate heavily when your contract comes up for renewal, lowering the cost). Verify that the company has a responsive customer service team rather than an automated machine or poor customer service. This can be a nightmare when internet problems occur and has a been a big problem over the last year, particularly in the UK. If you live or work in an area where broadband or fibre is weak regarding internet connectively or it doesn’t connect at all, consider a 4G internet contract and an antenna as an alternative solution to get fast and stable internet. Most of the above is quite logical, but it is easy to miss things in the hubbub of starting a new business. Getting a business phone line. Having a landline number for your business is still a necessity for having a legitimate business image from the start and for having a fix and reliable number where customers can reach you on. If you own or rent a private office, it is easy to set up a business line with your phone package. However, if you do not, you can still purchase a business landline in London and many other cities that will route to your mobile phone, allowing you to take calls via that number and make calls online using that number. Finding office space. Apart from working from home, there a few different options for entrepreneurs looking for space to start and run their businesses. Rent a co-working space. Co-working spaces allow you to flexibly rent office space or an individual desk at a relatively low cost compared to traditional serviced or private office options. They also offer an environment designed for start-ups with a great community of like-minded entrepreneurs. Apply for a business accelerator. Accelerator programs provide seed investment, mentorship and office space for a limited time to start-ups and other small companies. If you are a technology business there are many accelerators where you could apply for in many major cities in the UK. Rent a business incubator office. Incubators are effectively low-cost office space that offer some level of community and network. Non-for-profit companies, charities or universities typically run them. Rent from another local business. Many large to medium sized businesses that find they have excess space are often open if approached by a smaller company about renting unused space in their premises. It is a great source of extra income for the landlord business and often a flexible renting agreement for the tenant business. Rent a serviced office. If you are starting with a large team and have investment ea serviced office is probably the best option for you. A serviced office will not be cheap but you can usually choose the layout that best suits your team on a particular floor or area of the building. Selecting business stationary and signage. It may be hard to believe but for limited companies there are specific laws you must obey regarding the details you include on signage, stationery and promotional material. Choosing a sign for your business. It is a matter of British law that you must display a sign showing your company name and your registered business address as well as any other address where your business operates in your business premise (if your home address is where your business is based you do not need to display a sign). Office supply and stationary options. When purchasing official company stationary or producing promotional materials such as letters, forms or your website, you must display your company name, company number, registered address, and the country your business is registered in (Scotland, Wales, England, or Northern Ireland). If you also decide to list a director’s name on materials, you must include all the directors’ names if there are more than one. 11. Find funding for your new business. Most businesses require some source of funding to start. This section covers the primary sources of financing available to small businesses with the relative advantages and disadvantages. Your savings. Some of the world’s most successful companies have been initially self-funded. The upside of this option is you do not lose any control by involving any outside party. The downside is that depending on the business you are starting, you may need more capital than you have or it may run out very quickly. Friends & family. Many entrepreneurs receive their initial funding from friends and relatives in the form of an investment or loan. This is because in many cases you will not have to pay this money back if something goes wrong or you can agree on preferable terms when dealing with friends and family, usually both! The upside is that your family or friends are unlikely to try and bankrupt your business to retrieve their money if you cannot pay them back within the terms set. The downside is you can put relationships in jeopardy if things do not go to plan and you cannot pay the money back or if expectations are poorly managed. Business grants. Business grants are free funding (money) awarded to qualifying businesses. A significant amount of public and private grants are available for new businesses; typically they are designed to support businesses starting up in impoverished areas, to boost the economy or to promote technological innovation and research. The best place to start looking for small business grants is your local Council website. They typically will have all the details of local grants available and of some national ones as well. Grants tend to range from £1,000 up to £5,000,000 in size, the amount depends on the grant (it is also common for payment to be made in stages based on achieving certain conditions). The plus side of grants is it’s free money with the downside being that applying for grant funding is often a complicated and time-consuming process, and the probability of obtaining one is not very high. Still, many businesses in the UK receive grant funding each year, it is still worth a shot! Business competitions. Business competitions offer the chance to win free funding for your business, typically between £500 and £50,000. Large corporates, universities, or local councils usually run them to gain exposure, support the local economy or as a PR and marketing stunt. Competitions are often underapplied for and applying is usually far less time-consuming than applying for other funding sources like grant funding. The downside is you might not win and lose a lot of time and energy in the process, depending on the requirements and conditions of the competition. Angel investors. An angel investor or business angel is a wealthy individual (commonly a former entrepreneur) who is willing to provide money for your business in exchange of a percentage shareholding in your business. A business angel is usually a good option for businesses who are a little further along than just starting out, as these investors typically want to see some growth/traction in your business before investing. However, some entrepreneurs do raise business angel finance initially ranging from £30,000 to £150,000 (typically under the Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme or EIS). The downside of this option is you’re losing some control at an early stage. The upside is that it’s a much quicker way to raise money than through VC or grant funding. Angel funding usually has few requirements and angel investors at this stage are primarily investing in people much more than they are in the business! Venture capital. Venture capitalists are professional investors who invest significant sums of money into many companies with the aim of making a return on their overall portfolio. At this early stage, venture capital unfortunately is only applicable to highly technological companies that operate in fields such as life science and biotech. These types of companies require huge initial investments from the start and can justify this funding by the promise of massive innovations and breakthroughs in technology and science that could yield considerable returns. The relative downside of venture capital is that it is hard to raise and, as professional investors, they will actively take ownership and control of part of your business. The upside is that you can raise a considerable amount of money very quickly (if your business already has much traction, venture capital could also apply to you). Crowdfunding. Crowdfunding is a relatively new form of investment, it allows you to raise small amounts of funding from many people. This can be done by selling equity or offering a reward or product in a presale crowdfunding campaign. Crowdfunding campaigns typically require an enormous level of marketing to be successful in most cases. The upside is that a campaign gives you the chance to test if people are receptive to your business and if you crowdfund goes well, in some cases, you can raise your funds in 48hrs (of course, after having prepared for months). Crowdfunding platforms like Seedrs and Crowdcube offer equity solutions, and Kickstart and Indiegogo are the go-to choices for pre-ale/rewards-based crowdfunding campaigns. Business Loans. A simple business loan means you borrow an amount of money from a bank, person or lender and agree to pay it back over time, such as in a timeline with interest. Although loans offer a flexible way for businesses to raise capital, in most start-up situations they are not an ideal form of funding as you’re immediately taking on a risk where if you cannot pay back the loan you could lose your business and any personal wealth you have (depending on the liability). Given that banks do not lend as much as they used to to new businesses, the start-up loans scheme detailed below is likely the best option for anyone starting up if you want to raise finance this way. Getting a Start Up loan. The Start Up Loans Scheme was launched in 2012 by the British government. It made available £150+ million pounds of public money to entrepreneurs in the form of a favourable, low-interest loan up to the amount of £25,000. Eligibility and facilitation of a start-up loan are carried out by delivery partners who assess each business plan or business case. The loan is typically payment free for the initial year where you only pay nominal interest payments each month, with the bulk repayment starting on the second year and being paid back over as much as five years (be aware that although the loan terms are very favourable the actual debt obligation lies on you). Over the last few years, many businesses have been successfully launched by entrepreneurs who took startup loans. It can be a good funding option depending on your situation. Business credit cards. You occasionally do hear stories about entrepreneurs maxing out business credit cards to fund their new business that quickly becomes successful. What you do not hear a lot is about most entrepreneurs who max out their credit cards and go bankrupt. A business credit card is one of the worse forms of finance to use for starting a business. The interest rates, penalties, and complexity of this kind of short-term finance only make it useful to trading businesses which are profitable and need a flexible credit facility. Business overdrafts. A business overdraft is a flexible lending/credit facility you will agree with the bank or another financial institution. An overdraft allows you to borrow a set amount of money on an ongoing basis or until the bank withdraws the facility. You pay an agreed monthly rate of interest on top of anything you borrow. It is not a good form of finance for starting a business and should only really be used by trading profitable companies. It is specially useful for businesses who have seasonal businesses or cashflow issues due to longer client payment terms or other reasons. 12. Creating a sales and marketing strategy. Sales and marketing are the beating heart of any new business, for a business to be successful it needs to be innovative at marketing and effective at selling. When it comes to starting a business, this means thinking about preparing your product or service for sale, how you plan to go to the market and what channels and systems will be employed to reach and close customers. Getting a product or service ready for sale. Once you have a product or service ready to be sold, you need to start packaging it for the market, this means considering differentiation, positioning and pricing. Positioning your offering. Positioning is all about identifying your product’s/service’s key attributes and how you are going to communicate them to the customer. It is about defining who you are and what you are offering in a way that resonates with your prospective customer. Understanding your USP (Unique selling point). Differentiating your offering from your competitors is all about identifying and showing your USPs (Unique Selling Points). This means thinking about where you offer superior functionality and value over your competitors and how you can communicate this through your marketing message. Setting price at the right level. Pricing a product or service is tricky, it is often unclear for new entries into a market what pricing strategies you should implement, so here are few ways that will help you to calculate a fair price: Work out your costs per unit. Work out the profit margin you will be making per unit/per hour. Gather pricing information on your competitors’ products or services. Find out what the customer is willing to pay. This will require market Once you’ve done your research and pricing analysis, it comes down to what you think the market will bear combined with what you want to make per unit or per hour for any product or service respectively. Choosing a route to market. Once you are ready to go to market, you need to figure how you will get there. This means choosing the best route to market; this could be online, through fixed retail, wholesale, even selling through a third party or a mix. Selling online. Selling online could be in the form of an online shop or a subscription software platform (SAAS). The internet offers small businesses complete control over their route to market. Many new businesses will choose to sell directly to their customers through the web as it provides fantastically low overheads with little required investment compared to starting a physical business location. Selling via a retail shop. A retail store is a public place where customers can go and purchase from your business directly. Retail stores give you a guaranteed audience of passing customers depending on the site. This type of sales route is perfect for high-volume product-based businesses, but it also works for services, i.e. travel agents, insurers… Selling wholesale. Wholesaling offers businesses the chance to sell their products in bulk to suppliers or retailers who will then go and sell directly to the public through their own sales channels. The profit margin from this model is usually smaller given that there’s another party involved, but it does offer the potential for selling substantial orders and generating significant revenue. Selling through an agent or affiliate. Hiring an agent or affiliate on your behalf means they will find and connect you with potential customers, thus doing most of the marketing and some of the sales work for you. You will however usually have to pay a hefty commission to the agent when a customer they refer converts or a fixed fee on a per lead basis. Selecting marketing channels. Once you have chosen a route to market, selecting the correct marketing channels to generate interest and customers is critical. There are many different channels and you have to find the most cost-effective and high-return channels for your business. It can take some time and testing. Email marketing. Email remains the core way people and businesses communicate online. Thus, email marketing (reaching potential customers via email) is one of the primary marketing channels for generating customers and sales. This type of marketing could be done through newsletters or cold sales emails, and it is one of the online marketing channels available with the highest return on investment. Online advertising. Pay per click (PPC) advertising is one of the most popular forms of online marketing. It typically involves using paid display and search advertising via Google and other networks to reach potential buyers and drive them to your website or landing page. If PPC campaigns are well targeted and managed, it can be a highly efficient and reliable method of generating business. It is important to note that social media and Facebook advertising also now accounts for a huge amount of marketing budgets for many businesses. Social media marketing. Social media is one of the newest and best ways to reach potential customers. Whether it is Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, LinkedIn or others, there is a range of social media platforms that are useful for effectively targeting and reaching your ideal customers. It is time-consuming to build and maintain an account, but in the long term it has proven to generate a significant return on investment for many brands. Content creation. Written content can