Copywriteroffice

Serp data

Request Result Detail

The request result help you to show your API requests results.

Copywriteroffice - beginner's guide to camera shutter speed serp result detail
Keyword beginner's guide to camera shutter speed
Search Urlhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?q=beginner%27s+guide+to+camera+shutter+speed&oq=beginner%27s+guide+to+camera+shutter+speed&num=30&hl=en&gl=GB&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Devicedesktop
Languageen
LocationGB
Search Enginegoogle.co.uk
No. Of Results7100000
RelatedSearch
shutter speed exampleshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Shutter+speed+examples&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAg8EAE
shutter speed calculatorhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Shutter+speed+calculator&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAhCEAE
shutter speed charthttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Shutter+speed+chart&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAhAEAE
slow shutter speed exampleshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Slow+shutter+speed+examples&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAg-EAE
fast shutter speed exampleshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Fast+shutter+speed+examples&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAhDEAE
slow shutter speed settingshttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Slow+shutter+speed+settings&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAg6EAE
aperture and shutter speedhttps://www.google.co.uk/search?num=30&hl=en&gl=gb&q=Aperture+and+shutter+speed&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwik89XS9KP1AhUfSmwGHe2jBL8Q1QJ6BAg5EAE
Result 1
TitleA Beginner's Guide to Shutter Speed | Skillshare Blog
Urlhttps://www.skillshare.com/blog/a-beginners-guide-to-shutter-speed/
DescriptionUse this beginner's guide to shutter speed to help improve your photography skills
Date
Organic Position
H1A Beginner’s Guide to Shutter Speed
H2Discover Online Classes in Photography
What is Shutter Speed?
How Do You Use Shutter Speed?
Learn More Photography Basics!
What Results Do You Get With Different Shutter Speeds?
Play Around With Shutter Speed!
Join Skillshare
H3Movement Photography
Light Painting
Low-Light Photos
Is there a best shutter speed?
Your creative journey starts here
H2WithAnchorsDiscover Online Classes in Photography
What is Shutter Speed?
How Do You Use Shutter Speed?
Learn More Photography Basics!
What Results Do You Get With Different Shutter Speeds?
Play Around With Shutter Speed!
Join Skillshare
BodyA Beginner’s Guide to Shutter Speed Use this beginner’s guide to shutter speed to help improve your photography skills. Share Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Discover Online Classes in Photography. Portrait photography, lifestyle photography, photo editing, and more. Start for Free Shutter speed is one of the fundamental camera settings—and every aspiring photographer should it understand through and through. Not only does it affect your final exposure, it can be used for movement photography in creative ways.  Heading out on a photoshoot? Read on for an overview of everything you need to know to get started with shutter speed. What is Shutter Speed? Before we get into how to use shutter speed creatively as a photographer, let’s get a few basics out of the way: Shutter definition: The mechanism that opens and closes to expose film in a camera. It’s actually made of two parts—the shutter release, which is the button you click, and the shutter curtain, the device that opens to let light into your camera.Shutter speed definition: The amount of time your shutter is open and allowing light to reach your film or digital sensor. Shutter speed is typically measured in seconds—or even fractions of a second! For example, 1/500 means the shutter will be open for a 500th of a second, letting very little light in, whereas 5” or 5s means the shutter will be open for five seconds, letting a lot more seep through. The smaller the fraction, the faster the shutter speed is.  But it’s not just about light—shutter speed also affects how movement is captured in your shots. A faster shutter speed is capturing a very short moment in time, meaning movement will typically be frozen, whereas a slow shutter speed may create a blurred look since the shutter remains open while your subject is moving. A shutter speed chart showing how different speeds affect light and motion. The shutter speed works together with the aperture (or how wide your lens is open) and the ISO (or how sensitive your film or digital sensor is to light) to create the final exposure of your photograph.  How Do You Use Shutter Speed? We’ll talk more about how to choose the right shutter speed for your situation in a minute, but here’s a general rule of thumb: For frozen motion, use the fastest shutter speed you can given your lighting situation. For blurred motion or capturing a low-light situation, you’ll want to use a slow shutter speed. Another photography tip: If you’re going slower than 1/125, you’ll need to use a tripod (unless you want your entire image to be shaky!). If you’re shooting handheld, stay faster than that.  In terms of how to change shutter speed, there are a few options depending on your camera and preferences.  Most DSLR cameras display the shutter speed on the digital display as well as in your viewfinder. You can typically adjust it using the common dial, or the little ridged dial: Turn it left for a slower shutter speed and right for a higher one. Whether you’re wondering how to change shutter speed on Canon or how to change shutter speed on Nikon or anything in between, start here. If you’re shooting in manual mode, select the shutter speed you want and then adjust your ISO and aperture until the light meter shows you’re in a good exposure range. Another way is to use shutter priority mode on your camera. Shutter priority mode allows you to choose a specific shutter speed you want—the camera will then automatically adjust the aperture and ISO to create a good exposure. On most DSLR cameras, shutter priority mode is labeled as “Tv” or “S” on your settings dial. A DSLR camera set to shutter priority mode. Learn More Photography Basics! Fundamentals of DSLR Photography Take the Class What Results Do You Get With Different Shutter Speeds? Movement Photography. Carefully selected shutter speed is great for capturing movement in different ways. If you want to freeze motion—such as in sports photography or when capturing action on the streets—use a fast shutter speed. You can also capture the feeling of movement by intentionally using a slower shutter speed for a blurred effect.  Shutter speed chart showing experiments in freezing fast-paced action using a fast shutter speed. A blurred motion picture taken with a slower shutter speed. Light Painting. Use a long shutter speed to capture the movement of light, creating long trails of light and color. Use a tripod if you want the rest of your image in focus—or go handheld to create abstract art. Light painting using a long shutter speed and a tripod. Light painting using a long shutter speed and no tripod. Low-Light Photos. In low-light situations—such as shooting the night sky or capturing lightning—you’ll want to use very long shutter speeds and make sure to use a tripod to keep the rest of your shot steady. Lightning photograph captured using a long shutter speed. Star photograph captured using a long shutter speed. Is there a best shutter speed? There is no best shutter speed, only the best shutter speed for the look you’re trying to achieve. Here are some general ranges to keep in mind for different situations: Freeze a slow-moving subject: 1/250 – 1/500 secFreeze fast motion: 1/1000 – 1/5000 secSlight motion blur: 1/15 – 1/60 secNight photography: 15-30 sec Start with these, then experiment until you capture the exact photograph you have in your mind! Play Around With Shutter Speed! Shutter Speed: Photographing Lightning, Stars, and Water Take the Class Written by: Erin Greenawald . Share Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Your creative journey starts here. Get Started for Free Unlimited access to every class Supportive online creative community Learn offline with Skillshare's app Join Skillshare. Join today for unlimited access to thousands of classes and more. Try Skillshare For Free
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 54
  • 1
  • speed
  • 47
  • 1
  • shutter speed
  • 44
  • 1
  • light
  • 17
  • 1
  • open
  • 13
  • 1
  • photography
  • 11
  • 1
  • camera
  • 10
  • 1
  • motion
  • 8
  • 1
  • share
  • 8
  • 1
  • movement
  • 7
  • 1
  • long
  • 7
  • 1
  • shutter speed shutter
  • 6
  • 1
  • speed shutter speed
  • 6
  • 1
  • long shutter speed
  • 6
  • 1
  • speed shutter
  • 6
  • 1
  • long shutter
  • 6
  • 1
  • situation
  • 6
  • 1
  • fast
  • 5
  • 1
  • class
  • 5
  • 1
  • capturing
  • 5
  • 1
  • tripod
  • 5
  • 1
  • mode
  • 5
  • 1
  • open windowclick share
  • 4
  • 1
  • shutter priority mode
  • 4
  • 1
  • open windowclick
  • 4
  • 1
  • windowclick share
  • 4
  • 1
  • shutter priority
  • 4
  • 1
  • priority mode
  • 4
  • 1
  • lightning
  • 4
  • 1
  • windowclick
  • 4
  • 1
  • start
  • 4
  • 1
  • exposure
  • 4
  • 1
  • create
  • 4
  • 1
  • blurred
  • 4
  • 1
  • photograph
  • 4
  • 1
  • slower
  • 4
  • 1
  • dslr
  • 4
  • 1
  • priority
  • 4
  • 1
  • change shutter speed
  • 3
  • 1
  • slower shutter speed
  • 3
  • 1
  • light painting long
  • 3
  • 1
  • painting long shutter
  • 3
  • 1
  • shutter speed tripod
  • 3
  • 1
  • shutter open
  • 3
  • 1
  • low light
  • 3
  • 1
  • change shutter
  • 3
  • 1
  • dslr camera
  • 3
  • 1
  • slower shutter
  • 3
  • 1
  • light painting
  • 3
  • 1
  • painting long
  • 3
  • 1
  • speed tripod
  • 3
  • 1
  • dial
  • 3
  • 1
  • capture
  • 3
  • 1
  • painting
  • 3
  • 1
  • skillshare
  • 3
  • 1
Result 2
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position1
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 3
TitleShutter Speed: A Beginner's Guide | Photography Mad
Urlhttps://www.photographymad.com/pages/view/shutter-speed-a-beginners-guide
DescriptionShutter speed is a great tool for perfecting exposure, controlling blurring, and creating interesting effects. Discover what it is and how to use it
Date
Organic Position2
H1Shutter Speed: A Beginner's Guide
H2What is Shutter Speed?
How is Shutter Speed Measured?
Choosing the Best Shutter Speed
You might also like..
H3Camera Shake
Motion Blur
Exposure
Creative Effects
Exposure, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained
What is a "Stop" of Exposure in Photography?
10 Ways to Digitally Improve Your Photos
Beach Photography Tips
Macro Lenses
7 Landmark Photography Tips for Avoiding Clichéd Photos
H2WithAnchorsWhat is Shutter Speed?
How is Shutter Speed Measured?
Choosing the Best Shutter Speed
You might also like..
BodyShutter Speed: A Beginner's Guide Shutter speed is a great tool for perfecting exposure, controlling blurring, and creating interesting effects. Discover what it is and how to use it. I've always believed that in photography, you should avoid getting bogged down in the technical side of your hobby, and focus on developing your creative talent. However, there are certain technical elements that are essential to getting a good photo - shutter speed is one of them. Shutter speed is 1 of the 3 elements (along with aperture and ISO speed) that determine a photo's exposure. It also controls how sharp your photos are, and lets you introduce lots of interesting creative effects into your shots. Let's look at what it is, why it's important, and how you can use it. Shutter speed is an essential tool in photography and well worth learning. Image by Mikel. What is Shutter Speed? Inside your camera, directly in front of the sensor, is a small flap called the shutter. When you take a photo, this opens and closes to let light reach the sensor, creating your image. Shutter speed describes how quickly or slowly the shutter opens and closes again. A fast shutter speed means that the shutter is only open for a short period of time; a slow shutter speed means the shutter is open for longer. How is Shutter Speed Measured? Shutter speeds are measured in seconds, or fractions of a second. For example, a shutter speed of 1/100 means 1/100th of a second, or 0.01 seconds. This is also known as the "exposure time", because it's the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light. Most cameras offer a wide range of shutter speeds, starting at just a few thousandths of a second and going up to several seconds. SLRs also have a "Bulb" mode where you can hold the shutter open for as long as you want. Choosing the Best Shutter Speed. In automatic mode, your camera will try to guess the best shutter speed to capture your scene. Unfortunately it doesn't always get it right, and your photo can end up poorly exposed or blurred. A better option is to switch to manual mode and take control of shutter speed yourself. When doing so, you need to consider the following: Camera Shake. Camera shake occurs when hand-holding your camera. No matter how steady you think you are, you can never stand perfectly still, and this slight movement shows up in your photos as a blurriness or lack of sharpness. Camera shake occurs when hand-holding your camera, and causes blurring of stationary objects. Image by Dean Ayres. You can avoid camera shake by using a faster shutter speed. It's more noticeable when using lenses with a long focal length, so the longer the lens, the more you'll need to increase your shutter speed to avoid camera shake. As a rule of thumb, you should use a minimum shutter speed of 1/focal length. So for a 200mm lens, use a shutter speed of at least 1/200th. When calculating this, use your lens's effective focal length, which is found by multiplying the focal length by your camera's crop factor. Motion Blur. Motion blurring happens when you're photographing a moving subject, let's say a runner. If you use a slow shutter speed, the runner will move across the frame while the shutter is open, causing them to appear as a blurry streak in the final image. Use a fast shutter speed to eliminate motion blur, or use it creatively to convey movement and speed. Image by Ondra Soukup. You can avoid motion blur by using a faster shutter speed. Doing so means that the subject will move less while the shutter is open, reducing the blurring effect. With a fast enough shutter speed, this blurring becomes unnoticeable, and the action appears "frozen". But before you go cranking your shutter speed as high as you can, you should consider whether you actually want to eliminate motion blur. It's an excellent way to convey speed or movement in a scene. You can also pan your camera to keep the subject sharp and blur the background. Exposure. You also need to make sure that your scene is properly exposed. A slower shutter speed lets in more light, while a faster shutter speed lets in less. You need to choose a shutter speed that lets in just the right amount of light, to give a photo which isn't too bright (overexposed) or dark (underexposed), and which has a good level of detail in the most important areas. Choosing the right shutter speed is important in achieving perfect exposure, with good detail in the highlights and shadows. Image by Jeff Smallwood. Remember that exposure isn't just about shutter speed - it also depends on your aperture and ISO speed. A good technique is to choose a shutter speed which gives the desired amount of blurring (if any), and then adjust your aperture and ISO to give a good overall exposure. Creative Effects. By using very short or very long shutter speeds, you can introduce some interesting creative effects into your shots. Long exposure photography is where you open the shutter for much longer than normal - anything from a few seconds to several minutes. This is perfect for creating blurred crowd shots, giving moving water a fog-like appearance, and capturing trails of light from things like cars and stars. A very slow shutter speed can be used for interesting abstract effects such as making water appear misty and smooth. Image by Jim. Alternatively, by using a very fast shutter speed you can capture some stunning "frozen" motion, such as birds in flight, sportsmen in action, or water splashing. These types of shots often require lots of trial and error, but they're truly fascinating when they work. Use a very fast shutter speed to freeze motion. Image by Diego Diaz. There's no end to the interesting effects you can create by varying your shutter speed. Don't be afraid to experiment or use settings that you'd normally avoid - you never know when you'll find a way to bring a new perspective to a common subject. The best way to learn about shutter speed is to flick your camera into manual or shutter priority mode and play around. Pay attention to the effect on exposure and blurring, and see how you can use that knowledge to bring a new level of creativity to your photos. You might also like... Exposure, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained. Aperture size and shutter speed add up to create our exposure. Learn how they work, and how to use them to get the creative effect you desire. What is a "Stop" of Exposure in Photography? Exposure is controlled by shutter speed, aperture, and ISO speed. "Stops" let you directly compare and swap these to produce the image you want. 10 Ways to Digitally Improve Your Photos. Digital editing software allows us to remove unwanted objects, adjust colours, and touch up blemishes. Learn how to digitally improve your photos. Beach Photography Tips. Beaches are crammed full of interesting photo opportunities. Follow these tips to get the most out of them on your next holiday. Macro Lenses. A macro lens is one which allows you to take sharp, detailed, close-up photos of small subject such as flowers, plants, insects, and products. 7 Landmark Photography Tips for Avoiding Clichéd Photos. Some landmarks have been photographed so many times we feel we've seen them from all angles. These tips will help you see them through fresh eyes.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 49
  • 3
  • speed
  • 47
  • 3
  • shutter speed
  • 41
  • 3
  • photo
  • 14
  • 3
  • exposure
  • 13
  • 3
  • camera
  • 13
  • 3
  • effect
  • 9
  • 3
  • image
  • 9
  • 3
  • open
  • 8
  • 3
  • blurring
  • 7
  • 3
  • motion
  • 7
  • 3
  • shutter open
  • 6
  • 3
  • interesting
  • 6
  • 3
  • photography
  • 6
  • 3
  • aperture
  • 6
  • 3
  • let
  • 6
  • 3
  • fast shutter speed
  • 5
  • 3
  • fast shutter
  • 5
  • 3
  • camera shake
  • 5
  • 3
  • avoid
  • 5
  • 3
  • creative
  • 5
  • 3
  • good
  • 5
  • 3
  • light
  • 5
  • 3
  • fast
  • 5
  • 3
  • shake
  • 5
  • 3
  • blur
  • 5
  • 3
  • subject
  • 5
  • 3
  • aperture iso
  • 4
  • 3
  • creative effect
  • 4
  • 3
  • motion blur
  • 4
  • 3
  • shot
  • 4
  • 3
  • mean
  • 4
  • 3
  • time
  • 4
  • 3
  • second
  • 4
  • 3
  • mode
  • 4
  • 3
  • long
  • 4
  • 3
  • length
  • 4
  • 3
  • tip
  • 4
  • 3
  • aperture iso speed
  • 3
  • 3
  • shutter speed mean
  • 3
  • 3
  • slow shutter speed
  • 3
  • 3
  • faster shutter speed
  • 3
  • 3
  • shutter speed let
  • 3
  • 3
  • iso speed
  • 3
  • 3
  • speed mean
  • 3
  • 3
  • slow shutter
  • 3
  • 3
  • faster shutter
  • 3
  • 3
  • focal length
  • 3
  • 3
  • speed let
  • 3
  • 3
Result 4
TitleUnderstanding Shutter Speed for Beginners - Photography Basics
Urlhttps://photographylife.com/what-is-shutter-speed-in-photography
DescriptionIn photography, shutter speed refers to the length of time camera shutter is open. Read this article to learn all about one of the key elements of exposure
Date2 Apr 2021
Organic Position3
H1Introduction to Shutter Speed in Photography
H2An exposure variable that is important to know for beginners
Footer
H3What is Shutter Speed?
How Shutter Speed is Measured
Shutter Speed and Exposure
Fast, Slow and Long Shutter Speeds
How to Set Shutter Speed
How to Find Shutter Speed
Shutter Speed FAQ
Site Menu
Reviews
More
H2WithAnchorsAn exposure variable that is important to know for beginners
Footer
BodyIntroduction to Shutter Speed in PhotographyAn exposure variable that is important to know for beginners. By Nasim Mansurov 76 CommentsLast Updated On November 9, 2021An image of a bird captured using fast shutter speedOne of the three most important settings in photography is Shutter Speed, the other two being Aperture and ISO. Shutter speed is responsible for two particular things: changing the brightness of your photo and creating dramatic effects by either freezing action or blurring motion. In the following article, we will explain everything you need to know about it in very simple language.Shutter speed exists because of the camera shutter – which is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that stays closed until the camera fires. When the camera fires, the shutter opens and fully exposes the camera sensor to the light that has passed through your lens. After the sensor is done collecting the light, the shutter closes immediately, stopping the light from hitting the sensor. The button that fires the camera is also called “shutter” or “shutter button,” because it triggers the shutter to open and close.Table of ContentsWhat is Shutter Speed?Shutter speed is the length of time the camera shutter is open, exposing light onto the camera sensor. Essentially, it’s how long your camera spends taking a photo. This has a few important effects on how your images will appear.When you use a long shutter speed (also known as a “slow” shutter speed), you end up exposing your sensor for a significant period of time. The first big effect of it is motion blur. If your shutter speed is long, moving subjects in your photo will appear blurred along the direction of motion. This effect is used quite often in advertisements of cars and motorbikes, where a sense of speed and motion is communicated to the viewer by intentionally blurring the moving wheels.Motion blur.Slow shutter speeds are also used to photograph the Milky Way or other objects at night, or in dim environments with a tripod. Landscape photographers may intentionally use long shutter speeds to create a sense of motion on rivers and waterfalls while keeping everything else completely sharp.Shutter speed: 5 seconds (a long shutter speed).On the other hand, shutter speed can also be used to do just the opposite – freeze motion. If you use an especially fast shutter speed, you can eliminate motion even from fast-moving objects, like birds in flight, or cars driving past. If you use a fast shutter speed while taking pictures of water, each droplet will hang in the air completely sharp, which might not even be visible to our own eyes.Shutter speed: 1/1600th second (a fast shutter speed)All of the above is achieved by simply controlling the shutter speed. In summary, quick shutter speeds freeze action, while long ones create an effect of motion when you photograph moving objects.How Shutter Speed is Measured. Shutter speeds are typically measured in fractions of a second when they are under a second. For example, 1/4 means a quarter of a second, while 1/250 means one-two-hundred-and-fiftieth of a second (or four milliseconds).Most modern DSLRs and mirrorless cameras can handle shutter speeds of 1/4000th of a second at the fastest, while some can handle even quicker speeds of 1/8000th of a second and faster. On the other hand, the longest available shutter speed on most DSLRs or mirrorless cameras is typically 30 seconds. You can use a longer shutter speed by using external remote triggers, if necessary.Shutter Speed and Exposure. The other important effect of shutter speed is on exposure, which relates to the brightness of an image. If you use a long shutter speed, your camera sensor gathers a lot of light, and the resulting photo will be quite bright. By using a quick shutter speed, your camera sensor is only exposed to a small fraction of light, resulting in a darker photo.However, shutter speed is not the only variable that affects the brightness of an image. There are also Aperture and ISO, along with the actual brightness of the scene in front of you. So, you have some flexibility when you’re deciding on a shutter speed, but you need to pick your other settings carefully.Shutter speed can be a vital tool to capture a photo of the proper brightness. On a sunny day, you may need to use a fast shutter speed so that your photo isn’t overexposed. Or, if it is dark out, a long shutter speed may be necessary to avoid a photo that is too dark (which, in turn, could require a tripod, due to motion blur from handholding the camera). For many people, this is the main reason to adjust shutter speed: to make sure your photos are the proper brightness. Still, motion blur concerns are also very important, and should not be overlooked.Fast, Slow and Long Shutter Speeds. A fast shutter speed is typically whatever it takes to freeze action. If you are photographing birds, that may be 1/1000th second or faster. However, for general photography of slower-moving subjects, you might be able to take pictures at 1/200th second, 1/100th second, or even longer without introducing motion blur.Long shutter speeds are typically above 1 second – at which point, you will need to use a tripod to get sharp images. You would use long shutter speeds for certain types of low-light / night photography, or to capture movement intentionally. If anything in your scene is moving when you use long shutter speeds, it will appear very blurry.In between, shutter speeds from 1/100th second to 1 second are still considered relatively slow. You may not be able to handle them without introducing camera shake from your hands, especially close to the one-second mark.This photo is blurry because I used a relatively slow shutter speed of 1/30 second.Also, this strongly depends upon your lens. Some lenses, such as the Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8, have specific image stabilization (also known as “vibration reduction”) technologies within the lens that can help photographers take pictures at very slow shutter speeds when hand-holding cameras, without introducing camera shake. Other lenses do not have vibration reduction, which means you need to use the reciprocal rule instead to determine how long your shutter speed should be without introducing blur from camera shake. It is also important that you know how to hold a camera.How to Set Shutter Speed. Most cameras handle shutter speeds automatically by default. When the camera is set to “Auto” mode, the shutter speed is selected by the camera without your input (and so are aperture and ISO). However, you can still set the shutter speed manually if necessary:By setting the camera to “Shutter Priority” mode, you choose the shutter speed, and the camera automatically selects the aperture.By setting the camera to “Manual” mode, you choose both shutter speed and aperture manually.Within both of these modes, you can choose to set ISO manually or automatically.In most cases, we recommend letting the camera select the correct shutter speed for you. Still, watch to be certain that you aren’t introducing too much motion blur in a photo (or freezing motion that you want to be blurred). I cover more of this in an article on camera modes, but I tend to shoot in “Aperture Priority” mode 95% of the time, letting the camera calculate the shutter speed automatically.How to Find Shutter Speed. Do you know how to find what your camera shutter speed is set to? It is typically very easy to find it. On cameras that have a top panel, the shutter speed is typically located on the top left corner, as circled:Shutter speed displayed on top camera LCDIf your camera does not have a top LCD, like some entry-level DSLRs, you can look through the viewfinder, where you will see the shutter speed on the bottom-left side. And if your camera has neither a top LCD nor a viewfinder, like many mirrorless cameras, you can see your shutter speed simply by looking on the back screen.On most cameras, the shutter speed will not show up directly as a fraction of a second – it will typically be a regular number. When the shutter speed is longer than or equal to one second, you will see something like 1” or 5” (with the quotation sign to indicate a full second).If you still cannot find the shutter speed, set your camera to “Aperture Priority” mode, and make sure that you have turned “AUTO ISO” off. Then, start pointing around your camera from dark to bright areas. The number that changes will be your shutter speed.Below are some other related posts you might enjoy:What is Exposure?What is Shutter Shock?Understanding ISO, Shutter Speed and ApertureSeven Tips to Pick the Perfect Shutter SpeedWe also made a video explaining shutter speed if that’s how you prefer to learn things:Shutter Speed FAQ. Below are some of the frequently asked questions related to shutter speed:What is a Slow Shutter Speed?A long shutter speed is typically around 1 second and longer. In comparison, a slow shutter speed can refer to a fraction of a second, such as 1/2 or 1/4.What is a Fast Shutter Speed?A fast shutter speed is often referred to as the shutter speed that is fast enough to freeze action. Typically, photographers refer to small fractions of a second, such as 1/250th of a second or faster when talking about fast shutter speed.How Do I Find My Shutter Speed?Shutter speed is often displayed on your camera’s top or rear LCD as a number or fraction. If you half-press the shutter release, then move your camera towards a brighter area, the number that changes is typically your shutter speed.Which Shutter Speed is the Slowest?Depending on your camera, the slowest shutter speed that is allowed to use without using a remote shutter release is typically 30 seconds.What is the Fastest Shutter Speed I can Use on My Camera?That depends on the camera’s capabilities. Most DSLR and mirrorless cameras can shoot as fast as 1/4000 of a second using the mechanical shutter. Some of the more advanced cameras can shoot as fast as 1/8000 of a second with mechanical shutters, and even faster when using electronic shutters.How is Shutter Speed Written?Shutter speed is always written in seconds or a fraction of a second. For example, a 1-second shutter speed is typically displayed as a single number with a quote sign or a letter “s” at the end of it, such as 1″ or 1s. Whereas a fraction of a second such as 1/250 is typically displayed as 1/250 or simply 250 on most cameras.What is the Best Shutter Speed?There is no such thing, as it really depends on what you are trying to achieve.How Do I Change Shutter Speed on My Phone?While some smartphones allow changing shutter speed using the built-in phone app, most require installing a third-party camera app to allow changing the shutter speed. If you use an iPhone, try out some apps like Camera+.And if you want to continue learning from our Photography Basics Guide, below is our Table of Contents.Take me to Chapter 4: Aperture Photography Basics Introduction What is Photography? Shutter Speed (You are here) Aperture F-Stop ISO Composition Metering Camera Modes Focusing Flash Camera Settings How to Take Sharp Pictures Photography Tips for Beginners Photography IdeasAbout Nasim Mansurov. Nasim Mansurov is the author and founder of Photography Life, based out of Denver, Colorado. He is recognized as one of the leading educators in the photography industry, conducting workshops, producing educational videos and frequently writing content for Photography Life. You can follow him on Instagram and Facebook. Read more about Nasim here.Footer. Site Menu. About Us Beginner Photography Lens Database Lens Index Photo Spots Search ForumReviews. Reviews Archive Camera Reviews Lens Reviews Other Gear ReviewsMore. Contact Us Subscribe Workshops Support Us Submit ContentInsert
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 94
  • 4
  • speed
  • 79
  • 4
  • shutter speed
  • 67
  • 4
  • camera
  • 48
  • 4
  • typically
  • 15
  • 4
  • fast
  • 13
  • 4
  • motion
  • 13
  • 4
  • long
  • 13
  • 4
  • photography
  • 12
  • 4
  • photo
  • 11
  • 4
  • long shutter
  • 10
  • 4
  • aperture
  • 10
  • 4
  • long shutter speed
  • 9
  • 4
  • fast shutter
  • 9
  • 4
  • speed typically
  • 8
  • 4
  • sensor
  • 8
  • 4
  • fraction
  • 8
  • 4
  • mode
  • 8
  • 4
  • top
  • 7
  • 4
  • iso
  • 7
  • 4
  • light
  • 7
  • 4
  • slow
  • 7
  • 4
  • shutter speed typically
  • 6
  • 4
  • camera shutter
  • 6
  • 4
  • important
  • 6
  • 4
  • image
  • 6
  • 4
  • brightness
  • 6
  • 4
  • effect
  • 6
  • 4
  • len
  • 6
  • 4
  • moving
  • 6
  • 4
  • set
  • 6
  • 4
  • fast shutter speed
  • 5
  • 4
  • camera sensor
  • 5
  • 4
  • slow shutter
  • 5
  • 4
  • setting
  • 5
  • 4
  • blur
  • 5
  • 4
  • introducing
  • 5
  • 4
  • find
  • 5
  • 4
  • number
  • 5
  • 4
  • slow shutter speed
  • 4
  • 4
  • shutter speed camera
  • 4
  • 4
  • speed aperture
  • 4
  • 4
  • camera top
  • 4
  • 4
  • motion blur
  • 4
  • 4
  • mirrorless camera
  • 4
  • 4
  • speed camera
  • 4
  • 4
  • displayed
  • 4
  • 4
  • shutter speed aperture
  • 3
  • 4
  • dslr mirrorless camera
  • 3
  • 4
  • camera shutter speed
  • 3
  • 4
  • nasim mansurov
  • 3
  • 4
  • aperture iso
  • 3
  • 4
  • shutter open
  • 3
  • 4
  • freeze action
  • 3
  • 4
  • dslr mirrorless
  • 3
  • 4
  • camera shake
  • 3
  • 4
  • priority mode
  • 3
  • 4
  • mode choose
  • 3
  • 4
  • find shutter
  • 3
  • 4
Result 5
TitleWhat is Shutter Speed? The Ultimate Beginners Guide!
Urlhttps://www.colesclassroom.com/shutter-speed/
DescriptionFeeling overwhelmed when thinking about the shutter speed settings of your camera? Read this guide to learn all about this key element of photography
Date
Organic Position4
H1What is Shutter Speed? The Ultimate Beginners Guide!
H2Tutorials » Photography » What is Shutter Speed? The Ultimate Beginners Guide!
What is Shutter Speed?
How to Change the Shutter Speed Settings on Your Camera
How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Canon
How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Nikon
How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Sony
When to Change Your Shutter Speed
Hang out with us on
Want More Photography Clients?Click Here to Take One of Our FREE Classes!
Welcome and Why Me?
Presets in Adobe Lightroom to Automate Workflow & “Pop” to Images!
H3Sports
Panning and Groups
Motion Blur & Action
Night/Long Exposure
Share this Image On Your Site
About the Author
You May Also Like
Photography
Editing
H2WithAnchorsTutorials » Photography » What is Shutter Speed? The Ultimate Beginners Guide!
What is Shutter Speed?
How to Change the Shutter Speed Settings on Your Camera
How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Canon
How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Nikon
How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Sony
When to Change Your Shutter Speed
Hang out with us on
Want More Photography Clients?Click Here to Take One of Our FREE Classes!
Welcome and Why Me?
Presets in Adobe Lightroom to Automate Workflow & “Pop” to Images!