be an excellent way to reach customers via online search. If you have access to a good writer and your business is primarily online, one of the best and cost-effective ways to reach your customers is through organic search. Out of all forms of online promotion, natural search traffic is the highest converting regarding sales, it is particularly useful for promoting your website to potential customers. Posting a letter. An old-fashioned method, direct mail marketing is still used by many companies today to inform potential customers about their offering and drive sales. It is particularly useful for service-based companies who have complex offerings that need to be described well, i.e. pensions, life insurance… Telesales. In the UK you may be asking yourself ‘how can telesales even be a marketing channel anymore? No one has a positive experience’. However, you might be wrong, many businesses still rely heavily on telesales for large swathes of their marketing and sales budgets, and the return is still substantial, particularly in the telecoms industry. Build a sales process. Creating an effective sales process is about taking potential customers generated by your marketing efforts and turning them into paying customers. With sales and marketing inextricably linked, it is important that your sales process will highly convert the leads that your marketing delivers, otherwise marketing is a waste of resources. This section covers the assets you will need, the pipeline you will need to set up and how to create a great customer service team. Building sales assets. Sales assets are the documentation and document-based promotional material used in the selling process, for example, this could mean leaflets, brochures, PDFs, pitch decks and much more. These materials are critical to a salesperson as customers will often ask for a presentation or written document during the sales process. These assets demonstrate key features and advantages of any product or service. It is imperative to have these assets ready, looking professional and well-structured for your sales team to use. Building a sales pipeline. A sales pipeline is at the core of any sales process, it is a system that continuously tracks the stage of the customer. This pipeline allows sales teams and managers to see where prospective customers are regarding the sale and to look for efficiency gains and problems that need correcting in the sales process. A typical sales pipeline is just a set of stages going from A to Z, A being the first contact, Z being when the sale closed (there can be further steps if you include cross-selling or up-selling as part of the same process). To manage this pipeline businesses will typically use a software-based CRM (customer relationship management) system. It is crucial to the sales process to have a structured pipeline set out so you can ensure every potential sale is tracked and there is maximum conversion. Create a customer service team. One of the most overlooked areas of sales is customer service, with many organisations seeing sales and customer service are separate functions. This leads to a lack of focus on proper customer service will dramatically increases the amount of customers lost and thus the long term profitabilltiy of any sale. This means that from the start it is critical to building a strong customer service framework and team to minimise the loss of any clients and maximise the longevity of clients or repeat purchases. This all contributes to the sales bottom line. 13. Building a team for your new business. Most new businesses will start with a small team or begin to grow one very quickly. Thus, businesses and entrepreneurs need to learn early on how to effectively recruit and manage their team, while developing a great company culture and themselves as leaders. This section is here to guide you through the initial setup of what will become your business’ human resources department, covering recruitment, management, company culture and self-management. Brilliant recruitment practices are linked to business success. Don’t hire anyone until you absolutely need to. The work and responsibility that come with employing another person is tremendous. When you do get to a stage when you need to recruit, it is important to make sure you take the right approach to finding and employing the best person or people for the role and for your business. Attracting great employees. The start of a recruitment process is about finding and getting the best potential candidates to apply for the position you have open. Companies who want to attract great candidates should: Offer a competitive remuneration package (salary, benefits, share options). Use their company’s vision to inspire a candidate to want to be part of the enterprise. Show career progression possibilities for the candidate. Demonstrate a progressive, diverse and exciting work culture to the candidate. Beyond the basics of attracting great employees, it is often about highlighting how your offer is better than other organisations’ offerings, i.e. if you cannot compete on salary, compete on offering responsibility and progression. Create a strong recruitment process. Once you have attracted a good pool of potential candidates having a strong recruitment process is key to making sure you end up hiring the best candidate. At a minimum, this means having a process with: A clear timeline and stages for candidates. Unambiguous criterion for what you are looking for and how you will be assessing candidates. At least 3 interviews (ideally with different members of your team). A step for checking previous work references and thoroughly vetting candidate claims. A poor recruitment process may leave you with the worst candidate. A strong recruitment process will enable you to work down to the best candidate efficiently. Companies who choose to invest time and resources into the recruitment process will always outperform those who do not! In-house recruitment vs outsourcing. Outsourcing recruitment to an agency and in-house recruitment both have advantages. When it comes to choosing there is no easy answer, the best method depends on your business situation. However, to help here are some the key advantages/disadvantages of each. Outsourcing recruitment A professional agency will find candidates that exactly fit your profile. It eliminates the need for an extensive in-house recruitment team. It can be very expensive (the agency will usually take a fee between 15% and 25% of the candidate’s total first year annual earnings). In-house recruitment It enables you to control and optimise all aspects of the recruitment It’s usually cheaper than hiring an outside agency. It will require the use of an internal team and resources. When it comes to choosing, smaller companies who are profitable will often choose to initially outsource the first steps of the process to attract candidates and then do in-house recruitment and asses the candidates themselves. Creating a management ethos and system. Excellent management is essential for the success of any business. From the very beginning your management team or even just you as an entrepreneur need to create a clear management structure, a positive work environment, and build a company culture that will support the business and its people as you grow. Set management structures. Getting a management structure in place early on is critical to any small business that hopes to grow. This ensures that business’ policies and objectives initiated at the top will be carried out throughout the structure and that there will be accountability for their progress. In practice, this means having clear structures, roles, objectives, roadmaps and responsibilities, tracking employee performance, having team building exercises and feedback sessions, among other areas. Create a positive work environment. Having a productive workforce is inextricably linked to creating a positive and supportive work environment. This means that from day one, managers and CEOs should make creating and maintaining a positive work environment a core company objective. This could mean holding office social events, providing large desk spaces, having clear HR policies and career progression, offering flexible holidays or any other initiatives that employees would value. Build a great company culture. People are the primary resource of any business. Your founding team may work hard, be passionate and close-knit but how do you make sure that culture of excellence and responsibility scales with your business? Very simply, by clearly outlining and documenting your company culture and making sure it is one of the main objectives of your business. Company culture should be considered in the hiring process and each new employee should be introduced to it. It should not be something unspoken but something at the core of the business. Making sure you are compliant with employment law and taxes. Building a great team can be complicated and not just regarding recruitment and management, but also regarding understanding and adhering to your tax and legal responsibilities when hiring. You need to be aware of the legal, tax and pension responsibilities that come with employing people. Knowing employment taxes. When hiring anyone in the UK, you will need to pay several monthly employment taxes on their behalf including national insurance contributions for each employee. These taxes are typically paid via PAYE; this system is the primary mean of collecting employment taxes from UK companies by the government (speak to your accountant if you need to register for PAYE). Understanding employment law. Employment law in the UK is strict and well set up to protect both businesses and employees; there are several key areas all employers should be aware of: You must pay each employee at least the minimum wage. After two years of continuous service, employees are entitled to a redundancy package if they are forced by your organisation to leave their job without cause,e. workplace closure or need to reduce workforce. Females employees are entitled to 52 weeks of maternity leave and men up to 2 weeks if they have worked longer than 26 weeks for the business. The maximum number of hours anyone can work for an employer in a week is 48 hours, unless they agree to work further and sign a release. Employees are entitled to at least 28 days paid holiday a year (this is prorated for part-timers). You cannot unfairly discriminate by race, gender, disability, or any other factor regarding recruitment, pay, promotion, access to training, or termination. Unfair dismissal applies after two years of continuous employment and companies can be fined by having to provide compensation to employees wrongly terminated. It is important to be aware of employment law and the aspects that affect you as an employer. Providing a pension for employees. As of 2018 the Pensions Regulator has made pensions mandatory for all employees who work in the UK, are aged 22 years or over, and earn at least £10,000 a year. This means that as a small business and employer, you are legally required to provide a pension scheme for all staff that meet the above requirements. Note that to contribute to this payment scheme you can choose a private business pension provider. Managing yourself. As an entrepreneur, one of the difficult things you will often face is managing stress, fatigue, and pressure while balancing work and life. This is common as there is an enormous level of responsibility upon you as an entrepreneur and leader. In this section, we cover how you can mitigate this by creating a support network, engaging in the community and finding mentors to guide you through the perils of entrepreneurship. Build a support network. Whether it is friends, family or colleagues, having a strong support network around you is critical. This system will help to support you and keep you going through the ups and downs of the entrepreneurial path, make sure not to neglect this network! Meet the start-up community. Start-up communities and networks in the UK and across the world are prolific and well established. Engaging and becoming part of these communities in your local area is an excellent way to meet other entrepreneurs, share stories and exchange ideas and advice. Find a mentor. Finding an industry relevant mentor is one of the best things you can do when starting any business. If your mentor is knowledgeable in your sector, he or she will be able to provide advice and guidance. It is true what they say, great entrepreneurs learn from other people’s mistakes. 14. Starting a business in your spare time. If like many reading this article you have a full-time job and can’t afford to quit your job to start straight away, have no fear. In this section, you can learn how to start a business and make it successful in your spare time without having to leave your job. One way of reducing the risk of starting up your own business is to hold onto your day job in the early days and work on your business in your spare time at evenings and weekends. It’s an appealing idea because if your business venture fails then you still have your job, and if it succeeds then making the transition to being your own boss will be a lot less risky. In fact, there are now so many people running businesses from home in their spare time at evenings and weekends that there is even a name for them – the 5 to 9 ers. Perfect businesses to start in your spare time. An internet-based business which does not require your constant physical presence for it to function A business that can outsource many of its functions. Husband and wife Brent and Marilena Shaw run their online luggage business Swiss luggage.com in their spare time while both do full-time day jobs. They outsource the packing and posting of orders to a fulfilment company, which takes delivery of their stock and stores it in its warehouse. During the day a call centre handles their customer enquiries. One that allows you to communicate with customers by email rather than by phone, so you are not limited to conventional office hours Don’t start a business that will be in competition with the company you work for, and don’t start one that uses information or data provided by your employer, as you will quickly run into legal issues. Hide your entrepreneurial intentions. Downplay your entrepreneurial intentions in front of your boss. No matter how well you get on, no-one likes to feel that their employee’s attention and focus is elsewhere. Provide information solely on a ‘need to know’ basis and never bring up your business venture in conversation unless you are specifically asked about it. Only work on your business in your spare time. Don’t give your boss any reason to clamp down on your business venture. Be scrupulous about doing your day job competently. Only work on your business in your own time and never use your employer’s resources for your business – don’t take stationery, don’t use the office phone for your business phone calls. Social life on hold. Put your social life on hold, and try to get the support and understanding of your family – you can’t do a full-time job and start a business AND see as much of friends and family as you used to. Maximise the number of hours. Make the most of every hour you have available to you – When Chris Orrell was starting up his company Hotelstayuk.com offering cheap hotel rooms to employees of large firms, he would go down to the car park every lunch hour to make calls to potential clients on his mobile phone. His business now has a turnover of millions. Work on your business every hour. Don’t underestimate how much time you still have available – there are 168 hours in the week, so even allowing for a 40 hour a week full-time job and eight hours sleep a night, that still gives you a potential 88 hours left in which to work on your business. Make sure to get some rest. But don’t sacrifice sleep. Make sure you get enough sleep every night as over tiredness will make you feel ill, run-down, grumpy, short-tempered and lead to poor judgement and bad decisions. Advice from owners of successful spare time entrepreneurs. Janan Leo, is a typical 5-9er. During the day she works as a product development manager for Virgin Trains. As soon as she is finished there, she switches to running Cocorose, which makes folding shoes for women to wear while commuting. She started the company, which she runs from the spare room of her home in north London, in 2008 with £3,000 of savings. She works every evening from 5 pm until at least 11 pm and every weekend and now sells hundreds of pairs of shoes a month in boutiques and through her website. She may never see her boyfriend and barely get any sleep but for Leo, starting a business this way and running it at home has one huge advantage – it has minimised the financial risk. She says: ‘I lie in bed at midnight watching the orders come through on my BlackBerry.’ Steve Emecz, runs his own book company, MX Publishing, in his spare time from home while holding down a demanding full-time job as the business development director for Venda.com, an e-commerce support company. Steve, whose business publishes around 50 titles, including books on Sherlock Holmes and neurolinguistics, says: ‘I process urgent orders in my lunch break and regular ones in the evening. I have an outsourced warehouse that picks the books and ships them — it is all technology-driven and web-based. The authors all have day jobs themselves and so want to talk to me in the evening anyway, and the distributors do everything online. I have my e-mails sent directly to my BlackBerry, and I use Skype a lot.’ 15. A little bit of entrepreneurial inspiration. If at this stage you’re feeling a little overloaded you should be but don’t worry every one of the worlds most successful businesses started from the smallest of to-do lists. to remind you that’s its entirely possible to do here are 10 case studies of extremely successful businesses that came from very humble beginnings. Johnny Cupcakes This business started by selling t-shirts, sweaters, shorts and undergarments in a bakery-themed retail shop. The initial investment was $6,700. The firm is now worth $3.8 Million. The first store opened in 2005 and the founder, Johnny Earle, soon found himself on the list of ‘Best Entrepreneurs 25 and Under’ in 2008. Adventure Life Adventure Life offers group tours and vacation packages for its customers. In 2008, it had revenue of $11 Million; the start-up costs, however, were very low. These included $3,000 for brochures, $11,500 for ads in 1999 and £33,500 in 2000. Paragon Space Development Paragon Space, which is now worth £8 million in 2008, started with an initial investment which includes $30,000 for computers and lab equipment, £600 per month for office and lab premises, and $20,000 for yearly travel. Chobani Yogurt The #1 selling yoghurt in the United States was founded in 2005 by Hamdi Ulukaya. However, his ex-wife claims that he stole the recipe and paid $40,000 for it. The founder used a loan of under $1 million to buttress the initial start-up costs. The company is now worth $1.1 billion. Sweet Leaf Tea With its current value of $12 Million, Sweet Leaf Tea was founded in 1998 with a $100,000 initial investment. The company broke even in its third year and reported revenue of £300,000. Tokyo Joe’s Earning revenue of $22 Million per year, Tokyo Joe’s was started off in 1996 with an initial cost of $330,000. Tokyo Joe’s is famous for consistently bringing nutritious and delicious food to customers’ tables. Tarte Cosmetics Tarte Cosmetics offers a wide variety of make-up products including brushes and body products. It was established in 1999 by Maureen Kelly in New York. The start-up cost was $18,000 and now the company grosses $12 million (2008 figures). Edible Arrangements This company changed the way people send gifts. They specialise in fresh fruit arrangements and offer a wide variety of speciality fruit gift items and gift boxes. Tariq Farid founded this company in 1999 with an initial investment of $100,000 and the company is now worth $19.4 million. Facebook Now worth over $200 Billion, Mark Zuckerberg started the world’s biggest social network when he was still in university. According to various reports, the idea was allegedly stolen from twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss who eventually sued Mark. ZARA We have saved the best for last: ZARA. It was founded in 1975 by Amancio Ortega. The big retail giant opened up several stores across the globe. The founder’s estimated worth is reported to be $65 billion. Now that you have made it to the end, hopefully, you’re well on your way to starting and beginning to build a successful business, good luck! Related topics. Tags: Business ideasBusiness planCompany formationNaming a business Related Posts. Start a business 15 startup ideas that can change your life . Are you happy and satisfied with your work? Your commute is short, the salary is quite big, and colleagues are ... Published by Editorial team 27th July 2021 Start a business Top 100 ways you can make money online . Whether you want to generate a passive income, earn some fast cash or launch a multi million-pound (or dollar) business ... Published by Thea Graves 6th May 2021 Start a business Writing an internal business plan . While all of the reasons for writing a business plan are usually described as external, such as landing investors or ... Published by Thomas Evans 27th July 2021 About. Advertise with us Privacy policy Terms of use Contact us Topics. Finance Insurance Technology Marketing Human resources Legal eCommerce Leadership Procurement Luxury Start a business Advertise with us Contact us Cookie list Home Alpha Join the Entrepreneur Handbook community Notifications error Privacy & cookie policy Terms and conditions of use Thanks for subscribing! Copyright © 2013 - 2022 Entrepreneur Handbook Ltd. All rights reserved. Registered offices at 20-22 Wenlock Road, London, N1 7GU, United Kingdom. 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Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 450
  • 16
  • company
  • 155
  • 16
  • start
  • 80
  • 16
  • customer
  • 60
  • 16
  • time
  • 50
  • 16
  • idea
  • 48
  • 16
  • product
  • 47
  • 16
  • sale
  • 45
  • 16
  • work
  • 45
  • 16
  • plan
  • 43
  • 16
  • service
  • 43
  • 16
  • starting
  • 42
  • 16
  • website
  • 40
  • 16
  • address
  • 39
  • 16
  • limited
  • 39
  • 16
  • process
  • 37
  • 16
  • insurance
  • 36
  • 16
  • market
  • 36
  • 16
  • person
  • 34
  • 16
  • cost
  • 33
  • 16
  • create
  • 33
  • 16
  • entrepreneur
  • 33
  • 16
  • online
  • 32
  • 16
  • marketing
  • 32
  • 16
  • structure
  • 30
  • 16
  • tax
  • 29
  • 16
  • account
  • 29
  • 16
  • year
  • 28
  • 16
  • team
  • 27
  • 16
  • pay
  • 27
  • 16
  • business plan
  • 25
  • 16
  • limited company
  • 24
  • 16
  • starting business
  • 23
  • 16
  • business idea
  • 22
  • 16
  • small business
  • 21
  • 16
  • product service
  • 18
  • 16
  • start business
  • 17
  • 16
  • sole trader
  • 15
  • 16
  • protect business
  • 12
  • 16
  • ecommerce platform
  • 11
  • 16
  • mail address
  • 10
  • 16
  • business start
  • 10
  • 16
  • mail
  • 10
  • 16
  • hosting company
  • 9
  • 16
  • potential customer
  • 9
  • 16
  • spare time
  • 9
  • 16
  • house recruitment
  • 8
  • 16
  • company culture
  • 8
  • 16
  • limited liability
  • 8
  • 16
  • customer service
  • 8
  • 16
  • limited liability partnership
  • 7
  • 16
  • initial investment
  • 7
  • 16
  • structure business
  • 7
  • 16
  • marketing sale
  • 7
  • 16
  • successful business
  • 7
  • 16
  • business business
  • 7
  • 16
  • business model
  • 7
  • 16
  • liability partnership
  • 7
  • 16
  • company house
  • 7
  • 16
  • corporation tax
  • 7
  • 16
  • sale process
  • 7
  • 16
  • tokyo joe
  • 6
  • 16
  • person business
  • 6
  • 16
  • premise ecommerce
  • 6
  • 16
  • loan
  • 6
  • 16
  • business including
  • 6
  • 16
  • full time
  • 6
  • 16
  • world
  • 6
  • 16
  • venture capital
  • 6
  • 16
  • great business
  • 6
  • 16
  • time consuming
  • 6
  • 16
  • work business
  • 6
  • 16
  • register company
  • 6
  • 16
  • intellectual property
  • 6
  • 16
  • bank account
  • 6
  • 16
  • recruitment process
  • 6
  • 16
  • full time job
  • 5
  • 16
  • million
  • 5
  • 16
  • hosting provider
  • 5
  • 16
  • business planning
  • 5
  • 16
  • legal structure
  • 5
  • 16
  • time job
  • 5
  • 16
  • type business
  • 5
  • 16
  • route market
  • 5
  • 16
  • cost effective
  • 5
  • 16
  • general partner
  • 5
  • 16
  • credit card
  • 5
  • 16
  • company director
  • 5
  • 16
  • business address
  • 5
  • 16
  • financial transaction
  • 5
  • 16
  • liability insurance
  • 5
  • 16
  • insurance protect
  • 5
  • 16
  • web hosting
  • 5
  • 16
  • marketing channel
  • 5
  • 16
  • great business idea
  • 4
  • 16
  • premise ecommerce platform
  • 4
  • 16
  • accounting tax
  • 4
  • 16
  • protecting business
  • 4
  • 16
  • website business
  • 4
  • 16
  • prospective customer
  • 4
  • 16
  • business grant
  • 4
  • 16
  • business angel
  • 4
  • 16
  • bank business
  • 4
  • 16
  • based business
  • 4
  • 16
  • professional
  • 4
  • 16
  • human resource
  • 4
  • 16
  • external party
  • 4
  • 16
  • business structure
  • 4
  • 16
  • amount money
  • 4
  • 16
  • limited partner
  • 4
  • 16
  • company registered
  • 4
  • 16
  • home address
  • 4
  • 16
  • address business
  • 4
  • 16
  • annual account
  • 4
  • 16
  • business rate
  • 4
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  • business starting
  • 4
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  • business insurance
  • 4
  • 16
  • insurance business
  • 4
  • 16
  • pay back
  • 4
  • 16
  • business typically
  • 4
  • 16
  • web based
  • 4
  • 16
  • office space
  • 4
  • 16
  • friend family
  • 4
  • 16
  • grant funding
  • 4
  • 16
  • business venture
  • 4
  • 16
  • social media
  • 4
  • 16
  • selling
  • 4
  • 16
  • work environment
  • 4
  • 16
  • employment law
  • 4
  • 16
  • day job
  • 4
  • 16
  • coming business idea
  • 3
  • 16
  • legal structure business
  • 3
  • 16
  • product service solution
  • 3
  • 16
  • limited company limited
  • 3
  • 16
  • private limited company
  • 3
  • 16
  • public limited company
  • 3
  • 16
  • registered business address
  • 3
  • 16
  • register sole trader
  • 3
  • 16
  • insurance protect business
  • 3
  • 16
  • web hosting company
  • 3
  • 16
  • server ip address
  • 3
  • 16
  • customer service team
  • 3
  • 16
  • business credit card
  • 3
  • 16
  • strong recruitment process
  • 3
  • 16
  • positive work environment
  • 3
  • 16
  • business spare time
  • 3
  • 16
  • start cost
  • 3
  • 16
  • business spare
  • 3
  • 16
  • joe
  • 3
  • 16
  • policy term
  • 3
  • 16
  • entrepreneur handbook
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
TitleGrow your business | Business West
Urlhttps://www.businesswest.co.uk/grow
DescriptionTake your business to the next level with the right skills, investment and finance
Date
Organic Position16
H1Grow your business
H2Finance Hub
People and skills
Business grants
One-to-one support
Business premises and workspace
Market Research Services
Digital support for family run businesses
H3
H2WithAnchorsFinance Hub
People and skills
Business grants
One-to-one support
Business premises and workspace
Market Research Services
Digital support for family run businesses
BodyGrow your business Start your journey to growth and take your business to the next level with our expert range of support and advice.Whether you're an SME looking to grow your business with a coaching grant, you're in need of finance and investment, or you're looking to up-skill your workforce, we have a programme of support that can be tailored to your needs. Our expert team will work with you to take your business to the next level. Finance Hub Finance Hub Finance Hub. Our Finance Hub will help you to explore, understand and access finance solutions that are right for your business. Find out more /finance-hub People and skills People and skills People and skills. Whether you’re looking to take on an apprentice, up-skill your existing staff or attract new staff, our Skills team can help. Find out more /grow/skills Business grants Business grants Business grants. The financial assistance you need to develop your leadership skills, expand your management knowledge or advance your business strategy. Find out more /business-grants One-to-one support One-to-one support One-to-one support. If you're running a business and ready to enter the next stage of business growth, we can help. Find out more /one-one-support Business premises and workspace Business premises and workspace Business premises and workspace. Prestigous office space, virtual office services and corporate event hire solutions at a competitive price. Find out more /grow/business-premises-and-workspace Market Research Services Market Research Services Market Research Services. Grow your business in the UK or overseas with our market research and selection services.  Find out more grow/market-research-service Digital support for family run businesses Digital support for family run businesses Digital support for family run businesses. Gain support to boost productivity by encouraging the adoption of new technologies and processes.   Find out more https://www.businesswest.co.uk/digital-support-family-run-businesses Lifecycle: InnovateCRM Tag: GrowthPalette: Grow your business
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 21
  • 17
  • support
  • 19
  • 17
  • one
  • 9
  • 17
  • skill
  • 9
  • 17
  • find
  • 9
  • 17
  • finance
  • 7
  • 17
  • service
  • 6
  • 17
  • finance hub
  • 5
  • 17
  • youre
  • 5
  • 17
  • premis
  • 5
  • 17
  • workspace
  • 5
  • 17
  • grant
  • 5
  • 17
  • hub
  • 5
  • 17
  • research
  • 5
  • 17
  • support one
  • 4
  • 17
  • support family run
  • 4
  • 17
  • family run business
  • 4
  • 17
  • premis workspace
  • 4
  • 17
  • grow business
  • 4
  • 17
  • business grant
  • 4
  • 17
  • market research
  • 4
  • 17
  • research service
  • 4
  • 17
  • support family
  • 4
  • 17
  • family run
  • 4
  • 17
  • run business
  • 4
  • 17
  • grow
  • 4
  • 17
  • market
  • 4
  • 17
  • family
  • 4
  • 17
  • run
  • 4
  • 17
  • finance hub finance
  • 3
  • 17
  • hub finance hub
  • 3
  • 17
  • business premis workspace
  • 3
  • 17
  • market research service
  • 3
  • 17
  • digital support family
  • 3
  • 17
  • hub finance
  • 3
  • 17
  • person skill
  • 3
  • 17
  • business premis
  • 3
  • 17
  • digital support
  • 3
  • 17
  • person
  • 3
  • 17
  • digital
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleGrow your business – Business Bolton
Urlhttps://www.businessbolton.org/grow-business
Description
Date
Organic Position17
H1Grow your business
H2Is your business growing?
H3
H2WithAnchorsIs your business growing?
BodyGrow your business Grow your business Is your business growing? Could you benefit from support and direction to overcome barriers? There is a wide range of support available both locally and regionally to assist with all your business growth needs. PeoplePlus Enterprise have 30 years of business support experience, with 80% of the businesses we support still trading in their second year; and we can help you go further. Our business growth programme offers self-employed and freelance residents 6 months of business mentoring with a dedicated business coach. You'll work with them to grow your business, increase your turnover, and achieve your goals. The programme is government funded, so doesn't cost you a penny. Access to up to 200 training & development courses Webinars & workshops Networking opportunities Independent financial advice Access to co-working spaces Seminars of health, nutrition & wellbeing If you're self-employed in Bolton, we can help. * Up to 70% of participants have increased their turnover * Over 90% said they've developed their business on the programme Visit: https://peopleplus.co.uk/enterprisingyou-grow-your-business Call: 0161 507 6366 Contact: [email protected] Cookie Consent by FreePrivacyPolicy.com
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 13
  • 18
  • grow
  • 5
  • 18
  • grow business
  • 4
  • 18
  • support
  • 4
  • 18
  • growth
  • 3
  • 18
  • programme
  • 3
  • 18
Result 19
TitleGrowth Business UK - For entrepreneurs and business leaders
Urlhttps://www.growthbusiness.co.uk/
DescriptionFeaturing news on the latest mergers, acquisitions, exits and busts, to in-depth analyses of larger business issues, GrowthBusiness is a core resource in the arsenal of the UK’s entrepreneurial elite
Date
Organic Position18
H1
H2US takeovers of British tech companies rise by 50% in 2021
Cambridge Innovation Capital raising second fund
UK tech investment accounts for one third of £76bn invested in Europe
European technology investment busts $100bn threshold for first time
Deals of the week January 4 to January 7 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
US takeovers of British tech companies rise by 50% in 2021
What happened to the Yellow Pages?
Cambridge Innovation Capital raising second fund
UK tech investment accounts for one third of £76bn invested in Europe
Deals of the week Dec 13 to Dec 17 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
Deals of the week Dec 6 to Dec 10 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
European technology investment busts $100bn threshold for first time
How to raise first equity finance for your business
Deals of the week Nov 29 to Dec 3 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
H3
H2WithAnchorsUS takeovers of British tech companies rise by 50% in 2021
Cambridge Innovation Capital raising second fund
UK tech investment accounts for one third of £76bn invested in Europe
European technology investment busts $100bn threshold for first time
Deals of the week January 4 to January 7 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
US takeovers of British tech companies rise by 50% in 2021
What happened to the Yellow Pages?