BodyWhat is Shutter Speed? The Ultimate Beginners Guide! So you’re finally getting out of the easy, automatic mode and experimenting with your creative side. Learning shutter speed basics and how to control the shutter speed settings is one of the most important things you can do to improve your photography skills. What is Shutter Speed? Shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter is open inside your camera when snapping a photo. This is measured in seconds and it greatly affects the outcome of your photos. You will see numbers like 1/2, 1/250, 1/50, 1/60, 1/500, 2”, or bulb (on certain cameras) on your display screen telling you how fast or for how long the shutter is open and then closed. Usually, a well-exposed photo will have a faster shutter speed for clarity and sharpness, whereas a low-light or night photo will have a long shutter speed to allow more light into the camera. Shutter speed is part of the exposure triangle. The exposure triangle settings include ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. If you have just recently ventured out of automatic mode on your DSLR, you need to understand the exposure triangle elements on your camera. This shutter speed guide will help you know how these elements work when you leave your shutter open, both individually and together, to change your shutter speed settings and take creative, artistic photos. How to Change the Shutter Speed Settings on Your Camera. Put your camera into manual mode to change the shutter speed. If you have a Canon, you can also put it on TV (Time Value) mode. If you have a Nikon or Sony, S (shutter speed priority mode) will also work. There should be a dial or arrows somewhere on your camera. Move the dial left or right/ arrows up or down depending on the shutter speeds you want. The shutter speed format is usually in 1/1000, 1/250, 1/30, 1/2, 1/4, etc. The higher the bottom number, the faster the shutter speed is. Shutter speeds are measured in fractions of a second. A shutter speed of 1/1000 means “the shutter is open for one one-thousandth fraction of a second.” With higher shutter speed, the less time you leave your shutter open and the less is exposed to light. In general, higher shutter speeds are better for daytime photography, whereas lower shutter speeds are better for nighttime photos. ISO is the setting that refers to the light sensitivity of the image sensor in your DSLR. The lower the setting (for example ISO 100) the more sensitive your camera is to light and the sharper the image will turn out. When you are shooting in darker environments, it is recommended to raise the ISO (ISO 2800 for example) and set the other two elements of the exposure triangle in accordance. The aperture is also referred to as the f-stop. This is the most important element to master on your DSLR because knowing how the aperture works will give you the power to control the depth of field of your photos. Read this informative article explaining the f-stop and how you can get creative with it. Many photographers shoot in a semi-automatic mode called aperture priority. This means that the camera lets you choose the f-stop and then decides the shutter speed and ISO. https://youtu.be/ROZVkHexZZQ When your camera is in automatic mode, it will try its best to take the sharpest photo in the best exposure possible for the situation you are shooting in. You must get into manual mode and understand how to tell your DSLR exactly what you want it to do in order to achieve this level of photography yourself. All DSLR cameras and some point-and-shoot cameras use the same basic technology when it comes to taking photographs; aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. The settings may not all be in the same area on each digital camera body, even within the same brand. You will have to be in manual or one of the semi-automatic modes in order to change the camera’s shutter speed.  The semi-automatic mode that allows you to only adjust the shutter speed is called shutter priority mode (TV or S depending on the camera brand). How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Canon. The Canon Rebel series is a great entry-level camera that provides access to professional-level photography. Canon has TV mode (Time Value) which lets you adjust only the shutter speed. The camera will automatically choose the aperture and ISO depending on the shutter speed you decide. Turn the dial to M (manual), or TV (Time Value) mode. Turn the black dial below the shutter button until you reach your desired shutter speed. How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Nikon. Nikon also has some great entry-level models that allow you to get creative while providing professional features. The semi-automatic mode that lets you change the shutter speed is “S” (shutter priority). Let’s take a look at where do you find the shutter speed on the Nikon D7000. Turn the mode dial to M (Manual) or S (Shutter priority) Turn the dial on the right-hand side left or right, depending on the shutter speed you’re wanting. How to Change Shutter Speed Settings on a Sony. Sony has risen to professional-level grade with mirrorless cameras that give you all the professional settings you need to take amazing photos. These are now popular with travel photographers because of the smaller sized camera body and general low weight. The Sony A6000 is a great starter camera to get you started in your photography hobby. Turn the mode dial to M (Manual) or S (Shutter priority) Turn the main dial left or right depending on the shutter speed you’re wanting. When to Change Your Shutter Speed. Shutter speed allows you to control how fast the camera absorbs light and images. Have you seen those action shots where there are a fast-moving object and a still object in the same photo? This is achieved by using a shutter speed like 1/500. Those photos of soft, flowing water are also achieved with similar shutter speed. If you want crisp, sharp photos of a moving object frozen in action, you will need a very fast shutter speed. This is the shutter speed meaning in a nutshell. So basically, when you see a blurry photo (that obviously wasn’t planned that way) you will immediately recognize that the shutter speed was possibly wrong for that photo. There are other reasons why a photo may be blurry, it could be out of focus or have a shallow depth of field, but many of the times the shutter speed is the culprit. This is why we try to use fast shutter speed in our immediate situation. But some situations or projects don’t need a fast shutter speed but rather require other shutter speeds; like low light environments or motion blur photography. To use long shutter speeds (anything slower than 1/60 like 1/2 or 1/4) you’ll need a tripod to avoid camera shake. Camera shake is when unsteady hands or an unstable stand results in blurry images. A general rule of thumb to avoid camera shake is that any shutter speed under 1/30 or 1/60 will require a very steady hand or a tripod. Remember that when you change one setting in the exposure triangle, the other two settings are invariably affected. For example, when you have high shutter speed, you will need to compensate for the amount of light you’re letting in by raising the ISO. A high ISO adds grain to your photos, so achieving a good balance is key to successful images. The main rule of thumb about achieving sharp photos is to use a higher shutter speed than your lens focal length. Meaning if you are shooting with a 200mm lens focal length, your shutter speed needs to be above 1/200, maybe 1/250. Let’s take a look at a few situations where you may want to experiment and we’ll give you some helpful tips to achieve the photos that you want. Sports. Photographing live sports is a sport in itself! Obviously, there are a lot of action and moving objects, and you will want to freeze that action in your images. The key here is to have the highest fast shutter speed possible. A shutter speed of 1/1000 is usually a good place to start to freeze motion. This is easily achievable if you are outside during the day. Nighttime or inside sports photography may require you to raise the ISO because the fast shutter speed does not allow enough light in. Panning and Groups. Panning photography means following a moving object with your camera and clicking the shot while you, the photographer, is moving along with the object. The shutter speed does not necessarily need to be low and there is no golden rule here to accomplish good images. What you want to achieve is the frozen moving object and have the background blurred out. When taking portraits or group photos,  remember people move, especially kids. So it’s wise to use higher shutter speed in these situations. Adjust the shutter speed higher than the focal length of the lens that you are using. Example: If you are using an 80mm lens focal length, your shutter speed will have to be above 1/80. Motion Blur & Action. The main rule for motion blur photography is to use slow shutter speeds. Usually, shutter speeds like 1/500 mean that a tripod is required to avoid camera shake, a remote shutter, and possibly some lens filters. Use a long shutter speed for as long as 30 seconds to a few minutes to achieve the blurry, soft waves that make a photo look creative and unique. This may mean that you will have to limit the amount of light intake with a filter on your lens. With motion blur, the look you want to achieve will determine your shutter speed. Just remember to keep your ISO as low as possible, experiment, and have fun! Assuming you are outside, use a long shutter speed without having to raise the ISO too much. Using the shutter priority mode in this situation is recommended because you need to be quick on your feet. Having your camera decide the ISO and the aperture depending on the shutter speed will help you spend less time fiddling with the controls. Night/Long Exposure. Low light and nighttime photography require longer shutter speeds and higher ISOs. There are plenty of nighttime photography projects that are fun but require you to have complete control of the exposure time. Have you seen those fun nighttime photos with the light trails of cars? This is achieved by using long shutter speed. Start with an f/8 f-stop and a 10-second shutter speed and take it from there. Go outside and pick a setting that has moving objects. Stand in the same spot and take several photos, changing your shutter speed as you take your shots. You can try putting your camera into shutter speed priority (TV on the Canon or S on the other brands). This way the camera will automatically adjust the ISO and the aperture in accordance with the environment. See what happens to the photos when you change the shutter speed? Make sure to watch the settings change on your screen. Take notes and learn what happens to the final images. Remember that a long shutter speed may create blur or cause camera shake. This is also a great place to practice panning, nighttime, and long exposure photography. Get out there and practice! Learn from your mistakes and keep trying new things. This is how great photographers are made. Share this Image On Your Site. Please include attribution to ColesClassroom.com with this graphic. colesclassroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/shutterspeed101-infographic__2_.jpg’ alt=’Shutter Speed 101: The Ultimate Beginners Guide’ width=’800′ border=’0′ /> Hang out with us on. Want More Photography Clients?Click Here to Take One of Our FREE Classes! . Get the Free Class! About the Author. Kelly Acs How to Write a Successful Photography Business Plan Client Appreciation: 8 Tips for Saying Thank You! You May Also Like. Photography. Welcome and Why Me? . Editing. Presets in Adobe Lightroom to Automate Workflow & “Pop” to Images! . X Start a FREE TRIAL of Cole's Classroom today! SUBSCRIBE
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 92
  • 5
  • shutter speed
  • 77
  • 5
  • speed
  • 74
  • 5
  • camera
  • 31
  • 5
  • photo
  • 23
  • 5
  • mode
  • 17
  • 5
  • iso
  • 16
  • 5
  • setting
  • 15
  • 5
  • photography
  • 15
  • 5
  • manual
  • 13
  • 5
  • dial
  • 12
  • 5
  • light
  • 12
  • 5
  • change
  • 12
  • 5
  • image
  • 11
  • 5
  • change shutter speed
  • 9
  • 5
  • change shutter
  • 9
  • 5
  • long
  • 9
  • 5
  • exposure
  • 9
  • 5
  • shutter priority
  • 8
  • 5
  • speed shutter
  • 8
  • 5
  • higher
  • 8
  • 5
  • time
  • 8
  • 5
  • fast
  • 8
  • 5
  • aperture
  • 8
  • 5
  • priority
  • 8
  • 5
  • object
  • 8
  • 5
  • shutter speed shutter
  • 7
  • 5
  • speed shutter speed
  • 7
  • 5
  • shutter open
  • 7
  • 5
  • automatic mode
  • 7
  • 5
  • long shutter
  • 7
  • 5
  • moving object
  • 7
  • 5
  • depending
  • 7
  • 5
  • automatic
  • 7
  • 5
  • turn
  • 7
  • 5
  • moving
  • 7
  • 5
  • shutter speed setting
  • 6
  • 5
  • long shutter speed
  • 6
  • 5
  • speed setting
  • 6
  • 5
  • low
  • 6
  • 5
  • nighttime
  • 6
  • 5
  • situation
  • 6
  • 5
  • len
  • 6
  • 5
  • depending shutter speed
  • 5
  • 5
  • fast shutter speed
  • 5
  • 5
  • higher shutter
  • 5
  • 5
  • exposure triangle
  • 5
  • 5
  • depending shutter
  • 5
  • 5
  • fast shutter
  • 5
  • 5
  • camera shake
  • 5
  • 5
  • shake
  • 5
  • 5
  • higher shutter speed
  • 4
  • 5
  • semi automatic mode
  • 4
  • 5
  • camera shutter
  • 4
  • 5
  • stop
  • 4
  • 5
  • semi automatic
  • 4
  • 5
  • motion blur
  • 4
  • 5
  • focal length
  • 4
  • 5
  • camera shutter speed
  • 3
  • 5
  • adjust shutter speed
  • 3
  • 5
  • dial manual
  • 3
  • 5
  • avoid camera shake
  • 3
  • 5
  • len focal length
  • 3
  • 5
  • low light
  • 3
  • 5
  • iso aperture
  • 3
  • 5
  • priority mode
  • 3
  • 5
  • raise iso
  • 3
  • 5
  • adjust shutter
  • 3
  • 5
  • avoid camera
  • 3
  • 5
  • len focal
  • 3
  • 5
Result 6
Title
Url
Description
Date
Organic Position5
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 7
TitleFocus: What is shutter speed? A beginner's guide
Urlhttps://focus.picfair.com/articles/what-is-shutter-speed-in-photography-beginners-guide
DescriptionFocus: Learn how shutter speed works, why it is so important and how you can manipulate it to improve your images
Date
Organic Position6
H1What is shutter speed? A beginner's guide
H2
H3To avoid camera shake
To capture sharp photos of moving subjects
For creative reasons
To get the correct exposure
H2WithAnchors
BodyWhat is shutter speed? A beginner's guideCover image by Peter J. GriffifthsFor beginnersTechniqueWhat is shutter speed? A beginner's guideWritten by Kav Dadfar Categories:For beginnersTechnique— Level:BeginnerWhat is shutter speed? A beginner's guideByKav Dadfar No items found.Shutter speed is one of the most important elements of every image you'll ever take. In this guide, you’ll learn how it works, why it is so important and how to manipulate it to improve your imagesBeginnerWhat is shutter speed?Simply put, shutter speed controls the speed in which the curtain in front of your camera’s sensor opens and closes. When the shutter button is pressed, the curtain opens, and your sensor begins to record the light that passes through your lens until the moment the curtain closes again.The longer that this curtain remains open, the more light is recorded by the camera’s sensor. So, shutter speed is the length of time that your shutter is open. Shutter speed, together with aperture and ISO, form the ‘exposure triangle’ - the blueprint of every photo taken.Learn more about the exposure triangle with our dedicated guide here.‍View of the sensor on a DSLR camera. The shutter speed is what controls the amount of time light will be exposed to the sensor to create the image. Photo by Valentin ValkovHow is shutter speed measured?On the LCD screen on the back of DSLRs, and on dials on the top of mirrorless cameras and film camera bodies, there are numbers such as 1/20, 1/100, 2” etc. These relate to shutter speed settings and are measured in seconds. Where the shutter speed is faster than 1 second, this is shown as a fraction of a second.So, for example, when the shutter speed is set at 1/4 it means a quarter of a second. If it is 1/1000 it means one-thousandth of a second. Where the shutter speed is slower than 1 second it is shown as a whole number and followed by a “ (i.e., 2”, 3”, 10” etc). Most DSLR and mirrorless cameras allow you to set a shutter speed of up to 30 seconds with the option of setting longer shutter speeds with a shutter cable release.‍The LCD display on the back of a Canon DSLR camera. The shutter speed setting of 1/160s is displayed at the top left of the screenWhy is shutter speed important?There are four main reasons why shutter speed is such an important aspect of digital photography. Here’s why:‍To avoid camera shake. One of the biggest frustrations of photographers is their images lacking sharpness. Often the main reason for this is that the shutter speed is too slow. As mentioned above, shutter speed is the length of time that the camera’s shutter will remain open.The longer this is, the more difficult it will be to avoid the camera moving or shaking during the exposure. Even the smallest of movements will result in camera shake, which means blurred photos.This image was taken with a shutter speed of 1/60 sec - and as you can see from the blurred elements in the image - this was not fast enough to get a completely sharp imageWith the advancement of in-camera image stabilization technology, cameras and lenses can capture images at lower shutter speeds without causing blur. There are different types of image stabilization technology. But they all help the photographer shoot with a slower shutter speed than is recommended and still end up with sharp photos. This is typically 1 or 2 stops slower (i.e rather than shooting at 1/250s, the photographer can capture a replicable image at 1/125s).But there is still a limit to how slow you can set your shutter speed and hold the camera. This will vary between cameras and also individuals. But no one will be able to handhold a camera steady at very slow shutter speeds such as 1/30s, 1/15s, and so forth.Taken at 1/200s, this photo mixes the sharpness of the dancer’s face but there is a hint of motion blur around their legsThe best way to know your limit is to test it out. Shoot the same scene with different shutter speeds to see at what point your image will stop being sharp. You’ll then know your limit and your camera’s, and can ensure that you don’t select a slower shutter speed in the future.See these examples below:‍Image captured at 1/6s while holding the camera - you can see the image is significantly blurredThe same scene shot at 1/40s - the image is somewhat sharper, however there is still significant blurring, which is especially noticeable in the treesCaptured at 1/60s - this is generally considered the lowest shutter speed that can be used without causing significant blur when holding the cameraShot at 1/200s - the faster shutter speed has prevented any blurring in the scene and when viewing at full size, the image will be noticeably sharper than the 1/60s exposure captured at this speedTo capture sharp photos of moving subjects. The other aspect of capturing sharp photos is determined by the subject that you are photographing. For example, a shutter speed of 1/80s is fast enough to capture a stationary object. But if you are photographing a moving object, then your shutter speed will need to be faster in order to avoid blur.A fast shutter speed of 1/500s at f4 was used to capture the scene without encounter blur from the cars. Image from Havana, Cuba, by Sven HartmannFor creative reasons. Sometimes you might want to deliberately lengthen the shutter speed for creative reasons. For example, you may want to capture the movement of someone dancing, or light trails of a speeding car. Or you may want to smooth out the water or sky in your landscape shots.These require slower shutter speeds and will allow you to capture movement in your shots. This technique is called ‘long exposure photography’ - see the example below.Commuters pass under a snowy overpass on a steely grey evening, image by Leigh Hickin. In order to capture the light trails left by the movement of cars, this image was taken with a slow shutter speed of 30s at f10Further reading on how to photograph long exposures can be found in our dedicated guide here.To get the correct exposure. Ultimately, shutter speed should be used to get the best exposure settings for each image. So, this also includes the brightness or darkness of the image. A slower shutter speed means more light being captured by the sensor which in turn means a brighter image. Faster shutter speed means less time for the sensor to be exposed to light and will mean a darker image. So, if the image is too dark and needs to be brightened, make the shutter speed longer.A slower shutter speed, such as 1/60s, can be used creatively to convey a sense movement in your imageThis image was shot with a shutter speed of 1/500s at f4 to freeze-frame the action while also getting the correct exposure settings for the scene. Dancer depicting the devil at the annual Buddhist Festival at Jakar Monastry, eastern Bhutan. Image by Peter J. GriffithsHow to select the correct shutter speedUnfortunately, there are no fast rules or cheat sheets that will cover every scenario. Everything from subject matter to the light in the scene, as well as hand steadiness, will have an impact on the shutter speed.For example, birds in flight may need a shutter speed of 1/1000s or even faster. But capturing a sharp photo of someone jogging can be done with 1/250s or even a little slower. A portrait can be pin-sharp at 1/80s or slower, and if using a tripod, sharp photos can be captured at 30 seconds or longer.‍Bird photography usually warrants very fast shutter speeds in order to capture the exact moment. This image of a Kingfisher was taken with a shutter speed of 1/3200s. Photo by Alan Grant‍This spectacular Cheetah shot was taken at 1/1000s which meant the action could be captured sharply. In order to get enough light for the scene the image was recorded with at ISO 1000 and f10 aperture. Photo by Julia's ImagesThe next step is about learning about different scenarios and practising taking photos. The more you do this the better you will become at judging how fast or slow your shutter speeds needs to be.‍A shutter speed of 1/200s was enough to capture this scene sharply.Final tip…Most cameras will have a semi-automatic setting which is called ‘shutter priority’ (often selected from the dial on the top of your camera). This allows a minimum shutter speed to be set. The camera will then automatically determine the relevant aperture and ISO to help achieve a correct exposure at that shutter speed.‍On Canon cameras Shutter Priority is “Tv” which can be set usually from the LCD screen or the dials on top of the camera.This is a useful setting to select when shutter speed is of particular importance to the subject you are photographing, such as wildlife or sport, like the image below:‍Dulwich Hamlets match by Duncan Palmer. Image captured with a shutter speed of 1/1000s at f4.Hopefully, you now have a better understanding of shutter speed and why it is so important in photography. My advice would be to err on the side of caution and select a slightly faster shutter speed than you think you will need to begin with. With experience and practice, you will become better at gauging what shutter speed you will need for each shot.Images by Kav Dadfar unless otherwise stated.educationhow toShare this article Kav DadfarKav is a full-time photographer and author of 400+ articles. He is also a judge on the Wanderlust Magazine Photography of the Year competition and leads small group photo tours around the world.More articles like thisHow to create the Orton Effect in your landscape images with PhotoshopVideoHow to add a burst of sunlight to dull images in PhotoshopVideoHow to add realistic light leaks to your images in Adobe PhotoshopVideoHow to use foreground interest effectivelyPhotography by subjectNo items found.Upgrade to Picfair Plus to unlock all Focus articlesWant unlimited access?Upgrade to Picfair plus now to:Learn from the experts with unlimited access to Focus articlesGet more sales by unlocking all Picfair Plus Store featuresImprove your store with your own layout, branding & customizationUnlock unlimited uploads & 0% commissionUnlock my features“I’ve used places like Getty and Adobe and this is much better in my experience”— Marcin, Picfair PhotographerLove photography? Sign up to Picfair nowLove photography?Sign up for free now to get everything you need to start selling your photos, including:More articles like thisYour own photography storeExpert guides on how to sell your photosSign up free“The all-in-one solution for selling your photography”— PetapixelFocus is the world’s leading resource for aspiring photographers. Every guide is specially commissioned by Picfair & written by selected experts in their field. Which means - unlike elsewhere - you only get the very best advice the world has to offer, all in one place.Included with Picfair PlusUnlock more like this with Picfair PlusTaking   photographers to the next levelSign up to read moreLove photography? Sign up for free now to get everything you need to start selling your photos, including:More articles like thisYour own photography storeExpert guides on how to sell your photosUnlock my features“The all-in-one solution for selling your photography”— PetapixelWant unlimited access?Upgrade to Picfair Plus now to:Learn from the experts with unlimited access to Focus articlesGet more sales by unlocking all Picfair Plus Store featuresImprove your store with your own layout, branding & customizationUnlock unlimited uploads & 0% commissionUnlock my featuresOr learn more about Picfair Plus“The all-in-one solution for selling your photography”— Petapixel
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 64
  • 7
  • speed
  • 56
  • 7
  • shutter speed
  • 54
  • 7
  • image
  • 34
  • 7
  • camera
  • 27
  • 7
  • photo
  • 14
  • 7
  • photography
  • 13
  • 7
  • picfair
  • 11
  • 7
  • slower
  • 10
  • 7
  • light
  • 10
  • 7
  • exposure
  • 10
  • 7
  • capture
  • 10
  • 7
  • sensor
  • 9
  • 7
  • mean
  • 8
  • 7
  • sharp
  • 8
  • 7
  • scene
  • 8
  • 7
  • guide
  • 7
  • 7
  • faster
  • 7
  • 7
  • example
  • 7
  • 7
  • setting
  • 7
  • 7
  • the
  • 6
  • 7
  • solution
  • 6
  • 7
  • solution selling
  • 6
  • 7
  • photographer
  • 6
  • 7
  • fast
  • 6
  • 7
  • captured
  • 6
  • 7
  • unlimited
  • 6
  • 7
  • slower shutter speed
  • 5
  • 7
  • slower shutter
  • 5
  • 7
  • sharp photo
  • 5
  • 7
  • time
  • 5
  • 7
  • set
  • 5
  • 7
  • slow
  • 5
  • 7
  • movement
  • 5
  • 7
  • article
  • 5
  • 7
  • selling
  • 5
  • 7
  • camera shutter
  • 4
  • 7
  • store
  • 4
  • 7
  • shutter speed beginner
  • 3
  • 7
  • slow shutter speed
  • 3
  • 7
  • faster shutter speed
  • 3
  • 7
  • solution selling photography
  • 3
  • 7
  • speed beginner
  • 3
  • 7
  • speed important
  • 3
  • 7
  • dial top
  • 3
  • 7
  • slow shutter
  • 3
  • 7
  • faster shutter
  • 3
  • 7
  • correct exposure
  • 3
  • 7
  • selling photography
  • 3
  • 7
Result 8
TitleWhat is shutter speed in photography? A beginners guide | Adobe
Urlhttps://www.adobe.com/uk/creativecloud/photography/discover/shutter-speed.html
DescriptionShutter speed is how fast the shutter of the camera closes. Discover how adjusting shutter speed can help you capture clean shots or motion-filled moments
Date
Organic Position7
H1Shutter speed in photography: basics for beginners
H2What you’ll learn:
What is shutter speed?
Shutter speed fundamentals
Lightroom v Photoshop: which is best for you?
Shutter speed techniques
Using Lightroom to master shutter speed
Do more with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom.
You might also be interested in…
Get Photoshop Lightroom
H3What does changing the shutter speed do?
Key equipment for experimenting with shutter speed
How to find shutter speed on your camera.
How to set and change shutter speed
What is Shutter Priority?
The difference between fast, slow and long shutter speeds
How to use a fast shutter speed.
Key technique: intentional blur
How to use a slow shutter speed
Key technique: camera shake.
Contributors
H2WithAnchorsWhat you’ll learn:
What is shutter speed?
Shutter speed fundamentals
Lightroom v Photoshop: which is best for you?
Shutter speed techniques
Using Lightroom to master shutter speed
Do more with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom.
You might also be interested in…
Get Photoshop Lightroom
BodyShutter speed in photography: basics for beginners. Shutter speed is one of the most important settings in photography – alongside aperture and ISO. Learn the basics of shutter speed in photography and discover the creative opportunities it can offer.. What you’ll learn:. What is shutter speed? Shutter speed fundamentals Shutter speed techniques Using Lightroom to master shutter speed   What is shutter speed? Shutter speed is exactly what it sounds like – the speed at which the shutter of the camera closes. A fast shutter speed creates a shorter exposure — the amount of light the camera takes in  —while a slow shutter speed gives the photographer a longer exposure.    The shutter is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that remains closed until you start shooting. Once you click the button to take a photo, the shutter opens and lets in light that passes through the lens, exposing the sensor to it. Then the shutter closes again. The length of time the shutter remains open is determined by its speed.     What does changing the shutter speed do? Shutter speed is used in photography to capture images with motion blur and to freeze movement. Most shutter speed examples include subjects which are moving – from wildlife photography to landscapes featuring motion, such as passing clouds or running waterfalls. To use it effectively when you’re out shooting in different settings with various subjects, you need to understand the difference between fast and slow shutter speed and the best techniques to achieve your desired results.    “Shutter speed gives you two things. One, it lets you freeze time. If you have a faster shutter speed, it’s going to open and close quickly and get that slice of whatever’s happening. Then there’s the instance where you want a really slow shutter speed that opens the aperture to let in more light. You can use slow shutter speed in a dimmer environment when you need more light to expose a shot correctly.”  Photographer Jeff Carlson Shutter speed fundamentals. Shutter speed is measured in fractions of a second. Most modern DSLR cameras are capable of the fastest shutter speeds of up to 1/4000th of a second – some go up to 1/8000th. At the other end of the scale are the slowest shutter speeds. These are measured in whole seconds and generally fall anywhere between two and 30 seconds.   Fast shutter speeds of 1/4000th are used for capturing rapidly moving objects, such as freezing a race car hitting its top speed. The slower the shutter speed, the more motion blur your camera will capture when shooting fast-moving subjects. With long shutter speeds from two to 30 seconds, any movement in the image will blur. This can create a cool effect with landscapes and the sky, as water and clouds turn soft and streaky.   Key equipment for experimenting with shutter speed. There are a few essential pieces of equipment you need when experimenting with shutter speed in photography:   DSLR camera. Most DSLR cameras have the shortest shutter speed of 1/4000th of a second and longest ones of up to 30 seconds. To extend this, you need a camera with manual controls for the ISO, aperture and shutter speeds – not just automatic settings.    Tripod. When shooting handheld action, a tripod can help to avoid any unwanted motion blur. Even if you want to capture the movement of a subject, you might not want other background elements or motion blur around the edge due to camera movement.     Editing software. If your photos don’t turn out 100% as you envisioned, you can always edit them afterwards with the right photo editing software. “You could have academic knowledge of how photography works. But you also need to have the practical knowledge of trying it and practising it all the time to put the two together.” Photographer Carli Davidson   How to find shutter speed on your camera. . To find the shutter speed setting on your camera, read your instruction manual or try one of these methods:   1. While shutter speed is measured in fractions of a second, on most cameras it appears as a whole number. When it’s equal to or longer than one second you should see 1” (the quotation marks identifying a second). If it’s a fraction of a second – such as 1/250th – you should see 250. For example:   1” = shutter speed of 1 second. 10” = shutter speed of 10 seconds. 10 = shutter speed of 1/10th of a second. 500 = shutter speed of 1/500th of a second.   2. With most DSLRs, the shutter speed can be seen in the top left corner of the LCD display. If yours doesn’t have a screen, look through the viewfinder and it may appear in the bottom left. When you have neither, it should be on the back screen.    3. Do a manual check by:    Setting the camera to ‘Aperture Priority’ mode.  Turning ‘AUTO ISO’ off. Moving your camera between dark and light areas. Looking for the number that changes (this is your shutter speed).   How to set and change shutter speed. Many cameras automatically set the shutter speed alongside aperture and ISO. This helps beginners get to grips with different shutter speeds without worrying about the other two aspects. Even professional photographers use the setting for ease when shooting in an environment where light changes quickly.     To change your camera’s shutter speed manually:   Select ‘Shutter Priority’ mode. On the camera’s dial, this is usually indicated by an ‘S’ or ‘Tv’.  Scroll through and choose the shutter speed you want.  If your camera has an LCD display, the speed will normally appear here – or inside the viewfinder on the bottom or the side.    Alternatively, choose manual mode to adjust the aperture, ISO and shutter speed together.    It’s worth taking a few test shots to make sure you’re not introducing or freezing too much motion blur, depending on the effect you’re going for. This should inform whether you need to manually adjust it or not.   What is Shutter Priority? Shutter Priority mode allows you to set and adjust shutter speed in photography. You’re likely to shoot in Shutter Priority mode in nature photography, when you can freeze a fast-moving animal on the ground or in the sky. The difference between fast, slow and long shutter speeds. With such a great range of shutter speeds, it’s important you choose the right one for what you’re shooting. Fast shutter speeds, at 1/500th of a second or faster, will freeze and capture quick-moving action – so you get a clean image of a subject that would otherwise be blurred.  Lightroom v Photoshop: which is best for you? Discover the key differences between the apps so you can make the right choice and find the right plan. Learn more Slow shutter speeds often refers to a larger fraction of a second, such as ½ or ¼. Slow shutter speeds can capture movement and introduce blur, usually for slower moving subjects.   Long shutter speeds are typically around one second or longer. Like slow shutter speeds, they can be used for adding blurring effects to images.   These general guidelines of the best shutter speeds for capturing different subjects can help you to get the right amount of motion blur or stillness for your images:   1/500th of a second and above. This fast shutter speed freezes all but the quickest objects in a frame. It’s ideal for snapping race cars, skateboarders, skiers and birds in flight.    1/100th to 1/500th. Perfect for freezing slow moving and posing humans, this shutter speed is best for wedding photos, portraits and pets (when they’re not running).    1/10th to 1/100th. Good for posing models, but ideally they need to be completely still. Using a tripod or framing a scenic shot with no movement can work well at these speeds.    Two seconds to 1/10th. A tripod is necessary, as anything that moves will blur – best for calm landscape images.    Up to 30 seconds. This slow shutter speed is great for long exposure shots, where water and clouds turn silky and dreamlike, forming wonderful images. Any slight movement blurs.   “It goes back to your reason for taking the photograph. Are you wanting to capture motion or a split-second in time where something is moving but it doesn’t look like it? Like a rock falling into a pond, so you see that split-second where the water flies up into the air.”  Photographer and Designer Shawn Ingersoll Shutter speed techniques. When adjusting your camera’s shutter speed, consider light and motion. If you leave the shutter open for longer to capture more light, motion will affect the photo - potentially in ways you don’t like.   A slow shutter speed can illuminate a darker scene, as it brings more light through the lens. With a fast shutter speed, the lens is open for less time, so less light can enter. That makes low light a challenge and demonstrates the importance of a well-lit scene.    Properly setting your shutter speed is crucial to not missing the moment and retaining good light levels – especially with fast-moving subjects. Specific techniques can help you achieve the best results for both fast and slow shutter speed photos.    How to use a fast shutter speed. . A fast shutter speed is perfect for capturing a snapshot of action – whether that’s a bird in flight, a sports car speeding round a track or just your friend jumping over a fence.    Fast shutter speed eliminates, or at least reduces, the amount of blur around the subject during its movement. The shutter speed needs to match the speed of movement being captured, so the best setting varies depending on the subject.    Examples of how you can utilise a fast shutter speed are:   Sports – usually at 1/500 or higher. Birds in your garden – at as fast a shutter speed as your camera can manage. Your dog playing fetch – 1/250 is normally fast enough.   Consider your subject and take shots at different shutter speeds where possible to work out the optimum speed.   Key technique: intentional blur. Motion blur can be used creatively to blur certain elements in a frame to convey movement.   For example, a race car would look like it’s parked on the track if there was no blur whatsoever. Many photographers use a fast shutter speed that cleanly captures the car while blurring its tyres.   Intentionally blurring the background is another common effect to show movement or focus on the subject in the foreground. Panning is a popular technique to achieve this. Panning follows the movement with the shutter open to keep the subject sharp and the background blurred. When panning, slower shutter speeds of 1/60 to 1/30 are generally used.      “If I’m out at the race track and there’s a Formula One race car going by at 200 miles an hour, and I shoot it at 1/8000 of a second to perfectly freeze its motion, when I look at the final picture, it looks like a parked car. There’s going to be no sense of the reality of that scene. There’s going to be no sense that it was traveling quickly. If, instead, I use a slower shutter speed and time my camera to follow the car as it goes through the frame, the car is going to have a little bit of blur, but the background is going to be totally smeared — it’s going to look like [the car] was going 200 miles an hour. That’s a creative choice I get to make at the time to impart a greater sense of the true reality in the scene.”  Photographer Ben Long   Find out how to add motion blur effects to your images.   How to use a slow shutter speed. Capturing action that goes beyond a single moment is possible with slow shutter speeds. It’s often used to conjure up creative effects when shooting landscapes and other subjects featuring water and clouds.    For that silky-smooth effect at the bottom of a waterfall or waves crashing against a coastline, slow shutter speeds are best at:   1/8 to 12 seconds – to add a slight sense of movement.  15 to 30 seconds – to blur the water movement completely.  30 seconds+ – to smooth out the moving water.    Slow shutter speed photography is also a common technique when shooting at night, as it lets more light into the lens, even if your subject is moving. Experiment with the speed, aperture and ISO settings to get your desired results.  Key technique: camera shake. . Even with a slow shutter speed, you can get unwanted motion blur due to camera shake – that’s because the whole camera moves when the shutter is open. Using a tripod will avoid this, but sometimes you need to shoot handheld.    In this case, avoid using a shutter speed slower than your lens length. For example, if your camera has a 300mm lens, use a shutter speed of at least 1/300 – unless you have a tripod. Basically, the longer your lens, the faster your shutter speed should be.   “I used to photograph basketball in this dark gym. To get the proper exposure, I would sometimes have to go down to a shutter speed of 1/50, but then I could see movement in my images, which I didn’t want. In sports photography, you want images to be clean.”  Journalist and Wedding Photographer Anna Goellner   Using Lightroom to master shutter speed. Capture and edit photos on the go and in one place with Lightroom. You can quickly see if your techniques using fast and slow shutter speeds worked, editing them as you go. Explore images and tutorials from professional photographers to improve your own techniques when experimenting with shutter speeds. Discover more inspiring fast and slow shutter speed creations on Behance.   Discover Adobe Lightroom and create professional images when using fast and slow shutter speeds.    Contributors. Carli Davidson, Ben Long, Jeff Carlson, Anna Goellner, Shawn Ingersoll Do more with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom.  . Edit photos easily with Lightroom presets, Super Resolution, easily share photos from any device and access your projects anywhere with cloud photo storage management. You might also be interested in…. Understanding shutter speed. Discover how adjusting shutter speed can help you capture clean shots or motion-filled moments. Understanding focal length. Discover ways to select the ideal focal length for any and every photo. Night Photography. Low light doesn’t have to equal low quality with these tips for successful nighttime photos. An introduction to shallow depth of field. Explore how shallow depth of field can add dimension to your photographs. Discover more on photography Get Photoshop Lightroom. Edit, organise, store and share photos from anywhere. 7 days free, then £10.42/mo. Try for free stickypromobar stickypromobar Try Lightroom, free for 7 days then £9.98/mo. Try for free Free Trial Free Trial Language Navigation Language Navigation
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 105
  • 8
  • speed
  • 103
  • 8
  • shutter speed
  • 98
  • 8
  • camera
  • 29
  • 8
  • slow
  • 22
  • 8
  • fast
  • 21
  • 8
  • slow shutter
  • 19
  • 8
  • blur
  • 19
  • 8
  • slow shutter speed
  • 18
  • 8
  • photo
  • 16
  • 8
  • motion
  • 16
  • 8
  • movement
  • 15
  • 8
  • subject
  • 15
  • 8
  • light
  • 14
  • 8
  • photography
  • 13
  • 8
  • capture
  • 12
  • 8
  • image
  • 12
  • 8
  • moving
  • 12
  • 8
  • fast shutter speed
  • 11
  • 8
  • fast shutter
  • 11
  • 8
  • lightroom
  • 11
  • 8
  • setting
  • 10
  • 8
  • photographer
  • 10
  • 8
  • technique
  • 10
  • 8
  • second
  • 10
  • 8
  • car
  • 10
  • 8
  • motion blur
  • 9
  • 8
  • time
  • 8
  • 8
  • shooting
  • 8
  • 8
  • open
  • 8
  • 8
  • free
  • 7
  • 8
  • aperture
  • 7
  • 8
  • discover
  • 7
  • 8
  • len
  • 7
  • 8
  • effect
  • 7
  • 8
  • shutter speed photography
  • 6
  • 8
  • speed photography
  • 6
  • 8
  • fast slow
  • 6
  • 8
  • 30 second
  • 6
  • 8
  • tripod
  • 6
  • 8
  • fast slow shutter
  • 5
  • 8
  • speed shutter
  • 5
  • 8
  • shutter speed shutter
  • 4
  • 8
  • speed shutter speed
  • 4
  • 8
  • speed camera
  • 4
  • 8
  • day
  • 4
  • 8
  • aperture iso
  • 4
  • 8
  • shutter open
  • 4
  • 8
  • race car
  • 4
  • 8
  • priority mode
  • 4
  • 8
  • shutter priority
  • 4
  • 8
  • shutter speed technique
  • 3
  • 8
  • shutter speed measured
  • 3
  • 8
  • shutter speed 14000th
  • 3
  • 8
  • slower shutter speed
  • 3
  • 8
  • long shutter speed
  • 3
  • 8
  • experimenting shutter speed
  • 3
  • 8
  • shutter speed camera
  • 3
  • 8
  • shutter priority mode
  • 3
  • 8
  • speed technique
  • 3
  • 8
  • movement shutter
  • 3
  • 8
  • technique achieve
  • 3
  • 8
  • speed measured
  • 3
  • 8
  • dslr camera
  • 3
  • 8
  • speed 14000th
  • 3
  • 8
  • slower shutter
  • 3
  • 8
  • fast moving
  • 3
  • 8
  • moving subject
  • 3
  • 8
  • long shutter
  • 3
  • 8
  • water cloud
  • 3
  • 8
  • experimenting shutter
  • 3
  • 8
  • edit photo
  • 3
  • 8
Result 9
TitleUnderstanding Shutter Speed: A Beginner’s Guide
Urlhttps://www.bobbooks.co.uk/blog-post/understanding-shutter-speed-a-beginners-guide
DescriptionIf you want to gain greater control of your images and get sharp photos regardless of the lighting conditions or what you’re photographing, at some point you’re going to have to venture into manual or shutter speed priority mode
Date9 Jan 2018
Organic Position8
H1Understanding Shutter Speed: A Beginner’s Guide
H2
H3Be in the know…
H2WithAnchors
BodyUnderstanding Shutter Speed: A Beginner’s Guide Marianne Stenger 9th January 2018 If you want to gain greater control of your images and get sharp photos regardless of the lighting conditions or what you’re photographing, at some point you’re going to have to venture into manual or shutter speed priority mode.So what exactly is shutter speed and how does it affect your photos?Every camera has a physical shutter that opens and closes when a picture is taken in order to expose the sensor to the light that’s coming through the lens. So the shutter speed or exposure time controls how long this shutter stays open for and how much light will reach the sensor.Together with aperture and ISO, shutter speed is also one of the three elements of exposure, so understanding how it affects your photos will help you take your photography to the next level. With this in mind, here are a few important things you should know about shutter speed. Shutter speed is measured in seconds and fractions of seconds. In order to effectively control your shutter speed and get the results you’re looking for, you need to understand how shutter speed is measured and displayed. When shutter speeds are under a second, and they usually will be when you’re handholding your camera, they’ll be measured in fractions of a second.So you’ll see shutter speeds ranging from 1/4, which is a quarter of a second, to 1/250, which is one two-hundred-and-fiftieth of a second. These days, most DSLRs can go up to faster shutter speeds of up to 1/8000th of a second or more.Slower shutter speeds can be measured in seconds, and the longest shutter speed for most DSLRs is around 30 seconds, although longer exposures are possible with a remote shutter release. A fast shutter speed freezes motion. When you want to freeze motion and get sharp and well-focused action shots, whether you’re photographing a sports event, a child playing or an animal in the wild; you need to use a faster shutter speed.How fast it needs to be depends on the situation, but it should generally be over 1/500 for things like runners or sports events, and 1/1000 to 1/2000 if you’re photographing faster action such as a bird flying or a car driving by. A slow shutter speed captures motion blur. Although sharp photos are the norm in photography, there are some situations where you’ll actually want to capture motion in order to give the picture a sense of movement or create other artistic effects such as light trails or blurred water.There are a few different ways to add motion blur to an image, and these include panning a moving subject, using longer exposures or purposely zooming the camera during the exposure.Panning is a technique that allows you to keep the subject relatively sharp while blurring the background to add a sense of speed to the photo. In order for it to work, you need to choose a slower shutter speed, usually somewhere around 1/30 or 1/40, and then follow the subject with the camera as it moves. Longer lenses require a faster shutter speed. If you own any telephoto lenses, you may have already realised that it’s harder to get sharp and well-focused images, especially at longer focal lengths. This is generally down to what’s known as camera shake because it’s nearly impossible to hold the camera completely still.So if you’re using a 600mm lens, for instance, you’ll need to use a much faster shutter speed than you would if you were using a 35mm lens. One trick for getting it right is to follow the 1/focal length rule, which states that your shutter speed should always be faster than the focal length of your lens. So when you’re using a 300mm lens and hand-holding the camera, your shutter speed should be at least 1/300 or more for tack sharp photos.Slower shutter speeds require a tripod. If you’re interested in experimenting with longer exposures, you’re going to need a tripod, especially if you’ll also be using a telephoto lens. This is because telephoto lenses are heavier and more difficult to hold still, not to mention that they usually also have a slower maximum aperture.A tripod will keep the camera still for the duration of the exposure, whether your shutter speed is 1 second or 30 seconds. Tripods can also come in handy for panning, as the tripod will hold the camera straight and steady even as you move it to follow your subject. Looking for more tips on how to improve your photography techniques? Be sure to check out our 20 essential photography tips for beginners.  Related Articles. Remembering Wildlife: Three Years On The Ultimate Guide to Modern Day Scrapbooking 10 Christmas Gift Ideas for Photographers Be in the know…. Sign up now for exclusive offers, expert tips, and inspiring stories, straight to your inbox. Products Photo Books Wall Art Photo Calendars Photo Cards Presentation Boxes Paper Swatch pack Personalised Photo Albums Layflat Photo Books Holiday Photo Books Memory Books Wedding Photo Books Baby Photo Books Personalised Gifts Create a Book Bob Designer Software Online Book Creator PDF-to-Book iOS App Video Photobook Logo-free books Self-publishing online bookshop About Bob Books About us Contact us Christmas Order Dates Christmas Ordering FAQS Job Vacancies Product price list Terms & Conditions Data Protection Policy Help and Info Discounts & Rewards Bob Rewards Gift Vouchers Professional discount Student discount © Bob Books Ltd. 241a Portobello Road, London W11 1LT This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience Ok
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 27
  • 9
  • speed
  • 25
  • 9
  • shutter speed
  • 24
  • 9
  • book
  • 13
  • 9
  • photo
  • 12
  • 9
  • camera
  • 9
  • 9
  • sharp
  • 8
  • 9
  • len
  • 6
  • 9
  • exposure
  • 6
  • 9
  • faster
  • 6
  • 9
  • photo book
  • 5
  • 9
  • order
  • 5
  • 9
  • second
  • 5
  • 9
  • longer
  • 5
  • 9
  • motion
  • 5
  • 9
  • tripod
  • 5
  • 9
  • faster shutter
  • 4
  • 9
  • photography
  • 4
  • 9
  • measured
  • 4
  • 9
  • subject
  • 4
  • 9
  • bob
  • 4
  • 9
  • shutter speed measured
  • 3
  • 9
  • faster shutter speed
  • 3
  • 9
  • speed measured
  • 3
  • 9
  • longer exposure
  • 3
  • 9
  • image
  • 3
  • 9
  • photographing
  • 3
  • 9
  • light
  • 3
  • 9
  • follow
  • 3
  • 9
  • lense
  • 3
  • 9
  • telephoto
  • 3
  • 9
  • length
  • 3
  • 9
  • hold
  • 3
  • 9
  • tip
  • 3
  • 9
  • christmas
  • 3
  • 9
  • gift
  • 3
  • 9
  • discount
  • 3
  • 9
Result 10
TitleWhat is Shutter Speed? Stupid-simple Beginner’s Guide – Camera Harmony
Urlhttps://cameraharmony.com/shutter-speed-explained/
Description
Date
Organic Position9
H1What is Shutter Speed? Stupid-simple Beginner’s Guide
H2What is Shutter Speed?
Shutter Speed and the Exposure Equation
How To Control Shutter Speed
Freezing Action and Speeding Everything Up
Long Exposures and Slowing It All Down
Shutter Speed and Image Stabilization
Shutter Speed and Frames-Per-Second
Shutter Speed and Aperture
Shutter Speed with Strobes and Other Artificial Light
Conclusion
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat is Shutter Speed?
Shutter Speed and the Exposure Equation
How To Control Shutter Speed
Freezing Action and Speeding Everything Up
Long Exposures and Slowing It All Down
Shutter Speed and Image Stabilization
Shutter Speed and Frames-Per-Second
Shutter Speed and Aperture
Shutter Speed with Strobes and Other Artificial Light
Conclusion
BodyWhat is Shutter Speed? Stupid-simple Beginner’s Guide // By Gintaras To capture the images that you dream of, you’ll ultimately need to get a grasp of how to control the camera manually. This seems daunting, but once you break down the three key components that you need, it’s not too bad! The pieces of the puzzle are ISO, aperture, and… shutter speed.  Shutter speed mishaps tend to be the main reason that new camera enthusiasts are disappointed in their images. If you set the wrong shutter speed, then your images will either be blurry or they will be too dark. Get it just right and you can catch a snowboarder frozen in mid air! Here is how shutter speed works.  What is Shutter Speed? . In layman terms, shutter speed is how fast your camera can take a picture. In your settings or on the camera screen, this is denoted by 1/-insert number here-. This simply refers to how long the shutter in your camera is open. Shutter speed ranges from 1/8 all the way to 1/8000.  The shutter is like a door, it opens and shuts (hence the name). Every time it opens and closes, a picture is taken. The larger the number after the 1/—, such as 1/1000, the faster the shutter moves. The smaller the number, the longer the shutter remains open because it is moving slower.  Fast shutters capture photographs more quickly than slow shutters. Keeping your shutter moving quickly is what freezes action! When the shutter is slow, motion begins to blur because the doors don’t close quickly. When the motion blurs and the shutter is slow, this is called a long exposure. We will talk more about long exposures later in the article.  Because the shutter is like a door, it has an unintentional purpose of controlling how much light hits the sensor. The shutter is located right between the lens and the aperture, which is the hole that leads to the sensor. The faster it moves, the less time light has to hit the sensor, and as such, your photographs will be darker. The slower the shutter moves, the more light hits the sensor, and the brighter your image will be.  Shutter Speed and the Exposure Equation . As mentioned in the introduction, in order to use your camera to its fullest potential, you need to grasp how to manually control the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. These three factors make up the exposure triangle or exposure equation.  Exposure is the amount of light that reaches your camera. Too much light and your image will be too bright. Too little, and it’ll be too dark. Controlling your exposure is how you bring out the vividness of your shot or the moodiness of a solemn moment.  Exposure is a formula: ISO + shutter speed + aperture = exposure.  Like a mathematical formula, if one variable is changed, the rest are affected by the change.  Here is their correlation, broken down in the simplest of explanations:  The ISO is your camera’s sensitivity to light. The lower the ISO number, the less sensitive the camera is to light (but the less noise the photograph has). The higher the ISO number, the more sensitive the camera is to light (but the more noise the photograph has). Noise are the obnoxious little specks you see in photographs.  The aperture controls how much light does (or doesn’t) hit your sensor. The lower the aperture number, the more light the camera lets in. The higher the aperture number, the less light the camera lets in. The lower the aperture number, the shallower the depth of field. The larger the aperture number, the deeper the depth of field.  Finally, the shutter speed. The higher the shutter speed number, the darker the image. The lower the shutter speed number, the lighter the image. Fast freezes action and slow causes motion blur.  Together, these three components keep balancing each other out to create the perfect exposure for your photograph! The aperture and the shutter speed affect how much light is able to reach the sensor and the ISO controls what happens to the light when it touches the sensor. This is why a fast shutter speed causes a darker image, because if you imagine a shutter as a door that opens and closes, the faster you open and close the door the less time light has to fill a room. Therefore, the light has less time to reach the sensor, and as such, everything is darker! How To Control Shutter Speed . As a general view, on the majority of cameras you can control shutter speed by setting your camera to either Manual Mode or Shutter Priority Mode.  Depending on the camera brand, Shutter Priority may be defined by an S in the menu dial or Tv (such as Canon) in the menu dial. Shutter Priority mode is when all you adjust is the shutter speed and the camera automatically adjusts the aperture and ISO accordingly in order to reach its definition of perfect exposure. It’s generally not recommended to rely on this form of automatic mode because the camera’s sensor is not always accurate and does not always make the right decisions.  In Manual Mode, you control all of the variables yourself. Nearly all cameras have a dial that you spin in order to change the shutter speed, turning to the right (increasing the number) raises the speed and turning to the left (decreasing the number) slows it down.  Freezing Action and Speeding Everything Up. Many people find freezing the action to be the most eye-catching aspect of photography. To be on the safe side of motion being frozen no matter what, going higher than 1/4000 is recommended, with 1/8000 being the maximum. Many sport photographers shoot at 1/8000.  But that being said, lighting may not always be ideal and you’ll often need to go to a somewhat lower shutter speed in order to maintain proper exposure. The shutter speed you need to freeze action depends on how fast your subject is moving.  Here is a general chart: 1/125-1/150 is great to snap a person walking leisurely.  1/500-1/1000 seconds will capture a person running or jogging.  1/500-1/2000 seconds will freeze an animal running.  1/800-1/2000 seconds will photograph faster movements, such as a bird flying.  1/500-1/8000 seconds is great for anything faster, such as a car racing on a track or horses galloping at the Kentucky Derby.  Equally, anything about 1/125 allows you to photograph handheld and not need a tripod.  Long Exposures and Slowing It All Down. Long exposures are when the shutter is open for a long period of time. This is used to blur movement or obscure elements and create a more artistic-looking image. If you’ve ever seen a photograph of a freeway with light trails or a waterfall with water that looks silky smooth, those are achieved with long exposures!  Long exposures are also used to capture astrophotography and the night sky. Photographers place the camera on a tripod and let the shutter stay open for a very long period of time, perfectly still. The result are a thousand stars and sometimes even galaxies immortalized in a photograph.  Long exposures are achieved with shutter speeds of the following:  Landscape (making water look silky): Around 1/60 Speed light trails: Around 1/10” – 1/15” Night sky: Around 1/20” The longer the shutter is open, the lighter the image will be. That is why other than landscapes, you rarely see long exposures done during the daytime.  So, how do landscape photographers do it? It might seem impossible given the fact that a slow shutter speed equals a very light image, but there is a solution! You can put a Neutral Density, or ND, filter onto your lens.  Neutral density filters darken the frame so that you can photograph in really bright conditions. If you like shooting with super wide apertures, like F/1.4, but have to contend with the bright afternoon sun, you’ll want to place a neutral density filter on your lens. This is because the wide aperture will still overexpose your frame even when using the fastest shutter speed and the least sensitive ISO because too much light is entering the lens. But with a neutral density filter, you have the ability to modify how much light enters your camera and make your frame much darker.  Going back to long exposures, if you find that setting your shutter speed too slow makes the photograph too bright, a neutral density filter can aid with that by darkening the frame enough for your to keep the shutter wide open. This is how those landscape photographers do it.  Shutter Speed and Image Stabilization. When shopping for lenses, you may notice a few acronyms attached to the lens name. Letters such as “IS” in Canon equipment, “VR“ in Nikon, “OSS“ in Sony, and so forth are all brand terms to the same feature: image stabilization.  Image stabilization is a system inside of a lens that is intended to reduce blurring associated with the motion of a camera. This mechanical system will make sure that your hand shaking or something bumping into your lens won’t cause an image to blur!  So, how does this pertain to shutter speed? Well, image stabilization is also really handy if you like to shoot in low light. Image stabilization allows you to shoot in darker conditions without motion blur because you can lower your shutter speed even more. Image stabilization will ensure that a slow shutter speed won’t be affected by your hand shaking or the wind blowing a camera while on a tripod.  As such, if you photograph a lot of night portraits or in light that is not ideal, having a lens with image stabilization is a worthwhile investment.  If you capture photographs in brightly lit situations, then you can save your money. A fast shutter speed will already stabilize an image and prevent motion blur, even if your hand shakes!  Shutter Speed and Frames-Per-Second. Every camera has something called FPS, or Frames-Per-Second. What this discloses is how many pictures a camera can snap per second of shooting. To access this feature to its maximum potential, you have to go to the menu of your camera and set it to either “Burst Mode” or “High Speed Continuous Shooting” (depending on your camera brand). Your camera will then fire off as many photographs as it is capable of taking per second.  This relates directly to shutter speed, and can actually aid you in using slower shutter speeds.  To capture the fastest FPS, set your shutter speed to something fast. This lets you photograph every sequence of an action, such as a dog chasing after a ball.  If you have to use a slower shutter speed due to low light but still want to freeze the action, set the speed to something higher than 1/50 and then make sure your camera is in Burst Mode / High Speed Continuous Shooting. If you keep firing off and taking advantage of the FPS, at least one of the images will be perfectly still with no motion blur solely because of how fast the camera is able to take photographs!  Shutter Speed and Aperture. Shutter speed doesn’t always have to be about the motion in your shot. You can also use shutter speed to help you shoot at the aperture that you want. This technique is used by landscape, still life, and portrait photographers all the time.  If you’re using wide open apertures in brighter light, raise the shutter speed all the way to its maximum of 1/8000 in order to darken the shot enough to counteract the wide open aperture which lets the sensor get a lot of light.  Or, if you want to shoot with a deeper depth of field and a narrow aperture, slow your shutter speed down to contend with the sensor getting less light due to the narrow aperture.  Shutter Speed with Strobes and Other Artificial Light . Now, everything we have been chatting about has to do with natural light. What if you’re a photographer looking to get into the photo studio? Your shutter speed rules may change a bit here.  If you use continuous light (photography lights that stay on), your shutter speed can remain the same as you shooting outdoors because continuous light is meant to mimic natural light.  If you use strobes, flashes, or speedlites- that’s a different story. These lights burst a very bright light in synchrony with your camera shutter. They are usually attached to the hot shoe (the silver metal component at the very top of your camera) and communicate with your camera through that, or they can be attached to a tripod and communicate with your camera via a remote control or wireless unit. When you click the shutter button the flash goes off.  That being said, your shutter speed can actually be faster than the light from the flash. If you make your shutter too fast, you will get only half of the frame lit up or none at all! The light will travel slower than you photograph it! As such, you will become limited on your shutter speed, often to a speed of 1/250 or so to make sure the whole image is illuminated.  Conclusion. In conclusion, accidentally setting your camera to a slow shutter speed or one that is too fast is often the reason for a lot of photography frustration! Understanding how to control your shutter speed will fix many common problems, and help you capture those “wow” captures of frozen movement!  Remember, once more, the larger the number after the 1/— the more your action will freeze but the darker your photo will look, and vice versa. You’re able to adjust ISO and Aperture accordingly when you keep this in mind!  We use cookies on our website to give you the most relevant experience by remembering your preferences and repeat visits. By clicking “Accept”, you consent to the use of ALL the cookies.Cookie settingsACCEPTPrivacy & Cookies Policy Close Privacy Overview. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may have an effect on your browsing experience. Necessary Necessary Always Enabled Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information. Non-necessary Non-necessary Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website. SAVE & ACCEPT Scroll to Top
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 75
  • 10
  • speed
  • 55
  • 10
  • shutter speed
  • 53
  • 10
  • camera
  • 36
  • 10
  • light
  • 36
  • 10
  • image
  • 24
  • 10
  • aperture
  • 21
  • 10
  • cooky
  • 19
  • 10
  • exposure
  • 19
  • 10
  • photograph
  • 18
  • 10
  • number
  • 17
  • 10
  • sensor
  • 12
  • 10
  • long
  • 12
  • 10
  • open
  • 12
  • 10
  • slow
  • 11
  • 10
  • website
  • 10
  • 10
  • iso
  • 10
  • 10
  • fast
  • 10
  • 10
  • long exposure
  • 9
  • 10
  • action
  • 9
  • 10
  • control
  • 9
  • 10
  • motion
  • 9
  • 10
  • capture
  • 8
  • 10
  • blur
  • 8
  • 10
  • len
  • 8
  • 10
  • image stabilization
  • 7
  • 10
  • photographer
  • 7
  • 10
  • time
  • 7
  • 10
  • darker
  • 7
  • 10
  • mode
  • 7
  • 10
  • frame
  • 7
  • 10
  • stabilization
  • 7
  • 10
  • second
  • 6
  • 10
  • neutral density filter
  • 5
  • 10
  • aperture shutter
  • 5
  • 10
  • slow shutter
  • 5
  • 10
  • motion blur
  • 5
  • 10
  • neutral density
  • 5
  • 10
  • density filter
  • 5
  • 10
  • shutter speed image
  • 4
  • 10
  • light hit sensor
  • 4
  • 10
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 4
  • 10
  • slow shutter speed
  • 4
  • 10
  • iso aperture
  • 4
  • 10
  • cooky website
  • 4
  • 10
  • non
  • 4
  • 10
  • speed image
  • 4
  • 10
  • light hit
  • 4
  • 10
  • hit sensor
  • 4
  • 10
  • aperture number
  • 4
  • 10
  • website cooky
  • 4
  • 10
  • shutter speed fast
  • 3
  • 10
  • lower shutter speed
  • 3
  • 10
  • control shutter speed
  • 3
  • 10
  • speed image stabilization
  • 3
  • 10
  • speed fast
  • 3
  • 10
  • setting camera
  • 3
  • 10
  • shutter door
  • 3
  • 10
  • fast shutter
  • 3
  • 10
  • slower shutter
  • 3
  • 10
  • camera light
  • 3
  • 10
  • light image
  • 3
  • 10
  • depth field
  • 3
  • 10
  • lower shutter
  • 3
  • 10
  • control shutter
  • 3
  • 10
  • shutter priority
  • 3
  • 10
  • wide open
  • 3
  • 10
Result 11
TitleA Beginner's Guide to Shutter Speed in Photography | Fstoppers
Urlhttps://fstoppers.com/education/beginners-guide-shutter-speed-photography-488223
DescriptionAlong with aperture and ISO, shutter speed is one of the three fundamental parameters that determine the exposure of a photo and that give you creative control over the look of an image. If you are new to photography, this helpful video will show you the ins and outs of how shutter speed works and how it affects the style of your photos. Coming to you from Taylor Jackson, this
Date
Organic Position10
H1A Beginner's Guide to Shutter Speed in Photography
H2
H3Premium Photography Tutorials
H2WithAnchors
BodyA Beginner's Guide to Shutter Speed in Photography by Alex Cooke May 24, 2020 0 Comments Video of Camera Basics | Shutter Speed | How To Camera Episode 4 FacebookTwitter 0 Comments Along with aperture and ISO, shutter speed is one of the three fundamental parameters that determine the exposure of a photo and that give you creative control over the look of an image. If you are new to photography, this helpful video will show you the ins and outs of how shutter speed works and how it affects the style of your photos. Coming to you from Taylor Jackson, this great video will show you how shutter speed controls the exposure and look of your images as part of the exposure triangle (if you would like to read more about the exposure triangle, check out this article). Shutter speed controls how long your camera's sensor is exposed to light and along with aperture, determines the total amount of light it gathers for an image. Like the other exposure parameters, it has a technical/creative tradeoff: a faster shutter speed freezes more motion but allows less light to reach the sensor and vice versa. Mastering it is one of the most crucial skills any photographer should have. Check out the video above for the full rundown. And if you would like to continue on your photography journey, be sure to check out "Photography 101: How to Use Your Digital Camera and Edit Photos in Photoshop With Lee Morris!" Posted In: Educationvia: Taylor Jackson Post a comment Follow Alex Cooke is a Cleveland-based portrait, events, and landscape photographer. He holds an M.S. in Applied Mathematics and a doctorate in Music Composition. He is also an avid equestrian. cookestudios.com Related Articles Education / May 9, 2020 A Beginner's Guide to Aperture in Photography Education / June 18, 2021 How to Choose the Right Shutter Speed and ND Filter for Long Exposure Photography Education / May 15, 2020 A Beginner's Guide to Aperture in Photography Education / May 12, 2020 The Exposure Triangle: Something Every New Photographer Should Master Premium Photography Tutorials. Check out the Fstoppers Store for in-depth tutorials from some of the best instructors in the business. Photography 101 How to Use Your Digital Camera and Edit Photos in Photoshop With Lee Morris $99 Introduction to Video A Photographer's Guide to Filmmaking With Lee Morris and Patrick Hall $199.99 Log in or register to post comments
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • photography
  • 9
  • 11
  • shutter speed
  • 8
  • 11
  • shutter
  • 8
  • 11
  • speed
  • 8
  • 11
  • exposure
  • 7
  • 11
  • 2020
  • 6
  • 11
  • comment
  • 6
  • 11
  • education
  • 5
  • 11
  • video
  • 5
  • 11
  • camera
  • 5
  • 11
  • guide
  • 4
  • 11
  • aperture
  • 4
  • 11
  • photo
  • 4
  • 11
  • check
  • 4
  • 11
  • photographer
  • 4
  • 11
  • beginner guide
  • 3
  • 11
  • exposure triangle
  • 3
  • 11
  • lee morri
  • 3
  • 11
  • photography education
  • 3
  • 11
  • beginner
  • 3
  • 11
  • control
  • 3
  • 11
  • image
  • 3
  • 11
  • triangle
  • 3
  • 11
  • light
  • 3
  • 11
  • lee
  • 3
  • 11
  • morri
  • 3
  • 11
Result 12
TitleThe Beginner’s Guide To Shutter Speed | Shaw Academy
Urlhttps://www.shawacademy.com/blog/beginners-guide-to-shutter-speed/
Description
Date
Organic Position11
H1The Beginner’s Guide To Shutter Speed
H2What is shutter speed?
Shutter speed and blur
Shutter speed and camera shake
Shutter speed and flash
How to set shutter speed on a DSLR
H3
H2WithAnchorsWhat is shutter speed?
Shutter speed and blur
Shutter speed and camera shake
Shutter speed and flash
How to set shutter speed on a DSLR
BodyThe Beginner’s Guide To Shutter SpeedSep 20155 mins readPhotography & VideoA photograph is a single moment in time. The shutter speed determines just how long that moment is, whether a few seconds, or just a fraction of a second. Any time a camera’s shutter is open, an image is being taken. It’s the shutter speed that determines just how long the shutter stays open. Understanding shutter speed is essential to mastering manual modes and taking complete control over your images. What is shutter speed? The camera’s shutter is what opens to let light in to take the image. Shutter speed isn’t necessarily how fast the shutter opens and closes, but how long it stays open, or the duration. Since the camera’s shutter lets in light, a slow shutter speed lets in more light, while a short shutter speed lets in just a little. Of course, that means shutter speed has an impact on the exposure. In low lighting, a slower shutter speed is often necessary to let in enough light, or you’re left with a dark image. Shutter speed is measured in seconds, or fractions of seconds. A very slow shutter speed will be a few seconds long. This is referred to as a long exposure. Fast shutter speeds are just a fraction of a second, like 1/8,000. Most cameras also have a bulb mode, which simply means the shutter stays open until the photographer presses the shutter release again. Bulb mode is helpful for when it’s unclear how long the shutter speed needs to be, or when the minimum shutter speed on the camera isn’t slow enough. Shutter speed usually doubles from one setting to the next, so the available shutter speeds look a little like this (with the “ mark often used to designate seconds) : 1/16000 1/8000 1/2000 1/1000 1/500 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1/4 1/2 1” 1.3” 1.6” 2” Outdoors during the day, choosing a fast enough shutter speed isn’t usually a problem. Shooting indoors or at the end of the day, however, becomes a challenge. Since fast shutter speeds let in less light, a wider aperture or a higher ISO is necessary. Shutter speed and blur. Anything that moves while the shutter is open results in blur. That’s why fast moving action requires a fast shutter speed. If the shutter speed is too slow, the subject will be blurry. This simple concept, however, can be used in a number of different ways. Along with preventing blur, shutter speed can also be used for intentional blur. A long exposure with a slow shutter speed is often used to intentionally blur a subject. At slow shutter speeds, waterfalls become smooth, moving traffic becomes streaks of light and people become a busy blur. Long exposures are often used to convey motion within a single image. Shutter speed is also essential to mastering techniques like panning and zoom burst. If you use a slower shutter speed, like a 1/60, then follow the action in a panning motion as the shutter is open, the subject will be clear, while the background will be blurred from the motion. In a zoom burst, using a slow shutter speed, like two seconds, and zooming while the image is being taken results in a blur that radiates towards the center of the image. Shutter speed and camera shake. A slow shutter speed can also blur the entire image if the camera moves just slightly in your hands. A tripod helps prevent this by keeping the camera steady during the exposure. Image stabilisation also helps enable photographers to use a shutter speed that’s slow by a step or two, compared to using gear that’s not equipped with image stabilisation. But how do you know if your shutter speed is enough to keep the camera handheld, or if you should use a tripod? Since telephoto lenses also enhance the effects of camera shake, the answer depends on what focal length you are using. As a general guideline, turn the focal length of your lens into a fraction: A 200mm telephoto becomes a 1/200, for example. So, if you are zoomed into 200mm, you should use a shutter speed of 1/200 seconds or faster. Camera shake is less intense on shorter lenses, so if you’re using your 55mm kit lens, you can get away with a 1/60 second shutter speed. Shutter speed and flash. When adjusting the aperture and ISO isn’t enough to get a fast shutter speed with the proper exposure, a flash can help, but that’s not always the case. The flash often can’t keep up with fast shutter speeds. A camera’s flash sync speed indicates the fastest shutter speed that can be used with the flash on. On most DSLRs, the flash sync speed is 1/200 or 1/250. Thankfully, the characteristics of the flash helps to freeze motion. In many cases where a 1/250 would be too slow, using the flash at 1/250 will often capture the shot without blur, even though without the flash at the same speed, there would be blur. How to set shutter speed on a DSLR. Shutter speed can be set in either shutter priority mode, where you only choose the shutter speed, or full manual, where you choose shutter speed as well as the aperture and ISO. On most DSLRs, the shutter speed isn’t displayed as a fraction (probably to preserve space), so 1/200 is written as 200. To see if that number is a fraction or a second, the “ symbol is used with shutter speeds of a second or longer, like 1” and 1.3”. If your DSLR has a second screen at the top of the camera, the shutter speed is usually displayed next to the aperture, or the number with an f in front of it. The shutter speed is also displayed when the shooting settings are on the LCD screen, and also at the bottom of the viewfinder, again, normally next to the aperture of f-number. On most DSLRs, the control wheel that rests near your thumb adjusts the shutter speed. Try that dial and watch the numbers change. Some cameras with a single control dial use a function button to switch between adjusting [shutter speed and aperture.][9] Like many aspects of photography, understanding shutter speed is best done with a bit of practice. Head out to someplace with plenty of moving subjects, like a racetrack, a local team’s match or a park. Use shutter priority mode (the S or Tv on the mode dial) and experiment with different shutter speeds to see, hands-on, what the different settings produce. Keep in mind the speed of the subject plays a role too, and try to match the shutter speed with the subject. How low can you get before the subject appears blurry? How low can you get before you notice some camera shake? As one of the three elements of exposure, understanding shutter speed is essential to taking complete creative control over your photography. To learn more about Shutter speed. Register at Shaw Academy today! Looking to sharpen your photography skills? Join our top-rated photography course today! Join 12+ million students who already have a head start Sign up today and get 4 weeks free! Start now for free No commitments. Cancel at any time. Shaw AcademyShaw Academy has over 100 globally recognised courses across 10 faculties. Sign up now - the first four weeks are free.Previous articleBest Blogging Platforms You Always Wanted to Know AboutNext articleThe Beginner’s Guide to ApertureShareRecent Posts. Street Photography: The Ultimate GuideBest Essential Oils For 12 Everyday UsesThe Ultimate Guide On How to Photograph WaterfallsHeart Chakra Stones: Healing Crystals for Universal LoveHow to Make a GIF in Photoshop
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 67
  • 12
  • speed
  • 56
  • 12
  • shutter speed
  • 52
  • 12
  • camera
  • 19
  • 12
  • flash
  • 10
  • 12
  • image
  • 10
  • 12
  • slow
  • 10
  • 12
  • blur
  • 10
  • 12
  • long
  • 8
  • 12
  • open
  • 8
  • 12
  • fast
  • 8
  • 12
  • slow shutter speed
  • 7
  • 12
  • shutter open
  • 7
  • 12
  • speed camera
  • 7
  • 12
  • fast shutter
  • 7
  • 12
  • slow shutter
  • 7
  • 12
  • number
  • 7
  • 12
  • mode
  • 7
  • 12
  • second
  • 7
  • 12
  • exposure
  • 7
  • 12
  • subject
  • 7
  • 12
  • image shutter speed
  • 6
  • 12
  • fast shutter speed
  • 6
  • 12
  • image shutter
  • 6
  • 12
  • aperture
  • 6
  • 12
  • fraction
  • 6
  • 12
  • light
  • 6
  • 12
  • shutter speed camera
  • 5
  • 12
  • dslr
  • 5
  • 12
  • photography
  • 5
  • 12
  • camera shake
  • 4
  • 12
  • today
  • 4
  • 12
  • essential
  • 4
  • 12
  • control
  • 4
  • 12
  • 1250
  • 4
  • 12
  • motion
  • 4
  • 12
  • shake
  • 4
  • 12
  • 1200
  • 4
  • 12
  • camera shutter
  • 3
  • 12
  • understanding shutter speed
  • 3
  • 12
  • shutter speed essential
  • 3
  • 12
  • shutter speed displayed
  • 3
  • 12
  • stay open
  • 3
  • 12
  • understanding shutter
  • 3
  • 12
  • speed essential
  • 3
  • 12
  • long exposure
  • 3
  • 12
  • speed blur
  • 3
  • 12
  • speed displayed
  • 3
  • 12
  • help
  • 3
  • 12
  • displayed
  • 3
  • 12
  • dial
  • 3
  • 12
Result 13
TitleA Comprehensive Beginner's Guide to Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO | PetaPixel
Urlhttps://petapixel.com/2016/06/25/comprehensive-beginners-guide-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/
DescriptionThis guide to photographic exposure aims to help you take full control of your camera. I often tell my students that I want them to move away from the
Date25 Jun 2016
Organic Position12
H1A Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO
H2
H3What is exposure?
Measuring exposure using a histogram
Examples of underexposed and overexposed photographs
Using the highlights warning feature on your camera
What is aperture?
How does your choice of aperture affect the photograph?
What is shutter speed?
How does your choice of shutter speed affect the photograph?
How do you know if your shutter speed is fast enough to shoot handheld?
What is ISO?
How does your choice of ISO affect the photograph?
How to use Aperture Priority Mode on your camera
How to use Shutter Priority Mode on your camera
How to use the Exposure Compensation feature on your camera
How to use Manual Mode on your camera
How do I decide which settings to use in manual mode?
What if the highlights are blown out or the shadows are clipped no matter what settings I use?
H2WithAnchors
BodyA Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO Jun 25, 2016 Barry O Carroll This guide to photographic exposure aims to help you take full control of your camera. I often tell my students that I want them to move away from the idea “taking a photograph” and towards the idea of “making a photograph.” I teach them how to take the camera off auto mode and take full control of the settings themselves in order to create the photograph they want. Why let the camera decide these things for you? Do you let your mother choose your clothes? Maybe some of you do, I don’t know. Frankly, I don’t want to know. I hope to do the same for the readers of this tutorial. I want you take control of your camera. In order to do this, it’s essential to understand the 3 components of what we call “The Exposure Triangle”. These are: aperture, shutter speed and ISO. By the end of this tutorial, you should understand what these 3 components are and how they affect the final photograph. You will also learn how to use the 3 main shooting modes on your camera: aperture priority, shutter priority and manual. Finally, I’ll explain how to decide which settings to choose as you prepare to shoot a scene. What is exposure? First of all we need to define what we mean by exposure. Exposure refers to the amount of light that enters the camera and hits the digital sensor. Basically, it is a measure of how dark or bright a photograph is. If the image is too bright, it is overexposed. Too much light has been allowed to hit the sensor. If it is too dark, it is underexposed. Not enough light has been allowed to hit the sensor. We can control how much light reaches the sensor by changing the aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings. Exposure is measured in ‘stops’. For example, if you find that your photo has turned out too dark (underexposed), you may increase your exposure by a ‘stop’ or two to make it brighter. Conversely, if the image is overexposed, you may need to decrease the exposure by a stop or two. There is no such thing as the ‘perfect’ exposure, only the right exposure for the photograph you are creating. Some photos such as night shots are supposed to be dark while photos taken in the snow for example are supposed to be bright. Measuring exposure using a histogram. All digital cameras allow you to see a visual representation of exposure using the histogram. Check your camera’s manual to find out how to turn on the histogram feature. There was a member of my photography club who would tell all new members to RTFM. This stood for ‘Read the Manual’. I’ll let you figure out what the ‘f’ stood for yourself. The histogram is a graph that represents the spread of tones in a photograph, from the shadows, to the mid tones to the highlights. It allows you to check if the photograph has any shadows that are too dark or ‘clipped’ and to see if you have any highlights that are too bright or ‘blown out’. Clipped shadows are areas of pure black and contain no detail. Blown out highlights are areas of pure white and also contain no detail. Very generally speaking, you will want to avoid both of these. That said, I personally don’t mind a little clipping in the shadows as it adds punch to the image. If you look at the histogram below, you will see that some of the graph is right up against the left hand axis of the graph. This means that some of the shadows are clipped. If you look at the right, you will see that a very tiny amount of highlights have been blown out as a very small part of the graph is up against the right hand edge. Sometimes this is unavoidable for example with street lights or if the sun in the frame. Remember, that the histogram is only a guide. Examples of underexposed and overexposed photographs. Below we have examples of an underexposed photo, an overexposed photo and a correctly exposed photo. Underexposed photograph: This photograph is underexposed by about 3 stops. You can see that the histogram is completely bunched up to the left as a result. There are lots of clipped shadows on the underside of the gondolas. Overexposed photograph: This image is overexposed by about 3 stops and as you can see, the histogram is bunched up to the right as a result. There are a lot of clipped highlights is this photo. In fact, the entire sky is pure white and contains no detail whatsoever. Correctly exposed photograph: The photo above has the right exposure for the scene in question. You can see on the histogram that there is a good spread of shadows, mid-tones and highlights. It’s quite a bright image as you can see from the fact that the graph spikes on the right of the graph. There is a little clipping in the shadows which I don’t mind as it adds some punch to the shot. As you can see from the right hand side of the graph, there are some very bright areas but the highlights are not blown out. Using the highlights warning feature on your camera. It’s always a good idea to check the histogram after you’ve taken a shot in order to prevent too many clipped shadows and blown out highlights. Most digital cameras also have a ‘highlight warning’ feature. This makes areas of the image that have blown highlights flash on your screen. It’s an incredibly useful feature and I keep it turned on all the time. Below, you can see how the highlight warning looks on the overexposed gondola photo. A huge amount of the photo is flashing because so many of the highlights have been blown out. What is aperture? The aperture refers to the size of the opening in the lens through which the light enters the camera. The size of this opening can be adjusted and the aperture size is measured in f-stops. The image on the right shows you exactly what the aperture on a lens looks like. When you change the f-stop value, you change the size of the opening. Here’s the weird thing though. The higher the f-stop, the smaller the opening. Take a look at the chart below to see what different apertures look like at different f-stops. On the far left, you can see that setting an aperture of f16 will result in a small opening. Choosing an aperture of f1.4 will result in a very wide opening. How does your choice of aperture affect the photograph? The most noticeable effect your choice of aperture has on the photograph is the depth of field. What do we mean by this exactly? In very simple terms, depth of field refers to the amount of the image that is sharp. What does this mean in practice? If you use a wide aperture, the depth of field will be shallow. Only part of the image is sharp and the rest will be out of focus or blurred. Look at the picture on the left below. The cat is perfectly sharp but the background is blurred. Using a wide aperture works well for portrait style photographs as it makes the subject of the shot really stand out against the blurred background. In this case, the depth of field extends from about the tip of the cat’s nose to just behind its head, no more than a few centimeters (from point A to point B in the diagram). Anything not in this range, either in front of it or behind will not be sharp. For this shot, I used a wide aperture of f/3.5. When you use a narrow aperture, the depth of field is deep. When the depth of field is deep, all of the photograph from foreground to background is sharp. Take a look at the photo below taken in the Dublin Docklands. Everything from the dock cleat in the foreground to the bridge in the background is sharp. In this case the depth of field is several hundred metres, extending right from the foreground to the background of the scene. In this case, I used a narrower aperture of f/11. Most of the time, we want to achieve a deep depth of field when shooting landscapes. We want all of the image to be pin sharp. The mid range apertures (around f/8) are good for shooting handheld for example when doing street photography. You get a good balance between having enough depth of field and fast enough shutter speeds to shoot hand held. We’ll discuss shutter speeds in more detail later. The chart below gives you a good idea how different apertures will affect the depth of field in your photographs. You can see that as the aperture gets wider, the pyramid in the background becomes more blurred. What is shutter speed? The shutter speed refers to the length of time the opening in the lens remains open to let light into the camera and onto the sensor. The shutter speed can be as fast as 1/10,000 of a second or as slow as several minutes. How does your choice of shutter speed affect the photograph? Fast shutter speeds have the effect of freezing motion in the scene you are photographing. Conversely, slow shutter speeds will blur motion in a scene. Both of these can be used to great creative effect. The shutter speed settings on your camera provide a great way to experiment with capturing motion in your landscape photography. This is especially the case with moving water. By using a slow shutter speed (1/2 second), we can blur the water in a waterfall for example and create a sense of motion even though it’s a still image. You can see this in this photo of a waterfall in Ireland above. When working with slow shutter speeds, it is essential to use a tripod otherwise camera shake will result in a completely blurred photo. In the second photograph taken in Tunisia, I used an extremely long shutter speed of 160 seconds. To achieve this, I used a 10 stop neutral density filter. This reduced the light entering the camera down to 1/1000th of what it would be without the filter. This, in turn, allowed me to set such a long exposure time. As you can see, the clouds moved across the sky during the almost 3 minutes it took to take the photo resulting in the blurred effect. You can also use fast shutter speeds to freeze motion like in this black and white seascape below. For this photograph, I wanted to freeze the motion of the waves crashing against the shore. A fast shutter speed of 1/320th of a second ensured that the wave seems to ‘freeze’ in time. Landscapes that include moving water afford great opportunities to experiment with different exposure times. The chart below shows how different shutter speeds would effect the sense of motion if you were photographing a person running. Fast shutter speeds will freeze the motion. This technique is often used in sports photography. The slower the shutter speed becomes, the more blurred the person running becomes in the photograph. How do you know if your shutter speed is fast enough to shoot handheld? There is a very simple trick to check if your shutter speed is fast enough to shoot hand held. Simply look at the focal length you have zoomed in to on the lens. On the lens below, the focal length is set at about 30mm. In this case I simply multiply the focal length by 2 and divide it into 1 to get the minimum shutter speed required to shoot hand held. So, 30 x 2 is 60 therefore the minimum shutter speed required to shoot hand held is 1/60 of a second. This means that you can get away with using slower shutter speeds when the angle is wider. It’s obviously harder to keep the camera steady when zooming in. Think of how difficult it is to keep your sights on an object when using binoculars. It’s the same principle. If you find that the light is low and you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed, you can increase the ISO. In the next section, I’ll explain what ISO is and how it effects the photograph. What is ISO? The ISO refers to how sensitive the digital sensor in your camera is to light. The lower the ISO number, the less sensitive it is to light. Setting a higher ISO number increases the sensitivity of your camera sensor to light. Most cameras have ISOs ranging from about 50 or 100 ISO right up to 16,000 ISO or higher. How does your choice of ISO affect the photograph? As you increase the ISO value, your camera sensor becomes more sensitive to light. This means that you can achieve higher shutter speeds. This can be extremely useful when shooting in low light without a tripod. You may find that shooting at 100 ISO results in shutter speeds that are too slow to hand hold without camera shake. By increasing the ISO to 800 ISO for example, you may find that your shutter speed is now fast enough to hand hold. You may be wondering: why not just use a really high ISO every time to ensure a sharp photo? The problem is that there is a trade off when it comes to image quality. The higher the ISO used, the more digital noise will be present in the image. Digital noise results in a graininess that can have a negative effect on image quality. Take a look at the labels of this bottle of wine shot at different ISOs. The first one was shot at 100 ISO. The second photo was shot at a very high ISO 3200. You can see that the graininess has degraded the image quality quite a lot. When I finished taking these shots of the bottle of wine, I of course sampled the contents. I… eh… wanted to learn about French culture. Funnily enough, after I finished the bottle, the image quality from my own eyes degraded somewhat. The chart below illustrates the effect of ISO on image quality. This does not mean that you should not increase your ISO when the need arises. The example of ISO 3200 above is quite extreme. Most of the newer cameras actually handle higher ISOs very well and retain high image quality. I know that in low light conditions, I prefer to increase my ISO a little to avoid camera shake even it it means a little graininess. It’s usually not enough to seriously degrade the image quality though. Next, we’re going to take a look at how to actually set the aperture and shutter speed in your camera. There are 3 modes you can use: aperture priority, shutter priority and manual. How to use Aperture Priority Mode on your camera. Aperture priority mode is a semi-manual mode. When using this mode, you choose the aperture you want and the camera chooses an appropriate shutter speed in order to achieve a correctly exposed photo. To switch your camera to aperture priority, turn the dial on top of your camera to ‘A’. This is actually the shooting mode I use 90% of the time when shooting urban landscapes. I usually choose an aperture of around f16 to ensure maximum depth of field and then let the camera choose the correct shutter speed. As I usually use a tripod, I am generally not too concerned about the shutter speed being too slow. If I am shooting hand held, I always keep an eye on the shutter speed the camera has chosen just to make sure it isn’t too slow. If it is too slow, I use a wider aperture which will give a faster shutter speed as the opening is larger and lets the light in faster. I also have the option of increasing the ISO to get a faster shutter speed. How to use Shutter Priority Mode on your camera. Shutter priority is basically the opposite to aperture priority. You set the shutter speed you want and the camera sets the aperture. To switch your camera to shutter priority, turn the dial on top of your camera to ‘S’. On Canon models, this mode is actually called “Tv” mode which stands for “time value”. I personally don’t use this mode too often. It can be useful if you need to set a minimum shutter speed in order to avoid camera shake. You may also want a specific longer shutter speed in order to create motion blur. I tend to use manual mode in this case as it gives me greater control over the shutter speed and aperture together. More on manual mode later. How to use the Exposure Compensation feature on your camera. Sometimes when you use aperture or shutter priority modes, you may find that your images are too bright or too dark. Sometimes the lighting conditions may confuse the camera and it results in the image being underexposed or overexposed. Thankfully, there is a way of fixing this. It’s called exposure compensation. To switch this on, press the button with the plus/minus symbols. This will bring up a chart that goes from -5 to +5. Sometimes these numbers are different and may only range from -3 to +3 depending on the camera. This chart represents the exposure of your photograph. So how does it work? When you are using aperture priority mode for example, the camera will set a shutter speed that makes the camera expose at the “0” point of this chart, right in the middle. In theory, this should be the correct exposure. In reality though, this is not always the case. As we said, some photos are supposed to be bright and others are supposed to be dark. If you find that your photo is too bright or overexposed, you simply dial down the exposure by a stop or whatever you think is needed. When you turn the dial to the left (RTFM to see which dial), you can set the exposure at -1 for example. This will make the photograph 1 stop darker. When you turn the dial to the right, you can make the photo brighter. You may need to experiment a little to get the exposure you want. How does exposure compensation work exactly? If you are using aperture priority mode and dial the exposure down 2 stops for example, the aperture will stay the same but the shutter speed will change to a faster speed so that less light enters the camera and the picture is made darker. The opposite happens when you dial up the exposure. The aperture stays the same but the shutter speed will get longer to let more light in and make the image brighter. As already mentioned, keep an eye on the shutter speed if you are shooting hand held. Don’t allow it to become too slow in order to avoid camera shake. Exposure compensation works in the same way when using shutter priority mode except that the shutter speed will stay the same and the aperture will be changed by the camera accordingly. How to use Manual Mode on your camera. Here comes the scary one: manual mode! When you set the camera to manual mode, you set both the aperture and shutter speed. How do you know what combination to use to ensure the right exposure? It’s actually quite easy. When you switch to manual mode on the dial (M), you again see an exposure chart that is exactly the same as the exposure compensation chart. You then turn the aperture and shutter speed dials until the exposure is set to 0. Check your manual to see which dials to use. Here is an example of how I might use manual mode when shooting a landscape: I decide what aperture I want to use. If it’s a landscape, I might pick an aperture of about f/16 to ensure plenty of depth of field. After all, I want everything to be sharp from the foreground to the background. I turn the aperture dial until, the aperture is set to f/16. I then turn the shutter speed dial until the marker on the exposure chart is at zero. This in theory should mean that I now have the correct combination of aperture and shutter speed to ensure the right exposure. I then check that I am happy with both the aperture and shutter speed and make some adjustments if necessary. If I find that the shot is too bright or too dark I retake it after moving the dial to either minus a stop or plus a stop (or more as the case may be). The ‘right’ exposure may not always be at the “0” point in the middle. As I have said a few times now, some photos are supposed to be bright or dark. How do I decide which settings to use in manual mode? This is where your own creativity comes in to play. I usually decide which is the most important element in the photo and set this first. As I mainly shoot urban landscape photos, this means I usually set the aperture first as ensuring plenty of depth of field is my biggest concern. I then set the shutter speed. It’s basically a balancing act and with practice you will gain an intuition for what settings you need to achieve the vision you have for a particular photograph. What if the highlights are blown out or the shadows are clipped no matter what settings I use? Sometimes the contrast in a scene is simply too much for your camera to handle no matter which combination of aperture and shutter speed you use. In this case, bracketing can be used to solve the problem. When I bracket a photo, I usually take 3 photos of the same scene, one with the exposure set to “0”, another deliberately underexposed by 2 stops and a final one deliberately overexposed by 2 stops. I can then combine these these in post-processing to get the ‘perfect’ exposure. There are several methods of doing this which I will cover in a future tutorial. In the example below, I took 3 exposures of the Charles Bridge in Prague and blended them in post production to produce a single photograph with plenty of detail in all areas of the frame. The final photograph is a blend of all 3 images, leading to plenty of detail throughout the image. There are also no clipped shadows or blown out highlights. As you can see, I also cropped the final image to create a better composition. I hope that after reading this tutorial that you will be confident to take your camera off auto mode and take control of the settings yourself. In this way, you can move from merely taking a photography to making a photograph. Don’t be afraid to experiment with all of the settings you have just learnt about. Over time, you won’t even have to think too much about the settings. I often advise students to go on a photo shoot where they specifically experiment with different apertures, another to experiment with shutter speed and so on. About the author: Barry O Carroll is a Dublin, Ireland-based photographer specializing in landscape photography with a particular emphasis on urban landscapes, street scenes and architecture photography. You can find more of his work on his website or by following him on Facebook and Twitter. This article was also published here. Educational, Tutorials aperture, basic, beginner, beginnersguide, educational, howto, information, iso, novice, shutterspeed Related Articles The Exposure Triangle: Making Sense of Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISOBeginner's Guide to Mastering Manual and Avoiding Auto Mode MistakesAstrophotography: How to Photograph the StarsCamera Settings for Concert Photography BeginnersHow to Photograph the Milky Way Core Season
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 61
  • 13
  • speed
  • 55
  • 13
  • shutter speed
  • 54
  • 13
  • aperture
  • 52
  • 13
  • camera
  • 51
  • 13
  • exposure
  • 44
  • 13
  • photograph
  • 33
  • 13
  • iso
  • 29
  • 13
  • photo
  • 28
  • 13
  • stop
  • 27
  • 13
  • mode
  • 27
  • 13
  • image
  • 26
  • 13
  • set
  • 18
  • 13
  • light
  • 18
  • 13
  • example
  • 16
  • 13
  • manual
  • 16
  • 13
  • dial
  • 15
  • 13
  • priority
  • 15
  • 13
  • highlight
  • 15
  • 13
  • depth field
  • 13
  • 13
  • setting
  • 13
  • 13
  • depth
  • 13
  • 13
  • field
  • 13
  • 13
  • overexposed
  • 12
  • 13
  • chart
  • 12
  • 13
  • time
  • 12
  • 13
  • aperture shutter
  • 11
  • 13
  • bright
  • 11
  • 13
  • shadow
  • 11
  • 13
  • hand
  • 11
  • 13
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 10
  • 13
  • shot
  • 10
  • 13
  • histogram
  • 10
  • 13
  • fast
  • 10
  • 13
  • manual mode
  • 9
  • 13
  • aperture priority
  • 8
  • 13
  • shutter priority
  • 7
  • 13
  • image quality
  • 7
  • 13
  • priority mode
  • 7
  • 13
  • fast shutter speed
  • 6
  • 13
  • dial exposure
  • 6
  • 13
  • fast shutter
  • 6
  • 13
  • hand held
  • 6
  • 13
  • clipped shadow
  • 5
  • 13
  • blown highlight
  • 5
  • 13
  • camera shake
  • 5
  • 13
  • exposure compensation
  • 5
  • 13
  • shoot hand held
  • 4
  • 13
  • shutter speed fast
  • 4
  • 13
  • aperture priority mode
  • 4
  • 13
  • exposure stop
  • 4
  • 13
  • focal length
  • 4
  • 13
  • minimum shutter
  • 4
  • 13
  • speed camera
  • 4
  • 13
  • mode camera
  • 4
  • 13
  • camera aperture
  • 4
  • 13
  • highlight blown
  • 4
  • 13
  • shoot hand
  • 4
  • 13
  • speed fast
  • 4
  • 13
  • increase iso
  • 4
  • 13
  • set aperture
  • 4
  • 13
  • turn dial
  • 4
  • 13
  • shutter speed iso
  • 3
  • 13
  • camera aperture priority
  • 3
  • 13
  • light enter camera
  • 3
  • 13
  • slow shutter speed
  • 3
  • 13
  • minimum shutter speed
  • 3
  • 13
  • avoid camera shake
  • 3
  • 13
  • shutter speed camera
  • 3
  • 13
  • shutter speed order
  • 3
  • 13
  • shutter priority mode
  • 3
  • 13
  • set shutter speed
  • 3
  • 13
  • speed iso
  • 3
  • 13
  • auto mode
  • 3
  • 13
  • exposure exposure
  • 3
  • 13
  • light enter
  • 3
  • 13
  • enter camera
  • 3
  • 13
  • supposed bright
  • 3
  • 13
  • correctly exposed
  • 3
  • 13
  • highlight warning
  • 3
  • 13
  • size opening
  • 3
  • 13
  • aperture f16
  • 3
  • 13
  • affect photograph
  • 3
  • 13
  • wide aperture
  • 3
  • 13
  • point
  • 3
  • 13
  • foreground background
  • 3
  • 13
  • camera sensor
  • 3
  • 13
  • slow shutter
  • 3
  • 13
  • freeze motion
  • 3
  • 13
  • higher iso
  • 3
  • 13
  • 100 iso
  • 3
  • 13
  • avoid camera
  • 3
  • 13
  • speed order
  • 3
  • 13
  • urban landscape
  • 3
  • 13
  • set shutter
  • 3
  • 13
  • mode set
  • 3
  • 13
  • bright dark
  • 3
  • 13
Result 14
TitleBeginner's Guide to Camera Settings | Iceland Photo Tours
Urlhttps://iceland-photo-tours.com/articles/camera-and-gear-reviews/beginner-s-guide-to-camera-settings
DescriptionIf you’re reading this, then it’s too late. You’ve probably been sucked into the world of photography and it will now take over your life. In the best kind of way, that
Date
Organic Position13
H1Beginner's Guide to Camera Settings
H2See our popular Russia Photography Tours & Workshops
Depth of Field
The Exposure Triangle
Camera Setup
Camera Shooting Modes
Focus Area Modes
Metering Modes
How to Change Exposure Settings
Shutter Release Mode
Image Stabilisation
Conclusion
Popular articles
Other interesting articles
Popular photo tours & workshops
H3One Week Photography Tour in Russia | Lake Baikal & Olkhon Island
Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula | 15 Day Photo Tour
See our popular Winter Photography Tours & Workshops in Iceland
Date and Time
File Type
File Naming
Memory Card
Copyright Information
Auto Mode
Program Mode
Shutter Priority Mode
Aperture Priority Mode
Manual Mode
Bulb Mode
Scene Modes
AF-S
AF-C
See our popular Germany Photo Tours and Workshops
Shutter Speed
Aperture
ISO
White Balance
Single Frame
High Speed Continuous Shooting
Low Speed Continuous Shooting
Self Timer / Remote Shutter Control
Landscape Photography in the Lofoten Islands of Norway
Interview with Erin Babnik
The Best Places to Photograph Puffins in Iceland
Ultimate Photography Guide to the Lofoten Islands of Norway
Ultimate Guide to Landscape Photography
How to Use the On-Camera Flash
Where to Find Camera Manuals Online
A Beginner's Guide to Using Polarising Filters for Photography in Iceland
Summer Photo Tours in Iceland
Winter Photo Tours in Iceland
International Photo Tours
Greenland Photo Tours
Private Photo Tours in Iceland
Patagonia Photo Tours
Norway Photo Tours and Workshops
Faroe Islands Photo Tours and Workshops
H2WithAnchorsSee our popular Russia Photography Tours & Workshops
Depth of Field
The Exposure Triangle
Camera Setup
Camera Shooting Modes
Focus Area Modes
Metering Modes
How to Change Exposure Settings
Shutter Release Mode
Image Stabilisation
Conclusion
Popular articles
Other interesting articles
Popular photo tours & workshops