Cambridge Innovation Capital raising second fund
UK tech investment accounts for one third of £76bn invested in Europe
Deals of the week Dec 13 to Dec 17 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
Deals of the week Dec 6 to Dec 10 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
European technology investment busts $100bn threshold for first time
How to raise first equity finance for your business
Deals of the week Nov 29 to Dec 3 – a GrowthBusiness roundup
Body"https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-TSDH29F" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> menu Uncategorized 3 Jan 2022 US takeovers of British tech companies rise by 50% in 2021 . US takeovers of UK tech companies soar by over 50% in 2021, according to Beauhurst, as Government tightens screws on foreign ownership rules Venture Capital Funding 21 Dec 2021 Cambridge Innovation Capital raising second fund . CIC acts as a booster rocket for tech start-ups spun out from Cambridge university, with £200m invested in 35 companies to date Venture Capital Funding 20 Dec 2021 UK tech investment accounts for one third of £76bn invested in Europe . Record-breaking £26bn invested in UK technology in 2021, up 2.3x from last year's £11.5bn figure Venture Capital Funding 8 Dec 2021 European technology investment busts $100bn threshold for first time . Investors will plough $121bn in European tech companies this year, according to VC firm Atomico, with record figures for unicorn creation Uncategorized 7 Jan 2022 Deals of the week January 4 to January 7 – a GrowthBusiness roundup . This week’s deals include Space Forge breaking the record for a space tech seed round, theUp.co raising £7m to consolidate its business, and ethical investing app C5K raising £4m through CrowdCube Uncategorized 3 Jan 2022 US takeovers of British tech companies rise by 50% in 2021 . US takeovers of UK tech companies soar by over 50% in 2021, according to Beauhurst, as Government tightens screws on foreign ownership rules Technology 22 Dec 2021 What happened to the Yellow Pages? . Remember the Yellow Pages? Find out what happened to the classic printed business listings directory and what Yell now offers online for consumers and businesses. Venture Capital Funding 21 Dec 2021 Cambridge Innovation Capital raising second fund . CIC acts as a booster rocket for tech start-ups spun out from Cambridge university, with £200m invested in 35 companies to date Venture Capital Funding 20 Dec 2021 UK tech investment accounts for one third of £76bn invested in Europe . Record-breaking £26bn invested in UK technology in 2021, up 2.3x from last year's £11.5bn figure Funding 17 Dec 2021 Deals of the week Dec 13 to Dec 17 – a GrowthBusiness roundup . Paul McCartney joins £7.2m investment round for music royalty technology Audoo, office space organiser Kitt raises £6.1m Series A and second-hand watch marketplace Subdial clocks £4m investment in this week's Deals of the Week Funding 10 Dec 2021 Deals of the week Dec 6 to Dec 10 – a GrowthBusiness roundup . This week’s deals include goods delivery platform Sorted raising £30m Series A, global VC launching a £21m fund for UK tech companies, and Atom Learning smashing the record for Series A funding for a UK edtech start-up Venture Capital Funding 8 Dec 2021 European technology investment busts $100bn threshold for first time . Investors will plough $121bn in European tech companies this year, according to VC firm Atomico, with record figures for unicorn creation Funding 6 Dec 2021 How to raise first equity finance for your business . The first thing you need to decide, says Oliver Woolley, is what kind of business you are building – a ‘lifestyle’ business or a ‘growth’ business? News 3 Dec 2021 Deals of the week Nov 29 to Dec 3 – a GrowthBusiness roundup . Future Fund: Breakthrough makes first life sciences investment, German luxury goods platform Timeless raises £11m and recruitment video software firm Hinterland closes £3m Series A round in this week’s deals Next 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 … 1,433
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Result 20
TitleHow to Grow Your Business - For Entrepreneurs - Amazon.co.uk
Urlhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Grow-Your-Business-Entrepreneurs/dp/0273720937
DescriptionHow to Grow Your Business - For Entrepreneurs : Blyth, Alex: Amazon.co.uk: Books.
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Organic Position19
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Result 21
TitleThe ultimate guide to growing a business - British Business Bank
Urlhttps://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/finance-hub/the-ultimate-guide-to-growing-a-business/
DescriptionThis article explains how to go from planning your growth strategy to pitching to investors. Everything you need to know about growing your business
Date
Organic Position20
H1The ultimate guideto growing a business
H2Planning for growth
Assessing your options
Searching for finance
Securing the finance
Final takeaway
Want to explore finance options for your business?
Recommended reading
How do businesses finance growth?
When it might be worth considering equity and debt
Do I need an independent adviser before looking for finance?
Unfortunately this site does not support your browser
H3Business need
Your decision
Peers and networks
H2WithAnchorsPlanning for growth
Assessing your options
Searching for finance
Securing the finance
Final takeaway
Want to explore finance options for your business?
Recommended reading
How do businesses finance growth?
When it might be worth considering equity and debt
Do I need an independent adviser before looking for finance?
Unfortunately this site does not support your browser
BodyThe ultimate guideto growing a business The ultimate guideto growing a business Growing your business is an exciting time. But when it comes to finding finance, enthusiasm won’t take you all the way. Preparation is key. Having a clear picture of the road ahead helps you plan for any surprises that may arise. It can help give you clarity when identifying suitable finance options, and confidence when looking to make the most of your opportunities. This article will take you from planning your growth strategy to pitching to an investor. Here’s everything you need to know about growing your business. Planning for growth. So you know you want to grow your business – but what are you trying to achieve? First, decide what success looks like to you. Then map out how you’ll reach your goals. What’s your action plan for the next 12 months? For the next three years? The next five years? Once you have a clear vision, you’ll get closer to knowing where external finance could come in. Business need. You may have got to this stage thanks to a large chunk of will, excitement and momentum. But now it’s time to breathe. Spend some time identifying your business’ key needs. Do you understand your strengths and areas of development? Do you have clear goals in place and the ambition to hit them? A good foundation here will help you further down the line if you need to pitch to potential investors. How to scale your business – checklist Option title arrow [https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/finance-hub/wp-content/themes/bbb/modules/related-link-banner/assets/option-title-arrow.png] Are you ready for finance? – checklist Option title arrow [data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==]Option title arrow [https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/finance-hub/wp-content/themes/bbb/modules/related-link-banner/assets/option-title-arrow.png] Assessing your options. You have the plan and you’re ready to grow. But do you have the right financial capital to execute your strategy? When you start to look for finance, it can feel overwhelming. It’s worth getting to know the range of options before deciding which is right for you. And it may be that your business could use more than one form of finance. So there’s no harm in exploring – just be wary of over-leveraging your business as it may be off-putting for some investors further down the line. Your decision. Break down your search for finance into steps. One decision you’ll have to make is between equity finance and debt finance. At a very high level: Equity involves selling shares to raise money Debt involves borrowing money Choosing between equity and debt depends on a number of factors, including your attitude to ownership and growth. If you’re happy to sell a share of ownership and your business is ready to significantly grow over the long term, equity might be better for you. 1 See the full range of finance optionsLink opens in a new window available 2 Read our success stories Link opens in a new windowto learn how other UK businesses have used external finance 3 Use our quick six-step toolLink opens in a new window to see which finance options could work for you 4 Find out everything you need to know about external financeLink opens in a new window 5 Learn when it might be worth considering equity and debtLink opens in a new window Searching for finance. Once you’ve decided what type of finance suits your business, you need to start looking for an investor or finance provider. It can be very tempting to take the first offer. However, it’s important to keep your options open and find a deal that’s right for you – whether that’s the right type of debt or the right investor relationship. Peers and networks. Speak to contacts who have gone through the same process. This should give you a better idea of what might work best for you. Whether you’re looking at equity or debt, there are lots of ways to access potential funders or investors. You could find an expert finance partner or a financial adviser, for example. Not only can their wealth of knowledge help increase your reputation, but they have a network of valuable contacts too. Don’t forget to make the most of your own professional network. Grow your contact list by attending industry events. You’ll quickly start to expand your pool of contacts, and a contact from your existing network can go a long way. If you can’t get an introduction from your existing contacts, write a personal email or make a phone call yourself. 1 Search our finance expertsLink opens in a new window 2 Have a question about financial advisers? Read our FAQsLink opens in a new window 3 View our calendar of industry eventsLink opens in a new window Securing the finance. Like most businesses actively seeking investment or debt financeLink opens in a new windowLink opens in a new window, you’ll be asked to present your business plan and ideas. See this as an opportunity to find someone who believes in your business as you do. If you know what you’re looking for, an investor or lender can offer you much more than money. You know your business better than anyone, so tell a story. Be honest and passionate: that way you’re more likely to find someone you actually connect with. Remember: this partnership could last long into the future, so it needs to feel right. 1 Understand the route to investmentLink opens in a new window 2 Learn the 7 ways to prove value to investorsLink opens in a new window 3 Learn how much equity you should offer investorsLink opens in a new window Final takeaway. Growing your business can be a long, hard journey. There are rarely any quick wins, or challenges you can avoid. But if you’re prepared for the slog and have a clear, well-thought-through business plan, the end result could be very rewarding. Click here to share on Facebook - Link opens in a new window Click here to share on Twitter - Link opens in a new window Click here to share on LinkedIn - Link opens in a new window Click here to share via sending an Email - Link opens in a new window Related Reading How I grew then exited my businessWhat matters most to growing businesses?5 benefits of equity finance for growing businesses Want to explore finance options for your business? You can with our quick six-step tool Find my business finance options Recommended reading. How do businesses finance growth? Infographic 2 min read When it might be worth considering equity and debt. Article 5 min read Do I need an independent adviser before looking for finance? Article 3 min read Launch unsupport browser modal Unfortunately this site does not support your browser. This site may not display correctly in your current browser. To view the site in its intended form and for the best user experience, download the latest version of your browser using the options below. 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Result 22
TitleWhat is Business Growth and Why It Is Important | Act! CRM
Urlhttps://www.act.com/en-uk/business-growth
DescriptionBusiness growth can be hard to define. Learn these key metrics used to measure business growth, and how to continue to grow your business and keep it growing
Date
Organic Position21
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Result 23
TitleFive tips to grow your business sustainably - Elite Business
Urlhttp://elitebusinessmagazine.co.uk/analysis/item/five-tips-to-grow-your-business-sustainably
DescriptionSMEs can start their net-zero journey by making changes to their business operations early on
Date24 Nov 2021
Organic Position22
H1Five tips to grow your business sustainably
H2
H3Understand your carbon footprint and how making changes could benefit your business
Adopt technologies that can help you to reduce your carbon footprint
Rethink your business values
Get your team onside
Plan for the long term and make your product or service more innovative
About the Author
Latifa Yedroudj
Related articles
Our Partners
Event Media Partners
H2WithAnchors
BodyFive tips to grow your business sustainably Written by Latifa Yedroudj on Wednesday, 24 November 2021. Posted in Insight, Analysis SMEs can start their net-zero journey by making changes to their business operations early on Tweet SMEs can start their net-zero journey by making changes to their business operations early on  Under new Treasury rules, UK businesses must now show how they will achieve a goal of being net-zero by 2050. By 2023, firms will have to set out detailed public plans for how they will move to a low-carbon future. Businesses should adopt sustainability at the heart of their operations to lower carbon emissions and also continue eco-friendly practices that will reduce their carbon footprint. Here are five tips to help businesses pave their way towards a net-zero future.  A survey by the British Business Bank last month revealed that small businesses account for around half (43-53%) of UK business greenhouse gas emissions. However, it also showed 94% of businesses questioned had taken at least one action to reduce their emissions. Business leaders can now learn sure-fire strategies to get them towards their net-zero target by 2050. The Help to Grow Management course has been created to help small and medium-sized businesses grow post-pandemic, with invaluable advice on how to reach new customers and boost profits while keeping sustainability at its core. Dr Lynn Oxborrow, Associate Professor in Management at Nottingham Business School and Programme Director of the Help to Grow: Management course at the school, said addressing the climate crisis will have not only to reduce carbon footprint but also have a ‘positive impact’ on business competitiveness. “Addressing the climate crisis is essential and everyone needs to do their bit,” Dr Lynn Oxborrow said. “SMEs can play a big role here, as introducing sustainable innovations and practices not only helps to reduce carbon emissions, it can also have a really positive impact on business competitiveness. This could include everything from cost savings and improved efficiency to winning new business, carving out a niche, and retaining employees – the benefits have a real impact on productivity and innovation for forward-thinking SMEs.”  And to help businesses start their net-zero journey, Dr Oxborrow has shared five tips on business sustainability:  Understand your carbon footprint and how making changes could benefit your business  . Could reducing energy, water use or waste reduce your costs? Or could adopting more sustainable products or services add value for your customers and help to engage your staff? Reflect on and rethink your energy use and where it comes from. Consider the energy used for machinery, lighting and heating but don’t forget what you use to cool your server, store data and send emails too.  Adopt technologies that can help you to reduce your carbon footprint . Using MS Teams, Zoom or a similar platform could mean fewer routine visits to customers. Sensors that switch off the lights when you leave could reduce your energy use. You could also use technology to monitor your carbon footprint and measure the improvements you make.   Rethink your business values . Look at how changes you make could reflect positively in your external and internal branding and communications. You need to be genuine and include the tangible things you’re doing to make a difference. Innovations in your product change to your supply chain, doing more with fewer resources need to be shared with staff, customers and stakeholders.   Get your team onside . Making a positive difference can have a beneficial effect on staff morale, wellbeing, motivation, staff retention and productivity. Getting everyone involved in making changes such as cycling to work, introducing a recycling scheme, reducing food waste in catering outlets, and turning down the heating, could make a big difference to the team and make sure your initiatives are a success.   Plan for the long term and make your product or service more innovative . Plan for carbon reduction, targeting the easiest, most accessible changes first, and then move onto longer-term actions that might require more knowledge and investment, but which could also have the biggest impact on your business and the environment. Introducing sustainable or recycled materials, and reducing packaging could cut materials usage, reduce logistics costs and create added customer interest. These innovations could help differentiate your business from your competitors.  The Help to Grow: Management course is delivered by leading business schools from across the UK, targeting SMEs that employ between 5 to 248 employees. Business leaders can benefit from 50 hours of in-depth training, one-to-one business mentoring, and the opportunity to grow their business. To fit in with their busy schedules, business leaders can take part in sessions around existing work commitments and access learning through online and face-to-face sessions. The course covers financial management, strategies for growth and innovation, digital adoption and responsible business practices. It features inspirational business leaders and the opportunity to learn alongside local peers, with access to a national alumni network.  Anne Kiem OBE, Executive Director, Small Business Charter and Chief Executive, Chartered Association of Business Schools, said: “Business schools support many thousands of small and medium-sized businesses to address pressing issues they face, including growing their businesses in sustainable ways. The expertise in the UK’s business schools is world-leading and based on real-life practice. All of the business schools delivering the Help to Grow: Management Course have been accredited by the Small Business Charter – an assessment led by small business leaders themselves.”  The course is worth £7,110 per participant but is 90% subsidized by the government, meaning business leaders pay just £750 for tailored, high-quality business advice. The Help to Grow: Management course is open at business schools across the UK. To find out more visit gov.uk/helptogrow. Tweet About the Author. Latifa Yedroudj . Latifa Yedroudj has joined the Elite team to fully immerse herself in the business side of journalism, a strong passion of hers cultivated from young having co-run her mother's start up business since she was 18. Her interests lie in a wide range of subjects, including start ups, business, travel, and anything entrepreneurial she can get her hands on. She has worked for some of the biggest names in journalism including The Guardian and The Mirror. Follow her on @latifayed on Twitter for her latest journo rants. Related articles. New Year Resolution: spring clean your finances Stay or sell? What can direct marketers learn from the removal of a tree stump? Michael Portillo: government has done all it can for SMEs Dara Jegede Adam Pescod Mark and Mel Sinjakli, co-owners of My Baker, leave high-flying London city jobs to take over bakery during pandemic Latifa Yedroudj Our Partners. Event Media Partners.
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Result 24
TitleGC Business Growth Hub: Resources to support and grow your business | GC Business Growth Hub
Urlhttps://www.businessgrowthhub.com/
DescriptionWelcome to Business Growth Hub. Access our fully-funded business support. Masterclasses, workshops, events, case studies, blogs and more
Date
Organic Position23
H1Here for Business
H2Explore our resources
Explore our services
Gain knowledge, be inspired, and network
H3General
Support Services
Sector Support
Networks & programmes
Ethical fashion brand Masumi heads for success
In conversation with: Samuel Bafunso, Innovation Advisor at GC Business Growth Hub
A call for more green start-ups: Lessons from those who did it
Hub rises to the challenge to help solve business conundrum
EnterprisingYou
Starting a Business
Business Strategy support service
Skills for Growth – SME Support
H2WithAnchorsExplore our resources
Explore our services
Gain knowledge, be inspired, and network
BodyHere for Business If you’re concerned about the impact of COVID-19 on your Greater Manchester business, we are here to help you navigate the latest government information and provide specialist advice. Get support Explore our resources. Start a Business Ethical fashion brand Masumi heads for success . Read Case Study Innovation In conversation with: Samuel Bafunso, Innovation Advisor at GC Business Growth Hub . Read Blog Post Sustainability A call for more green start-ups: Lessons from those who did it . Read Blog Post Business Strategy Hub rises to the challenge to help solve business conundrum . Read Case Study Find out more Explore our services. Start a Business EnterprisingYou . Find out more Start a Business Starting a Business . Find out more Business Strategy Business Strategy support service . Find out more People, Skills & Talent Skills for Growth – SME Support . Find out more Gain knowledge, be inspired, and network. View All Events Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
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Result 25
TitleNew Business or Freelancer - FREE Training - Start and Grow Enterprise
Urlhttps://www.startandgrowenterprise.uk/business-size/grow/
DescriptionThis is for you if you’ve recently started a new business and you're looking for support, advice and resources to help you reach your goals
Date
Organic Position24
H1GROW programme, GROW
H2
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H2WithAnchors
BodyGROW programme, GROW Your business is off the ground. Take it to the skies. This is for you if you’ve started a new business and you're looking for support, advice and resources to help you reach your goals. The GROW programme Free support for existing businesses Your business is off to a flying start. But you’re running into challenges that you’d like some help with, or you’d like to get ahead of yourself and make sure the road ahead is clear. Our GROW package will help you to take your business from early success to an established firm, to keep your dream going. What's Involved Growth Day Over the course of a full day, you’ll cover 4 important topics to help build on what you’ve learnt during the early stages of your business journey: • Mission, Vision, Value: Defining what makes you and your team tick • Accountable Goal Setting: How to prioritise and motivate • Sell Me This Pen: Getting why, how and what across in the elevator • Growing Strategically: Tools & techniques to concentrate on what matters. Wondering what it's really like on our Growth Course? In this video, our business coach Jules Ellison tells you who the Growth Course is for and exactly how it can help you to make your new business a success. Watch the video here. What's Involved Growth Workshops After your GROWTH DAY, you can hand-pick another 2 workshops that focus on a challenge specific to the growth of you and your business. We’re always adding new topics here, so treat this list like a sample menu... • SWOT and TIME: Identify your challenges and make time to solve them • Products, Packaging, Pricing: Developing a strategy that sells • Social Media Marketing: How to stay on top of the day-to-day • How To Sell: Psychology and sales wrapped into one • Financial Planning: Conquer cash flow and plan for growth • Hiring Staff: The legals and logistics of becoming an employer • Design Thinking: A school of thought for creative problem solving • Sustainable Practices: Positive for the planet, people and profits What's Involved Growth Coaching The fastest-growing firms on our GROW programme will be hand-picked for a package of free coaching, to help them keep the pace up and take their business even higher. If selected, you will be matched to a coach whose experience and expertise matches the specific challenges your business is facing, for an invaluable series of one-to-one support sessions. This is another 3 hours of expertise, on top of everything else. Take a look at what one of our successful clients, Nicala, thinks of this opportunity... "My coach helped me adjust my business plan and work out my short and long term plans. I also picked up techniques for dealing with difficult clients and how to continuously improve with feedback. A big takeaway was understanding who my 'introducers' are, as well as my ideal clients. I now target my marketing not just at the end client, but those who will help me meet them. This opportunity has given me clarity on my business plan and I feel I can now move forward even in these difficult times. I would recommend anyone who is given the opportunity for coaching to take it up, especially if you feel you are stuck in a rut." What's Involved Access to Funding Don’t forget. As a sole trader or registered business owner who’s been on one of our courses, you can apply for up to £1,000 to help your business fly... As well as all of the free training and support, here’s another incentive to take advantage of: Our Enterprise Vouchers are free money, so expect some stiff competition from other businesses. Those applications which really shine will be given a reimbursed grant of £1,000 (that means you won’t need to pay anything back!) You can use this voucher in any way which legitimately helps your business grow; from social media training or website development, to financial advice, to manufacturing equipment, and much much more. "The courses gave us invaluable business knowledge and it's the best way to learn" Kieran Scott & Luke Lutman, Founders, Phoenix Consultants Gloucestershire Ltd “We joined Start and Grow Enterprise in the final year of our Product Design degree at the University of Gloucestershire. We were skilled in design however without a background in business, we needed support to transition to a viable registered business. After completing both Start and Grow courses, we learned how to register our business, what type of business to register it as, our unique selling point, and we completed a business model canvas to further understand our value proposition. The courses allowed us to be in a room with other start-up businesses to learn from each other’s experiences, as well as from a business professional who has faced and overcame many of the problems new businesses face. We were lucky enough to be awarded a £1,000 Enterprise Voucher which we used to purchase business insurance and a Prusa i3 Mk2s 3D printer that we use for product prototyping and model making. We highly recommend Start and Grow Enterprise, they have an amazing community that we are proud to be a part of.” Luke & Kieran, Founders, Phoenix Consultants Gloucestershire Ltd www.phoenixconsultants.co.uk "The courses gave us invaluable business knowledge and it's the best way to learn" To take part in the Start and Grow Enterprise project, you will need to complete a short joining form. Join Our Funders And Partners
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 29
  • 25
  • grow
  • 11
  • 25
  • start
  • 8
  • 25
  • growth
  • 8
  • 25
  • support
  • 7
  • 25
  • day
  • 7
  • 25
  • learn
  • 5
  • 25
  • cours
  • 5
  • 25
  • enterprise
  • 5
  • 25
  • start grow
  • 4
  • 25
  • grow enterprise
  • 4
  • 25
  • what involved
  • 4
  • 25
  • free
  • 4
  • 25
  • challenge
  • 4
  • 25
  • what
  • 4
  • 25
  • involved
  • 4
  • 25
  • plan
  • 4
  • 25
  • client
  • 4
  • 25
  • what involved growth
  • 3
  • 25
  • grow programme
  • 3
  • 25
  • involved growth
  • 3
  • 25
  • programme
  • 3
  • 25
  • sell
  • 3
  • 25
  • coach
  • 3
  • 25
  • time
  • 3
  • 25
  • product
  • 3
  • 25
  • design
  • 3
  • 25
  • coaching
  • 3
  • 25
  • invaluable
  • 3
  • 25
  • opportunity
  • 3
  • 25
  • 1000
  • 3
  • 25
  • voucher
  • 3
  • 25
  • gloucestershire
  • 3
  • 25
Result 26
TitleWe Grow Businesses | Business Growth Consultants
Urlhttps://wegrowbusinesses.co.uk/
DescriptionWelcome to We Grow Businesses. Faster small business growth. Happy and confident small business owners. Business growth consultants
Date
Organic Position25
H1Welcome to We Grow Businesses
H2What We Do
How We Do It
Results We Achieve
£70,718
58.6%
£46,565
Blog
Videos
Events and Business Growth Meetups
Team
What Have We Been Up To Recently?
H3Free Business Growth Health Check
Business Growth Service
How to Grow Your Small Business
Case Studies
The Power of Repeat Business
Land and Expand
Statistics
Testimonials
Why A Good Profit Margin Is Essential To Your Business
Small Business Guide to Hiring Employees
Fundamentals of Business Growth (Part 1/4)
Introduction to Winning More Work (Part 2/4)
Meet Our Team
H2WithAnchorsWhat We Do
How We Do It
Results We Achieve
£70,718
58.6%
£46,565
Blog
Videos
Events and Business Growth Meetups
Team
What Have We Been Up To Recently?