BodyBeginner's Guide to Camera SettingsBy Sean EnschVerified ExpertJump to chapterDepth of FieldThe Exposure TriangleCamera SetupDate and TimeFile TypeFile NamingMemory CardCopyright InformationCamera Shooting ModesAuto ModeProgram ModeShutter Priority ModeAperture Priority ModeManual ModeBulb ModeScene ModesFocus Area ModesAF-SAF-CMetering ModesHow to Change Exposure SettingsShutter SpeedApertureISOWhite BalanceShutter Release ModeSingle FrameHigh Speed Continuous ShootingLow Speed Continuous ShootingSelf Timer / Remote Shutter ControlImage StabilisationConclusion If you’re reading this, then it’s too late. You’ve probably been sucked into the world of photography and it will now take over your life. In the best kind of way, that is. You've probably just purchased your first DSLR camera, unpackaged it, switched it on and looked at all of the fancy buttons and dials. Sure, you can take some decent photos right away but you want to have more control. Check out these Camera & Gear Reviews Discover our Recommended Camera Settings for Landscape Photography Join us on this 2-Day Snaefellsnes Peninsula in Summer Photography Tour Perhaps you're looking at your camera and feeling just a little confused. You realise that you have no idea how to use all of those crazy buttons and settings. Well, that’s totally okay because you really want to learn how to use your camera, which puts you a good step ahead. Today’s modern digital cameras have tremendous amounts of power and are designed to help you achieve your vision by making photography easier and more efficient. You just need to learn how to use them properly. This article is aimed at teaching you all the basics of using a camera. From various shooting modes to focusing systems and white balance, this is your guide to the camera settings of a digital camera. See our popular Russia Photography Tours & Workshops. One Week Photography Tour in Russia | Lake Baikal & Olkhon Island. Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula | 15 Day Photo Tour. See all tours See also:  The Best Camera Bags for 2020 Depth of Field. Before we get into camera dials and functions, let’s briefly discuss a couple things that are important to understand when you're starting out in photography, the first being depth of field. Depth of field is defined as the distance between the nearest and the farthest subjects that are in relatively sharp focus in an image. A “shallow” depth of field refers to that distance being very small, meaning that most of the frame will be out of focus. An extremely shallow depth of field can be only an inch before things become out of focus. On the other hand, a “deep” depth of field means that the distance is very large. Using a deep depth of field, you can have everything in the frame in focus all the way to infinity. The three things that affect depth of field are the focal length of your lens, the aperture, and the distance you are from the focus point. Shallow vs deep depth of field. Photo by: 'Sean Ensch'. Here is a visual example above of a photographer taking a photo of a person standing in a field with mountains in the background. The subject is the person, so they are the focus point. With a shallow depth of field, the foreground will be out of focus, while the person will be in focus and everything beyond the person will be out of focus. With the deep depth of field, everything in the frame will be in focus. See also:  Aperture and F-Stop in Landscape Photography for Beginners The Exposure Triangle. The second concept you should be familiar with is the Exposure Triangle. Exposure is determined by three factors: shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. The Exposure Triangle is the relation of how these three elements directly interact with one another. Adjustments to your ISO, shutter speed and aperture are needed to achieve proper exposure and give you creative control while doing it. Understanding exposure is so incredibly important to creating great images. It is something that a lot of photographers just don’t grasp or overlook. I’ve seen preset examples and editing tutorials on Youtube correcting images whereby much of the problem was that they were just poorly exposed. It is important to familiarise yourself with the Exposure Triangle. Photo by: 'Unsplash'. Improper exposure can also result in grainy or noisy images, loss of detail, colour shifts, colour dullness and more. This all may be overwhelming and sounds confusing right now but it is very simple to understand when explained properly. I highly suggest reading this article, “The Exposure Triangle: Aperture, ISO, and Shutter Speed Explained” for an in-depth explanation so that you can understand exposure properly. See also:  What is a DSLR Camera? Everything You Need to Know Insider tipSee our popular Winter Photography Tours & Workshops in Iceland. Learn more Camera Setup. Alright, now let’s get your camera set up quickly. Every camera is slightly different with its interface, so I always suggest looking through the manual that came with your specific camera to familiarise yourself with its layout. Date and Time. When you first unbox your camera and turn it on, it should prompt you to set the date and time. Be sure to set the proper date and time because this information will be stored in the image EXIF data and is great to have for records. If you were impatient and skipped over this when you first got your camera so that you could use it straight away, don’t worry – you can still change the date and time in your camera settings. Every camera has a different menu system but they are all fairly similar. Open your menu and find the settings area. Then, scroll through until you find “set date/time” and press that to open the prompt.  See also:  Small Format Photography: What You Need to Know File Type. Selecting file type is very important. There are generally two file types for digital photography that you can choose for your camera to record in: JPEG and RAW. You can also choose between different sizes for each file type. Screenshot of RAW and JPEG file types in the Settings menu with different quality of recording. Photo by: 'Sean Ensch'. JPEG files are commonly used for almost all photographic digital images and the Internet. They are compressed image files, so they are usually small in size and will take up less memory on your storage card. However, with that compression, they lose a fair amount of quality and detail. Also, with the in-camera compression, whatever automatic adjustments that your camera makes will be permanent in your JPEG image. RAW files store all the image data when the photo is taken. Everything. With this file format, all the settings used to take the photo can be adjusted in post production with no issues. For example, if you took a photo on auto-white balance but for some reason, the photo appears to be too cold during post-processing, you can edit that photo with software such as Lightroom, Adobe Camera RAW or Capture One. You'll be able to adjust the white balance where you need it, as if it was still done in camera. When editing RAW files, the image data never changes, so you can make unlimited edits to the image and always go back to original. RAW format is the best way to take your photos. I highly recommend that you set your camera to record in RAW. The only downside is that the file sizes are much larger, which means that they'll take up much more space on your memory card. It's a small price to pay in my opinion. You can also set your camera to record in both RAW and JPEG. This will save both file formats to your memory card. In some instances, this can be very useful. See also:  A Beginner's Guide to RAW vs JPEG in Landscape Photography File Naming. Each camera uses a different default file naming system, which can be changed in the camera settings. This can be useful for distinguishing your photos when using different camera bodies, if you want your files to have a unique filename, or if you work with multiple photographers on a project and will be sharing all of the files in the group. Memory Card. To store the images you take, you will need a memory card. Before you put in your memory card, make sure that the camera is switched off. This is always good practice, as inserting a memory card while the camera is on can sometimes cause damage. After the card is in, turn the camera on. If it is a brand new card to the camera, then you may be asked to format the memory card. Formatting the card will remove any data from it and ensure that the proper folders and filename conventions will be introduced to your card. Make sure that there is nothing on the card that you need before you format it, otherwise it will be lost. If you need to format your memory card, then you'll also find this setting in your camera's menu. See also:  The Best Camera Gear Recommendations for Photography in Iceland Copyright Information. In today’s digital world with social media and the Internet, images are passed around and plainly stolen left and right. A good practice is to embed your copyright information into the metadata of the images that you take. You can do this in your settings panel by completing a profile of information, so that every photo taken will have your personal copyright data stored automatically. See also:  How to Minimise and Clean Camera Sensor Dust Camera Shooting Modes. Cameras today have several shooting modes to help you maximise your shooting efficiency. On most cameras, you'll find the Auto, Program, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manuel mode and Bulb mode. Some cameras have “Scenes” or custom programmed settings which you can store. Each one of these will give you more control over your camera, while still allowing you to work effectively. You can locate each of these settings within your camera’s menu or by using the mode dial, which is usually located on the top left of most cameras. Canon mode dial. Photo by: 'Canon USA Support Centre'. Auto Mode. Auto mode (A or A+) gives your camera full control. It will meter the exposure, set your ISO, shutter speed and aperture automatically and fire away. This is the easiest way to take photos, as it essentially turns your camera into a point and shoot. The downside is that you'll have zero control, both creatively and technically, so sometimes the photo can turn out poorly. It’s best used in well lit, outdoor scenarios for snapshots. See also:  Beginner's Guide to Types of Cameras for Digital Photography Program Mode. Program mode (P) is similar to Auto, however, it allows you some control over certain settings. The exposure is automatically decided for you but you can choose some settings to have control over. You can manually set the ISO so that the camera does not increase it to an uncomfortable level. You can also choose whether to use the on-camera flash or not and you can set the white balance. This mode allows you to control pieces of your settings, while still allowing the camera to calculate your exposure. See also:  Ultimate Guide to Long Exposure Shutter Priority Mode. Shutter Priority mode (Tv or T) allows you to manually set your shutter speed and ISO, while letting your camera adjust the aperture automatically to properly expose the image. This shooting mode is extremely useful in situations when you are photographing fast moving objects where you absolutely need a fast shutter speed in order to capture them sharply. If you were to try to photograph the same scene with Auto mode, then the camera may designate much too slow of a shutter speed, causing some degree of blur. See also:  A Fundamental Guide to Sharp Focus in Handheld Landscape Photography Aperture Priority Mode. Aperture Priority mode (Av or A) allows you to manually set your aperture (f-stop) and ISO, while allowing the camera to choose the shutter speed needed to properly expose the image. Aperture Priority mode. Photo by: 'Unsplash'. The main reason to shoot in Aperture Priority mode is so you can control your depth of field. For example, if you are out shooting landscapes, then you might want to use a deep depth of field (high f-stop) to ensure that everything is in focus. On the other hand, if you are shooting portraits, then you might need a shallow depth of field (low f-stop) so that only the subject will be in focus. The camera will keep your desired aperture and depth of field, while adjusting the shutter speed for you to ensure a well-balanced exposure. See also:  Ultimate Guide to Achieving Beautiful Bokeh Manual Mode. Manual mode (M) gives full control to the photographer. In my opinion, if you are serious about photography, then you should eventually learn to shoot in manual mode. It is what it sounds like – fully manual. This means that you get to set your own ISO, aperture and shutter speed. You will have full control over each of these settings to achieve your desired result. Manual mode. Photo by: 'Unsplash'. To use manual mode, you really must understand metering and exposure. Using manual mode will give you ultimate creative control over your photography. See also:  Ultimate Guide to Panorama Photography Bulb Mode. Bulb mode (B) is a special kind of shooting mode. All cameras have a limited setting for slowest shutter speed, which is usually 30 seconds. Sometimes, you need longer than that. This is where Bulb mode comes in. Bulb mode allows you to set your shutter speeds to unlimited lengths. When you click the shutter button, it will open the shutter and keep it open for as long as you hold the shutter button down. You might be thinking that this sounds crazy! Who would ever need that, let alone longer than 30 seconds?! Well, there are some instances where you may want to take photos with shutter speeds longer than 30 seconds. Consider star trails, low light scenes and instances where you may want to smooth the movement of rough water. Experimenting with long exposures can create some beautiful, surreal effects. See also:  Night Sky and Star Photography Tips for Beginners Scene Modes. Scene modes are programmed settings in your camera that will allow you to achieve particular results. These modes can vary or not even exist, depending on what kind of camera you have. They generally consist of landscape, portrait, sports and macro settings, allowing you to capture these scenes in a pre-programmed manner. For example, landscape mode will use a high aperture to ensure a deep depth of field. See also:  Tips and Tricks for Shooting Better Landscapes with a Smartphone Focus Area Modes. Your DSLR will have a few auto-focusing modes, depending on the model. The most common are AF-S and AF-C. AF-S. AF-S (Autofocus Single) means that when you press the camera shutter button down halfway, the camera will focus. When you press it down fully, it will take the photo. If you let go of the shutter button midway or when you go to take another photo, the focus will start over. This mode is best used for stationary objects, such as landscapes, architecture or people that aren’t moving. See also:  12 Tips for Capturing Amazing City Skylines AF-C. AF-C (Autofocus Continuous) means that when you press the shutter halfway down and the focus locks, the focus will adjust as the subject moves, thereby keeping it in focus. This is the best way to photograph moving objects such as wildlife and sports. See also:  Namibia Wildlife Photography Tour Metering Modes. When you take a photo using any of the shooting modes, your camera makes a number of calculations to achieve the proper exposure. This is what is referred to as light metering. Your camera has a meter built in to it that evaluates the light in the scene that you’ve framed. Based on the settings that you've selected, the meter will calculate the optimal exposure. It does this by looking at light in the image (shadow and highlights), determining an exposure whereby all the tones in the image average 18% grey or “middle grey”. This is why if you take a photo of a bright white wall or white snow, the metered image will look a bit grey and underexposed. Similarly, a darkly-lit room may appear a bit brighter. As long as the scene isn’t pure white or extremely dark, then the camera’s meter will do a great job getting a proper exposure. There are three basic metering modes: Average, Centre Weighted, and Spot Metering. The three metering modes. Photo by: 'Sean Ensch'. Average metering means that the camera will evaluate the entire scene in frame from corner to corner, then average it all to 18% grey. Centre weighted, or partial metering, means that the camera will only evaluate 80% of the centre of the frame, leaving the corners out.  Spot metering is when the camera only meters a small area of the scene, usually in the centre marked by a dot. This means that it will only set the exposure based upon this small portion of your frame. This is a more advanced metering, typically used for scenes with dramatic contrast between light and dark where you want your metering to be based off one or the other. Using spot metering in a situation like this will give you more creative and technical control. To change metering modes, most cameras have a designated button on the top right or back of the camera. The button is labelled with a square that contains a broken circle, with a spot inside the circle. Press this button, then use the wheel to cycle through options. As a beginner, it is best to stick with average or centre weighted metering modes before experimenting with spot metering. See also:  Ultimate Guide to Understanding Focus in Photography Insider tipSee our popular Germany Photo Tours and Workshops. Learn more How to Change Exposure Settings. How you adjust the shutter speed, aperture, or ISO on your camera will depend largely upon which camera model you own. Each camera has a slightly different button interface but there is usually a general layout that is adhered to by each manufacturer across all of their models. Most DSLR cameras have two main wheels or dials on them that will control the exposure settings. The main one is located by the shutter button on the top of the camera. The secondary or rear dial is usually located on the back of the camera. Location of the main two control wheels on most cameras. Photo by: 'Sean Ensch'. Shutter Speed. To change your shutter speed, you will almost always use the main wheel on the top of the camera near the shutter button. Turn it to the right or left to adjust the shutter speed. Each click of the wheel will be ⅓ stop of light. This dial is in close proximity to your shutter release button. As such, it is also often used to adjust any other settings when you are using a priority shooting mode. See also:  Ultimate Guide to Focus Stacking Aperture. You can adjust your aperture in one of two ways, depending on which shooting mode you are in. If you are in Aperture Priority mode, then you can use the same main wheel on the top near the shutter button. In Manual mode you can use the rear wheel on the back of your camera. If you still can’t figure it out, refer to your camera’s manual. See also:  Which Camera Lens to Use? An Introduction to Focal Lengths ISO. There are a couple of general ways to adjust the ISO, depending on your camera model. Most modern, more professional DSLR cameras will have a designated, labelled ISO button on the top or upper back of the camera. Press this and an ISO panel will come up on the LCD display or in the viewfinder. Use the wheel to adjust the ISO, then press the ISO button again to set it. There are a few ways to adjust the ISO. Photo by: 'Unsplash'. Some cameras do not have an ISO button and will require you to go into the camera settings menu to adjust the ISO. Keep in mind that with ISO, the image quality can greatly be affected. The higher the ISO, the more grain or noise that will appear in your image. The quality is affected even more by an underexposed photo and in the shadows of an image. See also:  Understanding Image Noise in Your Landscape Photography of Iceland White Balance. White balance refers to the colour temperature in an image and is measured in “kelvin”. Each light source – for example, the sun, fluorescent lights and diffused natural light – emits a unique colour of light due to its different wavelengths. It is because of this that a sunset appears to be a warm (orange) glow while a cloudy day may seem cooler (more blue) in colour. Colour temperature chart, showing warmest to coolest. Photo by: 'Sean Ensch'. The human brain can compensate for the different colours of light naturally and our cameras can do the same, just not always as effectively. Your camera has a default automatic white balance setting, which evaluates the brightest tones throughout the image and calculates the white balance as best as it can. This works fairly well but can sometimes give inaccurate results. Some cameras also have white balance scene selection such as Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent, Tungsten and Flash. Cycling through these will adjust the white balance to the scene, such as using “Daylight” for shooting outdoors on a sunny day.  You may also manually adjust your white balance by using the custom white balance in your settings. This will bring up a panel with the lowest (coldest) to highest (warmest) white balance numbers in their kelvin values. See also:  How to Use Complementary Colours in Photography Shutter Release Mode. There are several different modes that change how the shutter is released when taking a photo. Each one has a benefit for certain instances out in the field. Single Frame. This is the default mode. When you press the shutter button, the camera will take one frame. Continuing to hold it down will do nothing. Another photo isn’t taken until the button is released and pressed again. This is most useful for taking photos that do not take a lot of time to compose. See also:  Ultimate Guide to Composition in Photography High Speed Continuous Shooting. When you press the shutter button down in this mode, the camera will begin taking multiple frames continuously at a high speed rate. The rate depends on your camera’s capabilities. Some can do 4 frames per second while others can go up to 10 frames per second. This mode is best used when shooting very fast moving objects, such as wildlife or sports. See also:  12 Day Costa Rica Wildlife & Landscape Photography Workshop Low Speed Continuous Shooting. Similar to above, low speed continuous shooting just lowers the amount of frames per second that the camera takes. This is beneficial for shooting quickly but with slower moving objects, such as lifestyle images of people. The slower frames per second save memory for unneeded bursts of images. See also:  15 Types of Photography to Challenge Your Creativity Self Timer / Remote Shutter Control. These modes give you a self timer delay for taking photos. Some cameras have a 2 second option, while the standard is 10 seconds. When the shutter is pressed, a timer begins. When the timer is up, a single photo will be taken. This is useful for group photos and is also the mode to put your camera in if you are using a remote shutter control. See also:  8 Tips to Improve Your Landscape Photographs Image Stabilisation. Image stabilisation (IS), or vibration reduction, is technology that enables photographers to take handheld photos at lower shutter speeds than before. As a general rule, you should never take a handheld photo at shutter speeds slower than the focal length equivalent of your lens. This means that if you are shooting with a 35mm focal length, then 1/35th of a second is the slowest shutter speed you should use when handholding your camera. With a 500mm focal length, you shouldn't shoot slower than 1/500th of a second. The reason for this is because when you are holding the camera in your hands, especially when you press the shutter button, you will always move the camera a bit. This tiny movement will result in blurry, shaky photos whenever you shoot with a shutter speed that is even just a little bit too slow.  To combat this, you can use a tripod. If your camera or lens has IS technology, then you can turn it on.   Image stabilisation comes either in your lens or in-camera. Lens image stabilisation uses a floating lens element that is electronically controlled and will shift with any movement. In-camera image stabilisation is similar, however, the camera will physically shift the camera sensor to movements. Image stabilisation technology is hugely beneficial when photographing with high focal length lenses and/or in low light scenarios when you can’t use a tripod. Keep in mind that it will only help with shooting stationary objects as it reduces vibration from handheld cameras. It does not help capture fast moving objects in frame at lower shutter speeds. The downside to image stabilisation can be a slight loss of detail, as it will never be as good as a photo taken on a sturdy tripod with no vibrations. Also, it is important to remember to turn Image Stabilisation off when you do not need it. In-camera image stabilisation can drain your battery heavily. In addition, using it when it is not needed can sometimes confuse the IS system and make your photos appear to have jumbled edges. So if you have an IS system, remember to turn it off when it is not needed. See also:  How to Take Sharp Landscape Photos in Windy Conditions Conclusion. If you are reading this, then you have made it all the way to the end – congratulations! I know that was a lot of information but hopefully, you will now have a fairly good understanding of your camera’s functions. Of course, there is so much still to learn but when I first began photography, I found the best way to learn was reading articles such as this one and then just messing around with my camera. The more you use your camera, the more familiar you will be with it. Eventually, everything will be second nature and your camera will become an extension of you. When this happens, you will truly be free to explore your creativity out in the field without worry of not knowing how to use a certain function. So go out and put all of this new knowledge to good use! About the author:  Sean Ensch is a landscape photographer based in the USA. You can find more of his work on his website or by following him on Facebook and Instagram. Would you like to take your photography to the next level? Join one of our photography tours and workshops in Iceland. It's the best place to improve your photography skills! Popular articles. Landscape Photography in the Lofoten Islands of Norway. With its dramatic and largely untouched Arctic landscape and immensely scenic viewpoints, Lofoten is arguably one of the best locations in the world in regards to photography. Adding the midnight sun...Interview with Erin Babnik. Landscape photography is as much of an art form as any other genre; just ask Erin Babnik, one of the leaders in the genre in the present day. This artist, educator, writer and speaker is not only kn...The Best Places to Photograph Puffins in Iceland. Iceland has one of the greatest puffin colonies in the world, and it is estimated that between 8 and 10 million birds inhabit the island. The puffin is a small bird that belongs to the auk family. I...Ultimate Photography Guide to the Lofoten Islands of Norway. Far above the Arctic Circle is an archipelago of islands with landscapes that seem to come out straight from a fairytale. This is a place where it feels like time stopped many years ago and where Mo...Ultimate Guide to Landscape Photography. If you like being out in nature and taking pictures, this guide is for you! In this extensive guide, we’ll go over everything that has to do with landscape photography: how to scout locations, best...Other interesting articles. How to Use the On-Camera Flash. The on-camera flash is a useful way to add light to your scene. These types of flashes are useful for many reasons. They keep your ISO low for event photography such as weddings, freezing movement i...Read moreWhere to Find Camera Manuals Online. You’ve probably done it before; misplacing your camera manual or losing it isn’t a new thing for anyone. Perhaps you’ve purchased a second hand camera which didn’t come with the box, let alone the m...Read moreA Beginner's Guide to Using Polarising Filters for Photography in Iceland. A polarising filter is an essential item in the camera kit of any serious landscape photographer who wants to take beautiful photos of Iceland. This useful tool changes the way that your camera sees...Read morePopular photo tours & workshops. Travel the world to capture the most incredible landscapesSummer Photo Tours in Iceland. Winter Photo Tours in Iceland. International Photo Tours. Greenland Photo Tours. Private Photo Tours in Iceland. Patagonia Photo Tours. Norway Photo Tours and Workshops. Faroe Islands Photo Tours and Workshops. Iceland Photo ToursAbout usTerms & conditionsCopyright & privacySkólavörðustígur 21ReviewsAddress Iceland Photo Workshops ehf.CIN: 7103171270 (VAT nr. 133084)Skólavörðustígur 21101 Reykjavík+354 519 [email protected] of TravelAll Workshops and ToursWorkshops in IcelandPrivate ToursHelicopter ToursInternational WorkshopsSpecial RequestsLocation ScoutingFashion PhotographyJoin our teamBecome a local contactJoin our affiliate programPhotography ArticlesWildlife PhotographyLandscape & Nature PhotographyPhotography TutorialsAerial & Drone PhotographyCamera & Gear ReviewsPhotographer InterviewsPhotography TechniquesMobile Photography
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 131
  • 14
  • mode
  • 64
  • 14
  • photo
  • 63
  • 14
  • shutter
  • 45
  • 14
  • photography
  • 40
  • 14
  • image
  • 38
  • 14
  • speed
  • 29
  • 14
  • exposure
  • 28
  • 14
  • aperture
  • 26
  • 14
  • setting
  • 26
  • 14
  • landscape
  • 25
  • 14
  • shutter speed
  • 24
  • 14
  • button
  • 23
  • 14
  • shooting
  • 22
  • 14
  • focu
  • 22
  • 14
  • control
  • 21
  • 14
  • iso
  • 21
  • 14
  • field
  • 20
  • 14
  • set
  • 19
  • 14
  • tour
  • 19
  • 14
  • af
  • 18
  • 14
  • file
  • 18
  • 14
  • depth
  • 18
  • 14
  • depth field
  • 17
  • 14
  • adjust
  • 16
  • 14
  • frame
  • 16
  • 14
  • scene
  • 16
  • 14
  • metering
  • 16
  • 14
  • guide
  • 16
  • 14
  • white
  • 16
  • 14
  • iceland
  • 14
  • 14
  • card
  • 14
  • 14
  • white balance
  • 13
  • 14
  • light
  • 13
  • 14
  • ultimate guide
  • 12
  • 14
  • shooting mode
  • 12
  • 14
  • photo tour
  • 11
  • 14
  • image stabilisation
  • 10
  • 14
  • landscape photography
  • 10
  • 14
  • shutter button
  • 10
  • 14
  • memory card
  • 9
  • 14
  • deep depth
  • 8
  • 14
  • manual mode
  • 8
  • 14
  • camera flash
  • 7
  • 14
  • stop
  • 7
  • 14
  • focal length
  • 7
  • 14
  • sean ensch
  • 7
  • 14
  • mode camera
  • 7
  • 14
  • tour workshop
  • 7
  • 14
  • priority mode
  • 7
  • 14
  • deep depth field
  • 6
  • 14
  • choose
  • 6
  • 14
  • beginner guide
  • 6
  • 14
  • setting camera
  • 6
  • 14
  • spot metering
  • 6
  • 14
  • bulb mode
  • 6
  • 14
  • metering mode
  • 6
  • 14
  • photography tour
  • 6
  • 14
  • aperture priority
  • 6
  • 14
  • ultimate
  • 6
  • 14
  • photo sean ensch
  • 5
  • 14
  • aperture priority mode
  • 5
  • 14
  • dslr camera
  • 5
  • 14
  • sport
  • 5
  • 14
  • speed continuou
  • 5
  • 14
  • camera setting
  • 5
  • 14
  • photo sean
  • 5
  • 14
  • exposure triangle
  • 5
  • 14
  • file type
  • 5
  • 14
  • moving object
  • 5
  • 14
  • shallow depth field
  • 4
  • 14
  • photo tour workshop
  • 4
  • 14
  • frame focu
  • 4
  • 14
  • speed aperture
  • 4
  • 14
  • adjust white
  • 4
  • 14
  • menu
  • 4
  • 14
  • full control
  • 4
  • 14
  • manually set
  • 4
  • 14
  • main wheel
  • 4
  • 14
  • camera len
  • 4
  • 14
  • shallow depth
  • 4
  • 14
  • taking photo
  • 4
  • 14
  • photo unsplash
  • 4
  • 14
  • date time
  • 4
  • 14
  • press shutter
  • 4
  • 14
  • back camera
  • 4
  • 14
  • adjust iso
  • 4
  • 14
  • photography tour workshop
  • 3
  • 14
  • shutter speed aperture
  • 3
  • 14
  • iso shutter speed
  • 3
  • 14
  • tour workshop iceland
  • 3
  • 14
  • adjust white balance
  • 3
  • 14
  • mode bulb mode
  • 3
  • 14
  • fast moving object
  • 3
  • 14
  • af af
  • 3
  • 14
  • press shutter button
  • 3
  • 14
  • speed continuou shooting
  • 3
  • 14
  • photo tour iceland
  • 3
  • 14
  • remote shutter
  • 3
  • 14
  • person focu
  • 3
  • 14
  • aperture iso
  • 3
  • 14
  • iso shutter
  • 3
  • 14
  • proper exposure
  • 3
  • 14
  • workshop iceland
  • 3
  • 14
  • camera record
  • 3
  • 14
  • raw jpeg
  • 3
  • 14
  • card camera
  • 3
  • 14
  • photography iceland
  • 3
  • 14
  • how
  • 3
  • 14
  • shutter priority
  • 3
  • 14
  • mode bulb
  • 3
  • 14
  • auto mode
  • 3
  • 14
  • set iso
  • 3
  • 14
  • fast moving
  • 3
  • 14
  • mode photo
  • 3
  • 14
  • 30 second
  • 3
  • 14
  • photo shutter
  • 3
  • 14
  • light scene
  • 3
  • 14
  • centre weighted
  • 3
  • 14
  • button top
  • 3
  • 14
  • iso button
  • 3
  • 14
  • continuou shooting
  • 3
  • 14
  • tour iceland
  • 3
  • 14
  • iceland photo
  • 3
  • 14
Result 15
TitleShutter Speed in Photography: The Essential Guide
Urlhttps://digital-photography-school.com/shutter-speed/
DescriptionWhat is shutter speed, and how can you use it for great images? Discover everything you need to know about this key photography setting!
Date
Organic Position14
H1Shutter Speed in Photography: The Essential Guide
H2What is shutter speed in photography? A simple definition
How shutter speed affects your photos
How to set the shutter speed on your camera
How to choose the perfect shutter speed: step by step
Slow shutter speed photography
Shutter speed in photography: final words
H3Shutter speed increases and decreases exposure
Shutter speed increases and decreases sharpness
Step 1: Determine the lowest-possible shutter speed that will get you a sharp shot
Step 2: Boost your shutter speed (or adjust other variables) for the proper exposure
Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category
H2WithAnchorsWhat is shutter speed in photography? A simple definition
How shutter speed affects your photos
How to set the shutter speed on your camera
How to choose the perfect shutter speed: step by step
Slow shutter speed photography
Shutter speed in photography: final words
BodyShutter Speed in Photography: The Essential Guide A Post By: Darren Rowse ... ... What is shutter speed in photography, and how does it affect your images? Shutter speed is a foundational photographic concept – one that every beginner photographer must master. Once you know how to use shutter speed, you’ll be able to capture sharp photos at will, and you’ll also be prepared to capture interesting creative effects (such as a gorgeous slow shutter speed blur). In this article, I’m going to take you through all the shutter speed basics, including: A simple definition of shutter speedThe effects that shutter speed has on your imagesThe value of slow versus fast shutter speedsHow to use different shutter speeds for outstanding results. So if you’re ready to become a shutter speed photography expert… …then read on! What is shutter speed in photography? A simple definition. Shutter speed is the length of time the camera shutter is open while the camera takes a photo. You press the shutter button, the shutter opens for a predetermined time period, then the shutter closes and the image has been captured. The longer the shutter is open, the more light that hits the camera sensor (or film, for analog shooters); this has various effects, as discussed in the next section. Note that shutter speed is measured in seconds (or fractions of a second). Here are a few common shutter speeds: 1/125s1/250s1/500s1/1000s1/1600s1/2000s In fact, there are literally thousands of possible shutter speeds, all of which expose the camera sensor to slightly different quantities of light. How shutter speed affects your photos. Shutter speed affects your images in a couple of key ways: It increases and decreases exposureIt increases and decreases sharpness Let’s take a look at each item in turn. Shutter speed increases and decreases exposure. The longer the shutter speed, the more light that hits your camera sensor – and the brighter the image becomes. So if you photograph a tree at 1/250s, then you drop the shutter speed to 1/60s, the second image, with the slower shutter speed, will be noticeably brighter. This has major consequences. Much of photography is about achieving the proper brightness, or exposure, for a scene, and by adjusting the shutter speed, you can get different results. For this reason, shutter speed is one of the three camera exposure variables (along with aperture and ISO). So when you’re out with your camera, you’ll need to adjust the shutter speed to achieve a nice, balanced exposure. The specifics will depend on the scene, but watch for blown-out highlights and clipped shadows (i.e., make sure you don’t over or underexpose so heavily that you lose information in the lightest or darkest parts of the photo). Shutter speed increases and decreases sharpness. Faster shutter speeds freeze motion. Slower shutter speeds blur motion. So if you’re photographing a bird in flight at 1/4000s, every feather will be crisp, even the flapping wings. But if you photograph that same bird at 1/15s, it will be an indecipherable blur. Now, the shutter speed needed to freeze motion will change depending on the speed of the moving objects. A feather drifting through the air may require a 1/200s shutter speed for maximum sharpness, while a fast-moving car may require 1/2000s or more. A too-slow shutter speed is one of the main reasons why pictures come out blurry – so you should pay very close attention to this setting. Always make sure it’s high enough to get the results you’re after. How to set the shutter speed on your camera. The precise shutter speed mechanisms vary from camera to camera – but changing the shutter speed is usually as simple as rotating a dial (to learn all the specifics, I recommend you check your camera manual). Note that your ability to adjust the shutter speed will change depending on your camera mode. If you use Auto, your camera will select the shutter speed for you, and you will have zero ability to make changes. If you use Manual mode, you can dial in the shutter speed at will (and you can also select your aperture and ISO). If you use Shutter Priority mode, you can select the shutter speed, while your camera will select the aperture for an optimal exposure. If you use Aperture Priority mode, you can select the aperture, while your camera will select the shutter speed for an optimal exposure. Different modes are good for different situations, so don’t just pick a mode and stick to it; instead, learn to adjust your mode dial depending on your photographic needs. How to choose the perfect shutter speed: step by step. Struggling to pick the perfect shutter speed? You’re not alone. But while selecting the best shutter speed for your shooting situation might seem hard, it’s actually easy – once you get the hang of it. Here’s the two-step process I recommend: Step 1: Determine the lowest-possible shutter speed that will get you a sharp shot. Look at your scene. Ask yourself: Are any subjects moving? And if so, what shutter speed do I need to freeze them? You’ll get better at determining the lowest-possible shutter speed over time, but at first, it will take a lot of trial and error. Here’s a list of minimum sharp shutter speeds to get you started: Water flowing: 1/125sPeople walking: 1/250sPeople/animals running: 1/500sCars driving: 1/1000sBirds flying: 1/2000s Also note that, if your scene has zero movement, you cannot simply select whatever shutter speed you like. If you’re handholding your camera, then your hands will shake, and this will create blur – unless your shutter speed is fast enough. The lowest-possible handheld shutter speed varies from person to person, plus it depends on your lens (longer lenses increase camera shake). And thanks to image stabilization technology, some cameras and lenses allow for unbelievably slow handheld shooting. But I’d recommend keeping the shutter speed above 1/60s or so for short lenses, and 1/160s or so for long lenses, at least until you’ve done some tests. Of course, if you’re shooting a scene with no movement, you do have another option: you can shoot with a tripod. Assuming your tripod is sturdy, it really will let you drop your shutter speed as low as you like (which is how you can create beautiful moving water effects, as I discuss later in this article!). Step 2: Boost your shutter speed (or adjust other variables) for the proper exposure. At this point, you should know your minimum shutter speed for a sharp shot. You shouldn’t drop below this speed – but you can always go above it, depending on your exposure needs. If you’re in Manual mode, check your camera’s exposure bar (in the viewfinder). If the scene is overexposed, go ahead and boost the shutter speed. If you’re in Shutter Priority mode, your camera will automatically select an aperture for a good exposure. But feel free to raise the shutter speed as long as your camera continues to choose an aperture you like. On the other hand, if the scene is underexposed according to your camera’s exposure bar, you’ll need to change other camera settings to get the right exposure. Consider widening the aperture – but if this isn’t possible, you’ll need to raise the ISO. Do not drop the shutter speed, however. Better to increase the ISO for a noisy image than to end up with unwanted blur. And that’s it! To recap: Start by identifying your lowest-possible shutter speed for a sharp shot, then simply make tweaks for the optimal exposure. That way, you get a crisp photo – with a balanced exposure, too. Slow shutter speed photography. The advice I’ve given above is perfect for situations where you want to freeze a moving subject. But what if a sharp shot isn’t your goal? What if, instead, you want to creatively blur your photo for a beautiful effect? You see, blur isn’t always bad; it can communicate motion, plus it can look truly breathtaking, as in this waterfall shot: In deliberate motion-blur situations, you should set your camera to Manual mode, then dial in the exact shutter speed you’re after. At this point, you should check your camera’s exposure bar and adjust the aperture and/or ISO for a good exposure. Note that you definitely need a tripod for this type of long-exposure photography. Otherwise, the entire shot will blur! Pro tip: If you’re struggling to get a slow enough shutter speed without overexposing the image, consider using a neutral density filter, which blocks out light and is perfect for long exposure shooting. Alternatively, you can shoot in near darkness (either indoors or at night). That’s how this subway image was captured: Shutter speed in photography: final words. Now that you’ve finished this article, you’re well equipped to create some gorgeous photos. So head out with your camera and test out different shutter speeds. Get familiar with your options. And try the two-step process I outlined above! Now over to you: How do you plan to select your shutter speed from now on? Do you have any shutter speed tips? Share your thoughts in the comments below! ... ... Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category. Darren Rowse is the editor and founder of Digital Photography School and SnapnDeals. He lives in Melbourne Australia and is also the editor of the ProBlogger Blog Tips. Follow him on Instagram, on Twitter at @digitalPS or on Google+. I need help with... Landscape Photography Tips Portrait Photography Tips Photo Composition Tips Beginner Photography Tips Photo Post Processing Tips Get Started with Cameras and Gear Sign up to the weekly DPS NEWSLETTER Guaranteed for 2 full months Pay by PayPal or Credit Card Instant Digital Download Learn to Use It! Your email is safe with us. We won't share it with anyone Sign up to the weekly DPS NEWSLETTER All our best articles for the week Fun photographic challenges Special offers and discounts Learn to Use It! Your email is safe with us. We won't share it with anyone Sign up to the weekly DPS NEWSLETTER All our best articles for the week Fun photographic challenges Special offers and discounts Your email is safe with us. We won't share it with anyone Learn to Use It!
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 74
  • 15
  • shutter speed
  • 65
  • 15
  • speed
  • 64
  • 15
  • camera
  • 30
  • 15
  • exposure
  • 21
  • 15
  • photography
  • 12
  • 15
  • step
  • 10
  • 15
  • mode
  • 10
  • 15
  • image
  • 9
  • 15
  • photo
  • 9
  • 15
  • blur
  • 9
  • 15
  • aperture
  • 9
  • 15
  • select
  • 9
  • 15
  • tip
  • 9
  • 15
  • lowest
  • 8
  • 15
  • slow
  • 7
  • 15
  • scene
  • 7
  • 15
  • shutter speed photography
  • 6
  • 15
  • exposure bar
  • 6
  • 15
  • speed photography
  • 6
  • 15
  • sharp
  • 6
  • 15
  • shot
  • 6
  • 15
  • select shutter speed
  • 5
  • 15
  • check camera
  • 5
  • 15
  • slow shutter
  • 5
  • 15
  • select shutter
  • 5
  • 15
  • effect
  • 5
  • 15
  • article
  • 5
  • 15
  • iso
  • 5
  • 15
  • adjust
  • 5
  • 15
  • motion
  • 5
  • 15
  • moving
  • 5
  • 15
  • learn
  • 5
  • 15
  • slow shutter speed
  • 4
  • 15
  • increas decreas
  • 4
  • 15
  • select aperture
  • 4
  • 15
  • sharp shot
  • 4
  • 15
  • perfect
  • 4
  • 15
  • shooting
  • 4
  • 15
  • lense
  • 4
  • 15
  • long
  • 4
  • 15
  • share
  • 4
  • 15
  • drop shutter speed
  • 3
  • 15
  • shutter speed camera
  • 3
  • 15
  • lowest shutter
  • 3
  • 15
  • shutter speed sharp
  • 3
  • 15
  • speed sharp shot
  • 3
  • 15
  • camera exposure
  • 3
  • 15
  • sign weekly dp
  • 3
  • 15
  • weekly dp newsletter
  • 3
  • 15
  • email safe wont
  • 3
  • 15
  • safe wont share
  • 3
  • 15
  • shutter open
  • 3
  • 15
  • camera sensor
  • 3
  • 15
  • drop shutter
  • 3
  • 15
  • speed camera
  • 3
  • 15
  • camera select
  • 3
  • 15
  • manual mode
  • 3
  • 15
  • mode dial
  • 3
  • 15
  • priority mode
  • 3
  • 15
  • optimal exposure
  • 3
  • 15
  • speed sharp
  • 3
  • 15
  • photography tip
  • 3
  • 15
  • sign weekly
  • 3
  • 15
  • weekly dp
  • 3
  • 15
  • dp newsletter
  • 3
  • 15
  • email safe
  • 3
  • 15
  • safe wont
  • 3
  • 15
  • wont share
  • 3
  • 15
Result 16
TitleA Beginner’s Guide to ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed - Christine Abroad
Urlhttps://www.christineabroad.com/a-beginners-guide-to-iso-aperture-shutter-speed/
DescriptionDo you have a DSLR camera and not sure how to use it? In this guide, I will teach you about the three basic elements - ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed!
Date29 Nov 2019
Organic Position15
H1A Beginner’s Guide to ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed
H2Understanding ISO
Understanding Aperture
Understanding Shutter Speed
H3What is ISO?
Why you should avoid using high ISO
ISO Practice
What is Aperture?
How does the Aperture work?
The Aperture controls the Depth of Field
Aperture Exercise
What is Shutter Speed?
Select the appropriate Shutter Speed
The Shutter Speed controls motion blur and the freezing of a movement
Shutter Speed Exercise
Leave A Comment Cancel reply
H2WithAnchorsUnderstanding ISO
Understanding Aperture
Understanding Shutter Speed
BodyA Beginner’s Guide to ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Home/Photography Tips/A Beginner’s Guide to ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed A Beginner’s Guide to ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed I will start this guide by saying that cameras are complicated, and it takes quite some time and effort to learn how they work inside out. When I first bought my camera, I had no idea what ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed was, which are the most important things to know before starting taking pictures.  In the beginning, I was so frustrated that the camera didn’t capture what I could see through the camera’s viewfinder. So what did I do? I went to a beginners class by NIKON, took notes, and started to research about how the settings on my camera worked. When I got the hang of it, I began to be able to capture some amazing pictures.  In this post, I will teach you about the three essential elements for photography. Get ready, here is a Beginner’s Guide to ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed! Understanding ISO. What is ISO? To explain ISO as simple as possible, ISO is the level of how sensitive your camera sensor is to light. A higher ISO number makes the sensor in your camera more sensitive to light, and a lower ISO-number makes it less sensitive to light.  This means that a low ISO-number suits in good lighting conditions, and a high ISO number when the light is poor. You may, therefore, need to increase the ISO-number in dark environments, so the camera’s sensor can be able to register enough light to get a correct exposure of your photo.  For example, if you are shooting inside your house at night and without your cameras flash, then it could be a good idea to select a higher ISO-number such as ISO 400, depending on the available light inside your home. A bright summer’s day outside, you will foremost not have to use a higher ISO-number than ISO 100, as you are shooting in good lighting conditions.  If you are shooting in poor lighting conditions, like at a concert, then you may have to use a high ISO-number to be able to take the picture.  This photo was taken with ISO-number of 1600, as the available light was pretty good at this concert Why you should avoid using high ISO. Sure, it may feel very comfortable to use a high ISO-number to shoot in dark environments. But there’s a catch. When you are shooting with a high number of ISO, the picture will contain more noise than an image with a low ISO-number. Then you might wonder what noise is in a photograph? Noise is randomly scattered color dots or unevenly colored patches in areas of your photo which should be smooth and evenly colored. The noise is usually seen in dark shadows and cleaner surfaces such as a soft and blue sky. With that said, always try to have an as low ISO as you possibly can if you are looking for good image quality, as the quality will be so much better then if you use a high ISO-number. This picture was taken with a high ISO-number, which gave this picture noise in the sky ISO Practice. Before you read forward about Aperture and Shutter Speed, it’s a good idea to experiment a little with the ISO on your camera. So you understand how it works, where to find the ISO setting and how you change the ISO-number (you can look that up in your camera manual). When you have figured that out, take some pictures of a motive in both good and poor lighting conditions and change the ISO number from low (100) to higher and higher ISO-numbers. Then make sure to look at the results and compare the pictures. Understanding Aperture. What is Aperture? To simply put what Aperture is, it’s a hole within your camera’s lens. Through this hole, the light travels to hit the camera’s sensor. Through your decision of the size of the aperture (hole), you will affect how much light that will reach the sensor in your camera. The larger the aperture (hole), the more light will hit the camera’s sensor. Quite logical right? How does the Aperture work? The aperture is to be found in your lens, and it’s a hole that is built up of a number of moving blades. When shooting a picture, you can set the size of the aperture (hole), and control the amount of light that hits the sensor. The aperture is defined as an F-number on your camera, often displayed both in the cameras viewfinder and on the screen of your camera body.  The aperture’s F-number (size of the hole) indicates the amount of light that is let through to hit the sensor. These different aperture numbers are also known as F-Stops and run in a series of numbers. The first times that you look at these numbers you might feel a little confused as they can be a bit difficult to understand. But don’t worry, in time you will understand the aperture from inside out.  The aperture number are often specified by an “F” before the actual number, and runs from F/1 up to about F/32 as following numbers: 1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32.  These numbers represent the whole steps of the aperture on your camera. The numbers may also vary as some cameras can choose the aperture number in half or thirds steps. The characteristics of the chosen aperture number will affect your image significantly, something that you will learn soon.  Therefore, it is very important to know what the aperture numbers mean, and what they do to a picture before you’re about to snap some shots. For each step between the numbers, from left to right in the number series above, the hole in your lens lets exactly half as much light into your camera as it did before. Let’s say that your given environment requires an F of 8 (F/8) and your camera is set on F/11, then it means that only half of the light that this picture needs to get a correct exposure is released into your camera. The result of this would be an underexposed (too dark) image. Would you instead have an aperture of F/6 and the picture requires F/8, the photo would be overexposed (too bright) as you have let in too much light to hit the sensor.   This is important to add to your mind: A LOW number gives a LARGE aperture (hole), which lets through much light.  A HIGH number gives a SMALL aperture (hole), which lets through less light.  The Aperture controls the Depth of Field. The right aperture for your picture does not only help your image to get a correct exposure, it does also control the depth of field in your photos. The depth of field in your images is depending on what aperture you have set on the camera and regulates your foreground/background to be either sharp or blurry. This is called depth of field, and by learning and understand how the aperture affects your pictures, you will develop your photography skills. The depth has no sharp boundaries where the motive goes from sharp to blurry in one step. The transition takes place gradually, both in front of and behind the motive that you focus on. The better you understand the relationship between aperture and depth of field, the more you will be able to use that knowledge in a creative way to help improve your skills as a photographer. In fact, this will be one of your sharpest tools when you are creating an interesting image.  Important to remember about the connection between aperture and depth of field: A LARGE aperture (low F-number) gives a SHALLOW depth of field (blurry) A SMALL aperture (high F-number) gives a DEEP depth of field (sharp) For example; you are shooting a photograph with focus on a person that are standing front of a forest. If you use a LARGE aperture (low F-number), the background will be shallow (blurry). If you instead use a SMALL aperture (high F-number), then your background will be deep (sharp).  When should I use a shallow depth of field? When you want to isolate your motive, then it can be a good idea to use a shallow depth of field (a low F-number).   A few examples of when you could use a shallow depth of field: When you want to separate your motive from a messy background When you are shooting a portrait and wants the motive to stand out from the background When shooting animals, sports, and small details is larger contexts The shallow depth of field can be used in countless situations, and there is only your imagination that can limit that. Never be afraid to experiment with a shallow depth of field, the results can be amazing! This picture was taken with a LARGE aperture (low F-number), which gives a SHALLOW depth of field (blurry background) When should I use a deep depth of field? Landscape photography is a classic example of pictures that requires a deep depth of field. With a small aperture (high F-number), the picture will be able to be sharp from the foreground all the way to the background. A deep depth of field gives you a nice overlooking view of a landscape where you will be able to see all its beautiful details. As the whole picture will be sharp, the image will give us a perspective that is much similar to the way that we experience the landscape view in real life. Those pictures that not have obvious motives and those who are relatively calm for the eyes to look at are perfect examples of images that can be shot with a deep depth of field.  This picture was taken with a SMALL aperture (high F-number), which gives a DEEP depth of field (sharp from foreground til background) Aperture Exercise. Even though you might know how the aperture works and how it affects your pictures just by reading this guide, it’s still important to practice before you head out to shoot. Change the aperture and see how it affects the exposure and the depth of field of your pictures. Think about how the emotion/feeling changes when your pictures change step by step. Remember that the depth of field is one of the best tools when it comes to creating interesting pictures. If you are facing each picture and are thinking about what kind of aperture you should use to affect the depth of field, then you’re starting to think like a real photographer.  Understanding Shutter Speed. What is Shutter Speed? Now when you have learned how the ISO and aperture works, then it’s time to go on to the third element. This third element controls the flow of the light that hits your camera’s sensor – the Shutter Speed.  The shutter is to be found between the sensor and your lens and is best described as a door. The speed of the shutter (door) is up to you to decide how long it is going to be open for light. The longer you have the shutter open, the more light will hit the sensor. The shorter time that you have the shutter open, the less light will hit the sensor. The time that you hold the shutter open is called shutter speed.  When it comes to shutter speed, there is no standard speed to make the perfect images; you simply have to learn and adjust to the environment that you are shooting in.  Select the appropriate Shutter Speed. The Shutter Speed is usually changed with a wheel or a button on the camera’s body. Your selected shutter speed is often displayed in both the viewfinder and on the screen of your camera. Most DSLR cameras has a shutter speed that varies from 30 seconds to 1/2000 (and even higher) part of a second in the following steps: 30”, 15”, 8”, 4”, 2”, 1”, 2, 4, 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, and so on… This series of numbers are corresponding the “whole” steps of the shutter, but can also be chosen in half or third steps. From the left side of the number series above, the first numbers has a symbol (“). This symbol (“) means that this number is a whole second, so for example, the number 30” means that the shutter will be open for 30 seconds. On the right side of the series of numbers this symbol disappears, and that means that the numbers is a part of a second. So, 250 implies that it is a 1/250 part of a second.  For each step that you take in the right direction of these numbers, the shutter speed will release in half as much light as in the step before. These steps of the shutter has the same effect as the steps of the aperture when it comes to the amount of light that hits the sensor. For example, if your picture is to bright (overexposed) when you have set the shutter speed to 60, try to set the shutter speed setting to 125, which will make your image darker as the shutter lets through less light.  The Shutter Speed controls motion blur and the freezing of a movement. Freeze movements with a fast shutter speed. If you are shooting a subject that are moving, for example a bird, then you will have to choose a fast shutter speed to freeze the moment. If you have a longer shutter speed while shooting a photograph of a moving motive, then the motive will be blurry. This is calls motion blur, and if it’s not used as a fully aware effect, it usually ruins the image.  The best way to avoid motion blur if you want to freeze a moment of movement is to select a shutter speed of 1/500 or faster depending on the available light. A fast shutter speed is very useful if you want to take a sharp picture of, for example, a flying bird, a marathon of running people or a car that is driving by. You can even freeze those moments that the eye can’t see, such as falling water droplets with perfect clarity.  This picture was taken with a short/fast shutter speed, which freezes the movement of your motive Experiment with longer shutter speeds and motion blur. Sometimes a long shutter speed can be the perfect decision, even though the motive is in motion. If your motive is in motion and you have set a long shutter speed, it will create motion blur. When using a long shutter speed deliberately, it can create really cool effects in your photos.  For example, you would like to obtain a picture that shows how the water of an waterfall actually flows or turning a river or lake with movement crystal clear. Then a long shutter speed is a crystal clear choice. A classic example of great pictures with deliberate motion blur is photographing cars at night. When shooting a road with cars that are passing by at night, it will create long lines of the lights that the cars emit.  Avoid Camera Shake when you are shooting with a long shutter speed. . When you are shooting a picture with a long shutter speed, it’s very important to know that you have to keep the camera completely still to avoid blur in the image. It is impossible to hold a camera with your hands perfectly still while the shutter is open, and that affects the sharpness in your pictures. This is called camera shake and is one of the most common causes of blurred images. To avoid getting camera shake into the picture while shooting with longer shutter speed, use a tripod.  If you don’t have a tripod, you can always try to lean against a wall while you’re shooting, or place your camera on a stable place like a table, chair or whatever else you can find at your location. Also, make sure to push the trigger of the camera gently but firmly to avoid further camera shake.  This picture was taken with a long/slow shutter speed, which gives motion blur to a moving motive Shutter Speed Exercise. Experiment with the shutter speed to see what your camera can do. Start with a shorter/faster shutter speed and take photos of dripping water from your kitchen tap. Then, set your camera to a longer/slower shutter speed and photograph a friend or a family member who is walking around in front of the camera and see what happens.   2019-11-29T20:02:50+02:00 Share This Story:. FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditPinterestEmail Leave A Comment Cancel reply.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • number
  • 68
  • 16
  • aperture
  • 48
  • 16
  • shutter
  • 48
  • 16
  • camera
  • 46
  • 16
  • speed
  • 43
  • 16
  • shutter speed
  • 40
  • 16
  • picture
  • 38
  • 16
  • iso
  • 34
  • 16
  • light
  • 26
  • 16
  • depth
  • 23
  • 16
  • depth field
  • 22
  • 16
  • field
  • 22
  • 16
  • sensor
  • 18
  • 16
  • shooting
  • 18
  • 16
  • iso number
  • 16
  • 16
  • high
  • 16
  • 16
  • step
  • 15
  • 16
  • image
  • 14
  • 16
  • low
  • 13
  • 16
  • motive
  • 12
  • 16
  • example
  • 11
  • 16
  • hole
  • 10
  • 16
  • hit
  • 9
  • 16
  • sharp
  • 9
  • 16
  • motion
  • 9
  • 16
  • guide iso
  • 8
  • 16
  • aperture high
  • 8
  • 16
  • aperture number
  • 8
  • 16
  • light hit
  • 8
  • 16
  • deep
  • 8
  • 16
  • good
  • 8
  • 16
  • shallow
  • 8
  • 16
  • long
  • 8
  • 16
  • blur
  • 8
  • 16
  • shallow depth field
  • 7
  • 16
  • deep depth
  • 7
  • 16
  • shallow depth
  • 7
  • 16
  • motion blur
  • 7
  • 16
  • affect
  • 7
  • 16
  • set
  • 7
  • 16
  • background
  • 7
  • 16
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 6
  • 16
  • light hit sensor
  • 6
  • 16
  • deep depth field
  • 6
  • 16
  • long shutter speed
  • 6
  • 16
  • hit camera
  • 6
  • 16
  • aperture low
  • 6
  • 16
  • series number
  • 6
  • 16
  • iso aperture
  • 6
  • 16
  • aperture shutter
  • 6
  • 16
  • high iso
  • 6
  • 16
  • aperture hole
  • 6
  • 16
  • hit sensor
  • 6
  • 16
  • long shutter
  • 6
  • 16
  • iso aperture shutter
  • 5
  • 16
  • high iso number
  • 5
  • 16
  • number picture
  • 5
  • 16
  • longer shutter
  • 5
  • 16
  • small aperture
  • 5
  • 16
  • speed shutter
  • 5
  • 16
  • shutter open
  • 5
  • 16
  • beginner guide
  • 4
  • 16
  • guide iso aperture
  • 4
  • 16
  • higher iso number
  • 4
  • 16
  • camera sensor
  • 4
  • 16
  • low number
  • 4
  • 16
  • small aperture high
  • 4
  • 16
  • high number
  • 4
  • 16
  • shutter speed shutter
  • 4
  • 16
  • correct exposure
  • 4
  • 16
  • beginner
  • 4
  • 16
  • guide
  • 4
  • 16
  • higher iso
  • 4
  • 16
  • lighting condition
  • 4
  • 16
  • large aperture
  • 4
  • 16
  • camera shake
  • 4
  • 16
  • amount light hit
  • 3
  • 16
  • large aperture low
  • 3
  • 16
  • speed shutter speed
  • 3
  • 16
  • fast shutter speed
  • 3
  • 16
  • shutter speed shooting
  • 3
  • 16
  • longer shutter speed
  • 3
  • 16
  • avoid camera shake
  • 3
  • 16
  • low iso
  • 3
  • 16
  • good idea
  • 3
  • 16
  • number iso
  • 3
  • 16
  • aperture work
  • 3
  • 16
  • amount light
  • 3
  • 16
  • half light
  • 3
  • 16
  • let light
  • 3
  • 16
  • aperture affect
  • 3
  • 16
  • background deep
  • 3
  • 16
  • open light
  • 3
  • 16
  • fast shutter
  • 3
  • 16
  • speed shooting
  • 3
  • 16
  • freeze moment
  • 3
  • 16
  • avoid camera
  • 3
  • 16
Result 17
TitleBeginners Guide to Camera Settings (EASY & FUN!)
Urlhttps://shotkit.com/camera-settings/
DescriptionMaster your camera settings with this easy-to-follow guide for beginners, including pro tips you can use to keep improving your photography in 2022
Date
Organic Position16
H1Beginner’s Guide to Camera Settings
H2Recommended Camera Settings for Beginners
What are the 3 Basic Camera Settings?
Camera Shooting Modes
Autofocus Modes
Metering Modes
Final Words
H3Aperture
Shutter Speed
ISO
Full Manual Mode (M)
Full Automatic Mode (A)
Program (P)
Aperture Priority (A)
Shutter Priority (S)
Scene Modes (Icons)
Exposure Compensation
AF-S / One-Shot
AF-C / AI Servo
Autofocus Automatic / AI Focus AF
Spot Metering
Center-Weighted Metering
Matrix / Pattern / Evaluative / Multi-Zone Metering
H2WithAnchorsRecommended Camera Settings for Beginners
What are the 3 Basic Camera Settings?
Camera Shooting Modes
Autofocus Modes
Metering Modes
Final Words
BodyBeginner’s Guide to Camera Settings This guide to camera settings will help you through the first steps out of getting your camera out of Auto mode. If you’re just snapping pictures with your camera as it came out of the box, you’re missing out on wonderful photography opportunities. You don’t need to jump straight into Manual mode to start taking control of your pictures. You can learn how to use the different Auto and Semi-Auto features on your camera, and you’ll see a big difference. With this guide, you’ll learn the basic camera settings and how they work. You’ll also find different shooting modes to put your knowledge into action to ease your way out of auto-mode. Then, I’ll explain the different metering modes to learn how your camera measures light. This way, you can choose the right one for each photography situation. Finally, I’ll cover the different auto-focus modes to help you capture sharp images every time. Overall, this article is an ideal complement to our guide: photography for beginners. So, if you’re ready to improve your photos, let’s get started! Table of Contents Recommended Camera Settings for Beginners. If you’re in a rush and just want the best all-round camera settings for most situations, here’s a cheat sheet: Image Quality: RAW (lossless compressed) White Balance: Auto Aperture Priority (A / Tv) (use exposure compensation to adjust brightness of scene) Single Area AF for static subjects; Continuous AF for moving Matrix/Evaluative metering Largest lens aperture available (i.e. lowest f-number) Auto ISO (if not available, the lowest ISO possible) Photzy is giving away a set of free photography cheat sheets to help you understand the basics, so head over there and download them. Now let’s take a closer look at each of the camera settings available on modern digital cameras. What are the 3 Basic Camera Settings? Credit: jeshoots As you probably know, a photograph is made by capturing light. With your camera, you let in the light that will be registered by a light-sensitive surface – in digital photography, it’s a sensor; in film photography, it’s the film. You need the right amount of light, though. That’s what’s known as the correct exposure. To achieve the right exposure, you need to control how sensitive the sensor is and how much light is going to hit the surface. For this, we have three basic camera settings: aperture, shutter speed and ISO. Aperture, shutter speed and ISO all work together, as you have to find the balance between them. If you adjust one of the camera settings, you’ll have to compensate with one of the others, and so on. This is known as the exposure triangle. The exposure triangle is one of the most valuable things you can learn in photography, and no guide to camera settings would be complete without it. So, let’s take a look at each of the three elements so you can get a better idea of what I mean. Aperture. What is aperture? This is one of the camera settings that will control the exposure of your image. The aperture refers to the size of the hole that lets in the light, and the diaphragm controls it. It works very much like your eyes: stand in front of a mirror and look at the size of your pupils, then shine a light and see how your pupil shrinks. That’s because the iris’ muscles constrict or dilate the pupil to regulate how much light can pass through it. In the lens of the camera, there’s a piece called the iris diaphragm. It’s shaped like a circle and holds movable blades that make the aperture smaller or larger. Obviously, a small aperture lets in less light and vice versa. The size of the aperture is expressed in f-numbers; each one of them is considered a stop. That’s why changing from one to the next is called moving an f-stop. Normally, the scale goes f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22. Some rare (and expensive) lenses have diaphragms that can go beyond this range. You’ll often find other numbers representing fractions of an f-stop, for example, f/1.8 or f/3.5. The lenses with smaller f-numbers are called fast lenses and are usually more expensive, especially when they’re zoom lenses. When you adjust the aperture, you’re also changing the depth of field (DOF) – in other words, how much of your image is in focus. A wide aperture (such as f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8) results in a shallow depth of field, creating a selective focus. This is useful when you want to create a blurry background or attract the viewer’s attention to a specific part of the image. Then, of course, a small aperture (such as f/11, f/16, f/22) will create a deep depth of field. This is used mainly in landscape photography, or product photography where everything needs to be sharp. I’m not going into it in this article; however, you should know that depth of field is also impacted by your lens’s focal length and the distance between you and the subject. So, if you’re using an aperture of f/1.8, you’ll have a lot of light, but not much of your image will be in focus. If instead, you choose an f/11, you’ll have less light, but more will be in focus. When you’re adjusting the aperture to achieve a specific focus effect, you need to compensate with the other camera settings; otherwise, you’ll be affecting the exposure resulting in a darker or brighter image. For example, if you close your aperture by one stop, you need to make the shutter speed slower by one stop too. Alternatively, you can raise the ISO by one stop. Have a play around with this depth of field calculator to learn more. Shutter Speed. What is shutter speed? Aperture lets you decide how much light comes into your camera; shutter speed lets you control for how long. The shutter is what covers the sensor from being hit by light. When you press the shutter button to take a picture, you’re moving the shutter out of the way and exposing the sensor to light. When you adjust the shutter speed setting, you’re controlling how much time the shutter will be open – in other words, how long the exposure is. Since you measure time, the values are expressed in seconds or fractions of a second. Most cameras offer a range from 30 seconds to 1/4000 of a second. Some higher-end cameras can shoot even faster. If you need a shutter speed of more than 30 seconds, you’re doing long exposure photography. In this case, you should change to bulb mode. The amount of time goes hand in hand with how much light is coming in through the aperture. If you’re using an f/22 you’re not letting in a lot of light, so you’ll need a slower shutter speed to expose the sensor for a longer time. Keep in mind that the entire time that it’s open, the sensor is capturing your image. So, if you or your subject are moving, it will be registered. This results in blur. If you’re not using a tripod, a slow shutter speed will then capture your own movement while you’re holding the camera. Unfortunately, this happens often in low light situations. As a result, you’ll have a blurry photo due to camera shake which is less than desirable. The slowest shutter speed you can use without camera shake is related to the focal length – telephoto lenses need faster shutter speeds. It also depends if your equipment has image stabilization. Image stabilization technology can be built into your camera or your lens. However, it’s always better to use a tripod if you’re going to be taking photographs in low light. When you’re using a tripod and deliberately capture your subject’s movement, the effect is called motion blur and can be used as a creative element. On the other hand, if you want to freeze moving subjects, you’ll need to use a fast shutter speed. The right amount will depend on the velocity of your subject. For example, in street photography, you can freeze a walking person with 1/250. However, if you’re doing wildlife photography and want to take a picture of a flying bird, you might need something around 1/2000. Make sure you compensate for any adjustments that you make to the shutter speed by changing the other camera settings. You can do this with the aperture or the ISO, whichever works best for you. ISO. What is ISO? The ISO determines how sensitive the camera sensor is. In film photography, you had a fixed sensitivity on each roll. Fortunately, in digital photography, you can change this on every shot. A low ISO number will be less sensitive to light, but the image’s quality will be smoother. In most cameras, the lowest ISO can be 100 or 200. If you use a high ISO instead, the sensor will be very sensitive to light, but you’ll get a grainy effect called digital noise. Camera manufacturers keep extending the highest ISO numbers, but they are rarely used. Ideally, you should stay in the lowest ISO your camera offers, but this isn’t always possible. If you’re photographing at night or low light conditions, you often have to compromise. Fortunately, you can reduce the amount of noise by using post-processing software. In general, full-frame cameras deliver images with less noise than cameras with a cropped sensor. However, the difference is less noticeable as technology keeps getting better. Remember that, as with the other camera settings above, you have to compensate for any changes in the ISO. That means changing the aperture and shutter speed. You can also let the camera decide the ISO value by using the Auto ISO feature. I know what you’re thinking: what if my camera chooses a really high ISO and you end up with super noisy images? Well, you don’t have to worry about that because you can set a limit to how high it can go. If you feel that your images are too noisy after ISO 800, for example, you can configure it to never go over that value. Inside these settings, you can also determine the minimum shutter speed. This value will let the camera know when to change to the next ISO value. Keep in mind this is a secondary setting – so, the camera will overwrite the minimum shutter speed assigned if there isn’t enough light to prioritize the maximum ISO setting. Camera Shooting Modes. Now that you know the basic camera settings that determine the exposure, you might be wondering how to use them to capture a well-exposed photograph. Not to worry, you don’t have to figure it out from scratch and shoot in Manual mode. Digital cameras have different shooting modes to fit your level of expertise. They range from Full Automatic up to Manual with a wide set of choices in between. You’ll normally find them on the top dial of your camera. Some of these modes are expressed in letters, the others in icons. In our guide to camera settings, we’ve included the most common: Full Manual Mode (M). As the name indicates, you have to adjust all the camera settings by yourself when you shoot in Manual mode. You don’t need to jump right into this mode, as it requires advanced skills and knowledge. You can work your way up to it by starting with some of the Semi-Automatic modes. Full Automatic Mode (A). You’ll notice that your camera has a shooting mode called Auto, usually marked in green. This stands for a Fully Automatic mode – the camera will decide all the settings for you. In Auto mode, you can’t adjust exposure settings like the aperture, shutter speed and ISO, and features like metering mode and white balance are also disabled. Technology is so good by now that most of the time you’ll get a correctly exposed photograph when you have the camera settings in Auto. However, it’s still not very advisable. As mentioned in the first part of the article, each setting impacts more than the amount of light. If you can’t control them, you’ll also lose control of the final image. Program (P). Most people often overlook the Program mode because they think it’s the same as the Auto mode. While they are similar, there are some advantages to using this one. For starters, the ISO is not set by your camera. This means you can decide which ISO you want to use, and the camera will adjust the aperture and shutter speed settings accordingly. Then – this is the best part – you can shift those values in case you have a moving subject, or you want to control the depth of field. If you’re looking to take some baby steps to leave the Auto mode on your camera, you can start by using Program mode. Plus, you can also change other camera settings such as metering mode, white balance and focus mode in Program – which are usually disabled when you use your camera in Auto-mode. Aperture Priority (A). This is another semi-automatic program which – as you probably guessed already – gives priority to the aperture value. It’s useful when you want to control the depth of field. If you want to have everything in focus or create a bokeh background, you just worry about the right aperture and the camera will take care of the rest. It’s useful to pair up aperture priority with auto ISO. This way, you can avoid noisy images due to a super high ISO or blurry images due to camera shake. Shutter Priority (S). Being part of the exposure triangle, the shutter speed also has a semi-automatic program.  It’s represented with an S on most cameras, but you can also find it as Tv (time value). If you’re experimenting with motion blur or long exposure, or need to stay over a certain speed to avoid camera shake, then this is the program you need. This is because it lets you choose the shutter speed while the rest of the camera settings are determined automatically. Scene Modes (Icons). You already know all the letters in your dial, but what about the icons? Those are called Scene Modes, and they’re part of the Automatic features. You probably know that different camera settings work better for different types of photography. With the scene modes, the camera will decide the exposure settings based on this. Depending on your camera, the amount and variety of scenes might be different. Here are some of the most common: Landscape: Since this type of photography is best with a deep depth of field, the camera will prioritize having a closed aperture causing a higher ISO and a slower shutter speed. Apart from landscapes, it’s also a good mode for group portraits or any wide scene. Portrait: This mode is used mainly for headshots. Contrary to the landscape, a portrait needs a shallow depth of field to blur the background. That’s why this mode will choose wider apertures. It’s also good for creating bokeh with any kind of subject. Macro: With this mode, you are telling the camera that you need a shorter focusing distance. Its icon is usually a flower because flowers are a common subject in macro photography. However, it also works on insects, jewellery, and other small subjects. The minimum focus distance that you can achieve with this mode will depend on the lens you’re using. Sports (Action): When you want to freeze a moving subject, this is the scene program that will deliver the best camera settings. It works well for sports, children playing, wildlife, etc. To achieve this, it chooses a fast shutter speed. Exposure Compensation. When the camera is deciding the settings, sometimes it can be ‘tricked’ by difficult scenes. As a result, the image can be overly bright or dark. For example, if you’re photographing a snowy landscape, the white can reflect so much light that your camera will underexpose the picture. Fortunately, digital cameras come with a feature that allows you to override the settings to get the best result. This works when you’re using any of the Semi-Auto modes. If you’re using Manual mode, it’s not necessary because you are deciding the camera settings yourself. So, if you’re using any of the Scene Modes, aperture priority mode, shutter priority mode or program mode, you can use exposure compensation. This feature has a dedicated button in most cameras that you can identify by its icon that has a plus and a minus symbol (+/-). If you can’t locate it, it might be a dial instead of a button. You can always check your owner’s manual to find the various parts of your camera or do a quick internet search. Either way, it’s fairly simple to use. If your photo is too dark, you’ll add a +EV number which will overexpose it one stop. If the image is too bright, use a -EV to underexpose one stop. Most digital cameras range from -3 EV to +3 EV. If the exposure compensation on your camera is on a dial, just turn it to one side or the other. If the camera has a button, press and hold it while using one of the dials to adjust it. When you’re using the shutter priority mode, the exposure compensation adjusts the aperture’s f-stop, so you don’t have to worry about overriding the wrong setting. In the same way, the aperture priority mode will compensate by adjusting the shutter speed. This combination is the ideal way to shoot in most situations. Autofocus Modes. Credit: Federico Bottos With most cameras, you can press the shutter button halfway down, and you’ll hear a beep that lets you know that it’s in focus and ready to shoot. If you’re looking through the viewfinder, you’ll see the focus area highlighted, or the focus points selected. In some cameras, it’s also possible to see this in live view. You can choose the focus area manually or leave it in Auto mode. Separately, you can tell your camera how to behave: if it should lock the focus or try to re-focus whenever a subject moves. The Autofocus Modes control this. AF-S / One-Shot. Depending on the camera manufacturer, this focusing mode can have different names: in Nikon it’s called Single Area AF and Canon calls it One-Shot AF. Either way, it’s fairly simple to use. With a single point focus, you pick a spot, and the camera will lock the focus there. To see this before snapping the picture, you can press the shutter button halfway down. If the camera can’t focus there because there isn’t enough contrast or you’re too close to your subject, you won’t be able to take the picture. AF-C / AI Servo. Continuous AF-C for Nikon or AI Servo for Canon is the ideal focus mode for moving subjects. That’s because it tracks the subject to keep it in focus. To do this, you need to keep the shutter button pressed halfway, or hold the focusing button if your camera has one. It’s also the best focusing mode to use when you’re shooting in burst mode. This camera mode is ideal for photographing wildlife or action images, including sports. Keep in mind that having multiple subjects moving in different directions can confuse the camera, so it might get it wrong sometimes. Another disadvantage is that consumes a lot of battery – bring a back-up if you’re planning a long day of shooting. Autofocus Automatic / AI Focus AF. This third one allows the camera to decide between the previous two. It’s called Autofocus Automatic if you have a Nikon camera and AI Focus AF if you’re shooting with Canon. Note that not all cameras have this mode as it’s mostly for the entry-level DSLRs like these models. When you’re using this focus mode, the camera will choose Single AF if it detects a static subject or Continuous mode if it sees a moving subject. It sounds like the best solution, right? Well, it could be, but very often it makes the wrong decision. Generally speaking, it’s better to decide on your own. Metering Modes. The last thing we’ll cover in this beginner’s guide to camera settings is Metering. To determine the correct exposure – whether you’re using Manual, Auto or Semi-Automatic modes – you need to measure the light that’s falling on your scene. All cameras have an exposure meter that reads the reflective light, even if you’ve never seen it. When you use your camera in Fully Automatic mode, the camera measures the light and determines what it thinks are the best settings. Then it takes the picture, and you won’t even know how it made the decisions. If you’re using the camera in Manual mode, you will see the meter. It’s a scale that goes from -2 to +2. The zero in the middle represents the correct exposure. So, when you’re adjusting your camera settings, you need to reach the middle. To calculate if the exposure is correct or not, the camera needs to know where to gather the information (i.e., from what part of the scene). That’s why there are a number of metering modes. Different cameras offer different metering modes; here are the three most common: Spot Metering. This is an exact way of metering because it takes the information from one spot – an area that ranges from 3% to 7% of the frame, usually in the centre. Some high-end cameras allow you to choose between leaving the spot in the centre or aligning it with the focus point. This mode is very precise, and it’s the best one to use when you have a very contrasting scene. For example, you can use it to capture a full moon against the very dark sky. It’s also handy for backlit subjects. Otherwise, you might end up with a silhouette. Center-Weighted Metering. You can also find this metering mode with the name Average. This is because it takes into account almost the entire image and calculates the average amount of light. The calculation doesn’t consider the corners; that’s why it’s also called centre-weighted. Of course, the area that’s considered central is wider than the one in spot metering. Matrix / Pattern / Evaluative / Multi-Zone Metering. The name of this metering mode changes according to the manufacturer of your camera. For example, Canon calls it Evaluative, while Nikon calls it Matrix. It has different names because it’s run by different algorithms – which are proprietary to each brand. With some differences here and there, it basically means that it measures the scene and decides the best exposure. As you can imagine, you don’t have much say in this one, and that’s also because it’s used for all the fully automatic modes (Auto and Scenes). It does a pretty good job when there isn’t much contrast; otherwise, it can be a little off. Obviously, this depends on the brand, and some algorithms are better than others. Final Words. When it comes to camera settings, technology has come very far, and the features and algorithms in digital cameras do a great job on their own. That doesn’t mean that you have to leave your camera settings in the hands of the device, however. Making the decision between a shallow or a deep depth of field, a frozen subject or one with motion blur, etc., is what makes your photograph unique. The basic camera settings are the ones that allow you to add your creative touch, so don’t underestimate them. Some exposure problems can be corrected in post-processing, especially if you’re shooting RAW files – so make sure you do that to have more flexibility when you edit. However, you should always try to get the best possible result in-camera. I hope you found this guide to camera settings useful and are motivated to try out what you learned. Let us know in the comments how it goes and if you have any doubts about managing your camera settings, ask your questions below. TwitterFacebookPinterest Ana MirelesAna Mireles is a Mexican researcher that specializes in photography and communications for the arts and culture sector. anamirelesphoto.com WELCOME TO SHOTKIT Enter your email to be sent today's Welcome Gift: 19 Photography Tools Enter your Email Please enter a valid email address. YES! SEND THEM TO ME Thanks for subscribing! Please check your email for further instructions. Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 105
  • 17
  • mode
  • 65
  • 17
  • setting
  • 45
  • 17
  • shutter
  • 34
  • 17
  • aperture
  • 33
  • 17
  • camera setting
  • 31
  • 17
  • light
  • 29
  • 17
  • iso
  • 27
  • 17
  • focu
  • 26
  • 17
  • speed
  • 25
  • 17
  • shutter speed
  • 24
  • 17
  • exposure
  • 24
  • 17
  • image
  • 22
  • 17
  • subject
  • 21
  • 17
  • auto
  • 19
  • 17
  • photography
  • 19
  • 17
  • metering
  • 15
  • 17
  • scene
  • 14
  • 17
  • stop
  • 13
  • 17
  • af
  • 13
  • 17
  • automatic
  • 12
  • 17
  • moving
  • 11
  • 17
  • depth field
  • 10
  • 17
  • manual
  • 10
  • 17
  • priority
  • 10
  • 17
  • adjust
  • 10
  • 17
  • program
  • 10
  • 17
  • control
  • 10
  • 17
  • called
  • 10
  • 17
  • depth
  • 10
  • 17
  • field
  • 10
  • 17
  • work
  • 9
  • 17
  • sensor
  • 9
  • 17
  • guide camera
  • 8
  • 17
  • auto mode
  • 8
  • 17
  • metering mode
  • 8
  • 17
  • manual mode
  • 7
  • 17
  • mode camera
  • 7
  • 17
  • guide camera setting
  • 6
  • 17
  • basic camera
  • 6
  • 17
  • digital camera
  • 6
  • 17
  • automatic mode
  • 6
  • 17
  • basic camera setting
  • 5
  • 17
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 5
  • 17
  • aperture priority
  • 5
  • 17
  • exposure compensation
  • 5
  • 17
  • aperture shutter
  • 5
  • 17
  • moving subject
  • 5
  • 17
  • adjust aperture
  • 4
  • 17
  • shutter priority
  • 4
  • 17
  • ev
  • 4
  • 17
  • shooting mode
  • 4
  • 17
  • focu mode
  • 4
  • 17
  • light camera
  • 4
  • 17
  • setting aperture
  • 4
  • 17
  • shutter button
  • 4
  • 17
  • camera shake
  • 4
  • 17
  • camera decide
  • 4
  • 17
  • semi automatic
  • 4
  • 17
  • scene mode
  • 4
  • 17
  • priority mode
  • 4
  • 17
  • camera setting work
  • 3
  • 17
  • shutter speed iso
  • 3
  • 17
  • deep depth field
  • 3
  • 17
  • press shutter button
  • 3
  • 17
  • shutter speed camera
  • 3
  • 17
  • camera shooting mode
  • 3
  • 17
  • fully automatic mode
  • 3
  • 17
  • setting work
  • 3
  • 17
  • measure light
  • 3
  • 17
  • white balance
  • 3
  • 17
  • number
  • 3
  • 17
  • auto iso
  • 3
  • 17
  • lowest iso
  • 3
  • 17
  • amount light
  • 3
  • 17
  • correct exposure
  • 3
  • 17
  • speed iso
  • 3
  • 17
  • exposure triangle
  • 3
  • 17
  • deep depth
  • 3
  • 17
  • press shutter
  • 3
  • 17
  • long exposure
  • 3
  • 17
  • camera offer
  • 3
  • 17
  • low light
  • 3
  • 17
  • speed camera
  • 3
  • 17
  • motion blur
  • 3
  • 17
  • high iso
  • 3
  • 17
  • camera shooting
  • 3
  • 17
  • camera mode
  • 3
  • 17
  • fully automatic
  • 3
  • 17
  • program mode
  • 3
  • 17
Result 18
TitleBeginner's Guide to Understanding Your Camera Settings
Urlhttps://expertphotography.com/camera-settings/
DescriptionStop taking photos on auto mode and maximize your creative potential by learning how to use your camera settings properly. Start with our easy guide!
Date
Organic Position17
H1A Beginners Guide to Basic Camera Settings
H2Exposure Settings
White Balance Settings
Focus Settings
Release Mode Settings
File Type Settings
Conclusion
Related Articles
How to Never Take a Blurry Photo Again (With These 7 Simple Steps)
How to Never Take a Blurry Photo Again (With These 7 Simple Steps)
H3Shutter Speed
Aperture
ISO
How to Change Camera Settings for Exposure
Focus Area Modes
Continuous or Single Autofocus
H2WithAnchorsExposure Settings
White Balance Settings
Focus Settings
Release Mode Settings
File Type Settings
Conclusion
Related Articles
How to Never Take a Blurry Photo Again (With These 7 Simple Steps)
How to Never Take a Blurry Photo Again (With These 7 Simple Steps)
BodyA Beginners Guide to Basic Camera Settings By ExpertPhotography A- A+ Download as PDF Subscribe Below to Download the Article Immediately. You can also select your interests for free access to our premium training: Related course: Photography for Beginners Still stuck on auto mode? It is the fastest way to take a photo. But it offers little in the way of flexibility and creative control. For that, you need complete control over the camera settings. Camera settings play a role in several factors, from the blur in a photograph to the color. Photography settings include exposure, white balance, focus, drive mode, file type, and many more. Learn the basics and how to change camera settings in this beginner’s guide. [Note: ExpertPhotography is supported by readers. Product links on ExpertPhotography are referral links. If you use one of these and buy something, we make a little bit of money. Need more info? See how it all works here.] Exposure Settings. In auto mode, the camera chooses the settings for you. But the computer in your camera doesn’t have the same creative vision that exists in your mind. To turn that vision into a photograph, you need to understand and adjust exposure settings. Exposure settings determine how bright or dark the image is. You can adjust them in the P / S (Tv) / A (Av) / M / B modes. Exposure settings also control motion blur, depth of field, resolution, and other factors that you wouldn’t even think of. We often think of the three key settings as the components of the exposure triangle. They are shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Shutter Speed. When the camera takes a photo, the shutter opens and closes to let light in to capture the image. Shutter speed determines how long that shutter stays open. Longer shutter speed will let in more light and create a brighter image. Shorter shutter speed will result in a darker exposure, and it will also reduce the amount of motion blur. Shutter speed is indicated in fractions of a second. A shutter speed that is 1/1000th of a second long will be displayed as 1000 on cameras. If it’s a second (or longer), it’s written as 1″. A fast shutter speed, such as 1/500, will freeze most movement in the photograph. Only subjects that move very fast (relative to the frame) will be a bit blurred. In situations like airshows or sports events, prioritise shutter speed over other settings. Keep it very fast. But faster shutter speeds limit the light coming into the lens. In darker environments, a relatively slower shutter speed such as 1/60 may be necessary. This will keep the image from being too dark or underexposed. Choosing shutter speeds is a matter of finding a balance between exposure and blur. If the subject is still or slow-moving, the shutter speed can be a low setting such as 1/60. If the subject is moving, such as in a street scene or concert, you’ll likely want a shutter speed of at least 1/250. Sports events, as mentioned, require even more. If you can’t reach high enough shutter speeds for your needs, raise the ISO and introduce more noise. Correcting noise is much easier than fixing a motion-blurred image during editing. Keep in mind that blur comes from more than just a moving subject. If you set your shutter speed too low, the slight motion of your hands can blur the image. As a general rule, keep the bottom number of that shutter speed at or higher than your focal length. This is the reciprocal rule. So, if you are shooting with a 50mm lens, you should be using a shutter speed of at least 1/50. Please note that we’re referring to equivalent focal lengths. Multiply your real focal length with the crop factor of your camera to figure it out. Long lenses exaggerate camera shake. When using a 200 mm lens, you should use a shutter speed of at least 1/200. When using a tripod, you don’t need to worry about this rule for camera shake. Optical image stabilisation systems also reduce shake. A quick note on resolution. If you have a high-resolution camera, the reciprocal rule may not be enough to keep your scenes sharp. A high-res sensor is more sensitive to minor camera shakes. Experiment with your camera and the stability of your hands to know your limits. Aperture. A camera lens aperture controls the size of the opening in the lens. Like a larger window lets in more light, a wider aperture will let in more light to the photo. This creates a brighter image. We measure aperture in f-numbers. A low f-number, such as f/2.8 is a wide aperture that lets in lots of light. A high f-number, such as f/11, is a narrow aperture that lets in less light. Aperture does not only affect the photograph’s exposure. It also plays a role in depth of field, or how much of the image is sharp. A photo with a shallow depth of field has a very soft or blurred background. A picture with a wide depth of field leaves more of the details sharp. Like shutter speed, the aperture is a matter of balance. A wide aperture is helpful for blurring the background to draw attention to the subject. It can also balance a dark exposure caused by limited light or high shutter speed. A narrow aperture will keep more of the photograph sharp, such as when taking a group photo. It will also allow intentionally slow shutter speed, such as when blurring the motion of a waterfall. ISO. The final piece to the exposure puzzle is ISO. This setting determines how sensitive the camera sensor is to light. The trade-off for increasing the camera’s sensitivity to light is grain. A low ISO, such as ISO 100, maintains image quality but isn’t very sensitive to light. A setting like ISO 3200 is much more sensitive but also more prone to noise. ISO helps balance out shutter speed and aperture. If you want to keep most of the scene sharp with a narrow aperture, for example, you can bump up to high ISO. If you are shooting in low light but need fast shutter speeds to freeze motion, you can bump up to a high ISO. You should keep ISO low if possible, such as when shooting on a bright sunny day. But you can use it when faster shutter speeds or narrower aperture is more important. ISO options and grain patterns are different among camera models. Try snapping a photo at each ISO setting on your camera. Determine which ISO is too high to use because of that grain. How to Change Camera Settings for Exposure. To change shutter speeds, aperture, and ISO, you’ll need to switch the camera’s mode dial from auto to M. So, how do I find my camera settings? Each model is a little bit different. On most cameras, look for the dial that rests by your right index finger at the front of the camera. This adjusts the aperture. The dial at the back of the camera by your right thumb adjusts the shutter speed. Some cameras only have one dial. In this case, press and hold the Fn button to switch the dial’s function between shutter speeds and aperture. ISO is adjusted through a shortcut button or sometimes the camera menu. M or manual mode isn’t the only option to adjust camera settings. B (or bulb) mode is very similar to manual, with one important distinction. In Bulb, shutter speed is not predetermined. You can connect an external release (or press and hold the shutter button). This allows you to keep the shutter as long as you wish, with no limit. It’s handy when shooting long exposures. In S/Tv (shutter priority) mode, you’ll adjust the shutter speed while the camera will choose the aperture for you. In A/Av (aperture priority) mode, you’ll choose the aperture while the camera chooses the shutter speed for you. In P (program) mode, you can use the dial to switch between suggested pairs of shutter speed and aperture. In S, A and P modes, the camera still chooses what it thinks the proper exposure is. You can use the exposure compensation button to brighten or darken the image. These semi-auto modes are excellent for learning. They are also practical in scenarios with moderately bright, quickly changing light. White Balance Settings. Light comes in different colours. We don’t realise it because our eyes adjust. Cameras don’t have the same ability to adjust to the different colours of light. If your images are turning out too blue, yellow, green or purple, the problem is the white balance. Auto white balance allows the camera to adjust the settings for you. Auto white balance works well. If the image’s colour is off, manually adjusting the white balance will correct the issue. White balance settings are easy to understand because they are named after the type of light. Choose cloudy for taking photos on a cloudy day, florescent for taking photos under fluorescent lights, and so on. The goal with white balance is to keep white objects a true white in the photograph. You can also set white balance manually using temperature settings. A more advanced solution is to take a photo of a white object or colour card. Changing the white balance settings differs based on camera models. Look for a shortcut button marked WB or look for the option in the camera menu. If you’re unsure, consult your camera’s user manual. If you’re shooting RAW, white balance is not a huge concern for you. It’s one of the few settings that is not “baked into” your image files. You can change it non-destructively during editing. However, if you’re shooting JPG or video, it’s important to set it correctly on the spot. Focus Settings. In auto mode, a camera will select what it thinks the subject is. Often, it will select whatever is closest to the camera. What if you don’t want to focus on the object closest to the camera? What if the subject is moving quickly? Selecting the right focus settings will increase the odds of getting a sharp shot every time. Focus Area Modes. Focus area modes tell the camera which part of the image to focus on. Focus modes vary a bit by brand. Most cameras will have at least these autofocus area modes: Auto-area AF is the default autofocus setting. The camera uses this setting on auto mode. It chooses from the entire image area and decides what to focus on without user input. Single point autofocus mode focuses using one small point. This point is determined by the user. In this mode, you move the focal point around using the arrow keys or joystick to tell the camera where to focus. Dynamic or AF Point Expansion allows the user to choose a single point. It will then use the surrounding focal points if the subject moves. This is less specific than single point but more custom than the auto area. It works well for moving subjects. Tracking autofocus or 3D autofocus allows the user to select the subject. It will then track that object as it moves. This mode can sometimes fail if the subject leaves the frame or if there isn’t much contrast between the subject and the background. Some cameras will also offer face AF or eye AF. This will automatically look for an eye or face to focus on. Continuous or Single Autofocus. Autofocus camera settings tell the camera where to focus. They also instruct the camera on how often to focus. These settings are essential for getting sharp, focused action shots. In single (AF-S or One-Shot) mode, the camera focuses once when the shutter button is pressed halfway. This mode is good for still subjects. If the subject moves, the camera won’t refocus, and the image will be out of focus. Continuous (AF-C or Al Servo) focus will continue to adjust the focus as long as the shutter button is halfway. That means the focus is constantly being adjusted until the image is actually taken. This mode allows for moving subjects to remain in focus. You should avoid it for stationary subjects. AF-A or Al Focus AF is an automatic focus mode that switches between AF-S and AF-C. To do this, the camera tries to determine if the subject is moving or not. While good for beginners, it’s not as accurate as switching between AF-S and AF-C yourself. Release Mode Settings. When you press the shutter, does the camera take one image or two? You can set that in the camera’s release (or drive) mode. Burst mode will continue taking a series of photographs as long as the shutter button is pressed. This is unlike the single-shot mode, which takes one image each time you press the shutter release. Some cameras have more than one burst mode; a fast mode and a slower mode. Burst mode is excellent for photographing action and perfecting the timing of a shot, even a smile. The burst setting will fill your memory card faster, however. Along with burst mode options, the release mode settings often include other options, such as a self-timer. The self-timer is great for jumping in front of the camera for a selfie. Or to prevent camera shake when using a tripod for a long exposure image. File Type Settings. Most cameras also offer different options when it comes to how the images are saved. You can dive into custom options like how each image is named. But the most important file typesetting to understand is the difference between JPEG and RAW. A JPEG is a typical digital photograph and the default mode. JPEGS are processed in-camera. The image is ready to share and print right out of the camera. JPEGs are also smaller than RAW files. They take up less space on a memory card and won’t slow a camera down like RAW files sometimes can. RAW photographs are unprocessed. You can’t share that RAW file straight to Instagram. But this file type opens up more editing options. If you messed up the white balance, a RAW file could fix that error with no effect on image quality. RAW files are also better for making minor exposure adjustments. They store a larger dynamic range, which can be used to create better contrast and vibrance. You can’t fix major exposure errors and blur in RAW. It’s best to get as much right as possible in camera. If you plan on editing those photos, RAW is the best file type. Conclusion. Camera settings can prevent common issues like blur and underexposure. Your settings give you the tools to capture creative imagery. Learning digital photography settings can feel daunting at first. Take each setting one at a time, practice it, and then move on to the next setting. It is essential to build an understanding of the different camera settings. With this knowledge, you’ll know how to capture any potential image that comes your way. You can learn more about camera settings with our Photography for Beginners course. Looking for more ideas for entry-level photography? Why not check out our post on photography terms you need to know next! Share with friends Share Share Share Show Comments (1) Hide Comments Related Articles. How Does a Camera Shutter Work? We are all familiar with the sound of a camera shutter. But do you know what happens inside your device when that happens? In this… 8 Best Online Photography Classes for Beginners in 2022. Taking an online photography class for beginners is among the best ways to skyrocket your photography skills in no time. In this article, I've collected… What is Manual Focus? (And How To Use It). It's hard to imagine a time before our trusty autofocus (AF) systems when we used manual focus. We now have cameras that boast a whopping total of… See all articles in Beginner Photography How to Never Take a Blurry Photo Again (With These 7 Simple Steps) . Here are 3 of the 7 steps we uncover in this 21 minute video: 3 Focus Modes Easily the most common reason for poor focus and blurry images Focus Selection Points  Leaving your camera on its default settings will produce blurry results Shutter Speed Post processing won’t fix a blurry image from a slow shutter Where should we send the video? . Your privacy is safe! We will never share your information. How to Never Take a Blurry Photo Again (With These 7 Simple Steps) . Here are 3 of the 7 steps we uncover in this 21 minute video: 3 Focus Modes Easily the most common reason for poor focus and blurry images Focus Selection Points  Leaving your camera on its default settings will produce blurry results Shutter Speed Post processing won’t fix a blurry image from a slow shutter Where should we send the video? . Your privacy is safe! We will never share your information.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 74
  • 18
  • shutter
  • 49
  • 18
  • setting
  • 45
  • 18
  • mode
  • 44
  • 18
  • shutter speed
  • 36
  • 18
  • speed
  • 35
  • 18
  • image
  • 32
  • 18
  • focu
  • 30
  • 18
  • af
  • 24
  • 18
  • aperture
  • 24
  • 18
  • exposure
  • 19
  • 18
  • light
  • 17
  • 18
  • subject
  • 17
  • 18
  • balance
  • 16
  • 18
  • iso
  • 16
  • 18
  • white
  • 15
  • 18
  • photo
  • 14
  • 18
  • camera setting
  • 13
  • 18
  • white balance
  • 12
  • 18
  • adjust
  • 12
  • 18
  • auto
  • 11
  • 18
  • file
  • 11
  • 18
  • photograph
  • 10
  • 18
  • photography
  • 10
  • 18
  • raw
  • 10
  • 18
  • point
  • 10
  • 18
  • high
  • 9
  • 18
  • option
  • 9
  • 18
  • step
  • 8
  • 18
  • long
  • 8
  • 18
  • button
  • 8
  • 18
  • autofocu
  • 8
  • 18
  • share
  • 8
  • 18
  • blurry
  • 8
  • 18
  • speed aperture
  • 7
  • 18
  • shutter speed aperture
  • 6
  • 18
  • focu mode
  • 6
  • 18
  • mode camera
  • 6
  • 18
  • raw file
  • 6
  • 18
  • burst mode
  • 5
  • 18
  • auto mode
  • 5
  • 18
  • setting camera
  • 5
  • 18
  • simple step
  • 4
  • 18
  • timer
  • 4
  • 18
  • file type
  • 4
  • 18
  • exposure setting
  • 4
  • 18
  • setting auto
  • 4
  • 18
  • depth field
  • 4
  • 18
  • camera shake
  • 4
  • 18
  • shutter button
  • 4
  • 18
  • camera focu
  • 4
  • 18
  • image focu
  • 4
  • 18
  • blurry image
  • 4
  • 18
  • setting auto mode
  • 3
  • 18
  • speed aperture iso
  • 3
  • 18
  • shutter speed camera
  • 3
  • 18
  • white balance setting
  • 3
  • 18
  • camera choos
  • 3
  • 18
  • aperture iso
  • 3
  • 18
  • speed camera
  • 3
  • 18
  • long shutter
  • 3
  • 18
  • subject moving
  • 3
  • 18
  • moving subject
  • 3
  • 18
  • focal length
  • 3
  • 18
  • number
  • 3
  • 18
  • narrow aperture
  • 3
  • 18
  • slow shutter
  • 3
  • 18
  • balance setting
  • 3
  • 18
  • focu setting
  • 3
  • 18
  • area mode
  • 3
  • 18
  • single point
  • 3
  • 18
Result 19
TitleWhat Is Shutter Speed In Photography | A Beginners Guide
Urlhttps://nightskypix.com/what-is-shutter-speed-in-photography/
DescriptionNeed a clear explanation of what is shutter speed in photography? Our guide will clear up what it is and what it isn't. Plus how'll it'll affect your images
Date
Organic Position18
H1What Is Shutter Speed In Photography? A Beginners Guide
H2What Is Shutter Speed?