BodyWelcome to We Grow Businesses We help small businesses to grow. We analyse, advise and help small business owners to implement improvements. Our service delivers three results – more revenue, more profit and more cash. On average, we charge our clients £242 per month, or £2,905 per year. On average, our clients increase net profit by £46,565 per year. What We Do. Free Business Growth Health Check. Spend an hour with our team and receive expert analysis and advice to grow your business. No obligations. Completely confidential. Face-to-face or via the internet. Book online today. Learn More Business Growth Service. We help small businesses to grow. We provide small business owners with three things: analysis, advice and help to implement. Our clients increase revenue, profit and cash. Find Out More How We Do It. How to Grow Your Small Business. Learn how real small business owners are taking their businesses to the next level. Find out how small business owners like Graham, Tanya, Sam and Garry are winning more work, delivering more work and banking more money. Learn More Results We Achieve. Case Studies.   The Power of Repeat Business. The key thing that this particular client has got right, has been building a business based on a stable recurring revenue model, and then retaining customers. This has given a very predictable [...] Read More   Land and Expand. This is a really interesting case study that demonstrates how much can be achieved by growing the value of your relationship with one customer. Read More Read More Case Studies Statistics. Average client turnover increase (£) after one year: £70,718. Average client turnover increase (%) after one year: 58.6%. Average client net profit increase (£) after one year: £46,565. See More Statistics Testimonials. We’ve been trading for 25-years and doing very well, but with thanks to input from We Grow Businesses over the last 2-years we have grown and continue to grow significantly. Like 40%!!! … Starting to work with We Grow Businesses is the best decision I’ve made in a very long time and I would recommend any other small businesses to do the same! ★★★★★ Melanie Lord AVS VAT Consultancy Ltd Francis gave us a really useful 360 degree view of our agency; both what was working well and areas we could improve. He explained everything really clearly and it highlighted where we needed to focus our efforts in order to scale the business. We now work with WGB monthly and it’s really exciting to see our agency have some strategy and structure as we grow. ★★★★★ Roland Gurney Treacle Copywriters Ltd Read More Testimonials Blog. Our blog posts go into further detail on growing small businesses.   Why A Good Profit Margin Is Essential To Your Business. You might have heard the old saying, “turnover is vanity, profit is sanity.” But what does this mean, and why is it important? And why is a profit margin especially important when trying to grow [...] Read More   Small Business Guide to Hiring Employees. The time may come when you think about hiring employees. Our Small Business Guide to Hiring Employees lists some key points that we look for to decide if it’s the right time to hire. Read More Read More Blog Posts Videos. Our videos share some of the key ideas that we use to help small businesses to grow. Small businesses grow faster when the owners work smarter – not harder. Fundamentals of Business Growth (Part 1/4). In this brief introduction to the fundamentals of business growth we break the problem of how to grow a business into three simple and more manageable chunks. Read More Introduction to Winning More Work (Part 2/4). If you want to grow a business then winning more work is absolutely key. Our Introduction to Winning More Work covers the fundamentals - marketing, sales and repeat business. Read More Watch More Videos Events and Business Growth Meetups. Prior to coronavirus and lockdown restrictions, we ran free events for small business owners in Construction, IT and B2B. At the time of writing we are very busy with client work – which means we don’t have the capacity for events right now. But hopefully as things stabilise our events will return. Business Growth Meetups See All Past Events Team. Meet Our Team. Find out who we are and how we go about making small businesses more successful. Learn More What Have We Been Up To Recently? wegrowbusinesses.co.uk View on Instagram Nov 26 Link to display lightbox Instagram post 18114187447194847 Pragmatic slogan on a van door spotted in Stevenage. ... 3 0 wegrowbusinesses.co.uk View on Instagram Oct 29 Link to display lightbox Instagram post 17845145234435198 Live client performance data streamed onto the office wall! ... 2 0 wegrowbusinesses.co.uk View on Instagram Oct 23 Link to display lightbox Instagram post 18128938144185647 We now have a map in the office with pins showing where all our clients are located. There are a couple more elsewhere in the UK. Busy times! ... 4 0 Load More… Follow on Instagram Interested in working with us? | 1. Quick Chat | 2. Free Growth Health Check | 3. Business Growth Service What We Do | How We Do It | Results We Get | Free Stuff | About | Contact | Coronavirus [email protected] | 01438 879 462 | Suite 1, Beechwood House, 5 Arlington Court, Whittle Way, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, SG1 2FS Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube © We Grow Businesses Ltd. All rights reserved. We Grow Businesses Ltd is registered in England & Wales (Company Number: 08591163) and is VAT registered. Terms of Website Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Acceptable Use Policy
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 38
  • 26
  • grow
  • 16
  • 26
  • small business
  • 15
  • 26
  • small
  • 15
  • 26
  • client
  • 10
  • 26
  • grow business
  • 9
  • 26
  • work
  • 9
  • 26
  • read
  • 9
  • 26
  • business growth
  • 8
  • 26
  • year
  • 8
  • 26
  • growth
  • 8
  • 26
  • instagram
  • 8
  • 26
  • wegrowbusinessescouk
  • 7
  • 26
  • time
  • 7
  • 26
  • profit
  • 7
  • 26
  • owner
  • 6
  • 26
  • small business owner
  • 5
  • 26
  • wegrowbusinessescouk view
  • 5
  • 26
  • business owner
  • 5
  • 26
  • free
  • 5
  • 26
  • average
  • 5
  • 26
  • increase
  • 5
  • 26
  • post
  • 5
  • 26
  • event
  • 5
  • 26
  • small business grow
  • 4
  • 26
  • business grow
  • 4
  • 26
  • average client
  • 4
  • 26
  • winning work
  • 4
  • 26
  • learn
  • 4
  • 26
  • winning
  • 4
  • 26
  • key
  • 4
  • 26
  • view
  • 4
  • 26
  • wegrowbusinessescouk view instagram
  • 3
  • 26
  • link display lightbox
  • 3
  • 26
  • display lightbox instagram
  • 3
  • 26
  • lightbox instagram post
  • 3
  • 26
  • case study
  • 3
  • 26
  • increase year
  • 3
  • 26
  • hiring employee
  • 3
  • 26
  • view instagram
  • 3
  • 26
  • link display
  • 3
  • 26
  • display lightbox
  • 3
  • 26
  • lightbox instagram
  • 3
  • 26
  • instagram post
  • 3
  • 26
  • employee
  • 3
  • 26
  • video
  • 3
  • 26
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  • 3
  • 26
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  • 3
  • 26
  • link
  • 3
  • 26
  • display
  • 3
  • 26
  • lightbox
  • 3
  • 26
  • policy
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
TitleGrow Your Business - Best for business solutions : Best for business solutions
Urlhttps://southeastbusiness.org.uk/essex-southend-thurrock/grow-your-business/
DescriptionBusiness Essex, Southend & Thurrock
Date
Organic Position26
H1Grow Your Business
H2Developing your business
Choose your Growth Hub
Newsletter Subscribe
H3
H2WithAnchorsDeveloping your business
Choose your Growth Hub
Newsletter Subscribe
BodyGrow Your Business Developing your business. Once your business is established and you’re making a profit on the products and services you sell to customers, you may want to start thinking about how to grow. Many businesses think of growth in terms of increased sales, but it’s also important to focus on how to maintain or improve your profitability. Company growth can be anything from taking on your first employee to moving into bigger premises and developing your customer base. When considering growing your business, look into the different opportunities that may be available in your area, such as grants to support growth or innovation vouchers (click here) to access professional services through a local university. Consider utilising Business Incubation Spaces to help keep costs down rather than renting an office. Other things you can do to help grow your business include:. Looking into ways of increasing your sales, both to existing customers and new customers Improving your products and services by researching and testing changes with your customers Developing new products and services, and selling them to new or existing markets Taking on staff or training your current staff, including working with apprentices and mentors Looking for additional sources of funding, such as bringing in new investors Thinking about selling your products or services online Working with a business mentor, who can help you think about how to do all of these things If you have any further questions about growing your business or would like to discuss any information in more detail, please get in touch. Choose your Growth Hub. Kent & Medway Essex, Southend & Thurrock East Sussex If you prefer to you can browse all information Newsletter Subscribe. Choose your local growth hub Kent & Medway - Kent & Medway Growth HubEssex, Southend & Thurrock - Best for business solutionsEast Sussex - Business East Sussex This link will open an external link for you to sign up to our newsletter. Sign up to our newsletter Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Cookie Preferences
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 11
  • 27
  • growth
  • 6
  • 27
  • service
  • 5
  • 27
  • customer
  • 5
  • 27
  • product service
  • 4
  • 27
  • product
  • 4
  • 27
  • grow business
  • 3
  • 27
  • kent medway
  • 3
  • 27
  • grow
  • 3
  • 27
  • developing
  • 3
  • 27
  • kent
  • 3
  • 27
  • medway
  • 3
  • 27
  • sussex
  • 3
  • 27
  • newsletter
  • 3
  • 27
Result 28
TitleStart and grow your business | North Yorkshire County Council
Urlhttps://www.northyorks.gov.uk/start-and-grow-your-business
DescriptionIf you run or are starting a business in North Yorkshire you can find out about opportunities, support, funding, networking and advice here
Date
Organic Position27
H1Start and grow your business
H2Start and improve your business
Grow your business
Advertise on Buy Local
Developing the local economy
More business tips and advice
Rate this page
H3
H2WithAnchorsStart and improve your business
Grow your business
Advertise on Buy Local
Developing the local economy
More business tips and advice
Rate this page
BodyStart and grow your business If you run or are starting a business in North Yorkshire you can find out about opportunities, support, funding, networking and advice here. Start and improve your business. If you're looking for the information you need to start or improve your business, you'll find it at the region's growth hub, How’s Business, a trusted and impartial source of information, eBooks, and networking events. How's Business - startups and improvement Grow your business. If you're expanding your business, the team at How’s Business can provide free, impartial guidance on what opportunities, support and funding is available to support your growth. How's Business - growth Advertise on Buy Local. Buy Local is the North Yorkshire market place linking businesses with customers to help people shop locally. Any business can advertise on the site for free – giving customers a wide range of local businesses, tradesmen and services all in one place. Launch our business directory Developing the local economy. The York, North Yorkshire and East Riding Local Enterprise Partnership's website contains information on a wide range of business and growth topics. More business tips and advice. How to rent a market stall Market stalls are available to rent from district and borough councils. Craven District Council Hambleton District Council Harrogate Borough Council Richmondshire District Council Ryedale District Council Scarborough Borough Council Selby District Council  Rate this page. How would you rate this page?
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • business
  • 20
  • 28
  • council
  • 8
  • 28
  • how
  • 6
  • 28
  • district
  • 6
  • 28
  • district council
  • 5
  • 28
  • local
  • 5
  • 28
  • information
  • 4
  • 28
  • growth
  • 4
  • 28
  • north yorkshire
  • 3
  • 28
  • borough council
  • 3
  • 28
  • start
  • 3
  • 28
  • north
  • 3
  • 28
  • yorkshire
  • 3
  • 28
  • support
  • 3
  • 28
  • market
  • 3
  • 28
  • borough
  • 3
  • 28
Result 29
TitleResources - London Business Hub
Urlhttps://www.businesshub.london/resources/?_sft_resource_type=business_support
DescriptionSupporting London’s businesses to start, sustain and grow
Date
Organic Position28
H1Resources
H2Related Resources
H3Support from London Business Hub
Business Support for Early Years Providers in Haringey
Grow with Google
Business Grants from Bromley Council
Pan London Early Years Sector Skills
London Borough of Barnet – Early Years Support
City of London Early Years Hub
London Progression Collaboration
Business Banking Resolution Service (BBRS)
Smarter London SMEs
qLegal
Brent Council Early Years Online
Strong Early Years London – Business Consultancy
Harrow Council Early Years Team
Cyber Runway
Recovery Ready
Strong Early Years London: Webinar Archive
Introduction to Childcare – Taster Training Programme
Financial Guidance from qNomics
Help to Grow: Digital
Help to Grow: Management
DAGILE – Digital Skills and Leadership Training
Ready to Supply Harrow
Climate Hub
Climate for SMEs: 4 Steps to Action
COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Support for Businesses and Employers
Small Business Sustainability Hub
Hounslow Early Years Online
Sutton Early Years Advisory Team
Wayfinder
Early Years and Childcare Training and Qualifications with PACEY
Nursery Business Consultancy Services
Expert Advisers
Early Education and Childcare Service Continuing Professional Development
The Mayor of London’s Business Climate Challenge
Peer Networks
Amazon Small Business Accelerator
Strong Early Years London: Free Business Support
Digital Boost
Information for Childcare Professionals Working in Kingston and Richmond
Boosting Community Business London
Technology Adoption Service
Recover & Grow
ICAEW Business Advice Service
Patch – Business Mentor and Support Network
Future Workspace Fund
Effective Team Leadership for Early Years Practitioners
Hammersmith and Fulham Early Years Advisory Service
Lewisham Early Years Online
Facebook – Support for Business During COVID-19
Allia Grow Your Business Programme
All Together – Support for CEOs
Dream Bigger
NatWest Business Builder
London Business Accelerator: Empowering Women in Business
Impact Accelerator
Start Up Step Up London
Brexit Ready Podcast
London & Partners’ Business Growth Programme
How to Use Our Business Adviser Service
Community Business Trade Up Programme
Bespoke and Up-to-date Training for Early Years Practitioners
Business Help Series
The Mayor’s International Business Programme
Circular Economy Business Support
Music Tech Incubator
Support for Manufacturers from Make UK
Investment for Impact
The Prince’s Trust Enterprise Programme
Continuing Professional Development Courses
Centre for Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence
Central Research Laboratory
Business Launchpad
Social Media Marketing
Digital Business Academy
DigitalHealth.London
Support for Film and Media
Google for Startups
London Chamber of Commerce & Industry
Engineering Construction Apprenticeships and Training
Cockpit Arts
Crowdfunding for Creative Projects
Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses
Accelerator for Tech Startups
Business Support from Abi
Accelerator Academy
Business Loans from Accredo
LawTech Eagle Lab
Bathtub Bursary for New Entrepreneurs
Bethnal Green Ventures Accelerator Programme
Funding for Social Enterprises from Big Issue Invest
BFI Film Fund
Co-Innovate Journeys from Brunel University London
Co-Innovate Bridging the Gap
Innovating for Growth: Scale-up
Start and Grow Your Business with the BIPC
Charity Bank Loans
Electronic Resources from the Small Business Research + Enterprise Centre
Samuel Wilson’s Loan Trust
Leadership Programmes from Common Purpose UK
Creative Apprenticeships in England
Crowdcube Crowdfunding
Crowdfunder
deK Business Growth Programme
deliverBEST – Make Your Business More Efficient
Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme
Support for Exporters from the Department for International Trade
Support for Exporters to Sell Online
Digital Catapult
Enterprise Steps
Entrepreneur First: Build Your Startup
The Startup Accelerator
Export Opportunities and Support
Training Courses for Fashion Businesses
FinTech Innovation Lab London
The Food & Food Tech Innovation Hub
Funding for Growing Firms
Funding Options
Geovation: Location and Property Accelerator
Finance for Charities and Social Enterprises
Greater London Investment Fund
Support for Digital Businesses from Blenheim Chalcot
Hangar 51
Government R&D Tax Relief
Find a Chartered Accountant
Feeding the City: Accelerate Programme
Impacting Business by Design
Indiegogo Crowdfunding
Funding from UK Research and Innovation
Innovation Warehouse
Help for Recruiters
New Enterprise Allowance
Level39
Invoice Finance Solutions
Support to Relocate and Grow Your Business in London
London Business Partnership
Export Documents and International Trade Services
London Open Workspaces Map
Better Futures
Mayor of London’s TechInvest
MedCity
MedTech Directory
Change Management Consultancy from Middlesex University
Staff Training and Employment Services from Middlesex University
National Cyber Security Centre
NatWest Accelerator
Innovation Support from Newable
NHS Suppliers Portal
Offender Employment
Ask the Experts at Open to Export
OpenLearn: Free Training Courses from The Open University
Supporting Women and Parents into Self-employment
Funding for Technology Firms from Pentech Ventures
RBS Social & Community Capital
Microsoft Reactor London
Training and Consultancy for Social Enterprises
Mentoring and Coaching
Royal Academy of Engineering Enterprise Hub
Commercialising Ideas in the Space Industry
Lloyds Bank and Bank of Scotland Social Entrepreneurs Programme
School for Social Entrepreneurs
Funding for the Science and Technology Sector
Equity Crowdfunding from Seedrs
Seraphim Capital: Space Camp Programme
Funding from the Social Investment Business
Start Up Loans
Startupbootcamp: Accelerators for Startups
Sussex Innovation Croydon
TechHub London
Traveltech Lab
TrustLaw: Legal Assistance for Social Enterprises
UK Business Angels Association
India Market Entry Support
Resources and Support for Social Enterprises
Ready, Steady, Grow
YSYS (Your Startup, Your Story)
Find Public Sector Contracts
The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders
Support for Construction Firms to Access Funding
Funding for Construction Training and Apprenticeships
Online SEO Training Courses
SEO Training for Beginners
Develop Your Social Media Skills
Tourism Business Advice Hub
Find Your Local Chamber of Commerce
My Virtual Neighbourhood
Continuing Professional Development
Pay It Forward
Government Support for Business
Shared Workspace Support Programme
Because I’m a Londoner
Government Support for the Self-Employed
External Resources, Support and Webinars
NHS Test and Trace – Advice for Employers
The Self-employment Income Support Scheme
Mental Health and Wellbeing
Sector-specific Support During COVID-19
Find Your Local Business Improvement District (BID)
Property Advice Service
London Strategic Regulatory Network
EU Post-Transition Business Resource Hub
Executive Education Courses at London Business School
National Business Support Helpline
H2WithAnchorsRelated Resources
BodyResources Guidance is great when you need it. And here at LBH we pride ourselves on the quality of advice that we provide to everyone who reaches out to us.  We also know that, sometimes, what you need most is a simple answer to a difficult question – quickly.  That’s why we created and collected our library of business resources. Insightful, effective , easy to navigate and always growing, our resources are here for you whenever you need them – no matter what stage your business is at.  Browse our business resources below and find what you’re looking for. Simple solutions. Exactly when you need them. All in one place.  Your search results will update automatically. Stages Locations Sectors Needs Type Selected filters Business Support Resource LBH Content Support from London Business Hub. Specialist programmes and support from London Business Hub. Keep reading about Support from London Business Hub Resource Business Support for Early Years Providers in Haringey. Business support surgeries and resources for early years providers and childminders in Har... Keep reading about Business Support for Early Years Providers in Haringey Resource Grow with Google. Receive free, tailored one-to-one mentoring via Google Mentoring. Keep reading about Grow with Google Resource Business Grants from Bromley Council. Grant funding for businesses from Bromley Council. Keep reading about Business Grants from Bromley Council Resource Pan London Early Years Sector Skills. A free early years skills training programme. Keep reading about Pan London Early Years Sector Skills Resource London Borough of Barnet – Early Years Support. Advice, support and information for early years providers in Barnet. Keep reading about London Borough of Barnet – Early Years Support Resource City of London Early Years Hub. Early years services for practitioners in the City of London. Keep reading about City of London Early Years Hub Resource London Progression Collaboration. Free support to help employers take on apprentices. Keep reading about London Progression Collaboration Resource Business Banking Resolution Service (BBRS). Support for larger SMEs to resolve business banking complaints. Keep reading about Business Banking Resolution Service (BBRS) Resource Smarter London SMEs. Free support and advice on disability for small and medium-sized businesses. Keep reading about Smarter London SMEs Resource qLegal. Pro bono legal advice for startups and entrepreneurs. Keep reading about qLegal Resource Brent Council Early Years Online. Early years services for providers in Brent. Keep reading about Brent Council Early Years Online Resource Strong Early Years London – Business Consultancy. Free business consultancy from early years experts. Keep reading about Strong Early Years London – Business Consultancy Resource Harrow Council Early Years Team. Support for early years providers in Harrow. Keep reading about Harrow Council Early Years Team Resource Cyber Runway. Specialist support to accelerate the growth of cyber businesses. Keep reading about Cyber Runway Resource Recovery Ready. Resources and support to help businesses recover and grow. Keep reading about Recovery Ready Resource Strong Early Years London: Webinar Archive. Webinars to support the sustainability of the early years sector. Keep reading about Strong Early Years London: Webinar Archive Resource Introduction to Childcare – Taster Training Programme. An introduction to working within the early years sector. Keep reading about Introduction to Childcare – Taster Training Programme Resource Financial Guidance from qNomics. Free financial guidance for start ups in London. Keep reading about Financial Guidance from qNomics Resource Help to Grow: Digital. Advice and vouchers to help businesses use technology. Keep reading about Help to Grow: Digital Resource Help to Grow: Management. 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LCCI is a business support and networking organisation. Keep reading about London Chamber of Commerce & Industry Resource Engineering Construction Apprenticeships and Training. ECITB provides engineering training grants. Keep reading about Engineering Construction Apprenticeships and Training Resource Cockpit Arts. Cockpit Arts is a business incubator for creative startups and small firms. Keep reading about Cockpit Arts Resource Crowdfunding for Creative Projects. Kickstarter is a crowdfunding platform for new creative projects.  Keep reading about Crowdfunding for Creative Projects Resource Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses. This programme supports growth-orientated small businesses. Keep reading about Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Resource Accelerator for Tech Startups. Accelerator in Shoreditch is for early-stage tech startups. Keep reading about Accelerator for Tech Startups Resource Business Support from Abi. 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Finance for social enterprises and profit-with-purpose businesses. Keep reading about Funding for Social Enterprises from Big Issue Invest Resource BFI Film Fund. BFI is a cultural charity to champion and support film, television and moving image. Keep reading about BFI Film Fund Resource Co-Innovate Journeys from Brunel University London. Co-Innovate Journeys is an innovation support programme for established SMEs. Keep reading about Co-Innovate Journeys from Brunel University London Resource Co-Innovate Bridging the Gap. Co-Innovate Bridging the Gap supports eligible startup and early-stage businesses. Keep reading about Co-Innovate Bridging the Gap Resource Innovating for Growth: Scale-up. Innovating for Growth Scale-up supports small firms to scale and grow. Keep reading about Innovating for Growth: Scale-up Resource Start and Grow Your Business with the BIPC. Resources, support and workshops for startups and growing businesses. Keep reading about Start and Grow Your Business with the BIPC Resource Charity Bank Loans. Charity Bank provides loans to charitable organisations. Keep reading about Charity Bank Loans Resource Electronic Resources from the Small Business Research + Enterprise Centre. City Business Library provides specialist resources for startups and small businesses. Keep reading about Electronic Resources from the Small Business Research + Enterprise Centre Resource Samuel Wilson’s Loan Trust. Samuel Wilson's Loan Trust provides business loans to people under the age of 40. Keep reading about Samuel Wilson’s Loan Trust Resource Leadership Programmes from Common Purpose UK. Common Purpose UK runs leadership programmes for individuals and organisations. Keep reading about Leadership Programmes from Common Purpose UK Resource Creative Apprenticeships in England. Creative & Cultural Skills supports employers to take on creative apprentices. 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Keep reading about Export Opportunities and Support Resource Training Courses for Fashion Businesses. Short courses on starting and running a successful fashion business. Keep reading about Training Courses for Fashion Businesses Resource FinTech Innovation Lab London. Three-month global accelerator programme for ambitious fintech startups. Keep reading about FinTech Innovation Lab London Resource The Food & Food Tech Innovation Hub. Shared workspace for innovative food and food tech startups. Keep reading about The Food & Food Tech Innovation Hub Resource Funding for Growing Firms. Funding London channels funds to early-stage high-growth SMEs in London. Keep reading about Funding for Growing Firms Resource Funding Options. Funding Options helps businesses to find finance that meets their needs. Keep reading about Funding Options Resource Geovation: Location and Property Accelerator. Accelerators for startups that want to create a business using location or property data. Keep reading about Geovation: Location and Property Accelerator Resource Finance for Charities and Social Enterprises. Good Finance supports social enterprises to navigate the social investment landscape. Keep reading about Finance for Charities and Social Enterprises Resource Greater London Investment Fund. Debt and equity finance for businesses in London. Keep reading about Greater London Investment Fund Resource Support for Digital Businesses from Blenheim Chalcot. Blenheim Chalcot is a venture builder to support the growth of digital businesses. Keep reading about Support for Digital Businesses from Blenheim Chalcot Resource Hangar 51. Hangar 51 runs a 10-week global travel accelerator. Keep reading about Hangar 51 Resource Government R&D Tax Relief. Tax incentives and reliefs for companies involved in R&D activities. Keep reading about Government R&D Tax Relief Resource Find a Chartered Accountant. ICAEW provides a directory of chartered accountants and accountancy firms. Keep reading about Find a Chartered Accountant Resource Feeding the City: Accelerate Programme. Support for sustainable food businesses to scale their operations. Keep reading about Feeding the City: Accelerate Programme Resource Impacting Business by Design. Support for businesses to commercialise their design innovation activities. Keep reading about Impacting Business by Design Resource Indiegogo Crowdfunding. Indiegogo is a crowdfunding platform to help innovative entrepreneurs raise funds. Keep reading about Indiegogo Crowdfunding Resource Funding from UK Research and Innovation. Innovate UK runs funding competitions to help businesses develop innovative ideas. Keep reading about Funding from UK Research and Innovation Resource Innovation Warehouse. Innovation Warehouse is a coworking accelerator for high-growth digital startups. Keep reading about Innovation Warehouse Resource Help for Recruiters. Jobcentre Plus offers practical recruitment support to employers. Keep reading about Help for Recruiters Resource New Enterprise Allowance. Support for people on certain benefits to start a business. Keep reading about New Enterprise Allowance Resource Level39. Level39 is a community of cybersecurity, fintech and retail tech businesses. Keep reading about Level39 Resource Invoice Finance Solutions. Link Capital UK provides advice on invoice factoring to help improve cash flow. Keep reading about Invoice Finance Solutions Resource Support to Relocate and Grow Your Business in London. London & Partners helps overseas businesses to set up and grow in London. Keep reading about Support to Relocate and Grow Your Business in London Resource London Business Partnership. London Business Partnership provides advice, support and workspace. Keep reading about London Business Partnership Resource Export Documents and International Trade Services. LCCI provides a range of international trade services. Keep reading about Export Documents and International Trade Services Resource LBH Content London Open Workspaces Map. An interactive map and guide to the capital's coworking spaces and start-up workspaces. Keep reading about London Open Workspaces Map Resource Better Futures. Support for businesses to reduce negative impacts on the environment. Keep reading about Better Futures Resource Mayor of London’s TechInvest. An exclusive event series supported by the Mayor of London. Keep reading about Mayor of London’s TechInvest Resource MedCity. MedCity champions and supports the growth of the life sciences sector. Keep reading about MedCity Resource MedTech Directory. Information about the current trends across the medtech sector. Keep reading about MedTech Directory Resource Change Management Consultancy from Middlesex University. Consultancy services to support businesses with change management. Keep reading about Change Management Consultancy from Middlesex University Resource Staff Training and Employment Services from Middlesex University. Middlesex University runs short courses to help employers train their staff. Keep reading about Staff Training and Employment Services from Middlesex University Resource National Cyber Security Centre. Specialist resources to help businesses reduce the risks of a cyberattack. Keep reading about National Cyber Security Centre Resource NatWest Accelerator. The NatWest Accelerator supports businesses to grow and scale. Keep reading about NatWest Accelerator Resource Innovation Support from Newable. Newable provides innovation support to businesses in London. Keep reading about Innovation Support from Newable Resource NHS Suppliers Portal. Search for new contract opportunities with the NHS. Keep reading about NHS Suppliers Portal Resource Offender Employment. Support for employers to hire prisoners and ex-offenders. Keep reading about Offender Employment Resource Ask the Experts at Open to Export. Support for small businesses to export and grow internationally. Keep reading about Ask the Experts at Open to Export Resource OpenLearn: Free Training Courses from The Open University. Free training courses on starting and running a business. Keep reading about OpenLearn: Free Training Courses from The Open University Resource Supporting Women and Parents into Self-employment. My OutSpace supports women and parents in south London into self-employment. Keep reading about Supporting Women and Parents into Self-employment Resource Funding for Technology Firms from Pentech Ventures. Pentech provides capital funding to technology and software startups. Keep reading about Funding for Technology Firms from Pentech Ventures Resource RBS Social & Community Capital. Loans for social enterprises that don't qualify for mainstream loans from banks. Keep reading about RBS Social & Community Capital Resource Microsoft Reactor London. Microsoft Reactor - London is a hub for developers and startups. Keep reading about Microsoft Reactor London Resource Training and Consultancy for Social Enterprises. Red Ochre supports organisations that are delivering social change. Keep reading about Training and Consultancy for Social Enterprises Resource Mentoring and Coaching. Mentoring and coaching for businesses that want to improve and grow. Keep reading about Mentoring and Coaching Resource Royal Academy of Engineering Enterprise Hub. The Enterprise Hub runs programmes to support engineering entrepreneurs. Keep reading about Royal Academy of Engineering Enterprise Hub Resource Commercialising Ideas in the Space Industry. Support for businesses to harness the power of satellite-based services. Keep reading about Commercialising Ideas in the Space Industry Resource Lloyds Bank and Bank of Scotland Social Entrepreneurs Programme. 