How Does The Shutter Speed Work?
How To Find It On A Digital Camera
How To Set It For Night Photography?
What Is The Best Shutter Speed For Astrophotography?
Conclusion
H3The Focal-Plane Shutter In DSLR And Mirrorless Cameras
Electronic Shutters
Shutter Speed Is Part Of The Exposure Triangle
Effects Of Setting Fast Shutter Speed Times
Effects Of Setting Slow Shutter Speed Times
How To Set The Shutter Speed When Using A Tripod: The 500 Rule
How To Set The Shutter Speed To Photograph The Moon
How To Set The Shutter Speed To Photograph Deep Sky Objects
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Shutter Speed?
How Does The Shutter Speed Work?
How To Find It On A Digital Camera
How To Set It For Night Photography?
What Is The Best Shutter Speed For Astrophotography?
Conclusion
BodyWhat Is Shutter Speed In Photography? A Beginners Guide Andrea MinoiaJanuary 16, 2021February 12, 2020Reading Time: 10 minShare this article:Share92Pin2Tweet94SharesHave you ever been in that situation where your image exposure is ok, but you can’t get it as sharp as you would like or with that nice effect you have in mind?A friend of mine once told me: “The shutter speed is that thing you messed up when getting blurred images instead of sharp ones, and sharp images when you want them to be blurred.”But what exactly is shutter speed in photography? This article will help you to understand how shutter speed works and how to master it, to squeeze the best from your photography. Table Of Contents show 1) What Is Shutter Speed? 2) How Does The Shutter Speed Work? 2.1) The Focal-Plane Shutter In DSLR And Mirrorless Cameras 2.2) Electronic Shutters 3) How To Find It On A Digital Camera 3.1) Shutter Speed Is Part Of The Exposure Triangle 3.2) Effects Of Setting Fast Shutter Speed Times 3.3) Effects Of Setting Slow Shutter Speed Times 4) How To Set It For Night Photography? 5) What Is The Best Shutter Speed For Astrophotography? 5.1) How To Set The Shutter Speed When Using A Tripod: The 500 Rule 5.2) How To Set The Shutter Speed To Photograph The Moon 5.3) How To Set The Shutter Speed To Photograph Deep Sky Objects 6) Conclusion What Is Shutter Speed?Shutter speed in photography refers to the amount of time the camera shutter stays open to exposes the sensor to light, to record the image.Together with aperture and ISO, it is a key element in setting the exposure. When used creatively, interesting effects, like motion blur, can be introduced in the images.While in Kerkyra, I wanted to have smooth waves breaking on the beach, but it was a struggle at first.How Does The Shutter Speed Work?The idea behind the shutter speed is simple: in low light conditions, you need more time to collect the same amount of light than in bright situations. Thus you need slow shutter speeds.Example of how the shutter speed affects the image exposure in low light conditions.In bright daylight or when using a flash, the amount of available light is enough to allow a fast shutter speed.So, how does this idea translate into practice? When you press the button to take a photo, the shutter inside your camera opens for a given amount of time. And only during this time, the sensor is exposed to light and can record the image.Traditionally, the shutter is a mechanical device that uses one or more movable parts to allow the sensor to expose to light the sensor (or film) only for the selected amount of time.Electronic shutters are often used in camera phones and compact cameras.DSLR and mirrorless cameras have a mechanical Focal-Plane Shutters, often coupled with an electronic shutter.The Focal-Plane Shutter In DSLR And Mirrorless Cameras. This type of shutter is placed directly in front of the sensor, and it consists of two mobile curtains, one of which covers the sensor, thus preventing the light from reaching it.View of the shutter’s 1st curtain of my old 35mm Olympus OM-1 camera.At low shutter speeds, when you fire the shutter to take a photo, the curtain that was covering the sensor (1st curtains) moves out the way, exposing the sensor.After the desired amount of time, the other curtain (2nd curtain) moves in, covering the sensor again.Slow motion of a working shutter at 1/30th of a second.At high shutter speeds, the two curtains move together across the sensor while being separated by a distance depending on the shutter speed.At high shutter speed, both curtains move together across the sensor from right to left.In this case, the sensor is not exposed to light all at once, but a portion at a time.Most cameras today use a vertical-travel shutter.This is still a “two-curtains” shutter, but now the curtains move vertically, rather than horizontally, thus minimizing the distance to cover. This allows setting the shutter speed as fast as 1/16000th of a second (Nikon D1).The main drawback of this design is that when using a flash, you cannot use a shutter speed faster than a certain value (called sync speed), or you will see the curtains in the image.At 1/800th of a second, you freeze the movement of the shutter curtain, here visible as a black band at the top of the image.Electronic Shutters. Electronic shutters allow you to use a shutter speed as fast as 1/32000th of a second.They also have the advantage of being silent, as there are no moving parts. How To Find It On A Digital Camera. In a digital camera, you can set the shutter speed with two operational modes: (i) shutter speed priority mode and (ii) the manual mode.The semi-automatic shutter speed priority mode lets you set the shutter speed while the camera adjusts the lens aperture (and the ISO if you use them in auto) to properly expose the scene.With the manual mode, control both the shutter speed and the aperture: it is up to you to get the right exposure or the right creative effect you are after.To set the shutter speed, you may have a dedicated dial, a button or menu, etc. If you are unsure, refer to your camera user manual.Why Is Shutter Speed Important In Photography (Especially Astrophotography)?Have you ever made photographs that were exposed correctly, but people came out blurred? Too slow shutter speed was probably why that happened.In astrophotography, the shutter speed is, if possible, even more crucial, as it is responsible for the balance between the need to collect enough light and to have pinpoint stars for the best image quality. The image below shows the open cluster NGC6871 in Cygnus: to get a hint of the faint Tulip Nebula (the red splash of color), I had to use a shutter speed of 180″ for each photo, and take 30 of them. At 400mm, having sharp stars that slow shutter speed is challenging.The open cluster NGC6871 (center) and a hint of the Tulip Nebula (at the top) in Cygnus: a challenging balance between shutter speed and tracking accuracy.Learning how to set the shutter speed in astrophotography is crucial.Shutter Speed Is Part Of The Exposure Triangle. Shutter speed is one of the three ingredients making up the so-called exposure triangle, and together with the aperture and ISO value, it sets the exposure (brightness) of the photo.The famous exposure triangle, linking shutter speed, lens aperture, and ISO values.But there is much more than getting the exposure right when it comes to shutter speed. Effects Of Setting Fast Shutter Speed Times. The main effect in using a fast shutter speed is freezing any movement, both in the scene and with the camera, typically from the camera shaking when photographing handheld.A fast shutter speed is particularly crucial with sports photography, and everywhere there is rapid movement: if your shutter speed is too slow, you’ll get blurred photos. I realized that the hard way, the first time I was photographing dancers in a theatre. My widest aperture was still not wide enough, and my shutter speed was about 1/40th of a second, but still, I have 5-stops image stabilization in my camera, so no problem, right? Wrong. Only when I lowered my shutter speed to 1/125th, I started to be able to freeze the dancers.A too slow shutter speed resulted in a slightly blurred photo of this dancer, no matter how good your optical stabilization is…In portraiture with natural light, try not to go slower than 1/60th. I discover that people can’t stay perfectly still, and below 1/60th of a second, this can blur away the details. If you are shooting handheld, to avoid camera shake, you should use a shutter speed equal to the inverse of the focal length you are using.Say you are trying to photograph the Moon handheld at 200mm, for the sharpest results use a shutter speed of about 1/200th of a second or faster.Image stabilization will let you take sharp images even with slower-than-recommended shutter speed, but remember: it only compensates for camera shake.Effects Of Setting Slow Shutter Speed Times. The obvious effects of using slow shutter speeds are increasing the brightness of the image and introducing motion blur in it.This is where you can get creative with the shutter speed by turning motion blur at your advantage to create a compelling image.Light trails from moving traffic are a classic example of nocturnal long exposures in the city.A set of neutral density filters, ND, of different strengths is a must-have accessory for creating long exposures. They allow you to take long exposures in broad daylight.An ND filter cutting 10 stops of light allowed me to smooth the waterfall in daylight.ND filters are also used in architecture photography to blur moving clouds, thus conveying a sense of motion.The blurred clouds add dynamism to this image.How To Set It For Night Photography?When it comes to night photography, you may think you always have to use a slow shutter speed, but this is not always true. Consider astrophotography, for example.What Is The Best Shutter Speed For Astrophotography?Particularly in astrophotography, setting the shutter speed is quite a challenge, as the exposure time is limited by several factors other than the amount of available light.How To Set The Shutter Speed When Using A Tripod: The 500 Rule. If you are trying to do astrophotography using a tripod, the limiting factor for the shutter speed is the apparent movement of the stars across the sky.I used the software Stellarium to show how stars around Polaris move during the night.Because the Earth revolves on its axis of 360º in 24hrs, stars seem to move across the sky at a speed of about 15º each hour.This means that too long exposures from a fixed tripod will show stars looking like short trails rather than a sharp point of light.View at 100%, this single shot of this starry landscape shows trailing stars because I used a shutter speed that was a bit too slow.A set of empirical rules that I call N-rules gives you a rough estimation for the slowest shutter speed for which stars will not trail noticeably. Those rules take into consideration the size of your camera sensor (the crop factor) and the focal length you use.The rule reads like: SS = N / (CP * FL), where SS is the shutter speed (in seconds), CP the crop factor, and FL the focal length, and N is a number.The most famous rule has N=500, and it is known as 500-rule.So, how do those rules help us? Say you are trying to photograph a starry landscape with a 24mm on Canon 60D. The camera has an APS-C sensor and a CP=1.6. If you use the 500-rule, the slowest shutter speed you should use with this setup is 500 / (1.6*24) = 15s. The 500-rule worked well for film and is still ok today for prints, but on screen, it shows its limit with modern high-resolution digital sensors.Better to use the more conservative 400-rule: for the example above, the recommended shutter speed drops to 10 seconds.With star trail photography, the wow-factor is in the trailing star, and in theory, you could expose as long as you want.But because digital sensors suffer from thermal noise, it is best to limit yourself at 5-10 minutes exposures. Simply take a series of photos and combine them later on to get the final star trail image.A classic star trailHow To Set The Shutter Speed To Photograph The Moon. It seems easy, at first, to photograph the Moon, but have you ever struggled to get it sharp even when the focus was ok?Assuming it was not camera shake, this is due to poor seeing conditions (atmospheric turbulence, haze, etc.), magnified by the long focal length you used.The effect of bad seeing on the Moon, at high magnification.The trick is to pick a clear night and to keep the shutter speed as fast as possible to freeze the atmospheric turbulence.With the Full Moon, an empirical rule called Looney-11 says that the Moon is properly exposed when using an aperture of f/11, ISO 100 and a shutter speed of 1/100th. The Moon with the looney-11 rule. It is a bit darker as it was foggy when I took it.Depending on the focal length used, a shutter speed of 1/100 can still be too slow. By using the exposure triangle, you know you can get the same good exposure using a shutter speed of 1/200th combined to an aperture of f/8 and ISO 100.How To Set The Shutter Speed To Photograph Deep Sky Objects. Of all targets, deep sky objects (DSO) are the most difficult to photograph, mainly because they are faint and require long exposure to be revealed in a photo.Because of the long exposure required for DSO, the ability to track the movement of the stars is crucial: a motorized equatorial mount is needed. Scheme equatorial mount and how it tracks the sky.The shutter speed, in this case, is limited by the tracking accuracy of your mount and by the brightness of the sky due to light pollution.A good rule of thumb is to set the shutter speed so that the peak of the histogram is about ⅓ to ½ of the range from the leftmost edge…This image shows a single light frame from the starfield around the Rosette Nebula. The inset shows the image histogram from the camera LCD screen.Once again, the idea is to take many photos to be combined later to create a more detailed image of your target. Conclusion. In this article, we have covered the basics of what shutter speed is and how it can be used to create creative effects in everyday photography and how to use it in astrophotography. All it remains for you to do is go out there and experiment with this setting.About Andrea MinoiaAndrea Minoia works as a researcher in a Belgian university by day and is a keen amateur astrophotographer by night. He is most interested in deep sky photography with low budget equipment and in helping beginners along their journey under the stars. ... 922
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 95
  • 19
  • speed
  • 75
  • 19
  • shutter speed
  • 74
  • 19
  • camera
  • 21
  • 19
  • exposure
  • 20
  • 19
  • rule
  • 17
  • 19
  • set
  • 17
  • 19
  • sensor
  • 15
  • 19
  • light
  • 14
  • 19
  • star
  • 14
  • 19
  • photography
  • 13
  • 19
  • time
  • 13
  • 19
  • curtain
  • 13
  • 19
  • image
  • 12
  • 19
  • set shutter speed
  • 11
  • 19
  • set shutter
  • 11
  • 19
  • effect
  • 10
  • 19
  • slow
  • 10
  • 19
  • show
  • 9
  • 19
  • photograph
  • 9
  • 19
  • slow shutter
  • 8
  • 19
  • 500
  • 8
  • 19
  • photo
  • 8
  • 19
  • focal
  • 8
  • 19
  • fast
  • 8
  • 19
  • moon
  • 8
  • 19
  • aperture
  • 8
  • 19
  • long
  • 8
  • 19
  • slow shutter speed
  • 7
  • 19
  • sharp
  • 7
  • 19
  • setting
  • 7
  • 19
  • astrophotography
  • 7
  • 19
  • amount
  • 7
  • 19
  • focal length
  • 6
  • 19
  • long exposure
  • 6
  • 19
  • sky
  • 6
  • 19
  • iso
  • 6
  • 19
  • speed time
  • 5
  • 19
  • exposure triangle
  • 5
  • 19
  • fast shutter
  • 5
  • 19
  • fast shutter speed
  • 4
  • 19
  • shutter speed time
  • 4
  • 19
  • shutter speed photograph
  • 4
  • 19
  • sky object
  • 4
  • 19
  • 500 rule
  • 4
  • 19
  • speed photograph
  • 4
  • 19
  • photograph moon
  • 4
  • 19
  • deep sky
  • 4
  • 19
  • aperture iso
  • 4
  • 19
  • focal plane shutter
  • 3
  • 19
  • deep sky object
  • 3
  • 19
  • shutter speed fast
  • 3
  • 19
  • speed photography
  • 3
  • 19
  • focal plane
  • 3
  • 19
  • plane shutter
  • 3
  • 19
  • mirrorless camera
  • 3
  • 19
  • digital camera
  • 3
  • 19
  • effect setting
  • 3
  • 19
  • amount time
  • 3
  • 19
  • motion blur
  • 3
  • 19
  • speed curtain
  • 3
  • 19
  • curtain move
  • 3
  • 19
  • speed fast
  • 3
  • 19
  • star trail
  • 3
  • 19
Result 20
TitleDetailed Beginners Guide to Camera & Photography Basics
Urlhttps://www.photographytalk.com/beginner-photography-tips/camera-basics-for-beginners
DescriptionNot sure what aperture does? How about shutter speed? Is ISO confusing? This guide on photography and camera basic for beginners will help you out with it
Date
Organic Position19
H1Camera Basics and Photography for Beginners
H2Photography Basics: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO
Creative Elements of Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO
Ease Your Way Into Changing Camera Settings
We Recommend
H3Learn More:
Learn More:
Hello from PT!
Beginner Photography Tips
H2WithAnchorsPhotography Basics: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO
Creative Elements of Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO
Ease Your Way Into Changing Camera Settings
We Recommend
BodyCamera Basics and Photography for Beginners 72.9K 72.9K When I think back to my early days as a photographer, I recall how frustrating it was trying to figure out the photography basics like camera settings.I'm talking about learning aperture, shutter speed, and ISO...Though understanding these basics of photography is certainly needed, it's easier said than done.It's just a lot to learn. And could the aperture scale be more confusing??Thankfully, I've figured things out over the years.But if you don't want to toil for years and years like I did trying to learn photography, perhaps this short tutorial photography tips for beginners will get you pointed in the right direction.In the video above, Peter McKinnon offers a quick run-down of camera basics.Below, I've expanded on Peter's discussion a bit and included links to relevant topics to give you an even more robust learning tool.Let's get started!Editor's Tip: Need to upgrade your lens but don't have the budget to do so? LEARN WHY BUYING A PRE-OWNED LENS IS THE WAY TO GO.Photography Basics: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO. The three camera settings that control the exposure are aperture, shutter speed, and ISO.Here's what each one does in a nutshell:Aperture controls the amount of light entering the lens. The aperture is controlled by a diaphragm in the lens that adjusts its width based on the f-stop being used. The higher the f-number, the smaller the aperture opening, and the less light coming into the lens. Shutter speed controls the duration of light that reaches the lens. It's controlled by a curtain in front of the camera's sensor. A fast shutter speed means that the curtain opens and closes quickly, thus minimizing how long the sensor is exposed to light. ISO is responsible for the sensitivity of the camera's sensor to light. The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the sensor becomes. Of course, these three settings aren't that simple, nor do they operate in a vacuum.That is, each setting has other responsibilities and they all work together to help you get the proper exposure, as shown in the graphic above.Learn More:. Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO: The Exposure Triangle Explained 10 Beginner Photography Tips and Camera Settings You Need to Know Creative Elements of Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO. In addition to their responsibilities regarding exposure, aperture, shutter speed, and ISO impact your photos in a creative manner as well.Let's start with aperture...The size of the aperture impacts the depth of field in the photos you take. The depth of field refers to the area of the image that's in focus.If you want a shallow depth of field with a blurry background as seen in the portrait above, you want to use a large aperture.The confusing part for many people is that the size of the aperture is inversely related to the f-stop number, meaning, a large aperture is indicated by a small f-number.So, f/2 is a very large aperture while f/16 is a very small aperture.When it comes to shutter speed, it controls how movement is captured in a photo.Shutter speed is measured in fractions of a second, like 1/30 seconds, 1/100 seconds, 1/500 seconds, and so on.Naturally, the faster the shutter speed (i.e., 1/500 seconds), the more likely it will be that you can freeze the movement of a moving target, as shown above.Conversely, if you slow the shutter down, you'll begin to see motion blur appear in the photo.The last element, ISO, controls how much digital noise is in the shot.Digital noise looks like film grain, and it can add a grittiness to your images, as seen above.ISO is measured on a scale that extends from about 100-6400 on most entry-level cameras, though the scale can extend much, much further.The higher the ISO you use, the more grain will be evident in the photos that you take.Quick Tip: Another way to ratchet up the creativity of your images is to use a high-quality neutral density filter. These filters block out light, allowing you to extend the shutter speed to get beautiful motion effects, even in broad daylight. Something like a 10-stop ND filter will give you long shutter speeds to blur the motion of rivers, waterfalls, clouds, passing cars, and so forth, for a gorgeous, creative look. Not all filters are made alike though. When selecting a filter, go with something that's well-made, offers hyper-neutrality, and offers water and oil-repellent features, like this one.Ease Your Way Into Changing Camera Settings. You don't have to shoot in manual mode in order to take more control over your camera.In fact, a good way to transition from shooting in full auto to shooting in full manual is to utilize your camera's semi-automatic modes: aperture priority, shutter priority, and program.As you might've guessed, aperture priority mode (A or Av on your camera's dial) prioritizes aperture, giving you control over that setting (you also control ISO).However, the camera controls shutter speed, so when you make an adjustment to the aperture, the camera makes an adjustment to the shutter speed so that you get a good exposure. This is advantageous when the depth of field is the most important thing, like in a portrait.In shutter priority mode (S or Tv on your camera's dial), you control the shutter and ISO while the camera controls the aperture.Again, when you make a change to the shutter speed, the camera will automatically change the aperture to get a well-exposed image.This mode is ideal for controlling movement, like freezing the movement of your kids running around or blurring the motion of a waterfall, as was done above.Lastly, program mode (P on your camera's dial) gives you even more control over your camera settings.In this mode, the ISO is prioritized, so when you set the ISO, the camera will adjust the aperture and shutter speed accordingly. This is an ideal mode for low-light shooting when you need to be able to push the ISO, like when shooting at dusk, as pictured above.However, you can override the aperture and shutter speed selections that your camera makes, whereas you can't do that in aperture priority or shutter priority.That makes program mode a step closer to manual mode without actually being in manual mode.So, the goal with learning about the photography basics of exposure, the exposure triangle, and various shooting modes is to help you get on track with getting out of auto and into manual mode.This isn't to say that you have to shoot in manual mode all the time - not even the pros do that.But equipping yourself with a better understanding of how your camera works will certainly have a positive impact on the photos you create.Learn More:. Best Camera Settings for Landscape Photography Best Camera Settings for Portrait Photography Facebook Twitter Best Print Product 2021 Try HDR with your photos Print your photos Sell your lens Save $$ on lens Best Camera Strap Backdrops You Need Camera deals you want Hello from PT! . Beginner Photography Tips. Not sure what to photograph next?Go through our 30-Day Creative Eye Challenge and discover the long last secrets to finding awesome shots, anywhere, anytime (with any camera).Not a Member? Join TodayWe Recommend. How to Use Contrast for Better PhotosImage File Types for PhotographyBeginner's Guide to Still Life PhotographyHow to Use Shadows in Photography Looking for the best canvas prints? Check this out.Home LearnPhotography ArticlesCamera Buying Guide Lens Buying GuideHow to Learn PhotographyTime Lapse PhotographyTravel GuidesLearn & Explore Photography How to ArticlesAstrophotographyMaternity PhotographyPhotography BlogFree Photography eBooks Real Estate PhotographyBird & Wildlife PhotographyPhotography Quotes Holiday Gift GuidesBest Canvas Print CompanyCanvas Print FramesBest Workshops & Tours 2020/2021Photography GlossaryPhotography LightingDrone PhotographyPortrait Photography TipsExploreGallery HomeLatest UploadedInspirational Photos ForumPhotography Forum Home Latest PostsGeneral Discussion Taking The Photo & Editing Photo Galleries & Critiques General Manufacturers Equipment Research More Recommended Vendor Recommended GearLensesCamera BagsTripodsFiltersLightingTriggersMobileVendorsBallheadsColor ManagementSoundCamera StrapsSoftwareMaternity GearAboutGet Canvas PrintsCommunity BadgesGet Metal PrintsPT ScholarshipMember Interviews Master ON DemandAdventureFaqPhotography Courses 30 Day Creative Eye ChallengeBird Photography Mastery CourseBusiness Builder Mastery CourseTravel Photography Mastery CoursePortrait Photography Master CourseLandscape Photography Mastery Course
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 27
  • 20
  • aperture
  • 22
  • 20
  • shutter
  • 22
  • 20
  • photography
  • 18
  • 20
  • speed
  • 18
  • 20
  • shutter speed
  • 17
  • 20
  • control
  • 14
  • 20
  • mode
  • 14
  • 20
  • iso
  • 12
  • 20
  • photo
  • 10
  • 20
  • len
  • 9
  • 20
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 8
  • 20
  • aperture shutter
  • 8
  • 20
  • light
  • 8
  • 20
  • setting
  • 8
  • 20
  • exposure
  • 7
  • 20
  • filter
  • 6
  • 20
  • manual
  • 6
  • 20
  • camera setting
  • 5
  • 20
  • basic
  • 5
  • 20
  • tip
  • 5
  • 20
  • creative
  • 5
  • 20
  • shooting
  • 5
  • 20
  • priority
  • 5
  • 20
  • print
  • 5
  • 20
  • shutter speed iso
  • 4
  • 20
  • camera dial
  • 4
  • 20
  • speed iso
  • 4
  • 20
  • depth field
  • 4
  • 20
  • beginner
  • 4
  • 20
  • learn
  • 4
  • 20
  • sensor
  • 4
  • 20
  • depth
  • 4
  • 20
  • field
  • 4
  • 20
  • movement
  • 4
  • 20
  • second
  • 4
  • 20
  • motion
  • 4
  • 20
  • mastery
  • 4
  • 20
  • photography tip
  • 3
  • 20
  • iso camera
  • 3
  • 20
  • manual mode
  • 3
  • 20
  • aperture priority
  • 3
  • 20
  • photography mastery
  • 3
  • 20
Result 21
TitleCamera Shutter Speed Chart | Shutter Speed – Beginner’s Guide to DSLR Photography - AlexSablan ... | Shutter speed, Dslr photography, Shutter speed chart
Urlhttps://www.pinterest.com/pin/50735933276493167/
DescriptionMar 13, 2014 - Welcome to part II of my Beginner’s Guide to DSLR Photography. This part will be over shutter speed. If you missed the first part on aperture/f-stop, you can see it here. In this tutorial, I will take you through the basics..
Date
Organic Position20
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body7 iyn Hsu" style="padding:25px;text-align:center">Oh no! Pinterest doesn't work unless you turn on JavaScript.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 22
TitleUnderstanding Shutter Speed - A beginners guide
Urlhttps://www.photographyaxis.com/photography-articles/understanding-shutter-speed/
DescriptionUnderstanding Camera Shutter — In the case of a DSLR/ Mirrorless camera, aperture comes in the lens that is detachable. Camera body contains the shutter and ...
Date
Organic Position21
H1
H2
H3
H2WithAnchors
Body
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
Result 23
TitleHow to Use a Mirrorless Camera: A Beginner's Photography Guide
Urlhttps://www.findingtheuniverse.com/how-to-use-a-mirrorless-camera/
DescriptionA complete guide to how to use a mirrorless camera. All the controls you need to learn, a guide to the settings, and how to take great photos!
Date3 days ago
Organic Position22
H1How to Use a Mirrorless Camera: A Beginner’s Photography Guide
H2What is a Mirrorless Camera?
Mirrorless Camera Controls: A Guide to Using Your Mirrorless Camera
How to Get Better Photos With A Mirrorless Camera
How to Care For and Protect Your New Mirrorless Camera
Best Mirrorless Camera for Beginners
Further Reading
H3Shutter Release
Mode Dial
Control Wheel
ISO Button
Exposure Compensation Button (+/-)
Flash Button
Focus Mode
Zoom / Focal Length Ring
Metering Mode
Shooting Mode
Video
What The On-Screen Display Tells You
Hold Your Mirrorless Camera Properly
Understand the Settings and Modes
Learn About the Exposure Triangle
Learn the Basics of Composition
Master Depth of Field
Understand Light
Take Workshops or Courses to Improve your Skills
Take Lots of Photos!
How to Protect your Mirrorless Camera
How to Clean your Mirrorless Camera
Tips for Travelling with a Mirrorless Camera
Should you Service your Mirrorless Camera?
1. Canon EOS M200
2. Sony A6600
Leave a Reply Cancel reply
H2WithAnchorsWhat is a Mirrorless Camera?
Mirrorless Camera Controls: A Guide to Using Your Mirrorless Camera
How to Get Better Photos With A Mirrorless Camera
How to Care For and Protect Your New Mirrorless Camera
Best Mirrorless Camera for Beginners
Further Reading
BodyHow to Use a Mirrorless Camera: A Beginner’s Photography Guide Last updated: January 6, 2022. Written by Laurence Norah - 4 CommentsSo you’re the proud owner of a new mirrorless camera. Awesome! Mirrorless cameras are a wonderful bit of photography kit, with a number of advantages over other types of camera. They’re also one of the best cameras with which to learn photography on, because you can see the changes you make to various settings in real time. However, a mirrorless camera is a complicated piece of equipment. As such, you definitely need to spend a bit of time learning how to use it properly so you can unlock its full potential. Which is where I come in. I’ve been taking photos for over thirty years with a wide range of cameras, from a film SLR through to compact, mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. I also teach an online photography course, lead photo workshops, and give talks on photography around the world. So those are my qualifications. Today, I’m going to share with you all the key things you need to know in order to get the most out of your new mirrorless camera. I’m going to tell you all the major functions it has, the settings you need to master, explain how to get great photos with your new camera, and then go over some tips for caring and looking after your new investment. This guide is written on the assumption that you have no previous photography experience, so we will start with the basics and work our way forward. Of course, if you have photography experience that’s great, however, refreshing yourself on the basics never hurts in my opinion. At this point, I would like to quickly say that photography is not a simple subject. It can take time to grasp many of the concepts, and practice with your gear is the best way to get a handle on it. Reading a guide like this is a great starting point, but I urge you to get out there and take photos as much as you can. Digital film doesn’t cost anything, and as you use your camera more and more the various settings and features will all start to make more sense. Please don’t get too frustrated if you feel overwhelmed. Photography is complicated, and like any skill, it takes time to master. Perseverance and patience are key! Feel free to bookmark this page and come back to it for reference as your photography journey progresses. Now, let’s start with the basics of what a mirrorless camera actually is. Contents: What is a Mirrorless Camera? A mirrorless camera is a type of digital camera. There are a number of types of digital cameras on the market, such as DSLR cameras, compact cameras and even smartphone cameras. These cameras actually have more in common with each other than differences. In fact, the basic principle of how a camera works hasn’t changed a great deal since photography was invented. At its core, a camera is a device which is used to record light information, to create an output we call a photograph. The medium for recording light was initially a chemically photosensitive piece of film, but that has been replaced by a digital sensor in most modern cameras. All types of digital cameras take light from a scene, focus it through a lens, and record it onto a sensor. The differences between the various types of digital cameras are largely around some of the components that make up the camera. Key differences include: the size of the sensor inside the camera. Smaller cameras usually have smaller sensors the size of the aperture inside the lens the level of manual control a user has whether or not it supports different lenses or not A mirrorless camera is very similar to a DSLR camera in most regards. Most mirrorless cameras have relatively large sensors, produce high quality images, have full manual controls, and have interchangeable lenses. The difference is that a mirrorless camera, as the name suggests, does not have a mirror inside it. In a DSLR, the mirror is used to redirect the light passing through the lens to the optical viewfinder. This means the photographer sees the actual scene when looking through the viewfinder. A mirrorless camera does not have this mirror, and as such, it does not have an optical viewfinder. The image that the photographer uses to compose the shot is either displayed on the screen on the back of the camera, or on some mirrorless cameras, in the electronic viewfinder. In both of these cases, the image is the result of the light hitting the camera sensor, being processed by the cameras electronics, and then output to the screen as a digital image. This is actually the same with smartphones and most compact cameras, which also do not have a mirror inside. However, because the mirrorless camera arose as a direct competitor to the DSLR, and the key difference is the lack of mirror, the name stuck. Mirrorless cameras have a number of advantages over DSLR cameras. They tend to be lighter and smaller whilst producing similar image quality. They are easier to use in many cases because what you see on the screen is exactly the image you get when you press the shutter button. Plus they have the same advantages that a DSLR camera has, including interchangeable lenses, support for RAW shooting, and full manual controls. The main disadvantage is price, as most mirrorless cameras tend to be a little bit more expensive than their equivalent DSLR product. There is also a very slight delay between reality and the image seen on screen due to the processing. This isn’t noticeable or even a factor for most photographers, however high end sports photographers have largely stuck with DSLR cameras for this reason. In addition, there is still a wider selection of lenses for DSLR cameras as they have been available for longer, and battery life on a DSLR is better than on a mirrorless camera.   Mirrorless Camera Controls: A Guide to Using Your Mirrorless Camera. When you take a mirrorless camera out of the box, you will probably notice that it has a lot of buttons and controls, with a range of obscure labels and markings. This can be a bit overwhelming, and you might be tempted to leave it in auto mode as a result. This is definitely a natural reaction. However, to get the most out of your camera, it is definitely worth learning what at least some of the buttons do. The good news is that once you have done this with one camera, you can transfer your knowledge to other cameras which are all fairly similar. I am now going to go through the major controls, features, and buttons that most mirrorless camera have. The exact controls, features and naming conventions might vary from camera to camera, but this should cover most of the key elements you should be looking to master on your new camera.   Shutter Release. Probably the most obvious button on your camera, the shutter release is the button you press to take a photo. This will usually be located at the top right of the camera, to be operated by the index finger on your right hand. Left handed photographers are out of luck, as far as I know there has never been a left handed camera design with the shutter button placed for left handed use.   Mode Dial. Like DSLR cameras and some advanced compact cameras, a mirrorless camera has a range of modes that you can operate it in. These modes are generally used to define how much degree of manual control you want over the camera. They will range from full Automatic modes where the camera does everything for you, through to a fully manual mode where you are in charge of everything. To change the mode the camera is in, you just rotate the mode dial to the mode you want. This will instantly change the mode the camera is in, and the new mode is usually displayed on screen as well when you change operating mode. The exact modes available will vary by camera model, but should be similar to the following: Auto. This is the default mode that most cameras will come set to. In Automatic mode, the camera will handle everything for you, including setting the shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. It will also often pick the focus point, and may fire the flash if you have one. Auto is designed so you just have to point the camera at your subject and press the shutter button. Additional Auto modes. As well as the default auto mode, the camera may also come with a number of additional auto modes, which are usually referred to as “scene” modes. For example, there may be a landscape auto mode, a portrait auto mode, a night scene mode, and a macro auto mode. These modes exist to give the camera a clue as to what you are taking a picture of, so it can adjust the settings for you. P mode. “P” mode stands for Program Auto. This is basically a slightly advanced version of automatic mode, where the camera lets you make some adjustments to the shot. These include increasing and decreasing the brightness of the image with exposure compensation, adjusting the ISO, and changing the white balance. It’s a stepping stone to the more manual controls, but I’d suggest ignoring it and moving to one of the modes below instead. “A” or “AV” mode. This is aperture priority mode. Aperture priority lets you set the aperture, and then the camera will evaluate the light in the scene, and set the appropriate shutter. You can also adjust the ISO in this mode, as well as adjust the brightness using exposure compensation. Aperture allows you to control depth of field, and this mode works well for both portrait shots and landscapes. “S”, “T”, or “TV” mode. This is the shutter priority mode. Shutter priority lets you set the shutter, and then the camera will evaluate the light in the scene and set the appropriate aperture. You can also adjust the ISO. This mode is essentially the same as aperture priority, except you control the shutter. You can also adjust the brightness using exposure compensation. Shutter priority is great for when you want to control motion in the shot, such as freezing a fast moving subject. “M”. This is full manual mode. In this mode you control the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. The camera will use the exposure meter to tell you if you are under or over exposing the image, but it won’t stop you from doing either. You can’t use exposure compensation in this mode because you have full control over the exposure. You can also adjust ISO in this mode. Although out of the box, you may want to start just shooting in Auto to get a feel for the camera, I would recommend that you aim to eventually shoot in aperture priority, shutter priority or manual modes. These modes give you the most control over the final look of the image and the composition. Aperture priority lets you control the aperture, which adjusts the depth of field of the shot. This works well for portraits and landscapes, or any shot where the depth of field is a key part of the composition. Shutter priority for me is all about controlling how motion appears in your shot. If you want to show some motion blur, you’d use a slow shutter speed. If you want to freeze the action of a fast moving subject, you’d use a high shutter speed. Exactly how aperture, shutter speed, and ISO work together to create a correctly exposed final image is a concept known as the exposure triangle. This is a bit beyond the scope of this post, but I have written a detailed guide to the exposure triangle which I think you will find useful. Finally, don’t worry too much about jumping all the way to manual mode. Whilst manual mode is useful for specific photography situations like long exposure photography or astrophotography, I generally find that for my photography needs, I work 90% of the time in either aperture priority or shutter priority mode. These modes let me control a specific compositional element of the scene, like depth of field or motion, whilst not having to worry too much about the other settings at the risk of missing the shot.   Control Wheel. Depending on the camera you have, you will have one or more control wheels to play with. These may be located in different places on the camera. A common place for a control wheel is near the shutter button, so it can be easily adjusted with your index finger. Control wheels can also often be found on the back of the camera or on the top of the camera. For example, on my Lumix GX8 mirrorless camera, there’s a control wheel around the shutter button, and a control wheel on the top of the camera behind the shutter button. Usually, a control wheel is used to adjust a specific setting. What it changes will vary depending on the mode the camera is in. In aperture priority mode for example, the control wheel can usually be used to increase or decrease the aperture. In shutter priority mode, the control wheel will usually increase or decrease the shutter speed. If your camera has multiple control wheels, then in manual mode one wheel will adjust the aperture, and the other will adjust shutter speed. Depending on your camera, you might be able to change exactly what each control wheel changes. For example, you might be able to set it up to manage exposure compensation, ISO settings, white balance settings, and so on. The default settings will usually be fine, but every photographer is different, so do feel free to adjust these to your needs as you progress on your photography journey.   ISO Button. Nearly every mirrorless camera should have a dedicated ISO button on the back or top of the camera. Pressing this button will take you directly to the ISO settings. Often, pressing the ISO button will also mean the control wheel adjusts ISO. ISO is one of the three sides of the exposure triangle. If you put the camera into manual mode and leave the aperture and shutter speed as they are, when you increase or decrease the ISO you will see the image getting brighter and darker on the screen. A side effect of increasing the ISO is that your images will get more noisy. Most modern mirrorless cameras perform admirably at an ISO range of 100 – 800 (for daily use I recommend 100-400 range), and noise will start to creep in from ISO 1600 and higher. Noise appears as blotches of grain or color on your images. It can be hard to see on the camera’s screen, but when you look at your images on a computer screen at 100%, it will be very obvious. Because of the noise issue, ISO is often the last control we want to use to adjust the brightness of an image. Ideally, you will be able to get the correct exposure by adjusting the aperture and shutter speed, and using a nice low ISO. Of course, this isn’t always possible. When you are shooting in low light, you might need to increase the ISO. However, it is really important to remember to reduce this back to a normal range of 100 – 400, which should work in most photography situations. If you leave the ISO too high, you run the risk of all your images turning out noisy, which is not something you want.   Exposure Compensation Button (+/-). Exposure compensation is a common feature across the majority of cameras, including smartphones and compact cameras. It’s basically a quick override button that lets you brighten or darken an image without having to play around with any settings. The technical term for capturing an image in photography is actually an exposure. This is because you are exposing the camera’s sensor to the light for a defined period of time (the shutter speed), with the exposure being the end result. In most situations you want a correctly exposed image, which is not too bright and not too dark. Camera’s use a variety of methods for calculating the correct settings for this correct exposure, but they don’t always get it right. For this reason, you can quickly tell the camera to increase or decrease the brightness of the image using the exposure compensation button. Usually this will be marked with a +/- button. When you press the button, you will be able to increase the exposure compensation, or decrease it. This might be done on screen, or by using the control wheel when exposure compensation is selected. Some cameras have a dedicated exposure compensation wheel rather than a button. This achieves the same effect, it’s just a little faster to do. On a mirrorless camera, the change to your image should be immediately apparent on screen, as it brightens and darkens the shot. When you make changes to the exposure compensation setting, you should see the camera making adjustments to the aperture, shutter speed, or ISO in order to actually make the image brighter or darker. The numbers for these settings will appear on screen. As with ISO, it’s really important to remember to put your exposure compensation back to zero after you have finished using it. I have spoken with folks learning photography who have accidentally set their exposure compensation to a high number at some point, and then they can’t figure out why all their images end up being way too bright. This is a common photography mistake, so try to avoid it if you can.   Flash Button. Many of the mirrorless cameras on the market today feature some sort of built-in flash. We’ve written a couple of guides to flash in photography, specifically around how to turn off flash on your camera, and reasons to turn off flash on your camera. Suffice to say, we aren’t huge fans of the built-in flash on most cameras as the results are sub optimal. In addition, there are many locations where flash photography isn’t allowed. Still, folks are used to having a flash and manufacturers are used to putting them into cameras, and flash does come in handy at times. The good news is that it’s quick and easy to adjust the flash settings on your camera, as most mirrorless cameras feature a dedicated flash button (assuming they have a flash built-in). My mirrorless camera doesn’t have a flash built in, but as the flash button is pretty universal, this image of a compact camera flash button should do! The flash button is the little icon on the right side of the back of the camera. Pressing this button will take you to the flash settings menu, where you can enable or disable your auto flash settings. We’d recommend disabling it for most situations unless you really want to use it. This will stop it from going off when you don’t want it to. If you have an external flash unit, this will normally be controlled via it’s own menu system and buttons, although you will need to configure the camera via the menu as well.   Focus Mode. When we take a picture, we want our subject to be nice and sharp. This sharpness is achieved by adjusting the focus. An in focus image will be sharp, whilst an out of focus image will be blurry. Most mirrorless cameras on the market today ship with a variety of focus modes, which allow you to adjust how the camera focuses. The focus mode button on the camera, which may also be a dial or toggle, lets you quickly switch between some of these modes. If you are looking for the button on your camera, it will usually be labelled something like “AF”, which stands for Autofocus. If it’s not accessible via a button, you might have to go into your camera’s settings menu, where it will be called something like “focus mode”. The exact modes your camera has will depend on your manufacturer, but usually there are at least three modes you can access quickly. The first of these will be the standard focus mode, perhaps called auto focus single. This is the focus mode you would use for subjects that are not likely to move. In this mode, the camera will focus on the subject, and then lock the focus. The next mode will be called something like auto focus continuous. In this mode, once you have a subject, the camera will do it’s best to track focus on the subject even if it’s moving. This means you will get sharp shots of your subject even if it moves as you take one or more shots of it. Continuous focus is good for any moving subject, including photos of wildlife, photos of sporting events, or photos of people moving. The third mode you should also have access to will be a manual mode. Manual mode means that you have total control over the focus. Usually, there will be a focus ring on the lens itself, which you twist to change focus. I should add that many cameras have additional versions of the above modes. For example, many cameras offer some sort of face or eye detection for focus, meaning the camera will automatically detect and track focus on a subjects face or eye. This can be especially useful for taking pictures of people in motion.   Zoom / Focal Length Ring. A mirrorless camera, like a DSLR camera, lets you change the lens depending on what you are shooting. There are two types of lens that you can get. These are “prime” lenses, where there is no zoom, and “zoom” lenses, where you can zoom in and out on the scene. In photography terms, this “zoom” is known as a focal length. This is a number in mm. The smaller the number, the wider the shot, and the more of the scene you will be able to see. The larger the number, the narrower the shot, and the larger your subjects will be. Most lenses have a dedicated focal length / zoom ring on the lens itself, which you can twist to increase or decrease the zoom amount. Some lenses do not have this however, in which case there will be some sort of button on the camera body itself which you can use to electronically zoom the lens in and out.   Metering Mode. Another button that you might find on the back of the camera will let you quickly change the metering mode. As previously mentioned in this guide, before you actually take a photo your camera calculates the correct settings by measuring the amount of light in the scene. This is so you get the correct exposure, and the image is not too bright or too dark. The way the camera measures the light is through a process known as metering. By default, most cameras are set up to evaluate the whole scene that is in frame to create a balanced exposure. However, there are some scenarios where this will not give the best results, such as a scene with a very strong contrast between the dark and bright areas. In order to shoot in these more challenging situations and still get good result, you can set your camera to different metering modes. This will help the camera zero in on the part of the scene you want to expose correctly for. Different cameras have different metering modes. Most cameras will have have a spot metering mode, which only uses the light information in the very centre of the image. For other cameras, you might be able to set the metering point to be the focal point, which is also a good option in many cases. The camera I am using to demonstrate does not have a metering mode button, but this function has to be accessed via the menu system.   Shooting Mode. Next up, the shooting mode. If you’ve ever wanted to take a picture of yourself, this is the mode you want to adjust. Shooting mode tells the camera how to take the picture. Most cameras will have a single shot mode, a continuous shooting mode, and a timer mode. The single shot mode will take one photo when you depress the shutter button. To take another photo, you have to raise your finger off the shutter button and then depress it again. Continuous shooting mode will have the camera continue to take photos while you hold the shutter button down. As long as you depress the shutter button, it will keep taking photos. This is good for capturing action shots of something happening over time. Note you will need to use this in conjunction with a continuous focus mode in order for all your shots to be sharp and in focus. Finally, most cameras on the market today come with some form of timer mode. This lets you press the shutter button, and the camera will take an image after a period of time, often 10 seconds. This is useful for capturing self portraits and group shots.   Video. This article is primarily about photography rather than video, however these days all the mirrorless cameras on the market also have the capability to shoot video. As such, there are usually buttons dedicated to video on the camera as well. These normally let you quickly toggle the camera between photo mode and video mode, and there may also be a dedicated button to stop and start video recording as well. When in video mode, most the other buttons on the back of the camera will work in the same way (video is after all very similar to photography), but it is definitely worth checking your specific camera manual for any differences if you do intend to use your mirrorless camera for video.   What The On-Screen Display Tells You. Lastly, your mirrorless camera will have a screen. This may or may not be a touchscreen. If it is a touchscreen, you will likely be able to access many of the above controls and settings through the touchscreen interface as well as the buttons. In addition, the display will overlay a lot of information on the image. This information will relate to various camera settings, and it’s important to understand what is being displayed so you can be sure the camera is set up correctly. Exactly what is displayed will vary from camera to camera, and also depending on how you have your camera set up. Usually there’s a “display” or “disp.” button to toggle different levels of information. However, here are some of the key pieces of information you will likely find on the screen of your mirrorless camera. This information will usually also display on the electronic viewfinder if your camera has one. Current mode the mode dial is set to Aperture Shutter speed ISO Remaining battery Remaining images Focus mode Flash status Whether you are shooting in RAW, JPG, or RAW+JPG Exposure compensation WiFi / Bluetooth / GPS status Current focus point White balance If image stabilization is active Of all the above, the most important readouts to keep an eye on are the current ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. Some cameras can also overlay a horizon levelling tool so you can see if you are holding the camera level, as well as a grid that follows a compositional rule like the rule of thirds. You can see both of these features enabled in the image below on my mirrorless camera example.   How to Get Better Photos With A Mirrorless Camera. In this part of the guide I am going to go through some tips for using your mirrorless camera, to help you start getting better photos right away. I’m also going to include some areas you should focus on in your photography generally, which are camera agnostic, but still important. Hold Your Mirrorless Camera Properly. The first thing you need to do when using your mirrorless camera is to learn how to hold it properly for taking photos. This advice applies to all types of camera. Holding your camera properly will make it more stable and will result in fewer blurry pictures as a result of camera motion whilst you take the shot. To hold your mirrorless camera, your right hand should grip it around the right side of the camera, with your right index finger over the shutter button. Most mirrorless cameras have a grip in this position which makes positioning your right hand quite easy. A common mistake at this point is to shoot one handed. You definitely don’t want to do this. Holding the camera with both hands will hugely increase the stability and result is less lost shots. This is particularly important when shooting indoors or in any situation where there is limited light available, as the camera will use lower shutter speeds. When taking a picture, your left hand should be supporting the camera lens. Usually this will be in a palm up manner. You might need to rotate your hand to adjust focus or zoom, but when you are ready to shoot you will ideally return to the palm up position. For maximum hand held stability, tuck your elbows tight to your body. This reduces how much your arms can move during shooting. If you find yourself struggling to hold your camera steady even following the above steps, then you should consider investing in a travel tripod which will let you keep the camera totally still in every situation. This will guarantee sharp photos.   Understand the Settings and Modes. In the first part of this guide I went through a variety of the controls, modes, and settings that you have available to you on your new mirrorless camera. Really, I just want to reiterate that it is important to learn what these modes, settings and controls do. It is true that as the technology inside a camera gets better, many cameras work very well in automatic mode. They are great at figuring out the light, figuring out what you are taking a picture of, and identifying and even tracking your subjects. So for many photographers, you will find that in automatic your camera will get good to great shots at least eighty percent of the time. However, you don’t want to miss a shot because the camera accidentally picks the wrong subject, or misjudges the lighting conditions, or just gets the settings wrong. It is for this reason that you want to take full control of your camera, or at least know how to do this. A mirrorless camera is after all an expensive and capable bit of equipment, and the best way to get the most out of it is to full understand how to use it. I would add also that you should read the instructions’ manual – it often comes in paper form with the camera or you can look it up online. Each camera is a bit different and its important to know how to use your particular camera and get the most of its functionality. The best way to do that is to check out the instruction manual.   Learn About the Exposure Triangle. When it comes to photography, one of the most important concepts to understand is the exposure triangle. I have touched on this in this guide a few times already. The exposure triangle can be a complicated seeming concept that takes a while to grasp. It’s also a fairly large topic, and I’ve put together a detailed guide to the exposure triangle here, which is worth reading. However, as a summary, the exposure triangle simply refers to the three controls that all mirrorless cameras offer you to control the exposure of the image. It’s called a triangle because there are three controls, like the three sides of a triangle. These three controls are aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. These are terms that I have touched on already in this post, and are three of the most important photography concepts to get to grips with. Changing any of these three controls will result in a change to how bright the image you capture is – the exposure. In addition, changing each of them will also change how the image looks in a different way. If you change the shutter speed, you change how motion appears in your image. A very fast shutter speed for example, like 1/2000th of a second, can be used to freeze fast action motion like a race car. However, a fast shutter speed lets less light in, and can result in a darker image. Changing the aperture changes the depth of field of your image. Again, this is an important concept to get to grips with, and I’ve written a guide to depth of field in photography to help. I also expand on this a little further on in the post. However, put simply, depth of field controls how sharp the foreground, midground, and background of your image are. Finally, the last control you have over exposure is ISO. Increasing the ISO from say 200 to 600 will increase the exposure of your image. It will also make the image grainier. As a general rule, ISO is the last side of the exposure triangle that you want to change. However, if you can’t achieve what you want by adjusting the shutter speed or aperture, then it is definitely a handy option to have.   Learn the Basics of Composition. This post has largely been about the more technical side of photography, covering how your camera works, and the various settings you have available to you. However, obviously photography is about much more than understanding how your camera works. Generally, I believe there are three main components to becoming a photographer. These are: Understanding how your camera works Learning what makes a great photo Mastering photo editing This post has focused on the first of these three, but the other two are just as important in my opinion. The second point is all about learning how to put together, or compose, a great shot. Composition covers a great many things, but in summary you need to: consider where your subject is placed relative to other elements in the shot get to grips with concepts like the rule of thirds understand how colors work with each other learn how the eye searches out patterns like leading lines and symmetrical subjects start to think about how you can frame subjects think about how to balance your composition There are of course more compositional concepts that you can get to grips with. By learning some of these tips and techniques, you can effectively shortcut your way to developing what many refer to as a photographer’s eye. I’d advise reading through my more detailed guide to composition in photography for more tips. Finally, whilst I’m not going to cover photo editing in this post, it is important. See my guide to the best photo editing software which will give you some pointers as to what options are on the market for photo editing.   Master Depth of Field. Getting to grips with depth of field is another great way to start taking better pictures. You have no doubt seen depth of field in photos, even if you weren’t aware what it was. If you think of a portrait of a person, very often the person will be sharpy in focus, whilst other elements of the shot like the background and even the foreground, will be pleasingly blurry. Modern smartphones can even achieve this affect with special “portrait” modes, where the effect is usually simulated through clever software. However, traditionally this effect has been achieved through changing the settings on your camera. Specifically, as mentioned in the section on the exposure triangle in this guide, by adjusting the aperture on your camera, you can control the depth of field. If you set an aperture number of between f/1.2 and f/4 for example, you will get a shallow depth of field. This means only your subject will be in focus, whilst the parts of the image between the camera and your subject, and behind your subject, will be out of focus. You would use this effect primarily for portraits, or when you want to isolate your subject from the background. If you set the aperture to a higher number, like f/8 – f/16, then more of the scene will be in focus. You would typically do this for landscape shots, or any shot where you want as much of the image to be sharply focused as possible. To practice your depth of field, I recommend putting your camera in aperture priority mode, and shooting the same scene and subject at different aperture settings to see the difference. I also have a complete guide to depth of field in photography here for more information and tips.   Understand Light. As I’ve mentioned throughout the post, a camera is just a device for recording an image, which it does by capturing light information. As you would imagine, light is therefore quite an important part of photography. However, not all lighting conditions are the same, and understanding different types of light and lighting conditions is key to taking better photos. To start with, there are different sources of light out there. The sun is generally the first light source you will think of, but there are other light source, from indoor lights to stadium lights to camera flashes. Even at night, the moon and stars, or even the Northern Lights, can be a light source. Different light sources have different qualities, and can result in different images. This may be due to their relative strength or weakness, due to the color of light they emit, or simply as a result of the angle you are shooting them. Shooting a photo towards the sun will give very different results to shooting the same photo with the sun behind you for example. In addition, our primary light source, the sun, gives different lighting results at different times of day and in different weather conditions, as the light is affected by the earth’s atmosphere. I’m not expecting you to become a meteorologist of course! There are however some simple rules of thumb around light that can help you get better photos. These are: Generally, shooting with the sun somewhere behind your shoulder rather than in front of you will get better photos If it’s a partly cloudy day, if you can be patient and wait for the sun to come out, you will usually get better photos with more colour and contrast Shooting with the sun directly overhead results in flat looking images, so try to avoid this if possible Shooting at sunset and sunrise, when the light is a more golden tone, often results in the best images. This is known as the “golden hour” in photography, although how long it lasts will depend on where you are in the world Hopefully these tips on light give you some pointers for improving your photos.   Take Workshops or Courses to Improve your Skills. Another great way to improve your photography and take better photos is to take part in some form of leaning program. There are a range of different options, from in person workshops, to photo walks, to local seminars. Some universities and colleges offer courses you can sign up for. If you’ve found this post useful and found my style of explaining photography concepts works for you, you might also be interested in my online photography course. I’ve taught thousands of students how to improve their photography in this course, and I’d love to help you out as well. I think that for what it includes, it’s also incredible value. You can read all about that and buy it for yourself, here.   Take Lots of Photos! Last but not least on my list of ways to start getting better photos is, well, to practice! One of the joys of mirrorless cameras, and digital cameras in particular, is that once you have invested in the equipment, you don’t have to worry about the costs of getting film developed. This means you can take as many photos as you want, try different settings, and really see how they change the look of a shot. A mirrorless camera is particularly good for learning on because as you change settings on the camera, you will see the results in real time on the screen or through the electronic viewfinder. So you can tell quickly what’s in or out of focus, and if the image is too bright or too dark. If you are struggling to find subjects or topics to photograph, then I can recommend trying to set yourself challenges around different subjects or themes, like wildlife, portraits, moving objects, landscapes and so on. Getting used to taking your camera with you everywhere you go will also help you on your photography journey.   How to Care For and Protect Your New Mirrorless Camera. A mirrorless camera is a serious investment, so you will want to keep it in good condition so you can take photos for years to come. Based on our years of international travel with a whole assortment of photography gear, I wanted to share some tips for keeping your gear in tip top condition.   How to Protect your Mirrorless Camera. Whilst mirrorless cameras are generally fairly well built bits of equipment, they are still ultimately an electronic device which has, amongst other things, components made of glass. As a result, they can of course be damaged. There are a number of options you have for protecting your mirrorless camera. The first two products we use on all of our cameras are a lens hood and a UV filter. These are two inexpensive products that will help protect the lens on your mirrorless camera. A lens hood, also known as a sun hood, sits over the end of your lens and is primarily designed to reduce lens flare from the sun. However, in my experience, it also works very well to protect the end of your lens from bumps and scrapes when you have the camera slung over your shoulder, and I never go anywhere without my lens hood on my camera. A UV filter is a screw in filter that attaches directly onto your lens. On a digital camera, the only function these serve is to protect the glass element on the end of your lens. However, as lenses can be expensive to replace, and UV filters run around $15 – $40, a scratched lens filter is a lot cheaper to replace than your whole lens. I have literally dropped a camera from a few feet in the air onto concrete, and shattered both my sun hood and UV filter. However, the camera and lens have been fine, because the impact was cushioned and absorbed by these components. I’m not saying a UV filter and lens hood mean you can go around dropping your camera onto concrete, but they are definitely a worthwhile investment in my opinion. Another must-have accessory in our mind is a camera strap. Whilst most cameras come with the manufacturer’s strap, we think a third party strap is often more comfortable and functional. My favorite straps are the Peak Design ones, and we use both a sling strap and a hand strap. Jess likes personalized straps such as those available on Etsy and the colorful camera straps by iMo. I can also recommend investing in a decent camera bag for your mirrorless camera, which I go into a little bit more in the section below on travelling with your mirrorless camera. Finally, it might be worth purchasing a specific warranty or accidental damage cover for your camera when you buy it, or even shortly afterwards if possible. This will cover your camera against a variety of mishaps, and is usually a worthwhile investment. You can see some options here.   How to Clean your Mirrorless Camera. To be honest, I don’t do much cleaning with my camera beyond keeping the lens clean and trying to ensure there’s not too much dirt or dust on the outside of the camera. To achieve that, I use an air blower like this,and micro fibre cloths like this. It is true that the sensors in mirrorless cameras are particularly prone to getting dust on them, which can become apparent in your images. Sometimes I will use my air blower to try and dislodge the dust, which will work to a point. However, for more thorough cleaning I personally use a professional. See the section below on camera servicing for more tips on that. I’d also advise checking your manual, which will likely have advice on any cleaning and care steps that manufacturer recommends for your particular camera model.   Tips for Travelling with a Mirrorless Camera. For many people, a camera is most commonly used when travelling, and as travel bloggers, this is definitely true for us as well! If you are planning on taking your camera travelling, then I can highly recommend picking up a proper camera bag to put it in. Unlike a normal bag, a camera bag has lots of nice soft padding to keep your gear safe and protected from the various bumps and knocks that are par for the course when on the road. There’s a wide range of camera bags on the market. When looking for a bag, I’d suggest finding one that will fit your camera as well as a few accessories, so you have plenty of room. Of course, the ultimate decision on the right bag for you lies with you. Personally, I use and travel with Vanguard bags. They make a wide range of camera bags, as well as other photography accessories, and I’ve always found their equipment to be well made and durable. For example, they have this relatively compact camera bag, this shoulder bag, and this backpack, all of which would work well for a mirrorless camera system. Make sure if travelling by air that you check the airline regulations. As we often discover, weight can be an issue with cabin luggage, especially if you have a lot of photography gear. As such, you may need to check certain items like tripods although most airlines will let you fly with them as carry-on. Also you should be aware that some items, particularly batteries, are not permitted in checked luggage. Finally, I can also suggest ensuring that your insurance policy covers your cameras. Many travel insurance policies have relatively low single item limits, meaning that loss, damage or theft of your equipment might not result in you getting the full value of your item back. Instead, you might find that your home insurance policy can be upgraded to include more expensive items away from the home. This is how we cover our camera equipment.   Should you Service your Mirrorless Camera? If you want to keep your camera in great condition for a long period of time, then I would definitely recommend you consider getting it serviced from time to time, perhaps every couple of years at least. In particular, you will want to get the sensor on your camera professionally cleaned. This shouldn’t cost too much (around $30 – $70 most likely), and will ensure your images are free of any imperfections. I try to get my cameras cleaned by a camera servicing professional at least once a year since they are used so regularly and endure quiet a bit with all our travelling. You should be able to find a service either online, or with your local camera shop.   Best Mirrorless Camera for Beginners. If you don’t actually own a mirrorless camera yet, but this post has inspired you to get out there and get one, I wanted to provide a couple of tips for the best mirrorless cameras for beginners. We also have a more detailed guide to the best mirrorless cameras which I recommend you check out, but here are two options that would make a great starter mirrorless camera at a reasonable price point. 1. Canon EOS M200. I’ve been a Canon user since I was 13 years old, and I think they produce an incredible range of great cameras. The EOS M100 is no exception – it’s a wonderful bit of kit that is available at a great price point. For your investment you get a 15-45mm lens, and APS-C sized 24.2MP sensor (the same as you’d find in a larger Canon DSLR), as well as WiFi and bluetooth support. It has a nice touchscreen interface on the back, and supports 4k video, but is lacking an electronic viewfinder. It is also missing in-body image stabilization, however this is rare at this price point in either a mirrorless camera or DSLR. You can see the latest prices and buy it online here.   2. Sony A6600. I’ve been recommending a camera from the Sony A6xxx as a great beginner’s camera for years. There are a number of these at difference price points, from the original a6000 (discontinued but can still be found), to the high end a6600. We would recommend the a6600 if your budget allows it. For your money you get super fast autofocus, a 24.2MP APS-C sized sensor, a flip out touchscreen, in body image stabilization, an electronic viewfinder, and up to 11fps shooting speeds. It also has WiFi. If we had to find fault, it would be that we find the menu system to be a bit of a challenge, but that might be because we are so used to the Canon interface! You can see the latest prices and buy it online here.   Further Reading. Well, that was quite a lot on the topic of mirrorless cameras! Before you go though, I did want to share some more guides we’ve written on the subject of photography which I think will help you on your photography journey. Whether you’re a beginner or intermediate photographer, I’m sure you’ll find something in these guides that will help you. We have a similar guide for how to use a DSLR and how to use a compact camera. We also have a guide to how a DSLR works Knowing how to compose a great photo is a key photography skill. See our guide to composition in photography for lots of tips on this subject Once you’ve mastered aperture, you can control depth of field. Read more about what depth of field is and when you would want to use it. If you have a lens with a zoom feature, you can take advantage of something called lens compression to make objects seem closer together than they are. We are big fans of getting the most out of your digital photo files, and do to that you will need to shoot in RAW. See our guide to RAW in photography to understand what RAW is, and why you should switch to RAW as soon as you can. You’re going to need some way of editing your photos. See our guide to the best photo editing software, as well our our guide to the best laptops for photo editing. We also have a guide to getting the best performance out of Adobe Lightroom, our preferred editing software. If you’re looking for advice on specific tips for different scenarios, we also have you covered. See our guide to Northern Lights photography, long exposure photography, fireworks photography, tips for taking photos of stars, and cold weather photography. You may hear photographers talking about a concept called back button focus. If you’ve ever wondered what that is, and want to know how to start using it, see our guide to back button focus. For landscape photography, you might find you need filters to achieve the look you want. See our guide to ND filters for more on that. If you’re looking for a great gift for a photography loving friend or family member (or yourself!), take a look at our photography gift guide, If you’re in the market for a new camera, we have a detailed guide to the best travel cameras, as well as specific guides for the best cameras for hiking and backpacking, the best compact camera, best mirrorless camera and best DSLR camera. We also have a guide to the best camera lenses. If you want a camera or lens, but the prices are a bit high, see our guide to where to buy used cameras and camera gear for some budget savings options. We have a guide to why you need a tripod, and a guide to choosing a travel tripod Ever wondered how to easily replace the sky in an image? Check out our guide to sky replacement in photography for an easy process anyone can do. Finally, if you want to improve your photography overall, you can join over 2,000 students on my travel photography course. I’ve been running this since 2016, and  it has helped lots of people take their photography to the next level. And that’s it for our detailed guide to getting the most out of your new mirrorless camera. As always, we’re happy to take feedback and answer your questions – just pop them in the comments below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can. Enjoyed this post? Why not share it!Home » Photography » Photography tips » How to Use a Mirrorless Camera: A Beginner’s Photography Guide Leave a Reply Cancel reply.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 277
  • 23
  • mode
  • 100
  • 23
  • mirrorless camera
  • 73
  • 23
  • mirrorless
  • 73
  • 23
  • photography
  • 66
  • 23
  • guide
  • 60
  • 23
  • image
  • 55
  • 23
  • photo
  • 47
  • 23
  • button
  • 47
  • 23
  • control
  • 45
  • 23
  • shutter
  • 43
  • 23
  • exposure
  • 39
  • 23
  • focu
  • 35
  • 23
  • light
  • 34
  • 23
  • setting
  • 33
  • 23
  • aperture
  • 31
  • 23
  • iso
  • 30
  • 23
  • shot
  • 29
  • 23
  • subject
  • 28
  • 23
  • len
  • 28
  • 23
  • flash
  • 24
  • 23
  • dslr
  • 20
  • 23
  • great
  • 20
  • 23
  • result
  • 20
  • 23
  • shooting
  • 20
  • 23
  • speed
  • 20
  • 23
  • shutter speed
  • 19
  • 23
  • depth field
  • 18
  • 23
  • work
  • 18
  • 23
  • manual
  • 18
  • 23
  • depth
  • 17
  • 23
  • field
  • 17
  • 23
  • adjust
  • 17
  • 23
  • exposure compensation
  • 15
  • 23
  • mode camera
  • 13
  • 23
  • control wheel
  • 13
  • 23
  • shutter button
  • 12
  • 23
  • dslr camera
  • 11
  • 23
  • compact camera
  • 10
  • 23
  • camera mirrorless
  • 10
  • 23
  • exposure triangle
  • 10
  • 23
  • camera mirrorless camera
  • 9
  • 23
  • manual mode
  • 9
  • 23
  • aperture shutter
  • 9
  • 23
  • focu mode
  • 9
  • 23
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 8
  • 23
  • photo editing
  • 8
  • 23
  • aperture priority
  • 8
  • 23
  • button camera
  • 7
  • 23
  • detailed guide
  • 7
  • 23
  • camera camera
  • 7
  • 23
  • auto mode
  • 7
  • 23
  • shutter priority
  • 7
  • 23
  • camera beginner
  • 6
  • 23
  • mode mode
  • 6
  • 23
  • digital camera
  • 6
  • 23
  • camera work
  • 6
  • 23
  • priority mode
  • 6
  • 23
  • metering mode
  • 6
  • 23
  • camera bag
  • 6
  • 23
  • shutter speed iso
  • 5
  • 23
  • price point
  • 5
  • 23
  • taking photo
  • 5
  • 23
  • camera market
  • 5
  • 23
  • manual control
  • 5
  • 23
  • back camera
  • 5
  • 23
  • electronic viewfinder
  • 5
  • 23
  • camera set
  • 5
  • 23
  • taking picture
  • 5
  • 23
  • set aperture
  • 5
  • 23
  • speed iso
  • 5
  • 23
  • increase decrease
  • 5
  • 23
  • flash button
  • 5
  • 23
  • mode button
  • 5
  • 23
  • shooting mode
  • 5
  • 23
  • camera len
  • 5
  • 23
  • light source
  • 5
  • 23
  • uv filter
  • 5
  • 23
  • mirrorless camera beginner
  • 4
  • 23
  • mirrorless camera mirrorless
  • 4
  • 23
  • type digital camera
  • 4
  • 23
  • button mirrorless camera
  • 4
  • 23
  • moving subject
  • 4
  • 23
  • flash camera
  • 4
  • 23
  • editing software
  • 4
  • 23
  • photography journey
  • 4
  • 23
  • type digital
  • 4
  • 23
  • light scene
  • 4
  • 23
  • camera control
  • 4
  • 23
  • button control
  • 4
  • 23
  • button mirrorless
  • 4
  • 23
  • top camera
  • 4
  • 23
  • automatic mode
  • 4
  • 23
  • adjust iso
  • 4
  • 23
  • setting camera
  • 4
  • 23
  • camera flash
  • 4
  • 23
  • len hood
  • 4
  • 23
  • cover camera
  • 4
  • 23
  • wide range camera
  • 3
  • 23
  • press shutter button
  • 3
  • 23
  • guide mirrorless camera
  • 3
  • 23
  • automatic mode camera
  • 3
  • 23
  • shutter speed aperture
  • 3
  • 23
  • aperture priority mode
  • 3
  • 23
  • adjust iso mode
  • 3
  • 23
  • control depth field
  • 3
  • 23
  • shutter priority mode
  • 3
  • 23
  • button control wheel
  • 3
  • 23
  • image bright dark
  • 3
  • 23
  • mirrorless camera market
  • 3
  • 23
  • camera market today
  • 3
  • 23
  • tip mirrorless camera
  • 3
  • 23
  • mode dial
  • 3
  • 23
  • speed aperture
  • 3
  • 23
  • mode example
  • 3
  • 23
  • brightness image
  • 3
  • 23
  • white balance
  • 3
  • 23
  • priority let
  • 3
  • 23
  • iso mode
  • 3
  • 23
  • mode adjust
  • 3
  • 23
  • adjust brightness
  • 3
  • 23
  • control depth
  • 3
  • 23
  • aperture adjust
  • 3
  • 23
  • mode control
  • 3
  • 23
  • control aperture
  • 3
  • 23
  • control exposure
  • 3
  • 23
  • depending camera
  • 3
  • 23
  • wheel adjust
  • 3
  • 23
  • iso button
  • 3
  • 23
  • correct exposure
  • 3
  • 23
  • period time
  • 3
  • 23
  • image bright
  • 3
  • 23
  • bright dark
  • 3
  • 23
  • market today
  • 3
  • 23
  • built
  • 3
  • 23
  • flash setting
  • 3
  • 23
  • menu system
  • 3
  • 23
  • focu image
  • 3
  • 23
  • focu subject
  • 3
  • 23
  • focal length
  • 3
  • 23
  • exposure image
  • 3
  • 23
  • image stabilization
  • 3
  • 23
  • holding camera
  • 3
  • 23
  • tip mirrorless
  • 3
  • 23
  • lighting condition
  • 3
  • 23
  • concept grip
  • 3
  • 23
  • photography tip
  • 3
  • 23
  • source light
  • 3
  • 23
  • improve photography
  • 3
  • 23
  • end len
  • 3
  • 23
  • insurance policy
  • 3
  • 23
Result 24
TitleUnderstanding Shutter Speed - The Complete Guide For Beginners
Urlhttps://www.bwillcreative.com/understanding-shutter-speed/
DescriptionUnderstanding shutter speed is essential for beginner photographers. Use this guide to decode shutter speed and master manual mode!