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Funding and support to help charities and social enterprises scale their impact. Keep reading about Funding from the Social Investment Business Resource Start Up Loans. A Start Up Loan is a government-backed loan for business purposes. Keep reading about Start Up Loans Resource Startupbootcamp: Accelerators for Startups. Startupbootcamp runs accelerator programmes across a range of sectors. Keep reading about Startupbootcamp: Accelerators for Startups Resource Sussex Innovation Croydon. Incubator for entrepreneurs, startups and innovative growing companies. Keep reading about Sussex Innovation Croydon Resource TechHub London. TechHub is a global community for tech entrepreneurs and startups. Keep reading about TechHub London Resource Traveltech Lab. Support for startups to develop tech for use in the travel industry. Keep reading about Traveltech Lab Resource TrustLaw: Legal Assistance for Social Enterprises. TrustLaw connects social enterprises with pro bono legal advice. Keep reading about TrustLaw: Legal Assistance for Social Enterprises Resource UK Business Angels Association. Support to help entrepreneurs and businesses access angel investment. Keep reading about UK Business Angels Association Resource India Market Entry Support. Services to help businesses export to and invest in India. Keep reading about India Market Entry Support Resource Resources and Support for Social Enterprises. Support and funding to help social entrepreneurs start-up and scale. Keep reading about Resources and Support for Social Enterprises Resource Ready, Steady, Grow. Support for entrepreneurs to start, fund and scale their new business. Keep reading about Ready, Steady, Grow Resource YSYS (Your Startup, Your Story). YSYS connects talented people from diverse groups to opportunities in tech. Keep reading about YSYS (Your Startup, Your Story) Resource Find Public Sector Contracts. Find public sector contract opportunities for your business. Keep reading about Find Public Sector Contracts Resource The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders. Support services and intelligence for the UK automotive industry. Keep reading about The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders Resource Support for Construction Firms to Access Funding. Support for construction firms to understand their finance options. Keep reading about Support for Construction Firms to Access Funding Resource Funding for Construction Training and Apprenticeships. CITB is responsible for training in the construction sector. Keep reading about Funding for Construction Training and Apprenticeships Resource Online SEO Training Courses. Free online training course about search engine optimisation. Keep reading about Online SEO Training Courses Resource SEO Training for Beginners. Introductory training courses on search engine optimisation. Keep reading about SEO Training for Beginners Resource Develop Your Social Media Skills. Free training course to help businesses use social media to promote their brand. Keep reading about Develop Your Social Media Skills Resource Tourism Business Advice Hub. Insights, advice and information for tourism businesses. Keep reading about Tourism Business Advice Hub Resource Find Your Local Chamber of Commerce. Chambers of Commerce promote, represent and support local businesses. Keep reading about Find Your Local Chamber of Commerce Resource My Virtual Neighbourhood. My Virtual Neighbourhood is a directory of independent local businesses. Keep reading about My Virtual Neighbourhood Resource Continuing Professional Development. Professional development courses from the National Day Nurseries Association. Keep reading about Continuing Professional Development Resource LBH Content Pay It Forward. Free fundraising to help businesses to secure trade during COVID-19. Keep reading about Pay It Forward Resource Government Support for Business. Advice and information about Government support for businesses during COVID-19. Keep reading about Government Support for Business Resource LBH Content Shared Workspace Support Programme. Free online support for workspace providers and their tenants. Keep reading about Shared Workspace Support Programme Resource Because I’m a Londoner. Citywide campaign to kickstart London's economy. Keep reading about Because I’m a Londoner Resource Government Support for the Self-Employed. Advice and information about Government support for the self-employed during COVID-19. Keep reading about Government Support for the Self-Employed Resource LBH Content External Resources, Support and Webinars. Information about support for businesses and the self-employed during COVID-19. Keep reading about External Resources, Support and Webinars Resource LBH Content NHS Test and Trace – Advice for Employers. Advice to help businesses comply with test and trace during COVID-19. 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Measures to simplify the local regulation of businesses. Keep reading about London Strategic Regulatory Network Resource LBH Content EU Post-Transition Business Resource Hub. Support for firms to adapt to new rules for business and trade. Keep reading about EU Post-Transition Business Resource Hub Resource Executive Education Courses at London Business School. Executive education courses to help businesses achieve key objectives. Keep reading about Executive Education Courses at London Business School Resource National Business Support Helpline. The helpline provides free advice and guidance to new and existing businesses. Keep reading about National Business Support Helpline
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  • trust enterprise programme
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  • professional development cours
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  • social media marketing
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  • start business reading
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  • co innovate journey
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  • innovate bridging gap
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  • innovating growth scale
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  • charity bank loan
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  • common purpose uk
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  • food food tech
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  • executive education cours
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Result 30
TitleGrow Your Business In The UK | ForwardFood.Tech
Urlhttps://www.forwardfood.tech/what-we-do/grow-your-business-in-the-uk
DescriptionOur goal is to support ambitions international Agri-FoodTech businesses and help them access the benefits of the UK's entrepreneurial scene
Date
Organic Position29
H1Give your business all the benefits of the UK's thriving entrepreneurial scene
H2The need for agrifood-tech innovation is greater than ever
UK Agri-FoodTech Ecosystem:
About the dealmaker
About Rob Ward
Your submission has been received, and we'll be in touch within one business day
H3Our goal is to support the ambitions of international Agri-FoodTech entrepreneurs. We provide mentoring, business development and introduction to our investor network
UK Tax Incentives
Investment
Leadership Hub
Business Advisory
H2WithAnchorsThe need for agrifood-tech innovation is greater than ever
UK Agri-FoodTech Ecosystem:
About the dealmaker
About Rob Ward
Your submission has been received, and we'll be in touch within one business day
BodyGive your business all the benefits of the UK's thriving entrepreneurial sceneOur goal is to support the ambitions of international Agri-FoodTech entrepreneurs. We provide mentoring, business development and introduction to our investor network.Apply HereLIVE CHATWhy the UK?The UK is Europe’s leading agrifoodtech startup nation, attracting $1.1 billion investment in 2020 (after US, China and India)UK Tech companies attracted a record of $15 billion VC investment in 2020, more than the rest of Europe combinedThe UK is 3rd in the world for tech unicorns behind only the US and China, with 7 new unicorn firms in 2020 aloneThe UK is placed at the centre of the world with its unique time zone to serve East and West marketsBeing in the UK puts you in the centre of a forward-thinking country that is at the forefront of sustainability and innovation, targeting Carbon Zero by 2050The need for agrifood-tech innovation is greater than ever. The UK saw a 21% increase in investmentfor climate tech and agriculture companies, reaching a record $798m in 2020Leading Agri-FoodTech companies choose the UKJCB, Denso, Syngenta, Elanco, Merck and Zoetis have all chosen the UK as their homeUK FoodTech companies accelerated investmentto $968m in 2020 compared to $315m in 2019Join a strong and diverse networkThe UK offers a wide University and institutional networks to provide support and to work with high-potential agri-foodtech businesses.UK Agri-FoodTech Ecosystem:. 100+designated resource and innovation centres form the UK AgriTech ecosystem. 2800Innovate UK funded projects in 2019/20. £3.3bngranted by UK Research & Innovation in 2019/20. Apply HereLIVE CHATAbout the dealmaker. Rob WardCEO, ForwardFood.TechAbout Rob Ward. Rob focuses on assisting businesses to develop the next generation of innovations in AgriFoodTech, sustainably transforming the future for the farming and food industry from farm to plate.Rob has a wide experience that spans from running one of the largest commercial soft fruit farms in the UK to product design and innovation (patenting the first commercially available hydroponics field scale strawberry growing system) to creating, building and selling businesses all ranging from grocery retail and wholesale distribution; food and drink CPG  and FoodTech.  He co-founded the world’s first CPG Seed investment Accelerator for the food industry.  Exiting this business in 2019 he created ForwardFood.Tech using his experience of working with early-stage tech applications to ensure that businesses have fully developed their commercial proposition and are investor-ready. Having undertaken a world study tour researching innovation in grocery retail and food and beverage as a Nuffield Farming Research Scholar in 2009, Rob has continued to develop an extensive international network of international business and trade contacts.What can we do for your business?We help up-skill and support founders by providing hands-on strategic/tactical assistance, mentoring, coaching, and introductions to the UK’s world-class ecosystem. . Being part of our support process, you will benefit from:Mentoring from Rob Ward - an experienced entrepreneur in the AgTech/ FoodTech sectorHelp to develop business plansAssistance with relocating to the UK (including Visa, setting up a bank account in the UK, up to date information on tax system)Introductions to key networks including investorsGuidance on how to scale internationallyApply HereLIVE CHATUK Tax Incentives. The UK has significant tax incentives for entrepreneurs (e.g. EIS investor tax relief, Patent Box, Research & Development cost rebate incentives, Innovate UK Grants).About Tax IncentivesWho this support is forAs an overseas-based entrepreneur and founder of an innovative agri-food technology brand, you could be considered to join our support process and grow your business in the UK.This support is tailored for international brands who want to be at the forefront of technology, sustainability and innovation. In order to qualify, you must: Have a customer-validated product either already in the market or ready to launchBe willing to relocate and establish the company’s global headquarters in the UKHave a desire to grow globally with a clear commercial propositionAnticipate employing over 10 people in the UK within 3 yearsApply herePlease fill in the form below to apply and we will follow up with next steps.If you have any questions, use the live chat to talk to us or to request a callback. Thank you! Your submission has been received, and we'll be in touch within one business day.Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.Other Services for founders. Investment. Leadership Hub. Business Advisory.
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Result 31
TitleHelp to Grow - Management - Small Business Charter
Urlhttps://smallbusinesscharter.org/help-to-grow-management/
Description
Date
Organic Position30
H1
H2Funded by
THE PROGRAMME
Funded by
WITH FURTHER SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
H3ABOUT THE HELP TO GROW: MANAGEMENT COURSE
BY THE END OF THE COURSE, YOU WILL:
H2WithAnchorsFunded by
THE PROGRAMME
Funded by
WITH FURTHER SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
Bodyimg class="alignnone wp-image-17466 webpexpress-processed" src="https://smallbusinesscharter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/HMG_LOGO_BLACK-300x101.png" alt="" width="210" height="71" srcset="https://smallbusinesscharter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/HMG_LOGO_BLACK-300x101.png 300w, https://smallbusinesscharter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/HMG_LOGO_BLACK-200x68.png 200w, https://smallbusinesscharter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/HMG_LOGO_BLACK.png 340w" sizes="(max-width: 210px) 100vw, 210px">Enhance your ability to lead the growth of your businessProduce a growth plan to achieve your business’s potentialDelivered by leading business schools in collaboration with industryFind A Course Near YouABOUT THE HELP TO GROW: MANAGEMENT COURSE. Join 30,000 senior leaders taking part in a practical management training programme, developed in collaboration with industry and delivered by world-class business schools, accredited by the Small Business Charter.The Help to Grow: Management Course supports senior managers of small and medium sized businesses to boost their business’s performance, resilience, and long-term growth.The 12-week programme is designed to be taken alongside full-time work through a combination of online sessions and face-to-face learning. The cost to attend is also 90% funded by the Government.The in-depth high quality curriculum will support you to build your capabilities in leadership, innovation, digital adoption, employee engagement, marketing, responsible business, and financial management. By the end of the programme you will develop a business growth plan to help you lead your business to release its potential.BY THE END OF THE COURSE, YOU WILL:. Develop a Growth Action Plan uniquely tailored to helping you to lead and grow your business.Develop your leadership and management skills, enhancing employee wellbeing and engagement in the process.Recognise what drives productivity and growth in your market and understand what this means for your business.Learn how to advance responsible business practices, including how you create an inclusive workplace and greener workplace practices.Understand how to innovate your business model, including how to adopt and invest in new and digital technologies.Identify key domestic and export markets for your business and develop strategies for market segmentation, positioning and targeting.Develop strategies to improve operational efficiency, saving time and money.Find a course near youTHE PROGRAMME. Facilitated by small business experts from leading university business schools located near you, this practical programme takes place over three months. The short focused sessions allow you to complete the course alongside running your business. It includes both online and face-to-face sessions, alongside peer support and 1:1 mentoring.A practical curriculum which features:Eight facilitated online two-hour sessionsFour practical, face-to-face case study workshops10 hours of one-to-one support from a mentor with experience of running a business, providing you with personalised support to develop your own business growth planPeer networking, including peer group calls that give you the opportunity to share experiences with a small group of other small business leadersAccess to the Alumni Programme featuring events with inspirational speakers, business clinics and networking eventsSee the course brochure for full details of the module content, here. The programme will cover key areas of leadership including:Strategy and innovationDigital adoptionInternationalisation & winning new marketsBuilding a brandDeveloping a marketing strategyVision, mission & valuesOrganisational designEmployee engagement & leading changeHigh performance workplaceImplementing growth plansFinance & financial managementEfficient operationsDownload the Course BrochureAbout the Business Schools and Facilitators. The programme will be delivered by small business and enterprise experts from leading business schools, with the support of leading figures from industry and experienced entrepreneurs.The participating business schools have been accredited by the Small Business Charter, an award which recognises the high quality, tailored guidance they provide to support small businesses and their local economy.The consortium brings a huge amount of expertise and experience to support you and your business.Eligibility. To join the Help to Grow: Management Course, your business must:Be a Small or Medium-sized Enterprise (SME) based in the United KingdomFrom any business sector, employing between 5 and 249 peopleHave been operational for at least one yearNot be a charityTo join the Help to Grow: Management Course, the applicant must:Be a senior decision maker, such as Chief Executive, Finance Director, Operations Director, etc. (Please note, only one person per business can attend the programme)Commit to completing all sessionsFind A Course Near YouDates:Courses until the end of March 2022 are now open for registrations. Course dates from April 2022 to 2023 will be added in due course. Find available courses near you.Locations:The programme will be delivered by university business schools throughout the United Kingdom. In order to attend the face-to-face sessions please choose a course location convenient to you.Fees:The programme is 90% funded by the Government. The fee payable by participants is £750.Funded by. WITH FURTHER SUPPORT PROVIDED BY. About Us. AboutManagement BoardThe TeamEntrepreneurs in ResidenceContactPrivacy PolicyCookie PolicyMore. BlogEventsHow to ApplySuccess Stories© 2017 Small Business Charter – part of the Chartered Association of Business schools – a registered charity in England and Wales (charity number: 1162854)Small Business Charter
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