Date
Organic Position23
H1Understanding Shutter Speed – The Complete Guide For Beginners
H2What Is Shutter Speed
How Is Shutter Speed Measured
Where To Find Your Shutter Speed
Why Is Shutter Speed Important
What Causes Motion Blur
Utilizing Motion Blur In Your Photography
Shutter Speed Quick Tips & Review
An Easy Way To Remember Shutter Speed
Conclusion
H3It Affects The Brightness Of Your Pictures
It’s In Charge Of How Motion Is Displayed
About The Author
Related Posts
H2WithAnchorsWhat Is Shutter Speed
How Is Shutter Speed Measured
Where To Find Your Shutter Speed
Why Is Shutter Speed Important
What Causes Motion Blur
Utilizing Motion Blur In Your Photography
Shutter Speed Quick Tips & Review
An Easy Way To Remember Shutter Speed
Conclusion
BodyUnderstanding Shutter Speed – The Complete Guide For Beginners As you start to explore the manual settings of your camera, understanding shutter speed becomes increasingly important. You’ll discover that shutter speed not only affects the exposure of your photos but is crucial to freeze motion in its place. It’s one of the three main pillars of exposure and is essential to understand if you want to capture more creative images. This article will be building off what I discussed in my ‘best beginner camera settings,’ post and go more in-depth with shutter speed to help you discover the ins and outs of this crucial setting. Here you’ll learn more about what shutter speed actually is, how it works, and the fantastic creative effects it can have in your photography. What Is Shutter Speed. Shutter speed is how long your shutter is open for. The shutter acts as a blockade in front of your camera sensor, and when it’s closed, no light can pass through. When your shutter is open, light can hit your sensor and is recorded as the pictures you see on the back of your camera. Your shutter is actually what makes that ‘click’ noise when you take a picture, you actually hear the opening and closing of your camera’s shutter. How Is Shutter Speed Measured. Shutter speed is measured in full seconds or fractions of a second. The number of seconds will tell you how long your shutter will remain open before it closes again. For example, a common shutter speed you may use is 1/100 (one one-hundredth of a second), which means your shutter will open and close in that amount of time. That might seem exceptionally fast, but it’s what’s necessary to capture movement! Another example would be a 30″ (30 seconds) shutter speed, where your shutter would remain open for an entire thirty seconds. This slow shutter speed can create some beautiful in-camera effects that you’ll learn about below! Where To Find Your Shutter Speed. Your shutter speed can be found in a few different places on your camera. The first place is when you look through the viewfinder on your camera. Here you’ll find all of the related settings you are using, including your shutter speed. The next place you can find it is on your camera’s LCD screen. If you are using a higher-end camera, you can even see the shutter speed displayed on the top of the camera body. Why Is Shutter Speed Important. Shutter speed is one of the three main pillars of exposure within your manual camera settings. It can drastically affect the exposure of your pictures, but also freeze fast motion like a hummingbirds wings or a fast car driving by. Beyond its technical importance, understanding shutter speed can play a massive role in the creativity of your pictures. To make things easier, let’s break down the two ways shutter speed is important, individually. It Affects The Brightness Of Your Pictures. Remember how I mentioned that when your shutter is open, light can pass through to your sensor? Well, the amount of time the light can hit your camera sensor, the brighter your photo will become! The more time light has on your sensor, the brighter your picture, it’s really as simple as that. If you had a slow shutter speed of 1 second and tried to take a photo on a bright sunny day, your photo will likely turn out completely white. Since there is so much light coming into your camera in the middle of the day, having it expose on your sensor for full second is more than enough time to make things way too bright. With so much available light, a faster shutter speed of 1/250 might be more suitable for a properly exposed photo. Good shutter speed, even exposure. Too slow of shutter speed, overexposed. The same thing is true if you were to use too fast of a shutter speed. Even though it’s a bright and sunny day, there might not be enough available light to record an image at a 1/4000 shutter speed. There isn’t enough time for light to expose on your camera sensor, so your photo will turn out completely black or just very dark. Finding the perfect shutter speed for your scene will all depend on how much available light there is. Too fast of shutter speed, underexposed It’s In Charge Of How Motion Is Displayed. Motion is a huge part of photography, and the way it’s captured can really make or break your pictures. If you were to capture a fast-moving object like a soccer player running, you’d probably want the motion to be frozen and crisp. Meanwhile, when you go to take a picture of that waterfall you really love, you’ll want to blur the water to create a beautiful long exposure effect. Deciding whether the motion in your photo will be frozen or blurred will all depend on your shutter speed. When you’re photographing a fast-moving subject, their ‘position’ is continually changing. With the soccer player example, if your shutter is open for too long, it’s going to capture the quick movement of their feet and blur them together, creating motion blur. When you use a fast shutter speed, any motion that occurs while the shutter opens and closes will stay frozen in time. At a shutter speed like 1/1000, for example, any fast movements the soccer player makes would appear completely frozen. Motion blur from slow shutter speed Fast motion completely frozen with fast shutter speed. What Causes Motion Blur. Motion blur is a crucial thing to consider when beginning to understand shutter speed in photography. While the shutter is open, anything that moves from one place to another will appear as a streak in your photo. If you’re using a fast shutter speed of 1/1000, there are few things fast enough to cause motion blur in that short amount of time. On the other hand, with a slower shutter like 1/30, a fast-moving object would become a complete blur across your photo. No motion blur Motion blur A really simple way to better visualize how motion blur appears in your pictures is to set a slow shutter speed like 1/30 and quickly move your camera as you take a picture. Everything in the frame will appear as a streak because of how much your camera moved in that short amount of time. Utilizing Motion Blur In Your Photography. When you start to understand how shutter speed plays a roll in your photography, it’s extremely fun to use a slow shutter speed as a creative tool. When using a slow shutter speed intentionally, you can create motion blur in moving objects like the ocean, a waterfall, cars driving by, or anything else you can imagine! This is called long exposure photography. It’s important to remember that a slow shutter speed also means a brighter photo. You may have to wait until there’s less light later in the day or find a more shaded area for your long exposures. Whenever you’re using a shutter speed slower than 1/60, it’s essential to use a tripod to keep your photos as crisp as possible. At slower shutter speeds, the small movements of your hands will make your entire picture appear blurry. That’s why it’s essential your camera stays completely still with the help of a tripod. Below are some great examples of slow shutter speeds being used for creative effects. Shutter Speed Quick Tips & Review. Now that you understand shutter speed and the role it plays in your photography let’s discuss a few important things to remember. Your shutter speed capabilities will depend on your camera: Most cameras are capable of shooting with a shutter speed of 30″ (30 seconds) through to 1/4000 (one four-thousandth of a second). You can shoot at a shutter speed of longer than 30 seconds when you use ‘Bulb’ mode. This mode will keep the shutter open as long as you hold the button. Get a tripod for shutter speeds slower than 1/60: There are a ton of tiny movements your hands make when holding a camera that starts to show up as blurry images when using a shutter speed slower than 1/60. The best rule of thumb is to only shoot handheld with a shutter speed of 1/80 or faster. Motion blur isn’t always a bad thing: Motion blur can make for beautiful in-camera effects when you photograph things like a lake or waterfall. Just remember to use a tripod! You must always consider what your subject is doing: Before you set your shutter speed, you need to know how fast your subject will be moving. There’s going to be a difference between shooting someone jumping in the air versus a hummingbird flapping its wings. Depending on how fast your subject is moving, that will dictate the approximate shutter speed to use. Shutter speed will affect how bright (or dark) your photo turns out: When your shutter is open, light can pass through and expose on your sensor. If the light hits your sensor for too long, your photo will appear bright. If the light doesn’t hit your sensor for long enough, your photo will appear dark. Choosing the best shutter speed will all depend on how much light is available in a scene. An Easy Way To Remember Shutter Speed. There’s a lot of stuff I talked about here, and I know how hard it is to remember all the essential details. That’s why I made the Manual Mode Cheat Sheet to help you stay on top of all the most important settings on your camera. At a glance, this free cheat sheet will help you to remember which shutter speeds are best for any scenario. It also covers other key settings like aperture and ISO. If you’re a beginner photographer struggling to figure out your camera settings, I can’t recommend the Manual Mode Cheat Sheet enough to you! Click Here to get access to this free cheat sheet! Conclusion. Understanding shutter speed in photography is a big step to take for any beginner photographer. Not only does it help you to create a better exposure, but it can also be used to make some fantastic in-camera effects. Shutter speed is an essential part of shooting in manual mode and one of the most important settings to learn in your photography. Make sure to download the free Manual Mode Cheat Sheet to use as your handy reference guide to shutter speed and other essential settings! If you know someone who’s getting started with photography and should know more about shutter speed, then make sure to share this post with them! Have you ever tried long exposures in your photography? How did it go? Let me know in the comments! Happy Shooting! – Brendan 🙂             Share: About The Author. Brendan Williams. Hey, I'm Brendan! I'm a professional photographer and photo retoucher who prefers dogs over cats. Around here my mission is to help you improve your photography, photo editing, and graphic design through easy-to-understand tutorials that maximize your creativity. Related Posts. Canon STM Vs. USM – What’s The Difference? May 7, 2021 10 Common Beginner Photography Mistakes And How To Avoid Them. April 27, 2020 Bring Your Astro Photography To The Next Level – Post Processing Tricks. May 19, 2018 What Do Photographers Do With Their Photos? December 30, 2020
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 77
  • 24
  • shutter speed
  • 62
  • 24
  • speed
  • 62
  • 24
  • camera
  • 30
  • 24
  • motion
  • 20
  • 24
  • photo
  • 18
  • 24
  • fast
  • 16
  • 24
  • light
  • 15
  • 24
  • blur
  • 15
  • 24
  • photography
  • 14
  • 24
  • motion blur
  • 12
  • 24
  • open
  • 11
  • 24
  • picture
  • 11
  • 24
  • setting
  • 10
  • 24
  • exposure
  • 10
  • 24
  • long
  • 10
  • 24
  • sensor
  • 10
  • 24
  • slow shutter speed
  • 9
  • 24
  • shutter open
  • 9
  • 24
  • slow shutter
  • 9
  • 24
  • slow
  • 9
  • 24
  • time
  • 8
  • 24
  • thing
  • 8
  • 24
  • important
  • 7
  • 24
  • remember
  • 7
  • 24
  • camera effect
  • 6
  • 24
  • manual
  • 6
  • 24
  • essential
  • 6
  • 24
  • effect
  • 6
  • 24
  • second
  • 6
  • 24
  • 30
  • 6
  • 24
  • moving
  • 6
  • 24
  • mode
  • 6
  • 24
  • fast shutter speed
  • 5
  • 24
  • fast shutter
  • 5
  • 24
  • cheat sheet
  • 5
  • 24
  • slower
  • 5
  • 24
  • cheat
  • 5
  • 24
  • sheet
  • 5
  • 24
  • understanding shutter speed
  • 4
  • 24
  • shutter speed shutter
  • 4
  • 24
  • understanding shutter
  • 4
  • 24
  • speed shutter
  • 4
  • 24
  • light hit
  • 4
  • 24
  • amount time
  • 4
  • 24
  • long exposure
  • 4
  • 24
  • manual mode
  • 4
  • 24
  • speed shutter speed
  • 3
  • 24
  • shutter open light
  • 3
  • 24
  • light hit sensor
  • 3
  • 24
  • understand shutter speed
  • 3
  • 24
  • shutter speed slower
  • 3
  • 24
  • speed slower 160
  • 3
  • 24
  • remember shutter speed
  • 3
  • 24
  • manual mode cheat
  • 3
  • 24
  • mode cheat sheet
  • 3
  • 24
  • camera setting
  • 3
  • 24
  • photography shutter
  • 3
  • 24
  • camera sensor
  • 3
  • 24
  • light pass
  • 3
  • 24
  • open light
  • 3
  • 24
  • hit sensor
  • 3
  • 24
  • 30 second
  • 3
  • 24
  • fast motion
  • 3
  • 24
  • time light
  • 3
  • 24
  • photo turn
  • 3
  • 24
  • fast moving
  • 3
  • 24
  • moving object
  • 3
  • 24
  • soccer player
  • 3
  • 24
  • understand shutter
  • 3
  • 24
  • speed slower
  • 3
  • 24
  • slower 160
  • 3
  • 24
  • remember shutter
  • 3
  • 24
  • mode cheat
  • 3
  • 24
Result 25
TitleAstrophotography for beginners: How to shoot the night sky | Space
Urlhttps://www.space.com/astrophotography-for-beginners-guide
DescriptionIn this astrophotography for beginners guide we cover everything from camera settings to equipment to editing tips
Date5 Oct 2021
Organic Position24
H1Astrophotography for beginners: How to shoot the night sky
H2
H3Camera bodies and lenses
Additional equipment for astro
Planning your astro shoot
Astrophotography settings for your camera
Tips and advice
H2WithAnchors
BodyAstrophotography for beginners: How to shoot the night sky By Stuart Cornell published 5 October 21 In this astrophotography for beginners guide we cover everything from camera settings to equipment to editing tips (Image credit: Stuart Cornell) Jump to: Cameras and lenses Accessories Planning Settings Tips It's tough to know where to start with night sky photography. Our astrophotography for beginners guide is here to make things a little easier for you, and to demystify the process of shooting the stars. While astrophotography, as a hobby, can require both financial investment and plenty of patience, the results are often spectacular, and you can achieve great star photos with any camera and even some smartphones - though one of the best cameras for astrophotography will help. Once you know the basic techniques, there are so many ways to get creative with your astro images.This astrophotography beginners guide aims to cover the following topics: the camera and lenses you need to get the best photos possible; the right way to plan an astro shoot; the astrophotography settings you'll need to use when you're on location; and our tips for getting the most out of your photos, from creative shoots to smarter editing in the best photo editing apps such as Lightroom and Photoshop.We also have guides to more specific types of night sky photography, which we cover in depth via separate articles. There's one on how to photograph the Milky Way, another on how to get photos of the moon, and another on how to shoot the aurora  (if you're lucky enough to see it).While it can be time-consuming, the best advice we can give astrophotography beginners is to just do some research, have a go, and learn from your mistakes each time. Pretty soon you'll have some spectacular night sky images to show your friends.(Image credit: Stuart Cornell)Camera bodies and lenses. Ideally, you'll be using a DSLR or mirrorless camera in Manual mode. We always recommend manual focusing when shooting astro too, as most sensors - even in low light AF - simply won't be able to focus on the night sky. Full frame cameras will perform the best in low light situations as they have a larger sensor and will therefore capture more light. However, modern crop-sensor cameras are very capable for astrophotography and are a more affordable option than full frame cameras.As a rough guide, full frame cameras can cost upwards of $1000 and will likely set you back between $2000-3000 for a good mirrorless or DSLR with the ability to take sharp images at higher ISO settings. More on that later. Crop-sensor or APS-C cameras are usually $400 upwards, and are more than capable of capturing the night sky.A wide or super-wide angle ‘fast’ lens in the 12-35mm range is best suited to landscape photography and astrophotography. Wide-angle focal lengths allow you to capture a good portion of the night sky as well as some of the landscape for foreground interest. A ‘fast’ lens is one that has a large maximum aperture – in other words, a small f-stop number. A lens with a maximum aperture of f/2.8 or lower is considered to be a fast lens and is excellent for astrophotography.A lens like the Rokinon (Samyang) 14mm f/2.8 is a great lens to get started with, and is very affordable. If you're ready to spend a little more, the Sigma f/1.4 14mm ART lens is superb. If you don’t have a fast lens just yet, you can still use the kit lens that came with your camera. Just make sure you operate at the maximum available aperture size (typically around f/4 on stock kit lenses).Finally, if you're going to be shooting in cold temperatures, it might be worth investing in some kind of lens heater. These can prevent condensation from creeping into your lens and ruining your shot.(Image credit: Stuart Cornell)Related: How to photograph meteors and meteor showersAdditional equipment for astro. Tripod Astrophotography involves taking long exposures, so a sturdy tripod is one of the most important items of equipment. If your camera moves at any point during a long exposure, your image will not be sharp, or worse, blurry. Camera movement from the wind will quickly ruin an image so a solid base for your camera is a must. Something like the Manfrotto BeFree is a good place to start, as it's relatively light and sturdy.Headlamp Keep your hands free to operate your camera by using a headlamp at night and, if possible, use the red light mode (if it has one) to preserve your night vision. A headlamp is also helpful for 'light painting' objects in the foreground of your images.Remote Shutter Release (recommended) This will allow you to trigger your shutter while minimizing the risk of introducing vibrations. If you don’t have a remote shutter release, use the timer delay on your camera to ensure there is no movement of the camera during an exposure.Intervalometer (optional) If you're shooting star trails, and need to take sequences of shots, then an intervalometer is an essential accessory. However, this is quite an advanced form of astrophotography, so we wouldn't necessarily suggest you head out to get one right away. When you feel you're ready for star trails, we have a guide to the best intervalometers on site.(Image credit: Stuart Cornell)Planning your astro shoot. Location It may sound obvious, but you’ll need to be in a dark sky area to be able to capture detailed images of the night sky. Head away from urban areas and find a dark sky location with minimal or no light pollution. There are useful websites like Dark Site Finder and Light Pollution Map, which will help you to find a suitable location to shoot. However, if you're taking a lot of astrophotos and you want to get weather reports, and guidance on where to point your camera when you shoot, the best stargazing apps only cost a few dollars/pounds, and they're so helpful when it comes to selecting your location, and letting you know when the best time to shoot is.Subject The night sky is constantly changing throughout the year and knowing what you are going to photograph is a key component of astrophotography. There are excellent apps like Stellarium and Starwalk 2 which allow you to visualize how the night sky will look at any time and date for a specific location.(Image credit: Yuting Gao from Pexels)Astrophotography settings for your camera. While there are no catch-all settings that will give you a perfect exposure for every situation, there are a handful of basic rules you can follow to maximize your chances of nailing that astro shot. Theses astrophotography settings Camera Shooting Mode Manual. You will need to set the shutter speed and ISO manually. And don't forget that you want your aperture as wide as possible, in almost all situations, so set it to an f-number of f/4 or lower. We recommend f/2.8 or lower.Image File Type RAW! Astrophotography can be broadly split into two separate areas – photography and post-processing. In order to process your newly acquired astro images back at home, you will need to shoot in RAW so that you capture and retain as much data as possible.Shutter Speed The aim is to capture as much light as possible while at the same time avoiding noticeable star movement in the image, known as star trailing. The longer the focal length of your lens, the shorter the shutter speed will need to be in order to avoid star trails. We have a separate guide if you want to photograph star trails.So, how do we calculate the correct shutter speed for any given lens? We use a formula called the '500-rule'. In its simplest form, this is 500 divided by the focal length of the lens you are using. For example, if you are using a 20mm lens, this would be 500 / 20mm = 25 seconds. This, however, only applies to full frame cameras. For a crop sensor camera, the crop factor needs to be taken into account, so in this instance I would recommend using a base value of 300 for your calculations (for APS-C type cameras).What we recommend doing is starting with an exposure of 20 seconds, which is about the longest you can leave the shutter open before stars begin to trail, and see how that looks. You can adjust as needed.(Image credit: Getty images)Aperture Open your aperture to at least f/2.8 if your lens allows (or the lowest f-stop possible). You want to capture as much light as possible during your exposure.ISO The higher the ISO, the more the light signal is amplified from your camera sensor. You will need to shoot at a high ISO but there’s a trade-off. The higher the ISO, the more noise (a type of digital degradation) you will see in the image. ISO 3200 is a good starting point. You may need to adjust down to something like ISO 1600 if there is a lot of ambient light or light pollution. Very dark skies may require you to boost the ISO to 6400, but I wouldn’t recommend going higher than this.Focusing in the dark First, set your camera to manual focus - autofocus will not work in the dark. Then use the ‘Live View’ feature of your camera to display an image preview on the camera’s LCD screen. Identify a bright star or distant light source like a streetlight on the LCD display and digitally zoom in to that point of light. Once you have done this, adjust the focus ring until the star or light source becomes as small as possible. Your focus is set!Now all you have to do is to compose the frame, take the shot and wait for the image to pop up on the LCD display! If your foreground is looking dark, try light ‘painting’ your subject with a headlamp or your smartphone light during the exposure to help brighten the scene. You may need to adjust the ISO or aperture slightly to find what works best for your location, but you are now firmly on your way to capturing your own images of the beautiful night sky.Tips and advice. Foreground If you're trying to balance light between the foreground and the night sky, we suggest you take multiple exposures and merge the images when you edit, as they will require different settings to get the best of each. You may even find that getting your foreground shots an hour or so earlier, during blue hour, will help as there is more light to work with for your foreground objects. This isn't always possible, though.Reflections If you're shooting the night sky near a lake, and the weather is still, there's a great opportunity to reflect the stars in the water. There are several ways to do this, depending on the conditions. We prefer to do the hard work in the shoot, so would suggest changing your focal point to the water and taking an exposure, then setting your focus back to the night sky and taking the exact same shot. You can merge them later in edit. You may find you need to balance your shutter speed a little here, depending on the conditions - a 20 second exposure will capture the reflection of the stars, but you may pick up movement on the water that reduces the clarity. You could try shorter exposures for your reflection shot, but may have to work harder to bring out the stars in edit. Something like Lightroom's linear gradient edits are perfect for bringing out the clarity and sharpness of reflections, so give that a go.White balance While we'd usually recommend setting your white balance to a slightly cooler temperature for astro shots, you can experiment with either the manual WB settings, or the presets, to create interesting tints and variations to your shots. If you're getting a little light pollution, adjusting the white balance can actually make it look like a feature of the photo (we recommend cooling it right down and seeing the effect that has), although you'd need a gradient filter to reduce noise if you're closer to an urban area. Speaking of which...Gradient filters If you've got plenty of cash and want to try shooting near a little light pollution, so you can get more urban foreground images, you could consider using a graduated ND filter, like these 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 landscape filters from Lee. What these allow you to do is block out some of the light at the bottom of your image, so if you're getting noise pollution from the ground upwards, applying a 0.6 grad filter (for example) allows you to essentially make the bottom of your image about 2-stops darker. It all depends on your location, and we'd always recommend shooting in dark skies for astro, but it is possible to photograph stars near urban areas with the right kit and a little experimentation. Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: [email protected] Stuart Cornell Stuart is a landscape and night sky photographer based in Cornwall, UK. Having always had a keen interest in photography and space, he has refined his photography skills in recent years by combining the two passions to create a portfolio of beautiful landscape, night sky and drone images. Inspired by the rugged Cornish coastline, Stuart has had his work featured in several national publications.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 28
  • 25
  • light
  • 23
  • 25
  • night
  • 19
  • 25
  • sky
  • 19
  • 25
  • image
  • 18
  • 25
  • len
  • 16
  • 25
  • night sky
  • 15
  • 25
  • astrophotography
  • 15
  • 25
  • star
  • 15
  • 25
  • youre
  • 13
  • 25
  • setting
  • 12
  • 25
  • shoot
  • 11
  • 25
  • astro
  • 9
  • 25
  • iso
  • 9
  • 25
  • exposure
  • 9
  • 25
  • photo
  • 8
  • 25
  • stuart
  • 8
  • 25
  • shooting
  • 8
  • 25
  • recommend
  • 8
  • 25
  • foreground
  • 8
  • 25
  • shutter
  • 8
  • 25
  • shot
  • 8
  • 25
  • dark
  • 8
  • 25
  • guide
  • 7
  • 25
  • location
  • 7
  • 25
  • capture
  • 7
  • 25
  • photography
  • 6
  • 25
  • sensor
  • 6
  • 25
  • aperture
  • 6
  • 25
  • pollution
  • 6
  • 25
  • work
  • 6
  • 25
  • astrophotography beginner
  • 5
  • 25
  • light pollution
  • 5
  • 25
  • higher iso
  • 4
  • 25
  • credit stuart
  • 4
  • 25
  • full frame
  • 4
  • 25
  • fast len
  • 4
  • 25
  • dark sky
  • 4
  • 25
  • shutter speed
  • 4
  • 25
  • astrophotography beginner guide
  • 3
  • 25
  • full frame camera
  • 3
  • 25
  • stuart cornell
  • 3
  • 25
  • beginner guide
  • 3
  • 25
  • frame camera
  • 3
  • 25
  • capture light
  • 3
  • 25
  • crop sensor
  • 3
  • 25
  • focal length
  • 3
  • 25
  • maximum aperture
  • 3
  • 25
  • stop
  • 3
  • 25
  • youre shooting
  • 3
  • 25
  • star trail
  • 3
  • 25
  • urban area
  • 3
  • 25
Result 26
TitleBeginners's Guide to Photography - Aperture and Shutter Speed | ePHOTOzine
Urlhttps://www.ephotozine.com/article/beginners-s-guide-to-photography---aperture-and-shutter-speed-6045
DescriptionWelcome to the third part of the ePHOTOzine Beginner's Guide to Photography. In this section we are going to be looking at the two main elements of photography which control exposure - aperture and shutter speed
Date6 Aug 2007
Organic Position25
H1Beginners's Guide to Photography - Aperture and Shutter Speed
H2Other articles you might find interesting..
H3There are no comments here! Be the first!
Sign In
Things to do..
Related Buyers Guides
Directory Pages
Login
H2WithAnchorsOther articles you might find interesting..
BodyBeginners's Guide to Photography - Aperture and Shutter Speed Features / Beginners's Guide to Photography - Aperture and Shutter Speed Welcome to the third part of the ePHOTOzine Beginner's Guide to Photography. In this section we are going to be looking at the two main elements of photography which control exposure - aperture and shutter speed.  6 Aug 2007 4:09PM by ePHOTOzine |  General Photography Like0  Add Comment ADVERTISEMENT You can download the Podcast of this article to your computer or MP3 player. It's 6.5Mb in size. Click the icon above to download to your PC.Aperture and shutter speed are the two closely related camera functions that control the light entering the camera and are the key elements in controlling the exposure. While the aperture controls the amount of light that enters the camera, the shutter speed is responsible for determining how long that light is allowed to enter. However, how these settings are used allows the photographer creative control over their work, affecting how the image looks. Aperture The aperture is the hole situated in the lens of the camera that controls the amount of light that is allowed to reach the sensor. Certain modes on a camera allow the user to change the size of the aperture therefore changing how much light is allowed through. Apertures are represented by a series of numbers called f-stops, and, in reverse of what you might think, the larger the number, the smaller the hole. For example, an f-stop of f/2.8 would represent a large aperture and an f-stop of f/32 would represent a small aperture. As you can see from the illustration below, the largest hole is represented by the smallest number. Each subsequently higher f-stop number lets in half as much light as the previous number. Aperture control is one of the most important factors in allowing photographers creative control because it determines the amount of depth-of-field. Depth-of-field refers to how much of the image is in sharp focus and which parts are not. The wider the aperture - ie the lower the f-stop number, the more light that is let in and the shallower the depth of field will be, i.e. the less of the image on either side of where you are focussing will be in focus. This is useful, for example, in portraits where you blur out the background so it doesn't distract from the subject. A smaller aperture makes the depth-of-field deeper, bringing more of the picture on either side of the point of focus, into sharp detail. This is useful for landscape shots, for example, where you would want as much of the picture in sharp focus as possible.Left: Using a smaller aperture such as f/14 gives a deeper depth-of-field meaning that more of the picture wil be in sharp focus. Right: A wider aperture such as f/3.6 will give a shallower depth-of-field. Shutter speed Although the term might seem to apply how fast the shutter works, it doesn't. The shutter speed is actually the amount of time that the shutter is open, letting light through the camera to the sensor, before closing again. As such, it operates with the aperture to control the total volume of light that is converted into the image. This can also be used for creative purposes as well. Slower shutter speeds (below) give the water an almost fluffy look while a faster speed freezes the moment. Faster shutter speeds of 1/1000sec can be used to freeze action, while slow shutter speeds can create a sense of movement in moving objects. How slow a shutter speed is required depends on how fast the subject is moving and what the creative effect is supposed to be achieved. For example, with moving water, a faster shutter speed will freeze the action creating a sharp result with water droplets clearly visible. Slowing down the shutter speed to something like 2 or 4secs will make the water appear like a creamy flow. A slightly faster shots, of say 1/8sec will show the water flowing, but neither freeze nor blur the water. Slow shutter speeds of a second or more are called long exposures.    Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates: Amazon UK, Amazon US, Amazon CA, ebay UK It doesn't cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you. ADVERTISEMENT Other articles you might find interesting... 6 Top Long Exposure Subjects For You To Photograph 5 Things To Do When Your New Camera Arrives 7 Photo Projects To Start In The New Year: Take On A Challenge Instantly Improve Your Photos By Guiding The Eye Night Photography Gear And Subject Suggestions Introduction To Using Your Camera At Christmas 6 Indoor Photography Projects To Try One Of My Bad Habits, Buying Cameras, Has Got A Little Out Of Hand... There are no comments here! Be the first! Sign In. You must be a member to leave a comment. ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community. Join For Free Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more. Reach 1.6 million Photographers; Advertise on EPZ ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT Things to do... Get the latest photography news straight to your inbox by signing up to our newsletter. Newsletter Signup Visit our Competitions Forum, where you'll find our monthly competition and other external competitions to enter. Photography Competitions Related Buyers Guides. 35 Essential Software For Photographers . 22 Nov 2020 19 Festival Essentials For Photographers . 19 Jun 2018 Valentine's Day Gift Ideas For Photographers . 7 Feb 2019 ADVERTISEMENT Directory Pages. Search for all the latest photography gear and services in our dedicated photography directories. Home News Reviews Cameras Lenses Phones Photos Forums Competitions Community The Team Vacancies Support Us Advertise Contact Support Contact Us Terms Of Use FAQs Site Map RSS Calibrate your monitor so you can see 16 different shades : ©2022 ePHOTOzine. Magezine Publishing | Top × Login. Can't access your account?New to ePHOTOzine? Join Today! ×
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • speed
  • 17
  • 26
  • aperture
  • 17
  • 26
  • shutter speed
  • 16
  • 26
  • shutter
  • 16
  • 26
  • photography
  • 12
  • 26
  • depth
  • 11
  • 26
  • field
  • 11
  • 26
  • stop
  • 10
  • 26
  • camera
  • 10
  • 26
  • light
  • 9
  • 26
  • photographer
  • 8
  • 26
  • control
  • 8
  • 26
  • ephotozine
  • 7
  • 26
  • number
  • 6
  • 26
  • water
  • 6
  • 26
  • depth field
  • 5
  • 26
  • example
  • 5
  • 26
  • photo
  • 5
  • 26
  • advertisement
  • 5
  • 26
  • sharp
  • 5
  • 26
  • focu
  • 5
  • 26
  • competition
  • 5
  • 26
  • guide
  • 4
  • 26
  • exposure
  • 4
  • 26
  • amount
  • 4
  • 26
  • creative
  • 4
  • 26
  • image
  • 4
  • 26
  • subject
  • 4
  • 26
  • faster
  • 4
  • 26
  • support
  • 4
  • 26
  • aperture shutter speed
  • 3
  • 26
  • slow shutter speed
  • 3
  • 26
  • guide photography
  • 3
  • 26
  • aperture shutter
  • 3
  • 26
  • aperture control
  • 3
  • 26
  • light allowed
  • 3
  • 26
  • sharp focu
  • 3
  • 26
  • slow shutter
  • 3
  • 26
  • site
  • 3
  • 26
  • amazon
  • 3
  • 26
Result 27
TitleThe Complete Beginner’s Guide to Shutter Speed - Compact Click
Urlhttps://www.compactclick.com/shutter-speed-in-photography/
Description
Date
Organic Position26
H1The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Shutter Speed
H2Introduction to Shutter Speed
Measuring Shutter Speed
Setting Your Shutter Speed
Exposure and Shutter Speed
Motion Blur and Shutter Speed
Recommended Settings for Shutter Speed
Frequently Asked Questions
Conclusion
H3When do I use slow shutter speeds?
When do I use fast shutter speeds?
What is the camera’s slowest/fastest shutter speed?
Where are the shutter speed settings on my camera?
H2WithAnchorsIntroduction to Shutter Speed
Measuring Shutter Speed
Setting Your Shutter Speed
Exposure and Shutter Speed
Motion Blur and Shutter Speed
Recommended Settings for Shutter Speed
Frequently Asked Questions
Conclusion
BodyThe Complete Beginner’s Guide to Shutter Speed Last Updated on July 2, 2021 by Ryan Geiss Shutter speed is part of the holy trinity of photograph settings, along with ISO and aperture. It affects your photo’s exposure and determines how much motion blur your camera captures. Using the correct shutter speed is essential to creating the desired effect in your photo. By the end of this article, you’ll understand everything shutter speed does and how to properly set it. Table of Contents Introduction to Shutter Speed. To understand shutter speed, let me first explain the mechanical components involved.Cameras have sensors that receive the light information passing through your lens. Our sensor is what allows the camera to record the scene, but it only captures the light for a certain amount of time.To take a shot, we first click the shutter button, which activates the curtain-like mechanism called the “camera shutter” between the lens and sensor. The shutter first closes, then it opens, and finally, it closes again. The moment the shutter opens is when the sensor is exposed to the light, and the amount of time it’s open is the “shutter speed.”You can simulate it with your vision. Place your hand in front of your eye to cover it completely, then move it up to expose your eye, then back to its original position. Count how fast you can do that cycle. In this simulation, your eye is the sensor, and your hand is the shutter; that’s basically how the camera shutter works.Try it with your camera. Look inside the camera and press the shutter button to take a photo. Notice how the sensor momentarily gets blocked by a curtain? That’s the shutter. You can also detach the lens to take a good close-up look at the shutter—but I wouldn’t touch it if I were you!Measuring Shutter Speed. The shutter is designed to move quickly, so its opening speed can be as fast as a tiny fraction of a second. We typically measure shutter speed in fractions of a second. Of course, it can also last for seconds, and if it reaches 60 seconds and more, we can start measuring by minutes, but this is seldomly done.The fraction can be in the ones, tens, hundreds, thousands, or ten thousands. A shutter speed of 1/8 means that it’s an eighth of a second, while 1/4000 means that it’s the four-thousandths of a second. Pretty fast, right?It’s conventional for most modern cameras to omit the numerator since it will be “1” in a fraction of a second. You’ll see numbers like 8, 60, or 250, which just denote 1/8, 1/60, 1/250 seconds respectively. When you start getting to the actual seconds like 2, 4, or 15 seconds, the camera differentiates actual seconds with a symbol so that you won’t be confused.Nowadays, cameras can go as fast as 1/4000 or 1/8000, or as slow as 30 seconds. If you want to exceed 30 second limit of your camera, a special mode allows you to do that. It’s called the remote trigger or “Bulb” (B) mode where you have to manually hold the shutter button to keep the shutter open for as long as you want.Shutter speeds are also conventionally measured in double or halved increments. For instance, if we start with one second, it goes from ½ second, ¼, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30 and so on. Some jumps aren’t perfect halves like 1/8 to 1/15, or 1/60 to 1/125, but this is the norm to make memorizing shutter speeds easier.Setting Your Shutter Speed. Film/vintage cameras had analog shutter speed dials where the speeds are written in increasing increments. You manually turn the dial to indicate what shutter speed your camera will capture the photo.Now, in almost all DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, it is done electronically. There’s a tiny dial that you just flick left and right to adjust the shutter speed.You’ll know what your current shutter speed setting is by looking at the LCD screen on your digital camera (or by viewing the analog dial for vintage cameras). Many DSLRs have a top LCD screen that displays the shutter speed information, along with ISO and aperture. For mirrorless cameras, the shutter speed is indicated in the rear screen. The viewfinder interface of both DSLRs and mirrorless can also display the shutter speed.“Auto” mode has made it easy to leave the shutter speed on automatic only. As you adjust the ISO or aperture, the shutter speed follows to compensate and produce the proper exposure. But if you want more control, you can either set the camera mode to “Shutter Priority,” which gives you full control over shutter speed while the ISO and aperture are on automatic, or “Manual” to give you complete control over all settings.Camera processing is pretty smart, so I leave the shutter speed on automatic in most cases. Doing so gives me photos that are often frozen and have no motion blur. However, in cases where I specifically want to create motion blur effects in the image, I take manual control of the shutter speed.Exposure and Shutter Speed. The relation between exposure and shutter speed has a no-brainer explanation. Exposure determines how bright or dark your photo is, primarily due to how much light the sensor received. Generally, more light means a brighter photo; less light means a darker photo. The shutter determines how fast the sensor is exposed to light—a fast shutter speed means less light passes through; a slow shutter speed means more time to capture light.Faster shutter speeds can yield darker exposures, while slower shutter speeds yield brighter exposure. If you’re shooting outside during a sunny day, it’s recommended to use fast shutter speeds to avoid overexposing your photo. But if there’s barely enough light, like dimly-lit indoors or night-time, then a slower shutter speed will help prevent producing an extremely dark photo.However, the shutter speed isn’t the only factor in determining photo exposure. ISO and aperture work with shutter speed to influence your photos’ brightness. If your ISO and aperture remain static, and all you adjust is the shutter speed, then the exposure will change accordingly.Motion Blur and Shutter Speed. The other significant effect of shutter speed is introducing motion blur in your photo.When your sensor is exposed, it takes an “imprint” of the received light. At a fast shutter speed, the sensor is exposed quickly to the light; the result is that any moving subjects will be entirely frozen in time. When I’m photographing a subject that moves very quickly, and I want to freeze it, then I use shutter speeds in the thousandths.Using slow shutter speeds allows more time to capture motion changes in the scene—e.g., the flow of water, subject movements, etc.—which translates to motion blur. The completely static elements in your scene will still be sharp, while the moving elements will appear blurred.Take a look at the photo below to see motion blur in action:The flow of water is a particularly exciting subject for capturing motion blur. It creates a dreamy feel and evokes the actual movement of water.Motion blur can also be introduced not from subject movement, but the photographer’s error. As a beginner, I’d make the mistake of handholding my shots at prolonged shutter speeds, thinking that my photos would turn out sharp anyway. As it turns out, the camera registers even tiny movements of the hand, which can lead to fuzzy and blurry details on the image.I had to remedy the problem through two solutions. First, get a lens, camera body, or both, that has built-in stabilization. The equipment practically stabilizes the lens and sensor to compensate for the handholding shakes. The second (and probably cheaper) solution is to get a tripod.Okay, there’s a third magical solution that won’t cost you anything: just place your camera on a still surface, and voila!Recommended Settings for Shutter Speed. 1/125 - 1/16000: These shutter speeds are the best range to freeze whatever moving subjects you have. Naturally, a faster shutter speed guarantees better elimination of motion blur. For freezing everyday scenes, a shutter speed of 1/125 – 1/500 is enough to get sharp subjects. Nature and sports photographers often shoot within the thousandths range when they need to capture the best frozen moments of their subjects, like a dunking basketball player or a rare bird.1/60 - 1: At this range, you’re entering motion blur territory (particularly as you get closer to a full one-second shutter speed). You’ll want to mount your camera on a tripod if you plan on shooting at this shutter speed, use image stabilization, or hope that your hands are steady enough to minimize potential motion blur. If your subject is moving quickly, motion blur is highly likely. Landscape and low-light photography generally deal with this range. It’s an excellent middle ground for getting enough light while minimizing the chances of blur.One second onwards: At this point, motion blur is a guarantee if you have moving subjects in the frame. It’s difficult to steadily handhold your camera here, so a tripod is a must to avoid motion blur from camera shake. Astrophotography needs very long shutter speeds to capture the faint light of stars in the black night sky.Frequently Asked Questions. When do I use slow shutter speeds?Set to slow shutter speeds to get a brighter image if the scene has poor lighting conditions, or if you want to introduce motion blur.When do I use fast shutter speeds?Set to fast shutter speeds if the scene is too bright, or if you want to freeze your subjects and eliminate motion blur in your image.What is the camera’s slowest/fastest shutter speed?Different cameras have different shutter speed limitations. Try turning your camera’s shutter speed setting to the slowest and fastest to find out. Many cameras go as fast as 1/4000 or 1/8000, and as slow as 30 seconds.Where are the shutter speed settings on my camera?Check your camera’s top or rear LCD screen. Shutter speed is denoted as fractions of a second or whole seconds—e.g., 1/4000 or 2s. Your digital camera’s default main dial setting is usually for changing shutter speeds.Conclusion. Now that you’re familiar with shutter speed and what it does, it’s all a matter of shooting and practicing with your camera to make setting the shutter speed second nature to you. The primary effects of shutter speed are merely controlling the exposure and creating or eliminating motion blur.If you know what you want to see in your photo, then simply adjust the shutter speed (or leave it on Auto, like I mostly do) along with the ISO and aperture and click away!You can check out my other articles on ISO and aperture to learn how they work with shutter speed. Share on FacebookTweet on Twitter
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 83
  • 27
  • speed
  • 61
  • 27
  • shutter speed
  • 60
  • 27
  • camera
  • 34
  • 27
  • motion
  • 17
  • 27
  • blur
  • 16
  • 27
  • light
  • 15
  • 27
  • motion blur
  • 14
  • 27
  • photo
  • 14
  • 27
  • fast
  • 12
  • 27
  • second
  • 11
  • 27
  • sensor
  • 11
  • 27
  • subject
  • 11
  • 27
  • exposure
  • 10
  • 27
  • iso aperture
  • 8
  • 27
  • iso
  • 8
  • 27
  • aperture
  • 8
  • 27
  • scene
  • 7
  • 27
  • mean
  • 7
  • 27
  • setting
  • 7
  • 27
  • capture
  • 7
  • 27
  • fast shutter
  • 6
  • 27
  • movement
  • 6
  • 27
  • fraction
  • 6
  • 27
  • slow
  • 6
  • 27
  • camera shutter
  • 5
  • 27
  • mode
  • 5
  • 27
  • range
  • 5
  • 27
  • len
  • 5
  • 27
  • time
  • 5
  • 27
  • dial
  • 5
  • 27
  • moving
  • 5
  • 27
  • fast shutter speed
  • 4
  • 27
  • sensor exposed
  • 4
  • 27
  • slow shutter
  • 4
  • 27
  • adjust
  • 4
  • 27
  • screen
  • 4
  • 27
  • control
  • 4
  • 27
  • shutter speed setting
  • 3
  • 27
  • slow shutter speed
  • 3
  • 27
  • len sensor
  • 3
  • 27
  • shutter button
  • 3
  • 27
  • adjust shutter
  • 3
  • 27
  • speed setting
  • 3
  • 27
  • lcd screen
  • 3
  • 27
  • moving subject
  • 3
  • 27
Result 28
TitleA Beginner's Guide to Understanding Priority Modes | Contrastly
Urlhttps://contrastly.com/a-beginners-guide-to-understanding-priority-modes/
DescriptionWhen you purchase your first DSLR or mirrorless camera, you will need to invest some time in learning your way around all of the little buttons, dials, and settings
Date
Organic Position27
H1Premium Lightroom & ACR Presets, Photoshop Actions, and eBooks For Photography Enthusiasts Premium Lightroom & ACR Presets, Photoshop Actions, and eBooks For Photography Enthusiasts
H2Auto Mode:
Aperture Priority:
Shutter Priority:
Manual Mode:
Review of the New Small Highline Ballhead From the Colorado Tripod Company
Detailed Review of the Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 Di III RXD Full-Frame E-Mount Lens
H3
H2WithAnchorsAuto Mode:
Aperture Priority:
Shutter Priority:
Manual Mode:
Review of the New Small Highline Ballhead From the Colorado Tripod Company
Detailed Review of the Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 Di III RXD Full-Frame E-Mount Lens
BodyPremium Lightroom & ACR Presets, Photoshop Actions, and eBooks For Photography Enthusiasts Premium Lightroom & ACR Presets, Photoshop Actions, and eBooks For Photography Enthusiasts A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Priority Modes by Sparkle Hill When you purchase your first DSLR or mirrorless camera, you will need to invest some time in learning your way around all of the little buttons, dials, and settings. Unlike basic point and shoots, DSLR and mirrorless cameras are a bit more complicated – and they offer a lot more options. One of the first things you need to familiarize yourself with are the different Priority Modes. Here is a breakdown of the four most commonly used Priority Modes on most cameras today. Auto Mode:. Auto Mode is pretty much exactly what it says it is. Choosing this mode puts your camera in charge of all of the settings. It controls exposure, shutter speed, ISO, and aperture. This is a popular option for those who are more interested in capturing the moment than getting a “technically correct” image. Though images shot on auto mode are technically correct. Shooting in fully automatic mode is great for things like typical family vacation or birthday party images. It is also a good start for beginning photographers because it allows you to take images in this mode and study the settings the camera chooses based on the scene. Contrastly - Tools and Resources for Photography Enthusiasts Modern Approach to Composition Ebook Learn all about photographic composition with this ebook loaded with advice, techniques, and concepts to help you create stunning images that wow viewers. From there, you can begin exploring the different settings and learn how to change them to affect the overall technical quality of images. Aperture Priority:. Aperture is one of the first settings beginners become familiar with when learning the exposure triangle. Aperture determines two things; the amount of light allowed to come in through the opening of the lens, and the depth-of-field. Wider apertures (smaller f/stop numbers) allow more light to come in through the lens. This means that faster shutter speeds can be used, allowing you to freeze motion more easily without worrying about the lack of light hitting your shutter due to the faster speeds. Wide apertures also give a much more shallow depth-of-field, resulting in a smaller plane of focus. Shooting with wide apertures is a great way to get a naturally blurred out background (bokeh), allowing the subject to stand out and be the main point of focus. Shooting at narrower apertures, such as f/11 or f/16, will put much more of your image sharp and in focus. In some cases, this may be better the option, especially when shooting large groups or landscapes. If you have a specific Aperture setting that you would like to set your camera to, but want the camera to control the other settings, Aperture Priority is the best option. It will shoot every image you take with the Aperture setting that you choose, while adjusting the other settings as needed. Shutter Priority:. Shutter Speed controls two things as well. When you determine the shutter speed, you are determining how long the shutter stays open when taking an image. The longer the shutter stays open, the more light you allow in to reach your camera’s sensor. However, you also run the risk of camera shake and blur due to the amount of subtle movement you are allowing to happen while the shutter is open and the sensor is recording information. In many instances, slow shutter speeds just aren’t an option, and especially not without a tripod. When you speed up the shutter, you have a better chance of freezing motion and reducing camera shake ruining your images. This will result in less light being allowed to hit your sensor, so that will need to be compensated with other settings such as Aperture or ISO. If the shutter speed setting is your top priority, then the Shutter Priority mode is the best choice. Simply set the appropriate speed, and allow the camera to adjust the other settings accordingly to ensure proper exposure. Manual Mode:. Manual Mode is the most complex and most intimidating setting for beginning photographers. When you put your camera in this mode, you are in control of every single setting. It is up to you to choose the appropriate aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc. Many professional photographers prefer this option because it gives them total control of the outcome of their images. Of course images can always be tweaked in post-processing, but when you are a professional photographer, time is money. Getting it as close to correct in-camera as possible can save you a lot of time when you open those images up in Lightroom or Photoshop. Shooting in full manual mode requires patience and practice. Beginning in one of the other priority modes and getting to know those first can make the transition much easier when you become comfortable with adjusting all of the settings yourself. Happy shooting! Liked this post? Please share it: About the Author: Sparkle Hill. Sparkle Hill has been in the photography and blogging industry for over 6 years. Her niche turned out to be natural light/on location photography. Her primary focus has always been families, children, and high school seniors. Her love for photography led her into blogging so that she could share the knowledge she has obtained over the years with other photographers. You can find her on Facebook. Ready to seriously improve your photography? Join thousands of photographers Free presets and resources Articles and tutorials Exclusive deals and discounts Previous Article Review of the New Small Highline Ballhead From the Colorado Tripod Company. Next Article Detailed Review of the Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 Di III RXD Full-Frame E-Mount Lens.
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • camera
  • 15
  • 28
  • mode
  • 15
  • 28
  • setting
  • 15
  • 28
  • shutter
  • 14
  • 28
  • aperture
  • 13
  • 28
  • image
  • 13
  • 28
  • speed
  • 10
  • 28
  • priority
  • 9
  • 28
  • shutter speed
  • 7
  • 28
  • photography
  • 7
  • 28
  • option
  • 6
  • 28
  • shooting
  • 6
  • 28
  • photographer
  • 6
  • 28
  • priority mode
  • 5
  • 28
  • control
  • 5
  • 28
  • light
  • 5
  • 28
  • correct
  • 4
  • 28
  • sensor
  • 4
  • 28
  • ebook
  • 4
  • 28
  • thing
  • 4
  • 28
  • focu
  • 4
  • 28
  • open
  • 4
  • 28
  • photography enthusiast
  • 3
  • 28
  • sparkle hill
  • 3
  • 28
  • auto mode
  • 3
  • 28
  • aperture setting
  • 3
  • 28
  • manual mode
  • 3
  • 28
  • time
  • 3
  • 28
  • auto
  • 3
  • 28
  • put
  • 3
  • 28
  • exposure
  • 3
  • 28
  • iso
  • 3
  • 28
  • beginning
  • 3
  • 28
  • len
  • 3
  • 28
  • allowing
  • 3
  • 28
  • manual
  • 3
  • 28
  • article
  • 3
  • 28
Result 29
TitleA Beginner’s Guide To Shutter Speed | Ted's Cameras
Urlhttps://www.teds.com.au/blog/shutter-speed-explained
Description
Date6 Aug 2021
Organic Position28
H1A Beginner’s Guide To Shutter Speed
H2Compare
Account Login
Forgot Password
Register
Your Cart
H3What is shutter speed, and how does shutter speed affect exposure?
The exposure triangle: Every photographer’s balancing act
How to use shutter speed creatively
Your shutter speed cheat sheet
Get the gear you need to master shutter speed
Save $10*
H2WithAnchorsCompare
Account Login
Forgot Password
Register
Your Cart
BodyA Beginner’s Guide To Shutter Speed 6 August 2021 Are you ready to venture out of automatic mode? Before you switch to manual, take the time to learn the ins and outs of shutter speed. One of the pillars of professional photography, shutter speed is essential to producing well-exposed images while you’re shooting in manual mode. Once you’ve figured out how it works, you can start to get creative with it for dramatic results. Let’s talk about the effect of shutter speed in photography and how to manipulate it to get the image you want.What is shutter speed, and how does shutter speed affect exposure?When you go to capture an image, the shutter on your lens or camera opens up to let light in. The length of time it’s open is called the “shutter speed,” and it’s measured in increments of a second, such as 1/60 second or 1/500 second.  With a slower shutter speed, your shutter stays open for longer and lets in more light. On the flip side, a faster shutter speed means your shutter closes quickly. They suit different goals and styles of photography, and we’ll get into that soon.The exposure triangle: Every photographer’s balancing act. Your shutter speed doesn’t operate on its own. As we touched on earlier, it’s one of the three camera settings that make up the “exposure triangle,” and changing it affects everything else. So, if you tweak the shutter speed, you’ll also need to tweak the aperture and ISO. Aperture adjusts the size of the opening at the front of your lens to change your depth of field, while ISO refers to your camera’s sensitivity to light.That’s why we like to say that capturing well-exposed images is a balancing act. For example, if you decide to use a slower shutter speed to create an intentionally blurry image, you’ll need to play around with a smaller aperture for your lens as well as a lower ISO. Otherwise, your image will end up overexposed.How to use shutter speed creatively. You’re probably wondering: what’s a good shutter speed? Choosing the right camera shutter speed for your image depends on two things: what you’re photographing and what you want your finished image to look like.  Let’s look at sports photography, where your goal is to freeze fast-paced action so you can capture a specific moment of time in a clear, sharp way. To do this successfully, you’ll need a fast shutter speed of around 1/500 second. In contrast, with waterfall photography, you’ll want to experiment with blur to highlight the movement of the water. Using a slow shutter speed of 1/8 second or 1/2 second will help you to achieve that dreamy, misty effect of cascading water. And don’t worry, a slow shutter speed only blurs movement, so the other objects in your image (like rocks or trees) will remain sharp. Just remember to use a tripod if you’re using slow shutter speeds, otherwise you could end up with unintentionally blurry, jarring images.Your shutter speed cheat sheet. Heading out on a shoot? Here’s a quick breakdown of when to use different shutter speeds. What you’re capturing Recommended shutter speed Extremely fast action (e.g. birds flying) 1/2000 second Fast action (e.g. sports games) 1/500 second General action or slow-paced subjects (e.g. people walking) 1/125 second Panning with subjects 1/125 - 1/15 second, depending on the pace of the subject Blurring (e.g. waterfalls or the ocean) 1/8 second - 1/2 second There are no shutter speed frame rate “rules,” just guides. Like most photography skills, practice makes perfect, and the more you play around with shutter speed, the better you’ll get at choosing the right shutter speed.Get the gear you need to master shutter speed. Now that you’ve brushed up on frame rate and shutter speed, it’s time to start perfecting your exposures. Shop the best DSLRs, mirrorless cameras and lenses online now, and earn free shopping on all Australian orders over $100. We offer a 14-day exchange on all orders, and our team is on hand to answer any questions you have. exposure shutter speed hints & tips Next Post. What Is Depth of Field, and How To Get Right Previous Post. DJI Drone Comparison Save $10*. When you subscribe to ClubTed today! Learn more about ClubTed benefits Compare Products Clear all
Topics
  • Topic
  • Tf
  • Position
  • shutter
  • 31
  • 29
  • shutter speed
  • 28
  • 29
  • speed
  • 28
  • 29
  • image
  • 10
  • 29
  • camera
  • 6
  • 29
  • photography
  • 6
  • 29
  • 1500
  • 4
  • 29
  • time
  • 4
  • 29
  • exposure
  • 4
  • 29
  • fast
  • 4
  • 29
  • action
  • 4
  • 29
  • slow
  • 4
  • 29
  • slow shutter speed
  • 3
  • 29
  • slow shutter
  • 3
  • 29
  • len
  • 3
  • 29
  • open
  • 3
  • 29
  • aperture
  • 3
  • 29
  • iso
  • 3
  • 29
  • subject
  • 3
  • 29